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Sample records for accurate spectroscopic parameters

  1. Isomerism of Cyanomethanimine: Accurate Structural, Energetic, and Spectroscopic Characterization.

    PubMed

    Puzzarini, Cristina

    2015-11-25

    The structures, relative stabilities, and rotational and vibrational parameters of the Z-C-, E-C-, and N-cyanomethanimine isomers have been evaluated using state-of-the-art quantum-chemical approaches. Equilibrium geometries have been calculated by means of a composite scheme based on coupled-cluster calculations that accounts for the extrapolation to the complete basis set limit and core-correlation effects. The latter approach is proved to provide molecular structures with an accuracy of 0.001-0.002 Å and 0.05-0.1° for bond lengths and angles, respectively. Systematically extrapolated ab initio energies, accounting for electron correlation through coupled-cluster theory, including up to single, double, triple, and quadruple excitations, and corrected for core-electron correlation and anharmonic zero-point vibrational energy, have been used to accurately determine relative energies and the Z-E isomerization barrier with an accuracy of about 1 kJ/mol. Vibrational and rotational spectroscopic parameters have been investigated by means of hybrid schemes that allow us to obtain rotational constants accurate to about a few megahertz and vibrational frequencies with a mean absolute error of ∼1%. Where available, for all properties considered, a very good agreement with experimental data has been observed.

  2. A spectroscopic transfer standard for accurate atmospheric CO measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwaboh, Javis A.; Li, Gang; Serdyukov, Anton; Werhahn, Olav; Ebert, Volker

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO) is a precursor of essential climate variables and has an indirect effect for enhancing global warming. Accurate and reliable measurements of atmospheric CO concentration are becoming indispensable. WMO-GAW reports states a compatibility goal of ±2 ppb for atmospheric CO concentration measurements. Therefore, the EMRP-HIGHGAS (European metrology research program - high-impact greenhouse gases) project aims at developing spectroscopic transfer standards for CO concentration measurements to meet this goal. A spectroscopic transfer standard would provide results that are directly traceable to the SI, can be very useful for calibration of devices operating in the field, and could complement classical gas standards in the field where calibration gas mixtures in bottles often are not accurate, available or stable enough [1][2]. Here, we present our new direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS) sensor capable of performing absolute ("calibration free") CO concentration measurements, and being operated as a spectroscopic transfer standard. To achieve the compatibility goal stated by WMO for CO concentration measurements and ensure the traceability of the final concentration results, traceable spectral line data especially line intensities with appropriate uncertainties are needed. Therefore, we utilize our new high-resolution Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy CO line data for the 2-0 band, with significantly reduced uncertainties, for the dTDLAS data evaluation. Further, we demonstrate the capability of our sensor for atmospheric CO measurements, discuss uncertainty calculation following the guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM) principles and show that CO concentrations derived using the sensor, based on the TILSAM (traceable infrared laser spectroscopic amount fraction measurement) method, are in excellent agreement with gravimetric values. Acknowledgement Parts of this work have been

  3. Accurate Stellar Parameters for Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, John Michael; Fischer, Debra; Basu, Sarbani; Valenti, Jeff A.

    2015-01-01

    A large impedement to our understanding of planet formation is obtaining a clear picture of planet radii and densities. Although determining precise ratios between planet and stellar host are relatively easy, determining accurate stellar parameters is still a difficult and costly undertaking. High resolution spectral analysis has traditionally yielded precise values for some stellar parameters but stars in common between catalogs from different authors or analyzed using different techniques often show offsets far in excess of their uncertainties. Most analyses now use some external constraint, when available, to break observed degeneracies between surface gravity, effective temperature, and metallicity which can otherwise lead to correlated errors in results. However, these external constraints are impossible to obtain for all stars and can require more costly observations than the initial high resolution spectra. We demonstrate that these discrepencies can be mitigated by use of a larger line list that has carefully tuned atomic line data. We use an iterative modeling technique that does not require external constraints. We compare the surface gravity obtained with our spectral synthesis modeling to asteroseismically determined values for 42 Kepler stars. Our analysis agrees well with only a 0.048 dex offset and an rms scatter of 0.05 dex. Such accurate stellar gravities can reduce the primary source of uncertainty in radii by almost an order of magnitude over unconstrained spectral analysis.

  4. Spectroscopically Accurate Line Lists for Application in Sulphur Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, D. S.; Azzam, A. A. A.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Tennyson, J.

    2013-09-01

    Monitoring sulphur chemistry is thought to be of great importance for exoplanets. Doing this requires detailed knowledge of the spectroscopic properties of sulphur containing molecules such as hydrogen sulphide (H2S) [1], sulphur dioxide (SO2), and sulphur trioxide (SO3). Each of these molecules can be found in terrestrial environments, produced in volcano emissions on Earth, and analysis of their spectroscopic data can prove useful to the characterisation of exoplanets, as well as the study of planets in our own solar system, with both having a possible presence on Venus. A complete, high temperature list of line positions and intensities for H32 2 S is presented. The DVR3D program suite is used to calculate the bound ro-vibration energy levels, wavefunctions, and dipole transition intensities using Radau coordinates. The calculations are based on a newly determined, spectroscopically refined potential energy surface (PES) and a new, high accuracy, ab initio dipole moment surface (DMS). Tests show that the PES enables us to calculate the line positions accurately and the DMS gives satisfactory results for line intensities. Comparisons with experiment as well as with previous theoretical spectra will be presented. The results of this study will form an important addition to the databases which are considered as sources of information for space applications; especially, in analysing the spectra of extrasolar planets, and remote sensing studies for Venus and Earth, as well as laboratory investigations and pollution studies. An ab initio line list for SO3 was previously computed using the variational nuclear motion program TROVE [2], and was suitable for modelling room temperature SO3 spectra. The calculations considered transitions in the region of 0-4000 cm-1 with rotational states up to J = 85, and includes 174,674,257 transitions. A list of 10,878 experimental transitions had relative intensities placed on an absolute scale, and were provided in a form suitable

  5. ACCURATE SPECTROSCOPIC CHARACTERIZATION OF PROTONATED OXIRANE: A POTENTIAL PREBIOTIC SPECIES IN TITAN’S ATMOSPHERE

    PubMed Central

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Ali, Ashraf; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    An accurate spectroscopic characterization of protonated oxirane has been carried out by means of state-of-the-art computational methods and approaches. The calculated spectroscopic parameters from our recent computational investigation of oxirane together with the corresponding experimental data available were used to assess the accuracy of our predicted rotational and IR spectra of protonated oxirane. We found an accuracy of about 10 cm−1 for vibrational transitions (fundamentals as well as overtones and combination bands) and, in relative terms, of 0.1% for rotational transitions. We are therefore confident that the spectroscopic data provided herein are a valuable support for the detection of protonated oxirane not only in Titan’s atmosphere but also in the interstellar medium. PMID:26543241

  6. Accurate spectroscopic characterization of protonated oxirane: a potential prebiotic species in Titan's atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Ali, Ashraf; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo

    2014-09-10

    An accurate spectroscopic characterization of protonated oxirane has been carried out by means of state-of-the-art computational methods and approaches. The calculated spectroscopic parameters from our recent computational investigation of oxirane together with the corresponding experimental data available were used to assess the accuracy of our predicted rotational and IR spectra of protonated oxirane. We found an accuracy of about 10 cm{sup –1} for vibrational transitions (fundamentals as well as overtones and combination bands) and, in relative terms, of 0.1% for rotational transitions. We are therefore confident that the spectroscopic data provided herein are a valuable support for the detection of protonated oxirane not only in Titan's atmosphere but also in the interstellar medium.

  7. Spectroscopic Parameters of Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terbetas, G.; Kozlovskaja, A.; Varanius, D.; Graziene, V.; Vaitkus, J.; Vaitkuviene, A.

    2009-06-01

    There are numerous methods of investigating intervertebral disc. Visualization methods are widely used in clinical practice. Histological, imunohistochemical and biochemical methods are more used in scientific research. We propose that a new spectroscopic investigation would be useful in determining intervertebral disc material, especially when no histological specimens are available. Purpose: to determine spectroscopic parameters of intervertebral disc material; to determine emission spectra common for all intervertebral discs; to create a background for further spectroscopic investigation where no histological specimen will be available. Material and Methods: 20 patients, 68 frozen sections of 20 μm thickness from operatively removed intervertebral disc hernia were excited by Nd:YAG microlaser STA-01-TH third harmonic 355 nm light throw 0, 1 mm fiber. Spectrophotometer OceanOptics USB2000 was used for spectra collection. Mathematical analysis of spectra was performed by ORIGIN multiple Gaussian peaks analysis. Results: In each specimen of disc hernia were found distinct maximal spectral peaks of 4 types supporting the histological evaluation of mixture content of the hernia. Fluorescence in the spectral regions 370-700 nm was detected in the disc hernias. The main spectral component was at 494 nm and the contribution of the components with the peak wavelength values at 388 nm, 412 nm and 435±5 nm were varying in the different groups of samples. In comparison to average spectrum of all cases, there are 4 groups of different spectral signatures in the region 400-500 nm in the patient groups, supporting a clinical data on different clinical features of the patients. Discussion and Conclusion: besides the classical open discectomy, new minimally invasive techniques of treating intervertebral disc emerge (PLDD). Intervertebral disc in these techniques is assessed by needle, no histological specimen is taken. Spectroscopic investigation via fiber optics through the

  8. IMPROVED SPECTROSCOPIC PARAMETERS FOR TRANSITING PLANET HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Guillermo; Holman, Matthew J.; Carter, Joshua A.; Fischer, Debra A.; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Buchhave, Lars A.; Winn, Joshua N.

    2012-10-01

    We report homogeneous spectroscopic determinations of the effective temperature, metallicity, and projected rotational velocity for the host stars of 56 transiting planets. Our analysis is based primarily on the stellar parameter classification (SPC) technique. We investigate systematic errors by examining subsets of the data with two other methods that have often been used in previous studies (Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME) and MOOG). The SPC and SME results, both based on comparisons between synthetic spectra and actual spectra, show strong correlations between T{sub eff}, [Fe/H], and log g when solving for all three quantities simultaneously. In contrast the MOOG results, based on a more traditional curve-of-growth approach, show no such correlations. To combat the correlations and improve the accuracy of the temperatures and metallicities, we repeat the SPC analysis with a constraint on log g based on the mean stellar density that can be derived from the analysis of the transit light curves. Previous studies that have not taken advantage of this constraint have been subject to systematic errors in the stellar masses and radii of up to 20% and 10%, respectively, which can be larger than other observational uncertainties, and which also cause systematic errors in the planetary mass and radius.

  9. Spectroscopically Accurate Calculations of the Rovibrational Energies of Diatomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Jason

    2005-05-01

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation has been used to calculate the rotational and vibrational states of diatomic hydrogen. Because it is an approximation, our group now wants to use a Born-Oppenheimer potential to calculate the electronic energy that has been corrected to match closely with spectroscopic results. We are using a code that has corrections for adiabatic, relativistic, radiative, and non-adiabatic effects. The rovibrational energies have now been calculated for both bound and quasi-bound states. We also want to compute quadrupole transition probabilities for diatomic hydrogen. These calculations aspire to investigate diatomic hydrogen in astrophysical environments.

  10. Accurate geometric characterization of gold nanorod ensemble by an inverse extinction/scattering spectroscopic method.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ninghan; Bai, Benfeng; Tan, Qiaofeng; Jin, Guofan

    2013-09-01

    Aspect ratio, width, and end-cap factor are three critical parameters defined to characterize the geometry of metallic nanorod (NR). In our previous work [Opt. Express 21, 2987 (2013)], we reported an optical extinction spectroscopic (OES) method that can measure the aspect ratio distribution of gold NR ensembles effectively and statistically. However, the measurement accuracy was found to depend on the estimate of the width and end-cap factor of the nanorod, which unfortunately cannot be determined by the OES method itself. In this work, we propose to improve the accuracy of the OES method by applying an auxiliary scattering measurement of the NR ensemble which can help to estimate the mean width of the gold NRs effectively. This so-called optical extinction/scattering spectroscopic (OESS) method can fast characterize the aspect ratio distribution as well as the mean width of gold NR ensembles simultaneously. By comparing with the transmission electron microscopy experimentally, the OESS method shows the advantage of determining two of the three critical parameters of the NR ensembles (i.e., the aspect ratio and the mean width) more accurately and conveniently than the OES method.

  11. Accurate alignment of optical axes of a biplate using a spectroscopic Mueller matrix ellipsometer.

    PubMed

    Gu, Honggang; Chen, Xiuguo; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Chuanwei; Li, Weiqi; Liu, Shiyuan

    2016-05-20

    The biplate that consists of two single wave plates made from birefringent materials with their fast axes oriented perpendicular to each other is one of the most commonly used retarders in many optical systems. The internal alignment of the optical axes of the two single wave plates is a key procedure in the fabrication and application of a biplate to reduce the spurious artifacts of oscillations in polarization properties due to the misalignment error and to improve the accuracy and precision of the systems using such biplates. In this paper, we propose a method to accurately align the axes of an arbitrary biplate by minimizing the oscillations in the characteristic parameter spectra of the biplate detected by a spectroscopic Mueller matrix ellipsometer (MME). We derived analytical relations between the characteristic parameters and the misalignment error in the biplate, which helps us to analyze the sensitivity of the characteristic parameters to the misalignment error and to evaluate the alignment accuracy quantitatively. Experimental results performed on a house-developed MME demonstrate that the alignment accuracy of the proposed method is better than 0.01° in aligning the optical axes of a quartz biplate.

  12. Accurate Parameter Estimation for Unbalanced Three-Phase System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Smart grid is an intelligent power generation and control console in modern electricity networks, where the unbalanced three-phase power system is the commonly used model. Here, parameter estimation for this system is addressed. After converting the three-phase waveforms into a pair of orthogonal signals via the α β-transformation, the nonlinear least squares (NLS) estimator is developed for accurately finding the frequency, phase, and voltage parameters. The estimator is realized by the Newton-Raphson scheme, whose global convergence is studied in this paper. Computer simulations show that the mean square error performance of NLS method can attain the Cramér-Rao lower bound. Moreover, our proposal provides more accurate frequency estimation when compared with the complex least mean square (CLMS) and augmented CLMS. PMID:25162056

  13. Accurate parameter estimation for unbalanced three-phase system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan; So, Hing Cheung

    2014-01-01

    Smart grid is an intelligent power generation and control console in modern electricity networks, where the unbalanced three-phase power system is the commonly used model. Here, parameter estimation for this system is addressed. After converting the three-phase waveforms into a pair of orthogonal signals via the α β-transformation, the nonlinear least squares (NLS) estimator is developed for accurately finding the frequency, phase, and voltage parameters. The estimator is realized by the Newton-Raphson scheme, whose global convergence is studied in this paper. Computer simulations show that the mean square error performance of NLS method can attain the Cramér-Rao lower bound. Moreover, our proposal provides more accurate frequency estimation when compared with the complex least mean square (CLMS) and augmented CLMS.

  14. Machine learning of parameters for accurate semiempirical quantum chemical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Dral, Pavlo O.; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Thiel, Walter

    2015-04-14

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempirical OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules.

  15. Machine learning of parameters for accurate semiempirical quantum chemical calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Dral, Pavlo O.; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Thiel, Walter

    2015-04-14

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempiricalmore » OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules.« less

  16. Direct computation of parameters for accurate polarizable force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Verstraelen, Toon Vandenbrande, Steven; Ayers, Paul W.

    2014-11-21

    We present an improved electronic linear response model to incorporate polarization and charge-transfer effects in polarizable force fields. This model is a generalization of the Atom-Condensed Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (DFT), approximated to second order (ACKS2): it can now be defined with any underlying variational theory (next to KS-DFT) and it can include atomic multipoles and off-center basis functions. Parameters in this model are computed efficiently as expectation values of an electronic wavefunction, obviating the need for their calibration, regularization, and manual tuning. In the limit of a complete density and potential basis set in the ACKS2 model, the linear response properties of the underlying theory for a given molecular geometry are reproduced exactly. A numerical validation with a test set of 110 molecules shows that very accurate models can already be obtained with fluctuating charges and dipoles. These features greatly facilitate the development of polarizable force fields.

  17. The calculation of thin film parameters from spectroscopic ellipsometry data

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison, G.E. Jr.

    1996-02-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) has proven to be a very powerful diagnostic for thin film characterization, but the results of SE experiments must first be compared with calculations to determine thin film parameters such as film thickness and optical functions. This process requires 4 steps: (1) The quantities measured must be specified and the equivalent calculated parameters identified. (2) The film structure must be modeled, where the number of films is specified and certain characteristics of each layer specified, such as whether or not the film is isotropic or anisotropic, homogeneous or graded. (3) The optical functions of each layer must be specified or parameterized. (4) The data must be compared with the calculated spectra, where a quantifiable figure of merit is used for the comparison. The last step is particularly important because without it, no {open_quotes}goodness of fit{close_quotes} parameter is calculated and one does not know whether or not the calculated spectrum fits the data.

  18. Accurate molecular structure and spectroscopic properties for nucleobases: A combined computational - microwave investigation of 2-thiouracil as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo; Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2015-01-01

    The computational composite scheme purposely set up for accurately describing the electronic structure and spectroscopic properties of small biomolecules has been applied to the first study of the rotational spectrum of 2-thiouracil. The experimental investigation was made possible thanks to the combination of the laser ablation technique with Fourier Transform Microwave spectrometers. The joint experimental – computational study allowed us to determine accurate molecular structure and spectroscopic properties for the title molecule, but more important, it demonstrates a reliable approach for the accurate investigation of isolated small biomolecules. PMID:24002739

  19. Spectroscopic Method for Fast and Accurate Group A Streptococcus Bacteria Detection.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Dillon; Aviv, Hagit; Rosenbaum, Efraim; Tischler, Yaakov R

    2016-02-16

    Rapid and accurate detection of pathogens is paramount to human health. Spectroscopic techniques have been shown to be viable methods for detecting various pathogens. Enhanced methods of Raman spectroscopy can discriminate unique bacterial signatures; however, many of these require precise conditions and do not have in vivo replicability. Common biological detection methods such as rapid antigen detection tests have high specificity but do not have high sensitivity. Here we developed a new method of bacteria detection that is both highly specific and highly sensitive by combining the specificity of antibody staining and the sensitivity of spectroscopic characterization. Bacteria samples, treated with a fluorescent antibody complex specific to Streptococcus pyogenes, were volumetrically normalized according to their Raman bacterial signal intensity and characterized for fluorescence, eliciting a positive result for samples containing Streptococcus pyogenes and a negative result for those without. The normalized fluorescence intensity of the Streptococcus pyogenes gave a signal that is up to 16.4 times higher than that of other bacteria samples for bacteria stained in solution and up to 12.7 times higher in solid state. This method can be very easily replicated for other bacteria species using suitable antibody-dye complexes. In addition, this method shows viability for in vivo detection as it requires minute amounts of bacteria, low laser excitation power, and short integration times in order to achieve high signal.

  20. Spectroscopic Method for Fast and Accurate Group A Streptococcus Bacteria Detection.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Dillon; Aviv, Hagit; Rosenbaum, Efraim; Tischler, Yaakov R

    2016-02-16

    Rapid and accurate detection of pathogens is paramount to human health. Spectroscopic techniques have been shown to be viable methods for detecting various pathogens. Enhanced methods of Raman spectroscopy can discriminate unique bacterial signatures; however, many of these require precise conditions and do not have in vivo replicability. Common biological detection methods such as rapid antigen detection tests have high specificity but do not have high sensitivity. Here we developed a new method of bacteria detection that is both highly specific and highly sensitive by combining the specificity of antibody staining and the sensitivity of spectroscopic characterization. Bacteria samples, treated with a fluorescent antibody complex specific to Streptococcus pyogenes, were volumetrically normalized according to their Raman bacterial signal intensity and characterized for fluorescence, eliciting a positive result for samples containing Streptococcus pyogenes and a negative result for those without. The normalized fluorescence intensity of the Streptococcus pyogenes gave a signal that is up to 16.4 times higher than that of other bacteria samples for bacteria stained in solution and up to 12.7 times higher in solid state. This method can be very easily replicated for other bacteria species using suitable antibody-dye complexes. In addition, this method shows viability for in vivo detection as it requires minute amounts of bacteria, low laser excitation power, and short integration times in order to achieve high signal. PMID:26752013

  1. ACCURATE SPECTROSCOPIC CHARACTERIZATION OF OXIRANE: A VALUABLE ROUTE TO ITS IDENTIFICATION IN TITAN’S ATMOSPHERE AND THE ASSIGNMENT OF UNIDENTIFIED INFRARED BANDS

    PubMed Central

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to provide an accurate spectroscopic characterization of oxirane, state-of-the-art computational methods and approaches have been employed to determine highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and rotational parameters. Available experimental data were used to assess the reliability of our computations, and an accuracy on average of 10 cm−1 for fundamental transitions as well as overtones and combination bands has been pointed out. Moving to rotational spectroscopy, relative discrepancies of 0.1%, 2%–3%, and 3%–4% were observed for rotational, quartic, and sextic centrifugal-distortion constants, respectively. We are therefore confident that the highly accurate spectroscopic data provided herein can be useful for identification of oxirane in Titan’s atmosphere and the assignment of unidentified infrared bands. Since oxirane was already observed in the interstellar medium and some astronomical objects are characterized by very high D/H ratios, we also considered the accurate determination of the spectroscopic parameters for the mono-deuterated species, oxirane-d1. For the latter, an empirical scaling procedure allowed us to improve our computed data and to provide predictions for rotational transitions with a relative accuracy of about 0.02% (i.e., an uncertainty of about 40 MHz for a transition lying at 200 GHz). PMID:26543240

  2. Accurate spectroscopic calculations of 21 electronic states of ClO radical including transition properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinxin; Shi, Deheng; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2016-08-01

    The potential energy curves were calculated for the 21 states (X2Π, A2Π, 32Π, 42Π, 52Π, 12Σ+, 22Σ+, 32Σ+, 12Σ-, 22Σ-, 32Σ-, 12Δ, 22Δ, 32Δ, 12Φ, 14Σ+, a4Σ-, 24Σ-, 14Π, 24Π and 14Δ), which originated from the two lowest dissociation channels of ClO radical. The calculations were done for internuclear separations approximately from 0.08 to 1.10 nm using the CASSCF method, which was followed by the icMRCI approach with the aug-cc-pV5Z basis set. Of these 21 states, the 14Π, 24Π, 32Δ, 42Π, 52Π, 12Φ, 32Σ+, 14Δ and 24Σ- states are repulsive. The 12Δ, 12Σ-, 14Σ+, 22Σ-, 12Σ+, 22Σ+, 22Δ and 32Σ- states are very weakly bound. Only the A2Π state has one barrier. The avoided crossing exists between the A2Π and the 32Π state. However, the avoided crossing does not generate any double wells. Core- valence correlation correction was accounted for at the level of an aug-cc-pCVQZ basis set. Scalar relativistic correction was included by the third-order Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian approximation at the level of an aug-cc-pVQZ basis set. All the potential energy curves were extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The spectroscopic parameters were determined. The 12Σ-, 22Σ-, 32Σ- and 14Σ+ states may be very difficult to be detected in an experiment, since each of these Λ-S states has only one or two vibrational states. The Franck-Condon factors and radiative lifetimes were calculated for several low vibrational levels of the A2Π - X2Π, 32Π - a4Σ-, 22Δ - a4Σ- and 32Σ- - 12Σ- transitions. The spin-orbit coupling effect on the spectroscopic parameters of the X2Π, A2Π, 32Π, a4Σ- and 22Σ+ states were discussed. The spectroscopic properties reported here can be expected to be reliably predicted ones.

  3. Spectroscopic parameters of phosphine, PH3, in its ground vibrational state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Holger S. P.

    2013-11-01

    The ground state rotational spectrum of PH3 has been reanalyzed taking into account recently published very accurate data from sub-Doppler and conventional absorption spectroscopy measurements as well as previous data from the radio-frequency to the far-infrared regions. These data include ΔJ=ΔK=0 transitions between A1 and A2 levels, ΔJ=0, ΔK=3 transitions as well as regular ΔJ=1, ΔK=0 rotational transitions. Hyperfine splitting caused by the 31P and 1H nuclei has been considered, and the treatment of the A1/A2 splitting has been discussed briefly. Improved spectroscopic parameters have been obtained. Interestingly, the most pronounced effects occurred for the hyperfine parameters.

  4. Rapid, accurate, and comparative differentiation of clinically and industrially relevant microorganisms via multiple vibrational spectroscopic fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Muhamadali, Howbeer; Subaihi, Abdu; Mohammadtaheri, Mahsa; Xu, Yun; Ellis, David I; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Bansal, Vipul; Goodacre, Royston

    2016-08-15

    Despite the fact that various microorganisms (e.g., bacteria, fungi, viruses, etc.) have been linked with infectious diseases, their crucial role towards sustaining life on Earth is undeniable. The huge biodiversity, combined with the wide range of biochemical capabilities of these organisms, have always been the driving force behind their large number of current, and, as of yet, undiscovered future applications. The presence of such diversity could be said to expedite the need for the development of rapid, accurate and sensitive techniques which allow for the detection, differentiation, identification and classification of such organisms. In this study, we employed Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), Raman, and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopies, as molecular whole-organism fingerprinting techniques, combined with multivariate statistical analysis approaches for the classification of a range of industrial, environmental or clinically relevant bacteria (P. aeruginosa, P. putida, E. coli, E. faecium, S. lividans, B. subtilis, B. cereus) and yeast (S. cerevisiae). Principal components-discriminant function analysis (PC-DFA) scores plots of the spectral data collected from all three techniques allowed for the clear differentiation of all the samples down to sub-species level. The partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) models generated using the SERS spectral data displayed lower accuracy (74.9%) when compared to those obtained from conventional Raman (97.8%) and FT-IR (96.2%) analyses. In addition, whilst background fluorescence was detected in Raman spectra for S. cerevisiae, this fluorescence was quenched when applying SERS to the same species, and conversely SERS appeared to introduce strong fluorescence when analysing P. putida. It is also worth noting that FT-IR analysis provided spectral data of high quality and reproducibility for the whole sample set, suggesting its applicability to a wider range of samples, and perhaps the

  5. Accurate fundamental parameters and detailed abundance patterns from spectroscopy of 93 solar-type Kepler targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruntt, H.; Basu, S.; Smalley, B.; Chaplin, W. J.; Verner, G. A.; Bedding, T. R.; Catala, C.; Gazzano, J.-C.; Molenda-Żakowicz, J.; Thygesen, A. O.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Hekker, S.; Huber, D.; Karoff, C.; Mathur, S.; Mosser, B.; Appourchaux, T.; Campante, T. L.; Elsworth, Y.; García, R. A.; Handberg, R.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Quirion, P.-O.; Régulo, C.; Roxburgh, I. W.; Stello, D.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Kawaler, S. D.; Kjeldsen, H.; Morris, R. L.; Quintana, E. V.; Sanderfer, D. T.

    2012-06-01

    We present a detailed spectroscopic study of 93 solar-type stars that are targets of the NASA/Kepler mission and provide detailed chemical composition of each target. We find that the overall metallicity is well represented by Fe lines. Relative abundances of light elements (CNO) and α elements are generally higher for low-metallicity stars. Our spectroscopic analysis benefits from the accurately measured surface gravity from the asteroseismic analysis of the Kepler light curves. The accuracy on the log g parameter is better than 0.03 dex and is held fixed in the analysis. We compare our Teff determination with a recent colour calibration of VT-KS [TYCHO V magnitude minus Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) KS magnitude] and find very good agreement and a scatter of only 80 K, showing that for other nearby Kepler targets, this index can be used. The asteroseismic log g values agree very well with the classical determination using Fe I-Fe II balance, although we find a small systematic offset of 0.08 dex (asteroseismic log g values are lower). The abundance patterns of metals, α elements and the light elements (CNO) show that a simple scaling by [Fe/H] is adequate to represent the metallicity of the stars, except for the stars with metallicity below -0.3, where α-enhancement becomes important. However, this is only important for a very small fraction of the Kepler sample. We therefore recommend that a simple scaling with [Fe/H] be employed in the asteroseismic analyses of large ensembles of solar-type stars.

  6. Clinically accurate fetal ECG parameters acquired from maternal abdominal sensors

    PubMed Central

    CLIFFORD, Gari; SAMENI, Reza; WARD, Mr. Jay; ROBINSON, Julian; WOLFBERG, Adam J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the accuracy of a novel system for measuring fetal heart rate and ST-segment changes using non-invasive electrodes on the maternal abdomen. STUDY DESIGN Fetal ECGs were recorded using abdominal sensors from 32 term laboring women who had a fetal scalp electrode (FSE) placed for a clinical indication. RESULTS Good quality data for FHR estimation was available in 91.2% of the FSE segments, and 89.9% of the abdominal electrode segments. The root mean square (RMS) error between the FHR data calculated by both methods over all processed segments was 0.36 beats per minute. ST deviation from the isoelectric point ranged from 0 to 14.2% of R-wave amplitude. The RMS error between the ST change calculated by both methods averaged over all processed segments was 3.2%. CONCLUSION FHR and ST change acquired from the maternal abdomen is highly accurate and on average is clinically indistinguishable from FHR and ST change calculated using FSE data. PMID:21514560

  7. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets.

  8. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.

    1998-11-17

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets. 3 figs.

  9. Determination of the spectroscopic stellar parameters for 257 field giant stars★

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, S.; Benamati, L.; Santos, N. C.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Sousa, S. G.; Israelian, G.; De Medeiros, J. R.; Lovis, C.; Udry, S.

    2015-04-01

    The study of stellar parameters of planet-hosting stars, such as metallicity and chemical abundances, help us to understand the theory of planet formation and stellar evolution. Here, we present a catalogue of accurate stellar atmospheric parameters and iron abundances for a sample of 257 K and G field evolved stars that are being surveyed for planets using precise radial-velocity measurements as part of the Coralie programme to search for planets around giants. The analysis was done using a set of high-resolution and high-signal-to-noise Ultraviolet and Visible Echelle Spectrograph spectra. The stellar parameters were derived using Fe I and II ionization and excitation equilibrium methods. To take into account possible effects related to the choice of the lines on the derived parameters, we used three different iron line-list sets in our analysis, and the results differ among themselves by a small factor for most of stars. For those stars with previous literature parameter estimates, we found very good agreement with our own values. In the present catalogue, we are providing new precise spectroscopic measurements of effective temperature, surface gravity, microturbulence, and metallicity for 190 stars for which it has not been found or published in previous articles.

  10. The spectroscopic orbits and physical parameters of GG Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchiano, P.; Brandi, E.; Muratore, M. F.; Quiroga, C.; Ferrer, O. E.; García, L. G.

    2012-04-01

    Aims: GG Car is an eclipsing binary classified as a B[e] supergiant star. The aims of our study are to improve the orbital elements of the binary system in order to obtain the actual orbital period of this system. We also compare the spectral energy distribution of the observed fluxes over a wide wavelength range with a model of a circumstellar envelope composed of gas and dust. This fitting allows us to derive the physical parameters of the system and its environment, as well as to obtain an estimation of the distance to GG Car. Methods: We analyzed about 55 optical and near infrared spectrograms taken during 1996-2010. The spectroscopic orbits were obtained by measuring the radial velocities of the blueshifted absorptions of the He I P-Cygni profiles, which are very representative of the orbital motion of both stars. On the other hand, we modeled the spectral energy distribution of GG Car, proposing a simple model of a spherical envelope consisting of a layer close to the central star composed of ionized gas and other outermost layers composed of dust. Its effect on the spectral energy distribution considering a central B-type star is presented. Comparing the model with the observed continuum energy distribution of GG Car, we can derive fundamental parameters of the system, as well as global physical properties of the gas and dust envelope. It is also possible to estimate the distance taking the spectral regions into account where the theoretical data fit the observational data very well and using the set of parameters obtained and the value of the observed flux for different wavelengths. Results: For the first time, we have determined the orbits for both components of the binary through a detailed study of the He I lines, at λλ4471, 5875, 6678, and 7065 Å, thereby obtaining an orbital period of 31.033 days. An eccentric orbit with e = 0.28 and a mass ratio q = 2.2 ± 0.9 were calculated. Comparing the model with the observed continuum energy distribution of

  11. Spectroscopic parameters for solar-type stars with moderate-to-high rotation. New parameters for ten planet hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsantaki, M.; Sousa, S. G.; Santos, N. C.; Montalto, M.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Mortier, A.; Adibekyan, V.; Israelian, G.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Planetary studies demand precise and accurate stellar parameters as input for inferring the planetary properties. Different methods often provide different results that could lead to biases in the planetary parameters. Aims: In this work, we present a refinement of the spectral synthesis technique designed to treat fast rotating stars better. This method is used to derive precise stellar parameters, namely effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and rotational velocity. The procedure is tested for FGK stars with low and moderate-to-high rotation rates. Methods: The spectroscopic analysis is based on the spectral synthesis package Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME), which assumes Kurucz model atmospheres in LTE. The line list where the synthesis is conducted is comprised of iron lines, and the atomic data are derived after solar calibration. Results: The comparison of our stellar parameters shows good agreement with literature values, both for slowly and for fast rotating stars. In addition, our results are on the same scale as the parameters derived from the iron ionization and excitation method presented in our previous works. We present new atmospheric parameters for 10 transiting planet hosts as an update to the SWEET-Cat catalog. We also re-analyze their transit light curves to derive new updated planetary properties. Based on observations collected at the La Silla Observatory, ESO (Chile) with the FEROS spectrograph at the 2.2 m telescope (ESO runs ID 089.C-0444(A), 088.C-0892(A)) and with the HARPS spectrograph at the 3.6 m telescope (ESO runs ID 072.C-0488(E), 079.C-0127(A)); at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP, CNRS/OAMP), France, with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the 1.93 m telescope and at the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées (CNRS), France, with the NARVAL spectrograph at the 2 m Bernard Lyot Telescope (Run ID L131N11).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. First line shape analysis and spectroscopic parameters for the ν11 band of 12C2H4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Es-sebbar, Et-touhami; Mantzaras, John; Benilan, Yves; Farooq, Aamir

    2016-11-01

    An accurate knowledge of line intensities, collisional broadening coefficients and narrowing parameters is necessary for the interpretation of high-resolution infrared spectra of the Earth and other planetary atmospheres. One of the most promising spectral domains for 12C2H4 monitoring in such environments is located near the 3.36 μm window, through its ν11 C-H stretching mode. In this paper, we report an extensive study in which we precisely determine spectroscopic parameters of 12C2H4 ν11 band at 297±1 K, using a narrow Difference-Frequency-Generation (DFG) laser with 10-4 cm-1 resolution. Absorption measurements were performed in the 2975-2980 cm-1 spectral window to investigate 32 lines corresponding to J'Ka',Kc'←JKa,Kc, where, 5≤J≤7; 0≤Ka≤6 and 1≤Kc≤14. Spectroscopic parameters are retrieved using either Voigt or appropriate Galatry profile to simulate the measured 12C2H4 line shape. Line intensities along with self-broadening coefficients are reported for all lines. Narrowing coefficients for each isolated line are also derived. To our knowledge, the current study reports the first extensive spectroscopic parameter measurements of the 12C2H4 ν11 band in the 2975-2980 cm-1 range.

  13. Precise spectroscopic parameters for solar-type stars with moderate-to-high rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsantaki, M.; Sousa, S.; Santos, N. C.; Montalto, M.

    2014-07-01

    One of the primary objectives of Gaia is to survey billions stars and build the most precise 3D map of the Milky Way. Automated techniques of spectral analysis are needed to perform a rapid and homogeneous processing of the data to provide precise and accurate stellar parameters, such as for the GAIA-ESO survey. In this context, our recent work is based on the spectral synthesis technique to derive parameters for both slowly and fast rotating stars (Tsantaki et al. 2014). The spectroscopic analysis was performed using the package Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME; Valenti & Piskunov 1996) and a specific methodology to deal with fast rotators (υsini up to 50 km/s). The spectral regions, including the atomic data of all the lines in our analysis are available online in SME readable format http://mariatsantaki.weebly.com;. A comparison between the parameters derived with our methodology and with the iron ionization and excitation method (e.g. Sousa et al. 2008; Tsantaki et al. 2013) shows that both results are on the same scale. Additionally, for fast rotating stars, our results are in good agreement with literature values when comparing to other methods. We are now able to provide parameters for a very wide group of stars: from giants to dwarfs and from slowly to fast rotating stars. Except for galactic studies, stellar parameters are important for the planetary characterization. We provided updated stellar and planetary properties for ten systems. The stellar parameters were compiled in the SWEET-Catalogue (https://www.astro.up.pt/resources/sweet-cat/).

  14. Physical and geometrical parameters of CVBS X: the spectroscopic binary Gliese 762.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masda, Suhail G.; Al-Wardat, Mashhoor A.; Neuhäuser, Ralph; Al-Naimiy, Hamid M.

    2016-07-01

    We present the physical and geometrical parameters of the individual components of the close visual double-lined spectroscopic binary system Gliese 762.1, which were estimated using Al-Wardat's complex method for analyzing close visual binary systems. The estimated parameters of the individual components of the system are as follows: radius RA = 0.845 ± 0.09 R ⊙, RB = 0.795 ± 0.10 R ⊙, effective temperature TA eff = 5300 ± 50 K, TB eff = 5150 ± 50 K, surface gravity log gA = 4.52 ± 0.10, log gB = 4.54±0.15 and luminosity LA = 0.51±0.08 L ⊙, LB = 0.40±0.07 L ⊙. New orbital elements are presented with a semi-major axis of 0.0865 ± 0.010 arcsec using the Hippracos parallax π = 58.96 ± 0.65 mas, and an accurate total mass and individual masses of the system are determined as M = 1.72 ± 0.60 M⊙, MA = 0.89 ± 0.08 M ⊙ and MB = 0.83 ± 0.07 M⊙. Finally, the spectral types and luminosity classes of both components are assigned as K0V and K1.5V for the primary and secondary components respectively, and their positions on the H-R diagram and evolutionary tracks are given.

  15. A simple and accurate resist parameter extraction method for sub-80-nm DRAM patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sook; Hwang, Chan; Park, Dong-Woon; Kim, In-Sung; Kim, Ho-Chul; Woo, Sang-Gyun; Cho, Han-Ku; Moon, Joo-Tae

    2004-05-01

    Due to the polarization effect of high NA lithography, the consideration of resist effect in lithography simulation becomes increasingly important. In spite of the importance of resist simulation, many process engineers are reluctant to consider resist effect in lithography simulation due to time-consuming procedure to extract required resist parameters and the uncertainty of measurement of some parameters. Weiss suggested simplified development model, and this model does not require the complex kinetic parameters. For the device fabrication engineers, there is a simple and accurate parameter extraction and optimizing method using Weiss model. This method needs refractive index, Dill"s parameters and development rate monitoring (DRM) data in parameter extraction. The parameters extracted using referred sequence is not accurate, so that we have to optimize the parameters to fit the critical dimension scanning electron microscopy (CD SEM) data of line and space patterns. Hence, the FiRM of Sigma-C is utilized as a resist parameter-optimizing program. According to our study, the illumination shape, the aberration and the pupil mesh point have a large effect on the accuracy of resist parameter in optimization. To obtain the optimum parameters, we need to find the saturated mesh points in terms of normalized intensity log slope (NILS) prior to an optimization. The simulation results using the optimized parameters by this method shows good agreement with experiments for iso-dense bias, Focus-Exposure Matrix data and sub 80nm device pattern simulation.

  16. Toward spectroscopically accurate global ab initio potential energy surface for the acetylene-vinylidene isomerization

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Huixian; Li, Anyang; Guo, Hua

    2014-12-28

    A new full-dimensional global potential energy surface (PES) for the acetylene-vinylidene isomerization on the ground (S{sub 0}) electronic state has been constructed by fitting ∼37 000 high-level ab initio points using the permutation invariant polynomial-neural network method with a root mean square error of 9.54 cm{sup −1}. The geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies of acetylene, vinylidene, and all other stationary points (two distinct transition states and one secondary minimum in between) have been determined on this PES. Furthermore, acetylene vibrational energy levels have been calculated using the Lanczos algorithm with an exact (J = 0) Hamiltonian. The vibrational energies up to 12 700 cm{sup −1} above the zero-point energy are in excellent agreement with the experimentally derived effective Hamiltonians, suggesting that the PES is approaching spectroscopic accuracy. In addition, analyses of the wavefunctions confirm the experimentally observed emergence of the local bending and counter-rotational modes in the highly excited bending vibrational states. The reproduction of the experimentally derived effective Hamiltonians for highly excited bending states signals the coming of age for the ab initio based PES, which can now be trusted for studying the isomerization reaction.

  17. Accurate spectroscopic characterization of ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide isotopologues: a route toward their astrophysical detection

    SciTech Connect

    Puzzarini, C.; Senent, M. L.; Domínguez-Gómez, R.; Carvajal, M.; Hochlaf, M.; Al-Mogren, M. Mogren E-mail: senent@iem.cfmac.csic.es E-mail: miguel.carvajal@dfa.uhu.es E-mail: mmogren@ksu.edu.sa

    2014-11-20

    Using state-of-the-art computational methodologies, we predict a set of reliable rotational and torsional parameters for ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide monosubstituted isotopologues. This includes rotational, quartic, and sextic centrifugal-distortion constants, torsional levels, and torsional splittings. The accuracy of the present data was assessed from a comparison to the available experimental data. Generally, our computed parameters should help in the characterization and the identification of these organo-sulfur molecules in laboratory settings and in the interstellar medium.

  18. Accurate molecular structure and spectroscopic properties of nucleobases: a combined computational-microwave investigation of 2-thiouracil as a case study.

    PubMed

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo; Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L

    2013-10-21

    The computational composite scheme purposely set up for accurately describing the electronic structure and spectroscopic properties of small biomolecules has been applied to the first study of the rotational spectrum of 2-thiouracil. The experimental investigation was made possible thanks to the combination of the laser ablation technique with Fourier transform microwave spectrometers. The joint experimental-computational study allowed us to determine the accurate molecular structure and spectroscopic properties of the title molecule, but more importantly, it demonstrates a reliable approach for the accurate investigation of isolated small biomolecules.

  19. Development of a new, robust and accurate, spectroscopic metric for scatterer size estimation in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassinopoulos, Michalis; Pitris, Costas

    2016-03-01

    The modulations appearing on the backscattering spectrum originating from a scatterer are related to its diameter as described by Mie theory for spherical particles. Many metrics for Spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography (SOCT) take advantage of this observation in order to enhance the contrast of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) images. However, none of these metrics has achieved high accuracy when calculating the scatterer size. In this work, Mie theory was used to further investigate the relationship between the degree of modulation in the spectrum and the scatterer size. From this study, a new spectroscopic metric, the bandwidth of the Correlation of the Derivative (COD) was developed which is more robust and accurate, compared to previously reported techniques, in the estimation of scatterer size. The self-normalizing nature of the derivative and the robustness of the first minimum of the correlation as a measure of its width, offer significant advantages over other spectral analysis approaches especially for scatterer sizes above 3 μm. The feasibility of this technique was demonstrated using phantom samples containing 6, 10 and 16 μm diameter microspheres as well as images of normal and cancerous human colon. The results are very promising, suggesting that the proposed metric could be implemented in OCT spectral analysis for measuring nuclear size distribution in biological tissues. A technique providing such information would be of great clinical significance since it would allow the detection of nuclear enlargement at the earliest stages of precancerous development.

  20. Highly Accurate Quartic Force Fields, Vibrational Frequencies, and Spectroscopic Constants for Cyclic and Linear C3H3(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xinchuan; Taylor, Peter R.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    High levels of theory have been used to compute quartic force fields (QFFs) for the cyclic and linear forms of the C H + molecular cation, referred to as c-C H + and I-C H +. Specifically the 33 3333 singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), has been used in conjunction with extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit and corrections for scalar relativity and core correlation have been included. The QFFs have been used to compute highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and other spectroscopic constants using both vibrational 2nd-order perturbation theory and variational methods to solve the nuclear Schroedinger equation. Agreement between our best computed fundamental vibrational frequencies and recent infrared photodissociation experiments is reasonable for most bands, but there are a few exceptions. Possible sources for the discrepancies are discussed. We determine the energy difference between the cyclic and linear forms of C H +, 33 obtaining 27.9 kcal/mol at 0 K, which should be the most reliable available. It is expected that the fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants presented here for c-C H + 33 and I-C H + are the most reliable available for the free gas-phase species and it is hoped that 33 these will be useful in the assignment of future high-resolution laboratory experiments or astronomical observations.

  1. Highly accurate quartic force fields, vibrational frequencies, and spectroscopic constants for cyclic and linear C3H3(+).

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinchuan; Taylor, Peter R; Lee, Timothy J

    2011-05-19

    High levels of theory have been used to compute quartic force fields (QFFs) for the cyclic and linear forms of the C(3)H(3)(+) molecular cation, referred to as c-C(3)H(3)(+) and l-C(3)H(3)(+). Specifically, the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), has been used in conjunction with extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit, and corrections for scalar relativity and core correlation have been included. The QFFs have been used to compute highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and other spectroscopic constants by use of both vibrational second-order perturbation theory and variational methods to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Agreement between our best computed fundamental vibrational frequencies and recent infrared photodissociation experiments is reasonable for most bands, but there are a few exceptions. Possible sources for the discrepancies are discussed. We determine the energy difference between the cyclic and linear forms of C(3)H(3)(+), obtaining 27.9 kcal/mol at 0 K, which should be the most reliable available. It is expected that the fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants presented here for c-C(3)H(3)(+) and l-C(3)H(3)(+) are the most reliable available for the free gas-phase species, and it is hoped that these will be useful in the assignment of future high-resolution laboratory experiments or astronomical observations. PMID:21510653

  2. Reliable Spectroscopic Constants for CCH-, NH2- and Their Isotopomers from an Accurate Potential Energy Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Schwenke, David W.; Chaban, Galina M.

    2005-01-01

    Accurate quartic force fields have been determined for the CCH- and NH2- molecular anions using the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T). Very large one-particle basis sets have been used including diffuse functions and up through g-type functions. Correlation of the nitrogen and carbon core electrons has been included, as well as other "small" effects, such as the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction, and basis set extrapolation, and corrections for higher-order correlation effects and scalar relativistic effects. Fundamental vibrational frequencies have been computed using standard second-order perturbation theory as well as variational methods. Comparison with the available experimental data is presented and discussed. The implications of our research for the astronomical observation of molecular anions will be discussed.

  3. Contact Transformations and Determinable Parameters in Spectroscopic Fitting Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekhtiev, Mirza A.; Hougen, Jon T.

    2000-02-01

    In recent least-squares fits of torsion-rotation spectra of acetaldehyde and methanol it was found possible to adjust more fourth-order parameters than would be expected from traditional contact-transformation considerations. To investigate this discrepancy between theory and practice we have carried out numerical fitting experiments on the simpler three-dimensional (three-Eulerian-angle) asymmetric rotor problem, using J ≤ 20 unitless energy levels generated artificially from a full orthorhombic Hamiltonian with quadratic through octic operators in the angular momentum components. Results are analyzed using the condition number κ of the least-squares matrix, which is a measure of its invertibility in the presence of round-off and other errors. When κ is very large, parameters must be removed from the fit until κ becomes acceptably small, corresponding to procedures which lead to reduced Hamiltonians in molecular spectroscopy. We find that under certain circumstances κ can be decreased to an acceptable level for Hamiltonians which are only partially reduced when compared to Watson A and S reductions. Some insight into this behavior is obtained from classical mechanics and from the concept of delayed contact transformations. Transferring this numerical and algebraic understanding to the more complicated four-dimensional methyl-top internal rotor problem supports the empirical observation that presently existing data sets for methanol and acetaldehyde are most efficiently fit using partially reduced Hamiltonians and further suggests that expanding the methanol data set to transitions involving levels of higher J, K, and vt would favor even more strongly the use of partially reduced fourth-order Hamiltonians.

  4. Bayesian parameter estimation of a k-ε model for accurate jet-in-crossflow simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Ray, Jaideep; Lefantzi, Sophia; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; Dechant, Lawrence

    2016-05-31

    Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes models are not very accurate for high-Reynolds-number compressible jet-in-crossflow interactions. The inaccuracy arises from the use of inappropriate model parameters and model-form errors in the Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes model. In this study, the hypothesis is pursued that Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes predictions can be significantly improved by using parameters inferred from experimental measurements of a supersonic jet interacting with a transonic crossflow.

  5. Accurate Atmospheric Parameters at Moderate Resolution Using Spectral Indices: Preliminary Application to the MARVELS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezzi, Luan; Dutra-Ferreira, Letícia; Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Porto de Mello, Gustavo F.; Santiago, Basílio X.; De Lee, Nathan; Lee, Brian L.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Wisniewski, John P.; González Hernández, Jonay I.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Fleming, Scott W.; Schneider, Donald P.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Cargile, Phillip; Ge, Jian; Pepper, Joshua; Wang, Ji; Paegert, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Studies of Galactic chemical, and dynamical evolution in the solar neighborhood depend on the availability of precise atmospheric parameters (effective temperature T eff, metallicity [Fe/H], and surface gravity log g) for solar-type stars. Many large-scale spectroscopic surveys operate at low to moderate spectral resolution for efficiency in observing large samples, which makes the stellar characterization difficult due to the high degree of blending of spectral features. Therefore, most surveys employ spectral synthesis, which is a powerful technique, but relies heavily on the completeness and accuracy of atomic line databases and can yield possibly correlated atmospheric parameters. In this work, we use an alternative method based on spectral indices to determine the atmospheric parameters of a sample of nearby FGK dwarfs and subgiants observed by the MARVELS survey at moderate resolving power (R ~ 12,000). To avoid a time-consuming manual analysis, we have developed three codes to automatically normalize the observed spectra, measure the equivalent widths of the indices, and, through a comparison of those with values calculated with predetermined calibrations, estimate the atmospheric parameters of the stars. The calibrations were derived using a sample of 309 stars with precise stellar parameters obtained from the analysis of high-resolution FEROS spectra, permitting the low-resolution equivalent widths to be directly related to the stellar parameters. A validation test of the method was conducted with a sample of 30 MARVELS targets that also have reliable atmospheric parameters derived from the high-resolution spectra and spectroscopic analysis based on the excitation and ionization equilibria method. Our approach was able to recover the parameters within 80 K for T eff, 0.05 dex for [Fe/H], and 0.15 dex for log g, values that are lower than or equal to the typical external uncertainties found between different high-resolution analyses. An additional test was

  6. Accurate atmospheric parameters at moderate resolution using spectral indices: Preliminary application to the marvels survey

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezzi, Luan; Da Costa, Luiz N.; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Dutra-Ferreira, Letícia; Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Porto de Mello, Gustavo F.; Santiago, Basílio X.; De Lee, Nathan; Lee, Brian L.; Ge, Jian; Wisniewski, John P.; González Hernández, Jonay I.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Cargile, Phillip; Pepper, Joshua; Fleming, Scott W.; Schneider, Donald P.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Wang, Ji; and others

    2014-12-01

    Studies of Galactic chemical, and dynamical evolution in the solar neighborhood depend on the availability of precise atmospheric parameters (effective temperature T {sub eff}, metallicity [Fe/H], and surface gravity log g) for solar-type stars. Many large-scale spectroscopic surveys operate at low to moderate spectral resolution for efficiency in observing large samples, which makes the stellar characterization difficult due to the high degree of blending of spectral features. Therefore, most surveys employ spectral synthesis, which is a powerful technique, but relies heavily on the completeness and accuracy of atomic line databases and can yield possibly correlated atmospheric parameters. In this work, we use an alternative method based on spectral indices to determine the atmospheric parameters of a sample of nearby FGK dwarfs and subgiants observed by the MARVELS survey at moderate resolving power (R ∼ 12,000). To avoid a time-consuming manual analysis, we have developed three codes to automatically normalize the observed spectra, measure the equivalent widths of the indices, and, through a comparison of those with values calculated with predetermined calibrations, estimate the atmospheric parameters of the stars. The calibrations were derived using a sample of 309 stars with precise stellar parameters obtained from the analysis of high-resolution FEROS spectra, permitting the low-resolution equivalent widths to be directly related to the stellar parameters. A validation test of the method was conducted with a sample of 30 MARVELS targets that also have reliable atmospheric parameters derived from the high-resolution spectra and spectroscopic analysis based on the excitation and ionization equilibria method. Our approach was able to recover the parameters within 80 K for T {sub eff}, 0.05 dex for [Fe/H], and 0.15 dex for log g, values that are lower than or equal to the typical external uncertainties found between different high-resolution analyses. An

  7. Parameter Estimation of Ion Current Formulations Requires Hybrid Optimization Approach to Be Both Accurate and Reliable

    PubMed Central

    Loewe, Axel; Wilhelms, Mathias; Schmid, Jochen; Krause, Mathias J.; Fischer, Fathima; Thomas, Dierk; Scholz, Eberhard P.; Dössel, Olaf; Seemann, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Computational models of cardiac electrophysiology provided insights into arrhythmogenesis and paved the way toward tailored therapies in the last years. To fully leverage in silico models in future research, these models need to be adapted to reflect pathologies, genetic alterations, or pharmacological effects, however. A common approach is to leave the structure of established models unaltered and estimate the values of a set of parameters. Today’s high-throughput patch clamp data acquisition methods require robust, unsupervised algorithms that estimate parameters both accurately and reliably. In this work, two classes of optimization approaches are evaluated: gradient-based trust-region-reflective and derivative-free particle swarm algorithms. Using synthetic input data and different ion current formulations from the Courtemanche et al. electrophysiological model of human atrial myocytes, we show that neither of the two schemes alone succeeds to meet all requirements. Sequential combination of the two algorithms did improve the performance to some extent but not satisfactorily. Thus, we propose a novel hybrid approach coupling the two algorithms in each iteration. This hybrid approach yielded very accurate estimates with minimal dependency on the initial guess using synthetic input data for which a ground truth parameter set exists. When applied to measured data, the hybrid approach yielded the best fit, again with minimal variation. Using the proposed algorithm, a single run is sufficient to estimate the parameters. The degree of superiority over the other investigated algorithms in terms of accuracy and robustness depended on the type of current. In contrast to the non-hybrid approaches, the proposed method proved to be optimal for data of arbitrary signal to noise ratio. The hybrid algorithm proposed in this work provides an important tool to integrate experimental data into computational models both accurately and robustly allowing to assess the often non

  8. An accurate Fortran code for computing hydrogenic continuum wave functions at a wide range of parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Liang-You; Gong, Qihuang

    2010-12-01

    The accurate computations of hydrogenic continuum wave functions are very important in many branches of physics such as electron-atom collisions, cold atom physics, and atomic ionization in strong laser fields, etc. Although there already exist various algorithms and codes, most of them are only reliable in a certain ranges of parameters. In some practical applications, accurate continuum wave functions need to be calculated at extremely low energies, large radial distances and/or large angular momentum number. Here we provide such a code, which can generate accurate hydrogenic continuum wave functions and corresponding Coulomb phase shifts at a wide range of parameters. Without any essential restrict to angular momentum number, the present code is able to give reliable results at the electron energy range [10,10] eV for radial distances of [10,10] a.u. We also find the present code is very efficient, which should find numerous applications in many fields such as strong field physics. Program summaryProgram title: HContinuumGautchi Catalogue identifier: AEHD_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHD_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1233 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7405 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran90 in fixed format Computer: AMD Processors Operating system: Linux RAM: 20 MBytes Classification: 2.7, 4.5 Nature of problem: The accurate computation of atomic continuum wave functions is very important in many research fields such as strong field physics and cold atom physics. Although there have already existed various algorithms and codes, most of them can only be applicable and reliable in a certain range of parameters. We present here an accurate FORTRAN program for

  9. Extending the molecular size in accurate quantum-chemical calculations: the equilibrium structure and spectroscopic properties of uracil.

    PubMed

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Barone, Vincenzo

    2011-04-21

    The equilibrium structure of uracil has been investigated using both theoretical and experimental data. With respect to the former, quantum-chemical calculations at the coupled-cluster level in conjunction with a triple-zeta basis set have been carried out. Extrapolation to the basis set limit, performed employing the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, and inclusion of core-correlation and diffuse-function corrections have also been considered. Based on the available rotational constants for various isotopic species together with corresponding computed vibrational corrections, the semi-experimental equilibrium structure of uracil has been determined for the first time. Theoretical and semi-experimental structures have been found in remarkably good agreement, thus pointing out the limitations of previous experimental determinations. Molecular and spectroscopic properties of uracil have then been studied by means of the composite computational approach introduced for the molecular structure evaluation. Among the results achieved, we mention the revision of the dipole moment. On the whole, it has been proved that the computational procedure presented is able to provide parameters with the proper accuracy to support experimental investigations of large molecules of biological interest.

  10. Near real time, accurate, and sensitive microbiological safety monitoring using an all-fibre spectroscopic fluorescence system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanholsbeeck, F.; Swift, S.; Cheng, M.; Bogomolny, E.

    2013-11-01

    Enumeration of microorganisms is an essential microbiological task for many industrial sectors and research fields. Various tests for detection and counting of microorganisms are used today. However most of the current methods to enumerate bacteria require either long incubation time for limited accuracy, or use complicated protocols along with bulky equipment. We have developed an accurate, all-fibre spectroscopic system to measure fluorescence signal in-situ. In this paper, we examine the potential of this setup for near real time bacteria enumeration in aquatic environment. The concept is based on a well-known phenomenon that the fluorescence quantum yields of some nucleic acid stains significantly increase upon binding with nucleic acids of microorganisms. In addition we have used GFP labeled organisms. The fluorescence signal increase can be correlated to the amount of nucleic acid present in the sample. In addition we have used GFP labeled organisms. Our results show that we are able to detect a wide range of bacteria concentrations without dilution or filtration (1-108 CFU/ml) using different optical probes we designed. This high sensitivity is due to efficient light delivery with an appropriate collection volume and in situ fluorescence detection as well as the use of a sensitive CCD spectrometer. By monitoring the laser power, we can account for laser fluctuations while measuring the fluorescence signal which improves as well the system accuracy. A synchronized laser shutter allows us to achieve a high SNR with minimal integration time, thereby reducing the photobleaching effect. In summary, we conclude that our optical setup may offer a robust method for near real time bacterial detection in aquatic environment.

  11. Time resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy with geometrically accurate models for bulk parameter recovery

    PubMed Central

    Guggenheim, James A.; Bargigia, Ilaria; Farina, Andrea; Pifferi, Antonio; Dehghani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    A novel straightforward, accessible and efficient approach is presented for performing hyperspectral time-domain diffuse optical spectroscopy to determine the optical properties of samples accurately using geometry specific models. To allow bulk parameter recovery from measured spectra, a set of libraries based on a numerical model of the domain being investigated is developed as opposed to the conventional approach of using an analytical semi-infinite slab approximation, which is known and shown to introduce boundary effects. Results demonstrate that the method improves the accuracy of derived spectrally varying optical properties over the use of the semi-infinite approximation. PMID:27699137

  12. Time resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy with geometrically accurate models for bulk parameter recovery

    PubMed Central

    Guggenheim, James A.; Bargigia, Ilaria; Farina, Andrea; Pifferi, Antonio; Dehghani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    A novel straightforward, accessible and efficient approach is presented for performing hyperspectral time-domain diffuse optical spectroscopy to determine the optical properties of samples accurately using geometry specific models. To allow bulk parameter recovery from measured spectra, a set of libraries based on a numerical model of the domain being investigated is developed as opposed to the conventional approach of using an analytical semi-infinite slab approximation, which is known and shown to introduce boundary effects. Results demonstrate that the method improves the accuracy of derived spectrally varying optical properties over the use of the semi-infinite approximation.

  13. Line Shape Parameters for CO_2 Transitions: Accurate Predictions from Complex Robert-Bonamy Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamouroux, Julien; Gamache, Robert R.

    2013-06-01

    A model for the prediction of the vibrational dependence of CO_2 half-widths and line shifts for several broadeners, based on a modification of the model proposed by Gamache and Hartmann, is presented. This model allows the half-widths and line shifts for a ro-vibrational transition to be expressed in terms of the number of vibrational quanta exchanged in the transition raised to a power p and a reference ro-vibrational transition. Complex Robert-Bonamy calculations were made for 24 bands for lower rotational quantum numbers J'' from 0 to 160 for N_2-, O_2-, air-, and self-collisions with CO_2. In the model a Quantum Coordinate is defined by (c_1 Δν_1 + c_2 Δν_2 + c_3 Δν_3)^p where a linear least-squares fit to the data by the model expression is made. The model allows the determination of the slope and intercept as a function of rotational transition, broadening gas, and temperature. From these fit data, the half-width, line shift, and the temperature dependence of the half-width can be estimated for any ro-vibrational transition, allowing spectroscopic CO_2 databases to have complete information for the line shape parameters. R. R. Gamache, J.-M. Hartmann, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer. {{83}} (2004), 119. R. R. Gamache, J. Lamouroux, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer. {{117}} (2013), 93.

  14. Accurate estimation of motion blur parameters in noisy remote sensing image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xueyan; Wang, Lin; Shao, Xiaopeng; Wang, Huilin; Tao, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    The relative motion between remote sensing satellite sensor and objects is one of the most common reasons for remote sensing image degradation. It seriously weakens image data interpretation and information extraction. In practice, point spread function (PSF) should be estimated firstly for image restoration. Identifying motion blur direction and length accurately is very crucial for PSF and restoring image with precision. In general, the regular light-and-dark stripes in the spectrum can be employed to obtain the parameters by using Radon transform. However, serious noise existing in actual remote sensing images often causes the stripes unobvious. The parameters would be difficult to calculate and the error of the result relatively big. In this paper, an improved motion blur parameter identification method to noisy remote sensing image is proposed to solve this problem. The spectrum characteristic of noisy remote sensing image is analyzed firstly. An interactive image segmentation method based on graph theory called GrabCut is adopted to effectively extract the edge of the light center in the spectrum. Motion blur direction is estimated by applying Radon transform on the segmentation result. In order to reduce random error, a method based on whole column statistics is used during calculating blur length. Finally, Lucy-Richardson algorithm is applied to restore the remote sensing images of the moon after estimating blur parameters. The experimental results verify the effectiveness and robustness of our algorithm.

  15. Photometric and Spectroscopic Analysis for the Determination of Physical Parameters of an Eclipsing Binary Star System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Piper

    2013-01-01

    A binary star system is a pair of stars that are bound together by gravity. Most of the stars that we see in the night sky are members of multiple star systems. A system of stars where one star passes in front of the other (as observed from Earth) on a periodic basis is called an eclipsing binary. Eclipsing binaries can have very short rotational periods and in all cases these pairs of stars are so far away that they can only be resolved from Earth as a single point of light. The interaction of the two stars serves to produce physical phenomena that can be observed and used to study stellar properties. By careful data collection and analysis is it possible for an amateur astronomer using commercial, low cost equipment (including a home built spectroscope) to gather photometric (brightness versus time) and spectroscopic (brightness versus wavelength) data, analyze the data, and calculate the physical properties of a binary star system? Using a CCD camera, tracking mount and telescope photometric data of BB Pegasi was collected and a light curve produced. 57 Cygni was also studied using a spectroscope, tracking mount and telescope to prove that Doppler shift of Hydrogen Balmer absorption lines can be used to determine radial velocity. The orbital period, orbital velocity, radius of each star, separation of the two stars and mass of each star was calculated for the eclipsing binary BB Pegasi using photometric and spectroscopic data and Kepler’s 3rd Law. These data were then compared to published data. By careful use of consumer grade astronomical equipment it is possible for an amateur astronomer to determine an array of physical parameters of a distant binary star system from a suburban setting.

  16. Extension of the AMBER force field for nitroxide radicals and combined QM/MM/PCM approach to the accurate determination of EPR parameters of DMPOH in solution

    PubMed Central

    Hermosilla, Laura; Prampolini, Giacomo; Calle, Paloma; García de la Vega, José Manuel; Brancato, Giuseppe; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    A computational strategy that combines both time-dependent and time-independent approaches is exploited to accurately model molecular dynamics and solvent effects on the isotropic hyperfine coupling constants of the DMPO-H nitroxide. Our recent general force field for nitroxides derived from AMBER ff99SB is further extended to systems involving hydrogen atoms in β-positions with respect to NO. The resulting force-field has been employed in a series of classical molecular dynamics simulations, comparing the computed EPR parameters from selected molecular configurations to the corresponding experimental data in different solvents. The effect of vibrational averaging on the spectroscopic parameters is also taken into account, by second order vibrational perturbation theory involving semi-diagonal third energy derivatives together first and second property derivatives. PMID:26584116

  17. Impact of difference in absorption line parameters in spectroscopic databases on CO2 and CH4 atmospheric content retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnokova, T. Yu.; Chentsov, A. V.; Rokotyan, N. V.; Zakharov, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The impact of uncertainties in CH4 and CO2 absorption line parameters in modern spectroscopic databases on the atmospheric transmission simulation in the near-infrared region is investigated. The atmospheric contents of CH4 and CO2 are retrieved from the absorption solar spectra measured by a ground-based Fourier transform spectrometer. Different spectroscopic databases are used in the forward radiative transfer model and a comparison of the retrieved results is made.

  18. Precise and accurate assessment of uncertainties in model parameters from stellar interferometry. Application to stellar diameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachaume, Regis; Rabus, Markus; Jordan, Andres

    2015-08-01

    In stellar interferometry, the assumption that the observables can be seen as Gaussian, independent variables is the norm. In particular, neither the optical interferometry FITS (OIFITS) format nor the most popular fitting software in the field, LITpro, offer means to specify a covariance matrix or non-Gaussian uncertainties. Interferometric observables are correlated by construct, though. Also, the calibration by an instrumental transfer function ensures that the resulting observables are not Gaussian, even if uncalibrated ones happened to be so.While analytic frameworks have been published in the past, they are cumbersome and there is no generic implementation available. We propose here a relatively simple way of dealing with correlated errors without the need to extend the OIFITS specification or making some Gaussian assumptions. By repeatedly picking at random which interferograms, which calibrator stars, and which are the errors on their diameters, and performing the data processing on the bootstrapped data, we derive a sampling of p(O), the multivariate probability density function (PDF) of the observables O. The results can be stored in a normal OIFITS file. Then, given a model m with parameters P predicting observables O = m(P), we can estimate the PDF of the model parameters f(P) = p(m(P)) by using a density estimation of the observables' PDF p.With observations repeated over different baselines, on nights several days apart, and with a significant set of calibrators systematic errors are de facto taken into account. We apply the technique to a precise and accurate assessment of stellar diameters obtained at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer with PIONIER.

  19. New method for determination of the photoresist Dill parameters using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boher, Pierre; Defranoux, Christophe; Piel, Jean-Philippe; Stehle, Jean-Louis P.

    1999-06-01

    In this paper a new method to determine photoresist DIll parameters is presented. Based on spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements, this new method is more precise than standard techniques based on transmittance measurements. Indeed, compared to photometry, SE technique is a self calibrated technique which provide directly two independent parameters Tan (Psi) and Cos (Delta) which can be used to extract directly thickness but also optical indices of a layer inside a multilayer structure. Moreover, the wavelength dependence introduces more restrictions for the data analysis since thickness and optical indices can be deduced directly in many cases. We apply this technique to different kinds of photoresist designed for 365nm and 248nm. At each wavelength ellipsometric parameters are simulate directly versus the exposure dose without any assumption on the thickness and on the index of refraction evolution. On 365nm photoresist this new method provides Dill parameters in good agreement with the standard method. On 248nm photoresist we show that the influence of the exposure is more important on the refractive index and on the thickness of the layer than on its absorption.

  20. New method for determination of the photoresist Dill parameters using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boher, Pierre; Defranoux, Christophe; Piel, Jean-Philippe; Stehle, Jean-Louis P.

    1999-04-01

    In this paper a new method to determine photoresist Dill parameters is presented. Based on spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements, this new method is more precise than standard techniques based on transmittance measurements. Indeed, compared to photometry, SE technique is a self calibrated technique which provide directly two independent parameters Tan (Psi) and Cos (Delta) which can be used to extract directly thickness but also optical indices of a layer inside a multilayer structure. Moreover, the wavelength dependence introduces more restrictions for the data analysis since thickness and optical indices can be deduced directly in many cases. We apply this technique to different kinds of photoresist designed for 365nm and 248nm. At each wavelength ellipsometric parameters are simulated directly versus the exposure dose without any assumption on the thickness and on the index of refraction evolution. On 365nm photoresist this new method provides Dill parameters in good agreement with the standard method. On 248nm photoresist we show that the influence of the exposure is more important on the refractive index and on the thickness of the layer than on its absorption.

  1. Significance of accurate diffraction corrections for the second harmonic wave in determining the acoustic nonlinearity parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing; Barnard, Dan

    2015-09-15

    The accurate measurement of acoustic nonlinearity parameter β for fluids or solids generally requires making corrections for diffraction effects due to finite size geometry of transmitter and receiver. These effects are well known in linear acoustics, while those for second harmonic waves have not been well addressed and therefore not properly considered in previous studies. In this work, we explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction corrections using the multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) equations which were developed from the quasilinear solutions of the KZK equation. The effects of making these corrections are examined through the simulation of β determination in water. Diffraction corrections are found to have more significant effects than attenuation corrections, and the β values of water can be estimated experimentally with less than 5% errors when the exact second harmonic diffraction corrections are used together with the negligible attenuation correction effects on the basis of linear frequency dependence between attenuation coefficients, α{sub 2} ≃ 2α{sub 1}.

  2. Accurate parameters for HD 209458 and its planet from HST spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Burgo, C.; Allende Prieto, C.

    2016-08-01

    We present updated parameters for the star HD 209458 and its transiting giant planet. The stellar angular diameter θ=0.2254±0.0017 mas is obtained from the average ratio between the absolute flux observed with the Hubble Space Telescope and that of the best-fitting Kurucz model atmosphere. This angular diameter represents an improvement in precision of more than four times compared to available interferometric determinations. The stellar radius R⋆=1.20±0.05 R⊙ is ascertained by combining the angular diameter with the Hipparcos trigonometric parallax, which is the main contributor to its uncertainty, and therefore the radius accuracy should be significantly improved with Gaia's measurements. The radius of the exoplanet Rp=1.41±0.06 RJ is derived from the corresponding transit depth in the light curve and our stellar radius. From the model fitting, we accurately determine the effective temperature, Teff=6071±20 K, which is in perfect agreement with the value of 6070±24 K calculated from the angular diameter and the integrated spectral energy distribution. We also find precise values from recent Padova Isochrones, such as R⋆=1.20±0.06 R⊙ and Teff=6099±41 K. We arrive at a consistent picture from these methods and compare the results with those from the literature.

  3. Comparison of one-particle basis set extrapolation to explicitly correlated methods for the calculation of accurate quartic force fields, vibrational frequencies, and spectroscopic constants: application to H2O, N2H+, NO2+, and C2H2.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinchuan; Valeev, Edward F; Lee, Timothy J

    2010-12-28

    One-particle basis set extrapolation is compared with one of the new R12 methods for computing highly accurate quartic force fields (QFFs) and spectroscopic data, including molecular structures, rotational constants, and vibrational frequencies for the H(2)O, N(2)H(+), NO(2)(+), and C(2)H(2) molecules. In general, agreement between the spectroscopic data computed from the best R12 and basis set extrapolation methods is very good with the exception of a few parameters for N(2)H(+) where it is concluded that basis set extrapolation is still preferred. The differences for H(2)O and NO(2)(+) are small and it is concluded that the QFFs from both approaches are more or less equivalent in accuracy. For C(2)H(2), however, a known one-particle basis set deficiency for C-C multiple bonds significantly degrades the quality of results obtained from basis set extrapolation and in this case the R12 approach is clearly preferred over one-particle basis set extrapolation. The R12 approach used in the present study was modified in order to obtain high precision electronic energies, which are needed when computing a QFF. We also investigated including core-correlation explicitly in the R12 calculations, but conclude that current approaches are lacking. Hence core-correlation is computed as a correction using conventional methods. Considering the results for all four molecules, it is concluded that R12 methods will soon replace basis set extrapolation approaches for high accuracy electronic structure applications such as computing QFFs and spectroscopic data for comparison to high-resolution laboratory or astronomical observations, provided one uses a robust R12 method as we have done here. The specific R12 method used in the present study, CCSD(T)(R12), incorporated a reformulation of one intermediate matrix in order to attain machine precision in the electronic energies. Final QFFs for N(2)H(+) and NO(2)(+) were computed, including basis set extrapolation, core-correlation, scalar

  4. Spectroscopic survey of γ Doradus stars - I. Comprehensive atmospheric parameters and abundance analysis of γ Doradus stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahraman Aliçavuş, F.; Niemczura, E.; De Cat, P.; Soydugan, E.; Kołaczkowski, Z.; Ostrowski, J.; Telting, J. H.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Poretti, E.; Rainer, M.; Suárez, J. C.; Mantegazza, L.; Kilmartin, P.; Pollard, K. R.

    2016-05-01

    We present a spectroscopic survey of known and candidate γ Doradus stars. The high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of 52 objects were collected by five different spectrographs. The spectral classification, atmospheric parameters (Teff, log g, ξ), vsin i and chemical composition of the stars were derived. The stellar spectral and luminosity classes were found between G0-A7 and IV-V, respectively. The initial values for Teff and log g were determined from the photometric indices and spectral energy distribution. Those parameters were improved by the analysis of hydrogen lines. The final values of Teff, log g and ξ were derived from the iron lines analysis. The Teff values were found between 6000 K and 7900 K, while log g values range from 3.8 to 4.5 dex. Chemical abundances and vsin i values were derived by the spectrum synthesis method. The vsin i values were found between 5 and 240 km s-1. The chemical abundance pattern of γ Doradus stars were compared with the pattern of non-pulsating stars. It turned out that there is no significant difference in abundance patterns between these two groups. Additionally, the relations between the atmospheric parameters and the pulsation quantities were checked. A strong correlation between the vsin i and the pulsation periods of γ Doradus variables was obtained. The accurate positions of the analysed stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram have been shown. Most of our objects are located inside or close to the blue edge of the theoretical instability strip of γ Doradus.

  5. Spectroscopic Parameters of X3Σ-, a1Δ, and A'3Δ Electronic States of SO Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie-min; Feng, Heng-qiang; Sun, Jin-feng; Shi, De-heng; Zhu, Zun-lue

    2012-10-01

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of three low-lying electronic states (X3Σ, a1Δ, and A'3Δ) of SO radical have been studied by ab initio quantum chemical method. The calculations were carried out with the full valence complete active space self-consistent field method followed by the highly accurate valence internally contracted multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) approach in combination with correlation-consistent basis sets. Effects of the core-valence correlation and relativistic corrections on the PECs are taken into account. The core-valence correlation correction is carried out with the cc-pCVDZ basis set. The way to consider the relativistic correction is to use the second-order Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian approximation, and the correction is performed at the level of cc-pV5Z basis set. To obtain more reliable results, the PECs determined by the MRCI calculations are also corrected for size-extensivity errors by means of the Davidson modification (MRCI+Q). These PECs are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit by the two-point energy extrapolation scheme. With these PECs, the spectroscopic parameters are determined.

  6. Consistency of VDJ Rearrangement and Substitution Parameters Enables Accurate B Cell Receptor Sequence Annotation

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Duncan K.; Matsen, Frederick A.

    2016-01-01

    VDJ rearrangement and somatic hypermutation work together to produce antibody-coding B cell receptor (BCR) sequences for a remarkable diversity of antigens. It is now possible to sequence these BCRs in high throughput; analysis of these sequences is bringing new insight into how antibodies develop, in particular for broadly-neutralizing antibodies against HIV and influenza. A fundamental step in such sequence analysis is to annotate each base as coming from a specific one of the V, D, or J genes, or from an N-addition (a.k.a. non-templated insertion). Previous work has used simple parametric distributions to model transitions from state to state in a hidden Markov model (HMM) of VDJ recombination, and assumed that mutations occur via the same process across sites. However, codon frame and other effects have been observed to violate these parametric assumptions for such coding sequences, suggesting that a non-parametric approach to modeling the recombination process could be useful. In our paper, we find that indeed large modern data sets suggest a model using parameter-rich per-allele categorical distributions for HMM transition probabilities and per-allele-per-position mutation probabilities, and that using such a model for inference leads to significantly improved results. We present an accurate and efficient BCR sequence annotation software package using a novel HMM “factorization” strategy. This package, called partis (https://github.com/psathyrella/partis/), is built on a new general-purpose HMM compiler that can perform efficient inference given a simple text description of an HMM. PMID:26751373

  7. Consistency of VDJ Rearrangement and Substitution Parameters Enables Accurate B Cell Receptor Sequence Annotation.

    PubMed

    Ralph, Duncan K; Matsen, Frederick A

    2016-01-01

    VDJ rearrangement and somatic hypermutation work together to produce antibody-coding B cell receptor (BCR) sequences for a remarkable diversity of antigens. It is now possible to sequence these BCRs in high throughput; analysis of these sequences is bringing new insight into how antibodies develop, in particular for broadly-neutralizing antibodies against HIV and influenza. A fundamental step in such sequence analysis is to annotate each base as coming from a specific one of the V, D, or J genes, or from an N-addition (a.k.a. non-templated insertion). Previous work has used simple parametric distributions to model transitions from state to state in a hidden Markov model (HMM) of VDJ recombination, and assumed that mutations occur via the same process across sites. However, codon frame and other effects have been observed to violate these parametric assumptions for such coding sequences, suggesting that a non-parametric approach to modeling the recombination process could be useful. In our paper, we find that indeed large modern data sets suggest a model using parameter-rich per-allele categorical distributions for HMM transition probabilities and per-allele-per-position mutation probabilities, and that using such a model for inference leads to significantly improved results. We present an accurate and efficient BCR sequence annotation software package using a novel HMM "factorization" strategy. This package, called partis (https://github.com/psathyrella/partis/), is built on a new general-purpose HMM compiler that can perform efficient inference given a simple text description of an HMM. PMID:26751373

  8. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging parameters describing acid phosphate substitution in biologic hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Spevak, Lyudmila; Flach, Carol R; Hunter, Tracey; Mendelsohn, Richard; Boskey, Adele

    2013-05-01

    Acid phosphate substitution into mineralized tissues is an important determinant of their mechanical properties and their response to treatment. This study identifies and validates Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging (FTIRI) spectral parameters that provide information on the acid phosphate (HPO4) substitution into hydroxyapatite in developing mineralized tissues. Curve fitting and Fourier self-deconvolution were used to identify subband positions in model compounds (with and without HPO4). The intensity of subbands at 1127 and 1110 cm(-1) correlated with the acid phosphate content in these models. Peak height ratios of these subbands to the ν3 vibration at 1096 cm(-1) found in stoichiometric apatite were evaluated in the model compounds and mixtures thereof. FTIRI spectra of bones and teeth at different developmental ages were analyzed using these spectral parameters. Factor analysis (a chemometric technique) was also conducted on the tissue samples and resulted in factor loadings with spectral features corresponding to the HPO4 vibrations described above. Images of both factor correlation coefficients and the peak height ratios 1127/1096 and 1112/1096 cm(-1) demonstrated higher acid phosphate content in younger vs. more mature regions in the same specimen. Maps of the distribution of acid phosphate content will be useful for characterizing the extent of new bone formation, the areas of potential decreased strength, and the effects of therapies such as those used in metabolic bone diseases (osteoporosis, chronic kidney disease) on mineral composition. Because of the wider range of values obtained with the 1127/1096 cm(-1) parameter compared to the 1110/1096 cm(-1) parameter and the smaller scatter in the slope, it is suggested that this ratio should be the parameter of choice.

  9. Effective Temperatures of Selected Main-Sequence Stars with the Most Accurate Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soydugan, F.; Eker, Z.; Soydugan, E.; Bilir, S.; Gökçe, E. Y.; Steer, I.; Tüysüz, M.; Šenyüz, T.; Demircan, O.

    2015-07-01

    In this study we investigate the distributions of the properties of detached double-lined binaries (DBs) in the mass-luminosity, mass-radius, and mass-effective temperature diagrams. We have improved the classical mass-luminosity relation based on the database of DBs by Eker et al. (2014a). Based on the accurate observational data available to us we propose a method for improving the effective temperatures of eclipsing binaries with accurate mass and radius determinations.

  10. Accurate and in situ monitoring of bacterial concentration using a real time all-fibre spectroscopic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, W.; McGoverin, C.; Lydiard, S.; Song, Y.; Cheng, M.; Swift, S.; Singhal, N.; Vanholsbeeck, F.

    2015-07-01

    Accurate in situ monitoring of bacterial transport is important for increased understanding and improvement of bioremediation processes where microorganisms convert toxic compounds to more benign compounds. Bioremediation methods have become the preferred mechanism for the rehabilitation of hard to reach contaminated environments. In this study, we have used fluorescence spectroscopy to monitor the movement of fluorescently labelled bacteria (Rhodococcus erythropolis and Pseudomonas putida) within a bench-top column filled with a porous medium. In situ fluorescence measurements made using a fibre optic based instrument (`optrode') were compared to ex situ measurements made using a plate reader. In situ monitoring using this fibre optic based instrument is a promising alternative to ex situ measurements as the initial flow of bacteria is reliably observed. However, a greater understanding of the effect of the porous medium on fluorescence measurements is required to develop an accurate calibration for bacterial concentration based in situ measurements.

  11. Revised spectroscopic parameters of SH(+) from ALMA and IRAM 30m observations.

    PubMed

    Müller, Holger S P; Goicoechea, Javier R; Cernicharo, José; Agúndez, Marcelino; Pety, Jérôme; Cuadrado, Sara; Gerin, Maryvonne; Dumas, Gaëlle; Chapillon, Edwige

    2014-09-19

    Hydrides represent the first steps of interstellar chemistry. Sulfanylium (SH(+)), in particular, is a key tracer of energetic processes. We used ALMA and the IRAM 30 m telescope to search for the lowest frequency rotational lines of SH(+) toward the Orion Bar, the prototypical photo-dissociation region illuminated by a strong UV radiation field. On the basis of previous Herschel/HIFI observations of SH(+), we expected to detect emission of the two SH(+) hyperfine structure (HFS) components of the NJ = 10-01 fine structure (FS) component near 346 GHz. While we did not observe any lines at the frequencies predicted from laboratory data, we detected two emission lines, each ~15 MHz above the SH(+) predictions and with relative intensities and HFS splitting expected for SH(+). The rest frequencies of the two newly detected lines are more compatible with the remainder of the SH(+) laboratory data than the single line measured in the laboratory near 346 GHz and previously attributed to SH(+). Therefore, we assign these new features to the two SH(+) HFS components of the NJ = 10-01 FS component and re-determine its spectroscopic parameters, which will be useful for future observations of SH(+), in particular if its lowest frequency FS components are studied. Our observations demonstrate the suitability of these lines for SH(+) searches at frequencies easily accessible from the ground.

  12. Revised spectroscopic parameters of SH(+) from ALMA and IRAM 30m observations.

    PubMed

    Müller, Holger S P; Goicoechea, Javier R; Cernicharo, José; Agúndez, Marcelino; Pety, Jérôme; Cuadrado, Sara; Gerin, Maryvonne; Dumas, Gaëlle; Chapillon, Edwige

    2014-09-19

    Hydrides represent the first steps of interstellar chemistry. Sulfanylium (SH(+)), in particular, is a key tracer of energetic processes. We used ALMA and the IRAM 30 m telescope to search for the lowest frequency rotational lines of SH(+) toward the Orion Bar, the prototypical photo-dissociation region illuminated by a strong UV radiation field. On the basis of previous Herschel/HIFI observations of SH(+), we expected to detect emission of the two SH(+) hyperfine structure (HFS) components of the NJ = 10-01 fine structure (FS) component near 346 GHz. While we did not observe any lines at the frequencies predicted from laboratory data, we detected two emission lines, each ~15 MHz above the SH(+) predictions and with relative intensities and HFS splitting expected for SH(+). The rest frequencies of the two newly detected lines are more compatible with the remainder of the SH(+) laboratory data than the single line measured in the laboratory near 346 GHz and previously attributed to SH(+). Therefore, we assign these new features to the two SH(+) HFS components of the NJ = 10-01 FS component and re-determine its spectroscopic parameters, which will be useful for future observations of SH(+), in particular if its lowest frequency FS components are studied. Our observations demonstrate the suitability of these lines for SH(+) searches at frequencies easily accessible from the ground. PMID:26525172

  13. Accurate spectroscopic calculations of the 17 Λ-S and 59 Ω states of the AsP molecule including the spin-orbit coupling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Deheng; Liu, Qionglan; Wang, Shuai; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2015-01-01

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of 59 Ω states generated from the 17 Λ-S states (X1Σ+, a3Σ+, 15Σ+, b3Δ, c3Π, 15Π, 25Σ+, 23Δ, 23Π, 33Σ+, A1Π, 23Σ+, 35Σ+, 17Σ+, 15Δ, 25Δ, and 25Π) of AsP molecule are studied for the first time for internuclear separations from about 0.10 to 1.10 nm. All the Λ-S states are contributed to the first three dissociation channels of AsP molecule except for the A1Π. The 23Σ+, 35Σ+, 17Σ+, 15Δ, 25Δ, and 25Π are found to be the repulsive states. The a3Σ+, 15Π, b3Δ, 17Σ+, 15Δ, 25Δ, and 25Π are found to be the inverted states. Each of the 33Σ+, c3Π, 23Π, 15Π, and 15Σ+ states has one potential barrier. The PECs are calculated by the CASSCF method, which is followed by the internally contracted MRCI approach with Davidson correction. Core-valence correlation and scalar relativistic corrections are included. The convergent behavior of present calculations is discussed with respect to the basis set and level of theory. The spin-orbit coupling effect is accounted for. All these PECs are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The spectroscopic parameters are evaluated for the bound states involved, and are compared with available measurements. Excellent agreement has been found between the present results and the measurements. It shows that the spectroscopic parameters reported in this paper can be expected to be reliably predicted ones. The conclusion is gained that the effect of spin-orbit coupling on the spectroscopic parameters is not obvious for all the Λ-S bound states except for few ones such as 15Σ+ and c3Π.

  14. Accurate calculations of spectroscopic properties for the 13 Λ-S states and the 23 Ω states of BO radical including the spin-orbit coupling effect.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zunlue; Yu, Wei; Wang, Shuai; Sun, Jinfeng; Shi, Deheng

    2014-10-15

    The spectroscopic properties of 23 Ω states generated from the 13 Λ-S states of BO radical are studied for the first time for internuclear separations from about 0.07 to 1.0nm. Of the 13 Λ-S states, each of the F(2)Π, 1(2)Φ and 1(2)Δ states is found to possess the double well. Each of the 1(4)Π, C(2)Π, 1(2)Σ(-) and 2(2)Σ(-) states possesses one well with one barrier. The A(2)Π, 1(4)Π and F(2)Π are the inverted states with the spin-orbit coupling effect taken into account. All the states possess the deep well except for the 1(2)Φ. The potential energy curves (PECs) are calculated by the complete active space self-consistent field method, which is followed by the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction approach with the Davidson correction. Core-valence correlation and scalar relativistic corrections are included into the calculations. The PECs are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The spin-orbit coupling effect is accounted for by the state interaction approach with the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. The spectroscopic parameters are evaluated, and compared with the available measurements and other theoretical results. The Franck-Condon factors and radiative lifetimes of the transitions from the B(2)Σ(+), C(2)Π, D(2)Σ(+), 1(2)Σ(-) and 1(4)Π Λ-S states to the ground state are calculated for several low vibrational levels, and some necessary discussion is made. Analyses show that the spectroscopic parameters reported in this paper can be expected to be reliably predicted ones. PMID:24820321

  15. Polynomial fitting of DT-MRI fiber tracts allows accurate estimation of muscle architectural parameters.

    PubMed

    Damon, Bruce M; Heemskerk, Anneriet M; Ding, Zhaohua

    2012-06-01

    Fiber curvature is a functionally significant muscle structural property, but its estimation from diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging fiber tracking data may be confounded by noise. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of polynomial fitting of fiber tracts for improving the accuracy and precision of fiber curvature (κ) measurements. Simulated image data sets were created in order to provide data with known values for κ and pennation angle (θ). Simulations were designed to test the effects of increasing inherent fiber curvature (3.8, 7.9, 11.8 and 15.3 m(-1)), signal-to-noise ratio (50, 75, 100 and 150) and voxel geometry (13.8- and 27.0-mm(3) voxel volume with isotropic resolution; 13.5-mm(3) volume with an aspect ratio of 4.0) on κ and θ measurements. In the originally reconstructed tracts, θ was estimated accurately under most curvature and all imaging conditions studied; however, the estimates of κ were imprecise and inaccurate. Fitting the tracts to second-order polynomial functions provided accurate and precise estimates of κ for all conditions except very high curvature (κ=15.3 m(-1)), while preserving the accuracy of the θ estimates. Similarly, polynomial fitting of in vivo fiber tracking data reduced the κ values of fitted tracts from those of unfitted tracts and did not change the θ values. Polynomial fitting of fiber tracts allows accurate estimation of physiologically reasonable values of κ, while preserving the accuracy of θ estimation.

  16. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION Accurate estimate of α variation and isotope shift parameters in Na and Mg+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, B. K.

    2010-12-01

    We present accurate calculations of fine-structure constant variation coefficients and isotope shifts in Na and Mg+ using the relativistic coupled-cluster method. In our approach, we are able to discover the roles of various correlation effects explicitly to all orders in these calculations. Most of the results, especially for the excited states, are reported for the first time. It is possible to ascertain suitable anchor and probe lines for the studies of possible variation in the fine-structure constant by using the above results in the considered systems.

  17. Predicting trace organic compound attenuation with spectroscopic parameters in powdered activated carbon processes.

    PubMed

    Ziska, Austin D; Park, Minkyu; Anumol, Tarun; Snyder, Shane A

    2016-08-01

    The removal of trace organic compounds (TOrCs) is of growing interest in water research and society. Powdered activated carbon (PAC) has been proven to be an effective method of removal for TOrCs in water, with the degree of effectiveness depending on dosage, contact time, and activated carbon type. In this study, the attenuation of TOrCs in three different secondary wastewater effluents using four PAC materials was studied in order to elucidate the effectiveness and efficacy of PAC for TOrC removal. With the notable exception of hydrochlorothiazide, all 14 TOrC indicators tested in this study exhibited a positive correlation of removal rate with their log Dow values, demonstrating that the main adsorption mechanism was hydrophobic interaction. As a predictive model, the modified Chick-Watson model, often used for the prediction of microorganism inactivation by disinfectants, was applied. The applied model exhibited good predictive power for TOrC attenuation by PAC in wastewater. In addition, surrogate models based upon spectroscopic measurements including UV absorbance at 254 nm and total fluorescence were applied to predict TOrC removal by PAC. The surrogate model was found to provide an excellent prediction of TOrC attenuation for all combinations of water quality and PAC type included in this study. The success of spectrometric parameters as surrogates in predicting TOrC attenuation by PAC are particularly useful because of their potential application in real-time on-line sensor monitoring and process control at full-scale water treatment plants, which could lead to significantly reduced operator response times and PAC operational optimization. PMID:27174829

  18. The spectroscopic binary system Gl 375. I. Orbital parameters and chromospheric activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, R. F.; González, J. F.; Cincunegui, C.; Mauas, P. J. D.

    2007-11-01

    Aims:We study the spectroscopic binary system Gl 375 to characterise its orbit and the spectral types and chromospheric activity levels of the components. Methods: We employed medium-resolution echelle spectra obtained at the 2.15 m telescope at the Argentinian observatory CASLEO and photometric observations obtained from the ASAS database. Results: We have separated the composite spectra into those corresponding to both components. The separated spectra allow us to confirm that the spectral types of both components are similar (dMe3.5) and to obtain precise measurements of the orbital period (P = 1.87844 days), minimum masses (M_1 sin3 i = 0.35 {M}_⊙ and M_2 sin3 i =0.33 {M}_⊙), and other orbital parameters. The photometric observations exhibit a sinusoidal variation with the same period as the orbital period. We interpreted this as signs of active regions carried along with rotation in a tidally synchronised system, and studied the evolution of the amplitude of the modulation on longer timescales. Together with the mean magnitude, the modulation exhibits a roughly cyclic variation with a period of around 800 days. This periodicity is also found in the flux of the Ca II K lines of both components, which seem to be in phase. Conclusions: The periodic changes in the three observables are interpreted as a sign of a stellar activity cycle. Both components appear to be in phase, which implies that they are magnetically connected. The measured cycle of ≈2.2 years (≈800 days) is consistent with previous determinations of activity cycles in similar stars. The authors are visiting astronomers of the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, operated under an agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan.

  19. Accurate nuclear masses from a three parameter Kohn-Sham DFT approach (BCPM)

    SciTech Connect

    Baldo, M.; Robledo, L. M.; Schuck, P.; Vinas, X.

    2012-10-20

    Given the promising features of the recently proposed Barcelona-Catania-Paris (BCP) functional [1], it is the purpose of this work to still improve on it. It is, for instance, shown that the number of open parameters can be reduced from 4-5 to 2-3, i.e. by practically a factor of two without deteriorating the results.

  20. Accurate parameters of the oldest known rocky-exoplanet hosting system: Kepler-10 revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Fogtmann-Schulz, Alexandra; Hinrup, Brian; Van Eylen, Vincent; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Kjeldsen, Hans; Silva Aguirre, Víctor; Tingley, Brandon

    2014-02-01

    Since the discovery of Kepler-10, the system has received considerable interest because it contains a small, rocky planet which orbits the star in less than a day. The system's parameters, announced by the Kepler team and subsequently used in further research, were based on only five months of data. We have reanalyzed this system using the full span of 29 months of Kepler photometric data, and obtained improved information about its star and the planets. A detailed asteroseismic analysis of the extended time series provides a significant improvement on the stellar parameters: not only can we state that Kepler-10 is the oldest known rocky-planet-harboring system at 10.41 ± 1.36 Gyr, but these parameters combined with improved planetary parameters from new transit fits gives us the radius of Kepler-10b to within just 125 km. A new analysis of the full planetary phase curve leads to new estimates on the planetary temperature and albedo, which remain degenerate in the Kepler band. Our modeling suggests that the flux level during the occultation is slightly lower than at the transit wings, which would imply that the nightside of this planet has a non-negligible temperature.

  1. Accurate predictions of spectroscopic and molecular properties of 27 Λ-S and 73 Ω states of AsS radical.

    PubMed

    Shi, Deheng; Song, Ziyue; Niu, Xianghong; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2016-01-15

    The PECs are calculated for the 27 Λ-S states and their corresponding 73 Ω states of AsS radical. Of these Λ-S states, only the 2(2)Δ and 5(4)Π states are replulsive. The 1(2)Σ(+), 2(2)Σ(+), 4(2)Π, 3(4)Δ, 3(4)Σ(+), and 4(4)Π states possess double wells. The 3(2)Σ(+) state possesses three wells. The A(2)Π, 3(2)Π, 1(2)Φ, 2(4)Π, 3(4)Π, 2(4)Δ, 3(4)Δ, 1(6)Σ(+), and 1(6)Π states are inverted with the SO coupling effect included. The 1(4)Σ(+), 2(4)Σ(+), 2(4)Σ(-), 2(4)Δ, 1(4)Φ, 1(6)Σ(+), and 1(6)Π states, the second wells of 1(2)Σ(+), 3(4)Σ(+), 4(2)Π, 4(4)Π, and 3(4)Δ states, and the third well of 3(2)Σ(+) state are very weakly-bound states. The PECs are extrapolated to the CBS limit. The effect of SO coupling on the PECs is discussed. The spectroscopic parameters are evaluated, and compared with available measurements and other theoretical ones. The vibrational properties of several weakly-bound states are determined. The spectroscopic properties reported here can be expected to be reliably predicted ones.

  2. Accurate predictions of spectroscopic and molecular properties of 27 Λ-S and 73 Ω states of AsS radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Deheng; Song, Ziyue; Niu, Xianghong; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2016-01-01

    The PECs are calculated for the 27 Λ-S states and their corresponding 73 Ω states of AsS radical. Of these Λ-S states, only the 22Δ and 54Π states are replulsive. The 12Σ+, 22Σ+, 42Π, 34Δ, 34Σ+, and 44Π states possess double wells. The 32Σ+ state possesses three wells. The A2Π, 32Π, 12Φ, 24Π, 34Π, 24Δ, 34Δ, 16Σ+, and 16Π states are inverted with the SO coupling effect included. The 14Σ+, 24Σ+, 24Σ-, 24Δ, 14Φ, 16Σ+, and 16Π states, the second wells of 12Σ+, 34Σ+, 42Π, 44Π, and 34Δ states, and the third well of 32Σ+ state are very weakly-bound states. The PECs are extrapolated to the CBS limit. The effect of SO coupling on the PECs is discussed. The spectroscopic parameters are evaluated, and compared with available measurements and other theoretical ones. The vibrational properties of several weakly-bound states are determined. The spectroscopic properties reported here can be expected to be reliably predicted ones.

  3. Accurate Prediction of Severe Allergic Reactions by a Small Set of Environmental Parameters (NDVI, Temperature)

    PubMed Central

    Andrianaki, Maria; Azariadis, Kalliopi; Kampouri, Errika; Theodoropoulou, Katerina; Lavrentaki, Katerina; Kastrinakis, Stelios; Kampa, Marilena; Agouridakis, Panagiotis; Pirintsos, Stergios; Castanas, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Severe allergic reactions of unknown etiology,necessitating a hospital visit, have an important impact in the life of affected individuals and impose a major economic burden to societies. The prediction of clinically severe allergic reactions would be of great importance, but current attempts have been limited by the lack of a well-founded applicable methodology and the wide spatiotemporal distribution of allergic reactions. The valid prediction of severe allergies (and especially those needing hospital treatment) in a region, could alert health authorities and implicated individuals to take appropriate preemptive measures. In the present report we have collecterd visits for serious allergic reactions of unknown etiology from two major hospitals in the island of Crete, for two distinct time periods (validation and test sets). We have used the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), a satellite-based, freely available measurement, which is an indicator of live green vegetation at a given geographic area, and a set of meteorological data to develop a model capable of describing and predicting severe allergic reaction frequency. Our analysis has retained NDVI and temperature as accurate identifiers and predictors of increased hospital severe allergic reactions visits. Our approach may contribute towards the development of satellite-based modules, for the prediction of severe allergic reactions in specific, well-defined geographical areas. It could also probably be used for the prediction of other environment related diseases and conditions. PMID:25794106

  4. An Accurate and Generic Testing Approach to Vehicle Stability Parameters Based on GPS and INS

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Zhibin; Zhang, Hongtian; Zhang, Jinzhu

    2015-01-01

    With the development of the vehicle industry, controlling stability has become more and more important. Techniques of evaluating vehicle stability are in high demand. As a common method, usually GPS sensors and INS sensors are applied to measure vehicle stability parameters by fusing data from the two system sensors. Although prior model parameters should be recognized in a Kalman filter, it is usually used to fuse data from multi-sensors. In this paper, a robust, intelligent and precise method to the measurement of vehicle stability is proposed. First, a fuzzy interpolation method is proposed, along with a four-wheel vehicle dynamic model. Second, a two-stage Kalman filter, which fuses the data from GPS and INS, is established. Next, this approach is applied to a case study vehicle to measure yaw rate and sideslip angle. The results show the advantages of the approach. Finally, a simulation and real experiment is made to verify the advantages of this approach. The experimental results showed the merits of this method for measuring vehicle stability, and the approach can meet the design requirements of a vehicle stability controller. PMID:26690154

  5. Can a combination of ultrasonographic parameters accurately evaluate concussion and guide return-to-play decisions?

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Michael S; Dupuis, Janae E; Bargoil, Jessica M; Foster, Dana C

    2015-09-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury, often referred to as concussion, is a common, potentially debilitating, and costly condition. One of the main challenges in diagnosing and managing concussion is that there is not currently an objective test to determine the presence of a concussion and to guide return-to-play decisions for athletes. Traditional neuroimaging tests, such as brain magnetic resonance imaging, are normal in concussion, and therefore diagnosis and management are guided by reported symptoms. Some athletes will under-report symptoms to accelerate their return-to-play and others will over-report symptoms out of fear of further injury or misinterpretation of underlying conditions, such as migraine headache. Therefore, an objective measure is needed to assist in several facets of concussion management. Limited data in animal and human testing indicates that intracranial pressure increases slightly and cerebrovascular reactivity (the ability of the cerebral arteries to auto-regulate in response to changes in carbon dioxide) decreases slightly following mild traumatic brain injury. We hypothesize that a combination of ultrasonographic measurements (optic nerve sheath diameter and transcranial Doppler assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity) into a single index will allow for an accurate and non-invasive measurement of intracranial pressure and cerebrovascular reactivity, and this index will be clinically relevant and useful for guiding concussion diagnosis and management. Ultrasound is an ideal modality for the evaluation of concussion because it is portable (allowing for evaluation in many settings, such as on the playing field or in a combat zone), radiation-free (making repeat scans safe), and relatively inexpensive (resulting in nearly universal availability). This paper reviews the literature supporting our hypothesis that an ultrasonographic index can assist in the diagnosis and management of concussion, and it also presents limited data regarding the

  6. Can a combination of ultrasonographic parameters accurately evaluate concussion and guide return-to-play decisions?

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Michael S; Dupuis, Janae E; Bargoil, Jessica M; Foster, Dana C

    2015-09-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury, often referred to as concussion, is a common, potentially debilitating, and costly condition. One of the main challenges in diagnosing and managing concussion is that there is not currently an objective test to determine the presence of a concussion and to guide return-to-play decisions for athletes. Traditional neuroimaging tests, such as brain magnetic resonance imaging, are normal in concussion, and therefore diagnosis and management are guided by reported symptoms. Some athletes will under-report symptoms to accelerate their return-to-play and others will over-report symptoms out of fear of further injury or misinterpretation of underlying conditions, such as migraine headache. Therefore, an objective measure is needed to assist in several facets of concussion management. Limited data in animal and human testing indicates that intracranial pressure increases slightly and cerebrovascular reactivity (the ability of the cerebral arteries to auto-regulate in response to changes in carbon dioxide) decreases slightly following mild traumatic brain injury. We hypothesize that a combination of ultrasonographic measurements (optic nerve sheath diameter and transcranial Doppler assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity) into a single index will allow for an accurate and non-invasive measurement of intracranial pressure and cerebrovascular reactivity, and this index will be clinically relevant and useful for guiding concussion diagnosis and management. Ultrasound is an ideal modality for the evaluation of concussion because it is portable (allowing for evaluation in many settings, such as on the playing field or in a combat zone), radiation-free (making repeat scans safe), and relatively inexpensive (resulting in nearly universal availability). This paper reviews the literature supporting our hypothesis that an ultrasonographic index can assist in the diagnosis and management of concussion, and it also presents limited data regarding the

  7. Can a Combination of Ultrasonographic Parameters Accurately Evaluate Concussion and Guide Return-to-Play Decisions?

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Michael S.; Dupuis, Janae E.; Bargoil, Jessica M.; Foster, Dana C.

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury, often referred to as concussion, is a common, potentially debilitating, and costly condition. One of the main challenges in diagnosing and managing concussion is that there is not currently an objective test to determine the presence of a concussion and to guide return-to-play decisions for athletes. Traditional neuroimaging tests, such as brain magnetic resonance imaging, are normal in concussion, and therefore diagnosis and management are guided by reported symptoms. Some athletes will under-report symptoms to accelerate their return-to-play and others will over-report symptoms out of fear of further injury or misinterpretation of underlying conditions, such as migraine headache. Therefore, an objective measure is needed to assist in several facets of concussion management. Limited data in animal and human testing indicates that intracranial pressure increases slightly and cerebrovascular reactivity (the ability of the cerebral arteries to auto-regulate in response to changes in carbon dioxide) decreases slightly following mild traumatic brain injury. We hypothesize that a combination of ultrasonographic measurements (optic nerve sheath diameter and transcranial Doppler assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity) into a single index will allow for an accurate and non-invasive measurement of intracranial pressure and cerebrovascular reactivity, and this index will be clinically relevant and useful for guiding concussion diagnosis and management. Ultrasound is an ideal modality for the evaluation of concussion because it is portable (allowing for evaluation in many settings, such as on the playing field or in a combat zone), radiation-free (making repeat scans safe), and relatively inexpensive (resulting in nearly universal availability). This paper reviews the literature supporting our hypothesis that an ultrasonographic index can assist in the diagnosis and management of concussion, and it also presents limited data regarding the

  8. Accurate spectroscopic properties of 10 Λ-S states and 25 Ω states of BS+ cation including the electronic transition properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinxin; Shi, Deheng; Zhou, Dan; Zhu, Zunlue; Sun, Jinfeng

    2015-11-01

    The potential energy curves of 10 Λ-S states of BS+ yielded from the first four dissociation limits are calculated by the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction approach with the Davidson correction. The core-valence correlation and scalar relativistic corrections are included. Basis on the calculated potential energy curves, the spectroscopic parameters are evaluated. All the PECs are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The spin-orbit coupling are taken into account by the state interaction method with the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. Finally, the transition dipole moments, Franck-Condon Factors and radiative lifetimes of transitions from the 23Π0-, 23Π0+, 23Σ0- and 23Σ1- states to ground state 13Π2 are predicted for future experiment.

  9. Accurate structure and dynamics of the metal-site of paramagnetic metalloproteins from NMR parameters using natural bond orbitals.

    PubMed

    Hansen, D Flemming; Westler, William M; Kunze, Micha B A; Markley, John L; Weinhold, Frank; Led, Jens J

    2012-03-14

    A natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis of unpaired electron spin density in metalloproteins is presented, which allows a fast and robust calculation of paramagnetic NMR parameters. Approximately 90% of the unpaired electron spin density occupies metal-ligand NBOs, allowing the majority of the density to be modeled by only a few NBOs that reflect the chemical bonding environment. We show that the paramagnetic relaxation rate of protons can be calculated accurately using only the metal-ligand NBOs and that these rates are in good agreement with corresponding rates measured experimentally. This holds, in particular, for protons of ligand residues where the point-dipole approximation breaks down. To describe the paramagnetic relaxation of heavy nuclei, also the electron spin density in the local orbitals must be taken into account. Geometric distance restraints for (15)N can be derived from the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and the Fermi contact shift when local NBOs are included in the analysis. Thus, the NBO approach allows us to include experimental paramagnetic NMR parameters of (15)N nuclei as restraints in a structure optimization protocol. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and structure determination of oxidized rubredoxin using the experimentally obtained paramagnetic NMR parameters of (15)N. The corresponding structures obtained are in good agreement with the crystal structure of rubredoxin. Thus, the NBO approach allows an accurate description of the geometric structure and the dynamics of metalloproteins, when NMR parameters are available of nuclei in the immediate vicinity of the metal-site.

  10. Accurate Structure and Dynamics of the Metal-Site of Paramagnetic Metalloproteins from NMR Parameters Using Natural Bond Orbitals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis of unpaired electron spin density in metalloproteins is presented, which allows a fast and robust calculation of paramagnetic NMR parameters. Approximately 90% of the unpaired electron spin density occupies metal–ligand NBOs, allowing the majority of the density to be modeled by only a few NBOs that reflect the chemical bonding environment. We show that the paramagnetic relaxation rate of protons can be calculated accurately using only the metal–ligand NBOs and that these rates are in good agreement with corresponding rates measured experimentally. This holds, in particular, for protons of ligand residues where the point-dipole approximation breaks down. To describe the paramagnetic relaxation of heavy nuclei, also the electron spin density in the local orbitals must be taken into account. Geometric distance restraints for 15N can be derived from the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and the Fermi contact shift when local NBOs are included in the analysis. Thus, the NBO approach allows us to include experimental paramagnetic NMR parameters of 15N nuclei as restraints in a structure optimization protocol. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and structure determination of oxidized rubredoxin using the experimentally obtained paramagnetic NMR parameters of 15N. The corresponding structures obtained are in good agreement with the crystal structure of rubredoxin. Thus, the NBO approach allows an accurate description of the geometric structure and the dynamics of metalloproteins, when NMR parameters are available of nuclei in the immediate vicinity of the metal-site. PMID:22329704

  11. GUIDANCE2: accurate detection of unreliable alignment regions accounting for the uncertainty of multiple parameters

    PubMed Central

    Sela, Itamar; Ashkenazy, Haim; Katoh, Kazutaka; Pupko, Tal

    2015-01-01

    Inference of multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) is a critical part of phylogenetic and comparative genomics studies. However, from the same set of sequences different MSAs are often inferred, depending on the methodologies used and the assumed parameters. Much effort has recently been devoted to improving the ability to identify unreliable alignment regions. Detecting such unreliable regions was previously shown to be important for downstream analyses relying on MSAs, such as the detection of positive selection. Here we developed GUIDANCE2, a new integrative methodology that accounts for: (i) uncertainty in the process of indel formation, (ii) uncertainty in the assumed guide tree and (iii) co-optimal solutions in the pairwise alignments, used as building blocks in progressive alignment algorithms. We compared GUIDANCE2 with seven methodologies to detect unreliable MSA regions using extensive simulations and empirical benchmarks. We show that GUIDANCE2 outperforms all previously developed methodologies. Furthermore, GUIDANCE2 also provides a set of alternative MSAs which can be useful for downstream analyses. The novel algorithm is implemented as a web-server, available at: http://guidance.tau.ac.il. PMID:25883146

  12. GUIDANCE2: accurate detection of unreliable alignment regions accounting for the uncertainty of multiple parameters.

    PubMed

    Sela, Itamar; Ashkenazy, Haim; Katoh, Kazutaka; Pupko, Tal

    2015-07-01

    Inference of multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) is a critical part of phylogenetic and comparative genomics studies. However, from the same set of sequences different MSAs are often inferred, depending on the methodologies used and the assumed parameters. Much effort has recently been devoted to improving the ability to identify unreliable alignment regions. Detecting such unreliable regions was previously shown to be important for downstream analyses relying on MSAs, such as the detection of positive selection. Here we developed GUIDANCE2, a new integrative methodology that accounts for: (i) uncertainty in the process of indel formation, (ii) uncertainty in the assumed guide tree and (iii) co-optimal solutions in the pairwise alignments, used as building blocks in progressive alignment algorithms. We compared GUIDANCE2 with seven methodologies to detect unreliable MSA regions using extensive simulations and empirical benchmarks. We show that GUIDANCE2 outperforms all previously developed methodologies. Furthermore, GUIDANCE2 also provides a set of alternative MSAs which can be useful for downstream analyses. The novel algorithm is implemented as a web-server, available at: http://guidance.tau.ac.il.

  13. Accurate Analytical and Statistical Approaches to Reduce O-C Discrepancies in the Precessional Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, M. J.; Marco, F. J.; López, J. A.

    2009-02-01

    The Hipparcos catalog provides a reference frame at optical wavelengths for the new International Celestial Reference System (ICRS). This new reference system was adopted following the resolution agreed at the 23rd IAU General Assembly held in Kyoto in 1997. Differences in the Hipparcos system of proper motions and the previous materialization of the reference frame, the FK5, are expected to be caused only by the combined effects of the motion of the equinox of the FK5 and the precession of the equator and the ecliptic. Several authors have pointed out an inconsistency between the differences in proper motion of the Hipparcos-FK5 and the correction of the precessional values derived from VLBI and lunar laser ranging (LLR) observations. Most of them have claimed that these discrepancies are due to slightly biased proper motions in the FK5 catalog. The different mathematical models that have been employed to explain these errors have not fully accounted for the discrepancies in the correction of the precessional parameters. Our goal here is to offer an explanation for this fact. We propose the use of independent parametric and nonparametric models. The introduction of a nonparametric model, combined with the inner product in the square integrable functions over the unitary sphere, would give us values which do not depend on the possible interdependencies existing in the data set. The evidence shows that zonal studies are needed. This would lead us to introduce a local nonparametric model. All these models will provide independent corrections to the precessional values, which could then be compared in order to study the reliability in each case. Finally, we obtain values for the precession corrections that are very consistent with those that are currently adopted.

  14. Homogeneous spectroscopic parameters for bright planet host stars from the northern hemisphere . The impact on stellar and planetary mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, S. G.; Santos, N. C.; Mortier, A.; Tsantaki, M.; Adibekyan, V.; Delgado Mena, E.; Israelian, G.; Rojas-Ayala, B.; Neves, V.

    2015-04-01

    Aims: In this work we derive new precise and homogeneous parameters for 37 stars with planets. For this purpose, we analyze high resolution spectra obtained by the NARVAL spectrograph for a sample composed of bright planet host stars in the northern hemisphere. The new parameters are included in the SWEET-Cat online catalogue. Methods: To ensure that the catalogue is homogeneous, we use our standard spectroscopic analysis procedure, ARES+MOOG, to derive effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities. These spectroscopic stellar parameters are then used as input to compute the stellar mass and radius, which are fundamental for the derivation of the planetary mass and radius. Results: We show that the spectroscopic parameters, masses, and radii are generally in good agreement with the values available in online databases of exoplanets. There are some exceptions, especially for the evolved stars. These are analyzed in detail focusing on the effect of the stellar mass on the derived planetary mass. Conclusions: We conclude that the stellar mass estimations for giant stars should be managed with extreme caution when using them to compute the planetary masses. We report examples within this sample where the differences in planetary mass can be as high as 100% in the most extreme cases. Based on observations obtained at the Telescope Bernard Lyot (USR5026) operated by the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées and the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France (Run ID L131N11 - OPTICON_2013A_027).

  15. Accurate ab initio potential energy curves and spectroscopic properties of the four lowest singlet states of C2

    SciTech Connect

    Boschen, Jeffery S.; Theis, Daniel; Ruedenberg, Klaus; Windus, Theresa L.

    2013-12-07

    The diatomic carbon molecule has a complex electronic structure with a large number of low-lying electronic excited states. In this work, the potential energy curves (PECs) of the four lowest lying singlet states (X-1 Sigma(+)(g), A(1)Pi(u), B-1 Delta(g), and B'(1)Sigma(+)(g)) were obtained by high-level ab initio calculations. Valence electron correlation was accounted for by the correlation energy extrapolation by intrinsic scaling (CEEIS) method. Additional corrections to the PECs included core-valence correlation and relativistic effects. Spin-orbit corrections were found to be insignificant. The impact of using dynamically weighted reference wave functions in conjunction with CEEIS was examined and found to give indistinguishable results from the even weighted method. The PECs showed multiple curve crossings due to the B-1 Delta(g) state as well as an avoided crossing between the two (1)Sigma(+)(g) states. Vibrational energy levels were computed for each of the four electronic states, as well as rotational constants and spectroscopic parameters. Comparison between the theoretical and experimental results showed excellent agreement overall. Equilibrium bond distances are reproduced to within 0.05 %. The dissociation energies of the states agree with experiment to within similar to 0.5 kcal/mol, achieving "chemical accuracy." Vibrational energy levels show average deviations of similar to 20 cm(-1) or less. The B-1 Delta(g) state shows the best agreement with a mean absolute deviation of 2.41 cm(-1). Calculated rotational constants exhibit very good agreement with experiment, as do the spectroscopic constants.

  16. A Weibull statistics-based lignocellulose saccharification model and a built-in parameter accurately predict lignocellulose hydrolysis performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingyu; Han, Lijuan; Liu, Shasha; Zhao, Xuebing; Yang, Jinghua; Loh, Soh Kheang; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Chenxi; Fang, Xu

    2015-09-01

    Renewable energy from lignocellulosic biomass has been deemed an alternative to depleting fossil fuels. In order to improve this technology, we aim to develop robust mathematical models for the enzymatic lignocellulose degradation process. By analyzing 96 groups of previously published and newly obtained lignocellulose saccharification results and fitting them to Weibull distribution, we discovered Weibull statistics can accurately predict lignocellulose saccharification data, regardless of the type of substrates, enzymes and saccharification conditions. A mathematical model for enzymatic lignocellulose degradation was subsequently constructed based on Weibull statistics. Further analysis of the mathematical structure of the model and experimental saccharification data showed the significance of the two parameters in this model. In particular, the λ value, defined the characteristic time, represents the overall performance of the saccharification system. This suggestion was further supported by statistical analysis of experimental saccharification data and analysis of the glucose production levels when λ and n values change. In conclusion, the constructed Weibull statistics-based model can accurately predict lignocellulose hydrolysis behavior and we can use the λ parameter to assess the overall performance of enzymatic lignocellulose degradation. Advantages and potential applications of the model and the λ value in saccharification performance assessment were discussed.

  17. A Weibull statistics-based lignocellulose saccharification model and a built-in parameter accurately predict lignocellulose hydrolysis performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingyu; Han, Lijuan; Liu, Shasha; Zhao, Xuebing; Yang, Jinghua; Loh, Soh Kheang; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Chenxi; Fang, Xu

    2015-09-01

    Renewable energy from lignocellulosic biomass has been deemed an alternative to depleting fossil fuels. In order to improve this technology, we aim to develop robust mathematical models for the enzymatic lignocellulose degradation process. By analyzing 96 groups of previously published and newly obtained lignocellulose saccharification results and fitting them to Weibull distribution, we discovered Weibull statistics can accurately predict lignocellulose saccharification data, regardless of the type of substrates, enzymes and saccharification conditions. A mathematical model for enzymatic lignocellulose degradation was subsequently constructed based on Weibull statistics. Further analysis of the mathematical structure of the model and experimental saccharification data showed the significance of the two parameters in this model. In particular, the λ value, defined the characteristic time, represents the overall performance of the saccharification system. This suggestion was further supported by statistical analysis of experimental saccharification data and analysis of the glucose production levels when λ and n values change. In conclusion, the constructed Weibull statistics-based model can accurately predict lignocellulose hydrolysis behavior and we can use the λ parameter to assess the overall performance of enzymatic lignocellulose degradation. Advantages and potential applications of the model and the λ value in saccharification performance assessment were discussed. PMID:26121186

  18. Optimization of tissue physical parameters for accurate temperature estimation from finite-element simulation of radiofrequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Swetha; Mast, T. Douglas

    2015-09-01

    Computational finite element models are commonly used for the simulation of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatments. However, the accuracy of these simulations is limited by the lack of precise knowledge of tissue parameters. In this technical note, an inverse solver based on the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is proposed to optimize values for specific heat, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity resulting in accurately simulated temperature elevations. A total of 15 RFA treatments were performed on ex vivo bovine liver tissue. For each RFA treatment, 15 finite-element simulations were performed using a set of deterministically chosen tissue parameters to estimate the mean and variance of the resulting tissue ablation. The UKF was implemented as an inverse solver to recover the specific heat, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity corresponding to the measured area of the ablated tissue region, as determined from gross tissue histology. These tissue parameters were then employed in the finite element model to simulate the position- and time-dependent tissue temperature. Results show good agreement between simulated and measured temperature.

  19. Optimization of tissue physical parameters for accurate temperature estimation from finite-element simulation of radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Swetha; Mast, T Douglas

    2015-10-01

    Computational finite element models are commonly used for the simulation of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatments. However, the accuracy of these simulations is limited by the lack of precise knowledge of tissue parameters. In this technical note, an inverse solver based on the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is proposed to optimize values for specific heat, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity resulting in accurately simulated temperature elevations. A total of 15 RFA treatments were performed on ex vivo bovine liver tissue. For each RFA treatment, 15 finite-element simulations were performed using a set of deterministically chosen tissue parameters to estimate the mean and variance of the resulting tissue ablation. The UKF was implemented as an inverse solver to recover the specific heat, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity corresponding to the measured area of the ablated tissue region, as determined from gross tissue histology. These tissue parameters were then employed in the finite element model to simulate the position- and time-dependent tissue temperature. Results show good agreement between simulated and measured temperature. PMID:26352462

  20. Spectroscopic Parameters of H2S Polyads Between 3400 and 8000 cm x 10 to -1 exponent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bykov, A. D.; Naumenko, O. V.; Smirnov, M. A.; Sinitsa, L. N.; Perrin, A.; Crisp, J.; Crisp, D.; Brown, L. R.

    1995-01-01

    The absorption spectra of hydrogen sulfide from 0.8 to 5 micro- meters were recorded with three spectral resolutions using the Fourier transform spectrometer at Kitt Peak National Observatory. Twenty bands were previously assigned so that accurate band origins and vi- brational parameters could be determined. Described are the analyses of the rotational structure of resonating hydrogen sulfide states.

  1. Pair Identity and Smooth Variation Rules Applicable for the Spectroscopic Parameters of H2O Transitions Involving High-J States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Q.; Tipping, R. H.; Lavrentieva, N. N.

    2010-01-01

    Two basic rules (i.e. the pair identity and the smooth variation) applicable for H2O transitions involving high-J states have been discovered. The origins of these rules are the properties of the energy levels and wavefunctions of H2O states with the quantum number J above certain boundaries. As a result, for lines involving high-J states in individually defined groups, all their spectroscopic parameters (i.e. the transition wavenumber, intensity, pressure-broadened half-width, pressure-induced shift, and temperature exponent) must follow these rules. One can use these rules to screen spectroscopic data provided by databases and to identify possible errors. In addition, by using extrapolation methods within the individual groups, one is able to predict the spectroscopic parameters for lines in this group involving very high-J states. The latter are required in developing high-temperature molecular spectroscopic databases such as HITEMP.

  2. Influence of vapor transport equilibration on spectroscopic parameters of Er3+ in LiNbO3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, De-Long; Wang, Dun-Chun; Pun, E. Y. B.

    2005-05-01

    A number of X-, Y- and Z-cut Er(/Yb):LiNbO3 crystals with six different doping levels of rare earth ions were annealed at 1110 °C for 120 h using the vapor transport equilibration (VTE) technique. At room temperature, -polarized or unpolarized absorption spectra of these VTE-treated crystals and corresponding as-grown crystals were recorded in the wavelength range 280-1700 nm. The absorption characteristics of the VTE-treated crystals are summarized and compared with those of the as-grown crystals. The (Li+ + RE3+)/Nb5+(RE3+ = Er3+ or Er3+ + Yb3+) ratios in the VTE-treated Er(/Yb):LiNbO3 crystals were evaluated using the optical absorption edge or Raman linewidth of the 153 cm-1 E(TO) phonon. Based upon the measured spectral data, spectroscopic parameters of Er3+ ions in as-grown and VTE-treated crystals were calculated using the Judd-Ofelt (J-O) theory. The influences of Er3+ doping level, type of crystal cut and VTE treatment on the key spectroscopic parameters, including integrated absorption coefficient, oscillator strength, J-O parameters and radiative lifetimes of three dominant emission manifolds (4I13/2 (1530 nm), 4F9/2 (660 nm) and 4S3/2 (560 nm)), are discussed and summarized and compared with the results for as-grown crystals. The results for as-grown crystals are also compared with those reported previously. The present theoretical result concerning the VTE effect on the 1530 nm lifetime is in rough agreement with the experimental result reported previously.

  3. Spectroscopic line parameters for the nu6 band of carbonyl fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Aaron; Blatherwick, Ronald D.; Bonomo, Francis S.; Rinsland, Curtis P.

    1990-01-01

    New measurements and analysis of high-resolution (0.0025/cm) laboratory spectra of the carbonyl fluoride nu6 band are described. The data are used to generate line parameters suitable for high-resolution atmospheric studies.

  4. An in-line micro-pyrolysis system to remove contaminating organic species for precise and accurate water isotope analysis by spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetta, R. J.; Hsiao, G.

    2011-12-01

    Trace levels of organic contaminants such as short alcohols and terpenoids have been shown to cause spectral interference in water isotope analysis by spectroscopic techniques. The result is degraded precision and accuracy in both δD and δ18O for samples such as beverages, plant extracts or slightly contaminated waters. An initial approach offered by manufacturers is post-processing software that analyzes spectral features to identify and flag contaminated samples. However, it is impossible for this software to accurately reconstruct the water isotope signature, thus it is primarily a metric for data quality. Here, we describe a novel in-line pyrolysis system (Micro-Pyrolysis Technology, MPT) placed just prior to the inlet of a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzer that effectively removes interfering organic molecules without altering the isotope values of the water. Following injection of the water sample, N2 carrier gas passes the sample through a micro-pyrolysis tube heated with multiple high temperature elements in an oxygen-free environment. The temperature is maintained above the thermal decomposition threshold of most organic compounds (≤ 900 oC), but well below that of water (~2000 oC). The main products of the pyrolysis reaction are non-interfering species such as elemental carbon and H2 gas. To test the efficacy and applicability of the system, waters of known isotopic composition were spiked with varying amounts of common interfering alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol, hexanol, trans-2-hexenol, cis-3-hexanol up to 5 % v/v) and common soluble plant terpenoids (carveol, linalool, geraniol, prenol). Spiked samples with no treatment to remove the organics show strong interfering absorption peaks that adversely affect the δD and δ18O values. However, with the MPT in place, all interfering absorption peaks are removed and the water absorption spectrum is fully restored. As a consequence, the δD and δ18O values also return to their original

  5. HIGH-PRECISION ORBITAL AND PHYSICAL PARAMETERS OF DOUBLE-LINED SPECTROSCOPIC BINARY STARS-HD78418, HD123999, HD160922, HD200077, AND HD210027

    SciTech Connect

    Konacki, Maciej; Helminiak, Krzysztof G.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    2010-08-20

    We present high-precision radial velocities (RVs) of double-lined spectroscopic binary stars HD78418, HD123999, HD160922, HD200077, and HD210027. They were obtained based on the high-resolution echelle spectra collected with the Keck I/HIRES, Shane/CAT/Hamspec, and TNG/Sarge telescopes/spectrographs over the years 2003-2008 as part of the TATOOINE search for circumbinary planets. The RVs were computed using our novel iodine cell technique for double-line binary stars, which relies on tomographically disentangled spectra of the components of the binaries. The precision of the RVs is of the order of 1-10 m s{sup -1}, and to properly model such measurements one needs to account for the light-time effect within the binary's orbit, relativistic effects, and RV variations due to tidal distortions of the components of the binaries. With such proper modeling, our RVs combined with the archival visibility measurements from the Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI) allow us to derive very precise spectroscopic/astrometric orbital and physical parameters of the binaries. In particular, we derive the masses, the absolute K- and H-band magnitudes, and the parallaxes. The masses together with the absolute magnitudes in the K and H bands enable us to estimate the ages of the binaries. These RVs allow us to obtain some of the most accurate mass determinations of binary stars. The fractional accuracy in msin i only, and hence based on the RVs alone, ranges from 0.02% to 0.42%. When combined with the PTI astrometry, the fractional accuracy in the masses in the three best cases ranges from 0.06% to 0.5%. Among them, the masses of HD210027 components rival in precision the mass determination of the components of the relativistic double pulsar system PSR J0737 - 3039. In the near future, for double-lined eclipsing binary stars we expect to derive masses with a fractional accuracy of the order of up to {approx}0.001% with our technique. This level of precision is an order of magnitude

  6. Effects of membrane physical parameters on hematoporphyrin-derivative binding to liposomes: a spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, E.; Malik, Z.; Ehrenberg, B.

    1987-01-01

    Physical parameters of membrane bilayers were studied for their effect on the binding of hematoporphyrin derivative (Hpd), which is used as a sensitizer in photodynamic therapy of cancerous tissues. The purpose of this study was to clarify which parameters were relevant, under physiological conditions, to the selectivity of Hpd binding to cancer cells. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to measure the relative partitioning of the dye between the lipid and aqueous media. Increasing the microviscosity of the liposomes' membranes by various bilayer additives results in a strong reduction of Hpd binding, to an extent independent of the specific additive. The effect of temperature near the physiological value as well as the effect of cross membrane potential are small. Surface potential does not affect the binding constant, indicating that the binding species does not carry a net electric charge.

  7. Multiple Populations in Globular Clusters: Spectroscopic Evidences and the Horizontal Branch Second Parameter Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, Raffaele

    2012-05-01

    A wealth of recent data indicate that globular clusters hosts multiple stellar populations. Spectroscopy allows a deep insight into their very early phases of formation. Also, they allow to clarify long standing issues like the second parameter affecting the morphology of the horizontal branch. We found that this is due to a combination of mainly two effects: variations in the age of individual clusters and the existence of populations with different He abundances within clusters. We discuss direct and indirect evidences for this.

  8. A spectroscopic study of southern (candidate) γ Doradus stars. II. Detailed abundance analysis and fundamental parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruntt, H.; De Cat, P.; Aerts, C.

    2008-02-01

    Context: The γ Doradus stars are a recent class of variable main sequence F-type stars located on the red edge of the Cepheid instability strip. They pulsate in gravity modes, and this makes them particularly interesting for detailed asteroseismic analysis, which can provide fundamental knowledge of properties near the convective cores of intermediate-mass main sequence stars. Aims: To improve current understanding of γ Dor stars through theoretical modelling, additional constraints are needed. Our aim is to estimate the fundamental atmospheric parameters and determine the chemical composition of these stars. Detailed analyses of single stars have previously suggested links to Am and λ Boo stars, so we wish to explore this interesting connection between chemical peculiarity and pulsation. Methods: We analysed a sample of γ Dor stars for the first time, including nine bona fide and three candidate members of the class. We determined the fundamental atmospheric parameters and compared the abundance pattern with other A-type stars. We used the semi-automatic software package VWA for the analysis. This code relies on the calculation of synthetic spectra and thus takes line-blending into account. This is important because of the fast rotation in some of the sample stars, and we made a thorough analysis of how VWA performs when increasing v sin i. We obtained good results in agreement with previously derived fundamental parameters and abundances in a few selected reference stars with properties similar to the γ Dor stars. Results: We find that the abundance pattern in the γ Dor stars is not distinct from the constant A- and F-type stars we analysed. Appendices A and B are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Spectroscopic line parameters of NH3 and PH3 in the far infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Husson, N.; Goldman, A.; Orton, G.

    1982-01-01

    NH3 and PH3 rotation and rotation-inversion line parameters in the far to medium IR are calculated for remote sounding purposes of planetary atmospheres; 1607 lines of (N-14)H3, 362 lines of (N-15)H3 and 325 lines of PH3 are compiled. The absolute intensity formulation has been reviewed in the case of rotation and rotation-inversion lines of molecules with C(3v) symmetry. The justification for the general agreement between the authors, and comparisons with other published expressions are given.

  10. Infrared Spectroscope for Electron Bunch-length Measurement: Heat Sensor Parameters Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Domgmo-Momo, Gilles; /Towson U. /SLAC

    2012-09-05

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is used for many experiments. Taking advantage of the free electron laser (FEL) process, scientists of various fields perform experiments of all kind. Some for example study protein folding; other experiments are more interested in the way electrons interact with the molecules before they are destroyed. These experiments among many others have very little information about the electrons x-ray produced by the FEL, except that the FEL is using bunches less than 10 femtoseconds long. To be able to interpret the data collected from those experiments, more accurate information is needed about the electron's bunch-length. Existing bunch length measurement techniques are not suitable for the measurement of such small time scales. Hence the need to design a device that will provide more precise information about the electron bunch length. This paper investigates the use of a pyreoelectric heat sensor that has a sensitivity of about 1.34 micro amps per watt for the single cell detector. Such sensitivity, added to the fact that the detector is an array sensor, makes the detector studied the primary candidate to be integrated to an infrared spectrometer designed to better measure the LCLS electron bunch length.

  11. Impact of Spectroscopic Line Parameters on Carbon Monoxide Column Density Retrievals from Shortwave Infrared Nadir Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Denise; Gimeno Garcia, Sebastian; Schreier, Franz; Lichtenberg, Gunter

    2015-06-01

    Among the various input data required for the retrieval of atmospheric state parameters from infrared remote sensing observations molecular spectroscopy line data have a central role, because their quality is critical for the quality of the final product. Here we discuss the impact of the line parameters on vertical column densities (VCD) estimated from short wave infrared nadir observations. Using BIRRA (the Beer InfraRed Retrieval Algorithm) comprising a line-by-line radiative transfer code (forward model) and a separable nonlinear least squares solver for inversion we retrieve carbon monoxide from observations of SCIAMACHY aboard Envisat. Retrievals using recent versions of HITRAN und GEISA have been performed and the results are compared in terms of residual norms, molecular density scaling factors, their corresponding errors, and the final VCD product. The retrievals turn out to be quite similar for all three databases, so a definite recommendation in favor of one of these databases is difficult for the considered spectral range around 2:3 μm . Nevertheless, HITRAN 2012 appears to be advantageous when evaluating the different quality criteria.

  12. Determination of molecular spectroscopic parameters and energy-transfer rates by double-resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinfeld, J. I.; Foy, B.; Hetzler, J.; Flannery, C.; Klaassen, J.; Mizugai, Y.; Coy, S.

    1990-01-01

    The spectroscopy of small to medium-size polyatomic molecules can be extremely complex, especially in higher-lying overtone and combination vibrational levels. The high density of levels also complicates the understanding of inelastic collision processes, which is required to model energy transfer and collision broadening of spectral lines. Both of these problems can be addressed by double-resonance spectroscopy, i.e., time-resolved pump-probe measurements using microwave, infrared, near-infrared, and visible-wavelength sources. Information on excited-state spectroscopy, transition moments, inelastic energy transfer rates and propensity rules, and pressure-broadening parameters may be obtained from such experiments. Examples are given for several species of importance in planetary atmospheres, including ozone, silane, ethane, and ammonia.

  13. Spectroscopic Investigation of a Dielectric Barrier Discharge Over a Wide Range of Pulse Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Julian; Prager, James; Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Kenneth E.; Hashim, Akel

    2015-09-01

    Most high voltage pulser used to drive dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs), produce a single pulse shape (width and voltage), thus making it challenging to assess the effect of pulse shape on the production of different chemical species during a discharge. Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT), Inc. has developed a nanosecond pulser that allows for independent control of the output voltage, pulse width, and pulse repetition frequency. Through the utilization of this technology, presented here is a precise characterization of reactive species generated by the DBD under the independent variation of voltage (0-20 kV), frequency (0-20 kHz) and pulse width (20-260 ns). A better understanding of this parameter dependency can allow for more targeted and effective application of plasma in medical, environmental, industrial, and other applications.

  14. Spectroscopic parameters of the cuticle and ethanol extracts of the fluorescent cave isopod Mesoniscus graniger (Isopoda, Oniscidea)

    PubMed Central

    Giurginca, Andrei; Šustr, Vladimír; Tajovský, Karel; Giurginca, Maria; Matei, Iulia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The body surface of the terrestrial isopod Mesoniscus graniger (Frivaldsky, 1863) showed blue autofluorescence under UV light (330–385 nm), using epifluorescence microscopy and also in living individuals under a UV lamp with excitation light of 365 nm. Some morphological cuticular structures expressed a more intense autofluorescence than other body parts. For this reason, only the cuticle was analyzed. The parameters of autofluorescence were investigated using spectroscopic methods (molecular spectroscopy in infrared, ultraviolet-visible, fluorescence, and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy) in samples of two subspecies of Mesoniscus graniger preserved in ethanol. Samples excited by UV light (from 350 to 380 nm) emitted blue light of wavelengths 419, 420, 441, 470 and 505 nm (solid phase) and 420, 435 and 463 (ethanol extract). The results showed that the autofluorescence observed from living individuals may be due to some β-carboline or coumarin derivatives, some crosslinking structures, dityrosine, or due to other compounds showing similar excitation-emission characteristics. PMID:26261444

  15. A spectroscopic survey of Herbig Ae/Be stars with X-shooter - I. Stellar parameters and accretion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairlamb, J. R.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; Mendigutía, I.; Ilee, J. D.; van den Ancker, M. E.

    2015-10-01

    Herbig Ae/Be stars (HAeBes) span a key mass range that links low- and high-mass stars, and thus provide an ideal window from which to explore their formation. This paper presents Very Large Telescope/X-shooter spectra of 91 HAeBes, the largest spectroscopic study of HAeBe accretion to date. A homogeneous approach to determining stellar parameters is undertaken for the majority of the sample. Measurements of the ultraviolet are modelled within the context of magnetospheric accretion, allowing a direct determination of mass accretion rates. Multiple correlations are observed across the sample between accretion and stellar properties: the youngest and often most massive stars are the strongest accretors, and there is an almost 1:1 relationship between the accretion luminosity and stellar luminosity. Despite these overall trends of increased accretion rates in HAeBes when compared to classical T Tauri stars, we also find noticeable differences in correlations when considering the Herbig Ae and Herbig Be subsets. This, combined with the difficulty in applying a magnetospheric accretion model to some of the Herbig Be stars, could suggest that another form of accretion may be occurring within Herbig Be mass range.

  16. Radiative heating and cooling in the middle and lower atmosphere of Venus and responses to atmospheric and spectroscopic parameter variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haus, R.; Kappel, D.; Arnold, G.

    2015-11-01

    A sophisticated radiative transfer model that considers absorption, emission, and multiple scattering by gaseous and particulate constituents over the broad spectral range 0.125-1000 μm is applied to calculate radiative fluxes and temperature change rates in the middle and lower atmosphere of Venus (0-100 km). Responses of these quantities to spectroscopic and atmospheric parameter variations are examined in great detail. Spectroscopic parameter studies include the definition of an optimum spectral grid for monochromatic calculations as well as comparisons for different input data with respect to spectral line databases, continuum absorption, line shape factors, and solar irradiance spectra. Atmospheric parameter studies are based on distinct variations of an initial model data set. Analyses of actual variations of the radiative energy budget using atmospheric features that have been recently retrieved from Venus Express data will be subject of a subsequent paper. The calculated cooling (heating) rates are very reliable at altitudes below 95 (85) km with maximum uncertainties of about 0.25 K/day. Heating uncertainties may reach 3-5 K/day at 100 km. Using equivalent Planck radiation as solar insolation source in place of measured spectra is not recommended. Cooling rates strongly respond to variations of atmospheric thermal structure, while heating rates are less sensitive. The influence of mesospheric minor gas variations is small, but may become more important near the cloud base and in case of episodic SO2 boosts. Responses to cloud mode 1 particle abundance changes are weak, but variations of other mode parameters (abundances, cloud top and base altitudes) may significantly alter radiative temperature change rates up to 50% in Venus' lower mesosphere and upper troposphere. A new model for the unknown UV absorber for two altitude domains is proposed. It is not directly linked to cloud particle modes and permits an investigation of radiative effects regardless of

  17. Accurate dipole moment curve and non-adiabatic effects on the high resolution spectroscopic properties of the LiH molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniz, Leonardo G.; Kirnosov, Nikita; Alijah, Alexander; Mohallem, José R.; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2016-04-01

    A very accurate dipole moment curve (DMC) for the ground X1Σ+ electronic state of the 7LiH molecule is reported. It is calculated with the use of all-particle explicitly correlated Gaussian functions with shifted centers. The DMC - the most accurate to our knowledge - and the corresponding highly accurate potential energy curve are used to calculate the transition energies, the transition dipole moments, and the Einstein coefficients for the rovibrational transitions with ΔJ = - 1 and Δv ⩽ 5 . The importance of the non-adiabatic effects in determining these properties is evaluated using the model of a vibrational R-dependent effective reduced mass in the rovibrational calculations introduced earlier (Diniz et al., 2015). The results of the present calculations are used to assess the quality of the two complete linelists of 7LiH available in the literature.

  18. Numerical parameter constraints for accurate PIC-DSMC simulation of breakdown from arc initiation to stable arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Christopher; Hopkins, Matthew; Moore, Stan; Boerner, Jeremiah; Cartwright, Keith

    2015-09-01

    Simulation of breakdown is important for understanding and designing a variety of applications such as mitigating undesirable discharge events. Such simulations need to be accurate through early time arc initiation to late time stable arc behavior. Here we examine constraints on the timestep and mesh size required for arc simulations using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method with direct simulation Monte Carlo (DMSC) collisions. Accurate simulation of electron avalanche across a fixed voltage drop and constant neutral density (reduced field of 1000 Td) was found to require a timestep ~ 1/100 of the mean time between collisions and a mesh size ~ 1/25 the mean free path. These constraints are much smaller than the typical PIC-DSMC requirements for timestep and mesh size. Both constraints are related to the fact that charged particles are accelerated by the external field. Thus gradients in the electron energy distribution function can exist at scales smaller than the mean free path and these must be resolved by the mesh size for accurate collision rates. Additionally, the timestep must be small enough that the particle energy change due to the fields be small in order to capture gradients in the cross sections versus energy. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. A non-empirical, parameter-free, hybrid functional for accurate calculations of optoelectronic properties of finite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brawand, Nicholas; Vörös, Márton; Govoni, Marco; Galli, Giulia

    The accurate prediction of optoelectronic properties of molecules and solids is a persisting challenge for current density functional theory (DFT) based methods. We propose a hybrid functional where the mixing fraction of exact and local exchange is determined by a non-empirical, system dependent function. This functional yields ionization potentials, fundamental and optical gaps of many, diverse systems in excellent agreement with experiments, including organic and inorganic molecules and nanocrystals. We further demonstrate that the newly defined hybrid functional gives the correct alignment between the energy level of the exemplary TTF-TCNQ donor-acceptor system. DOE-BES: DE-FG02-06ER46262.

  20. CC/DFT Route toward Accurate Structures and Spectroscopic Features for Observed and Elusive Conformers of Flexible Molecules: Pyruvic Acid as a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Barone, Vincenzo; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien; Cimino, Paola; Penocchio, Emanuele; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    The structures and relative stabilities as well as the rotational and vibrational spectra of the three low-energy conformers of pyruvic acid (PA) have been characterized using a state-of-the-art quantum-mechanical approach designed for flexible molecules. By making use of the available experimental rotational constants for several isotopologues of the most stable PA conformer, Tc-PA, the semiexperimental equilibrium structure has been derived. The latter provides a reference for the pure theoretical determination of the equilibrium geometries for all conformers, thus confirming for these structures an accuracy of 0.001 Å and 0.1 deg for bond lengths and angles, respectively. Highly accurate relative energies of all conformers (Tc-, Tt-, and Ct-PA) and of the transition states connecting them are provided along with the thermodynamic properties at low and high temperatures, thus leading to conformational enthalpies accurate to 1 kJ mol(-1). Concerning microwave spectroscopy, rotational constants accurate to about 20 MHz are provided for the Tt- and Ct-PA conformers, together with the computed centrifugal-distortion constants and dipole moments required to simulate their rotational spectra. For Ct-PA, vibrational frequencies in the mid-infrared region accurate to 10 cm(-1) are reported along with theoretical estimates for the transitions in the near-infrared range, and the corresponding infrared spectrum including fundamental transitions, overtones, and combination bands has been simulated. In addition to the new data described above, theoretical results for the Tc- and Tt-PA conformers are compared with all available experimental data to further confirm the accuracy of the hybrid coupled-cluster/density functional theory (CC/DFT) protocol applied in the present study. Finally, we discuss in detail the accuracy of computational models fully based on double-hybrid DFT functionals (mainly at the B2PLYP/aug-cc-pVTZ level) that avoid the use of very expensive CC

  1. CC/DFT Route toward Accurate Structures and Spectroscopic Features for Observed and Elusive Conformers of Flexible Molecules: Pyruvic Acid as a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Barone, Vincenzo; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien; Cimino, Paola; Penocchio, Emanuele; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    The structures and relative stabilities as well as the rotational and vibrational spectra of the three low-energy conformers of pyruvic acid (PA) have been characterized using a state-of-the-art quantum-mechanical approach designed for flexible molecules. By making use of the available experimental rotational constants for several isotopologues of the most stable PA conformer, Tc-PA, the semiexperimental equilibrium structure has been derived. The latter provides a reference for the pure theoretical determination of the equilibrium geometries for all conformers, thus confirming for these structures an accuracy of 0.001 Å and 0.1 deg for bond lengths and angles, respectively. Highly accurate relative energies of all conformers (Tc-, Tt-, and Ct-PA) and of the transition states connecting them are provided along with the thermodynamic properties at low and high temperatures, thus leading to conformational enthalpies accurate to 1 kJ mol(-1). Concerning microwave spectroscopy, rotational constants accurate to about 20 MHz are provided for the Tt- and Ct-PA conformers, together with the computed centrifugal-distortion constants and dipole moments required to simulate their rotational spectra. For Ct-PA, vibrational frequencies in the mid-infrared region accurate to 10 cm(-1) are reported along with theoretical estimates for the transitions in the near-infrared range, and the corresponding infrared spectrum including fundamental transitions, overtones, and combination bands has been simulated. In addition to the new data described above, theoretical results for the Tc- and Tt-PA conformers are compared with all available experimental data to further confirm the accuracy of the hybrid coupled-cluster/density functional theory (CC/DFT) protocol applied in the present study. Finally, we discuss in detail the accuracy of computational models fully based on double-hybrid DFT functionals (mainly at the B2PLYP/aug-cc-pVTZ level) that avoid the use of very expensive CC

  2. Towards an accurate specific reaction parameter density functional for water dissociation on Ni(111): RPBE versus PW91.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2016-08-01

    In search for an accurate description of the dissociative chemisorption of water on the Ni(111) surface, we report a new nine-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) based on a large number of density functional theory points using the RPBE functional. Seven-dimensional quantum dynamical calculations have been carried out on the RPBE PES, followed by site averaging and lattice effect corrections, yielding sticking probabilities that are compared with both the previous theoretical results based on a PW91 PES and experiment. It is shown that the RPBE functional increases the reaction barrier, but has otherwise a minor impact on the PES topography. Better agreement with experimental results is obtained with the new PES, but the agreement is still not quantitative. Possible sources of the remaining discrepancies are discussed.

  3. Line parameter study of ozone at 5 and 10 μm using atmospheric FTIR spectra from the ground: A spectroscopic database and wavelength region comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Christof; Boursier, Corinne; Jeseck, Pascal; Té, Yao

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric ozone concentration measurements mostly depend on spectroscopic methods that cover different spectral regions. Despite long years of measurement efforts, the uncertainty goal of 1% in absolute line intensities has not yet been reached. Multispectral inter-comparisons using both laboratory and atmospheric studies reveal that important discrepancies exist when ozone columns are retrieved from different spectral regions. Here, we use ground based FTIR to study the sensitivity of ozone columns on different spectroscopic parameters as a function of individual bands for identifying necessary improvements of the spectroscopic databases. In particular, we examine the degree of consistency that can be reached in ozone retrievals using spectral windows in the 5 and 10 μm bands of ozone. Based on the atmospheric spectra, a detailed database inter-comparison between HITRAN (version 2012), GEISA (version 2011) and S&MPO (as retrieved from the website at the end of 2015) is made. Data from the 10 μm window are consistent to better than 1%, but there are larger differences when the windows at 5 μm are included. The 5 μm results agree with the results from 10 μm within ±2% for all databases. Recent S&MPO data are even more consistent with the desired level of 1%, but spectroscopic data from HITRAN give about 4% higher ozone columns than those from GEISA. If four sub-windows in the 5 μm band are checked for consistency, retrievals using GEISA or S&MPO parameters show less dispersion than those using HITRAN, where one window in the P-branch of the ν1 + ν3 band gives about 2% lower results than the other three. The atmospheric observations are corroborated by a direct comparison of the spectroscopic databases, using a simple statistical analysis based on intensity weighted spectroscopic parameters. The bias introduced by the weighted average approach is investigated and it is negligible if relative differences between databases do not correlate with line

  4. Accurate determination of interface trap state parameters by admittance spectroscopy in the presence of a Schottky barrier contact: Application to ZnO-based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Andrew T.; Musselman, Kevin P.; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.

    2013-04-01

    This work shows that when a Schottky barrier is present in a photovoltaic device, such as in a device with an ITO/ZnO contact, equivalent circuit analysis must be performed with admittance spectroscopy to accurately determine the pn junction interface recombination parameters (i.e., capture cross section and density of trap states). Without equivalent circuit analysis, a Schottky barrier can produce an error of ˜4-orders of magnitude in the capture cross section and ˜50% error in the measured density of trap states. Using a solution processed ZnO/Cu2O photovoltaic test system, we apply our analysis to clearly separate the contributions of interface states at the pn junction from the Schottky barrier at the ITO/ZnO contact so that the interface state recombination parameters can be accurately characterized. This work is widely applicable to the multitude of photovoltaic devices, which use ZnO adjacent to ITO.

  5. A two-parameter kinetic model based on a time-dependent activity coefficient accurately describes enzymatic cellulose digestion

    PubMed Central

    Kostylev, Maxim; Wilson, David

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a potential source of renewable, low-carbon-footprint liquid fuels. Biomass recalcitrance and enzyme cost are key challenges associated with the large-scale production of cellulosic fuel. Kinetic modeling of enzymatic cellulose digestion has been complicated by the heterogeneous nature of the substrate and by the fact that a true steady state cannot be attained. We present a two-parameter kinetic model based on the Michaelis-Menten scheme (Michaelis L and Menten ML. (1913) Biochem Z 49:333–369), but with a time-dependent activity coefficient analogous to fractal-like kinetics formulated by Kopelman (Kopelman R. (1988) Science 241:1620–1626). We provide a mathematical derivation and experimental support to show that one of the parameters is a total activity coefficient and the other is an intrinsic constant that reflects the ability of the cellulases to overcome substrate recalcitrance. The model is applicable to individual cellulases and their mixtures at low-to-medium enzyme loads. Using biomass degrading enzymes from a cellulolytic bacterium Thermobifida fusca we show that the model can be used for mechanistic studies of enzymatic cellulose digestion. We also demonstrate that it applies to the crude supernatant of the widely studied cellulolytic fungus Trichoderma reesei and can thus be used to compare cellulases from different organisms. The two parameters may serve a similar role to Vmax, KM, and kcat in classical kinetics. A similar approach may be applicable to other enzymes with heterogeneous substrates and where a steady state is not achievable. PMID:23837567

  6. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS: Accurate metamodels of device parameters and their applications in performance modeling and optimization of analog integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Liang; Xinzhang, Jia; Junfeng, Chen

    2009-11-01

    Techniques for constructing metamodels of device parameters at BSIM3v3 level accuracy are presented to improve knowledge-based circuit sizing optimization. Based on the analysis of the prediction error of analytical performance expressions, operating point driven (OPD) metamodels of MOSFETs are introduced to capture the circuit's characteristics precisely. In the algorithm of metamodel construction, radial basis functions are adopted to interpolate the scattered multivariate data obtained from a well tailored data sampling scheme designed for MOSFETs. The OPD metamodels can be used to automatically bias the circuit at a specific DC operating point. Analytical-based performance expressions composed by the OPD metamodels show obvious improvement for most small-signal performances compared with simulation-based models. Both operating-point variables and transistor dimensions can be optimized in our nesting-loop optimization formulation to maximize design flexibility. The method is successfully applied to a low-voltage low-power amplifier.

  7. Petermann I and II spot size: Accurate semi analytical description involving Nelder-Mead method of nonlinear unconstrained optimization and three parameter fundamental modal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Choudhury, Raja; Roy Choudhury, Arundhati; Kanti Ghose, Mrinal

    2013-01-01

    A semi-analytical model with three optimizing parameters and a novel non-Gaussian function as the fundamental modal field solution has been proposed to arrive at an accurate solution to predict various propagation parameters of graded-index fibers with less computational burden than numerical methods. In our semi analytical formulation the optimization of core parameter U which is usually uncertain, noisy or even discontinuous, is being calculated by Nelder-Mead method of nonlinear unconstrained minimizations as it is an efficient and compact direct search method and does not need any derivative information. Three optimizing parameters are included in the formulation of fundamental modal field of an optical fiber to make it more flexible and accurate than other available approximations. Employing variational technique, Petermann I and II spot sizes have been evaluated for triangular and trapezoidal-index fibers with the proposed fundamental modal field. It has been demonstrated that, the results of the proposed solution identically match with the numerical results over a wide range of normalized frequencies. This approximation can also be used in the study of doped and nonlinear fiber amplifier.

  8. Coupling 1D Navier Stokes equation with autoregulation lumped parameter networks for accurate cerebral blood flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jaiyoung; Hu, Xiao; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2014-11-01

    The cerebral circulation is unique in its ability to maintain blood flow to the brain under widely varying physiologic conditions. Incorporating this autoregulatory response is critical to cerebral blood flow modeling, as well as investigations into pathological conditions. We discuss a one-dimensional nonlinear model of blood flow in the cerebral arteries that includes coupling of autoregulatory lumped parameter networks. The model is tested to reproduce a common clinical test to assess autoregulatory function - the carotid artery compression test. The change in the flow velocity at the middle cerebral artery (MCA) during carotid compression and release demonstrated strong agreement with published measurements. The model is then used to investigate vasospasm of the MCA, a common clinical concern following subarachnoid hemorrhage. Vasospasm was modeled by prescribing vessel area reduction in the middle portion of the MCA. Our model showed similar increases in velocity for moderate vasospasms, however, for serious vasospasm (~ 90% area reduction), the blood flow velocity demonstrated decrease due to blood flow rerouting. This demonstrates a potentially important phenomenon, which otherwise would lead to false-negative decisions on clinical vasospasm if not properly anticipated.

  9. Towards a spectroscopically accurate set of potentials for heavy hydride laser cooling candidates: Effective core potential calculations of BaH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Keith; McLaughlin, Brendan M.; Lane, Ian C.

    2016-04-01

    BaH (and its isotopomers) is an attractive molecular candidate for laser cooling to ultracold temperatures and a potential precursor for the production of ultracold gases of hydrogen and deuterium. The theoretical challenge is to simulate the laser cooling cycle as reliably as possible and this paper addresses the generation of a highly accurate ab initio 2Σ+ potential for such studies. The performance of various basis sets within the multi-reference configuration-interaction (MRCI) approximation with the Davidson correction is tested and taken to the Complete Basis Set (CBS) limit. It is shown that the calculated molecular constants using a 46 electron effective core-potential and even-tempered augmented polarized core-valence basis sets (aug-pCVnZ-PP, n = 4 and 5) but only including three active electrons in the MRCI calculation are in excellent agreement with the available experimental values. The predicted dissociation energy De for the X2Σ+ state (extrapolated to the CBS limit) is 16 895.12 cm-1 (2.094 eV), which agrees within 0.1% of a revised experimental value of <16 910.6 cm-1, while the calculated re is within 0.03 pm of the experimental result.

  10. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Single-probe measurements from DR12 galaxy clustering – towards an accurate model

    DOE PAGES

    Chia -Hsun Chuang; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J.; Zhao, Gong Bo; Wang, Yuting; Antonio J. Cuesta; Rubino-Martin, J. A.; Prada, Francisco; Alam, Shadab; et al

    2016-08-08

    We analyze the broad-range shape of the monopole and quadrupole correlation functions of the BOSS Data Release 12 (DR12) CMASS and LOWZ galaxy sample to obtain constraints on the Hubble expansion rate H(z), the angular-diameter distance DA(z), the normalised growth rate f(z)σ8(z), and the physical matter density Ωmh2. In addition, we adopt wide and flat priors on all model parameters in order to ensure the results are those of a `single-probe' galaxy clustering analysis. We also marginalize over three nuisance terms that account for potential observational systematics affecting the measured monopole. However, such Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis is computationallymore » expensive for advanced theoretical models, thus we develop a new methodology to speed up our analysis.« less

  11. A robust and accurate center-frequency estimation (RACE) algorithm for improving motion estimation performance of SinMod on tagged cardiac MR images without known tagging parameters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Wang, Jie; Xu, Xiangyang; Song, Enmin; Wang, Qian; Jin, Renchao; Hung, Chih-Cheng; Fei, Baowei

    2014-11-01

    A robust and accurate center-frequency (CF) estimation (RACE) algorithm for improving the performance of the local sine-wave modeling (SinMod) method, which is a good motion estimation method for tagged cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) images, is proposed in this study. The RACE algorithm can automatically, effectively and efficiently produce a very appropriate CF estimate for the SinMod method, under the circumstance that the specified tagging parameters are unknown, on account of the following two key techniques: (1) the well-known mean-shift algorithm, which can provide accurate and rapid CF estimation; and (2) an original two-direction-combination strategy, which can further enhance the accuracy and robustness of CF estimation. Some other available CF estimation algorithms are brought out for comparison. Several validation approaches that can work on the real data without ground truths are specially designed. Experimental results on human body in vivo cardiac data demonstrate the significance of accurate CF estimation for SinMod, and validate the effectiveness of RACE in facilitating the motion estimation performance of SinMod.

  12. The Araucaria Project: accurate stellar parameters and distance to evolved eclipsing binary ASAS J180057-2333.8 in Sagittarius Arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchomska, K.; Graczyk, D.; Smolec, R.; Pietrzyński, G.; Gieren, W.; Stȩpień, K.; Konorski, P.; Pilecki, B.; Villanova, S.; Thompson, I. B.; Górski, M.; Karczmarek, P.; Wielgórski, P.; Anderson, R. I.

    2015-07-01

    We have analyzed the double-lined eclipsing binary system ASAS J180057-2333.8 from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) catalogue. We measure absolute physical and orbital parameters for this system based on archival V-band and I-band ASAS photometry, as well as on high-resolution spectroscopic data obtained with ESO 3.6 m/HARPS and CORALIE spectrographs. The physical and orbital parameters of the system were derived with an accuracy of about 0.5-3 per cent. The system is a very rare configuration of two bright well-detached giants of spectral types K1 and K4 and luminosity class II. The radii of the stars are R1 = 52.12 ± 1.38 and R2 = 67.63 ± 1.40 R⊙ and their masses are M1 = 4.914 ± 0.021 and M2 = 4.875 ± 0.021 M⊙. The exquisite accuracy of 0.5 per cent obtained for the masses of the components is one of the best mass determinations for giants. We derived a precise distance to the system of 2.14 ± 0.06 kpc (stat.) ± 0.05 (syst.) which places the star in the Sagittarius-Carina arm. The Galactic rotational velocity of the star is Θs = 258 ± 26 km s-1 assuming Θ0 = 238 km s-1. A comparison with PARSEC isochrones places the system at the early phase of core helium burning with an age of slightly larger than 100 million years. The effect of overshooting on stellar evolutionary tracks was explored using the MESA star code.

  13. A photometric and spectroscopic survey of solar twin stars within 50 parsecs of the Sun. I. Atmospheric parameters and color similarity to the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porto de Mello, G. F.; da Silva, R.; da Silva, L.; de Nader, R. V.

    2014-03-01

    Context. Solar twins and analogs are fundamental in the characterization of the Sun's place in the context of stellar measurements, as they are in understanding how typical the solar properties are in its neighborhood. They are also important for representing sunlight observable in the night sky for diverse photometric and spectroscopic tasks, besides being natural candidates for harboring planetary systems similar to ours and possibly even life-bearing environments. Aims: We report a photometric and spectroscopic survey of solar twin stars within 50 parsecs of the Sun. Hipparcos absolute magnitudes and (B - V)Tycho colors were used to define a 2σ box around the solar values, where 133 stars were considered. Additional stars resembling the solar UBV colors in a broad sense, plus stars present in the lists of Hardorp, were also selected. All objects were ranked by a color-similarity index with respect to the Sun, defined by uvby and BV photometry. Methods: Moderately high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra were used for a subsample of equatorial-southern stars to derive Teff, log g (both ionization and evolutionary), and spectroscopic [Fe/H] with average internal errors better than 50 K, 0.20 dex, and 0.08 dex, respectively. Ages and masses were estimated from theoretical HR diagrams. Results: The color-similarity index proved very successful, since none of the best solar-analog and twin candidates that were photometrically and spectroscopically found to be good solar matches differed from the Sun by more than 3σ in their colors. We identify and quantitatively rank many new excellent solar analogs, which are fit to represent the Sun in the night sky to varying degrees of accuracy and in a wide range of contexts. Some of them are faint enough (VTycho ~ 8.5) to be of interest for moderately large telescopes. We also identify two stars with near-UV spectra indistinguishable from the Sun's, although only HD 140690 also has atmospheric parameters matching

  14. Statistical mechanical analysis of Raman spectroscopic order parameter changes in pressure-induced lipid bilayer phase transitions.

    PubMed Central

    Yager, P; Peticolas, W L

    1980-01-01

    The statistical mechanical cluster theory of Fisher as applied by Kanehisa and Tsong to phospholipid bilayers is modified to describe the effects of hydrostatic pressure on the state of an aqueous dispersion of the phospholipid dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine. A high pressure Raman scattering cell has been built to obtain the Raman spectra of aqueous dispersions of phospholipids as a function of the applied hydrostatic pressure from 0 to 100 atmospheres. Predicted thermal and pressure-induced phase transitions are compared with an experimentally obtained Raman order parameter derived from the ratio of two bands in the C-H stretching region of the Raman spectrum of the sample. The parameters of the theory are adjusted to obtain a satisfactory fit of the Raman order parameter versus temperature. The theory is then found to give an excellent prediction of the observed pressure dependence of the Raman order parameter with no changes in the adjustable parameters. The implications of the success of the theoretical fit is discussed. Particularly of interest is the rather high value of the critical temperature, Tc, for lipid bilayers which is predicted by the model. PMID:6894876

  15. Calculations of 21 Λ-S and 42 Ω states of BC molecule: Potential energy curves, spectroscopic parameters and spin-orbit coupling effect.

    PubMed

    Xing, Wei; Shi, Deheng; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2016-01-15

    The potential energy curves (PECs) were calculated for the 42 Ω states generated from the 21 Λ-S states (X(4)Σ(-), A(4)Π, B(4)Σ(-), a(2)Π, b(2)Σ(-), c(2)Δ, d(2)Σ(+), e(2)Π, 3(2)Π, 4(2)Π, 5(2)Π, 2(2)Σ(-), 3(2)Σ(-), 2(2)Σ(+), 3(2)Σ(+), 2(2)Δ, 3(2)Δ, 1(4)Σ(+), 2(4)Π, 1(4)Δ and 1(2)Φ), which originated from the lowest two dissociation channels, B((2)Pu)+C((3)Pg) and B((2)Pu)+C((1)Dg), of the BC molecule. The PECs were calculated for internuclear separations from 0.08 to 1.10 nm using the CASSCF method, which was followed by the icMRCI approach with the aug-cc-pV6Z basis set. Of these 21 Λ-S states, the e(2)Π, 2(2)Δ, 2(2)Σ(-), 4(2)Π, 1(2)Φ and 3(2)Δ possess the double wells. The A(4)Π, a(2)Π, c(2)Δ, 2(4)Π, 4(2)Π, 5(2)Π, 1(4)Δ and 1(2)Φ states are inverted with the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effect taken into account. The first well of e(2)Π state and the second well of 4(2)Π and 2(2)Δ states do not have any vibrational states whether with or without the SOC effect included. All the Λ-S and Ω states involved in this paper are bound states. Scalar relativistic correction was included by the third-order Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian approximation at the level of an aug-cc-pV5Z basis set. Core-valence correlation correction was included at the level of an aug-cc-pCV5Z basis set. The SOC effect was accounted for by the state interaction method with the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian and the all-electron cc-pCV5Z basis set. The PECs of all the states were extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The spectroscopic parameters were obtained. The vibrational properties of several Λ-S and Ω states with the relatively shallow wells were evaluated. The SOC effect on the spectroscopic parameters is not obvious for almost all the states. The spectroscopic properties reported in this paper can be expected to be reliably predicted ones.

  16. Calculations of 21 Λ-S and 42 Ω states of BC molecule: Potential energy curves, spectroscopic parameters and spin-orbit coupling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Wei; Shi, Deheng; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2016-01-01

    The potential energy curves (PECs) were calculated for the 42 Ω states generated from the 21 Λ-S states (X4Σ-, A4Π, B4Σ-, a2Π, b2Σ-, c2Δ, d2Σ+, e2Π, 32Π, 42Π, 52Π, 22Σ-, 32Σ-, 22Σ+, 32Σ+, 22Δ, 32Δ, 14Σ+, 24Π, 14Δ and 12Φ), which originated from the lowest two dissociation channels, B(2Pu) + C(3Pg) and B(2Pu) + C(1Dg), of the BC molecule. The PECs were calculated for internuclear separations from 0.08 to 1.10 nm using the CASSCF method, which was followed by the icMRCI approach with the aug-cc-pV6Z basis set. Of these 21 Λ-S states, the e2Π, 22Δ, 22Σ-, 42Π, 12Φ and 32Δ possess the double wells. The A4Π, a2Π, c2Δ, 24Π, 42Π, 52Π, 14Δ and 12Φ states are inverted with the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effect taken into account. The first well of e2Π state and the second well of 42Π and 22Δ states do not have any vibrational states whether with or without the SOC effect included. All the Λ-S and Ω states involved in this paper are bound states. Scalar relativistic correction was included by the third-order Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian approximation at the level of an aug-cc-pV5Z basis set. Core-valence correlation correction was included at the level of an aug-cc-pCV5Z basis set. The SOC effect was accounted for by the state interaction method with the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian and the all-electron cc-pCV5Z basis set. The PECs of all the states were extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The spectroscopic parameters were obtained. The vibrational properties of several Λ-S and Ω states with the relatively shallow wells were evaluated. The SOC effect on the spectroscopic parameters is not obvious for almost all the states. The spectroscopic properties reported in this paper can be expected to be reliably predicted ones.

  17. Structural investigations of {beta}-CaAlF{sub 5} by coupling powder XRD, NMR, EPR and spectroscopic parameter calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Body, M. . E-mail: monique.body@univ-lemans.fr; Silly, G.; Legein, C.; Buzare, J.-Y.; Calvayrac, F.; Blaha, P.

    2005-12-15

    {beta}-CaAlF{sub 5} was synthesized by solid-state reaction. The precise structure was refined from X-ray powder diffraction data in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/c with lattice constants a=5.3361A, b=9.8298A, c=7.3271A, and {beta}=109.91{sup o} (Z=4). The structure exhibits isolated chains of AlF{sub 6}{sup 3-} octahedra sharing opposite corners.{sup 19}F and {sup 27}Al solid state NMR spectra were recorded using MAS and SATRAS techniques. An EPR spectrum was recorded for {beta}-CaAlF{sub 5}:Cr{sup 3+}. The experimental spectra were simulated in order to extract the NMR and EPR parameter values. Five fluorine sites and one low symmetry aluminium site were found in agreement with the refined structure. These parameters were calculated using empirical and ab-initio methods. The agreement obtained between the calculated {sup 19}F chemical shift values, {sup 27}Al quadrupolar parameters, Cr{sup 3+} EPR fine structure parameters and the experimental results demonstrates the complementarity of XRD, magnetic resonance experiments and theoretical methodologies.

  18. Introduction of a valence space in quasiparticle random-phase approximation: Impact on vibrational mass parameters and spectroscopic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechaftois, F.; Deloncle, I.; Péru, S.

    2015-09-01

    For the first time, using a unique finite-range interaction (D1M Gogny force), a fully coherent and time-feasible calculation of the Bohr Hamiltonian vibrational mass is envisioned in a Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov + quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) framework. In order to reach a reasonable computation time, we evaluate the feasibility of this method by considering two restrictions for the QRPA: the Tamm-Dancoff approximation and the insertion of a valence space. We validate our approach in the even-even tin isotopes by comparing the convergence scheme of the mass parameter with those of built-in QRPA outputs: excited-state energy and reduced transition probability. The seeming convergence of these intrinsic quantities is shown to be misleading and the difference with the theoretical expected value is quantified. This work is a primary step towards the systematic calculation of mass parameters.

  19. MRCI study on the spectroscopic parameters and molecular constants of the X 1Σ +, a3Σ +, A 1Π and C 1Σ - electronic states of the SiO molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Deheng; Li, Wentao; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2012-02-01

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of the X 1Σ +, a3Σ +, A 1Π and C 1Σ - electronic states of the SiO molecule are studied using an ab initio quantum chemical method. The calculations have been made employing the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method, which is followed by the valence internally contracted multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) approach in combination with several correlation-consistent basis sets. The effect on the PECs by the core-valence correlation and relativistic corrections is included. The way to consider the relativistic correction is to use the third-order Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian approximation. The core-valence correlation correction is carried out with the cc-pCVQZ basis set, and the relativistic correction is performed at the level of the cc-pVQZ basis set. To obtain more reliable results, the PECs determined by the MRCI calculations are also corrected for size-extensivity errors by means of the Davidson modification (MRCI + Q). The PECs of these electronic states are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit by the total-energy extrapolation scheme. Employing these PECs, the spectroscopic parameters are calculated and compared with those reported in the literature. With these PECs determined by the MRCI + Q/CV + DK + 56 calculations, by solving the radial Schrödinger equation of nuclear motion, 110 vibrational states for the X 1Σ +, 69 for the a3Σ +, 54 for the A 1Π and 67 for the C 1Σ - electronic state are predicted when the rotational quantum number J equals zero. The vibrational manifolds of the first 20 vibrational states are reported and compared with the available RKR data for each electronic state. On the whole, as expected, the most accurate spectroscopic parameters and molecular constants of the SiO molecule are obtained by the MRCI + Q/CV + DK + 56 calculations. And the present molecular constants of the a3Σ +, C 1Σ - and A 1Π electronic states determined by the MRCI + Q/CV + DK

  20. Simultaneous estimation of plasma parameters from spectroscopic data of neutral helium using least square fitting of CR-model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Jalaj; Prakash, Ram; Vyas, Gheesa Lal; Pal, Udit Narayan; Chowdhuri, Malay Bikas; Manchanda, Ranjana; Halder, Nilanjan; Choyal, Yaduvendra

    2015-12-01

    In the present work an effort has been made to estimate the plasma parameters simultaneously like—electron density, electron temperature, ground state atom density, ground state ion density and metastable state density from the observed visible spectra of penning plasma discharge (PPD) source using least square fitting. The analysis is performed for the prominently observed neutral helium lines. The atomic data and analysis structure (ADAS) database is used to provide the required collisional-radiative (CR) photon emissivity coefficients (PECs) values under the optical thin plasma condition in the analysis. With this condition the estimated plasma temperature from the PPD is found rather high. It is seen that the inclusion of opacity in the observed spectral lines through PECs and addition of diffusion of neutrals and metastable state species in the CR-model code analysis improves the electron temperature estimation in the simultaneous measurement.

  1. Prediction of the Spectroscopic Parameters of New Iron Compounds: Hydride of Iron Cyanide/Isocyanide, HFeCN/HFeNC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Iron is the most abundant transition metal in space. Its abundance is similar to that of magnesium, and until today only, FeO and FeCN have been detected. However, magnesium-bearing compounds such as MgCN, MgNC, and HMgNC are found in IRC+10216. It seems that the hydrides of iron cyanide/isocyanide could be good candidates to be present in space. In the present work we carried out a characterization of the different minima on the quintet and triplet [C, Fe, H, N] potential energy surfaces, employing several theoretical approaches. The most stable isomers are predicted to be hydride of iron cyanide HFeCN, and isocyanide HFeNC, in their 5Δ states. Both isomers are found to be quasi-isoenergetics. The HFeNC isomer is predicted to lie about 0.5 kcal/mol below HFeCN. The barrier for the interconversion process is estimated to be around 6.0 kcal/mol, making this process unfeasible under low temperature conditions, such as those in the interstellar medium. Therefore, both HFeCN and HFeNC could be candidates for their detection. We report geometrical parameters, vibrational frequencies, and rotational constants that could help with their experimental characterization.

  2. Lateralization effects of image-guided 31P magnetoresonance spectroscopic parameters in the frontal lobe of schizophrenics and healthy controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebner, Gabriele; Volz, Hans-Peter; Riehemann, Stefan; Wenda, Berit; Roessger, Grit; Rzanny, Reinhard; Sauer, Heinrich

    1999-05-01

    Phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) has gained much interest in schizophrenia research in the last years since it allows the non-invasive measurement of high- energy phosphates and phospholipids in vivo. We investigated hemispherical differences of the concentrations of different phosphorus compounds in the frontal lobes. For this purpose, well defined volumes in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of 32 healthy controls and 51 schizophrenic patients were examined. Schizophrenic patients showed significant lateralization effects of phosphodiesters (PDE) and the intracellular pH-value. Differences in the lateralization of 31P-MRS parameters between patients and healthy volunteers were only detected for the pH-value. While healthy controls exhibit lower pH-values in the left frontal lobe (6.96), in schizophrenic patients we found lower pH-values in the right (6.89). Detailed examinations showed that this effect is mainly based on the subgroup of schizophrenics who received atypical neuroleptic medication.

  3. Accurate collision-induced line-coupling parameters for the fundamental band of CO in He - Close coupling and coupled states scattering calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Sheldon; Boissoles, J.; Boulet, C.

    1988-01-01

    The first accurate theoretical values for off-diagonal (i.e., line-coupling) pressure-broadening cross sections are presented. Calculations were done for CO perturbed by He at thermal collision energies using an accurate ab initio potential energy surface. Converged close coupling, i.e., numerically exact values, were obtained for coupling to the R(0) and R(2) lines. These were used to test the coupled states (CS) and infinite order sudden (IOS) approximate scattering methods. CS was found to be of quantitative accuracy (a few percent) and has been used to obtain coupling values for lines to R(10). IOS values are less accurate, but, owing to their simplicity, may nonetheless prove useful as has been recently demonstrated.

  4. Spectroscopic Constants and Vibrational Frequencies for l-C3H+ and Isotopologues from Highly-Accurate Quartic Force Fields: The Detection of l-C3H+ in the Horsehead Nebula PDR Questioned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xinchuan; Fortenberry, Ryan Clifton; Lee, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Very recently, molecular rotational transitions observed in the photon-dominated region of the Horsehead nebula have been attributed to l-C3H+. In an effort to corroborate this finding, we employed state-of-the art and proven high-accuracy quantum chemical techniques to compute spectroscopic constants for this cation and its isotopologues. Even though the B rotational constant from the fit of the observed spectrum and our computations agree to within 20 MHz, a typical level of accuracy, the D rotational constant differs by more than 40%, while the H rotational constant differs by three orders of magnitude. With the likely errors in the rotational transition energies resulting from this difference in D on the order of 1 MHz for the lowest observed transition (J = 4 yields 3) and growing as J increases, the assignment of the observed rotational lines from the Horsehead nebula to l-C3H+ is questionable.

  5. SPECTROSCOPIC CONSTANTS AND VIBRATIONAL FREQUENCIES FOR l-C{sub 3}H{sup +} AND ISOTOPOLOGUES FROM HIGHLY ACCURATE QUARTIC FORCE FIELDS: THE DETECTION OF l-C{sub 3}H{sup +} IN THE HORSEHEAD NEBULA PDR QUESTIONED

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Xinchuan; Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2013-05-10

    Very recently, molecular rotational transitions observed in the photon-dominated region of the Horsehead nebula have been attributed to l-C{sub 3}H{sup +}. In an effort to corroborate this finding, we employed state-of-the-art and proven high-accuracy quantum chemical techniques to compute spectroscopic constants for this cation and its isotopologues. Even though the B rotational constant from the fit of the observed spectrum and our computations agree to within 20 MHz, a typical level of accuracy, the D rotational constant differs by more than 40%, while the H rotational constant differs by three orders of magnitude. With the likely errors in the rotational transition energies resulting from this difference in D on the order of 1 MHz for the lowest observed transition (J = 4 {yields} 3) and growing as J increases, the assignment of the observed rotational lines from the Horsehead nebula to l-C{sub 3}H{sup +} is questionable.

  6. Is scoring system of computed tomography based metric parameters can accurately predicts shock wave lithotripsy stone-free rates and aid in the development of treatment strategies?

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Yasser Ali; Abdelaziz, Alsayed Saad; Shehab, Mohamed Ahmed; Mohamed, Hazem Abdelsabour Dief; Emara, Absel-Aziz Ali; Elnabtity, Ali Mohamed Ali; Ghanem, Maged Mohammed; ELHelaly, Hesham Abdel Azim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to determine the predicting success of shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) using a combination of computed tomography based metric parameters to improve the treatment plan. Patients and Methods: Consecutive 180 patients with symptomatic upper urinary tract calculi 20 mm or less were enrolled in our study underwent extracorporeal SWL were divided into two main groups, according to the stone size, Group A (92 patients with stone ≤10 mm) and Group B (88 patients with stone >10 mm). Both groups were evaluated, according to the skin to stone distance (SSD) and Hounsfield units (≤500, 500–1000 and >1000 HU). Results: Both groups were comparable in baseline data and stone characteristics. About 92.3% of Group A rendered stone-free, whereas 77.2% were stone-free in Group B (P = 0.001). Furthermore, in both group SWL success rates was a significantly higher for stones with lower attenuation <830 HU than with stones >830 HU (P < 0.034). SSD were statistically differences in SWL outcome (P < 0.02). Simultaneous consideration of three parameters stone size, stone attenuation value, and SSD; we found that stone-free rate (SFR) was 100% for stone attenuation value <830 HU for stone <10 mm or >10 mm but total number SWL sessions and shock waves required for the larger stone group were higher than in the smaller group (P < 0.01). Furthermore, SFR was 83.3% and 37.5% for stone <10 mm, mean HU >830, SSD 90 mm and SSD >120 mm, respectively. On the other hand, SFR was 52.6% and 28.57% for stone >10 mm, mean HU >830, SSD <90 mm and SSD >120 mm, respectively. Conclusion: Stone size, stone density (HU), and SSD is simple to calculate and can be reported by radiologists to applying combined score help to augment predictive power of SWL, reduce cost, and improving of treatment strategies. PMID:27141192

  7. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  8. Parasitic analysis and π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke model for complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor Lamb wave resonator with accurate two-port Y-parameter characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Goh, Wang Ling; Chai, Kevin T.-C.; Mu, Xiaojing; Hong, Yan; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Je, Minkyu

    2016-04-01

    The parasitic effects from electromechanical resonance, coupling, and substrate losses were collected to derive a new two-port equivalent-circuit model for Lamb wave resonators, especially for those fabricated on silicon technology. The proposed model is a hybrid π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke (PiBVD) model that accounts for the above mentioned parasitic effects which are commonly observed in Lamb-wave resonators. It is a combination of interdigital capacitor of both plate capacitance and fringe capacitance, interdigital resistance, Ohmic losses in substrate, and the acoustic motional behavior of typical Modified Butterworth-Van Dyke (MBVD) model. In the case studies presented in this paper using two-port Y-parameters, the PiBVD model fitted significantly better than the typical MBVD model, strengthening the capability on characterizing both magnitude and phase of either Y11 or Y21. The accurate modelling on two-port Y-parameters makes the PiBVD model beneficial in the characterization of Lamb-wave resonators, providing accurate simulation to Lamb-wave resonators and oscillators.

  9. Parasitic analysis and π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke model for complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor Lamb wave resonator with accurate two-port Y-parameter characterizations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Goh, Wang Ling; Chai, Kevin T-C; Mu, Xiaojing; Hong, Yan; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Je, Minkyu

    2016-04-01

    The parasitic effects from electromechanical resonance, coupling, and substrate losses were collected to derive a new two-port equivalent-circuit model for Lamb wave resonators, especially for those fabricated on silicon technology. The proposed model is a hybrid π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke (PiBVD) model that accounts for the above mentioned parasitic effects which are commonly observed in Lamb-wave resonators. It is a combination of interdigital capacitor of both plate capacitance and fringe capacitance, interdigital resistance, Ohmic losses in substrate, and the acoustic motional behavior of typical Modified Butterworth-Van Dyke (MBVD) model. In the case studies presented in this paper using two-port Y-parameters, the PiBVD model fitted significantly better than the typical MBVD model, strengthening the capability on characterizing both magnitude and phase of either Y11 or Y21. The accurate modelling on two-port Y-parameters makes the PiBVD model beneficial in the characterization of Lamb-wave resonators, providing accurate simulation to Lamb-wave resonators and oscillators. PMID:27131699

  10. Spectroscopic detection

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul P.; Hadidi, Kamal

    2003-01-01

    In embodiments, spectroscopic monitor monitors modulated light signals to detect low levels of contaminants and other compounds in the presence of background interference. The monitor uses a spectrometer that includes a transmissive modulator capable of causing different frequency ranges to move onto and off of the detector. The different ranges can include those with the desired signal and those selected to subtract background contributions from those with the desired signal. Embodiments of the system are particularly useful for monitoring metal concentrations in combustion effluent.

  11. Photoluminescence study of LiNbO3:Cr3+; W4+ at high pressure. Pressure dependence of spectroscopic parameters and local structure of Cr3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Alejo, M. A.; Rodríguez, F.; Barreda-Argüeso, J. A.; Camarillo, I.; Flores J., C.; Murrieta S., H.; Hernández A., J. M.; Jaque, F.; Camarillo, E.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the photoluminescence properties of congruent codoped LiNbO3:Cr3+; W4+, crystals have been systematically investigated by performing photoluminescence studies at room temperature in the 0-280 kbar pressure range. In particular, we focus on the influence that hydrostatic pressure has on the 2E→ 4A2 (R-lines) transitions of Cr3+. It has been observed that the pressure dependence of the spectral position of the R-lines associated with both Cr3+ centres β and γ shows a bilinear behaviour with an abrupt slope change near 210 kbar. This change is related to the existence of a pressure-induced structural phase transition in the LiNbO3 host. The analysis of experimental results provides the Racah parameters B and C and the crystal field parameter 10Dq and their pressure and volume, through the crystal field theory and equation of state, dependences.

  12. The GEISA Spectroscopic Database System in its latest Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Crépeau, L.; Capelle, V.; Scott, N. A.; Armante, R.; Chédin, A.

    2009-04-01

    GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information)[1] is a computer-accessible spectroscopic database system, designed to facilitate accurate forward planetary radiative transfer calculations using a line-by-line and layer-by-layer approach. It was initiated in 1976. Currently, GEISA is involved in activities related to the assessment of the capabilities of IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer on board the METOP European satellite -http://earth-sciences.cnes.fr/IASI/)) through the GEISA/IASI database[2] derived from GEISA. Since the Metop (http://www.eumetsat.int) launch (October 19th 2006), GEISA/IASI is the reference spectroscopic database for the validation of the level-1 IASI data, using the 4A radiative transfer model[3] (4A/LMD http://ara.lmd.polytechnique.fr; 4A/OP co-developed by LMD and Noveltis with the support of CNES). Also, GEISA is involved in planetary research, i.e.: modelling of Titan's atmosphere, in the comparison with observations performed by Voyager: http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/, or by ground-based telescopes, and by the instruments on board the Cassini-Huygens mission: http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Cassini-Huygens/index.html. The updated 2008 edition of GEISA (GEISA-08), a system comprising three independent sub-databases devoted, respectively, to line transition parameters, infrared and ultraviolet/visible absorption cross-sections, microphysical and optical properties of atmospheric aerosols, will be described. Spectroscopic parameters quality requirement will be discussed in the context of comparisons between observed or simulated Earth's and other planetary atmosphere spectra. GEISA is implemented on the CNES/CNRS Ether Products and Services Centre WEB site (http://ether.ipsl.jussieu.fr), where all archived spectroscopic data can be handled through general and user friendly associated management software facilities. More than 350 researchers are

  13. Characteristics of the energy bands and the spectroscopic parameters of Pr3+ ions in PrCl3 mixed methanol, iso-propanol and butanol solutions.

    PubMed

    Jana, Samar; Mitra, Subrata

    2011-12-01

    An investigation on the absorption spectra of the praseodymium chloride (PrCl(3)) in methanol, iso-propanol and butanol is carried out between 190 nm and 1100 nm. We have observed and assigned six energy bands of the 4f(2) electronic configuration of the Pr(3+) ion in the visible to near-infra-red and one due to 4f5d configuration in the ultraviolet region. The 4f5d band has been detected properly for low concentration of PrCl(3). We have also constructed a free-ion Hamiltonian and calculated the energy levels of the 4f(2) configuration theoretically. Hence, the best fit free-ion parameters are deduced.

  14. Spectroscopic survey of LAMOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongheng

    2014-07-01

    LAMOST is a special reflecting Schmidt telescope. LAMOST breaks through the bottleneck of the large scale spectroscopic survey observation with both large aperture (effective aperture of 3.6 - 4.9m) and wide field of view (5 degrees). It is an innovative active reflecting Schmidt configuration achieved by changing mirror surface continuously to achieve a series different reflecting Schmidt system in different moments. By using the parallel controllable fiber positioning technique, the focal surface of 1.75 meters in diameter accommodates 4000 optical fibers. Also, LAMOST has 16 spectrographs with 32 CCD cameras. LAMOST is the telescope of the highest spectrum acquiring rate. As a national large scientific project, LAMOST project was proposed formally in 1996. The construction was started in 2001 and completed in 2008. After commission period, LAMOST pilot survey was started in October 2011 and spectroscopic survey began in September 2012. From October 2011 to June 2013, LAMOST has obtained more than 2 million spectra of celestial objects. There are 1.7 million spectra of stars, in which the stellar parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, metalicitiy and radial velocity) of more than 1 million stars was obtained. In the first period of spectroscopic survey of LAMOST, 5 million of stellar spectra will be obtained and will make substantial contribution to the study of the stellar astrophysics and the structure of the Galaxy, such as the spheroid substructure of the Galaxy, the galactic gravitational potential and the distribution of the dark matter in the Galaxy, the extremely metal poor stars and hypervelocity stars, the 3D extinction in the Galaxy, the structure of thin and thick disks of the Galaxy, and so on.

  15. Accurate ab initio Quartic Force Fields of Cyclic and Bent HC2N Isomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inostroza, Natalia; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Highly correlated ab initio quartic force field (QFFs) are used to calculate the equilibrium structures and predict the spectroscopic parameters of three HC2N isomers. Specifically, the ground state quasilinear triplet and the lowest cyclic and bent singlet isomers are included in the present study. Extensive treatment of correlation effects were included using the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations, denoted CCSD(T). Dunning s correlation-consistent basis sets cc-pVXZ, X=3,4,5, were used, and a three-point formula for extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit was used. Core-correlation and scalar relativistic corrections were also included to yield highly accurate QFFs. The QFFs were used together with second-order perturbation theory (with proper treatment of Fermi resonances) and variational methods to solve the nuclear Schr dinger equation. The quasilinear nature of the triplet isomer is problematic, and it is concluded that a QFF is not adequate to describe properly all of the fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants (though some constants not dependent on the bending motion are well reproduced by perturbation theory). On the other hand, this procedure (a QFF together with either perturbation theory or variational methods) leads to highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants for the cyclic and bent singlet isomers of HC2N. All three isomers possess significant dipole moments, 3.05D, 3.06D, and 1.71D, for the quasilinear triplet, the cyclic singlet, and the bent singlet isomers, respectively. It is concluded that the spectroscopic constants determined for the cyclic and bent singlet isomers are the most accurate available, and it is hoped that these will be useful in the interpretation of high-resolution astronomical observations or laboratory experiments.

  16. Spectroscopic survey of LAMOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongheng

    2015-08-01

    LAMOST is a special reflecting Schmidt telescope. LAMOST breaks through the bottleneck of the large scale spectroscopic survey observation with both large aperture (effective aperture of 3.6 - 4.9m) and wide field of view (5 degrees). It is an innovative active reflecting Schmidt configuration achieved by changing mirror surface continuously to achieve a series different reflecting Schmidt system in different moments. By using the parallel controllable fiber positioning technique, the focal surface of 1.75 meters in diameter accommodates 4000 optical fibers. Also, LAMOST has 16 spectrographs with 32 CCD cameras. LAMOST is the telescope of the highest spectrum acquiring rate.In the spectroscopic survey of LAMOST from October 2011 to June 2014, LAMOST has obtained more than 4.13 million spectra of celestial objects. There are 3.27 million spectra of stars, in which the stellar parameters of 2.16 million stars were obtained.In the five-year regular survey upto 2017, LAMOST will obtaine 5 million stellar spectra, which would make substantial contribution to the study of the stellar astrophysics and the structure of the Galaxy, such as the spheroid substructure of the Galaxy, the galactic gravitational potential and the distribution of the dark matter in the Galaxy, the extremely metal poor stars and hypervelocity stars, the 3D extinction in the Galaxy, the structure of thin and thick disks of the Galaxy, and so on.

  17. Fundamental spectroscopic studies of carbenes and hydrocarbon radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, C.A.; Thaddeus, P.

    1993-12-01

    Highly reactive carbenes and carbon-chain radicals are studied at millimeter wavelengths by observing their rotational spectra. The purpose is to provide definitive spectroscopic identification, accurate spectroscopic constants in the lowest vibrational states, and reliable structures of the key intermediates in reactions leading to aromatic hydrocarbons and soot particles in combustion.

  18. Importance of including small body spin effects in the modelling of intermediate mass-ratio inspirals. II. Accurate parameter extraction of strong sources using higher-order spin effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, E. A.; Gair, Jonathan R.; Brown, Duncan A.

    2012-03-01

    -4, and 10-1, respectively. LISA should also be able to determine the location of the source in the sky and the SMBH spin orientation to within ˜10-4 steradians. Furthermore, we show that by including conservative corrections up to 2.5PN order, systematic errors no longer dominate over statistical errors. This shows that search templates that include small body spin effects in the equations of motion up to 2.5PN order should allow us to perform accurate parameter extraction for IMRIs with typical signal-to-noise ratio ˜1000.

  19. Spectroscopic ellipsometry on lamellar gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antos, R.; Ohlidal, I.; Mistrik, J.; Murakami, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Pistora, J.; Horie, M.; Visnovsky, S.

    2005-05-01

    Deep lamellar diffraction gratings fabricated by etching a transparent quartz plate are studied using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The rigorous coupled-wave analysis is used to calculate the optical response of the gratings. Three parameters of the rectangular profile are determined by utilizing the least-square method. Detailed investigation of the spectral dependences demonstrates the uniqueness of the solution. Observing the spectral dependences of Wood anomalies suggests that even complicated profiles can be fitted with high authenticity.

  20. The 1997 spectroscopic GEISA databank.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Arie, E.; Ballard, J.; Barbe, A.; Bjoraker, G.; Bonnet, B.; Brown, L. R.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Champion, J. P.; Chedin, A.; Chursin, A.; Clerbaux, C.; Duxbury, G.; Flaud, J.-M.; Fourrie, N.; Fayt, A.; Graner, G.; Gamache, R.; Goldman, A.; Golovko, V.; Guelachvili, G.; Hartmann, J. M.; Hilico, J. C.; Hillman, J.; Lefevre, G.; Lellouch, E.; Mikhailenko, S. N.; Naumenko, O. V.; Nemtchinov, V.; Newnham, D. A.; Nikitin, A.; Orphal, J.; Perrin, A.; Reuter, D. C.; Rinsland, C. P.; Rosenmann, L.; Rothman, L. S.; Scott, N. A.; Selby, J.; Sinitsa, L. N.; Sirota, J. M.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, K. M.; Tyuterev, V. G.; Tipping, R. H.; Urban, S.; Varanasi, P.; Weber, M.

    1999-05-01

    The current version GEISA-97 of the computer-accessible database system GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmospheriques: Management and Study of Atmospheric Spectroscopic Information) is described. This catalogue contains 1,346,266 entries. These are the spectroscopic parameters required to describe adequately the individual spectral lines belonging to 42 molecules (96 isotopic species) and located between 0 and 22656 cm-1. The featured molecules are of interest in studies of the terrestrial as well as the other planetary atmospheres, especially those of the giant planets. GEISA-97 contains also a catalog of absorption cross-sections of molecules such as chlorofluorocarbons which exhibit unresolvable spectra. The modifications and improvements made to the earlier edition (GEISA-92) and the data management software are described.

  1. ORBITAL SOLUTIONS FOR TWO YOUNG, LOW-MASS SPECTROSCOPIC BINARIES IN OPHIUCHUS

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, V.; Prato, L.; Wasserman, L. H.; Rodgers, B. E-mail: lprato@lowell.edu E-mail: brodgers@gemini.edu

    2011-01-15

    We report the orbital parameters for ROXR1 14 and RX J1622.7-2325Nw, two young, low-mass, and double-lined spectroscopic binaries recently discovered in the Ophiuchus star-forming region. Accurate orbital solutions were determined from over a dozen high-resolution spectra taken with the Keck II and Gemini South telescopes. These objects are T Tauri stars with mass ratios close to unity and periods of {approx}5 and {approx}3 days, respectively. In particular, RX J1622.7-2325Nw shows a non-circularized orbit with an eccentricity of 0.30, higher than any other short-period pre-main-sequence (PMS) spectroscopic binary known to date. We speculate that the orbit of RX J1622.7-2325Nw has not yet circularized because of the perturbing action of a {approx}1'' companion, itself a close visual pair. A comparison of known young spectroscopic binaries (SBs) and main-sequence (MS) SBs in the eccentricity-period plane shows an indistinguishable distribution of the two populations, implying that orbital circularization occurs in the first 1 Myr of a star's lifetime. With the results presented in this paper we increase by {approx}4% the small sample of PMS spectroscopic binary stars with known orbital elements.

  2. Spectroscopic measurements of solar wind generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, J. L.; Withbroe, G. L.; Zapata, C. A.; Noci, G.

    1983-01-01

    Spectroscopically observable quantities are described which are sensitive to the primary plasma parameters of the solar wind's source region. The method is discussed in which those observable quantities are used as constraints in the construction of empirical models of various coronal structures. Simulated observations are used to examine the fractional contributions to observed spectral intensities from coronal structures of interest which co-exist with other coronal structures along simulated lines-of-sight. The sensitivity of spectroscopic observables to the physical parameters within each of those structures is discussed.

  3. Absolute magnitude calibration using trigonometric parallax - Incomplete, spectroscopic samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnatunga, Kavan U.; Casertano, Stefano

    1991-01-01

    A new numerical algorithm is used to calibrate the absolute magnitude of spectroscopically selected stars from their observed trigonometric parallax. This procedure, based on maximum-likelihood estimation, can retrieve unbiased estimates of the intrinsic absolute magnitude and its dispersion even from incomplete samples suffering from selection biases in apparent magnitude and color. It can also make full use of low accuracy and negative parallaxes and incorporate censorship on reported parallax values. Accurate error estimates are derived for each of the fitted parameters. The algorithm allows an a posteriori check of whether the fitted model gives a good representation of the observations. The procedure is described in general and applied to both real and simulated data.

  4. The RbCs X(1)Sigma(+) Ground Electronic State: New Spectroscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Fellows; Gutterres; Campos; Vergès; Amiot

    1999-09-01

    In this paper a new spectroscopic investigation on the X(1)Sigma(+) electronic ground state of the RbCs molecule is reported. This study is conducted by using laser-induced fluorescence combined with Fourier transform spectroscopy (LIF-FTS). More than 23 000 spectral data are used in a global linear reduction to molecular constants. With these new and improved molecular constants, the potential energy curve has been calculated by the inverted perturbation approach (IPA). Accurate values for the dissociation energy and the long-range parameters have been derived. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  5. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  6. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  7. YONSEI EVOLUTIONARY POPULATION SYNTHESIS (YEPS) MODEL. I. SPECTROSCOPIC EVOLUTION OF SIMPLE STELLAR POPULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Chul; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Lee, Young-Wook

    2013-01-15

    We present a series of papers on the 2012 version of the Yonsei Evolutionary Population Synthesis (YEPS) model, which was constructed based on over 20 years of research. This first paper delineates the spectroscopic aspect of integrated light from stellar populations older than 1 Gyr. The standard YEPS is based on the most up-to-date Yonsei-Yale stellar evolutionary tracks and BaSel 3.1 flux libraries, and provides absorption line indices of the Lick/IDS system and high-order Balmer lines for simple stellar populations as functions of stellar parameters, such as metallicity, age, and {alpha}-element mixture. Special care has been taken to incorporate a systematic contribution from horizontal-branch (HB) stars, which alters the temperature-sensitive Balmer lines significantly, resulting in up to a 5 Gyr difference in the age estimation of old, metal-poor stellar populations. We also find that HBs exert an appreciable effect not only on the Balmer lines but also on the metallicity-sensitive lines, including the magnesium index. This is critical in explaining the intriguing bimodality found in index distributions of globular clusters in massive galaxies and to accurately derive spectroscopic metallicities from various indices. A full set of the spectroscopic and photometric YEPS model data of the entire parameter space is currently downloadable at http://web.yonsei.ac.kr/cosmic/data/YEPS.htm.

  8. A Spectroscopic Survey and Analysis of Bright, Hydrogen-rich White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianninas, A.; Bergeron, P.; Ruiz, M. T.

    2011-12-01

    We have conducted a spectroscopic survey of over 1300 bright (V <= 17.5), hydrogen-rich white dwarfs based largely on the last published version of the McCook & Sion catalog. The complete results from our survey, including the spectroscopic analysis of over 1100 DA white dwarfs, are presented. High signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra were obtained for each star and were subsequently analyzed using our standard spectroscopic technique where the observed Balmer line profiles are compared to synthetic spectra computed from the latest generation of model atmospheres appropriate for these stars. First, we present the spectroscopic content of our sample, which includes many misclassifications as well as several DAB, DAZ, and magnetic white dwarfs. Next, we look at how the new Stark broadening profiles affect the determination of the atmospheric parameters. When necessary, specific models and analysis techniques are used to derive the most accurate atmospheric parameters possible. In particular, we employ M dwarf templates to obtain better estimates of the atmospheric parameters for those white dwarfs that are in DA+dM binary systems. Certain unique white dwarfs and double-degenerate binary systems are also analyzed in greater detail. We then examine the global properties of our sample including the mass distribution and their distribution as a function of temperature. We then proceed to test the accuracy and robustness of our method by comparing our results to those of other surveys such as SPY and Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Finally, we revisit the ZZ Ceti instability strip and examine how the determination of its empirical boundaries is affected by the latest line profile calculations. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla or Paranal Observatories under program ID 078.D-0824(A).

  9. A SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY AND ANALYSIS OF BRIGHT, HYDROGEN-RICH WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Gianninas, A.; Bergeron, P.; Ruiz, M. T. E-mail: bergeron@astro.umontreal.ca

    2011-12-20

    We have conducted a spectroscopic survey of over 1300 bright (V {<=} 17.5), hydrogen-rich white dwarfs based largely on the last published version of the McCook and Sion catalog. The complete results from our survey, including the spectroscopic analysis of over 1100 DA white dwarfs, are presented. High signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra were obtained for each star and were subsequently analyzed using our standard spectroscopic technique where the observed Balmer line profiles are compared to synthetic spectra computed from the latest generation of model atmospheres appropriate for these stars. First, we present the spectroscopic content of our sample, which includes many misclassifications as well as several DAB, DAZ, and magnetic white dwarfs. Next, we look at how the new Stark broadening profiles affect the determination of the atmospheric parameters. When necessary, specific models and analysis techniques are used to derive the most accurate atmospheric parameters possible. In particular, we employ M dwarf templates to obtain better estimates of the atmospheric parameters for those white dwarfs that are in DA+dM binary systems. Certain unique white dwarfs and double-degenerate binary systems are also analyzed in greater detail. We then examine the global properties of our sample including the mass distribution and their distribution as a function of temperature. We then proceed to test the accuracy and robustness of our method by comparing our results to those of other surveys such as SPY and Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Finally, we revisit the ZZ Ceti instability strip and examine how the determination of its empirical boundaries is affected by the latest line profile calculations.

  10. Predicting hydration Gibbs energies of alkyl-aromatics using molecular simulation: a comparison of current force fields and the development of a new parameter set for accurate solvation data.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Nuno M; Jorge, Miguel; Queimada, António J; Gomes, José R B; Economou, Ioannis G; Macedo, Eugénia A

    2011-10-14

    The Gibbs energy of hydration is an important quantity to understand the molecular behavior in aqueous systems at constant temperature and pressure. In this work we review the performance of some popular force fields, namely TraPPE, OPLS-AA and Gromos, in reproducing the experimental Gibbs energies of hydration of several alkyl-aromatic compounds--benzene, mono-, di- and tri-substituted alkylbenzenes--using molecular simulation techniques. In the second part of the paper, we report a new model that is able to improve such hydration energy predictions, based on Lennard Jones parameters from the recent TraPPE-EH force field and atomic partial charges obtained from natural population analysis of density functional theory calculations. We apply a scaling factor determined by fitting the experimental hydration energy of only two solutes, and then present a simple rule to generate atomic partial charges for different substituted alkyl-aromatics. This rule has the added advantages of eliminating the unnecessary assumption of fixed charge on every substituted carbon atom and providing a simple guideline for extrapolating the charge assignment to any multi-substituted alkyl-aromatic molecule. The point charges derived here yield excellent predictions of experimental Gibbs energies of hydration, with an overall absolute average deviation of less than 0.6 kJ mol(-1). This new parameter set can also give good predictive performance for other thermodynamic properties and liquid structural information.

  11. THE APOKASC CATALOG: AN ASTEROSEISMIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC JOINT SURVEY OF TARGETS IN THE KEPLER FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Epstein, Courtney; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Elsworth, Yvonne; Chaplin, William J.; Hekker, Saskia; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Stello, Dennis; Mészáros, Sz.; García, Rafael A.; Beck, Paul; Mathur, Savita; García Pérez, Ana; Girardi, Léo; Basu, Sarbani; Shetrone, Matthew; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Beers, Timothy C.; and others

    2015-01-01

    We present the first APOKASC catalog of spectroscopic and asteroseismic properties of 1916 red giants observed in the Kepler fields. The spectroscopic parameters provided from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment project are complemented with asteroseismic surface gravities, masses, radii, and mean densities determined by members of the Kepler Asteroseismology Science Consortium. We assess both random and systematic sources of error and include a discussion of sample selection for giants in the Kepler fields. Total uncertainties in the main catalog properties are of the order of 80 K in T {sub eff}, 0.06 dex in [M/H], 0.014 dex in log g, and 12% and 5% in mass and radius, respectively; these reflect a combination of systematic and random errors. Asteroseismic surface gravities are substantially more precise and accurate than spectroscopic ones, and we find good agreement between their mean values and the calibrated spectroscopic surface gravities. There are, however, systematic underlying trends with T {sub eff} and log g. Our effective temperature scale is between 0 and 200 K cooler than that expected from the infrared flux method, depending on the adopted extinction map, which provides evidence for a lower value on average than that inferred for the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). We find a reasonable correspondence between the photometric KIC and spectroscopic APOKASC metallicity scales, with increased dispersion in KIC metallicities as the absolute metal abundance decreases, and offsets in T {sub eff} and log g consistent with those derived in the literature. We present mean fitting relations between APOKASC and KIC observables and discuss future prospects, strengths, and limitations of the catalog data.

  12. The APOKASC Catalog: An Asteroseismic and Spectroscopic Joint Survey of Targets in the Kepler Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Elsworth, Yvonne; Epstein, Courtney; Hekker, Saskia; Mészáros, Sz.; Chaplin, William J.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; García, Rafael A.; Holtzman, Jon; Mathur, Savita; García Pérez, Ana; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Girardi, Léo; Basu, Sarbani; Shetrone, Matthew; Stello, Dennis; Allende Prieto, Carlos; An, Deokkeun; Beck, Paul; Beers, Timothy C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bloemen, Steven; Bovy, Jo; Cunha, Katia; De Ridder, Joris; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Gilliland, Ronald; Harding, Paul; Hearty, Fred R.; Huber, Daniel; Ivans, Inese; Kallinger, Thomas; Majewski, Steven R.; Metcalfe, Travis S.; Miglio, Andrea; Mosser, Benoit; Muna, Demitri; Nidever, David L.; Schneider, Donald P.; Serenelli, Aldo; Smith, Verne V.; Tayar, Jamie; Zamora, Olga; Zasowski, Gail

    2014-12-01

    We present the first APOKASC catalog of spectroscopic and asteroseismic properties of 1916 red giants observed in the Kepler fields. The spectroscopic parameters provided from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment project are complemented with asteroseismic surface gravities, masses, radii, and mean densities determined by members of the Kepler Asteroseismology Science Consortium. We assess both random and systematic sources of error and include a discussion of sample selection for giants in the Kepler fields. Total uncertainties in the main catalog properties are of the order of 80 K in T eff, 0.06 dex in [M/H], 0.014 dex in log g, and 12% and 5% in mass and radius, respectively; these reflect a combination of systematic and random errors. Asteroseismic surface gravities are substantially more precise and accurate than spectroscopic ones, and we find good agreement between their mean values and the calibrated spectroscopic surface gravities. There are, however, systematic underlying trends with T eff and log g. Our effective temperature scale is between 0 and 200 K cooler than that expected from the infrared flux method, depending on the adopted extinction map, which provides evidence for a lower value on average than that inferred for the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). We find a reasonable correspondence between the photometric KIC and spectroscopic APOKASC metallicity scales, with increased dispersion in KIC metallicities as the absolute metal abundance decreases, and offsets in T eff and log g consistent with those derived in the literature. We present mean fitting relations between APOKASC and KIC observables and discuss future prospects, strengths, and limitations of the catalog data.

  13. Accurate determination of optical bandgap and lattice parameters of Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O epitaxial films (0{<=}x{<=}0.3) grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on a-plane sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Laumer, Bernhard; Schuster, Fabian; Stutzmann, Martin; Bergmaier, Andreas; Dollinger, Guenther; Eickhoff, Martin

    2013-06-21

    Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O epitaxial films with Mg concentrations 0{<=}x{<=}0.3 were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on a-plane sapphire substrates. Precise determination of the Mg concentration x was performed by elastic recoil detection analysis. The bandgap energy was extracted from absorption measurements with high accuracy taking electron-hole interaction and exciton-phonon complexes into account. From these results a linear relationship between bandgap energy and Mg concentration is established for x{<=}0.3. Due to alloy disorder, the increase of the photoluminescence emission energy with Mg concentration is less pronounced. An analysis of the lattice parameters reveals that the epitaxial films grow biaxially strained on a-plane sapphire.

  14. Spectroscopic Constants of the X1Σ+ and 13Π states of AlO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sghaier, Onsi; Linguerri, Roberto; Mogren, Muneerah Mogren Al; Francisco, Joseph S.; Hochlaf, Majdi

    2016-08-01

    Using both standard and explicitly correlated ab initio methods in conjunction with several atomic basis sets, the ground state of AlO(X2Σ+) and the two lowest electronic states of AlO+ (1Σ+ and 3Π) are investigated. Potential energy curves for these species are mapped, which are incorporated later to solve the nuclear motion problem. Benchmark computations on AlO(X2Σ+) are used to determine the reliability of the theoretical methods and basis sets used for an accurate description of aluminum oxide compounds. The electronic ground state of AlO+ is X1Σ+, followed by the low-lying 13Π state. For both cationic electronic states, a set of spectroscopic parameters are recommended that may help in the identification of this ion in laboratory and astrophysical media. An accurate estimation of the adiabatic ionization energy of AlO, AIE = 9.70 eV, is also reported.

  15. The HITRAN 2008 Molecular Spectroscopic Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Laurence S.; Gordon, Iouli E.; Barbe, Alain; Benner, D. Chris; Bernath, Peter F.; Birk, Manfred; Boudon, V.; Brown, Linda R.; Campargue, Alain; Champion, J.-P.; Chance, Kelly V.; Coudert, L. H.; Sung, K.; Toth, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the status of the 2008 edition of the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database. The new edition is the first official public release since the 2004 edition, although a number of crucial updates had been made available online since 2004. The HITRAN compilation consists of several components that serve as input for radiative-transfer calculation codes: individual line parameters for the microwave through visible spectra of molecules in the gas phase; absorption cross-sections for molecules having dense spectral features, i.e., spectra in which the individual lines are not resolved; individual line parameters and absorption cross sections for bands in the ultra-violet; refractive indices of aerosols, tables and files of general properties associated with the database; and database management software. The line-by-line portion of the database contains spectroscopic parameters for forty-two molecules including many of their isotopologues.

  16. Spectroscopic Needs for Imaging Dark Energy Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Slosar, Anze; Abate, Alexandra; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Allam, Sahar; Allen, Steven W.; Ansari, Reza; Bailey, Stephen; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Beers, Timothy C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Brodwin, Mark; Brownstein, Joel R.; Brunner, Robert J.; Carrasco-Kind, Matias; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge; Chisari, Nora Elisa; Colless, Matthew; Comparat, Johan; Coupon, Jean; Cheu, Elliott; Cunha, Carlos E.; de la Macorra, Alex; Dell’Antonio, Ian P.; Frye, Brenda L.; Gawiser, Eric J.; Gehrels, Neil; Grady, Kevin; Hagen, Alex; Hall, Patrick B.; Hearin, Andrew P.; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hirata, Christopher M.; Ho, Shirley; Honscheid, Klaus; Huterer, Dragan; Ivezic, Zeljko; Kneib, Jean -Paul; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Lahav, Ofer; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Matthews, Daniel J.; Menard, Brice; Miquel, Ramon; Moniez, Marc; Moos, H. W.; Moustakas, John; Papovich, Casey; Peacock, John A.; Park, Changbom; Rhodes, Jason; Sadeh, Iftach; Schmidt, Samuel J.; Stern, Daniel K.; Tyson, J. Anthony; von der Linden, Anja; Wechsler, Risa H.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Zentner, A.

    2015-03-15

    Ongoing and near-future imaging-based dark energy experiments are critically dependent upon photometric redshifts (a.k.a. photo-z’s): i.e., estimates of the redshifts of objects based only on flux information obtained through broad filters. Higher-quality, lower-scatter photo-z’s will result in smaller random errors on cosmological parameters; while systematic errors in photometric redshift estimates, if not constrained, may dominate all other uncertainties from these experiments. The desired optimization and calibration is dependent upon spectroscopic measurements for secure redshift information; this is the key application of galaxy spectroscopy for imaging-based dark energy experiments. Hence, to achieve their full potential, imaging-based experiments will require large sets of objects with spectroscopically-determined redshifts, for two purposes: Training: Objects with known redshift are needed to map out the relationship between object color and z (or, equivalently, to determine empirically-calibrated templates describing the rest-frame spectra of the full range of galaxies, which may be used to predict the color-z relation). The ultimate goal of training is to minimize each moment of the distribution of differences between photometric redshift estimates and the true redshifts of objects, making the relationship between them as tight as possible. The larger and more complete our “training set” of spectroscopic redshifts is, the smaller the RMS photo-z errors should be, increasing the constraining power of imaging experiments; Requirements: Spectroscopic redshift measurements for ~30,000 objects over >~15 widely-separated regions, each at least ~20 arcmin in diameter, and reaching the faintest objects used in a given experiment, will likely be necessary if photometric redshifts are to be trained and calibrated with conventional techniques. Larger, more complete samples (i.e., with longer exposure times) can improve photo-z algorithms and reduce scatter

  17. Spectroscopic Needs for Imaging Dark Energy Experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Slosar, Anze; Abate, Alexandra; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Allam, Sahar; Allen, Steven W.; Ansari, Reza; Bailey, Stephen; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Beers, Timothy C.; et al

    2015-03-15

    Ongoing and near-future imaging-based dark energy experiments are critically dependent upon photometric redshifts (a.k.a. photo-z’s): i.e., estimates of the redshifts of objects based only on flux information obtained through broad filters. Higher-quality, lower-scatter photo-z’s will result in smaller random errors on cosmological parameters; while systematic errors in photometric redshift estimates, if not constrained, may dominate all other uncertainties from these experiments. The desired optimization and calibration is dependent upon spectroscopic measurements for secure redshift information; this is the key application of galaxy spectroscopy for imaging-based dark energy experiments. Hence, to achieve their full potential, imaging-based experiments will require large setsmore » of objects with spectroscopically-determined redshifts, for two purposes: Training: Objects with known redshift are needed to map out the relationship between object color and z (or, equivalently, to determine empirically-calibrated templates describing the rest-frame spectra of the full range of galaxies, which may be used to predict the color-z relation). The ultimate goal of training is to minimize each moment of the distribution of differences between photometric redshift estimates and the true redshifts of objects, making the relationship between them as tight as possible. The larger and more complete our “training set” of spectroscopic redshifts is, the smaller the RMS photo-z errors should be, increasing the constraining power of imaging experiments; Requirements: Spectroscopic redshift measurements for ~30,000 objects over >~15 widely-separated regions, each at least ~20 arcmin in diameter, and reaching the faintest objects used in a given experiment, will likely be necessary if photometric redshifts are to be trained and calibrated with conventional techniques. Larger, more complete samples (i.e., with longer exposure times) can improve photo-z algorithms and reduce

  18. Accurate Optical Reference Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, N.

    2006-08-01

    Current and near future all-sky astrometric catalogs on the ICRF are reviewed with the emphasis on reference star data at optical wavelengths for user applications. The standard error of a Hipparcos Catalogue star position is now about 15 mas per coordinate. For the Tycho-2 data it is typically 20 to 100 mas, depending on magnitude. The USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC) observing program was completed in 2004 and reductions toward the final UCAC3 release are in progress. This all-sky reference catalogue will have positional errors of 15 to 70 mas for stars in the 10 to 16 mag range, with a high degree of completeness. Proper motions for the about 60 million UCAC stars will be derived by combining UCAC astrometry with available early epoch data, including yet unpublished scans of the complete set of AGK2, Hamburg Zone astrograph and USNO Black Birch programs. Accurate positional and proper motion data are combined in the Naval Observatory Merged Astrometric Dataset (NOMAD) which includes Hipparcos, Tycho-2, UCAC2, USNO-B1, NPM+SPM plate scan data for astrometry, and is supplemented by multi-band optical photometry as well as 2MASS near infrared photometry. The Milli-Arcsecond Pathfinder Survey (MAPS) mission is currently being planned at USNO. This is a micro-satellite to obtain 1 mas positions, parallaxes, and 1 mas/yr proper motions for all bright stars down to about 15th magnitude. This program will be supplemented by a ground-based program to reach 18th magnitude on the 5 mas level.

  19. SDSS spectroscopic survey of stars

    SciTech Connect

    Ivezic, Zeljko; Schlegel, D.; Uomoto, A.; Bond, N.; Beers, T.; Allende Prieto, C.; Wilhelm, R.; Lee, Y.Sun; Sivarani, T.; Juric, M.; Lupton, R.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /LBL, Berkeley /Johns Hopkins U. /Princeton U. /Michigan State U. /Texas U. /Texas Tech. /UC, Santa Cruz /Fermilab /Naval Observ., Flagstaff /Drexel U.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to optical photometry of unprecedented quality, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is also producing a massive spectroscopic database. They discuss determination of stellar parameters, such as effective temperature, gravity and metallicity from SDSS spectra, describe correlations between kinematics and metallicity, and study their variation as a function of the position in the Galaxy. They show that stellar parameter estimates by Beers et al. show a good correlation with the position of a star in the g-r vs. u-g color-color diagram, thereby demonstrating their robustness as well as a potential for photometric parameter estimation methods. Using Beers et al. parameters, they find that the metallicity distribution of the Milky Way stars at a few kpc from the galactic plane is bimodal with a local minimum at [Z/Z{sub {circle_dot}}] {approx} -1.3. The median metallicity for the low-metallicity [Z/Z{sub {circle_dot}}] < =1.3 subsample is nearly independent of Galactic cylindrical coordinates R and z, while it decreases with z for the high-metallicity [Z/Z{sub {circle_dot}}] > -1.3 sample. they also find that the low-metallicity sample has {approx} 2.5 times larger velocity dispersion and that it does not rotate (at the {approx} 10 km/s level), while the rotational velocity of the high-metallicity sample decreases smoothly with the height above the galactic plane.

  20. MAMA Spectroscopic Throughputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    This activity sets new baseline post-SM4 sensitivity/throughput measurements for all the STIS/MAMA spectroscopic modes, and establishes if there changes with respect to perfomance prior to the LVPS failure. It also checks the NUV focus of STIS and its dependence on wavelength.

  1. Accurate Potential Energy Curves for the Ground Electronic States of NeH^{+} and ArH^{+}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coxon, John A.; Hajigeorgiou, Photos G.

    2013-06-01

    All available microwave and infrared spectroscopic line positions for the ground electronic states of the molecular cations NeH^{+} and ArH^{+} were employed in a direct potential fitting procedure to determine compact analytical potential curves and radial functions describing breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. For NeH^{+}, 17 adjustable parameters were required to represent a total of 183 line positions for 4 isotopologues, whereas for ArH^{+}, 23 adjustable parameters were required to represent 440 line positions for 6 isotopologues. The MLR3 potential energy functional form was employed, taking full account of the proper 1/r{^4} limiting long-range dependence of the ion-atom dispersion energy interactions. Accurate vibrational energies, rotational constants and centrifugal distortion constants have been calculated for both diatomic cations.

  2. A Comparison of Galaxy Counting Techniques in Spectroscopically Undersampled Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Specian, Mike A.; Szalay, Alex S.

    2016-11-01

    Accurate measures of galactic overdensities are invaluable for precision cosmology. Obtaining these measurements is complicated when members of one’s galaxy sample lack radial depths, most commonly derived via spectroscopic redshifts. In this paper, we utilize the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s Main Galaxy Sample to compare seven methods of counting galaxies in cells when many of those galaxies lack redshifts. These methods fall into three categories: assigning galaxies discrete redshifts, scaling the numbers counted using regions’ spectroscopic completeness properties, and employing probabilistic techniques. We split spectroscopically undersampled regions into three types—those inside the spectroscopic footprint, those outside but adjacent to it, and those distant from it. Through Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that the preferred counting techniques are a function of region type, cell size, and redshift. We conclude by reporting optimal counting strategies under a variety of conditions.

  3. Developing Accurate Spatial Maps of Cotton Fiber Quality Parameters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Awareness of the importance of cotton fiber quality (Gossypium, L. sps.) has increased as advances in spinning technology require better quality cotton fiber. Recent advances in geospatial information sciences allow an improved ability to study the extent and causes of spatial variability in fiber p...

  4. Spectroscopic Low Coherence Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Aalders, Maurice C.; Hermann, Boris; Drexler, Wolfgang; Faber, Dirk J.

    Low-coherence interferometry (LCI) allows high-resolution volumetric imaging of tissue morphology and provides localized optical properties that can be related to the physiological status of tissue. This chapter discusses the combination of spatial and spectroscopic information by means of spectroscopic OCT (sOCT) and low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS). We describe the theory behind these modalities for the assessment of spatially resolved optical absorption and (back)scattering coefficient spectra. These spectra can be used for the highly localized quantification of chromophore concentrations and assessment of tissue organization on (sub)cellular scales. This leads to a wealth of potential clinical applications, ranging from neonatology for the determination of billibrubin concentrations, to oncology for the optical assessment of the aggressiveness of a cancerous lesion.

  5. Spectroscopic Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, A.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Historically, spectroscopic binary stars were binary systems whose nature was discovered by the changing DOPPLER EFFECT or shift of the spectral lines of one or both of the component stars. The observed Doppler shift is a combination of that produced by the constant RADIAL VELOCITY (i.e. line-of-sight velocity) of the center of mass of the whole system, and the variable shift resulting from the o...

  6. Spectroscopically Unlocking Exoplanet Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nikole

    2016-05-01

    Spectroscopy plays a critical role in a number of areas of exoplanet research. The first exoplanets were detected by precisely measuring Doppler shifts in high resolution (R ~ 100,000) stellar spectra, a technique that has become known as the Radial Velocity (RV) method. The RV method provides critical constraints on exoplanet masses, but is currently limited to some degree by robust line shape predictions. Beyond the RV method, spectroscopy plays a critical role in the characterization of exoplanets beyond their mass and radius. The Hubble Space Telescope has spectroscopically observed the atmospheres of exoplanets that transit their host stars as seen from Earth giving us key insights into atmospheric abundances of key atomic and molecular species as well as cloud optical properties. Similar spectroscopic characterization of exoplanet atmospheres will be carried out at higher resolution (R ~ 100-3000) and with broader wavelength coverage with the James Webb Space Telescope. Future missions such as WFIRST that seek to the pave the way toward the detection and characterization of potentially habitable planets will have the capability of directly measuring the spectra of exoplanet atmospheres and potentially surfaces. Our ability to plan for and interpret spectra from exoplanets relies heavily on the fidelity of the spectroscopic databases available and would greatly benefit from further laboratory and theoretical work aimed at optical properties of atomic, molecular, and cloud/haze species in the pressure and temperature regimes relevant to exoplanet atmospheres.

  7. ZFIRE: A KECK/MOSFIRE Spectroscopic Survey of Galaxies in Rich Environments at z ˜ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanayakkara, Themiya; Glazebrook, Karl; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Yuan, Tiantian; Tran, Kim-Vy; Spitler, Lee; Kewley, Lisa; Straatman, Caroline; Cowley, Michael; Fisher, David; Labbe, Ivo; Tomczak, Adam; Allen, Rebecca; Alcorn, Leo

    2016-09-01

    We present an overview and the first data release of ZFIRE, a spectroscopic redshift survey of star-forming galaxies that utilizes the MOSFIRE instrument on Keck-I to study galaxy properties in rich environments at 1.5 < z < 2.5. ZFIRE measures accurate spectroscopic redshifts and basic galaxy properties derived from multiple emission lines. The galaxies are selected from a stellar mass limited sample based on deep near infrared imaging ({K}{AB}\\lt 25) and precise photometric redshifts from the ZFOURGE and UKIDSS surveys as well as grism redshifts from 3DHST. Between 2013 and 2015, ZFIRE has observed the COSMOS and UDS legacy fields over 13 nights and has obtained 211 galaxy redshifts over 1.57 < z < 2.66 from a combination of nebular emission lines (such as Hα, [N ii], Hβ, [O ii], [O iii], and [S ii]) observed at 1–2 μm. Based on our medium-band near infrared photometry, we are able to spectrophotometrically flux calibrate our spectra to ˜10% accuracy. ZFIRE reaches 5σ emission line flux limits of ˜3 × 10‑18 erg s‑1 cm‑2 with a resolving power of R = 3500 and reaches masses down to ˜109 M ⊙. We confirm that the primary input survey, ZFOURGE, has produced photometric redshifts for star-forming galaxies (including highly attenuated ones) accurate to {{Δ }}z/(1+{z}{spec})=0.015 with 0.7% outliers. We measure a slight redshift bias of <0.001, and we note that the redshift bias tends to be larger at higher masses. We also examine the role of redshift on the derivation of rest-frame colors and stellar population parameters from SED fitting techniques. The ZFIRE survey extends spectroscopically confirmed z ˜ 2 samples across a richer range of environments, here we make available the first public release of the data for use by the community.7

  8. ZFIRE: A KECK/MOSFIRE Spectroscopic Survey of Galaxies in Rich Environments at z ˜ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanayakkara, Themiya; Glazebrook, Karl; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Yuan, Tiantian; Tran, Kim-Vy; Spitler, Lee; Kewley, Lisa; Straatman, Caroline; Cowley, Michael; Fisher, David; Labbe, Ivo; Tomczak, Adam; Allen, Rebecca; Alcorn, Leo

    2016-09-01

    We present an overview and the first data release of ZFIRE, a spectroscopic redshift survey of star-forming galaxies that utilizes the MOSFIRE instrument on Keck-I to study galaxy properties in rich environments at 1.5 < z < 2.5. ZFIRE measures accurate spectroscopic redshifts and basic galaxy properties derived from multiple emission lines. The galaxies are selected from a stellar mass limited sample based on deep near infrared imaging ({K}{AB}\\lt 25) and precise photometric redshifts from the ZFOURGE and UKIDSS surveys as well as grism redshifts from 3DHST. Between 2013 and 2015, ZFIRE has observed the COSMOS and UDS legacy fields over 13 nights and has obtained 211 galaxy redshifts over 1.57 < z < 2.66 from a combination of nebular emission lines (such as Hα, [N ii], Hβ, [O ii], [O iii], and [S ii]) observed at 1-2 μm. Based on our medium-band near infrared photometry, we are able to spectrophotometrically flux calibrate our spectra to ˜10% accuracy. ZFIRE reaches 5σ emission line flux limits of ˜3 × 10-18 erg s-1 cm-2 with a resolving power of R = 3500 and reaches masses down to ˜109 M ⊙. We confirm that the primary input survey, ZFOURGE, has produced photometric redshifts for star-forming galaxies (including highly attenuated ones) accurate to {{Δ }}z/(1+{z}{spec})=0.015 with 0.7% outliers. We measure a slight redshift bias of <0.001, and we note that the redshift bias tends to be larger at higher masses. We also examine the role of redshift on the derivation of rest-frame colors and stellar population parameters from SED fitting techniques. The ZFIRE survey extends spectroscopically confirmed z ˜ 2 samples across a richer range of environments, here we make available the first public release of the data for use by the community.7

  9. CFHTLenS and RCSLenS: Testing Photometric Redshift Distributions Using Angular Cross-Correlations with Spectroscopic Galaxy Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, A.; Heymans, C.; Blake, C.; Hildebrandt, H.; Duncan, C. A. J.; Erben, T.; Nakajima, R.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Viola, M.

    2016-09-01

    We determine the accuracy of galaxy redshift distributions as estimated from photometric redshift probability distributions p(z). Our method utilises measurements of the angular cross-correlation between photometric galaxies and an overlapping sample of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts. We describe the redshift leakage from a galaxy photometric redshift bin j into a spectroscopic redshift bin i using the sum of the p(z) for the galaxies residing in bin j. We can then predict the angular cross-correlation between photometric and spectroscopic galaxies due to intrinsic galaxy clustering when i ≠ j as a function of the measured angular cross-correlation when i = j. We also account for enhanced clustering arising from lensing magnification using a halo model. The comparison of this prediction with the measured signal provides a consistency check on the validity of using the summed p(z) to determine galaxy redshift distributions in cosmological analyses, as advocated by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). We present an analysis of the photometric redshifts measured by CFHTLenS, which overlaps the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We also analyse the Red-sequence Cluster Lensing Survey (RCSLenS), which overlaps both BOSS and the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We find that the summed p(z) from both surveys are generally biased with respect to the true underlying distributions. If unaccounted for, this bias would lead to errors in cosmological parameter estimation from CFHTLenS by less than ˜4%. For photometric redshift bins which spatially overlap in 3-D with our spectroscopic sample, we determine redshift bias corrections which can be used in future cosmological analyses that rely on accurate galaxy redshift distributions.

  10. Asteroseismic determination of fundamental parameters of Sun-like stars using multilayered neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Kuldeep; Hanasoge, Shravan; Bhattacharya, Jishnu; Antia, H. M.; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy

    2016-10-01

    The advent of space-based observatories such as Convection, Rotation and planetary Transits (CoRoT) and Kepler has enabled the testing of our understanding of stellar evolution on thousands of stars. Evolutionary models typically require five input parameters, the mass, initial helium abundance, initial metallicity, mixing length (assumed to be constant over time), and the age to which the star must be evolved. Some of these parameters are also very useful in characterizing the associated planets and in studying Galactic archaeology. How to obtain these parameters from observations rapidly and accurately, specifically in the context of surveys of thousands of stars, is an outstanding question, one that has eluded straightforward resolution. For a given star, we typically measure the effective temperature and surface metallicity spectroscopically and low-degree oscillation frequencies through space observatories. Here we demonstrate that statistical learning, using artificial neural networks, is successful in determining the evolutionary parameters based on spectroscopic and seismic measurements. Our trained networks show robustness over a broad range of parameter space, and critically, are entirely computationally inexpensive and fully automated. We analyse the observations of a few stars using this method and the results compare well to inferences obtained using other techniques. This method is both computationally cheap and inferentially accurate, paving the way for analysing the vast quantities of stellar observations from past, current, and future missions.

  11. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry during atomic layer deposition of Pt, Ru and Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leick, N.; Weber, J. W.; Mackus, A. J. M.; Weber, M. J.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2016-03-01

    The preparation of ultra-thin platinum-group metal films, such as Pt, Ru and Pd, by atomic layer deposition (ALD) was monitored in situ using spectroscopic ellipsometry in the photon energy range of 0.75-5 eV. The metals’ dielectric function was parametrized using a ‘flexible’ Kramers-Kronig consistent dielectric function because it was able to provide accurate curve shape control over the optical response of the metals. From this dielectric function, it was possible to extract the film thickness values during the ALD process. The important ALD process parameters, such as the nucleation period and growth per cycle of Pt, Ru and Pd could be determined from the thickness evolution. In addition to process parameters, the film resistivity in particular could be extracted from the modeled dielectric function. Spectroscopic ellipsometry thereby revealed itself as a feasible and valuable technique to be used in research and development applications, as well as for process monitoring during ALD.

  12. The STIS CCD Spectroscopic Line Spread Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, T.; Lindler, D.; Tennant, D.; Bowers, C.; Grady, C.; Hill, R. S.; Malumuth, E.

    2002-01-01

    We characterize the spectroscopic line spread functions of the spectroscopic CCD modes for high contrast objects. Our long range goal is to develop tools that accurately extract spectroscopic information of faint, point or extended sources in the vicinity of bright, point sources at separations approaching the realizable angular limits of HST with STIS. Diffracted and scattered light due to the HST optics, and scattered light effects within the STIS are addressed. Filter fringing, CCD fringing, window reflections, and scattering within the detector and other effects are noted. We have obtained spectra of several reference stars, used for flux calibration or for coronagraphic standards, that have spectral distributions ranging from very red to very blue. Spectra of each star were recorded with the star in the aperture and with the star blocked by either the F1 or F2 fiducial. Plots of the detected starlight along the spatial axis of the aperture are provided for four stars. With the star in the aperture, the line spread function is quite noticeable. Placing the star behind one of the fiducials cuts the scattered light and the diffracted light, is detectable even out to 1OOOOA. When the star is placed behind either fiducial, the scattered and diffracted light components, at three arcseconds displacement from the star, are below lop6 the peak of the star at wavelengths below 6000A; at the same angular distance, scattered light does contaminate the background longward of 6000A up to a level of 10(exp -5).

  13. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  14. The HITRAN2012 molecular spectroscopic database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, L. S.; Gordon, I. E.; Babikov, Y.; Barbe, A.; Chris Benner, D.; Bernath, P. F.; Birk, M.; Bizzocchi, L.; Boudon, V.; Brown, L. R.; Campargue, A.; Chance, K.; Cohen, E. A.; Coudert, L. H.; Devi, V. M.; Drouin, B. J.; Fayt, A.; Flaud, J.-M.; Gamache, R. R.; Harrison, J. J.; Hartmann, J.-M.; Hill, C.; Hodges, J. T.; Jacquemart, D.; Jolly, A.; Lamouroux, J.; Le Roy, R. J.; Li, G.; Long, D. A.; Lyulin, O. M.; Mackie, C. J.; Massie, S. T.; Mikhailenko, S.; Müller, H. S. P.; Naumenko, O. V.; Nikitin, A. V.; Orphal, J.; Perevalov, V.; Perrin, A.; Polovtseva, E. R.; Richard, C.; Smith, M. A. H.; Starikova, E.; Sung, K.; Tashkun, S.; Tennyson, J.; Toon, G. C.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.; Wagner, G.

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes the status of the 2012 edition of the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic compilation. The new edition replaces the previous HITRAN edition of 2008 and its updates during the intervening years. The HITRAN molecular absorption compilation is comprised of six major components structured into folders that are freely accessible on the internet. These folders consist of the traditional line-by-line spectroscopic parameters required for high-resolution radiative-transfer codes, infrared absorption cross-sections for molecules not yet amenable to representation in a line-by-line form, ultraviolet spectroscopic parameters, aerosol indices of refraction, collision-induced absorption data, and general tables such as partition sums that apply globally to the data. The new HITRAN is greatly extended in terms of accuracy, spectral coverage, additional absorption phenomena, and validity. Molecules and isotopologues have been added that address the issues of atmospheres beyond the Earth. Also discussed is a new initiative that casts HITRAN into a relational database format that offers many advantages over the long-standing sequential text-based structure that has existed since the initial release of HITRAN in the early 1970s.

  15. Spectroscopic Survey of Circumstellar Disks in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Maria; Hernandez, Jesus; Olguin, Lorenzo; Briceno, Cesar

    2013-07-01

    As a second stage of a project focused on characterizing candidate stars bearing a circumstellar disk in Orion, we present a spectroscopic follow-up of a set of about 170 bright stars. The present set of stars was selected by their optical (UBVRI) and infrared behavior in different color-color and color-magnitude diagrams. Observations were carried out at the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional located at the Sierra San Pedro Martir in B.C., Mexico and at the Observatorio Guillermo Haro in Cananea, Sonora, Mexico. Low-resolution spectra were obtained for all candidates in the sample. Using the SPTCLASS code, we have obtained spectral types and equivalent widths of the Li I 6707 and Halpha lines for each one of the stars. This project is a cornerstone of a large scale survey aimed to obtain stellar parameters in a homogeneous way using spectroscopic data. This work was partially supported by UNAM-PAPIIT grant IN-109311.

  16. Preparation, spectroscopic, thermal, antihepatotoxicity, hematological parameters and liver antioxidant capacity characterizations of Cd(II), Hg(II), and Pb(II) mononuclear complexes of paracetamol anti-inflammatory drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Megharbel, Samy M.; Hamza, Reham Z.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2014-10-01

    Keeping in view that some metal complexes are found to be more potent than their parent drugs, therefore, our present paper aimed to synthesized Cd(II), Hg(II) and Pb(II) complexes of paracetamol (Para) anti-inflammatory drug. Paracetamol complexes with general formula [M(Para)2(H2O)2]·nH2O have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, conductivity, IR and thermal (TG/DTG), 1H NMR, electronic spectral studies. The conductivity data of these complexes have non-electrolytic nature. Comparative antimicrobial (bacteria and fungi) behaviors and molecular weights of paracetamol with their complexes have been studied. In vivo the antihepatotoxicity effect and some liver function parameters levels (serum total protein, ALT, AST, and LDH) were measured. Hematological parameters and liver antioxidant capacities of both Para and their complexes were performed. The Cd2+ + Para complex was recorded amelioration of antioxidant capacities in liver homogenates compared to other Para complexes treated groups.

  17. Raman Spectroscopic Measurements of Dermal Carotenoids in Breast Cancer Operated Patients Provide Evidence for the Positive Impact of a Dietary Regimen Rich in Fruit and Vegetables on Body Oxidative Stress and BC Prognostic Anthropometric Parameters: A Five-Year Study.

    PubMed

    Perrone, A; Pintaudi, A M; Traina, A; Carruba, G; Attanzio, A; Gentile, C; Tesoriere, L; Livrea, M A

    2016-01-01

    Dermal carotenoids are a feasible marker of the body antioxidative network and may reveal a moderate to severe imbalance of the redox status, thereby providing indication of individual oxidative stress. In this work noninvasive Resonance Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) measurements of skin carotenoids (skin carotenoid score (SCS)) were used to provide indications of individual oxidative stress, each year for five years, in 71 breast cancer (BC) patients at high risk of recurrence. Patients' SCS has been correlated with parameters relevant to BC risk, waist circumference (WC), and body mass index (BMI), in the aim of monitoring the effect of a dietary regimen intended to positively affect BC risk factors. The RRS methodological approach in BC patients appeared from positive correlation between patients' SCS and blood level of lycopene. The level of skin carotenoids was inversely correlated with the patients' WC and BMI. At the end of the 5 y observation BC patients exhibited a significant reduction of WC and BMI and increase of SCS, when strictly adhering to the dietary regimen. In conclusion, noninvasive measurements of skin carotenoids can (i) reveal an oxidative stress condition correlated with parameters of BC risk and (ii) monitor dietary-related variations in BC patients.

  18. Raman Spectroscopic Measurements of Dermal Carotenoids in Breast Cancer Operated Patients Provide Evidence for the Positive Impact of a Dietary Regimen Rich in Fruit and Vegetables on Body Oxidative Stress and BC Prognostic Anthropometric Parameters: A Five-Year Study.

    PubMed

    Perrone, A; Pintaudi, A M; Traina, A; Carruba, G; Attanzio, A; Gentile, C; Tesoriere, L; Livrea, M A

    2016-01-01

    Dermal carotenoids are a feasible marker of the body antioxidative network and may reveal a moderate to severe imbalance of the redox status, thereby providing indication of individual oxidative stress. In this work noninvasive Resonance Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) measurements of skin carotenoids (skin carotenoid score (SCS)) were used to provide indications of individual oxidative stress, each year for five years, in 71 breast cancer (BC) patients at high risk of recurrence. Patients' SCS has been correlated with parameters relevant to BC risk, waist circumference (WC), and body mass index (BMI), in the aim of monitoring the effect of a dietary regimen intended to positively affect BC risk factors. The RRS methodological approach in BC patients appeared from positive correlation between patients' SCS and blood level of lycopene. The level of skin carotenoids was inversely correlated with the patients' WC and BMI. At the end of the 5 y observation BC patients exhibited a significant reduction of WC and BMI and increase of SCS, when strictly adhering to the dietary regimen. In conclusion, noninvasive measurements of skin carotenoids can (i) reveal an oxidative stress condition correlated with parameters of BC risk and (ii) monitor dietary-related variations in BC patients. PMID:27213029

  19. Raman Spectroscopic Measurements of Dermal Carotenoids in Breast Cancer Operated Patients Provide Evidence for the Positive Impact of a Dietary Regimen Rich in Fruit and Vegetables on Body Oxidative Stress and BC Prognostic Anthropometric Parameters: A Five-Year Study

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, A.; Pintaudi, A. M.; Traina, A.; Carruba, G.; Attanzio, A.; Gentile, C.; Tesoriere, L.; Livrea, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Dermal carotenoids are a feasible marker of the body antioxidative network and may reveal a moderate to severe imbalance of the redox status, thereby providing indication of individual oxidative stress. In this work noninvasive Resonance Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) measurements of skin carotenoids (skin carotenoid score (SCS)) were used to provide indications of individual oxidative stress, each year for five years, in 71 breast cancer (BC) patients at high risk of recurrence. Patients' SCS has been correlated with parameters relevant to BC risk, waist circumference (WC), and body mass index (BMI), in the aim of monitoring the effect of a dietary regimen intended to positively affect BC risk factors. The RRS methodological approach in BC patients appeared from positive correlation between patients' SCS and blood level of lycopene. The level of skin carotenoids was inversely correlated with the patients' WC and BMI. At the end of the 5 y observation BC patients exhibited a significant reduction of WC and BMI and increase of SCS, when strictly adhering to the dietary regimen. In conclusion, noninvasive measurements of skin carotenoids can (i) reveal an oxidative stress condition correlated with parameters of BC risk and (ii) monitor dietary-related variations in BC patients. PMID:27213029

  20. Accurate label-free reaction kinetics determination using initial rate heat measurements.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Kourosh Honarmand; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Jacobs, Denise; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2015-01-01

    Accurate label-free methods or assays to obtain the initial reaction rates have significant importance in fundamental studies of enzymes and in application-oriented high throughput screening of enzyme activity. Here we introduce a label-free approach for obtaining initial rates of enzyme activity from heat measurements, which we name initial rate calorimetry (IrCal). This approach is based on our new finding that the data recorded by isothermal titration calorimetry for the early stages of a reaction, which have been widely ignored, are correlated to the initial rates. Application of the IrCal approach to various enzymes led to accurate enzyme kinetics parameters as compared to spectroscopic methods and enabled enzyme kinetic studies with natural substrate, e.g. proteases with protein substrates. Because heat is a label-free property of almost all reactions, the IrCal approach holds promise in fundamental studies of various enzymes and in use of calorimetry for high throughput screening of enzyme activity.

  1. Accurate label-free reaction kinetics determination using initial rate heat measurements

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Kourosh Honarmand; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Jacobs, Denise; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate label-free methods or assays to obtain the initial reaction rates have significant importance in fundamental studies of enzymes and in application-oriented high throughput screening of enzyme activity. Here we introduce a label-free approach for obtaining initial rates of enzyme activity from heat measurements, which we name initial rate calorimetry (IrCal). This approach is based on our new finding that the data recorded by isothermal titration calorimetry for the early stages of a reaction, which have been widely ignored, are correlated to the initial rates. Application of the IrCal approach to various enzymes led to accurate enzyme kinetics parameters as compared to spectroscopic methods and enabled enzyme kinetic studies with natural substrate, e.g. proteases with protein substrates. Because heat is a label-free property of almost all reactions, the IrCal approach holds promise in fundamental studies of various enzymes and in use of calorimetry for high throughput screening of enzyme activity. PMID:26574737

  2. Spectroscopic method to measure the superfluid fraction of an ultracold atomic gas

    SciTech Connect

    John, S. T.; Hadzibabic, Z.; Cooper, N. R.

    2011-02-15

    We perform detailed analytical and numerical studies of a recently proposed method for a spectroscopic measurement of the superfluid fraction of an ultracold atomic gas [N. R. Cooper and Z. Hadzibabic, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 030401 (2010)]. Previous theoretical work is extended by explicitly including the effects of nonzero temperature and interactions, and assessing the quantitative accuracy of the proposed measurement for a one-component Bose gas. We show that for suitably chosen experimental parameters the method yields an experimentally detectable signal and a sufficiently accurate measurement. This is illustrated by explicitly considering two key examples: First, for a weakly interacting three-dimensional Bose gas it reproduces the expected result that below the critical temperature the superfluid fraction closely follows the condensate fraction. Second, it allows a clear quantitative differentiation of the superfluid and the condensate density in a strongly interacting Bose gas.

  3. NNLOPS accurate associated HW production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astill, William; Bizon, Wojciech; Re, Emanuele; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2016-06-01

    We present a next-to-next-to-leading order accurate description of associated HW production consistently matched to a parton shower. The method is based on reweighting events obtained with the HW plus one jet NLO accurate calculation implemented in POWHEG, extended with the MiNLO procedure, to reproduce NNLO accurate Born distributions. Since the Born kinematics is more complex than the cases treated before, we use a parametrization of the Collins-Soper angles to reduce the number of variables required for the reweighting. We present phenomenological results at 13 TeV, with cuts suggested by the Higgs Cross section Working Group.

  4. Accurate lineshape spectroscopy and the Boltzmann constant

    PubMed Central

    Truong, G.-W.; Anstie, J. D.; May, E. F.; Stace, T. M.; Luiten, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy has an illustrious history delivering serendipitous discoveries and providing a stringent testbed for new physical predictions, including applications from trace materials detection, to understanding the atmospheres of stars and planets, and even constraining cosmological models. Reaching fundamental-noise limits permits optimal extraction of spectroscopic information from an absorption measurement. Here, we demonstrate a quantum-limited spectrometer that delivers high-precision measurements of the absorption lineshape. These measurements yield a very accurate measurement of the excited-state (6P1/2) hyperfine splitting in Cs, and reveals a breakdown in the well-known Voigt spectral profile. We develop a theoretical model that accounts for this breakdown, explaining the observations to within the shot-noise limit. Our model enables us to infer the thermal velocity dispersion of the Cs vapour with an uncertainty of 35 p.p.m. within an hour. This allows us to determine a value for Boltzmann's constant with a precision of 6 p.p.m., and an uncertainty of 71 p.p.m. PMID:26465085

  5. Fast and Accurate Exhaled Breath Ammonia Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Solga, Steven F.; Mudalel, Matthew L.; Spacek, Lisa A.; Risby, Terence H.

    2014-01-01

    This exhaled breath ammonia method uses a fast and highly sensitive spectroscopic method known as quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) that uses a quantum cascade based laser. The monitor is coupled to a sampler that measures mouth pressure and carbon dioxide. The system is temperature controlled and specifically designed to address the reactivity of this compound. The sampler provides immediate feedback to the subject and the technician on the quality of the breath effort. Together with the quick response time of the monitor, this system is capable of accurately measuring exhaled breath ammonia representative of deep lung systemic levels. Because the system is easy to use and produces real time results, it has enabled experiments to identify factors that influence measurements. For example, mouth rinse and oral pH reproducibly and significantly affect results and therefore must be controlled. Temperature and mode of breathing are other examples. As our understanding of these factors evolves, error is reduced, and clinical studies become more meaningful. This system is very reliable and individual measurements are inexpensive. The sampler is relatively inexpensive and quite portable, but the monitor is neither. This limits options for some clinical studies and provides rational for future innovations. PMID:24962141

  6. Effect of anatomy on spectroscopic detection of cervical dysplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkovic, Jelena; Lau, Condon; McGee, Sasha; Yu, Chung-Chieh; Nazemi, Jonathan; Galindo, Luis; Feng, Victoria; Darragh, Teresa; de Las Morenas, Antonio; Crum, Christopher; Stier, Elizabeth; Feld, Michael; Badizadegan, Kamran

    2009-07-01

    It has long been speculated that underlying variations in tissue anatomy affect in vivo spectroscopic measurements. We investigate the effects of cervical anatomy on reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy to guide the development of a diagnostic algorithm for identifying high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) free of the confounding effects of anatomy. We use spectroscopy in both contact probe and imaging modes to study patients undergoing either colposcopy or treatment for HSIL. Physical models of light propagation in tissue are used to extract parameters related to tissue morphology and biochemistry. Our results show that the transformation zone, the area in which the vast majority of HSILs are found, is spectroscopically distinct from the adjacent squamous mucosa, and that these anatomical differences can directly influence spectroscopic diagnostic parameters. Specifically, we demonstrate that performance of diagnostic algorithms for identifying HSILs is artificially enhanced when clinically normal squamous sites are included in the statistical analysis of the spectroscopic data. We conclude that underlying differences in tissue anatomy can have a confounding effect on diagnostic spectroscopic parameters and that the common practice of including clinically normal squamous sites in cervical spectroscopy results in artificially improved performance in distinguishing HSILs from clinically suspicious non-HSILs.

  7. Accurate Molecular Polarizabilities Based on Continuum Electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Truchon, Jean-François; Nicholls, Anthony; Iftimie, Radu I.; Roux, Benoît; Bayly, Christopher I.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach for representing the intramolecular polarizability as a continuum dielectric is introduced to account for molecular electronic polarization. It is shown, using a finite-difference solution to the Poisson equation, that the Electronic Polarization from Internal Continuum (EPIC) model yields accurate gas-phase molecular polarizability tensors for a test set of 98 challenging molecules composed of heteroaromatics, alkanes and diatomics. The electronic polarization originates from a high intramolecular dielectric that produces polarizabilities consistent with B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ and experimental values when surrounded by vacuum dielectric. In contrast to other approaches to model electronic polarization, this simple model avoids the polarizability catastrophe and accurately calculates molecular anisotropy with the use of very few fitted parameters and without resorting to auxiliary sites or anisotropic atomic centers. On average, the unsigned error in the average polarizability and anisotropy compared to B3LYP are 2% and 5%, respectively. The correlation between the polarizability components from B3LYP and this approach lead to a R2 of 0.990 and a slope of 0.999. Even the F2 anisotropy, shown to be a difficult case for existing polarizability models, can be reproduced within 2% error. In addition to providing new parameters for a rapid method directly applicable to the calculation of polarizabilities, this work extends the widely used Poisson equation to areas where accurate molecular polarizabilities matter. PMID:23646034

  8. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-Visible) investigations, NMR chemical shielding anisotropy (CSA) parameters of 2,6-Diamino-4-chloropyrimidine for dye sensitized solar cells using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Gladis Anitha, E; Joseph Vedhagiri, S; Parimala, K

    2015-02-01

    The molecular structure, geometry optimization, vibrational frequencies of organic dye sensitizer 2,6-Diamino-4-chloropyrimidine (DACP) were studied based on Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) spectrum was investigated by time dependent DFT (TD-DFT). Features of the electronic absorption spectrum in the UV-Visible regions were assigned based on TD-DFT calculation. The absorption bands are assigned to transitions. The interfacial electron transfer between semiconductor TiO2 electrode and dye sensitizer DACP is due to an electron injection process from excited dye to the semiconductor's conduction band. The observed and the calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement. The energies of the frontier molecular orbitals (FMOS) have also been determined. The chemical shielding anisotropic (CSA) parameters are calculated from the NMR analysis, Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions and charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis.

  9. LIBS spectroscopic classification relative to compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Steven T.; Jacobs, Eddie; Furxhi, Orges

    2011-05-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) utilizes a diversity of standard spectroscopic techniques for classification of materials present in the sample. Pre-excitation processing sometimes limits the analyte to a short list of candidates. Prior art demonstrates that sparsity is present in the data. This is sometimes characterized as identification by components. Traditionally, spectroscopic identification has been accomplished by an expert reader in a manner typical for MRI images in the medicine. In an effort to automate this process, more recent art has emphasized the use of customized variations to standard classification algorithms. In addition, formal mathematical proofs for compressive sensing have been advanced. Recently the University of Memphis has been contracted by the Spectroscopic Materials Identification Center to advance and characterize the sensor research and development related to LIBS. Applications include portable standoff sensing for improvised explosive device detection and related law enforcement and military applications. Reduction of the mass, power consumption and other portability parameters is seen as dependent on classification choices for a LIBS system. This paper presents results for the comparison of standard LIBS classification techniques to those implied by Compressive Sensing mathematics. Optimization results and implications for portable LIBS design are presented.

  10. Two highly accurate methods for pitch calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniel, K.; Härtig, F.; Osawa, S.; Sato, O.

    2009-11-01

    Among profiles, helix and tooth thickness pitch is one of the most important parameters of an involute gear measurement evaluation. In principle, coordinate measuring machines (CMM) and CNC-controlled gear measuring machines as a variant of a CMM are suited for these kinds of gear measurements. Now the Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (NMIJ/AIST) and the German national metrology institute the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have each developed independently highly accurate pitch calibration methods applicable to CMM or gear measuring machines. Both calibration methods are based on the so-called closure technique which allows the separation of the systematic errors of the measurement device and the errors of the gear. For the verification of both calibration methods, NMIJ/AIST and PTB performed measurements on a specially designed pitch artifact. The comparison of the results shows that both methods can be used for highly accurate calibrations of pitch standards.

  11. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): spectroscopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, A. M.; Driver, S. P.; Brough, S.; Owers, M. S.; Bauer, A. E.; Gunawardhana, M. L. P.; Cluver, M. E.; Colless, M.; Foster, C.; Lara-López, M. A.; Roseboom, I.; Sharp, R.; Steele, O.; Thomas, D.; Baldry, I. K.; Brown, M. J. I.; Liske, J.; Norberg, P.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Bamford, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Loveday, J.; Meyer, M.; Peacock, J. A.; Tuffs, R.; Agius, N.; Alpaslan, M.; Andrae, E.; Cameron, E.; Cole, S.; Ching, J. H. Y.; Christodoulou, L.; Conselice, C.; Croom, S.; Cross, N. J. G.; De Propris, R.; Delhaize, J.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Ellis, S.; Frenk, C. S.; Graham, Alister W.; Grootes, M. W.; Häußler, B.; Heymans, C.; Hill, D.; Hoyle, B.; Hudson, M.; Jarvis, M.; Johansson, J.; Jones, D. H.; van Kampen, E.; Kelvin, L.; Kuijken, K.; López-Sánchez, Á.; Maddox, S.; Madore, B.; Maraston, C.; McNaught-Roberts, T.; Nichol, R. C.; Oliver, S.; Parkinson, H.; Penny, S.; Phillipps, S.; Pimbblet, K. A.; Ponman, T.; Popescu, C. C.; Prescott, M.; Proctor, R.; Sadler, E. M.; Sansom, A. E.; Seibert, M.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Sutherland, W.; Taylor, E.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Vázquez-Mata, J. A.; Warren, S.; Wijesinghe, D. B.; Wild, V.; Wilkins, S.

    2013-04-01

    The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey is a multiwavelength photometric and spectroscopic survey, using the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope to obtain spectra for up to ˜300 000 galaxies over 280 deg2, to a limiting magnitude of rpet < 19.8 mag. The target galaxies are distributed over 0 < z ≲ 0.5 with a median redshift of z ≈ 0.2, although the redshift distribution includes a small number of systems, primarily quasars, at higher redshifts, up to and beyond z = 1. The redshift accuracy ranges from σv ≈ 50 km s-1 to σv ≈ 100 km s-1 depending on the signal-to-noise ratio of the spectrum. Here we describe the GAMA spectroscopic reduction and analysis pipeline. We present the steps involved in taking the raw two-dimensional spectroscopic images through to flux-calibrated one-dimensional spectra. The resulting GAMA spectra cover an observed wavelength range of 3750 ≲ λ ≲ 8850 Å at a resolution of R ≈ 1300. The final flux calibration is typically accurate to 10-20 per cent, although the reliability is worse at the extreme wavelength ends, and poorer in the blue than the red. We present details of the measurement of emission and absorption features in the GAMA spectra. These measurements are characterized through a variety of quality control analyses detailing the robustness and reliability of the measurements. We illustrate the quality of the measurements with a brief exploration of elementary emission line properties of the galaxies in the GAMA sample. We demonstrate the luminosity dependence of the Balmer decrement, consistent with previously published results, and explore further how Balmer decrement varies with galaxy mass and redshift. We also investigate the mass and redshift dependencies of the [N II]/Hα versus [O III]/Hβ spectral diagnostic diagram, commonly used to discriminate between star forming and nuclear activity in galaxies.

  12. Fundamental spectroscopic studies of carbenes and hydrocarbon radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Thaddeus, P.; Gottlieb, C.

    1992-05-01

    This document details activities during this reporting period topics discussed are: The first spectroscopic identification of the HCCCO and DCCCO radicals; detection of new vibrationally excited states of the carbon chain radicals CCH and CCD and the three-membered carbene ring, cyclopropenylidene; determination of an accurate structure of the cumulene carbene H{sub 2}CCC; analysis the hyperfine structure in the SiC radical; and the undertaking of a systematic search for new sulfur bearing radicals.

  13. sick: The Spectroscopic Inference Crank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Andrew R.

    2016-03-01

    There exists an inordinate amount of spectral data in both public and private astronomical archives that remain severely under-utilized. The lack of reliable open-source tools for analyzing large volumes of spectra contributes to this situation, which is poised to worsen as large surveys successively release orders of magnitude more spectra. In this article I introduce sick, the spectroscopic inference crank, a flexible and fast Bayesian tool for inferring astrophysical parameters from spectra. sick is agnostic to the wavelength coverage, resolving power, or general data format, allowing any user to easily construct a generative model for their data, regardless of its source. sick can be used to provide a nearest-neighbor estimate of model parameters, a numerically optimized point estimate, or full Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the posterior probability distributions. This generality empowers any astronomer to capitalize on the plethora of published synthetic and observed spectra, and make precise inferences for a host of astrophysical (and nuisance) quantities. Model intensities can be reliably approximated from existing grids of synthetic or observed spectra using linear multi-dimensional interpolation, or a Cannon-based model. Additional phenomena that transform the data (e.g., redshift, rotational broadening, continuum, spectral resolution) are incorporated as free parameters and can be marginalized away. Outlier pixels (e.g., cosmic rays or poorly modeled regimes) can be treated with a Gaussian mixture model, and a noise model is included to account for systematically underestimated variance. Combining these phenomena into a scalar-justified, quantitative model permits precise inferences with credible uncertainties on noisy data. I describe the common model features, the implementation details, and the default behavior, which is balanced to be suitable for most astronomical applications. Using a forward model on low-resolution, high signal

  14. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography

    PubMed Central

    Adie, Steven G.; Liang, Xing; Kennedy, Brendan F.; John, Renu; Sampson, David D.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We present an optical technique to image the frequency-dependent complex mechanical response of a viscoelastic sample. Three-dimensional hyperspectral data, comprising two-dimensional B-mode images and a third dimension corresponding to vibration frequency, were acquired from samples undergoing external mechanical excitation in the audio-frequency range. We describe the optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal when vibration is applied to a sample and detail the processing and acquisition techniques used to extract the local complex mechanical response from three-dimensional data that, due to a wide range of vibration frequencies, possess a wide range of sample velocities. We demonstrate frequency-dependent contrast of the displacement amplitude and phase of a silicone phantom containing inclusions of higher stiffness. Measurements of an ex vivo tumor margin demonstrate distinct spectra between adipose and tumor regions, and images of displacement amplitude and phase demonstrated spatially-resolved contrast. Contrast was also observed in displacement amplitude and phase images of a rat muscle sample. These results represent the first demonstration of mechanical spectroscopy based on B-mode OCT imaging. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography (S-OCE) provides a high-resolution imaging capability for the detection of tissue pathologies that are characterized by a frequency-dependent viscoelastic response. PMID:21164898

  15. Spectroscopic Detection of Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    ALAM,M. KATHLEEN; TIMLIN,JERILYN A.; MARTIN,LAURA E.; HJELLE,DRIAN; LYONS,RICK; GARRISON,KRISTIN

    2000-11-01

    The goal of this LDRD Research project was to provide a preliminary examination of the use of infrared spectroscopy as a tool to detect the changes in cell cultures upon activation by an infectious agent. Due to a late arrival of funding, only 5 months were available to transfer and setup equipment at UTTM,develop cell culture lines, test methods of in-situ activation and collect kinetic data from activated cells. Using attenuated total reflectance (ATR) as a sampling method, live cell cultures were examined prior to and after activation. Spectroscopic data were collected from cells immediately after activation in situ and, in many cases for five successive hours. Additional data were collected from cells activated within a test tube (pre-activated), in both transmission mode as well as in ATR mode. Changes in the infrared data were apparent in the transmission data collected from the pre-activated cells as well in some of the pre-activated ATR data. Changes in the in-situ activated spectral data were only occasionally present due to (1) the limited time cells were studied and (2) incomplete activation. Comparison of preliminary data to infrared bands reported in the literature suggests the primary changes seen are due an increase in ribonucleic acid (RNA) production. This work will be continued as part of a 3 year DARPA grant.

  16. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Adie, Steven G; Liang, Xing; Kennedy, Brendan F; John, Renu; Sampson, David D; Boppart, Stephen A

    2010-12-01

    We present an optical technique to image the frequency-dependent complex mechanical response of a viscoelastic sample. Three-dimensional hyperspectral data, comprising two-dimensional B-mode images and a third dimension corresponding to vibration frequency, were acquired from samples undergoing external mechanical excitation in the audio-frequency range. We describe the optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal when vibration is applied to a sample and detail the processing and acquisition techniques used to extract the local complex mechanical response from three-dimensional data that, due to a wide range of vibration frequencies, possess a wide range of sample velocities. We demonstrate frequency-dependent contrast of the displacement amplitude and phase of a silicone phantom containing inclusions of higher stiffness. Measurements of an ex vivo tumor margin demonstrate distinct spectra between adipose and tumor regions, and images of displacement amplitude and phase demonstrated spatially-resolved contrast. Contrast was also observed in displacement amplitude and phase images of a rat muscle sample. These results represent the first demonstration of mechanical spectroscopy based on B-mode OCT imaging. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography (S-OCE) provides a high-resolution imaging capability for the detection of tissue pathologies that are characterized by a frequency-dependent viscoelastic response. PMID:21164898

  17. Spectroscopic classification of supernova candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkin, S. T.; Hall, A.; Fraser, M.; Campbell, H.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Pietro, N.

    2014-09-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of four supernovae at the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma, using the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph and the R300V grating (3500-8000 Ang; ~6 Ang resolution).

  18. Spectroscopic detection of nitrogen concentrations in sagebrush

    SciTech Connect

    J. J. MITCHELL; N. F. GLENN; T.T. SANKEY; D. R. DERRYBERRY; R. C. HRUSKA; M. O. Anderson

    2012-07-01

    The ability to estimate foliar nitrogen (N) in semi-arid landscapes can yield information on nutritional status and improve our limited understanding of controls on canopy photosynthesis. We examined two spectroscopic methods for estimating sagebrush dried leaf and live shrub N content: first derivative reflectance (FDR) and continuum removal. Both methods used partial least squares (PLS) regression to select wavebands most significantly correlated with N concentrations in the samples. Sagebrush dried leaf spectra produced PLS models (R2 = 0.76–0.86) that could predict N concentrations within the dataset more accurately than PLS models generated from live shrub spectra (R2 = 0.41–0.63). Inclusion of wavelengths associated with leaf water in the FDR transformations appeared to improve regression results. Findings are encouraging and warrant further exploration into sagebrush reflectance spectra to characterize N concentrations.

  19. Profitable capitation requires accurate costing.

    PubMed

    West, D A; Hicks, L L; Balas, E A; West, T D

    1996-01-01

    In the name of costing accuracy, nurses are asked to track inventory use on per treatment basis when more significant costs, such as general overhead and nursing salaries, are usually allocated to patients or treatments on an average cost basis. Accurate treatment costing and financial viability require analysis of all resources actually consumed in treatment delivery, including nursing services and inventory. More precise costing information enables more profitable decisions as is demonstrated by comparing the ratio-of-cost-to-treatment method (aggregate costing) with alternative activity-based costing methods (ABC). Nurses must participate in this costing process to assure that capitation bids are based upon accurate costs rather than simple averages. PMID:8788799

  20. Spectroscopic study of solar twins and analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datson, Juliet; Flynn, Chris; Portinari, Laura

    2015-02-01

    Context. Many large stellar surveys have been and are still being carried out, providing huge amounts of data, for which stellar physical parameters will be derived. Solar twins and analogues provide a means to test the calibration of these stellar catalogues because the Sun is the best-studied star and provides precise fundamental parameters. Solar twins should be centred on the solar values. Aims: This spectroscopic study of solar analogues selected from the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey (GCS) at a resolution of 48 000 provides effective temperatures and metallicities for these stars. We test whether our spectroscopic parameters, as well as the previous photometric calibrations, are properly centred on the Sun. In addition, we search for more solar twins in our sample. Methods: The methods used in this work are based on literature methods for solar twin searches and on methods we developed in previous work to distinguish the metallicity-temperature degeneracies in the differential comparison of spectra of solar analogues versus a reference solar reflection spectrum. Results: We derive spectroscopic parameters for 148 solar analogues (about 70 are new entries to the literature) and verify with a-posteriori differential tests that our values are well-centred on the solar values. We use our dataset to assess the two alternative calibrations of the GCS parameters; our methods favour the latest revision. We show that the choice of spectral line list or the choice of asteroid or time of observation does not affect the results. We also identify seven solar twins in our sample, three of which are published here for the first time. Conclusions: Our methods provide an independent means to differentially test the calibration of stellar catalogues around the values of a well-known benchmark star, which makes our work interesting for calibration tests of upcoming Galactic surveys. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Observatory under programme ID 077.D

  1. Fundamental M-dwarf parameters from high-resolution spectra using PHOENIX ACES models. I. Parameter accuracy and benchmark stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passegger, V. M.; Wende-von Berg, S.; Reiners, A.

    2016-03-01

    M-dwarf stars are the most numerous stars in the Universe; they span a wide range in mass and are in the focus of ongoing and planned exoplanet surveys. To investigate and understand their physical nature, detailed spectral information and accurate stellar models are needed. We use a new synthetic atmosphere model generation and compare model spectra to observations. To test the model accuracy, we compared the models to four benchmark stars with atmospheric parameters for which independent information from interferometric radius measurements is available. We used χ2-based methods to determine parameters from high-resolution spectroscopic observations. Our synthetic spectra are based on the new PHOENIX grid that uses the ACES description for the equation of state. This is a model generation expected to be especially suitable for the low-temperature atmospheres. We identified suitable spectral tracers of atmospheric parameters and determined the uncertainties in Teff, log g, and [Fe/H] resulting from degeneracies between parameters and from shortcomings of the model atmospheres. The inherent uncertainties we find are σTeff = 35 K, σlog g = 0.14, and σ[Fe/H] = 0.11. The new model spectra achieve a reliable match to our observed data; our results for Teff and log g are consistent with literature values to within 1σ. However, metallicities reported from earlier photometric and spectroscopic calibrations in some cases disagree with our results by more than 3σ. A possible explanation are systematic errors in earlier metallicity determinations that were based on insufficient descriptions of the cool atmospheres. At this point, however, we cannot definitely identify the reason for this discrepancy, but our analysis indicates that there is a large uncertainty in the accuracy of M-dwarf parameter estimates. Based on observations carried out with UVES at ESO VLT.

  2. The spectroscopic foundation of CO2 climate forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, M. G.; Daniels, T.; Kratz, D. P.; Collins, W.; Feldman, D.; Lawler, J. E.; Anderson, L. W.; Fahey, D. W.; Hunt, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The radiative forcing (RF) of carbon dioxide (CO2) is the leading contribution to climate change from anthropogenic activities. Calculating CO2 RF requires detailed knowledge of spectral line parameters and lineshape functions for thousands of infrared absorption lines. A reliable spectroscopic characterization of CO2 forcing is therefore a critical input to scientific and policy-oriented assessments of present climate and future climate change. Our study is partly motivated by a recent assertion that CO2 RF values, and hence predictions of climate sensitivity to elevated CO2, have a significant high bias because the CO2 spectroscopic parameters being used are incorrect. Our results show that CO2 RF in a variety of atmospheres is remarkably insensitive to known uncertainties in the three main CO2 spectroscopic parameters: the line strengths, half widths, and line shapes. We demonstrate that this is due largely to the definition of CO2 RF, which is the difference between the CO2 longwave net flux at the tropopause for doubled CO2 concentrations from the preindustrial era. We also assess the effects of sub-Lorentzian wings of CO2 lines and find that the computed RF is largely insensitive to the spectral lineshape function. Overall, the spectroscopic uncertainty in present-day CO2 RF is less than a few percent. Our study highlights the basics and subtleties of RF calculations, addressing interests of the expert and non-expert.

  3. Passive Spectroscopic Diagnostics for Magnetically-confined Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, B. C.; Biter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Hillis, D. L.; Hogan, J. T.

    2007-07-18

    Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities and hydrogen isotopes plays an important role in the study of magnetically-confined fusion plasmas, both in determining the effects of impurities on plasma behavior and in measurements of plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, particle transport, and particle influx rates. This paper reviews spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma radiation that are excited by collisional processes in the plasma, which are termed 'passive' spectroscopic diagnostics to distinguish them from 'active' spectroscopic diagnostics involving injected particle and laser beams. A brief overview of the ionization balance in hot plasmas and the relevant line and continuum radiation excitation mechanisms is given. Instrumentation in the soft X-ray, vacuum ultraviolet, ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared regions of the spectrum is described and examples of measurements are given. Paths for further development of these measurements and issues for their implementation in a burning plasma environment are discussed.

  4. Accurate AB Initio Calculation of Anharmonic Force Fields and Spectroscopic Constants of Small Polyatomic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jan M. L.

    The quartic force fields of a number of small polyatomic molecules (specifically, rm H _2O, NH_2, NH_3, CH_4, BH_3, BeH_2, H_2CO, N_2O, CO_2, CS_2, OCS, H_2S, FNO, ClNO, and H_2CS) have been computed ab initio using large basis sets and augmented coupled cluster methods. It has been established throughout that harmonic and fundamental frequencies can consistently be reproduced to within about 10 cm^{ -1} of experimental using spdf basis sets, except in such inherently problematic cases as the umbrella motion in NH_3; such problems are solved by recomputing the harmonic frequencies with an spdf g basis set. Coupled cluster frequencies using small basis sets of spd quality agree surprisingly well with experiment (mean absolute error of 26 cm^ {-1}), but bond distances are generally seriously overestimated. Using spdf basis sets, they are consistently overestimated by 0.002 and 0.006-7 A for single and multiple bonds, respectively; for spdf g basis sets this drops to 0.001 and 0.003-4 A, respectively. Geometries and harmonic frequencies for highly polar fluorine compounds such as HF and FNO are qualitatively wrong unless special anion functions are added to the fluorine basis set. Anharmonicity, rovibrational coupling, and centrifugal distortion constants are consistently predicted well; the anharmonic portions of the computed force fields are probably more reliable than their experimental counterparts in many cases. Remaining errors in the computed geometries and harmonic frequencies are shown to be almost entirely due to a combination of core correlation and residual deficiencies in the electron correlation treatment. A 3-term correction for remaining basis set incompleteness to computed total atomization energies is proposed by the author, and is shown to result in mean absolute errors of as little as 0.5 kcal/mol for spdf g basis sets. Example applications on rm HCO^+, HOC^+, B_2C, BCN, and BNC testify to the predictive power of the methods used in this work.

  5. Accurate documentation and wound measurement.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Sylvie

    This article, part 4 in a series on wound management, addresses the sometimes routine yet crucial task of documentation. Clear and accurate records of a wound enable its progress to be determined so the appropriate treatment can be applied. Thorough records mean any practitioner picking up a patient's notes will know when the wound was last checked, how it looked and what dressing and/or treatment was applied, ensuring continuity of care. Documenting every assessment also has legal implications, demonstrating due consideration and care of the patient and the rationale for any treatment carried out. Part 5 in the series discusses wound dressing characteristics and selection.

  6. THIRTY NEW LOW-MASS SPECTROSCOPIC BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Hebb, Leslie; Cameron, Andrew C.; Liu, Michael C.; Neill Reid, I. E-mail: Andrew.Cameron@st-and.ac.u E-mail: mliu@ifa.hawaii.ed

    2010-06-20

    As part of our search for young M dwarfs within 25 pc, we acquired high-resolution spectra of 185 low-mass stars compiled by the NStars project that have strong X-ray emission. By cross-correlating these spectra with radial velocity standard stars, we are sensitive to finding multi-lined spectroscopic binaries. We find a low-mass spectroscopic binary fraction of 16% consisting of 27 SB2s, 2 SB3s, and 1 SB4, increasing the number of known low-mass spectroscopic binaries (SBs) by 50% and proving that strong X-ray emission is an extremely efficient way to find M-dwarf SBs. WASP photometry of 23 of these systems revealed two low-mass eclipsing binaries (EBs), bringing the count of known M-dwarf EBs to 15. BD-22 5866, the ESB4, was fully described in 2008 by Shkolnik et al. and CCDM J04404+3127 B consists of two mid-M stars orbiting each other every 2.048 days. WASP also provided rotation periods for 12 systems, and in the cases where the synchronization time scales are short, we used P{sub rot} to determine the true orbital parameters. For those with no P{sub rot}, we used differential radial velocities to set upper limits on orbital periods and semimajor axes. More than half of our sample has near-equal-mass components (q > 0.8). This is expected since our sample is biased toward tight orbits where saturated X-ray emission is due to tidal spin-up rather than stellar youth. Increasing the samples of M-dwarf SBs and EBs is extremely valuable in setting constraints on current theories of stellar multiplicity and evolution scenarios for low-mass multiple systems.

  7. Toward Accurate and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S

    2016-08-25

    Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable accurate comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. PMID:27565341

  8. Toward Accurate and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S.

    2016-01-01

    Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable accurate comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. PMID:27565341

  9. How Accurately can we Calculate Thermal Systems?

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D; Blomquist, R N; Dean, C; Heinrichs, D; Kalugin, M A; Lee, M; Lee, Y; MacFarlan, R; Nagaya, Y; Trkov, A

    2004-04-20

    I would like to determine how accurately a variety of neutron transport code packages (code and cross section libraries) can calculate simple integral parameters, such as K{sub eff}, for systems that are sensitive to thermal neutron scattering. Since we will only consider theoretical systems, we cannot really determine absolute accuracy compared to any real system. Therefore rather than accuracy, it would be more precise to say that I would like to determine the spread in answers that we obtain from a variety of code packages. This spread should serve as an excellent indicator of how accurately we can really model and calculate such systems today. Hopefully, eventually this will lead to improvements in both our codes and the thermal scattering models that they use in the future. In order to accomplish this I propose a number of extremely simple systems that involve thermal neutron scattering that can be easily modeled and calculated by a variety of neutron transport codes. These are theoretical systems designed to emphasize the effects of thermal scattering, since that is what we are interested in studying. I have attempted to keep these systems very simple, and yet at the same time they include most, if not all, of the important thermal scattering effects encountered in a large, water-moderated, uranium fueled thermal system, i.e., our typical thermal reactors.

  10. SPLASH: Accurate OH maser positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Andrew; Gomez, Jose F.; Jones, Paul; Cunningham, Maria; Green, James; Dawson, Joanne; Ellingsen, Simon; Breen, Shari; Imai, Hiroshi; Lowe, Vicki; Jones, Courtney

    2013-10-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) 18 cm lines are powerful and versatile probes of diffuse molecular gas, that may trace a largely unstudied component of the Galactic ISM. SPLASH (the Southern Parkes Large Area Survey in Hydroxyl) is a large, unbiased and fully-sampled survey of OH emission, absorption and masers in the Galactic Plane that will achieve sensitivities an order of magnitude better than previous work. In this proposal, we request ATCA time to follow up OH maser candidates. This will give us accurate (~10") positions of the masers, which can be compared to other maser positions from HOPS, MMB and MALT-45 and will provide full polarisation measurements towards a sample of OH masers that have not been observed in MAGMO.

  11. Spectroscopic Modeling of Single Element Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ghomeishi, Mostafa; Yap, S. L.; Wong, C. S.; Saboohi, S.; Chan, L. S.

    2011-03-30

    A strategy for spectroscopic analysis of single element plasmas is through modeling. An experimental investigation or generation of a specified emission spectrum can be attempted based on the modeling results which are currently under investigating by many researchers in the world. In the emission spectroscopy, the K-shell emission is more interesting than emissions from other shells due to their unique EUV and SXR frequencies that can be applied in various scientific and industrial applications. Population information of our model is based on a steady state kinetic code which is calculated for a given electron temperature and an estimated electron density. Thus for each single element plasma it needs large amounts of experimental or theoretical database. Depending on the parameter of the plasma, theories based on local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE are considered. In the non-LTE case, the Corona model is used and the total absolute number densities are calculated based on the ion densities that are related to the electron density corresponds to the mean charge of the ions. The spectra generated by the model can then be compared with spectroscopic data obtained experimentally.

  12. Synergies between spectroscopic and asteroseismic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jianning; De Cat, Peter; Ren, An-Bing; Yang, Xiao-Hu; Catanzaro, Giovanni; Corbally, Christopher J.; Frasca, Antonio; Gray, Richard O.; Cecylia Molenda-Zakowicz, Joanna; Shi, Jian-Rong; Ali, Luo; Zhang, Haotong

    2015-08-01

    The NASA Kepler satellite has provided unprecedented high duty-cycle, high-precision light curves for a large number of stars by continuously monitoring a field of view in Cygnus-Lyra region, leading to great progress in both discovering exoplanets and characterizing planet-hosting stars by means of asteroseismic methods. The asteroseismic survey allows the investigation of stars covering the whole H-R diagram. However, the low precision of effective temperatures and surface gravities in the KIC10 catalogue and the lack of information on chemical composition, metallicity and rotation rate prevent asteroseismic modeling, requiring spectroscopic observations for thousands of asteroseismic targets in the Kepler field in a homogeneous way.In 2010, we initiated the LAMOST-Kepler project which aimed at collecting low-resolution spectra for as many objects from the KIC10 catalogue as possible, with the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST), a 4-m telescope equipped with 4,000 optical fibers. The first round of observations has been completed in fall 2014, covering all the 14 sub-fields at least once, resulting in more than 100,000 low-resolution spectra. The stellar atmospheric parameters are then derived and the results have been confirmed to be consistent with those reported in the literature based on high-resolution spectroscopy.

  13. High-Definition Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Rohith K.; Walsh, Michael J.; Schulmerich, Matthew V.; Carney, P. Scott; Bhargava, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    The quality of images from an infrared (IR) microscope has traditionally been limited by considerations of throughput and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). An understanding of the achievable quality as a function of instrument parameters, from first principals is needed for improved instrument design. Here, we first present a model for light propagation through an IR spectroscopic imaging system based on scalar wave theory. The model analytically describes the propagation of light along the entire beam path from the source to the detector. The effect of various optical elements and the sample in the microscope is understood in terms of the accessible spatial frequencies by using a Fourier optics approach and simulations are conducted to gain insights into spectroscopic image formation. The optimal pixel size at the sample plane is calculated and shown much smaller than that in current mid-IR microscopy systems. A commercial imaging system is modified, and experimental data are presented to demonstrate the validity of the developed model. Building on this validated theoretical foundation, an optimal sampling configuration is set up. Acquired data were of high spatial quality but, as expected, of poorer SNR. Signal processing approaches were implemented to improve the spectral SNR. The resulting data demonstrated the ability to perform high-definition IR imaging in the laboratory by using minimally-modified commercial instruments. PMID:23317676

  14. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Cameron J.; Slattery, Ashley D.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Gibson, Christopher T.

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  15. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Cameron J; Slattery, Ashley D; Stapleton, Andrew J; Shapter, Joseph G; Gibson, Christopher T

    2016-03-29

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  16. A DVD Spectroscope: A Simple, High-Resolution Classroom Spectroscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka; Hamada, Kiyohito

    2006-01-01

    Digital versatile disks (DVDs) have successfully made up an inexpensive but high-resolution spectroscope suitable for classroom experiments that can easily be made with common material and gives clear and fine spectra of various light sources and colored material. The observed spectra can be photographed with a digital camera, and such images can…

  17. Accurate intermolecular ground state potential of the Ne-N2 van der Waals complex.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Cristian R; López Cacheiro, Javier; Fernández, Berta

    2004-05-15

    Ab initio ground state potential energy surfaces are obtained from interaction energies calculated with the coupled cluster singles and doubles model including connected triples corrections [CCSD(T)] and the aug-cc-pVXZ (X=5,Q,T,D) basis sets augmented with two different sets of midbond functions (denoted 33221 and 33211). The aug-cc-pV5Z-33221 surface is characterized by a T-shaped 49.5 cm(-1) minimum at Re=3.38 Angstroms and a linear saddle point at 3.95 Angstroms with De=36.6 cm(-1). These results agree well with the values provided by the accurate semiempirical potentials available. The rovibronic spectroscopic properties are determined and compared to the available experimental data and previous theoretical results. We study the basis set convergence of the intermolecular potentials and the rotational frequencies. The aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets provide reasonable binding parameters, but seem not to be converged enough for the evaluation of the microwave spectra. The aug-cc-pVQZ basis sets considerably improve the triple zeta results. The differences between the results obtained with the aug-cc-pVTZ-33221 basis set surface and those with the aug-cc-pVQZ-33221 are smaller than those of the corresponding bases with the set of 33211 midbond functions. The aug-cc-pVQZ surfaces are close to the aug-cc-pV5Z, that are expected to be close to convergence. With our best surfaces the errors in the frequencies with respect to the accurate experimental results go down to 0.6%.

  18. Monitoring the composition of the Cd{sub 1-} {sub z}Zn{sub z}Te heteroepitaxial layers by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yakushev, M. V. Shvets, V. A.; Azarov, I. A.; Rykhlytski, S. V.; Sidorov, Yu. G.; Spesivtsev, E. V.; Shamirzaev, T. S.

    2010-01-15

    A hardware-software complex based on a spectroscopic ellipsometer integrated into a molecular beam epitaxy installation and destined to monitor the composition of the Cd{sub 1} {sub -z}Zn{sub z}Te alloy at small values of z is described. Methodical features of determination of the composition of growing layers by the spectra of ellipsometric parameters are considered. The procedure of determination of the composition by the absorption edge that allows measuring this parameter accurate to 1.2% is developed. Problems are considered the solutions of which will allow one to increase the resolution by the composition. In particular, maintaining a stable temperature during growth is required for this purpose.

  19. Spectroscopic neutron detection using composite scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, I.; Foster, A.; Kukharev, V.; Mayer, M.; Meddeb, A.; Nattress, J.; Ounaies, Z.; Trivelpiece, C.

    2016-09-01

    Shielded special nuclear material (SNM), especially highly enriched uranium, is exceptionally difficult to detect without the use of active interrogation (AI). We are investigating the potential use of low-dose active interrogation to realize simultaneous high-contrast imaging and photofission of SNM using energetic gamma-rays produced by low-energy nuclear reactions, such as 11B(d,nγ)12C and 12C(p,p‧)12C. Neutrons produced via fission are one reliable signature of the presence of SNM and are usually identified by their unique timing characteristics, such as the delayed neutron die-away. Fast neutron spectroscopy may provide additional useful discriminating characteristics for SNM detection. Spectroscopic measurements can be conducted by recoil-based or thermalization and capture-gated detectors; the latter may offer unique advantages since they facilitate low-statistics and event-by-event neutron energy measurements without spectrum unfolding. We describe the results of the development and characterization of a new type of capture-gated spectroscopic neutron detector based on a composite of scintillating polyvinyltoluene and lithium-doped scintillating glass in the form of millimeter-thick rods. The detector achieves >108 neutron-gamma discrimination resulting from its geometric properties and material selection. The design facilitates simultaneous pulse shape and pulse height discrimination, despite the fact that no materials intrinsically capable of pulse shape discrimination have been used to construct the detector. Accurate single-event measurements of neutron energy may be possible even when the energy is relatively low, such as with delayed fission neutrons. Simulation and preliminary measurements using the new composite detector are described, including those conducted using radioisotope sources and the low-dose active interrogation system based on low-energy nuclear reactions.

  20. An empirical evaluation of three vibrational spectroscopic methods for detection of aflatoxins in maize.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Min; Davis, Jessica; Herrman, Timothy J; Murray, Seth C; Deng, Youjun

    2015-04-15

    Three commercially available vibrational spectroscopic techniques, including Raman, Fourier transform near infrared reflectance (FT-NIR), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) were evaluated to help users determine the spectroscopic method best suitable for aflatoxin analysis in maize (Zea mays L.) grain based on their relative efficiency and predictive ability. Spectral differences of Raman and FTIR spectra were more marked and pronounced among aflatoxin contamination groups than those of FT-NIR spectra. From the observations and findings in our current and previous studies, Raman and FTIR spectroscopic methods are superior to FT-NIR method in terms of predictive power and model performance for aflatoxin analysis and they are equally effective and accurate in predicting aflatoxin concentration in maize. The present study is considered as the first attempt to assess how spectroscopic techniques with different physical processes can influence and improve accuracy and reliability for rapid screening of aflatoxin contaminated maize samples.

  1. Quadrupole resonance spectroscopic study of narcotic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Timothy J.; West, Rebecca; Garroway, Allen N.; Lyndquist, R.; Yesinowski, James P.

    1997-02-01

    Bulk narcotic detection systems based upon Quadrupole Resonance Analysis (QRA) technology have a major advantage over imaging technologies, in that QRA is chemical-specific and consequently has a lower rate of false alarms. QRA is a magnetic resonance technology which occurs as a result of the inherent molecular properties of the atomic nuclei in crystalline and amorphous solids. The QRA response is characterized by 1) the precessional frequency of the nucleus, and 2) the nature of the electric field gradient experienced by the nucleus,due to its molecular environment. Another important detection parameter is linewidth, resonant quality. All of these parameters depend on sample purity and manufacturing process. Quantum Magnetics recently carried out a study on the QRA signatures of various narcotic materials with the support of the US Army, US Customs, and the Office of National Drug Control Policy. The aim of the study was to fully characterize the variation in QRA spectroscopic parameters of different samples of cocaine base and cocaine hydrochloride. The results from this study ar discussed here.

  2. Investigation of infrared spectra of atmospheric gases to support stratospheric spectroscopic investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Spectroscopic instrumentation and the absorption characteristics of atmospheric gases are discussed in relation to the requirements of spectroscopic stratospheric experiments. Improvement in the spectral resolution, accuracy of the line parameters, and the ranges of atmospheric conditions over which information is to be obtained are among the factors considered. Methods of simultaneously analyzing entire bands containing many lines were developed and applied to the analysis of bands of N20 and CO2. Progress in this analysis is reported.

  3. Spectroscopic study and astronomical detection of doubly 13C-substituted ethyl cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulès, L.; Belloche, A.; Müller, H. S. P.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Guillemin, J.-C.; Garrod, R. T.; Menten, K. M.

    2016-05-01

    Context. We have performed a spectral line survey called Exploring Molecular Complexity with ALMA (EMoCA) toward Sagittarius B2(N) between 84.1 and 114.4 GHz with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in its Cycles 0 and 1. Line intensities of the main isotopic species of ethyl cyanide and its singly 13C-substituted isotopomers observed toward the hot molecular core Sagittarius B2(N2) suggest that the doubly 13C-substituted isotopomers should also be detectable. Aims: We want to determine the spectroscopic parameters of all three doubly 13C-substituted isotopologues of ethyl cyanide to search for them in our ALMA data. Methods: We investigated the laboratory rotational spectra of the three species between 150 GHz and 990 GHz. We searched for emission lines produced by these species in the ALMA spectrum of Sagittarius B2(N2). We modeled their emission and the emission of the 12C and singly 13C-substituted isotopologues assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium. Results: We identified more than 5000 rotational transitions, pertaining to more than 3500 different transition frequencies, in the laboratory for each of the three doubly 13C-substituted isotopomers. The quantum numbers reach J ≈ 115 and Ka ≈ 35, resulting in accurate spectroscopic parameters and accurate rest frequency calculations beyond 1000 GHz for strong to moderately weak transitions of either isotopomer. All three species are unambiguously detected in our ALMA data. The 12C/13C column density ratio of the isotopomers with one 13C atom to those with two 13C atoms is about 25. Conclusions: Ethyl cyanide is the second molecule after methyl cyanide for which isotopologues containing two 13C atoms have been securely detected in the interstellar medium. The model of our ethyl cyanide data suggests that we should be able to detect vibrational satellites of the main species up to at least ν19 = 1 at ~1130 K and up to ν13 + ν21 = 2 at ~600 K for the isotopologues with one 13C atom in

  4. Mid-infrared spectroscopic investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, John W.; Vergo, Norma; Walter, Louis

    1987-01-01

    Mid-infrared spectroscopic research efforts are discussed. The development of a new instrumentation to permit advanced measurements in the mid-infrared region of the spectrum, the development of a special library of well-characterized mineral and rock specimens for interpretation of remote sensing data, and cooperative measurements of the spectral signatures of analogues of materials that may be present on the surfaces of asteroids, planets or their Moons are discussed.

  5. Single nanoparticle tracking spectroscopic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Haw; Cang, Hu; Xu, Cangshan; Wong, Chung M.

    2011-07-19

    A system that can maintain and track the position of a single nanoparticle in three dimensions for a prolonged period has been disclosed. The system allows for continuously imaging the particle to observe any interactions it may have. The system also enables the acquisition of real-time sequential spectroscopic information from the particle. The apparatus holds great promise in performing single molecule spectroscopy and imaging on a non-stationary target.

  6. Method of absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Saveliev, Alexei; Jangale, Vilas Vyankatrao; Zelepouga, Sergeui; Pratapas, John

    2013-09-17

    A method and apparatus for absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor in which a reference light intensity measurement is made on a non-absorbing reference fluid, a light intensity measurement is made on a sample fluid, and a measured light absorbance of the sample fluid is determined. A corrective light intensity measurement at a non-absorbing wavelength of the sample fluid is made on the sample fluid from which an absorbance correction factor is determined. The absorbance correction factor is then applied to the measured light absorbance of the sample fluid to arrive at a true or accurate absorbance for the sample fluid.

  7. On the spectroscopic and thermochemical properties of ClO, BrO, IO, and their anions.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kirk A; Shepler, Benjamin C; Figgen, Detlev; Stoll, Hermann

    2006-12-28

    A coupled cluster composite approach has been used to accurately determine the spectroscopic constants, bond dissociation energies, and heats of formation for the X1(2)II(3/2) states of the halogen oxides ClO, BrO, and IO, as well as their negative ions ClO-, BrO-, and IO-. After determining the frozen core, complete basis set (CBS) limit CCSD(T) values, corrections were added for core-valence correlation, relativistic effects (scalar and spin-orbit), the pseudopotential approximation (BrO and IO), iterative connected triple excitations (CCSDT), and iterative quadruples (CCSDTQ). The final ab initio equilibrium bond lengths and harmonic frequencies for ClO and BrO differ from their accurate experimental values by an average of just 0.0005 A and 0.8 cm-1, respectively. The bond length of IO is overestimated by 0.0047 A, presumably due to an underestimation of molecular spin-orbit coupling effects. Spectroscopic constants for the spin-orbit excited X2(2)III(1/2) states are also reported for each species. The predicted bond lengths and harmonic frequencies for the closed-shell anions are expected to be accurate to within about 0.001 A and 2 cm-1, respectively. The dissociation energies of the radicals have been determined by both direct calculation and through use of negative ion thermochemical cycles, which made use of a small amount of accurate experimental data. The resulting values of D0, 63.5, 55.8, and 54.2 kcal/mol for ClO, BrO, and IO, respectively, are the most accurate ab initio values to date, and those for ClO and BrO differ from their experimental values by just 0.1 kcal/mol. These dissociation energies lead to heats of formation, DeltaH(f) (298 K), of 24.2 +/- 0.3, 29.6 +/- 0.4, and 29.9 +/- 0.6 kcal/mol for ClO, BrO, and IO, respectively. Also, the final calculated electron affinities are all within 0.2 kcal/mol of their experimental values. Improved pseudopotential parameters for the iodine atom are also reported, together with revised correlation

  8. MRCI study of spectroscopic and molecular properties of X2Πg, a 4Πu, A2Πu, b 4 ? , D2Δg and B2 ? electronic states of ? ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoniu; Shi, Deheng; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2011-06-01

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of six low-lying electronic states (X2Πg, a 4Πu, A2Πu, b 4 ? , D2Δg and B2 ? ) of ? ion were studied by the ab initio quantum chemical method. The calculations were carried out with the full valence complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method followed by the highly accurate valence internally contracted multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) approach in combination with large correlation-consistent basis sets. Effects on the PECs of the core-valence correlation and relativistic corrections are taken into account. The way to consider the relativistic correction is to use the second-order Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian (DKH2) approximation. The core-valence correlation correction is carried out with the cc-pCVQZ basis set, and the relativistic correction is performed at the level of cc-pVQZ basis set. To obtain more reliable results, the PECs determined by the MRCI calculations are also corrected for size-extensivity errors by means of the Davidson modification (MRCI + Q). These PECs are extrapolated to the complete basis set (CBS) limit by the two-point total-energy extrapolation scheme. With these PECs, the spectroscopic parameters (Te , De , D 0, Re , ωe , ωexe , αe and Be ) are determined and compared with those reported in the literature. The conclusion can be reached that the effect on the spectroscopic parameters of the core-valence correlation correction is larger than that of the relativistic correction. With the PECs obtained by the MRCI + Q/CV+DK+56 calculations, the vibrational levels and inertial rotation constants of the first 26 vibrational states are determined for these electronic states of non-rotating ? ion. Comparison with the experimental data shows that the present spectroscopic parameters and molecular constants are accurate.

  9. Spectroscopic failures in photometric redshift calibration: cosmological biases and survey requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, Carlos E.; Huterer, Dragan; Lin, Huan; Busha, Michael T.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2014-10-01

    We use N-body-spectrophotometric simulations to investigate the impact of incompleteness and incorrect redshifts in spectroscopic surveys on photometric redshift training and calibration and the resulting effects on cosmological parameter estimation from weak lensing shear-shear correlations. The photometry of the simulations is modelled after the upcoming Dark Energy Survey and the spectroscopy is based on a low/intermediate-resolution spectrograph with wavelength coverage of 5500 < λ < 9500 Å. Spectroscopic follow-up surveys suffer from both incompleteness (inability to obtain spectroscopic redshifts for certain galaxies) and wrong redshifts. Encouragingly, we find that a neural network-based approach can effectively describe the spectroscopic incompleteness in terms of the galaxies' colours, so that the spectroscopic selection can be applied to the photometric sample. Hence, we find that spectroscopic incompleteness yields no appreciable biases to cosmology, although the statistical constraints degrade somewhat because the photometric survey has to be culled to match the spectroscopic selection. Unfortunately, wrong redshifts have a more severe impact: the cosmological biases are intolerable if more than a per cent of the spectroscopic redshifts are incorrect. Moreover, we find that incorrect redshifts can substantially degrade the perceived accuracy of training set based photo-z estimators, though the actual accuracy is virtually unaffected. The main problem is the difficulty of obtaining redshifts, either spectroscopically or photometrically, for objects at z > 1.3. We discuss several approaches for reducing the cosmological biases, in particular finding that photo-z error estimators can reduce biases appreciably when the photo-z errors are correlated with the spectroscopic failures, but not otherwise.

  10. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  11. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  12. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  13. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  14. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  15. Accurate SHAPE-directed RNA structure determination

    PubMed Central

    Deigan, Katherine E.; Li, Tian W.; Mathews, David H.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2009-01-01

    Almost all RNAs can fold to form extensive base-paired secondary structures. Many of these structures then modulate numerous fundamental elements of gene expression. Deducing these structure–function relationships requires that it be possible to predict RNA secondary structures accurately. However, RNA secondary structure prediction for large RNAs, such that a single predicted structure for a single sequence reliably represents the correct structure, has remained an unsolved problem. Here, we demonstrate that quantitative, nucleotide-resolution information from a SHAPE experiment can be interpreted as a pseudo-free energy change term and used to determine RNA secondary structure with high accuracy. Free energy minimization, by using SHAPE pseudo-free energies, in conjunction with nearest neighbor parameters, predicts the secondary structure of deproteinized Escherichia coli 16S rRNA (>1,300 nt) and a set of smaller RNAs (75–155 nt) with accuracies of up to 96–100%, which are comparable to the best accuracies achievable by comparative sequence analysis. PMID:19109441

  16. Does DFT-SAPT method provide spectroscopic accuracy?

    SciTech Connect

    Shirkov, Leonid; Makarewicz, Jan

    2015-02-14

    Ground state potential energy curves for homonuclear and heteronuclear dimers consisting of noble gas atoms from He to Kr were calculated within the symmetry adapted perturbation theory based on the density functional theory (DFT-SAPT). These potentials together with spectroscopic data derived from them were compared to previous high-precision coupled cluster with singles and doubles including the connected triples theory calculations (or better if available) as well as to experimental data used as the benchmark. The impact of midbond functions on DFT-SAPT results was tested to study the convergence of the interaction energies. It was shown that, for most of the complexes, DFT-SAPT potential calculated at the complete basis set (CBS) limit is lower than the corresponding benchmark potential in the region near its minimum and hence, spectroscopic accuracy cannot be achieved. The influence of the residual term δ(HF) on the interaction energy was also studied. As a result, we have found that this term improves the agreement with the benchmark in the repulsive region for the dimers considered, but leads to even larger overestimation of potential depth D{sub e}. Although the standard hybrid exchange-correlation (xc) functionals with asymptotic correction within the second order DFT-SAPT do not provide the spectroscopic accuracy at the CBS limit, it is possible to adjust empirically basis sets yielding highly accurate results.

  17. Highlights of the Brazilian Solar Spectroscope (bss)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, Hanumant; Cecatto, José; Meszarosova, Hana; Faria, Claudio; Fernandes, Francisco; Karlicky, Marian; Andrade, Maria

    The digital, decimetric (1000-2500 MHz) Brazilian Solar Spectroscope (BSS) with high time (10- 1000 ms) and frequency (1-10 MHz) resolution is in regular operation since April, 1998, at the National Space Research Institute (INPE) at Sao Jose dos Campos, Brazil. The BSS has now been upgraded with a new digital data acquisition and data processing system. The new version of the BSS has a 14 bit A/D unit which permits improved combination of the observational parameters with a capability to record up to 200 frequency channels available in a selectable frequency range of 1000-2500 MHz. It permits data acquisition up to 5 ms time resolution with a limited number of frequency channels. The software system of the BSS is composed by two distinct modules: The first, data acquisition system provides a flexible Graphical User Interface (GUI) that allows one to choose a number of observational parameters. The second module is the real time visualization system that permits real time visualization of the observed dynamic spectrum and additionally has procedures for visualization and preliminary analysis of the recorded solar spectra. Using the new visualization system, we have realized two new types of dm-radio fine structures: narrow band type III bursts with positive/negative group frequency drift and dots-emissions arranged in zebras and fibers.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Parameters of Kepler stars using LAMOST & seismic data (Wang+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Wang, W.; Wu, Y.; Zhao, G.; Li, Y.; Luo, A.; Liu, C.; Zhang, Y.; Hou, Y.; Wang, Y.; Cao, Z.

    2016-06-01

    We present stellar atmospheric and physical parameters using Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) spectra and Kepler global oscillation parameters for 3,060 stars in the Kepler field. (1 data file).

  19. Spectroscopic Stokes polarimetry based on Fourier transform spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yeng-Cheng; Lo, Yu-Lung; Li, Chang-Ye; Liao, Chia-Chi

    2015-02-01

    Two methods are proposed for measuring the spectroscopic Stokes parameters using a Fourier transform spectrometer. In the first method, it is designed for single point measurement. The parameters are extracted using an optical setup comprising a white light source, a polarizer set to 0°, a quarter-wave plate and a scanning Michelson interferometer. In the proposed approach, the parameters are extracted from the intensity distributions of the interferograms produced with the quarter-wave plate rotated to 0°, 22.5°, 45° and -45°, respectively. For the second approach, the full-field and dynamic measurement can be designed based upon the first method with special angle design in a polarizer and a quarter-wave plate. Hence, the interferograms of two-dimensional detection also can be simultaneously extracted via a pixelated phase-retarder and polarizer array on a high-speed CCD camera and a parallel read-out circuit with a multi-channel analog to digital converter. Thus, a full-field and dynamic spectroscopic Stokes polarimetry without any rotating components could be developed. The validity of the proposed methods is demonstrated both numerically and experimentally. To the authors' knowledge, this could be the simplest optical arrangement in extracting the spectral Stokes parameters. Importantly, the latter one method avoids the need for rotating components within the optical system and therefore provides an experimentally straightforward means of extracting the dynamic spectral Stokes parameters.

  20. Spectroscopic and Interferometric Measurements of Nine K Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baines, Ellyn K.; Döllinger, Michaela P.; Guenther, Eike W.; Hatzes, Artie P.; Hrudkovu, Marie; van Belle, Gerard T.

    2016-09-01

    We present spectroscopic and interferometric measurements for a sample of nine K giant stars. These targets are of particular interest because they are slated for stellar oscillation observations. Our improved parameters will directly translate into reduced errors in the final masses for these stars when interferometric radii and asteroseismic densities are combined. Here, we determine each star’s limb-darkened angular diameter, physical radius, luminosity, bolometric flux, effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and mass. When we compare our interferometric and spectroscopic results, we find no systematic offsets in the diameters and the values generally agree within the errors. Our interferometric temperatures for seven of the nine stars are hotter than those determined from spectroscopy with an average difference of about 380 K.

  1. Spectroscopic signature for ferroelectric ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, Marek J.; Gług, Maciej; Boczar, Marek; Boda, Łukasz

    2014-09-01

    Various forms of ice exist within our galaxy. Particularly intriguing type of ice - ‘ferroelectric ice' was discovered experimentally and is stable in temperatures below 72 K. This form of ice can generate enormous electric fields and can play an important role in planetary formation. In this letter we present Car-Parrinello simulation of infrared spectra of ferroelectric ice and compare them with spectra of hexagonal ice. Librational region of the spectra can be treated as spectroscopic signature of ice XI and can be of help to identify ferroelectric ice in the Universe.

  2. Spectroscopic Survey of Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, J.

    This program will obtain far-UV spectra of cool stars that span a broad range of spectral type and luminosity class. It is our intention to obtain these spectra early in the FUSE program and to provide the spectra quickly to the user community in order to guide potential guest investigators in designing their observing programs. The specific science objectives include: (1) studying transition region dynamics (winds and downflows), (2) modeling the thermal structure of transition regions, (3) measuring electron densities, (4) search for low temperature coronae, (5) studying molecular excitation and fluorescence processes, and (6) inferring how the transition regions of spectroscopic binary systems differ from those of single stars.

  3. The far ultraviolet spectroscopic explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggess, A.

    1982-01-01

    The scientific objectives and performance characteristics of a new astronomy mission referred to as the far ultraviolet spectroscopic explorer, or FUSE are being defined by a team involving people experienced instrumental requirements that best meet the scientific needs. The team is intended to have a lifetime of about one year, ending with the submission of a report to NASA which could be used as the basis for an engineering design study. The principal objective of FUSE is to obtain astronomical spectra at wavelengths shorter than is possible with the Space Telescope.

  4. Spectroscopic Classifications of Optical Transients with SOAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, R. J.; Hounsell, R. A.; Downing, S.; Pan, Y.-C.; Scolnic, D.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.

    2015-07-01

    We report the following classifications of optical transients from spectroscopic observations with the Goodman spectrograph (wavelength range 3100 - 7100) on the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope.

  5. High Definition Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging for Lymph Node Histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, L. Suzanne; Wrobel, Tomasz P.; Mayerich, David; Bindra, Snehal; Emmadi, Rajyasree; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Chemical imaging is a rapidly emerging field in which molecular information within samples can be used to predict biological function and recognize disease without the use of stains or manual identification. In Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging, molecular absorption contrast provides a large signal relative to noise. Due to the long mid-IR wavelengths and sub-optimal instrument design, however, pixel sizes have historically been much larger than cells. This limits both the accuracy of the technique in identifying small regions, as well as the ability to visualize single cells. Here we obtain data with micron-sized sampling using a tabletop FT-IR instrument, and demonstrate that the high-definition (HD) data lead to accurate identification of multiple cells in lymph nodes that was not previously possible. Highly accurate recognition of eight distinct classes - naïve and memory B cells, T cells, erythrocytes, connective tissue, fibrovascular network, smooth muscle, and light and dark zone activated B cells was achieved in healthy, reactive, and malignant lymph node biopsies using a random forest classifier. The results demonstrate that cells currently identifiable only through immunohistochemical stains and cumbersome manual recognition of optical microscopy images can now be distinguished to a similar level through a single IR spectroscopic image from a lymph node biopsy. PMID:26039216

  6. Spectroscopic Studies of Molecular Systems relevant in Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaro, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    double-ζ quality such as N07D and SNSD. Such a protocol has been then applied to the dimers of nucleobases in order to study the perturbation on the vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities induced by the intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions. Efforts have been made to challenge the problems of simulating strongly anharmonic vibrations within hydrogen-bonded bridges, focusing on the requirement of a very accurate description of the underlying potential energy surface. Improvements for such vibrations have been achieved by means of hybrid models, where the harmonic part of the force-field is computed at a higher level of theory like B2PLYP, or by application of the less demanding ONIOM B2PLYP:B3LYP scheme, which is a focused model where only the part of the molecular system forming the hydrogen bonds is treated at B2PLYP level of theory. Moreover, for improving the vibrational frequencies of modes like the stretching of C=O and N-H functional groups, which are particularly sensitive to hydrogen-bonding, correction parameters for the B3LYP-D3/N07D frequencies have been determined. Afterwards, the treatment of the vibrational properties of nucleobases in condensed phases has been faced, focusing on uracil in the solid state. In particular, a heptamer cluster of uracil molecules has been considered as model to represent the properties in the solid state. The relative vibrational frequencies have been computed at anharmonic level within the VPT2 framework, combining two cost-effective approaches, namely the hybrid B3LYP-D3/N07D:DFTBA model, where the harmonic frequencies are computed with B3LYP-D3/N07D method and the anharmonic corrections are evaluated with the less expensive DFTBA method, and the reduced dimensionality VPT2 (RD-VPT2) approach, in which only selected vibrational modes are calculated anharmonically (including the couplings with the other modes) while the remaining modes are treated at the harmonic level, using the B3LYP-D3/N07D method only

  7. Radiative transfer and spectroscopic databases: A line-sampling Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtier, Mathieu; Blanco, Stéphane; Dauchet, Jérémi; El Hafi, Mouna; Eymet, Vincent; Fournier, Richard; Roger, Maxime; Spiesser, Christophe; Terrée, Guillaume

    2016-03-01

    Dealing with molecular-state transitions for radiative transfer purposes involves two successive steps that both reach the complexity level at which physicists start thinking about statistical approaches: (1) constructing line-shaped absorption spectra as the result of very numerous state-transitions, (2) integrating over optical-path domains. For the first time, we show here how these steps can be addressed simultaneously using the null-collision concept. This opens the door to the design of Monte Carlo codes directly estimating radiative transfer observables from spectroscopic databases. The intermediate step of producing accurate high-resolution absorption spectra is no longer required. A Monte Carlo algorithm is proposed and applied to six one-dimensional test cases. It allows the computation of spectrally integrated intensities (over 25 cm-1 bands or the full IR range) in a few seconds, regardless of the retained database and line model. But free parameters need to be selected and they impact the convergence. A first possible selection is provided in full detail. We observe that this selection is highly satisfactory for quite distinct atmospheric and combustion configurations, but a more systematic exploration is still in progress.

  8. Spectroscopic confusion: its impact on current and future extragalactic H I surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Papastergis, Emmanouil; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo

    2015-05-01

    We present a comprehensive model to predict the rate of spectroscopic confusion in H I surveys, and demonstrate good agreement with the observable confusion in existing surveys. Generically the action of confusion on the H I mass function was found to be a suppression of the number count of sources below the `knee', and an enhancement above it. This results in a bias, whereby the `knee' mass is increased and the faint end slope is steepened. For ALFALFA and HIPASS, we find that the maximum impact this bias can have on the Schechter fit parameters is similar in magnitude to the published random errors. On the other hand, the impact of confusion on the H I mass functions of upcoming medium depth interferometric surveys, will be below the level of the random errors. In addition, we find that previous estimates of the number of detections for upcoming surveys with Square Kilometre Array-precursor telescopes may have been too optimistic, as the framework implemented here results in number counts between 60 and 75 per cent of those previously predicted, while accurately reproducing the counts of existing surveys. Finally, we argue that any future single dish, wide area surveys of H I galaxies would be best suited to focus on deep observations of the local Universe (z < 0.05), as confusion may prevent them from being competitive with interferometric surveys at higher redshift, while their lower angular resolution allows their completeness to be more easily calibrated for nearby extended sources.

  9. Spectroscopic Engineering in the Submillimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Frank C.

    2013-06-01

    The field of high-resolution spectroscopy, as represented by the community that supports this meeting, has continued to grow and prosper, in no small part because the field has continued to evolve. Much of this evolution could fall under the rubric, Spectroscopic Engineering. This is especially true in the submillimeter where spectroscopists have taken on much broader roles in fields that have grown out of submillimeter spectroscopy. With specific examples from spectroscopic remote and point sensing, astronomy and atmospheric science, imaging, and process control, opportunities and paths forward for will be considered. Emphasis will be placed on the underlying physics that drives the optimization of applications. Since this is Columbus, at least one complex Hamiltonian will be shown. We will also discuss: What are the opportunities for young people entering the field and how might they be optimized? Is spectroscopy as a tool, less noble than spectroscopy as a science? Is what we do really physics (or even chemistry)? Where does what we do fit into the structure of academia, government, and industry?

  10. Spectroscopic imaging in electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, Stephen J; Colliex, C.

    2012-01-01

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope, multiple signals can be simultaneously collected, including the transmitted and scattered electron signals (bright field and annular dark field or Z-contrast images), along with spectroscopic signals such as inelastically scattered electrons and emitted photons. In the last few years, the successful development of aberration correctors for the electron microscope has transformed the field of electron microscopy, opening up new possibilities for correlating structure to functionality. Aberration correction not only allows for enhanced structural resolution with incident probes into the sub-angstrom range, but can also provide greater probe currents to facilitate mapping of intrinsically weak spectroscopic signals at the nanoscale or even the atomic level. In this issue of MRS Bulletin, we illustrate the power of the new generation of electron microscopes with a combination of imaging and spectroscopy. We show the mapping of elemental distributions at atomic resolution and also the mapping of electronic and optical properties at unprecedented spatial resolution, with applications ranging from graphene to plasmonic nanostructures, and oxide interfaces to biology.

  11. Accurate method of modeling cluster scaling relations in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jian-hua; Li, Baojiu

    2016-06-01

    We propose a new method to model cluster scaling relations in modified gravity. Using a suite of nonradiative hydrodynamical simulations, we show that the scaling relations of accumulated gas quantities, such as the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (Compton-y parameter) and the x-ray Compton-y parameter, can be accurately predicted using the known results in the Λ CDM model with a precision of ˜3 % . This method provides a reliable way to analyze the gas physics in modified gravity using the less demanding and much more efficient pure cold dark matter simulations. Our results therefore have important theoretical and practical implications in constraining gravity using cluster surveys.

  12. Accurate multireference configuration interaction calculations of the 24 Λ-S states and 60 Ω states of the BO+ cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Shi, Deheng; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2016-11-01

    The potential energy curves were calculated for the 24 Λ-S states correlating with the lowest four dissociation channels of the BO+ cation. The potential energy curves were also computed for the 60 Ω states generated from the 24 Λ-S states. Calculations were made for internuclear separations from 0.08 to 1.05 nm using the CASSCF method, which was followed by the icMRCI approach with the correlation-consistent basis sets. Core-valence correlation, scalar relativistic and basis extrapolation were accounted for. Of the 24 Λ-S states, only three states (25Π, 15Σ-, and 25Σ-) were found to be repulsive; only the 15Δ state was found to be a very weakly-bound state; and the E1Π, 23Π, and 15Π states were found to be very strong bound. In addition, the B1Σ+ and 31Σ+ states have double wells by the avoided crossing between the two states. The a3Π, 13Σ-, and 23Σ- states are inverted with the spin-orbit coupling effect included. The spectroscopic parameters were determined and the vibrational properties of several Λ-S states were predicted. Comparison with available experimental data shows that the methodology employed is highly accurate for this system.

  13. Accurate multireference configuration interaction calculations of the 24 Λ-S states and 60 Ω states of the BO(+) cation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Shi, Deheng; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2016-11-01

    The potential energy curves were calculated for the 24 Λ-S states correlating with the lowest four dissociation channels of the BO(+) cation. The potential energy curves were also computed for the 60 Ω states generated from the 24 Λ-S states. Calculations were made for internuclear separations from 0.08 to 1.05nm using the CASSCF method, which was followed by the icMRCI approach with the correlation-consistent basis sets. Core-valence correlation, scalar relativistic and basis extrapolation were accounted for. Of the 24 Λ-S states, only three states (2(5)Π, 1(5)Σ(-), and 2(5)Σ(-)) were found to be repulsive; only the 1(5)Δ state was found to be a very weakly-bound state; and the E(1)Π, 2(3)Π, and 1(5)Π states were found to be very strong bound. In addition, the B(1)Σ(+) and 3(1)Σ(+) states have double wells by the avoided crossing between the two states. The a(3)Π, 1(3)Σ(-), and 2(3)Σ(-) states are inverted with the spin-orbit coupling effect included. The spectroscopic parameters were determined and the vibrational properties of several Λ-S states were predicted. Comparison with available experimental data shows that the methodology employed is highly accurate for this system. PMID:27289351

  14. The HERMES solar atlas and the spectroscopic analysis of the seismic solar analogue KIC 3241581

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, P. G.; Allende Prieto, C.; Van Reeth, T.; Tkachenko, A.; Raskin, G.; van Winckel, H.; do Nascimento, J.-D., Jr.; Salabert, D.; Corsaro, E.; García, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Solar-analogue stars provide an excellent resource to study the Sun's evolution, i.e. the changes with time in stellar structure, activity, or rotation for solar-like stars. The unparalleled photometric data from the NASA space telescope Kepler allows us to study and characterise solar-like stars through asteroseismology. Aims: We aim to spectroscopically investigate the fundamental parameter and chromospheric activity of solar analogues and twins, based on observations obtained with the HERMES spectrograph and combine them with asteroseismology. Therefore, we need to build a solar atlas for the spectrograph, to provide accurate calibrations of the spectroscopically determined abundances of solar- and late-type stars observed with this instrument and thus perform differential spectroscopic comparisons. Methods: We acquire high-resolution and high signal-to-noise (S/N) spectroscopy to construct three solar reference spectra by observing the reflected light of the asteroids Vesta and Victoria and the jovian moon Europa (100 ≲ S/N ≲ 450) with the HERMES spectrograph. We then observe the Kepler solar analogue KIC 3241581 (S/N ~ 170). For this star, the fundamental spectral parameters are extracted using a differential analysis. Sufficient S/N in the near ultraviolet allows us to investigate the chromospheric magnetic activity in both objects. Results: We constructed three solar spectrum atlases from 385 to 900 nm, obtained with the HERMES spectrograph from observations of two bright asteroids and a jovian moon. A comparison between our solar spectra atlas to the Kurucz and HARPS solar spectrum shows an excellent agreement. KIC 3241581 was found to be a long-periodic binary system. The fundamental parameter for the stellar primary component are Teff = 5689 ± 11 K, log g = 4.385 ± 0.005, [Fe/H] = + 0.22 ± 0.01, being in agreement with the published global seismic values, which confirms its status as solar analogue. The chromospheric activity level is

  15. Recent advances and remaining challenges for the spectroscopic detection of explosive threats.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Augustus W; Christesen, Steven D; Moon, Raphael P; Guicheteau, Jason A; Emmons, Erik D

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, the U.S. Army initiated a program through the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center to identify viable spectroscopic signatures of explosives and initiate environmental persistence, fate, and transport studies for trace residues. These studies were ultimately designed to integrate these signatures into algorithms and experimentally evaluate sensor performance for explosives and precursor materials in existing chemical point and standoff detection systems. Accurate and validated optical cross sections and signatures are critical in benchmarking spectroscopic-based sensors. This program has provided important information for the scientists and engineers currently developing trace-detection solutions to the homemade explosive problem. With this information, the sensitivity of spectroscopic methods for explosives detection can now be quantitatively evaluated before the sensor is deployed and tested.

  16. Analysis of algebraic reconstruction technique for accurate imaging of gas temperature and concentration based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui-Hui, Xia; Rui-Feng, Kan; Jian-Guo, Liu; Zhen-Yu, Xu; Ya-Bai, He

    2016-06-01

    An improved algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) combined with tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy(TDLAS) is presented in this paper for determining two-dimensional (2D) distribution of H2O concentration and temperature in a simulated combustion flame. This work aims to simulate the reconstruction of spectroscopic measurements by a multi-view parallel-beam scanning geometry and analyze the effects of projection rays on reconstruction accuracy. It finally proves that reconstruction quality dramatically increases with the number of projection rays increasing until more than 180 for 20 × 20 grid, and after that point, the number of projection rays has little influence on reconstruction accuracy. It is clear that the temperature reconstruction results are more accurate than the water vapor concentration obtained by the traditional concentration calculation method. In the present study an innovative way to reduce the error of concentration reconstruction and improve the reconstruction quality greatly is also proposed, and the capability of this new method is evaluated by using appropriate assessment parameters. By using this new approach, not only the concentration reconstruction accuracy is greatly improved, but also a suitable parallel-beam arrangement is put forward for high reconstruction accuracy and simplicity of experimental validation. Finally, a bimodal structure of the combustion region is assumed to demonstrate the robustness and universality of the proposed method. Numerical investigation indicates that the proposed TDLAS tomographic algorithm is capable of detecting accurate temperature and concentration profiles. This feasible formula for reconstruction research is expected to resolve several key issues in practical combustion devices. Project supported by the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61205151), the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Project of China (Grant

  17. Analysis of algebraic reconstruction technique for accurate imaging of gas temperature and concentration based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui-Hui, Xia; Rui-Feng, Kan; Jian-Guo, Liu; Zhen-Yu, Xu; Ya-Bai, He

    2016-06-01

    An improved algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) combined with tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy(TDLAS) is presented in this paper for determining two-dimensional (2D) distribution of H2O concentration and temperature in a simulated combustion flame. This work aims to simulate the reconstruction of spectroscopic measurements by a multi-view parallel-beam scanning geometry and analyze the effects of projection rays on reconstruction accuracy. It finally proves that reconstruction quality dramatically increases with the number of projection rays increasing until more than 180 for 20 × 20 grid, and after that point, the number of projection rays has little influence on reconstruction accuracy. It is clear that the temperature reconstruction results are more accurate than the water vapor concentration obtained by the traditional concentration calculation method. In the present study an innovative way to reduce the error of concentration reconstruction and improve the reconstruction quality greatly is also proposed, and the capability of this new method is evaluated by using appropriate assessment parameters. By using this new approach, not only the concentration reconstruction accuracy is greatly improved, but also a suitable parallel-beam arrangement is put forward for high reconstruction accuracy and simplicity of experimental validation. Finally, a bimodal structure of the combustion region is assumed to demonstrate the robustness and universality of the proposed method. Numerical investigation indicates that the proposed TDLAS tomographic algorithm is capable of detecting accurate temperature and concentration profiles. This feasible formula for reconstruction research is expected to resolve several key issues in practical combustion devices. Project supported by the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61205151), the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Project of China (Grant

  18. The Hubble Spectroscopic Legacy Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeples, Molly S.; Tumlinson, Jason; Fox, Andrew; Aloisi, Alessandra; Ayres, Thomas R.; Danforth, Charles; Fleming, Scott W.; Jenkins, Edward B.; Jedrzejewski, Robert I.; Keeney, Brian A.; Oliveira, Cristina M.

    2016-01-01

    With no future space ultraviolet instruments currently planned, the data from the UV spectrographs aboard the Hubble Space Telescope have a legacy value beyond their initial science goals. The Hubble Spectroscopic Legacy Archive will provide to the community new science-grade combined spectra for all publicly available data obtained by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) and the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). These data will be packaged into "smart archives" according to target type and scientific themes to facilitate the construction of archival samples for common science uses. A new "quick look" capability will make the data easy for users to quickly access, assess the quality of, and download for archival science starting in Cycle 24, with the first generation of these products for the FUV modes of COS available online via MAST in early 2016.

  19. Multifunction Imaging and Spectroscopic Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis

    2004-01-01

    A proposed optoelectronic instrument would perform several different spectroscopic and imaging functions that, heretofore, have been performed by separate instruments. The functions would be reflectance, fluorescence, and Raman spectroscopies; variable-color confocal imaging at two different resolutions; and wide-field color imaging. The instrument was conceived for use in examination of minerals on remote planets. It could also be used on Earth to characterize material specimens. The conceptual design of the instrument emphasizes compactness and economy, to be achieved largely through sharing of components among subsystems that perform different imaging and spectrometric functions. The input optics for the various functions would be mounted in a single optical head. With the exception of a targeting lens, the input optics would all be aimed at the same spot on a specimen, thereby both (1) eliminating the need to reposition the specimen to perform different imaging and/or spectroscopic observations and (2) ensuring that data from such observations can be correlated with respect to known positions on the specimen. The figure schematically depicts the principal components and subsystems of the instrument. The targeting lens would collect light into a multimode optical fiber, which would guide the light through a fiber-selection switch to a reflection/ fluorescence spectrometer. The switch would have four positions, enabling selection of spectrometer input from the targeting lens, from either of one or two multimode optical fibers coming from a reflectance/fluorescence- microspectrometer optical head, or from a dark calibration position (no fiber). The switch would be the only moving part within the instrument.

  20. THE ARAUCARIA PROJECT: AN ACCURATE DISTANCE TO THE LATE-TYPE DOUBLE-LINED ECLIPSING BINARY OGLE SMC113.3 4007 IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Graczyk, Dariusz; Pietrzynski, Grzegorz; Gieren, Wolfgang; Pilecki, Bogumil; Mennickent, Ronald E-mail: wgieren@astro-udec.cl; and others

    2012-05-10

    We have analyzed the long-period, double-lined eclipsing binary system OGLE SMC113.3 4007 (SC10 137844) in the Small Magellanic Cloud. The binary lies in the northeastern part of the galaxy and consists of two evolved, well-detached, non-active G8 giants. The orbit is eccentric with e = 0.311, and the orbital period is 371.6 days. Using extensive high-resolution spectroscopic and multi-color photometric data, we have determined a true distance modulus of the system of m - M = 18.83 {+-} 0.02 (statistical) {+-} 0.05 (systematic) mag using a surface-brightness-color relation for giant stars. This method is insensitive to metallicity and reddening corrections and depends only very little on stellar atmosphere model assumptions. Additionally, we derived very accurate, at the level of 1%-2%, physical parameters of both giant stars, particularly their masses and radii, making our results important for comparison with stellar evolution models. Our analysis underlines the high potential of late-type, double-lined detached binary systems for accurate distance determinations to nearby galaxies.

  1. The spectroscopic foundation of radiative forcing of climate by carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Daniels, Taumi S.; Kratz, David P.; Feldman, Daniel R.; Collins, William D.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Alvarado, Matthew J.; Lawler, James E.; Anderson, L. W.; Fahey, David W.; Hunt, Linda A.; Mast, Jeffrey C.

    2016-05-01

    The radiative forcing (RF) of carbon dioxide (CO2) is the leading contribution to climate change from anthropogenic activities. Calculating CO2 RF requires detailed knowledge of spectral line parameters for thousands of infrared absorption lines. A reliable spectroscopic characterization of CO2 forcing is critical to scientific and policy assessments of present climate and climate change. Our results show that CO2 RF in a variety of atmospheres is remarkably insensitive to known uncertainties in the three main CO2 spectroscopic parameters: the line shapes, line strengths, and half widths. We specifically examine uncertainty in RF due to line mixing as this process is critical in determining line shapes in the far wings of CO2 absorption lines. RF computed with a Voigt line shape is also examined. Overall, the spectroscopic uncertainty in present-day CO2 RF is less than 1%, indicating a robust foundation in our understanding of how rising CO2 warms the climate system.

  2. Spectroscopic Studies on Eu3+ Doped Boro-Tellurite Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaraju, K.; Marimuthu, K.

    2011-07-01

    Eu3+ doped boro-tellurite glasses have been synthesized and its optical behavior have been studied and reported. The presence of varying tellurium dioxide content results changes in spectroscopic behavoir were explored through UV-VIS, and Luminescence spectra. The bonding parameters have been calculated based on the observed band positions of the absorption spectra. The Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters Ωλ (λ = 2, 4 and 6) have been determined through the luminescence spectra without applying any constraints and the results are presented. The Judd-Ofelt parameters have been used to determine various optical properties corresponding to 5D0→7FJ (J = 1,2,3 and 4) transitions of Eu3+ ions. The varying optical properties of the prepared glasses with the change in tellurium dioxide have been studied and compared with similar studies.

  3. NOSD-1000, the high-temperature nitrous oxide spectroscopic databank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashkun, S. A.; Perevalov, V. I.; Lavrentieva, N. N.

    2016-07-01

    We present a high-temperature version, NOSD-1000, of the nitrous oxide spectroscopic databank. The databank contains the line parameters (positions, intensities, air- and self-broadened half-widths and coefficients of temperature dependence of air- and self-broadened half-widths) of the most abundant isotopologue 14N216O of the nitrous oxide molecule. The reference temperature is Tref=1000 K and the intensity cutoff is Icut=10-25 cm-1/(molecule cm-2). More than 1.4 million lines covering the 260-8310 cm-1 spectral range are included in NOSD-1000. The databank has been generated within the framework of the method of effective operators and based on the global fittings of spectroscopic parameters (parameters of the effective Hamiltonian and effective dipole moment operators) to observed data collected from the literature. Line-by-line simulation of a medium-resolution high-temperature (T=873 K) spectrum has been performed in order to validate the databank. NOSD-1000 is freely accessible via the Internet.

  4. Ab initio structural and spectroscopic study of HPS{sup x} and HSP{sup x} (x = 0,+1,−1) in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Yaghlane, Saida Ben; Cotton, C. Eric; Francisco, Joseph S. E-mail: hochlaf@univ-mlv.fr; Linguerri, Roberto; Hochlaf, Majdi E-mail: hochlaf@univ-mlv.fr

    2013-11-07

    Accurate ab initio computations of structural and spectroscopic parameters for the HPS/HSP molecules and corresponding cations and anions have been performed. For the electronic structure computations, standard and explicitly correlated coupled cluster techniques in conjunction with large basis sets have been adopted. In particular, we present equilibrium geometries, rotational constants, harmonic vibrational frequencies, adiabatic ionization energies, electron affinities, and, for the neutral species, singlet-triplet relative energies. Besides, the full-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) for HPS{sup x} and HSP{sup x} (x = −1,0,1) systems have been generated at the standard coupled cluster level with a basis set of augmented quintuple-zeta quality. By applying perturbation theory to the calculated PESs, an extended set of spectroscopic constants, including τ, first-order centrifugal distortion and anharmonic vibrational constants has been obtained. In addition, the potentials have been used in a variational approach to deduce the whole pattern of vibrational levels up to 4000 cm{sup −1} above the minima of the corresponding PESs.

  5. Accurate transition rates for intercombination lines of singly ionized nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Tayal, S. S.

    2011-01-15

    The transition energies and rates for the 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 2} {sup 3}P{sub 1,2}-2s2p{sup 3} {sup 5}S{sub 2}{sup o} and 2s{sup 2}2p3s-2s{sup 2}2p3p intercombination transitions have been calculated using term-dependent nonorthogonal orbitals in the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock approach. Several sets of spectroscopic and correlation nonorthogonal functions have been chosen to describe adequately term dependence of wave functions and various correlation corrections. Special attention has been focused on the accurate representation of strong interactions between the 2s2p{sup 3} {sup 1,3}P{sub 1}{sup o} and 2s{sup 2}2p3s {sup 1,3}P{sub 1}{sup o}levels. The relativistic corrections are included through the one-body mass correction, Darwin, and spin-orbit operators and two-body spin-other-orbit and spin-spin operators in the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. The importance of core-valence correlation effects has been examined. The accuracy of present transition rates is evaluated by the agreement between the length and velocity formulations combined with the agreement between the calculated and measured transition energies. The present results for transition probabilities, branching fraction, and lifetimes have been compared with previous calculations and experiments.

  6. Mill profiler machines soft materials accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Mill profiler machines bevels, slots, and grooves in soft materials, such as styrofoam phenolic-filled cores, to any desired thickness. A single operator can accurately control cutting depths in contour or straight line work.

  7. An articulated statistical shape model for accurate hip joint segmentation.

    PubMed

    Kainmueller, Dagmar; Lamecker, Hans; Zachow, Stefan; Hege, Hans-Christian

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we propose a framework for fully automatic, robust and accurate segmentation of the human pelvis and proximal femur in CT data. We propose a composite statistical shape model of femur and pelvis with a flexible hip joint, for which we extend the common definition of statistical shape models as well as the common strategy for their adaptation. We do not analyze the joint flexibility statistically, but model it explicitly by rotational parameters describing the bent in a ball-and-socket joint. A leave-one-out evaluation on 50 CT volumes shows that image driven adaptation of our composite shape model robustly produces accurate segmentations of both proximal femur and pelvis. As a second contribution, we evaluate a fine grain multi-object segmentation method based on graph optimization. It relies on accurate initializations of femur and pelvis, which our composite shape model can generate. Simultaneous optimization of both femur and pelvis yields more accurate results than separate optimizations of each structure. Shape model adaptation and graph based optimization are embedded in a fully automatic framework. PMID:19964159

  8. A spectroscopic charge pumping model in spice for the low dimensional MOSFET's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahouadji, M.; Djahli, F.

    2002-01-01

    We have simulated the experimental spectroscopic charge pumping technique by the implementation of a model in the electrical simulator SPICE3F4. This model takes into account the temperature effect on the geometrical and electrical parameters of the studied transistor. The simulated results are in a good agreement with recent and different experimental results.

  9. Spectroscopic Studies of Molecular Systems relevant in Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaro, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    double-ζ quality such as N07D and SNSD. Such a protocol has been then applied to the dimers of nucleobases in order to study the perturbation on the vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities induced by the intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions. Efforts have been made to challenge the problems of simulating strongly anharmonic vibrations within hydrogen-bonded bridges, focusing on the requirement of a very accurate description of the underlying potential energy surface. Improvements for such vibrations have been achieved by means of hybrid models, where the harmonic part of the force-field is computed at a higher level of theory like B2PLYP, or by application of the less demanding ONIOM B2PLYP:B3LYP scheme, which is a focused model where only the part of the molecular system forming the hydrogen bonds is treated at B2PLYP level of theory. Moreover, for improving the vibrational frequencies of modes like the stretching of C=O and N-H functional groups, which are particularly sensitive to hydrogen-bonding, correction parameters for the B3LYP-D3/N07D frequencies have been determined. Afterwards, the treatment of the vibrational properties of nucleobases in condensed phases has been faced, focusing on uracil in the solid state. In particular, a heptamer cluster of uracil molecules has been considered as model to represent the properties in the solid state. The relative vibrational frequencies have been computed at anharmonic level within the VPT2 framework, combining two cost-effective approaches, namely the hybrid B3LYP-D3/N07D:DFTBA model, where the harmonic frequencies are computed with B3LYP-D3/N07D method and the anharmonic corrections are evaluated with the less expensive DFTBA method, and the reduced dimensionality VPT2 (RD-VPT2) approach, in which only selected vibrational modes are calculated anharmonically (including the couplings with the other modes) while the remaining modes are treated at the harmonic level, using the B3LYP-D3/N07D method only

  10. No microplastics in benthic eelpout (Zoarces viviparus): An urgent need for spectroscopic analyses in microplastic detection.

    PubMed

    Wesch, Charlotte; Barthel, Anne-Kathrin; Braun, Ulrike; Klein, Roland; Paulus, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Monitoring the ingestion of microplastics is challenging and suitable detection techniques are insufficiently used. Thus, misidentifying natural for synthetic microfibres cannot be avoided. As part of a framework to monitor the ingestion of microplastics in eelpout, this short report addresses the accurate identification of microfibres. We show that, following visual inspections, putatively synthetic microfibres are indeed of natural origin, as ascertained by spectrometric analyses. Consequently, we call for an inclusion of spectroscopic techniques in standardized microplastic monitoring schemes. PMID:27198628

  11. No microplastics in benthic eelpout (Zoarces viviparus): An urgent need for spectroscopic analyses in microplastic detection.

    PubMed

    Wesch, Charlotte; Barthel, Anne-Kathrin; Braun, Ulrike; Klein, Roland; Paulus, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Monitoring the ingestion of microplastics is challenging and suitable detection techniques are insufficiently used. Thus, misidentifying natural for synthetic microfibres cannot be avoided. As part of a framework to monitor the ingestion of microplastics in eelpout, this short report addresses the accurate identification of microfibres. We show that, following visual inspections, putatively synthetic microfibres are indeed of natural origin, as ascertained by spectrometric analyses. Consequently, we call for an inclusion of spectroscopic techniques in standardized microplastic monitoring schemes.

  12. Stellar modelling of Spica, a high-mass spectroscopic binary with a β Cep variable primary component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, A.; Matthews, J. M.; Aerts, C.; Pavlovski, K.; Pápics, P. I.; Zwintz, K.; Cameron, C.; Walker, G. A. H.; Kuschnig, R.; Degroote, P.; Debosscher, J.; Moravveji, E.; Kolbas, V.; Guenther, D. B.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Rowe, J. F.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D.; Weiss, W. W.

    2016-05-01

    Binary stars provide a valuable test of stellar structure and evolution, because the masses of the individual stellar components can be derived with high accuracy and in a model-independent way. In this work, we study Spica, an eccentric double-lined spectroscopic binary system with a β Cep type variable primary component. We use state-of-the-art modelling tools to determine accurate orbital elements of the binary system and atmospheric parameters of both stellar components. We interpret the short-period variability intrinsic to the primary component, detected on top of the orbital motion both in the photometric and spectroscopic data. The non-local thermodynamic equilibrium based spectrum analysis reveals two stars of similar atmospheric chemical composition consistent with the present-day cosmic abundance standard. The masses and radii of the stars are found to be 11.43 ± 1.15 M⊙ and 7.21 ± 0.75 M⊙, and 7.47 ± 0.54 R⊙ and 3.74 ± 0.53 R⊙ for the primary and secondary, respectively. We find the primary component to pulsate in three independent modes, of which one is identified as a radial mode, while the two others are found to be non-radial, low degree l modes. The frequency of one of these modes is an exact multiple of the orbital frequency, and the l = m = 2 mode identification suggests a tidal nature for this particular mode. We find a very good agreement between the derived dynamical and evolutionary masses for the Spica system to within the observational errors of the measured masses. The age of the system is estimated to be 12.5 ± 1 Myr.

  13. More-Accurate Model of Flows in Rocket Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, Ashvin; Chenoweth, James; Brinckman, Kevin; Dash, Sanford

    2011-01-01

    An improved computational model for simulating flows in liquid-propellant injectors in rocket engines has been developed. Models like this one are needed for predicting fluxes of heat in, and performances of, the engines. An important part of predicting performance is predicting fluctuations of temperature, fluctuations of concentrations of chemical species, and effects of turbulence on diffusion of heat and chemical species. Customarily, diffusion effects are represented by parameters known in the art as the Prandtl and Schmidt numbers. Prior formulations include ad hoc assumptions of constant values of these parameters, but these assumptions and, hence, the formulations, are inaccurate for complex flows. In the improved model, these parameters are neither constant nor specified in advance: instead, they are variables obtained as part of the solution. Consequently, this model represents the effects of turbulence on diffusion of heat and chemical species more accurately than prior formulations do, and may enable more-accurate prediction of mixing and flows of heat in rocket-engine combustion chambers. The model has been implemented within CRUNCH CFD, a proprietary computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer program, and has been tested within that program. The model could also be implemented within other CFD programs.

  14. Automated pipelines for spectroscopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allende Prieto, C.

    2016-09-01

    The Gaia mission will have a profound impact on our understanding of the structure and dynamics of the Milky Way. Gaia is providing an exhaustive census of stellar parallaxes, proper motions, positions, colors and radial velocities, but also leaves some glaring holes in an otherwise complete data set. The radial velocities measured with the on-board high-resolution spectrograph will only reach some 10 % of the full sample of stars with astrometry and photometry from the mission, and detailed chemical information will be obtained for less than 1 %. Teams all over the world are organizing large-scale projects to provide complementary radial velocities and chemistry, since this can now be done very efficiently from the ground thanks to large and mid-size telescopes with a wide field-of-view and multi-object spectrographs. As a result, automated data processing is taking an ever increasing relevance, and the concept is applying to many more areas, from targeting to analysis. In this paper, I provide a quick overview of recent, ongoing, and upcoming spectroscopic surveys, and the strategies adopted in their automated analysis pipelines.

  15. Vibrational spectroscopic characterization of fluoroquinolones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, U.; Szeghalmi, A.; Schmitt, M.; Kiefer, W.; Popp, J.; Holzgrabe, U.

    2005-05-01

    Quinolones are important gyrase inhibitors. Even though they are used as active agents in many antibiotics, the detailed mechanism of action on a molecular level is so far not known. It is of greatest interest to shed light on this drug-target interaction to provide useful information in the fight against growing resistances and obtain new insights for the development of new powerful drugs. To reach this goal, on a first step it is essential to understand the structural characteristics of the drugs and the effects that are caused by the environment in detail. In this work we report on Raman spectroscopical investigations of a variety of gyrase inhibitors (nalidixic acid, oxolinic acid, cinoxacin, flumequine, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, ofloxacin, enoxacin, sarafloxacin and moxifloxacin) by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy excited with various excitation wavelengths, both in the off-resonance region (532, 633, 830 and 1064 nm) and in the resonance region (resonance Raman spectroscopy at 244, 257 and 275 nm). Furthermore DFT calculations were performed to assign the vibrational modes, as well as for an identification of intramolecular hydrogen bonding motifs. The effect of small changes in the drug environment was studied by adding successively small amounts of water until physiological low concentrations of the drugs in aqueous solution were obtained. At these low concentrations resonance Raman spectroscopy proved to be a useful and sensitive technique. Supplementary information was obtained from IR and UV/vis spectroscopy.

  16. Spectroscopic Classifications of Optical Transients with SOAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hounsell, R. A.; Miller, J. A.; Pan, Y.-C.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.; Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    We report the following classifications of optical transients from spectroscopic observations with the Goodman spectrograph on the SOAR 4-m telescope. Targets were supplied by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST).

  17. Spectroscopic observations of ASASSN-15bp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, S. C.; Darnley, M. J.; Bode, M. F.; Copperwheat, C. M.

    2015-01-01

    We report spectroscopic observations of the optical transient ASASSN-15bp (ATel #6981) taken on 2015 January 25.31 UT using the FRODOSpec spectrograph (Barnsley et al. 2012) on the Liverpool Telescope (Steele et al. 2004).

  18. Asiago spectroscopic classification of SN 2016gdt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochner, P.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Pastorello, A.; Tomasella, L.; Turatto, M.; Terreran, G.

    2016-09-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic classification of SN2016gdt in IC1407. The target was supplied by the Italian Supernovae Search Project (ISSP).

  19. MAMA Spectroscopic Sensitivity and Focus Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    Monitor sensitivity of each MAMA grating mode to detect any change due tocontamination or other causes. Also monitor the STIS focus in a spectroscopic and animaging mode.Whenever possible, obtain parallel airglow spectra with COS.

  20. An Empirical Dipole Polarizability for he from a Fit to Spectroscopic Data Yielding Analytic Empirical Potentials for all Isotopologues of HeH^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young-Sang; Le Roy, Robert J.; Dattani, Nikesh S.

    2015-06-01

    All available spectroscopic data for all stable isotopologues of HeH^+ are analyzed with a direct-potential-fit (DPF) procedure that uses least-squares fits to experimental data in order to optimize the parameters defining an analytic potential. Since the coefficient of the leading (1/r^4) inverse-power term is C_4 = αHe/2, when treated as a free parameter in the fit, it provides an independent empirical estimate of the polarizability of the He atom. The fact that the present model for the long-range behaviour includes accurate theoretical C_6, C_7 and C_8 coefficients (which are held fixed in the fits) should make it possible to obtain a good estimate of this quantity. The Boltzmann constant k_B, a fundamental constant that can define temperature, is directly related to the dipole polarizability α of a gas by the expression k_B = α/3ɛ_0(ɛ_r+2/ɛ_r-1){p}/{T} in which ɛ_0 is the permitivity of free space, and ɛ_r is the relative dielectric permitivity at pressure p and temperature T. If k_B can be determined with greater precision, it can be used to define temperature based on a fundamental constant, rather than based on the rather arbitrary triple point of water, which is only known to 5 digits of precision. α for He is known theoretically to 8 digits of precision, but an empirical value lags behind. This work, examines the question of how precisely αHe can be determined from a DPF to spectroscopic HeH^+ data, where the limiting long-range tail of the analytic potential has the correct form implied by Rydberg theory: αHe/2r^4. Although the highest observed vibrational level is bound by over 1000 cm-1, our current fits determine an empirical C_4 = α{He}/2 with an uncertainty of only 0.6%. It has been shown that with more precise spectroscopic data near the dissociation, α{He} can be determined with high enough precision to determine a more precise k_B and hence redefine temperature more accurately. Dattani N S. & Puchalski M. (2015) Physical Review

  1. Spectroscopic ellipsometry data analysis: Measured vs. calculated quantities

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison, G.E. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is a very powerful technique for optical characterization of thin-film and bulk materials, but the technique measures functions of complex reflection coefficients, which are usually not of interest per se. The interesting characteristics such as film thickness, surface roughness thickness, and optical functions can be determined only by modeling the near-surface region of the sample. However, the measured quantities are not equivalent to those determined from the modeling. Ellipsometry measurements determine elements of the sample Mueller matrix, but the usual result of modeling calculations are elements of the sample. Often this difference is academic, but if the sample depolarizes the light, it is not. Ellipsometry calculations also include methods for determining the optical functions of materials. Data for bulk materials are usually accurate for substrates, but are not appropriate for most thin films. Therefore, reasonable parameterizations are quite useful in performing spectroscopic ellipsometry data analysis. Recently, there has been an increased interest in anisotropic materials, both in thin-film and bulk form. A generalized procedure will be presented for calculating the elements of the Jones matrix for any number of layers, any one of which may or may not be uniaxial.

  2. Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopic Data

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 108 Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopic Data (Web, free access)   This handbook provides a selection of the most important and frequently used atomic spectroscopic data. The compilation includes data for the neutral and singly-ionized atoms of all elements hydrogen through einsteinium (Z = 1-99). The wavelengths, intensities, and spectrum assignments are given for each element, and the data for the approximately 12,000 lines of all elements are also collected into a single table.

  3. Optical design of Lyman/FUSE. [Far UV Spectroscopic Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Content, D. A.; Davila, P. M.; Osantowski, J. F.; Saha, T. T.; Wilson, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    The optical system for the proposed Lyman/Far UV Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) orbiting observatory is described and illustrated with drawings and graphs of predicted performance. The system comprises (1) an FUV channel based on a 1.84-m-diameter Rowland circle spectrograph with five high-density modified ellipsiodal near-normal-incidence gratings and an array of four MAMA detectors; (2) an EUV channel with ellipsoidal mirror, planar varied-line-space grating, microchannel-plate array, and wedge-and-strip anode detector; (3) a 70-cm Wolter II glancing-incidence telescope; and (4) a CCD-detector fine-error sensor to provide accurate pointing (within 200 marcsec rms). The resolving powers of the spectrographs are 30,000 in the FUV and 300-600 (wavelength-dependent) in the EUV.

  4. Leveraging Two Kinect Sensors for Accurate Full-Body Motion Capture.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhiquan; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Yu; Du, Sidan

    2015-09-22

    Accurate motion capture plays an important role in sports analysis, the medical field and virtual reality. Current methods for motion capture often suffer from occlusions, which limits the accuracy of their pose estimation. In this paper, we propose a complete system to measure the pose parameters of the human body accurately. Different from previous monocular depth camera systems, we leverage two Kinect sensors to acquire more information about human movements, which ensures that we can still get an accurate estimation even when significant occlusion occurs. Because human motion is temporally constant, we adopt a learning analysis to mine the temporal information across the posture variations. Using this information, we estimate human pose parameters accurately, regardless of rapid movement. Our experimental results show that our system can perform an accurate pose estimation of the human body with the constraint of information from the temporal domain.

  5. Leveraging Two Kinect Sensors for Accurate Full-Body Motion Capture

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhiquan; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Yu; Du, Sidan

    2015-01-01

    Accurate motion capture plays an important role in sports analysis, the medical field and virtual reality. Current methods for motion capture often suffer from occlusions, which limits the accuracy of their pose estimation. In this paper, we propose a complete system to measure the pose parameters of the human body accurately. Different from previous monocular depth camera systems, we leverage two Kinect sensors to acquire more information about human movements, which ensures that we can still get an accurate estimation even when significant occlusion occurs. Because human motion is temporally constant, we adopt a learning analysis to mine the temporal information across the posture variations. Using this information, we estimate human pose parameters accurately, regardless of rapid movement. Our experimental results show that our system can perform an accurate pose estimation of the human body with the constraint of information from the temporal domain. PMID:26402681

  6. Spectroscopic studies of microwave plasmas containing hexamethyldisiloxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, A. S. C.; Mitschker, F.; Awakowicz, P.; Röpcke, J.

    2016-10-01

    Low-pressure microwave discharges containing hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) with admixtures of oxygen and nitrogen, used for the deposition of silicon containing films, have been studied spectroscopically. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) in the visible spectral range has been combined with infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (IRLAS). The experiments were carried out in order to analyze the dependence of plasma chemical phenomena on power and gas mixture at relatively low pressures, up to 50 Pa, and power values, up to 2 kW. The evolution of the concentration of the methyl radical, CH3, and of seven stable molecules, HMDSO, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, CO and CO2, was monitored in the plasma processes by in situ IRLAS using tunable lead salt diode lasers (TDL) and external-cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL) as radiation sources. To achieve reliable values for the gas temperature inside and outside the plasma bulk as well as for the temperature in the plasma hot and colder zones, which are of great importance for calculation of species concentrations, three different methods based on emission and absorption spectroscopy data of N2, CH3 and CO have been used. In this approach line profile analysis has been combined with spectral simulation methods. The concentrations of the various species, which were found to be in the range between 1011 to 1015 cm-3, are in the focus of interest. The influence of the discharge parameters power, pressure and gas mixture on the molecular concentrations has been studied. To achieve further insight into general plasma chemical aspects the dissociation of the HMDSO precursor gas including its fragmentation and conversion to the reaction products was analyzed in detail.

  7. Raman Spectroscopic Investigation of Dyes in Spices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlemann, Ute; Ramoji, Anuradha; Rösch, Petra; Da Costa Filho, Paulo Augusto; Robert, Fabien; Popp, Jürgen

    2010-08-01

    In this study, a number of synthetic colorants for spices have been investigated by means of Raman spectroscopy, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and surface enhanced (resonance) Raman spectroscopy (SER(S)). The aim of the study was the determination of limits of detection for each dye separately and in binary mixtures of dyes in spiked samples of the spices. Most of the investigated dyes have been azo dyes, some being water-soluble, the other being fat-soluble. Investigating the composition of food preparations is an ongoing and important branch of analytical sciences. On one hand, new ingredients have to be analyzed with regard to their contents, on the other hand, raw materials that have been tampered have to be eliminated from food production processes. In the last decades, the various Raman spectroscopic methods have proven to be successful in many areas of life and materials sciences. The ability of Raman spectroscopy to distinguish even structural very similar analytes by means of their vibrational fingerprint will also be important in this study. Nevertheless, Raman scattering is a very weak process that is oftentimes overlaid by matrix interferences or fluorescence. In order to achieve limits of detection in the nanomolar range, the signal intensity has to be increased. According to the well-known equations, there are several ways of achieving this increase: •increasing sample concentration •increasing laser power •decreasing the laser wavelength •using electronic resonance •increasing the local electromagnetic field In this study, nearly all of the above-mentioned principles were applied. In a first step, all dyes were investigated in solution at different concentrations to determine a limit of detection. In the second step, spiked spice samples have been extracted with a variety of solvents and process parameters tested. To lower the limit of detection even further, SERS spectroscopy has been used as well in as out of electronic resonance.

  8. Spectroscopic properties of Nd3+ doped transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yunlong; Chen, Daqin; Ma, En; Wang, Yuansheng; Hu, Zhongjian

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, the spectroscopic properties of Nd(3+) doped transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing LaF(3) nano-crystals were systematically studied. The formation and distribution of LaF(3) nano-crystals in the glass matrix were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Based on Judd-Ofelt theory, the intensity parameters Omega(t) (t=2, 4, 6), spontaneous emission probability, radiative lifetime, radiative quantum efficiency, width of the emission line and stimulated emission cross-section of Nd(3+) were evaluated. Particularly, the effect of Nd(3+) doping level on them was discussed. With the increase of Nd(3+) concentration in the glass ceramic, the experimental luminescence lifetime, radiative quantum efficiency and stimulated emission cross-section vary from 353.4 micros, 78.3% and 1.86 x 10(-20)cm(2) to 214.7 micros, 39.9% and 1.52 x 10(-20)cm(2), respectively. The comparative study of Nd(3+) spectroscopic parameters in different hosts suggests that the investigated glass ceramic system is potentially applicable as laser materials for 1.06 microm emission.

  9. Modified chemiluminescent NO analyzer accurately measures NOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Installation of molybdenum nitric oxide (NO)-to-higher oxides of nitrogen (NOx) converter in chemiluminescent gas analyzer and use of air purge allow accurate measurements of NOx in exhaust gases containing as much as thirty percent carbon monoxide (CO). Measurements using conventional analyzer are highly inaccurate for NOx if as little as five percent CO is present. In modified analyzer, molybdenum has high tolerance to CO, and air purge substantially quenches NOx destruction. In test, modified chemiluminescent analyzer accurately measured NO and NOx concentrations for over 4 months with no denegration in performance.

  10. A report on the laboratory performance of the spectroscopic detector arrays for SPIRE/HSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hien T.; Bock, James J.; Ringold, Peter; Battle, John; Elliott, Steven C.; Turner, Anthony D.; Weilert, Mark; Hristov, Viktor V.; Schulz, Bernhard; Ganga, Ken; Zhang, L.; Beeman, Jeffrey W.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Hargrave, Peter C.

    2004-10-01

    We report the performance of the flight bolometer arrays for the Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver (SPIRE) instrument to be on board of the Herschel Space Observatory (HSO). We describe the test setup for the flight Bolometric Detector Assembly (BDA) that allows the characterization of its performance, both dark and optical, in one instrument's cool down. We summarize the laboratory procedure to measure the basic bolometer parameters, optical response time, optical efficiency of bolometer and feedhorn, dark and optical noise, and the overall thermal conductance of the BDA unit. Finally, we present the test results obtained from the two flight units, Spectroscopic Long Wavelength (SLW) and Spectroscopic Short Wavelength (SSW).

  11. Spectroscopic Observations of Merging Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzelli, C. J.; Pastoriza, M. G.

    2000-07-01

    In this paper we describe the spectroscopic and infrared properties of a sample of 25 merging galaxy pairs, selected from the catalog of Arp & Madore, and we compare them with those observed in a similar sample of interacting galaxies (Donzelli & Pastoriza). It is noted that mergers as well as interacting systems comprise a wide range of spectral types, going from those corresponding to well-evolved stellar populations (older than 200 Myr) to those that show clear signatures of H II regions with stellar populations younger than 8 Myr. However, merger galaxies show on average more excited spectra than interacting pairs, which could be attributed to lower gas metallicity. From the emission lines we also found that merging systems show on average higher (about a factor of 2) star formation rates than interacting galaxies. Classical diagnostic diagrams show that only three of 50 of the galaxies (6%) present some form of nuclear activity: two Seyfert galaxies and one LINER. However, through a detailed analysis of the pure emission-line spectra, we conclude that this fraction may raise up to 23% of the mergers if we consider that some galaxies host a low-luminosity active nucleus surrounded by strong star-forming regions. This latter assumption is also supported by the infrared colors of the galaxies. Regarding to the total infrared luminosities, the merging galaxies show on average an IR luminosity, log(Lir)=10.7, lower than that of interacting systems, log(Lir)=10.9. We find that only three mergers of the sample (12%) can be classified as luminous infrared galaxies, while this fraction increases to 24% in the interacting sample. Based on observations made at CASLEO. Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan.

  12. Can Appraisers Rate Work Performance Accurately?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedge, Jerry W.; Laue, Frances J.

    The ability of individuals to make accurate judgments about others is examined and literature on this subject is reviewed. A wide variety of situational factors affects the appraisal of performance. It is generally accepted that the purpose of the appraisal influences the accuracy of the appraiser. The instrumentation, or tools, available to the…

  13. Accurate pointing of tungsten welding electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegelmeier, P.

    1971-01-01

    Thoriated-tungsten is pointed accurately and quickly by using sodium nitrite. Point produced is smooth and no effort is necessary to hold the tungsten rod concentric. The chemically produced point can be used several times longer than ground points. This method reduces time and cost of preparing tungsten electrodes.

  14. Combining weak-lensing tomography and spectroscopic redshift surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yan -Chuan; Bernstein, Gary

    2012-05-11

    Redshift space distortion (RSD) is a powerful way of measuring the growth of structure and testing General Relativity, but it is limited by cosmic variance and the degeneracy between galaxy bias b and the growth rate factor f. The cross-correlation of lensing shear with the galaxy density field can in principle measure b in a manner free from cosmic variance limits, breaking the f-b degeneracy and allowing inference of the matter power spectrum from the galaxy survey. We analyze the growth constraints from a realistic tomographic weak lensing photo-z survey combined with a spectroscopic galaxy redshift survey over the same sky area. For sky coverage fsky = 0.5, analysis of the transverse modes measures b to 2-3% accuracy per Δz = 0.1 bin at z < 1 when ~10 galaxies arcmin–2 are measured in the lensing survey and all halos with M > Mmin = 1013h–1M have spectra. For the gravitational growth parameter parameter γ (f = Ωγm), combining the lensing information with RSD analysis of non-transverse modes yields accuracy σ(γ) ≈ 0.01. Adding lensing information to the RSD survey improves \\sigma(\\gamma) by an amount equivalent to a 3x (10x) increase in RSD survey area when the spectroscopic survey extends down to halo mass 1013.5 (1014) h–1 M. We also find that the σ(γ) of overlapping surveys is equivalent to that of surveys 1.5-2 times larger if they are separated on the sky. This gain is greatest when the spectroscopic mass threshold is 1013 -1014 h–1 M, similar to LRG surveys. The gain of overlapping surveys is reduced for very deep or very shallow spectroscopic surveys, but any practical surveys are more powerful when overlapped than when separated. As a result, the gain of overlapped surveys is larger in the case when the primordial power spectrum normalization is

  15. Combining weak-lensing tomography and spectroscopic redshift surveys

    DOE PAGES

    Cai, Yan -Chuan; Bernstein, Gary

    2012-05-11

    Redshift space distortion (RSD) is a powerful way of measuring the growth of structure and testing General Relativity, but it is limited by cosmic variance and the degeneracy between galaxy bias b and the growth rate factor f. The cross-correlation of lensing shear with the galaxy density field can in principle measure b in a manner free from cosmic variance limits, breaking the f-b degeneracy and allowing inference of the matter power spectrum from the galaxy survey. We analyze the growth constraints from a realistic tomographic weak lensing photo-z survey combined with a spectroscopic galaxy redshift survey over the samemore » sky area. For sky coverage fsky = 0.5, analysis of the transverse modes measures b to 2-3% accuracy per Δz = 0.1 bin at z < 1 when ~10 galaxies arcmin–2 are measured in the lensing survey and all halos with M > Mmin = 1013h–1M⊙ have spectra. For the gravitational growth parameter parameter γ (f = Ωγm), combining the lensing information with RSD analysis of non-transverse modes yields accuracy σ(γ) ≈ 0.01. Adding lensing information to the RSD survey improves \\sigma(\\gamma) by an amount equivalent to a 3x (10x) increase in RSD survey area when the spectroscopic survey extends down to halo mass 1013.5 (1014) h–1 M⊙. We also find that the σ(γ) of overlapping surveys is equivalent to that of surveys 1.5-2 times larger if they are separated on the sky. This gain is greatest when the spectroscopic mass threshold is 1013 -1014 h–1 M⊙, similar to LRG surveys. The gain of overlapping surveys is reduced for very deep or very shallow spectroscopic surveys, but any practical surveys are more powerful when overlapped than when separated. As a result, the gain of overlapped surveys is larger in the case when the primordial power spectrum normalization is uncertain by > 0.5%.« less

  16. A Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Analysis of the Old Nova Q Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobow, Craig; Sion, E. M.

    2011-01-01

    Q Cygni (Nova Cygni 1876) is one of the oldest old novae with a long orbital period of 10.08 hours and spectroscopic peculiarities in the optical including the presence of variable wind outflow revealed by optical P Cygni profiles in the He I lines and Halpha (Kafka et al.2003). There has never been a far UV spectroscopic analysis of this system. Therefore, we have carried out a synthetic spectral analysis of a far ultraviolet IUE archival spectrum of Q Cygni using our optically thick, steady state, accretion disk models and model white dwarf photospheres. We report the results of our spectroscopic analysis and compare the physical parameters we derive with those of other old novae. We gratefully acknowledge the support of this by NSF grant 0807892 to Villanova University.

  17. Accurate and occlusion-robust multi-view stereo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhaokun; Stamatopoulos, Christos; Fraser, Clive S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes an accurate multi-view stereo method for image-based 3D reconstruction that features robustness in the presence of occlusions. The new method offers improvements in dealing with two fundamental image matching problems. The first concerns the selection of the support window model, while the second centers upon accurate visibility estimation for each pixel. The support window model is based on an approximate 3D support plane described by a depth and two per-pixel depth offsets. For the visibility estimation, the multi-view constraint is initially relaxed by generating separate support plane maps for each support image using a modified PatchMatch algorithm. Then the most likely visible support image, which represents the minimum visibility of each pixel, is extracted via a discrete Markov Random Field model and it is further augmented by parameter clustering. Once the visibility is estimated, multi-view optimization taking into account all redundant observations is conducted to achieve optimal accuracy in the 3D surface generation for both depth and surface normal estimates. Finally, multi-view consistency is utilized to eliminate any remaining observational outliers. The proposed method is experimentally evaluated using well-known Middlebury datasets, and results obtained demonstrate that it is amongst the most accurate of the methods thus far reported via the Middlebury MVS website. Moreover, the new method exhibits a high completeness rate.

  18. Method and apparatus for accurately manipulating an object during microelectrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Parvin, B.A.; Maestre, M.F.; Fish, R.H.; Johnston, W.E.

    1997-09-23

    An apparatus using electrophoresis provides accurate manipulation of an object on a microscope stage for further manipulations and reactions. The present invention also provides an inexpensive and easily accessible means to move an object without damage to the object. A plurality of electrodes are coupled to the stage in an array whereby the electrode array allows for distinct manipulations of the electric field for accurate manipulations of the object. There is an electrode array control coupled to the plurality of electrodes for manipulating the electric field. In an alternative embodiment, a chamber is provided on the stage to hold the object. The plurality of electrodes are positioned in the chamber, and the chamber is filled with fluid. The system can be automated using visual servoing, which manipulates the control parameters, i.e., x, y stage, applying the field, etc., after extracting the significant features directly from image data. Visual servoing includes an imaging device and computer system to determine the location of the object. A second stage having a plurality of tubes positioned on top of the second stage, can be accurately positioned by visual servoing so that one end of one of the plurality of tubes surrounds at least part of the object on the first stage. 11 figs.

  19. Method and apparatus for accurately manipulating an object during microelectrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Parvin, Bahram A.; Maestre, Marcos F.; Fish, Richard H.; Johnston, William E.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus using electrophoresis provides accurate manipulation of an object on a microscope stage for further manipulations add reactions. The present invention also provides an inexpensive and easily accessible means to move an object without damage to the object. A plurality of electrodes are coupled to the stage in an array whereby the electrode array allows for distinct manipulations of the electric field for accurate manipulations of the object. There is an electrode array control coupled to the plurality of electrodes for manipulating the electric field. In an alternative embodiment, a chamber is provided on the stage to hold the object. The plurality of electrodes are positioned in the chamber, and the chamber is filled with fluid. The system can be automated using visual servoing, which manipulates the control parameters, i.e., x, y stage, applying the field, etc., after extracting the significant features directly from image data. Visual servoing includes an imaging device and computer system to determine the location of the object. A second stage having a plurality of tubes positioned on top of the second stage, can be accurately positioned by visual servoing so that one end of one of the plurality of tubes surrounds at least part of the object on the first stage.

  20. Videometric terminal guidance method and system for UAV accurate landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiang; Lei, Zhihui; Yu, Qifeng; Zhang, Hongliang; Shang, Yang; Du, Jing; Gui, Yang; Guo, Pengyu

    2012-06-01

    We present a videometric method and system to implement terminal guidance for Unmanned Aerial Vehicle(UAV) accurate landing. In the videometric system, two calibrated cameras attached to the ground are used, and a calibration method in which at least 5 control points are applied is developed to calibrate the inner and exterior parameters of the cameras. Cameras with 850nm spectral filter are used to recognize a 850nm LED target fixed on the UAV which can highlight itself in images with complicated background. NNLOG (normalized negative laplacian of gaussian) operator is developed for automatic target detection and tracking. Finally, 3-D position of the UAV with high accuracy can be calculated and transfered to control system to direct UAV accurate landing. The videometric system can work in the rate of 50Hz. Many real flight and static accuracy experiments demonstrate the correctness and veracity of the method proposed in this paper, and they also indicate the reliability and robustness of the system proposed in this paper. The static accuracy experiment results show that the deviation is less-than 10cm when target is far from the cameras and lessthan 2cm in 100m region. The real flight experiment results show that the deviation from DGPS is less-than 20cm. The system implement in this paper won the first prize in the AVIC Cup-International UAV Innovation Grand Prix, and it is the only one that achieved UAV accurate landing without GPS or DGPS.

  1. Spectroscopic modeling of water molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danylo, R. I.; Okhrimenko, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    This research is devoted to the vibrational spectroscopy inverse problem solution that gives a possibility to design a molecule and make conclusions about its geometry. The valence angle finding based on the usage of inverse spectral vibrational spectroscopy problem is a well-known task. 3N-matrix method was chosen to solve the proposed task. The usage of this method permits to make no assumptions about the molecule force field, besides it can be applied to molecules of matter in liquid state. Anharmonicity constants assessment is an important part of the valence angle finding. The reduction to zero vibrations is necessary because used matrix analytical expression were found in the harmonic approach. In order to find the single-valued inverse spectral problem of vibrational spectroscopy solution a shape parameter characterizing "mixing" of ω1 and ω2 vibrations forms must be found. The minimum of such a function Υ called a divergence parameter was found. This function characterizes method's accuracy. The valence angle assessment was reduced to the divergence parameter minimization. The β value concerning divergence parameter minimum was interpreted as the desired valence angle. The proposed method was applied for water molecule in liquid state: β = (88,8 ±1,7)° . The found angle fits the water molecule nearest surrounding tetrahedral model including hydrogen bond curvature in the first approximation.

  2. Supergranular Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2016-07-01

    I study the complexity of supergranular cells using intensity patterns from Kodaikanal solar observatory. The chaotic and turbulent aspect of the solar supergranulation can be studied by examining the interrelationships amongst the parameters characterizing supergranular cells namely size, horizontal flow field, lifetime and physical dimensions of the cells and the fractal dimension deduced from the size data. The findings are supportive of Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence. The Data consists of visually identified supergranular cells, from which a fractal dimension 'D' for supergranulation is obtained according to the relation P α AD/2 where 'A' is the area and 'P' is the perimeter of the supergranular cells. I find a fractal dimension close to about 1.3 which is consistent with that for isobars and suggests a possible turbulent origin. The cell circularity shows a dependence on the perimeter with a peak around (1.1-1.2) x 105 m. The findings are supportive of Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence.

  3. On determining dose rate constants spectroscopically

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, M.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2013-01-15

    calculated with the TG-43U1 rather than the NNDC(2000) initial spectrum. The measured values from three different investigations are in much better agreement with the calculations using the NCRP Report 58 and NNDC(2000) initial spectra with average discrepancies of 0.9% and 1.7% for the {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds, respectively. However, there are no differences in the calculated TG-43U1 brachytherapy parameters using either initial spectrum in both cases. Similarly, there were no differences outside the statistical uncertainties of 0.1% or 0.2%, in the average energy, air kerma/history, dose rate/history, and dose rate constant when calculated using either the full photon spectrum or the main-peaks-only spectrum. Conclusions: Our calculated dose rate constants based on using the calculated on-axis spectrum and a line or dual-point source model are in excellent agreement (0.5% on average) with the values of Chen and Nath, verifying the accuracy of their more approximate method of going from the spectrum to the dose rate constant. However, the dose rate constants based on full seed models differ by between +4.6% and -1.5% from those based on the line or dual-point source approximations. These results suggest that the main value of spectroscopic measurements is to verify full Monte Carlo models of the seeds by comparison to the calculated spectra.

  4. Feedback about More Accurate versus Less Accurate Trials: Differential Effects on Self-Confidence and Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected by feedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On Day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of…

  5. Fast and Accurate Circuit Design Automation through Hierarchical Model Switching.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Linh; Tagkopoulos, Ilias

    2015-08-21

    In computer-aided biological design, the trifecta of characterized part libraries, accurate models and optimal design parameters is crucial for producing reliable designs. As the number of parts and model complexity increase, however, it becomes exponentially more difficult for any optimization method to search the solution space, hence creating a trade-off that hampers efficient design. To address this issue, we present a hierarchical computer-aided design architecture that uses a two-step approach for biological design. First, a simple model of low computational complexity is used to predict circuit behavior and assess candidate circuit branches through branch-and-bound methods. Then, a complex, nonlinear circuit model is used for a fine-grained search of the reduced solution space, thus achieving more accurate results. Evaluation with a benchmark of 11 circuits and a library of 102 experimental designs with known characterization parameters demonstrates a speed-up of 3 orders of magnitude when compared to other design methods that provide optimality guarantees.

  6. Radial velocity curve of the spectroscopic binary HD 25639 (ADS 2984A)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorda, S. Yu.

    2016-10-01

    We present the results of the reduction of our observations for the spectroscopic binary ADS 2984A (B0 II-B0 III), which along with its visual component ADS 2984B (SZ Cam) are the brightest members of the open star cluster NGC 1502. The spectroscopic data were obtained with a fiber-fed echelle spectrograph ( R = 15 000) at the 1.2-m telescope of the Astronomical Observatory of the Ural Federal University. The period of ADS 2984A ( P orb = 57.24 ± 0.05 days) has been found for the first time. This spectroscopic binary is shown to belong to the SB1 type. We have determined the parameters of the radial velocity curve for the visible spectroscopic component, V 0 = -5.5 ± 1.2 km s-1 and K = 41.5 ± 1.7 km s-1. The lower mass limit for the invisible spectroscopic component has been estimated to be 5M_⊙. Evidence for the presence of a stellar wind outflowing from the surface of this blue giant is presented.

  7. Structure and spectroscopic properties of low-lying states of the HOC(O)O radical.

    PubMed

    Linguerri, Roberto; Puzzarini, Cristina; Francisco, Joseph S

    2016-02-28

    The HOC(O)O radical is a product of the reaction of HOCO radicals with oxygen atoms. The present study provides theoretical prediction of critical spectroscopic features of this radical that should aid in its experimental characterization. Energies, structures, rotational constants, and harmonic frequencies are presented for the ground and two low-lying excited electronic states of HOC(O)O. The energies for the Ã(2)A″←X̃(2)A' and B̃(2)A'←X̃(2)A' electronic transitions are reported. The band origin of the B̃←X̃ transition of HOC(O)O is predicted to occur in the near infrared region of the spectrum at around 1.5 eV and it is suggested to be the most promising one for observing this radical spectroscopically. The structural and spectroscopic similarities between HOC(O)O and the isoelectronic radical FC(O)O are discussed. The abundance of experimental data on the FC(O)O radical should guide the spectroscopic characterization of HOC(O)O and serve as a benchmark for the structural and spectroscopic parameters obtained from theory.

  8. Feedback about more accurate versus less accurate trials: differential effects on self-confidence and activation.

    PubMed

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-06-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected byfeedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of two conditions: one group received feedback on the most accurate trials, whereas another group received feedback on the least accurate trials. On day 2, participants completed an anxiety questionnaire and performed a retention test. Shin conductance level, as a measure of arousal, was determined. The results indicated that feedback about more accurate trials resulted in more effective learning as well as increased self-confidence. Also, activation was a predictor of performance. PMID:22808705

  9. Accurate intermolecular ground state potential of the Ar-N2 van der Waals complex.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Cristian R; Cacheiro, Javier López; Fernández, Berta

    2004-12-01

    After carrying out a systematic basis set convergence study, we evaluate several ground state potential energy surfaces of the Ar-N(2) van der Waals complex at the coupled cluster singles and doubles model including connected triples corrections. We use the aug-cc-pVXZ (X=5,Q,D) and the daug-cc-pVQZ basis sets augmented with a set of 3s3p2d1f1g (denoted 33211) and 3s3p2d2f1g (denoted 33221) midbond functions, respectively. aug-cc-pVTZ-33211 results were available in the literature. The aug-cc-pV5Z-33211 (daug-cc-pVQZ-33221) surface is characterized by a T-shaped minimum at R(e)=3.709 (3.701) A and of 99.01 (102.50) cm(-1), and a linear saddle point at 4.260 (4.257) A and D(e)=75.28 (79.73) cm(-1). These results are compared with the values provided by the semiempirical potentials available, and those of previous theoretical studies. The basis set convergence of the intermolecular potentials is also analyzed. From the potentials the rovibronic spectroscopic properties are determined. We study the basis set convergence of the rotational frequencies. The binding parameters that characterized the aug-cc-pVTZ-33211 surface are reasonable, but the surface is not good enough to evaluate the microwave spectra. The aug-cc-pVQZ-33211 basis set results considerably improve the triple zeta and are close to the aug-cc-pV5Z-33211. Considering the small differences between the quadruple and the quintuple zeta surfaces, the latter results can be expected to be close to convergence. At this level the differences with respect to the accurate experimental frequencies are in the order of 0.7%. In the case of the daug-cc-pVXZ-33211,33221 (X=5,Q,T,D) series, the convergence of the interaction energies with respect to basis set improvement is not so smooth. The errors in the frequencies obtained with the daug-cc-pVQZ-33221 basis set with respect to experiment are in the order of 0.4%.

  10. Asymmetry parameter of peaked Fano line shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierott, S.; Hotz, T.; Néel, N.; Kröger, J.

    2016-10-01

    The spectroscopic line shape of electronic and vibrational excitations is ubiquitously described by a Fano profile. In the case of nearly symmetric and peaked Fano line shapes, the fit of the conventional Fano function to experimental data leads to difficulties in unambiguously extracting the asymmetry parameter, which may vary over orders of magnitude without degrading the quality of the fit. Moreover, the extracted asymmetry parameter depends on initially guessed values. Using the spectroscopic signature of the single-Co Kondo effect on Au(110) the ambiguity of the extracted asymmetry parameter is traced to the highly symmetric resonance profile combined with the inevitable scattering of experimental data. An improved parameterization of the conventional Fano function is suggested that enables the nonlinear optimization in a reduced parameter space. In addition, the presence of a global minimum in the sum of squared residuals and thus the independence of start parameters may conveniently be identified in a two-dimensional plot. An angular representation of the asymmetry parameter is suggested in order to reliably determine uncertainty margins via linear error propagation.

  11. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  12. Accurate Guitar Tuning by Cochlear Implant Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  13. Preparation and accurate measurement of pure ozone.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Christof; Simone, Daniela; Guinet, Mickaël

    2011-03-01

    Preparation of high purity ozone as well as precise and accurate measurement of its pressure are metrological requirements that are difficult to meet due to ozone decomposition occurring in pressure sensors. The most stable and precise transducer heads are heated and, therefore, prone to accelerated ozone decomposition, limiting measurement accuracy and compromising purity. Here, we describe a vacuum system and a method for ozone production, suitable to accurately determine the pressure of pure ozone by avoiding the problem of decomposition. We use an inert gas in a particularly designed buffer volume and can thus achieve high measurement accuracy and negligible degradation of ozone with purities of 99.8% or better. The high degree of purity is ensured by comprehensive compositional analyses of ozone samples. The method may also be applied to other reactive gases. PMID:21456766

  14. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task.

  15. Accurate modeling of parallel scientific computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Townsend, James C.

    1988-01-01

    Scientific codes are usually parallelized by partitioning a grid among processors. To achieve top performance it is necessary to partition the grid so as to balance workload and minimize communication/synchronization costs. This problem is particularly acute when the grid is irregular, changes over the course of the computation, and is not known until load time. Critical mapping and remapping decisions rest on the ability to accurately predict performance, given a description of a grid and its partition. This paper discusses one approach to this problem, and illustrates its use on a one-dimensional fluids code. The models constructed are shown to be accurate, and are used to find optimal remapping schedules.

  16. Line gas sampling system ensures accurate analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    Tremendous changes in the natural gas business have resulted in new approaches to the way natural gas is measured. Electronic flow measurement has altered the business forever, with developments in instrumentation and a new sensitivity to the importance of proper natural gas sampling techniques. This paper reports that YZ Industries Inc., Snyder, Texas, combined its 40 years of sampling experience with the latest in microprocessor-based technology to develop the KynaPak 2000 series, the first on-line natural gas sampling system that is both compact and extremely accurate. This means the composition of the sampled gas must be representative of the whole and related to flow. If so, relative measurement and sampling techniques are married, gas volumes are accurately accounted for and adjustments to composition can be made.

  17. Accurate mask model for advanced nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zine El Abidine, Nacer; Sundermann, Frank; Yesilada, Emek; Ndiaye, El Hadji Omar; Mishra, Kushlendra; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Bork, Ingo; Buck, Peter; Toublan, Olivier; Schanen, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    Standard OPC models consist of a physical optical model and an empirical resist model. The resist model compensates the optical model imprecision on top of modeling resist development. The optical model imprecision may result from mask topography effects and real mask information including mask ebeam writing and mask process contributions. For advanced technology nodes, significant progress has been made to model mask topography to improve optical model accuracy. However, mask information is difficult to decorrelate from standard OPC model. Our goal is to establish an accurate mask model through a dedicated calibration exercise. In this paper, we present a flow to calibrate an accurate mask enabling its implementation. The study covers the different effects that should be embedded in the mask model as well as the experiment required to model them.

  18. THE BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY OF SDSS-III

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Kyle S.; Ahn, Christopher P.; Bolton, Adam S.; Schlegel, David J.; Bailey, Stephen; Anderson, Scott F.; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Aubourg, Eric; Bautista, Julian E.; Beifiori, Alessandra; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Blake, Cullen H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Borde, Arnaud; Brandt, W. N.; and others

    2013-01-01

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) is designed to measure the scale of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in the clustering of matter over a larger volume than the combined efforts of all previous spectroscopic surveys of large-scale structure. BOSS uses 1.5 million luminous galaxies as faint as i = 19.9 over 10,000 deg{sup 2} to measure BAO to redshifts z < 0.7. Observations of neutral hydrogen in the Ly{alpha} forest in more than 150,000 quasar spectra (g < 22) will constrain BAO over the redshift range 2.15 < z < 3.5. Early results from BOSS include the first detection of the large-scale three-dimensional clustering of the Ly{alpha} forest and a strong detection from the Data Release 9 data set of the BAO in the clustering of massive galaxies at an effective redshift z = 0.57. We project that BOSS will yield measurements of the angular diameter distance d{sub A} to an accuracy of 1.0% at redshifts z = 0.3 and z = 0.57 and measurements of H(z) to 1.8% and 1.7% at the same redshifts. Forecasts for Ly{alpha} forest constraints predict a measurement of an overall dilation factor that scales the highly degenerate D{sub A} (z) and H {sup -1}(z) parameters to an accuracy of 1.9% at z {approx} 2.5 when the survey is complete. Here, we provide an overview of the selection of spectroscopic targets, planning of observations, and analysis of data and data quality of BOSS.

  19. Application of optical spectroscopic techniques for disease diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Anushree

    Optical spectroscopy, a truly non-invasive tool for remote diagnostics, is capable of providing valuable information on the structure and function of molecules. However, most spectroscopic techniques suffer from drawbacks, which limit their application. As a part of my dissertation work, I have developed theoretical and experimental methods to address the above mentioned issues. I have successfully applied these methods for monitoring the physical, chemical and biochemical parameters of biomolecules involved in some specific life threatening diseases like lead poisoning and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). I presented optical studies of melanosomes, which are one of the vital organelles in the human eye, also known to be responsible for a disease called age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a condition of advanced degeneration which causes progressive blindness. I used Raman spectroscopy, to first chemically identify the composition of melanosome, and then monitor the changes in its functional and chemical behavior due to long term exposure to visible light. The above study, apart from explaining the role of melanosomes in AMD, also sets the threshold power for lasers used in surgeries and other clinical applications. In the second part of my dissertation, a battery of spectroscopic techniques was successfully applied to explore the different binding sites of lead ions with the most abundant carrier protein molecule in our circulatory system, human serum albumin. I applied optical spectroscopic tools for ultrasensitive detection of heavy metal ions in solution which can also be used for lead detection at a very early stage of lead poisoning. Apart from this, I used Raman microspectroscopy to study the chemical alteration occurring inside a prostate cancer cell as a result of a treatment with a low concentrated aqueous extract of a prospective drug, Nerium Oleander. The experimental methods used in this study has tremendous potential for clinical

  20. Accurate maser positions for MALT-45

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Christopher; Bains, Indra; Voronkov, Maxim; Lo, Nadia; Jones, Paul; Muller, Erik; Cunningham, Maria; Burton, Michael; Brooks, Kate; Green, James; Fuller, Gary; Barnes, Peter; Ellingsen, Simon; Urquhart, James; Morgan, Larry; Rowell, Gavin; Walsh, Andrew; Loenen, Edo; Baan, Willem; Hill, Tracey; Purcell, Cormac; Breen, Shari; Peretto, Nicolas; Jackson, James; Lowe, Vicki; Longmore, Steven

    2013-10-01

    MALT-45 is an untargeted survey, mapping the Galactic plane in CS (1-0), Class I methanol masers, SiO masers and thermal emission, and high frequency continuum emission. After obtaining images from the survey, a number of masers were detected, but without accurate positions. This project seeks to resolve each maser and its environment, with the ultimate goal of placing the Class I methanol maser into a timeline of high mass star formation.

  1. Accurate maser positions for MALT-45

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Christopher; Bains, Indra; Voronkov, Maxim; Lo, Nadia; Jones, Paul; Muller, Erik; Cunningham, Maria; Burton, Michael; Brooks, Kate; Green, James; Fuller, Gary; Barnes, Peter; Ellingsen, Simon; Urquhart, James; Morgan, Larry; Rowell, Gavin; Walsh, Andrew; Loenen, Edo; Baan, Willem; Hill, Tracey; Purcell, Cormac; Breen, Shari; Peretto, Nicolas; Jackson, James; Lowe, Vicki; Longmore, Steven

    2013-04-01

    MALT-45 is an untargeted survey, mapping the Galactic plane in CS (1-0), Class I methanol masers, SiO masers and thermal emission, and high frequency continuum emission. After obtaining images from the survey, a number of masers were detected, but without accurate positions. This project seeks to resolve each maser and its environment, with the ultimate goal of placing the Class I methanol maser into a timeline of high mass star formation.

  2. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R; Holmes, William M

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models. PMID:27111139

  3. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R.; Holmes, William M.

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models.

  4. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R; Holmes, William M

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models.

  5. Relative flux calibration for the LAMOST Spectroscopic Survey of the Galactic anticentre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, M. S.; Liu, X. W.; Yuan, H. B.; Huo, Z. Y.; Huang, Y.; Zheng, Y.; Zhang, H. W.; Chen, B. Q.; Zhang, H. H.; Sun, N. C.; Wang, C.; Zhao, Y. H.; Shi, J. R.; Luo, A. L.; Li, G. P.; Bai, Z. R.; Zhang, Y.; Hou, Y. H.; Yuan, H. L.; Li, G. W.

    2015-03-01

    We have developed and implemented an iterative algorithm of flux calibration for the LAMOST Spectroscopic Survey of the Galactic anticentre (LSS-GAC). For a given LSS-GAC plate, the spectra are first processed with a set of nominal spectral response curves (SRCs) and used to derive initial stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature Teff, surface gravity log g and metallicity [Fe/H]) as well as dust reddening E(B - V) of all targeted stars. For each of the 16 spectrographs, several F-type stars with good signal-to-noise ratios are selected as flux standard stars for further, iterative spectral flux calibration. Comparison of spectrophotometric colours, deduced from the flux-calibrated spectra, with the photometric measurements yield average differences of 0.02 ± 0.07 and -0.04 ± 0.09 mag for (g - r) and (g - i), respectively. The relatively large negative offset in (g - i) is because we have opted not to correct for the telluric bands, most notably the atmospheric A band in the wavelength range of the i band. Comparison of LSS-GAC multi-epoch observations of duplicate targets indicates that the algorithm has achieved an accuracy of about 10 per cent in relative flux calibration for the wavelength range 4000-9000 Å. The shapes of SRCs deduced for individual LAMOST spectrographs vary by up to 30 per cent for a given night, and larger for different nights, indicating that the derivation of SRCs for the individual plates is essential to achieve accurate flux calibration for the LAMOST spectra.

  6. An isolated line-shape model to go beyond the Voigt profile in spectroscopic databases and radiative transfer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, N. H.; Lisak, D.; Tran, H.; Hartmann, J.-M.

    2013-11-01

    We demonstrate that a previously proposed model opens the route for the inclusion of refined non-Voigt profiles in spectroscopic databases and atmospheric radiative transfer codes. Indeed, this model fulfills many essential requirements: (i) it takes both velocity changes and the speed dependences of the pressure-broadening and -shifting coefficients into account. (ii) It leads to accurate descriptions of the line shapes of very different molecular systems. Tests made for pure H2, CO2 and O2 and for H2O diluted in N2 show that residuals are down to ≃0.2% of the peak absorption, (except for the untypical system of H2 where a maximum residual of ±3% is reached), thus fulfilling the precision requirements of the most demanding remote sensing experiments. (iii) It is based on a limited set of parameters for each absorption line that have known dependences on pressure and can thus be stored in databases. (iv) Its calculation requires very reasonable computer costs, only a few times higher than that of a usual Voigt profile. Its inclusion in radiative transfer codes will thus induce bearable CPU time increases. (v) It can be extended in order to take line-mixing effects into account, at least within the so-called first-order approximation.

  7. Optical Spectroscopic Monitoring of Parachute Yarn Aging

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, D.R.; Garcia, M.J.; Simpson, R.L.; Behr, V.L.; Whinery, L.D.; Peng, L.W.

    1999-04-01

    Optical spectroscopic techniques were evaluated as nondestructive monitors of the aging of parachutes in nuclear weapons. We analyzed thermally aged samples of nylon and Kevlar webbing by photoluminescence spectroscopy and reflection spectroscopy. Infrared analysis was also performed to help understand the degradation mechanisms of the polymer materials in the webbing. The photoluminescence and reflection spectra were analyzed by chemometric data treatment techniques to see if aged-induced changes in the spectra correlated to changes in measured tensile strength. A correlation was found between the shapes of the photoluminescent bands and the measured tensile strengths. Photoluminescent spectra can be used to predict the tensile strengths of nylon and Kevlar webbing with sufficient accuracy to categorize the webbing sample as above rated tensile strength, marginal or below rated tensile strength. The instrumentation required to perform the optical spectroscopic measurement can be made rugged, compact and portable. Thus, optical spectroscopic techniques offer a means for nondestructive field monitoring of parachutes in the enduring stockpile/

  8. Chemical Synthesis and High Resolution Spectroscopic Characterization of 1-AZA-ADAMANTANE-4-ONE C_9H13NO from the Microwave to the Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirali, Olivier; Goubet, Manuel; Boudon, Vincent; D'accolti, Lucia; Annese, Cosimo; Fusco, Caterina

    2016-06-01

    We have synthesized 1-aza-adamantane-4-one (C_9H13NO) starting from commercial 1,4-cyclohexanedionemonoethylene acetal and tosylmethylisocianide and following a procedure described in details in the literature. The high degree of sample purity was demonstrated by gas chromatography and mass spectrometric measurements, and its structure evidenced by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. We present a thorough spectroscopic characterization of this molecule by gas phase vibrational and rotational spectroscopy. Accurate vibrational frequencies have been determined by infrared and far-infrared spectra. The pure rotational spectrum of the molecule has been recorded both by cavity-based Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy in the 2-20 GHz region, by supersonically expanding the vapor pressure of the warm sample, and by room-temperature absorption spectroscopy in the 140-220 GHz range. Quantum-chemical calculations have enabled a fast analysis of the spectra. Accurate sets of rotational and centrifugal distorsion parameters of 1-aza-adamantane-4-one in its ground state and five vibrationally excited states have been derived from these measurements. Black, R. M. Synthesis, 1981, 829

  9. Characterization by spectroscopic Ellipsometry, the physical properties of silver nanoparticles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coanga, Jean-Maurice

    2013-04-01

    Physicists are able to change their minds through their experiments. I think it is time to go kick the curse and go further in research if we want a human future. I work in the Nano-Optics and Plasmonics research. I defined with ellipsomètrie the structure of new type of Nano particles of silver. It's same be act quickly to replace the old dirty leaded electronic-connexion chip and by the other hand to find a new way for the heath care of cancer disease by nanoparticles the next killers of bad cells. Silver nanoparticle layers are obtained by Spark Plasma Sintering are investigated as an alternative to lead alloy based material for solder joint in power mechatronics modules. These layers are characterized by mean of conventional techniques that is the dilatometry technique, the resistivity measurement through the van der Pauw method, and the flash laser technique. Furthermore, the nanoparticles of silver layer are deeply studied by UV-Visible spectroscopic ellipsometry. Spectroscopic angles parameters are determined in function of temperature and dielectric constants are deduced and analyzed through an optical model which takes into account a Drude and a Lorentz component within the Bruggeman effective medium approximation (EMA). The relaxation times and the electrical conductivity are plot in function of temperature. The obtained electrical conductivity give significant result in good agreement to those reported by four points electrical measurement method.

  10. Active spectroscopic measurements using the ITER diagnostic system

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D. M.; Counsell, G.; Johnson, D.; Vasu, P.; Zvonkov, A.

    2010-10-15

    Active (beam-based) spectroscopic measurements are intended to provide a number of crucial parameters for the ITER device being built in Cadarache, France. These measurements include the determination of impurity ion temperatures, absolute densities, and velocity profiles, as well as the determination of the plasma current density profile. Because ITER will be the first experiment to study long timescale ({approx}1 h) fusion burn plasmas, of particular interest is the ability to study the profile of the thermalized helium ash resulting from the slowing down and confinement of the fusion alphas. These measurements will utilize both the 1 MeV heating neutral beams and a dedicated 100 keV hydrogen diagnostic neutral beam. A number of separate instruments are being designed and built by several of the ITER partners to meet the different spectroscopic measurement needs and to provide the maximum physics information. In this paper, we describe the planned measurements, the intended diagnostic ensemble, and we will discuss specific physics and engineering challenges for these measurements in ITER.

  11. The 2003 edition of the GEISA/IASI spectroscopic database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Scott, N. A.; Chédin, A.; Garceran, K.; Armante, R.; Chursin, A. A.; Barbe, A.; Birk, M.; Brown, L. R.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Claveau, C.; Clerbaux, C.; Coheur, P. F.; Dana, V.; Daumont, L.; Debacker-Barilly, M. R.; Flaud, J. M.; Goldman, A.; Hamdouni, A.; Hess, M.; Jacquemart, D.; Köpke, P.; Mandin, J. Y.; Massie, S.; Mikhailenko, S.; Nemtchinov, V.; Nikitin, A.; Newnham, D.; Perrin, A.; Perevalov, V. I.; Régalia-Jarlot, L.; Rublev, A.; Schreier, F.; Schult, I.; Smith, K. M.; Tashkun, S. A.; Teffo, J. L.; Toth, R. A.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.; Vander Auwera, J.; Varanasi, P.; Wagner, G.

    2005-11-01

    The content of the current (2003) version, GEISA/IASI-03, of the computer-accessible spectroscopic database, GEISA/IASI, is described. This “system” or database is comprised of three independent spectroscopic archives, which are (a) a database of individual spectral line parameters on 14 molecules, H2O, CO2, O3, N2O, CO, CH4, O2, NO, SO2, NO2, HNO3, OCS, C2H2, N2, and the related 51 isotopomers and isotopologues, representing 702,550 entries, in the spectral range 599 3001cm, (b) a database of spectral absorption cross-sections (6,572,329 entries related to six molecules, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-14, HCFC-22, N2O5, CCl4), and a catalogue of microphysical and optical properties (mainly, the refractive indices) of atmospheric aerosols. The modifications and improvements, which have been implemented since the earlier editions of this database, in terms of content and management, have been explained in detail. GEISA/IASI has been created with the specific purpose of assessing the capability of measurement by the IASI instrument within the designated goals of ISSWG in the frame of the CNES/EUMETSAT European Polar System preparation. All the archived data can be handled through a user-friendly associated management software, which is posted on the ARA/LMD group web site at http://ara.lmd.polytechnique.fr.

  12. Active spectroscopic measurements using the ITER diagnostic system.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D M; Counsell, G; Johnson, D; Vasu, P; Zvonkov, A

    2010-10-01

    Active (beam-based) spectroscopic measurements are intended to provide a number of crucial parameters for the ITER device being built in Cadarache, France. These measurements include the determination of impurity ion temperatures, absolute densities, and velocity profiles, as well as the determination of the plasma current density profile. Because ITER will be the first experiment to study long timescale (∼1 h) fusion burn plasmas, of particular interest is the ability to study the profile of the thermalized helium ash resulting from the slowing down and confinement of the fusion alphas. These measurements will utilize both the 1 MeV heating neutral beams and a dedicated 100 keV hydrogen diagnostic neutral beam. A number of separate instruments are being designed and built by several of the ITER partners to meet the different spectroscopic measurement needs and to provide the maximum physics information. In this paper, we describe the planned measurements, the intended diagnostic ensemble, and we will discuss specific physics and engineering challenges for these measurements in ITER.

  13. Exploring spectroscopic and physicochemical properties of new fluorescent ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Marwani, Hadi M

    2013-03-01

    In the current study, spectroscopic and physicochemical properties of newly prepared ionic liquids were investigated. Ionic liquids were synthesized via a simple and straightforward route using a metathesis reaction of either N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine monohydrochloride or N-phenacylpyridinium bromide with bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide lithium in water. High yield and purity were obtained for the resultant ionic liquids. Data acquired by use of (1)H NMR and FT-IR measurements were consistent with the chemical structures of newly prepared ionic liquids. Results of thermal gravimetric analysis also implied that these ionic liquids have good thermal stability. In addition, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements provided that new ionic liquids are good absorbent and fluorescent. Time-based fluorescence steady-state measurements showed that ionic liquids have high photostability against photobleaching. For a deeper mechanistic understanding of the analytical potential of newly synthesized ionic liquids, spectroscopic and physicochemical parameters, including singlet absorption, extinction coefficient, fluorescence quantum yield, Stokes shift, oscillator strength and dipole moment, were also investigated.

  14. Are accurate equation of state parameters important in Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities?

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L D

    1999-08-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is a classical fluid dynamical instability that has been extensively studied to help understand turbulent mixing. A recent numerical simulation of a shock tube experiment with an air-SF6 interface and a weak shock (Mach 1.2) used the ideal gas equation of state for air and an artificially low temperature as a surrogate for the correct SF6 gas physics. We have run a similar problem with both the correct gas physics and three versions of the air surrogate to understand the errors thereby introduced. We find that for the weakly driven single-mode case considered here, the instability amplitude is not affected, the interface location is affected only slightly, but the thermodynamic states are quite different. This result is not surprising because the flow far from the shock waves is essentially incompressible.

  15. Are accurate equation of state parameters important in Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L D

    1999-08-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is a classical fluid dynamical instability that has been extensively studied to help understand turbulent mixing. A recent numerical simulation of a shock tube experiment with an air-SF6 interface and a weak shock (Mach 1.2) used the ideal gas equation of state for air and an artificially low temperature as a surrogate for the correct SF6 gas physics. We have run a similar problem with both the correct gas physics and three versions of the air surrogate to understand the errors thereby introduced. We find that for the weakly driven single-mode case considered here, the instability amplitude is not affected, the interface location is affected only slightly, but the thermodynamic states are quite different. This result is not surprising because the flow far from the shock waves is essentially incompressible.

  16. Accurate Zero Parameter Correlation Energy Functional Obtained from the Homogeneous Electron Gas with an Energy Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, J. B.; Chen, Jiqiang; Iafrate, G. J.; Savin, A.

    1998-03-01

    We have obtained an analytic approximation to E_c(r_g, ζ,G) where G is an energy gap separating the occupied and unoccupied states of a homogeneous electron gas for ζ=3D0 and ξ=3D1. When G=3D0, E_c(r_g, ζ) reduces to the usual LSD result. This functional is employed in calculating correlation energies for unpolarized atoms and ions for Z <= 18 by taking G[n]=3D1/8|nabla ln n|^2, which reduces to the ionization energy in the large r limit in an exact Kohn-Sham (KS) theory. The resulting functional is self-interaction-corrected employing a method which is invariant under a unitary transformation. We find that the application of this approach to the calculation of the Ec functional reduces the error in the LSD result by more than 95%. When the value of G is approximately corrected to include the effect of higher lying unoccupied localized states, the resulting values of Ec are within a few percent of the exact results.

  17. A More Accurate Measurement of the {sup 28}Si Lattice Parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Massa, E. Sasso, C. P.; Mana, G.; Palmisano, C.

    2015-09-15

    In 2011, a discrepancy between the values of the Planck constant measured by counting Si atoms and by comparing mechanical and electrical powers prompted a review, among others, of the measurement of the spacing of {sup 28}Si (220) lattice planes, either to confirm the measured value and its uncertainty or to identify errors. This exercise confirmed the result of the previous measurement and yields the additional value d{sub 220} = 192 014 711.98(34) am having a reduced uncertainty.

  18. Compact and accurate linear and nonlinear autoregressive moving average model parameter estimation using laguerre functions.

    PubMed

    Chon, K H; Cohen, R J; Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1997-01-01

    A linear and nonlinear autoregressive moving average (ARMA) identification algorithm is developed for modeling time series data. The algorithm uses Laguerre expansion of kernals (LEK) to estimate Volterra-Wiener kernals. However, instead of estimating linear and nonlinear system dynamics via moving average models, as is the case for the Volterra-Wiener analysis, we propose an ARMA model-based approach. The proposed algorithm is essentially the same as LEK, but this algorithm is extended to include past values of the output as well. Thus, all of the advantages associated with using the Laguerre function remain with our algorithm; but, by extending the algorithm to the linear and nonlinear ARMA model, a significant reduction in the number of Laguerre functions can be made, compared with the Volterra-Wiener approach. This translates into a more compact system representation and makes the physiological interpretation of higher order kernels easier. Furthermore, simulation results show better performance of the proposed approach in estimating the system dynamics than LEK in certain cases, and it remains effective in the presence of significant additive measurement noise. PMID:9236985

  19. Spectroscopic survey of M-type asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornasier, S.; Clark, B. E.; Dotto, E.; Migliorini, A.; Ockert-Bell, M.; Barucci, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    M-type asteroids, as defined in the Tholen taxonomy (Tholen, D.J. [1984]. Asteroid Taxonomy from Cluster Analysis of Photometry. Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Arizona, Tucson), are medium albedo bodies supposed to have a metallic composition and to be the progenitors both of differentiated iron-nickel meteorites and enstatite chondrites. We carried out a spectroscopic survey in the visible and near infrared wavelength range (0.4-2.5 μm) of 30 asteroids chosen from the population of asteroids initially classified as Tholen M-types, aiming to investigate their surface composition. The data were obtained during several observing runs during the years 2004-2007 at the TNG, NTT, and IRTF telescopes. We computed the spectral slopes in several wavelength ranges for each observed asteroid, and we searched for diagnostic spectral features. We confirm a large variety of spectral behaviors for these objects as their spectra are extended into the near infrared, including the identification of weak absorption bands, mainly of the 0.9 μm band tentatively attributed to orthopyroxene, and of the 0.43 μm band that may be associated to chlorites and Mg-rich serpentines or pyroxene minerals such us pigeonite or augite. A comparison with previously published data indicates that the surfaces of several asteroids belonging to the M-class may vary significantly. We attempt to constrain the asteroid surface compositions of our sample by looking for meteorite spectral analogs in the RELAB database and by modeling with geographical mixtures of selected meteorites/minerals. We confirm that iron meteorites, pallasites, and enstatite chondrites are the best matches to most objects in our sample, as suggested for M-type asteroids. For 22 Kalliope, we demonstrate that a synthetic mixture obtained enriching a pallasite meteorite with small amounts (1-2%) of silicates well reproduce the spectral behavior including the observed 0.9 μm feature. The presence of subtle absorption features on

  20. Accurately Mapping M31's Microlensing Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, Arlin

    2004-07-01

    We propose to augment an existing microlensing survey of M31 with source identifications provided by a modest amount of ACS {and WFPC2 parallel} observations to yield an accurate measurement of the masses responsible for microlensing in M31, and presumably much of its dark matter. The main benefit of these data is the determination of the physical {or "einstein"} timescale of each microlensing event, rather than an effective {"FWHM"} timescale, allowing masses to be determined more than twice as accurately as without HST data. The einstein timescale is the ratio of the lensing cross-sectional radius and relative velocities. Velocities are known from kinematics, and the cross-section is directly proportional to the {unknown} lensing mass. We cannot easily measure these quantities without knowing the amplification, hence the baseline magnitude, which requires the resolution of HST to find the source star. This makes a crucial difference because M31 lens m ass determinations can be more accurate than those towards the Magellanic Clouds through our Galaxy's halo {for the same number of microlensing events} due to the better constrained geometry in the M31 microlensing situation. Furthermore, our larger survey, just completed, should yield at least 100 M31 microlensing events, more than any Magellanic survey. A small amount of ACS+WFPC2 imaging will deliver the potential of this large database {about 350 nights}. For the whole survey {and a delta-function mass distribution} the mass error should approach only about 15%, or about 6% error in slope for a power-law distribution. These results will better allow us to pinpoint the lens halo fraction, and the shape of the halo lens spatial distribution, and allow generalization/comparison of the nature of halo dark matter in spiral galaxies. In addition, we will be able to establish the baseline magnitude for about 50, 000 variable stars, as well as measure an unprecedentedly deta iled color-magnitude diagram and luminosity

  1. Accurate upwind methods for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1993-01-01

    A new class of piecewise linear methods for the numerical solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations of gas dynamics is presented. These methods are uniformly second-order accurate, and can be considered as extensions of Godunov's scheme. With an appropriate definition of monotonicity preservation for the case of linear convection, it can be shown that they preserve monotonicity. Similar to Van Leer's MUSCL scheme, they consist of two key steps: a reconstruction step followed by an upwind step. For the reconstruction step, a monotonicity constraint that preserves uniform second-order accuracy is introduced. Computational efficiency is enhanced by devising a criterion that detects the 'smooth' part of the data where the constraint is redundant. The concept and coding of the constraint are simplified by the use of the median function. A slope steepening technique, which has no effect at smooth regions and can resolve a contact discontinuity in four cells, is described. As for the upwind step, existing and new methods are applied in a manner slightly different from those in the literature. These methods are derived by approximating the Euler equations via linearization and diagonalization. At a 'smooth' interface, Harten, Lax, and Van Leer's one intermediate state model is employed. A modification for this model that can resolve contact discontinuities is presented. Near a discontinuity, either this modified model or a more accurate one, namely, Roe's flux-difference splitting. is used. The current presentation of Roe's method, via the conceptually simple flux-vector splitting, not only establishes a connection between the two splittings, but also leads to an admissibility correction with no conditional statement, and an efficient approximation to Osher's approximate Riemann solver. These reconstruction and upwind steps result in schemes that are uniformly second-order accurate and economical at smooth regions, and yield high resolution at discontinuities.

  2. Accurate measurement of unsteady state fluid temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, two accurate methods for determining the transient fluid temperature were presented. Measurements were conducted for boiling water since its temperature is known. At the beginning the thermometers are at the ambient temperature and next they are immediately immersed into saturated water. The measurements were carried out with two thermometers of different construction but with the same housing outer diameter equal to 15 mm. One of them is a K-type industrial thermometer widely available commercially. The temperature indicated by the thermometer was corrected considering the thermometers as the first or second order inertia devices. The new design of a thermometer was proposed and also used to measure the temperature of boiling water. Its characteristic feature is a cylinder-shaped housing with the sheath thermocouple located in its center. The temperature of the fluid was determined based on measurements taken in the axis of the solid cylindrical element (housing) using the inverse space marching method. Measurements of the transient temperature of the air flowing through the wind tunnel using the same thermometers were also carried out. The proposed measurement technique provides more accurate results compared with measurements using industrial thermometers in conjunction with simple temperature correction using the inertial thermometer model of the first or second order. By comparing the results, it was demonstrated that the new thermometer allows obtaining the fluid temperature much faster and with higher accuracy in comparison to the industrial thermometer. Accurate measurements of the fast changing fluid temperature are possible due to the low inertia thermometer and fast space marching method applied for solving the inverse heat conduction problem.

  3. The first accurate description of an aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    2006-12-01

    As technology has advanced, the scientific study of auroral phenomena has increased by leaps and bounds. A look back at the earliest descriptions of aurorae offers an interesting look into how medieval scholars viewed the subjects that we study.Although there are earlier fragmentary references in the literature, the first accurate description of the aurora borealis appears to be that published by the German Catholic scholar Konrad von Megenberg (1309-1374) in his book Das Buch der Natur (The Book of Nature). The book was written between 1349 and 1350.

  4. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material.

  5. Accurate density functional thermochemistry for larger molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavachari, K.; Stefanov, B. B.; Curtiss, L. A.; Lucent Tech.

    1997-06-20

    Density functional methods are combined with isodesmic bond separation reaction energies to yield accurate thermochemistry for larger molecules. Seven different density functionals are assessed for the evaluation of heats of formation, Delta H 0 (298 K), for a test set of 40 molecules composed of H, C, O and N. The use of bond separation energies results in a dramatic improvement in the accuracy of all the density functionals. The B3-LYP functional has the smallest mean absolute deviation from experiment (1.5 kcal mol/f).

  6. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material. PMID:11366835

  7. Universality: Accurate Checks in Dyson's Hierarchical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godina, J. J.; Meurice, Y.; Oktay, M. B.

    2003-06-01

    In this talk we present high-accuracy calculations of the susceptibility near βc for Dyson's hierarchical model in D = 3. Using linear fitting, we estimate the leading (γ) and subleading (Δ) exponents. Independent estimates are obtained by calculating the first two eigenvalues of the linearized renormalization group transformation. We found γ = 1.29914073 ± 10 -8 and, Δ = 0.4259469 ± 10-7 independently of the choice of local integration measure (Ising or Landau-Ginzburg). After a suitable rescaling, the approximate fixed points for a large class of local measure coincide accurately with a fixed point constructed by Koch and Wittwer.

  8. Mixing parameters of neutral beauty mesons from the Coulomb plus power potential (CPPν)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Bhavin; Vinodkumar, P. C.

    2009-11-01

    The investigation of mixing parameters in neutral B meson systems provides an important testing ground for standard model flavour dynamics. The spectroscopic parameters deduced from the potential model are used to calculate the pseudoscalar decay constant and mixing parameters of the B and Bs mesons.

  9. Localized and Spectroscopic Orbitals: Squirrel Ears on Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, R. Bruce

    1988-01-01

    Reexamines the electronic structure of water considering divergent views. Discusses several aspects of molecular orbital theory using spectroscopic molecular orbitals and localized molecular orbitals. Gives examples for determining lowest energy spectroscopic orbitals. (ML)

  10. Coupled cluster study of spectroscopic constants of ground states of heavy rare gas dimers with spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Zhe-Yan; Wang, Wen-Liang; Li, Ren-Zhong; Xia, Cai-Juan; Li, Lian-Bi

    2016-07-01

    The CCSD(T) approach based on two-component relativistic effective core potential with spin-orbit interaction just included in coupled cluster iteration is adopted to study the spectroscopic constants of ground states of Kr2, Xe2 and Rn2 dimers. The spectroscopic constants have significant basis set dependence. Extrapolation to the complete basis set limit provides the most accurate values. The spin-orbit interaction hardly affects the spectroscopic constants of Kr2 and Xe2. However, the equilibrium bond length is shortened about 0.013 Å and the dissociation energy is augmented about 18 cm-1 by the spin-orbit interaction for Rn2 in the complete basis set limit.

  11. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  12. Accurate basis set truncation for wavefunction embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Taylor A.; Goodpaster, Jason D.; Manby, Frederick R.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) provides a formally exact framework for performing embedded subsystem electronic structure calculations, including DFT-in-DFT and wavefunction theory-in-DFT descriptions. In the interest of efficiency, it is desirable to truncate the atomic orbital basis set in which the subsystem calculation is performed, thus avoiding high-order scaling with respect to the size of the MO virtual space. In this study, we extend a recently introduced projection-based embedding method [F. R. Manby, M. Stella, J. D. Goodpaster, and T. F. Miller III, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2564 (2012)], 10.1021/ct300544e to allow for the systematic and accurate truncation of the embedded subsystem basis set. The approach is applied to both covalently and non-covalently bound test cases, including water clusters and polypeptide chains, and it is demonstrated that errors associated with basis set truncation are controllable to well within chemical accuracy. Furthermore, we show that this approach allows for switching between accurate projection-based embedding and DFT embedding with approximate kinetic energy (KE) functionals; in this sense, the approach provides a means of systematically improving upon the use of approximate KE functionals in DFT embedding.

  13. Accurate determination of characteristic relative permeability curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Michael H.; Benson, Sally M.

    2015-09-01

    A recently developed technique to accurately characterize sub-core scale heterogeneity is applied to investigate the factors responsible for flowrate-dependent effective relative permeability curves measured on core samples in the laboratory. The dependency of laboratory measured relative permeability on flowrate has long been both supported and challenged by a number of investigators. Studies have shown that this apparent flowrate dependency is a result of both sub-core scale heterogeneity and outlet boundary effects. However this has only been demonstrated numerically for highly simplified models of porous media. In this paper, flowrate dependency of effective relative permeability is demonstrated using two rock cores, a Berea Sandstone and a heterogeneous sandstone from the Otway Basin Pilot Project in Australia. Numerical simulations of steady-state coreflooding experiments are conducted at a number of injection rates using a single set of input characteristic relative permeability curves. Effective relative permeability is then calculated from the simulation data using standard interpretation methods for calculating relative permeability from steady-state tests. Results show that simplified approaches may be used to determine flowrate-independent characteristic relative permeability provided flow rate is sufficiently high, and the core heterogeneity is relatively low. It is also shown that characteristic relative permeability can be determined at any typical flowrate, and even for geologically complex models, when using accurate three-dimensional models.

  14. Asiago spectroscopic classification of SN 2016fmt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimbeni, V.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Terreran, G.; Tomasella, L.; Turatto, M.

    2016-08-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic observation of AT 2016fmt discovered by Fabrizio Ciabattari of the Italian Supernova Search Project (ISSP) in NGC 606, who reports a discovery magnitude of 17.8 on UT 2016-08-28 02:52:48.

  15. Asiago spectroscopic classification of two SNe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Terreran, G.; Tomasella, L.; OAPd, M. Turatto (INAF

    2016-09-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic classification of two transients. The targets are supplied by the All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNOvae (ASAS-SN) and the TNS (https://wis-tns.weizmann.ac.il).

  16. Spectroscopic observation of the rotational Doppler effect.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, S; Tabosa, J W R; Failache, H; Lezama, A

    2006-09-15

    We report on the first spectroscopic observation of the rotational Doppler shift associated with light beams carrying orbital angular momentum. The effect is evidenced as the broadening of a Hanle electromagnetically induced transparency coherence resonance on Rb vapor when the two incident Laguerre-Gaussian laser beams have opposite topological charges. The observations closely agree with theoretical predictions.

  17. Spectroscopic study in Z-pinch discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Garamoon, A.A.; Saudy, A.H.; Shark, W.

    1995-12-31

    The temporal variation of the emitted line intensity has been investigated, and thus an important information about the dynamic ionization stages in the Z-pinch discharge has been studied. Also the electron temperature Te, has been deduced by using a spectroscopic technique.

  18. An Improved Diffraction Grating Spectroscope Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherzer, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Discusses problems associated with standard diffraction grating experiments involving a diffraction grating, a straight meter stick, and a slit. Describes the use of a new spectroscope to overcome these problems using a curved scale to simplify calculations and help students obtain results from simple and straightforward measurements, thus giving…

  19. Spectroscopic mode identification in gamma Doradus stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rylvia Pollard, Karen

    2015-08-01

    The MUSICIAN programme at the University of Canterbury has been successfully identifying frequencies and pulsation modes in many gamma Doradus stars using hundreds of precise, high resolution spectroscopic observations. This paper describes some of these frequency and mode identifications and the emerging patterns of the programme.

  20. Reprocessing the Hipparcos Intermediate Astrometric Data of spectroscopic binaries. II. Systems with a giant component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourbaix, D.; Boffin, H. M. J.

    2003-02-01

    By reanalyzing the Hipparcos Intermediate Astrometric Data of a large sample of spectroscopic binaries containing a giant, we obtain a sample of 29 systems fulfilling a carefully derived set of constraints and hence for which we can derive an accurate orbital solution. Of these, one is a double-lined spectroscopic binary and six were not listed in the DMSA/O section of the catalogue. Using our solutions, we derive the masses of the components in these systems and statistically analyze them. We also briefly discuss each system individually. Based on observations from the Hipparcos astrometric satellite operated by the European Space Agency (ESA 1997) and on data collected with the Simbad database.

  1. Rotating compensator spectroscopic ellipsometry for line-width control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ha-Young; Bang, Kyoung-Yoon; Lee, Jaeho; Bak, Heungin; Sohn, Young-Soo; An, Ilsin

    2002-07-01

    Rotating compensator spectroscopic ellipsometry (RCSE) was applied to the characterization of line-width in deep UV photoresist films. Variation of line-width in few nm was distinguishable by comparing the features in conventional ellipsometry parameters or the degree of polarization spectra obtainable form RCSE. The variations in the former spectra were caused by the density change in patterned PR films. Meanwhile, the variations in latter spectra wee caused by the surface profile of the film. Once the spectral positions of the features were related to the result of CD- SEM, both spectra could be used to estimate the line-width of patterned PR without in-depth analysis. Further, when uniaxial anisotropy was assumed for the film, the line-width could be roughly deduced in the process of extracting the optical properties of film via an effective medium approximation.

  2. Investigation on interaction of prulifloxacin with pepsin: A spectroscopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yabei; Yan, Jie; Liu, Benzhi; Yu, Zhang; Gao, Xiaoyan; Tang, Yingcai; Zi, Yanqin

    2010-03-01

    The interaction between prulifloxacin, a kind of new oral taking antibiotic and pepsin, a kind of enzyme in the stomach has been investigated in vitro under a simulated physiological condition by different spectroscopic methods. The intrinsic fluorescence of pepsin was strongly quenched by prulifloxacin. This effect was rationalized in terms of a static quenching procedure. The binding parameters have been evaluated by fluorescence quenching methods. The negative value of Δ G0 reveals that the binding process is a spontaneous process. The binding distance R between donor (pepsin) and acceptor (prulifloxacin) was obtained according to the Förster's resonance energy transfer theory and found to be 0.95 nm. The results obtained herein will be of biological significance in pharmacology and clinical medicine.

  3. How many dark energy parameters?

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.; Huterer, Dragan

    2005-05-16

    For exploring the physics behind the accelerating universe a crucial question is how much we can learn about the dynamics through next generation cosmological experiments. For example, in defining the dark energy behavior through an effective equation of state, how many parameters can we realistically expect to tightly constrain? Through both general and specific examples (including new parametrizations and principal component analysis) we argue that the answer is 42 - no, wait, two. Cosmological parameter analyses involving a measure of the equation of state value at some epoch (e.g., w_0) and a measure of the change in equation of state (e.g., w') are therefore realistic in projecting dark energy parameter constraints. More elaborate parametrizations could have some uses (e.g., testing for bias or comparison with model features), but do not lead to accurately measured dark energy parameters.

  4. Accurate Biomass Estimation via Bayesian Adaptive Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Kevin R.; Knuth, Kevin H.; Castle, Joseph P.; Lvov, Nikolay

    2005-01-01

    The following concepts were introduced: a) Bayesian adaptive sampling for solving biomass estimation; b) Characterization of MISR Rahman model parameters conditioned upon MODIS landcover. c) Rigorous non-parametric Bayesian approach to analytic mixture model determination. d) Unique U.S. asset for science product validation and verification.

  5. Fast and Accurate Construction of Confidence Intervals for Heritability.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Regev; Kaufman, Shachar; Laaksonen, Reijo; Kleber, Marcus E; März, Winfried; Eskin, Eleazar; Rosset, Saharon; Halperin, Eran

    2016-06-01

    Estimation of heritability is fundamental in genetic studies. Recently, heritability estimation using linear mixed models (LMMs) has gained popularity because these estimates can be obtained from unrelated individuals collected in genome-wide association studies. Typically, heritability estimation under LMMs uses the restricted maximum likelihood (REML) approach. Existing methods for the construction of confidence intervals and estimators of SEs for REML rely on asymptotic properties. However, these assumptions are often violated because of the bounded parameter space, statistical dependencies, and limited sample size, leading to biased estimates and inflated or deflated confidence intervals. Here, we show that the estimation of confidence intervals by state-of-the-art methods is inaccurate, especially when the true heritability is relatively low or relatively high. We further show that these inaccuracies occur in datasets including thousands of individuals. Such biases are present, for example, in estimates of heritability of gene expression in the Genotype-Tissue Expression project and of lipid profiles in the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health study. We also show that often the probability that the genetic component is estimated as 0 is high even when the true heritability is bounded away from 0, emphasizing the need for accurate confidence intervals. We propose a computationally efficient method, ALBI (accurate LMM-based heritability bootstrap confidence intervals), for estimating the distribution of the heritability estimator and for constructing accurate confidence intervals. Our method can be used as an add-on to existing methods for estimating heritability and variance components, such as GCTA, FaST-LMM, GEMMA, or EMMAX. PMID:27259052

  6. Accurate estimation of sigma(exp 0) using AIRSAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holecz, Francesco; Rignot, Eric

    1995-01-01

    During recent years signature analysis, classification, and modeling of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data as well as estimation of geophysical parameters from SAR data have received a great deal of interest. An important requirement for the quantitative use of SAR data is the accurate estimation of the backscattering coefficient sigma(exp 0). In terrain with relief variations radar signals are distorted due to the projection of the scene topography into the slant range-Doppler plane. The effect of these variations is to change the physical size of the scattering area, leading to errors in the radar backscatter values and incidence angle. For this reason the local incidence angle, derived from sensor position and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data must always be considered. Especially in the airborne case, the antenna gain pattern can be an additional source of radiometric error, because the radar look angle is not known precisely as a result of the the aircraft motions and the local surface topography. Consequently, radiometric distortions due to the antenna gain pattern must also be corrected for each resolution cell, by taking into account aircraft displacements (position and attitude) and position of the backscatter element, defined by the DEM data. In this paper, a method to derive an accurate estimation of the backscattering coefficient using NASA/JPL AIRSAR data is presented. The results are evaluated in terms of geometric accuracy, radiometric variations of sigma(exp 0), and precision of the estimated forest biomass.

  7. Highly Accurate Inverse Consistent Registration: A Robust Approach

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Martin; Rosas, H. Diana; Fischl, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The registration of images is a task that is at the core of many applications in computer vision. In computational neuroimaging where the automated segmentation of brain structures is frequently used to quantify change, a highly accurate registration is necessary for motion correction of images taken in the same session, or across time in longitudinal studies where changes in the images can be expected. This paper, inspired by Nestares and Heeger (2000), presents a method based on robust statistics to register images in the presence of differences, such as jaw movement, differential MR distortions and true anatomical change. The approach we present guarantees inverse consistency (symmetry), can deal with different intensity scales and automatically estimates a sensitivity parameter to detect outlier regions in the images. The resulting registrations are highly accurate due to their ability to ignore outlier regions and show superior robustness with respect to noise, to intensity scaling and outliers when compared to state-of-the-art registration tools such as FLIRT (in FSL) or the coregistration tool in SPM. PMID:20637289

  8. Highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-12-30

    Disclosed is a highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine, comprising a revolute joint, comprising a circular encoder wheel, having an axis of rotation; a plurality of marks disposed around at least a portion of the circumference of the encoder wheel; bearing means for supporting the encoder wheel, while permitting free rotation of the encoder wheel about the wheel's axis of rotation; and a sensor, rigidly attached to the bearing means, for detecting the motion of at least some of the marks as the encoder wheel rotates; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the encoder wheel, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the sensor, for converting the output of the sensor into a set of cylindrical coordinates representing the position of the probe tip relative to a reference cylindrical coordinate system.

  9. Practical aspects of spatially high accurate methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Andrew G.; Mitchell, Curtis R.; Walters, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    The computational qualities of high order spatially accurate methods for the finite volume solution of the Euler equations are presented. Two dimensional essentially non-oscillatory (ENO), k-exact, and 'dimension by dimension' ENO reconstruction operators are discussed and compared in terms of reconstruction and solution accuracy, computational cost and oscillatory behavior in supersonic flows with shocks. Inherent steady state convergence difficulties are demonstrated for adaptive stencil algorithms. An exact solution to the heat equation is used to determine reconstruction error, and the computational intensity is reflected in operation counts. Standard MUSCL differencing is included for comparison. Numerical experiments presented include the Ringleb flow for numerical accuracy and a shock reflection problem. A vortex-shock interaction demonstrates the ability of the ENO scheme to excel in simulating unsteady high-frequency flow physics.

  10. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperaes in the range of about 1800.degree. to 2700.degree. C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  11. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, D.D.

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperatures in the range of about 1800/sup 0/ to 2700/sup 0/C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  12. Micron Accurate Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron accurate measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.

  13. Accurate metacognition for visual sensory memory representations.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Annelinde R E; Sligte, Ilja G; Barrett, Adam B; Seth, Anil K; Fahrenfort, Johannes J; Lamme, Victor A F

    2014-04-01

    The capacity to attend to multiple objects in the visual field is limited. However, introspectively, people feel that they see the whole visual world at once. Some scholars suggest that this introspective feeling is based on short-lived sensory memory representations, whereas others argue that the feeling of seeing more than can be attended to is illusory. Here, we investigated this phenomenon by combining objective memory performance with subjective confidence ratings during a change-detection task. This allowed us to compute a measure of metacognition--the degree of knowledge that subjects have about the correctness of their decisions--for different stages of memory. We show that subjects store more objects in sensory memory than they can attend to but, at the same time, have similar metacognition for sensory memory and working memory representations. This suggests that these subjective impressions are not an illusion but accurate reflections of the richness of visual perception.

  14. Accurate Thermal Stresses for Beams: Normal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Pilkey, Walter D.

    2003-01-01

    Formulations for a general theory of thermoelasticity to generate accurate thermal stresses for structural members of aeronautical vehicles were developed in 1954 by Boley. The formulation also provides three normal stresses and a shear stress along the entire length of the beam. The Poisson effect of the lateral and transverse normal stresses on a thermally loaded beam is taken into account in this theory by employing an Airy stress function. The Airy stress function enables the reduction of the three-dimensional thermal stress problem to a two-dimensional one. Numerical results from the general theory of thermoelasticity are compared to those obtained from strength of materials. It is concluded that the theory of thermoelasticity for prismatic beams proposed in this paper can be used instead of strength of materials when precise stress results are desired.

  15. Accurate Thermal Stresses for Beams: Normal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Pilkey, Walter D.

    2002-01-01

    Formulations for a general theory of thermoelasticity to generate accurate thermal stresses for structural members of aeronautical vehicles were developed in 1954 by Boley. The formulation also provides three normal stresses and a shear stress along the entire length of the beam. The Poisson effect of the lateral and transverse normal stresses on a thermally loaded beam is taken into account in this theory by employing an Airy stress function. The Airy stress function enables the reduction of the three-dimensional thermal stress problem to a two-dimensional one. Numerical results from the general theory of thermoelasticity are compared to those obtained from strength of materials. It is concluded that the theory of thermoelasticity for prismatic beams proposed in this paper can be used instead of strength of materials when precise stress results are desired.

  16. Accurate metacognition for visual sensory memory representations.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Annelinde R E; Sligte, Ilja G; Barrett, Adam B; Seth, Anil K; Fahrenfort, Johannes J; Lamme, Victor A F

    2014-04-01

    The capacity to attend to multiple objects in the visual field is limited. However, introspectively, people feel that they see the whole visual world at once. Some scholars suggest that this introspective feeling is based on short-lived sensory memory representations, whereas others argue that the feeling of seeing more than can be attended to is illusory. Here, we investigated this phenomenon by combining objective memory performance with subjective confidence ratings during a change-detection task. This allowed us to compute a measure of metacognition--the degree of knowledge that subjects have about the correctness of their decisions--for different stages of memory. We show that subjects store more objects in sensory memory than they can attend to but, at the same time, have similar metacognition for sensory memory and working memory representations. This suggests that these subjective impressions are not an illusion but accurate reflections of the richness of visual perception. PMID:24549293

  17. Accurate Telescope Mount Positioning with MEMS Accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, L.; Jaskó, A.; Pál, A.; Csépány, G.

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes the advantages and challenges of applying microelectromechanical accelerometer systems (MEMS accelerometers) in order to attain precise, accurate, and stateless positioning of telescope mounts. This provides a completely independent method from other forms of electronic, optical, mechanical or magnetic feedback or real-time astrometry. Our goal is to reach the subarcminute range which is considerably smaller than the field-of-view of conventional imaging telescope systems. Here we present how this subarcminute accuracy can be achieved with very cheap MEMS sensors and we also detail how our procedures can be extended in order to attain even finer measurements. In addition, our paper discusses how can a complete system design be implemented in order to be a part of a telescope control system.

  18. Parameters for burst detection

    PubMed Central

    Bakkum, Douglas J.; Radivojevic, Milos; Frey, Urs; Franke, Felix; Hierlemann, Andreas; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    Bursts of action potentials within neurons and throughout networks are believed to serve roles in how neurons handle and store information, both in vivo and in vitro. Accurate detection of burst occurrences and durations are therefore crucial for many studies. A number of algorithms have been proposed to do so, but a standard method has not been adopted. This is due, in part, to many algorithms requiring the adjustment of multiple ad-hoc parameters and further post-hoc criteria in order to produce satisfactory results. Here, we broadly catalog existing approaches and present a new approach requiring the selection of only a single parameter: the number of spikes N comprising the smallest burst to consider. A burst was identified if N spikes occurred in less than T ms, where the threshold T was automatically determined from observing a probability distribution of inter-spike-intervals. Performance was compared vs. different classes of detectors on data gathered from in vitro neuronal networks grown over microelectrode arrays. Our approach offered a number of useful features including: a simple implementation, no need for ad-hoc or post-hoc criteria, and precise assignment of burst boundary time points. Unlike existing approaches, detection was not biased toward larger bursts, allowing identification and analysis of a greater range of neuronal and network dynamics. PMID:24567714

  19. The importance of accurate atmospheric modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Dylan; Schroeder, John; Liang, Pang

    2014-11-01

    This paper will focus on the effect of atmospheric conditions on EO sensor performance using computer models. We have shown the importance of accurately modeling atmospheric effects for predicting the performance of an EO sensor. A simple example will demonstrated how real conditions for several sites in China will significantly impact on image correction, hyperspectral imaging, and remote sensing. The current state-of-the-art model for computing atmospheric transmission and radiance is, MODTRAN® 5, developed by the US Air Force Research Laboratory and Spectral Science, Inc. Research by the US Air Force, Navy and Army resulted in the public release of LOWTRAN 2 in the early 1970's. Subsequent releases of LOWTRAN and MODTRAN® have continued until the present. Please verify that (1) all pages are present, (2) all figures are correct, (3) all fonts and special characters are correct, and (4) all text and figures fit within the red margin lines shown on this review document. Complete formatting information is available at http://SPIE.org/manuscripts Return to the Manage Active Submissions page at http://spie.org/submissions/tasks.aspx and approve or disapprove this submission. Your manuscript will not be published without this approval. Please contact author_help@spie.org with any questions or concerns. The paper will demonstrate the importance of using validated models and local measured meteorological, atmospheric and aerosol conditions to accurately simulate the atmospheric transmission and radiance. Frequently default conditions are used which can produce errors of as much as 75% in these values. This can have significant impact on remote sensing applications.

  20. Accurate Weather Forecasting for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddalena, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    The NRAO Green Bank Telescope routinely observes at wavelengths from 3 mm to 1 m. As with all mm-wave telescopes, observing conditions depend upon the variable atmospheric water content. The site provides over 100 days/yr when opacities are low enough for good observing at 3 mm, but winds on the open-air structure reduce the time suitable for 3-mm observing where pointing is critical. Thus, to maximum productivity the observing wavelength needs to match weather conditions. For 6 years the telescope has used a dynamic scheduling system (recently upgraded; www.gb.nrao.edu/DSS) that requires accurate multi-day forecasts for winds and opacities. Since opacity forecasts are not provided by the National Weather Services (NWS), I have developed an automated system that takes available forecasts, derives forecasted opacities, and deploys the results on the web in user-friendly graphical overviews (www.gb.nrao.edu/ rmaddale/Weather). The system relies on the "North American Mesoscale" models, which are updated by the NWS every 6 hrs, have a 12 km horizontal resolution, 1 hr temporal resolution, run to 84 hrs, and have 60 vertical layers that extend to 20 km. Each forecast consists of a time series of ground conditions, cloud coverage, etc, and, most importantly, temperature, pressure, humidity as a function of height. I use the Liebe's MWP model (Radio Science, 20, 1069, 1985) to determine the absorption in each layer for each hour for 30 observing wavelengths. Radiative transfer provides, for each hour and wavelength, the total opacity and the radio brightness of the atmosphere, which contributes substantially at some wavelengths to Tsys and the observational noise. Comparisons of measured and forecasted Tsys at 22.2 and 44 GHz imply that the forecasted opacities are good to about 0.01 Nepers, which is sufficient for forecasting and accurate calibration. Reliability is high out to 2 days and degrades slowly for longer-range forecasts.

  1. The high cost of accurate knowledge.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Kathleen M; Weber, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    Many business thinkers believe it's the role of senior managers to scan the external environment to monitor contingencies and constraints, and to use that precise knowledge to modify the company's strategy and design. As these thinkers see it, managers need accurate and abundant information to carry out that role. According to that logic, it makes sense to invest heavily in systems for collecting and organizing competitive information. Another school of pundits contends that, since today's complex information often isn't precise anyway, it's not worth going overboard with such investments. In other words, it's not the accuracy and abundance of information that should matter most to top executives--rather, it's how that information is interpreted. After all, the role of senior managers isn't just to make decisions; it's to set direction and motivate others in the face of ambiguities and conflicting demands. Top executives must interpret information and communicate those interpretations--they must manage meaning more than they must manage information. So which of these competing views is the right one? Research conducted by academics Sutcliffe and Weber found that how accurate senior executives are about their competitive environments is indeed less important for strategy and corresponding organizational changes than the way in which they interpret information about their environments. Investments in shaping those interpretations, therefore, may create a more durable competitive advantage than investments in obtaining and organizing more information. And what kinds of interpretations are most closely linked with high performance? Their research suggests that high performers respond positively to opportunities, yet they aren't overconfident in their abilities to take advantage of those opportunities.

  2. A new approach to compute accurate velocity of meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egal, Auriane; Gural, Peter; Vaubaillon, Jeremie; Colas, Francois; Thuillot, William

    2016-10-01

    The CABERNET project was designed to push the limits of meteoroid orbit measurements by improving the determination of the meteors' velocities. Indeed, despite of the development of the cameras networks dedicated to the observation of meteors, there is still an important discrepancy between the measured orbits of meteoroids computed and the theoretical results. The gap between the observed and theoretic semi-major axis of the orbits is especially significant; an accurate determination of the orbits of meteoroids therefore largely depends on the computation of the pre-atmospheric velocities. It is then imperative to dig out how to increase the precision of the measurements of the velocity.In this work, we perform an analysis of different methods currently used to compute the velocities and trajectories of the meteors. They are based on the intersecting planes method developed by Ceplecha (1987), the least squares method of Borovicka (1990), and the multi-parameter fitting (MPF) method published by Gural (2012).In order to objectively compare the performances of these techniques, we have simulated realistic meteors ('fakeors') reproducing the different error measurements of many cameras networks. Some fakeors are built following the propagation models studied by Gural (2012), and others created by numerical integrations using the Borovicka et al. 2007 model. Different optimization techniques have also been investigated in order to pick the most suitable one to solve the MPF, and the influence of the geometry of the trajectory on the result is also presented.We will present here the results of an improved implementation of the multi-parameter fitting that allow an accurate orbit computation of meteors with CABERNET. The comparison of different velocities computation seems to show that if the MPF is by far the best method to solve the trajectory and the velocity of a meteor, the ill-conditioning of the costs functions used can lead to large estimate errors for noisy

  3. Precision cosmological parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendt, William Ashton, Jr.

    2009-09-01

    methods. These techniques will help in the understanding of new physics contained in current and future data sets as well as benefit the research efforts of the cosmology community. Our idea is to shift the computationally intensive pieces of the parameter estimation framework to a parallel training step. We then provide a machine learning code that uses this training set to learn the relationship between the underlying cosmological parameters and the function we wish to compute. This code is very accurate and simple to evaluate. It can provide incredible speed- ups of parameter estimation codes. For some applications this provides the convenience of obtaining results faster, while in other cases this allows the use of codes that would be impossible to apply in the brute force setting. In this thesis we provide several examples where our method allows more accurate computation of functions important for data analysis than is currently possible. As the techniques developed in this work are very general, there are no doubt a wide array of applications both inside and outside of cosmology. We have already seen this interest as other scientists have presented ideas for using our algorithm to improve their computational work, indicating its importance as modern experiments push forward. In fact, our algorithm will play an important role in the parameter analysis of Planck, the next generation CMB space mission.

  4. Approaching system equilibrium with accurate or not accurate feedback information in a two-route system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-mei; Xie, Dong-fan; Li, Qi

    2015-02-01

    With the development of intelligent transport system, advanced information feedback strategies have been developed to reduce traffic congestion and enhance the capacity. However, previous strategies provide accurate information to travelers and our simulation results show that accurate information brings negative effects, especially in delay case. Because travelers prefer to the best condition route with accurate information, and delayed information cannot reflect current traffic condition but past. Then travelers make wrong routing decisions, causing the decrease of the capacity and the increase of oscillations and the system deviating from the equilibrium. To avoid the negative effect, bounded rationality is taken into account by introducing a boundedly rational threshold BR. When difference between two routes is less than the BR, routes have equal probability to be chosen. The bounded rationality is helpful to improve the efficiency in terms of capacity, oscillation and the gap deviating from the system equilibrium.

  5. Theoretical studies of spectroscopic problems of importance for atmospheric radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipping, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    Many of the instruments used to deduce the physical parameters of the Earth's atmosphere necessary for climate studies or for pollution monitoring (for instance, temperature versus pressure or number densities of trace molecules) rely on the existence of accurate spectroscopic data and an understanding of the physical processes responsible for the absorption or emission of radiation. During the summer, research was either continued or begun on three distinct problems: (1) an improved theoretical framework for the calculation of the far-wing absorption of allowed spectral lines; (2) a refinement of the calculation of the collision-induced fundamental spectrum of N2; and (3) an investigation of possible line-mixing effects in the fundamental spectrum of CH4. Progress in these three areas is summarized below. During the past few years, we have developed a theoretical framework for the calculation of the absorption of radiation by the far wings of spectral lines. Such absorption due to water vapor plays a crucial role in the greenhouse effect as well as limiting the retrieval of temperature profiles from satellite data. Several improvements in the theory have been made and the results are being prepared for publication. Last year we published results for the theoretical calculation of the absorption of radiation due to the dipoles induced during binary collisions of N2 molecules using independently measured molecular parameters; the results were in reasonable agreement with experimental data. However, recent measurements have revealed new fine structure that has been attributed to line-mixing effects. We do not think that this is correct, rather that the structure results from short-range anisotropic dipoles. We are in the process of including this refinement in our theoretical calculation in order to compare with the new experimental data. Subtle changes in the spectra of CH4 measured by researchers at Langley have also been attributed to line-mixing effects. By

  6. Accurate masses for dispersion-supported galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Joe; Martinez, Gregory D.; Bullock, James S.; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Geha, Marla; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Simon, Joshua D.; Avedo, Frank F.

    2010-08-01

    We derive an accurate mass estimator for dispersion-supported stellar systems and demonstrate its validity by analysing resolved line-of-sight velocity data for globular clusters, dwarf galaxies and elliptical galaxies. Specifically, by manipulating the spherical Jeans equation we show that the mass enclosed within the 3D deprojected half-light radius r1/2 can be determined with only mild assumptions about the spatial variation of the stellar velocity dispersion anisotropy as long as the projected velocity dispersion profile is fairly flat near the half-light radius, as is typically observed. We find M1/2 = 3 G-1< σ2los > r1/2 ~= 4 G-1< σ2los > Re, where < σ2los > is the luminosity-weighted square of the line-of-sight velocity dispersion and Re is the 2D projected half-light radius. While deceptively familiar in form, this formula is not the virial theorem, which cannot be used to determine accurate masses unless the radial profile of the total mass is known a priori. We utilize this finding to show that all of the Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies (MW dSphs) are consistent with having formed within a halo of a mass of approximately 3 × 109 Msolar, assuming a Λ cold dark matter cosmology. The faintest MW dSphs seem to have formed in dark matter haloes that are at least as massive as those of the brightest MW dSphs, despite the almost five orders of magnitude spread in luminosity between them. We expand our analysis to the full range of observed dispersion-supported stellar systems and examine their dynamical I-band mass-to-light ratios ΥI1/2. The ΥI1/2 versus M1/2 relation for dispersion-supported galaxies follows a U shape, with a broad minimum near ΥI1/2 ~= 3 that spans dwarf elliptical galaxies to normal ellipticals, a steep rise to ΥI1/2 ~= 3200 for ultra-faint dSphs and a more shallow rise to ΥI1/2 ~= 800 for galaxy cluster spheroids.

  7. Efficient and accurate modelling of quantum nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayad, Marina; Obayya, Salah S. A.; Swillam, Mohamed A.

    2016-03-01

    An efficient sensitivity analysis approach for quantum nanostructures is proposed. The imaginary time propagation method (ITP) is utilized to solve the Time Dependent Schrödinger's Equation (TDSE). Using this method, an extraction of all the modes and their sensitivity with respect to all the design parameters have been performed with minimal computational effort. The sensitivity analysis is performed using the Adjoint Variable Method (AVM) and results are comparable to those obtained using Central Finite Difference Method (CFD) applied directly on the response level.

  8. Accurate free energy calculation along optimized paths.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changjun; Xiao, Yi

    2010-05-01

    The path-based methods of free energy calculation, such as thermodynamic integration and free energy perturbation, are simple in theory, but difficult in practice because in most cases smooth paths do not exist, especially for large molecules. In this article, we present a novel method to build the transition path of a peptide. We use harmonic potentials to restrain its nonhydrogen atom dihedrals in the initial state and set the equilibrium angles of the potentials as those in the final state. Through a series of steps of geometrical optimization, we can construct a smooth and short path from the initial state to the final state. This path can be used to calculate free energy difference. To validate this method, we apply it to a small 10-ALA peptide and find that the calculated free energy changes in helix-helix and helix-hairpin transitions are both self-convergent and cross-convergent. We also calculate the free energy differences between different stable states of beta-hairpin trpzip2, and the results show that this method is more efficient than the conventional molecular dynamics method in accurate free energy calculation.

  9. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10-12 at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H2, HD, HT, D2, DT, and T2 has been determined. For the ground state of H2 the estimated precision is 3 × 10-7 cm-1, which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels.

  10. Fast and Provably Accurate Bilateral Filtering.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Kunal N; Dabhade, Swapnil D

    2016-06-01

    The bilateral filter is a non-linear filter that uses a range filter along with a spatial filter to perform edge-preserving smoothing of images. A direct computation of the bilateral filter requires O(S) operations per pixel, where S is the size of the support of the spatial filter. In this paper, we present a fast and provably accurate algorithm for approximating the bilateral filter when the range kernel is Gaussian. In particular, for box and Gaussian spatial filters, the proposed algorithm can cut down the complexity to O(1) per pixel for any arbitrary S . The algorithm has a simple implementation involving N+1 spatial filterings, where N is the approximation order. We give a detailed analysis of the filtering accuracy that can be achieved by the proposed approximation in relation to the target bilateral filter. This allows us to estimate the order N required to obtain a given accuracy. We also present comprehensive numerical results to demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is competitive with the state-of-the-art methods in terms of speed and accuracy. PMID:27093722

  11. Accurate, reliable prototype earth horizon sensor head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F.; Cohen, H.

    1973-01-01

    The design and performance is described of an accurate and reliable prototype earth sensor head (ARPESH). The ARPESH employs a detection logic 'locator' concept and horizon sensor mechanization which should lead to high accuracy horizon sensing that is minimally degraded by spatial or temporal variations in sensing attitude from a satellite in orbit around the earth at altitudes in the 500 km environ 1,2. An accuracy of horizon location to within 0.7 km has been predicted, independent of meteorological conditions. This corresponds to an error of 0.015 deg-at 500 km altitude. Laboratory evaluation of the sensor indicates that this accuracy is achieved. First, the basic operating principles of ARPESH are described; next, detailed design and construction data is presented and then performance of the sensor under laboratory conditions in which the sensor is installed in a simulator that permits it to scan over a blackbody source against background representing the earth space interface for various equivalent plant temperatures.

  12. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-14

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10{sup −12} at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H{sub 2}, HD, HT, D{sub 2}, DT, and T{sub 2} has been determined. For the ground state of H{sub 2} the estimated precision is 3 × 10{sup −7} cm{sup −1}, which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels.

  13. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule.

    PubMed

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-14

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10(-12) at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H2, HD, HT, D2, DT, and T2 has been determined. For the ground state of H2 the estimated precision is 3 × 10(-7) cm(-1), which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels. PMID:25494728

  14. MEMS accelerometers in accurate mount positioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, László; Pál, András.; Jaskó, Attila

    2014-07-01

    In order to attain precise, accurate and stateless positioning of telescope mounts we apply microelectromechanical accelerometer systems (also known as MEMS accelerometers). In common practice, feedback from the mount position is provided by electronic, optical or magneto-mechanical systems or via real-time astrometric solution based on the acquired images. Hence, MEMS-based systems are completely independent from these mechanisms. Our goal is to investigate the advantages and challenges of applying such devices and to reach the sub-arcminute range { that is well smaller than the field-of-view of conventional imaging telescope systems. We present how this sub-arcminute accuracy can be achieved with very cheap MEMS sensors. Basically, these sensors yield raw output within an accuracy of a few degrees. We show what kind of calibration procedures could exploit spherical and cylindrical constraints between accelerometer output channels in order to achieve the previously mentioned accuracy level. We also demonstrate how can our implementation be inserted in a telescope control system. Although this attainable precision is less than both the resolution of telescope mount drive mechanics and the accuracy of astrometric solutions, the independent nature of attitude determination could significantly increase the reliability of autonomous or remotely operated astronomical observations.

  15. Towards Accurate Molecular Modeling of Plastic Bonded Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantawansri, T. L.; Andzelm, J.; Taylor, D.; Byrd, E.; Rice, B.

    2010-03-01

    There is substantial interest in identifying the controlling factors that influence the susceptibility of polymer bonded explosives (PBXs) to accidental initiation. Numerous Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of PBXs using the COMPASS force field have been reported in recent years, where the validity of the force field in modeling the solid EM fill has been judged solely on its ability to reproduce lattice parameters, which is an insufficient metric. Performance of the COMPASS force field in modeling EMs and the polymeric binder has been assessed by calculating structural, thermal, and mechanical properties, where only fair agreement with experimental data is obtained. We performed MD simulations using the COMPASS force field for the polymer binder hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene and five EMs: cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine, 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetra-azacyclo-octane, 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexantirohexaazazisowurzitane, 2,4,6-trinitro-1,3,5-benzenetriamine, and pentaerythritol tetranitate. Predicted EM crystallographic and molecular structural parameters, as well as calculated properties for the binder will be compared with experimental results for different simulation conditions. We also present novel simulation protocols, which improve agreement between experimental and computation results thus leading to the accurate modeling of PBXs.

  16. Are your spectroscopic data being used?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Iouli E.; Potterbusch, Megan R.; Bouquin, Daina; Erdmann, Christopher C.; Wilzewski, Jonas S.; Rothman, Laurence S.

    2016-09-01

    The issue of availability of data and their presentation in spectroscopic publications is discussed. Different current practices are critically reviewed from the point of view of potential users, government policies, and merit of success of the authors. Indeed, properly providing the data benefits not only users but also the authors of the spectroscopic research. We will show that this increases citations to the spectroscopy papers and visibility of the research groups. Examples based on the statistical analyses of the articles published in the Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy will be shown. We will discuss different methods including supplementary materials to the Journals, public-curated databases and also new tools that can be utilized by spectroscopists.

  17. Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus are disclosed which employ deep ultraviolet (e.g. in the 200 nm to 300 nm spectral range) electron beam pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor light emitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers to perform non-contact, non-invasive detection of unknown chemical analytes. These deep ultraviolet sources enable dramatic size, weight and power consumption reductions of chemical analysis instruments. Chemical analysis instruments employed in some embodiments include capillary and gel plane electrophoresis, capillary electrochromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, flow cytometry, flow cells for liquids and aerosols, and surface detection instruments. In some embodiments, Raman spectroscopic detection methods and apparatus use ultra-narrow-band angle tuning filters, acousto-optic tuning filters, and temperature tuned filters to enable ultra-miniature analyzers for chemical identification. In some embodiments Raman analysis is conducted simultaneously with native fluorescence spectroscopy to provide high levels of sensitivity and specificity in the same instrument.

  18. Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus are disclosed which employ deep ultraviolet (e.g. in the 200 nm to 300 nm spectral range) electron beam pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor light emitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers to perform non-contact, non-invasive detection of unknown chemical analytes. These deep ultraviolet sources enable dramatic size, weight and power consumption reductions of chemical analysis instruments. Chemical analysis instruments employed in some embodiments include capillary and gel plane electrophoresis, capillary electrochromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, flow cytometry, flow cells for liquids and aerosols, and surface detection instruments. In some embodiments, Raman spectroscopic detection methods and apparatus use ultra-narrow-band angle tuning filters, acousto-optic tuning filters, and temperature tuned filters to enable ultra-miniature analyzers for chemical identification. In some embodiments Raman analysis is conducted simultaneously with native fluorescence spectroscopy to provide high levels of sensitivity and specificity in the same instrument.

  19. Data Acquisition System for Instructional Spectroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, C. B. S. B.; Hetem, A.

    2014-10-01

    This article aims to present the software for data acquisition developed in scientific initiation program - IC, for use in the design of a spectrometer built by students. The program was built in C++, a language in wide use today. The origin of spectra used is a simplified model of rustic spectroscope. This equipment basically consists of a box that does not allow light to enter, except through a slit made in the side of it, a diffraction media and a camera for data acquisition. After the image acquisition, one executes the data processing, followed by the usual steps of reduction and analysis of this type of tool. We have implemented a method for calibrating the spectroscope, through which one can compare the incidence of the photons with characteristic of each monochromatic wave. The final result is a one-dimensional spectrum that can be subsequently analyzed.

  20. Studying Young Stars with Large Spectroscopic Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martell, Sarah L.

    2016-01-01

    Galactic archaeology is the study of the history of star formation and chemical evolution in the Milky Way, based on present-day stellar populations. Studies of young stars are a key anchor point for Galactic archaeology, since quantities like the initial mass function and the star formation rate can be studied directly in young clusters and star forming regions. Conversely, massive spectroscopic Galactic archaeology surveys can be used as a data source for young star studies.

  1. Integrated Spectroscopic Studies of MIL03346

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyar, M. D.; Pieters, C. M.; Hiroi, T.; Lane, M. D.; Marchand, G. J.

    2005-01-01

    Spectroscopic studies of the SNC meteorites continue to be of great interest because they provide the only "ground truth" available for ongoing Mossbauer, thermal emittance, MidIR, nearIR, and visible spectral analysis of the martian surface. We present here results of an integrated series of measurements made on the same split of MIL03346, in order to expand our understanding of the properties of these materials and to relate them to other SNCs.

  2. Spectroscopic classification of Gaia16alf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onori, F.; Fraser, M.; Jonker, P.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Blagorodnova, N.; Mattila, S.

    2016-04-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of Gaia16alf, from medium resolution (R~1000; 330-990nm) spectra taken with the William Herschel Telescope + ISIS + R300B/R158R on the night of 2016 April 19. The spectrum is consistent with that of a Type Ia SN a few days before maximum light at a redshift of z=0.094.

  3. Asiago spectroscopic classification of SN 2016eob

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochner, P.; Tomasella, G. Terreran L.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Turatto, M.; Yang, S.

    2016-08-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic classification of SN 2016eob. The transient was discovered by Leonini et al. 2016, TNS Astronomical Transient Report No. 3994, Italian Supernovae Search Project (ISSP), on UT 2016-08-03.11 in the galaxy UGC00005 (2 other supernovae exploded in this host: SN 2000da, SN 2003lq).

  4. Photometric and spectroscopic studies of massive binaries in the large Magellanic Cloud. II. Three O-type systems in the 30 Dor region

    SciTech Connect

    Morrell, Nidia I.; Massey, Philip; Neugent, Kathryn F.; Penny, Laura R.; Gies, Douglas R. E-mail: phil.massey@lowell.edu E-mail: penny@cofc.edu

    2014-07-10

    This is the second paper in a series devoted to the study of massive binary systems in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We mainly aim to provide accurate data that constrains the mass-luminosity relation for the most massive stars but also to address the long lasting problem known as the 'mass discrepancy'. We present here our results for three binaries (LMC 169782, LMC 171520, and [P93] 921) harboring the earliest O-type components—ranging from O4 V to O6.5 V—among our sample of 17 systems. Our photometry provided accurate periods for the studied systems, allowing the spectroscopic observations to be performed at selected phases where the radial velocity separation between binary components is larger. Following the procedure outlined in our first paper of this series, after solving the radial velocity curves for orbital parameters, we used tomographic reconstruction to obtain the individual spectra of each star, from which we determined effective temperatures via a model atmosphere fitting with FASTWIND. This information, combined with the light-curve analysis that was performed with GENSYN, enabled the determination of absolute masses, radii, and bolometric luminosities that are compared with those predicted by modern stellar evolutionary models finding that they agree within the uncertainties. Nevertheless, the comparison seems to confirm the small differences found in the first paper of this series in the sense that the evolutionary masses are slightly larger than the Keplerian ones, with differences averaging ∼10%, or alternatively, the stellar evolutionary models predict luminosities that are somewhat lower than observed. Still, the overall agreement between the current evolutionary models and the empirically determined stellar parameters is remarkable.

  5. Impact of Distortions on Fiber Position Location in the dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Stephen; Lampton, Michael; Doel, A. Peter; Brooks, David; Miller, Tim; Besuner, Robert; Silber, Joe; Liang, Ming; Sprayberry, David; Baltay, Charles; Rabinowitz, David

    2016-01-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, to be located at the prime focus of the Mayall telescope, includes a wide field corrector, a 5000 fiber positioner system, and a fiber view camera. The mapping of the sky to the focal plane, needed to position the fibers accurately, is described in detail. A major challenge is dealing with the large amount of distortion introduced by the optics (of order 10% scale change), including time-dependent non-axisymmetric distortions introduced by the atmospheric dispersion compensator. Solutions are presented to measure or mitigate these effects.

  6. Flux measurements using the BATSE spectroscopic detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnamara, Bernard

    1993-01-01

    Among the Compton Gama-Ray Observatory instruments, the BATSE Spectroscopic Detectors (SD) have the distinction of being able to detect photons of energies less than about 20 keV. This is an interesting energy range for the examination of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB's). In fact, Sco X-1, the prototype LMXB, is easily seen even in the raw BATSE spectroscopic data. The all-sky coverage afforded by these detectors offers a unique opportunity to monitor this source over time periods never before possible. The aim of this investigation was to test a number of ways in which both continous and discrete flux measurements can be obtained using the BATSE spectroscopic datasets. A instrumental description of a SD can be found in the Compton Workshop of Apr. 1989, this report will deal only with methods which can be used to analyze its datasets. Many of the items discussed below, particularly in regard to the earth occultation technique, have been developed, refined, and applied by the BATSE team to the reduction of BATSE LAD data. Code written as part of this project utilizes portions of that work. The following discussions will first address issues related to the reduction of SD datasets using the earth occultation technique. It will then discuss methods for the recovery of the flux history of strong sources while they are above the earth's limb. The report will conclude with recommended reduction procedures.

  7. The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaugher, Brenna; Bebek, Chris

    2014-07-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment that will study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure through redshift-space distortions with a wide-area galaxy and quasar spectroscopic redshift survey. The DESI instrument consists of a new wide-field (3.2 deg. linear field of view) corrector plus a multi-object spectrometer with up to 5000 robotically positioned optical fibers and will be installed at prime focus on the Mayall 4m telescope at Kitt Peak, Arizona. The fibers feed 10 three-arm spectrographs producing spectra that cover a wavelength range from 360-980 nm and have resolution of 2000-5500 depending on the wavelength. The DESI instrument is designed for a 14,000 sq. deg. multi-year survey of targets that trace the evolution of dark energy out to redshift 3.5 using the redshifts of luminous red galaxies (LRGs), emission line galaxies (ELGs) and quasars. DESI is the successor to the successful Stage-III BOSS spectroscopic redshift survey and complements imaging surveys such as the Stage-III Dark Energy Survey (DES, currently operating) and the Stage-IV Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST, planned start early in the next decade).

  8. Towards Accurate Application Characterization for Exascale (APEX)

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Simon David

    2015-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has been engaged in hardware and software codesign activities for a number of years, indeed, it might be argued that prototyping of clusters as far back as the CPLANT machines and many large capability resources including ASCI Red and RedStorm were examples of codesigned solutions. As the research supporting our codesign activities has moved closer to investigating on-node runtime behavior a nature hunger has grown for detailed analysis of both hardware and algorithm performance from the perspective of low-level operations. The Application Characterization for Exascale (APEX) LDRD was a project concieved of addressing some of these concerns. Primarily the research was to intended to focus on generating accurate and reproducible low-level performance metrics using tools that could scale to production-class code bases. Along side this research was an advocacy and analysis role associated with evaluating tools for production use, working with leading industry vendors to develop and refine solutions required by our code teams and to directly engage with production code developers to form a context for the application analysis and a bridge to the research community within Sandia. On each of these accounts significant progress has been made, particularly, as this report will cover, in the low-level analysis of operations for important classes of algorithms. This report summarizes the development of a collection of tools under the APEX research program and leaves to other SAND and L2 milestone reports the description of codesign progress with Sandia’s production users/developers.

  9. Accurate paleointensities - the multi-method approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    The accuracy of models describing rapid changes in the geomagnetic field over the past millennia critically depends on the availability of reliable paleointensity estimates. Over the past decade methods to derive paleointensities from lavas (the only recorder of the geomagnetic field that is available all over the globe and through geologic times) have seen significant improvements and various alternative techniques were proposed. The 'classical' Thellier-style approach was optimized and selection criteria were defined in the 'Standard Paleointensity Definitions' (Paterson et al, 2014). The Multispecimen approach was validated and the importance of additional tests and criteria to assess Multispecimen results must be emphasized. Recently, a non-heating, relative paleointensity technique was proposed -the pseudo-Thellier protocol- which shows great potential in both accuracy and efficiency, but currently lacks a solid theoretical underpinning. Here I present work using all three of the aforementioned paleointensity methods on suites of young lavas taken from the volcanic islands of Hawaii, La Palma, Gran Canaria, Tenerife, and Terceira. Many of the sampled cooling units are <100 years old, the actual field strength at the time of cooling is therefore reasonably well known. Rather intuitively, flows that produce coherent results from two or more different paleointensity methods yield the most accurate estimates of the paleofield. Furthermore, the results for some flows pass the selection criteria for one method, but fail in other techniques. Scrutinizing and combing all acceptable results yielded reliable paleointensity estimates for 60-70% of all sampled cooling units - an exceptionally high success rate. This 'multi-method paleointensity approach' therefore has high potential to provide the much-needed paleointensities to improve geomagnetic field models for the Holocene.

  10. Important Nearby Galaxies without Accurate Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, Kristen

    2014-10-01

    The Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) and its offspring programs (e.g., THINGS, HERACLES, KINGFISH) have resulted in a fundamental change in our view of star formation and the ISM in galaxies, and together they represent the most complete multi-wavelength data set yet assembled for a large sample of nearby galaxies. These great investments of observing time have been dedicated to the goal of understanding the interstellar medium, the star formation process, and, more generally, galactic evolution at the present epoch. Nearby galaxies provide the basis for which we interpret the distant universe, and the SINGS sample represents the best studied nearby galaxies.Accurate distances are fundamental to interpreting observations of galaxies. Surprisingly, many of the SINGS spiral galaxies have numerous distance estimates resulting in confusion. We can rectify this situation for 8 of the SINGS spiral galaxies within 10 Mpc at a very low cost through measurements of the tip of the red giant branch. The proposed observations will provide an accuracy of better than 0.1 in distance modulus. Our sample includes such well known galaxies as M51 (the Whirlpool), M63 (the Sunflower), M104 (the Sombrero), and M74 (the archetypal grand design spiral).We are also proposing coordinated parallel WFC3 UV observations of the central regions of the galaxies, rich with high-mass UV-bright stars. As a secondary science goal we will compare the resolved UV stellar populations with integrated UV emission measurements used in calibrating star formation rates. Our observations will complement the growing HST UV atlas of high resolution images of nearby galaxies.

  11. Accurate Thermal Conductivities from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbogno, Christian

    2015-03-01

    In spite of significant research efforts, a first-principles determination of the thermal conductivity at high temperatures has remained elusive. On the one hand, Boltzmann transport techniques that include anharmonic effects in the nuclear dynamics only perturbatively become inaccurate or inapplicable under such conditions. On the other hand, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) methods suffer from enormous finite-size artifacts in the computationally feasible supercells, which prevent an accurate extrapolation to the bulk limit of the thermal conductivity. In this work, we overcome this limitation by performing ab initio MD simulations in thermodynamic equilibrium that account for all orders of anharmonicity. The thermal conductivity is then assessed from the auto-correlation function of the heat flux using the Green-Kubo formalism. Foremost, we discuss the fundamental theory underlying a first-principles definition of the heat flux using the virial theorem. We validate our approach and in particular the techniques developed to overcome finite time and size effects, e.g., by inspecting silicon, the thermal conductivity of which is particularly challenging to converge. Furthermore, we use this framework to investigate the thermal conductivity of ZrO2, which is known for its high degree of anharmonicity. Our calculations shed light on the heat resistance mechanism active in this material, which eventually allows us to discuss how the thermal conductivity can be controlled by doping and co-doping. This work has been performed in collaboration with R. Ramprasad (University of Connecticut), C. G. Levi and C. G. Van de Walle (University of California Santa Barbara).

  12. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Battum, L. J.; Huizenga, H.; Verdaasdonk, R. M.; Heukelom, S.

    2016-01-01

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2-2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner’s transmission mode, with red-green-blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner’s optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film.

  13. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry.

    PubMed

    van Battum, L J; Huizenga, H; Verdaasdonk, R M; Heukelom, S

    2016-01-21

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2-2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner's transmission mode, with red-green-blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner's optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film.

  14. A quick accurate model of nozzle backflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuharski, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Backflow from nozzles is a major source of contamination on spacecraft. If the craft contains any exposed high voltages, the neutral density produced by the nozzles in the vicinity of the craft needs to be known in order to assess the possibility of Paschen breakdown or the probability of sheath ionization around a region of the craft that collects electrons for the plasma. A model for backflow has been developed for incorporation into the Environment-Power System Analysis Tool (EPSAT) which quickly estimates both the magnitude of the backflow and the species makeup of the flow. By combining the backflow model with the Simons (1972) model for continuum flow it is possible to quickly estimate the density of each species from a nozzle at any position in space. The model requires only a few physical parameters of the nozzle and the gas as inputs and is therefore ideal for engineering applications.

  15. Mass Assembly In The WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbert, James; Teplitz, Harry; Scarlata, Claudia; Siana, Brian; Malkan, Matt; McCarthy, Patrick; Henry, Alaina; Atek, Hakim; Fosbury, Robert; Ross, Nathanial; Hathi, Nimish; Bridge, Carrie; Bunker, Andrew; Dressler, Alan; Shim, Hyunjin; Bedregal, Alejandro; Dominguez, Alberto; Rafelski, Marc; Masters, Dan; Martin, Crystal

    2013-10-01

    The WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel (WISP) Survey uses over 1300 HST orbits to study galaxy evolution over a majority of cosmic history. Its slitless grism spectroscopy over a wide, continuous spectral range (0.8-1.7 micron) provides an unbiased selection of thousands of emission line galaxies over 0.5 < z < 2.5. Hundreds of these galaxies are detected in multiple emission lines, allowing for important diagnostics of metallicity and dust extinction. We propose deep 3.6 micron imaging (5 sigma, 0.9 micro-Jy) of 40 of the deepest WISP fields observed with the combination of G102+G141 grisms, in order to detect emission-line galaxies down to 0.1 L*. Combined with our HST optical and near-IR photometry, these IRAC data will be critical to determining accurate stellar masses for both passive and active galaxies in our survey. We will determine the evolution of the faint end slope of the stellar mass function and the mass-metallicity relation down to low-mass galaxies, including measurement of a possible mass-metallicity-SFR fundamental plane. The addition of the IRAC photometry will also provide much stronger constraints on dust extinction and star formation history, especially when combined with information available from the emission lines themselves.

  16. Spectroscopic studies of homogeneous precursors to atmospheric acids and aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Leopold, K.R.; Canagaratna, M.; Phillips, J.A.; Goodfriend, H.

    1996-10-01

    A detailed understanding of the nucleation and growth of atmospheric particulates is benefitted by precise knowledge of the structure and energetics of small molecular aggregates. We present the results of microwave spectroscopic characterization of three binary clusters which are potential precursors in such processes: H{sub 2}O-SO{sub 3}, H{sub 3}N-SO{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O-HNO{sub 3}. In addition to providing detailed structural information, we describe the nature of the bonding in these systems. For the SO{sub 3} complexes, the intermolecular interaction is weaker than a chemical bond, but stronger than a van der Waals bond. We discuss how this feature of these systems renders their structure and energetics unusually sensitive to the presence of additional binding partners, and infer that an accurate molecular-level description of cluster growth will need to account for this effect. The results are compared with published high level ab initio calculations for all three systems.

  17. Impedance spectroscopic characterization of gadolinium substituted cobalt ferrite ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Md. T. Ramana, C. V.

    2014-10-28

    Gadolinium (Gd) substituted cobalt ferrites (CoFe{sub 2−x}Gd{sub x}O{sub 4}, referred to CFGO) with variable Gd content (x = 0.0–0.4) have been synthesized by solid state ceramic method. The crystal structure and impedance properties of CFGO compounds have been evaluated. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that CFGO crystallize in the inverse spinel phase. The CFGO compounds exhibit lattice expansion due to substitution of larger Gd ions into the crystal lattice. Impedance spectroscopy analysis was performed under a wide range of frequency (f = 20 Hz–1 MHz) and temperature (T = 303–573 K). Electrical properties of Gd incorporated Co ferrite ceramics are enhanced compared to pure CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} due to the lattice distortion. Impedance spectroscopic analysis illustrates the variation of bulk grain and grain-boundary contributions towards the electrical resistance and capacitance of CFGO materials with temperature. A two-layer heterogeneous model consisting of moderately conducting grain interior (ferrite-phase) regions separated by insulating grain boundaries (resistive-phase) accurately account for the observed temperature and frequency dependent electrical characteristic of CFGO ceramics.

  18. Spectroscopic fingerprint of tea varieties by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Buyukgoz, Guluzar Gorkem; Soforoglu, Mehmet; Basaran Akgul, Nese; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki

    2016-03-01

    The fingerprinting method is generally performed to determine specific molecules or the behavior of specific molecular bonds in the desired sample content. A novel, robust and simple method based on surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was developed to obtain the full spectrum of tea varieties for detection of the purity of the samples based on the type of processing and cultivation. For this purpose, the fingerprint of seven different varieties of tea samples (herbal tea (rose hip, chamomile, linden, green and sage tea), black tea and earl grey tea) combined with silver colloids was obtained by SERS in the range of 200-2000 cm(-1) with an analysis time of 20 s. Each of the thirty-nine tea samples tested showed its own specific SERS spectra. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was also applied to separate of each tea variety and different models developed for tea samples including three different models for the herbal teas and two different models for black and earl grey tea samples. Herbal tea samples were separated using mean centering, smoothing and median centering pre-processing steps while baselining and derivatisation pre-processing steps were applied to SERS data of black and earl grey tea. The novel spectroscopic fingerprinting technique combined with PCA is an accurate, rapid and simple methodology for the assessment of tea types based on the type of processing and cultivation differences. This method is proposed as an alternative tool in order to determine the characteristics of tea varieties. PMID:27570296

  19. Spectroscopic study of the peculiar galaxy IC 883

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovleva, V. A.; Merkulova, O. A.; Karataeva, G. M.; Shalyapina, L. V.; Yablokova, N. V.; Burenkov, A. N.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze new optical spectroscopic observations obtained at the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences with the SCORPIO focal reducer (in the modes of a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) and long-slit spectroscopy) and the Multi-Pupil Fiber Spectrograph for the galaxy IC 883. We have confirmed that the main body of the galaxy rotates around its minor axis. The positions of the dynamical axes of the stellar and gaseous components have been found to differ by ~10°. The velocities in the SE tail do not correspond to the circular rotation around the galaxy's minor axis. This structure is probably a fragment of an unwound curved spiral arm. Regions with high velocity dispersions and peculiarities in the velocity fields have been found along the minor axis. Our study of the age and metallicity of the galaxy's stellar population has shown that the mean values of these parameters in the stellar disk, except for the central region ( r ≤ 5"), are ≈1 Gyr and ≈-0.4 dex, respectively. Both young (2-5 × 108 yr) and old (5-10 × 109 yr) stellar populations are present in the circumnuclear region. Our analysis of the spectroscopic data for the bright feature 8" south of the nucleus coincident in position with a compact X-ray source has shown that this is apparently a dwarf galaxy or a remnant of a companion galaxy. Our FPI observations in the Hα emission line and direct images have revealed a region of ionized gas that together with the already known structures along the minor axis forms a clumpy tidal structure of ionized gas pulled from the companion galaxy. The results of our study confirm the previously proposed hypothesis that the observed peculiar structures were formed by the merger of two galaxies. However, it can be said that IC 883 does not belong to the class of polar-ring galaxies.

  20. The extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: a cosmological forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Gong-Bo; Wang, Yuting; Ross, Ashley J.; Shandera, Sarah; Percival, Will J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Myers, Adam D.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Comparat, Johan; Delubac, Timothée; Gao, Pengyuan; Hojjati, Alireza; Koyama, Kazuya; McBride, Cameron K.; Meza, Andrés; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pogosian, Levon; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tao, Charling; Wang, Dandan; Yèche, Christophe; Zhang, Hanyu; Zhang, Yuecheng; Zhou, Xu; Zhu, Fangzhou; Zou, Hu

    2016-04-01

    We present a science forecast for the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) survey. Focusing on discrete tracers, we forecast the expected accuracy of the baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO), the redshift-space distortion (RSD) measurements, the fNL parameter quantifying the primordial non-Gaussianity, the dark energy and modified gravity parameters. We also use the line-of-sight clustering in the Lyman α forest to constrain the total neutrino mass. We find that eBOSS luminous red galaxies, emission line galaxies and clustering quasars can achieve a precision of 1, 2.2 and 1.6 per cent, respectively, for spherically averaged BAO distance measurements. Using the same samples, the constraint on fσ8 is expected to be 2.5, 3.3 and 2.8 per cent, respectively. For primordial non-Gaussianity, eBOSS alone can reach an accuracy of σ(fNL) ˜ 10-15. eBOSS can at most improve the dark energy figure of merit by a factor of 3 for the Chevallier-Polarski-Linder parametrization, and can well constrain three eigenmodes for the general equation-of-state parameter. eBOSS can also significantly improve constraints on modified gravity parameters by providing the RSD information, which is highly complementary to constraints obtained from weak lensing measurements. A principal component analysis shows that eBOSS can measure the eigenmodes of the effective Newton's constant to 2 per cent precision; this is a factor of 10 improvement over that achievable without eBOSS. Finally, we derive the eBOSS constraint (combined with Planck, Dark Energy Survey and BOSS) on the total neutrino mass, σ(Σmν) = 0.03 eV (68 per cent CL), which in principle makes it possible to distinguish between the two scenarios of neutrino mass hierarchies.

  1. Accurate theoretical chemistry with coupled pair models.

    PubMed

    Neese, Frank; Hansen, Andreas; Wennmohs, Frank; Grimme, Stefan

    2009-05-19

    Quantum chemistry has found its way into the everyday work of many experimental chemists. Calculations can predict the outcome of chemical reactions, afford insight into reaction mechanisms, and be used to interpret structure and bonding in molecules. Thus, contemporary theory offers tremendous opportunities in experimental chemical research. However, even with present-day computers and algorithms, we cannot solve the many particle Schrodinger equation exactly; inevitably some error is introduced in approximating the solutions of this equation. Thus, the accuracy of quantum chemical calculations is of critical importance. The affordable accuracy depends on molecular size and particularly on the total number of atoms: for orientation, ethanol has 9 atoms, aspirin 21 atoms, morphine 40 atoms, sildenafil 63 atoms, paclitaxel 113 atoms, insulin nearly 800 atoms, and quaternary hemoglobin almost 12,000 atoms. Currently, molecules with up to approximately 10 atoms can be very accurately studied by coupled cluster (CC) theory, approximately 100 atoms with second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), approximately 1000 atoms with density functional theory (DFT), and beyond that number with semiempirical quantum chemistry and force-field methods. The overwhelming majority of present-day calculations in the 100-atom range use DFT. Although these methods have been very successful in quantum chemistry, they do not offer a well-defined hierarchy of calculations that allows one to systematically converge to the correct answer. Recently a number of rather spectacular failures of DFT methods have been found-even for seemingly simple systems such as hydrocarbons, fueling renewed interest in wave function-based methods that incorporate the relevant physics of electron correlation in a more systematic way. Thus, it would be highly desirable to fill the gap between 10 and 100 atoms with highly correlated ab initio methods. We have found that one of the earliest (and now

  2. Spectroscopic investigation of U, Np and Th in nuclear glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calas, G.; Galoisy, L. V.; Petit-Maire, D.

    2011-12-01

    Vitrification of high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate glasses is currently used on an industrial scale in several countries. The fundamental properties of the waste forms are their chemical and mechanical durability against the forcing conditions represented by chemical alteration or internal/external irradiation. The waste immobilized in glass is composed of over 30 different nuclear fission and activation products, as well as minor actinides. The oxidation state and local atomic coordination of long-lived radionuclides are important parameters to understand the long-term evolution of the glass. We present an overview of the local structure around actinides in glasses similar to the French nuclear glass. X-Ray absorption spectroscopy has been used to probe the local environment around uranium, neptunium and thorium in these glasses. It is combined with with UV-visible spectroscopy, used to get selective information on the surrounding of U(IV), U(V) and U(VI) in glasses. Our spectroscopic data show that U, Np and Th occur in nuclear glasses in a peculiar surrounding showing significant differences with the crystal chemistry of these elements in crystalline compounds. Element speciation may be used as a pertinent parameter to follow the long-term stability of nuclear glasses, either under irradiation or during the alteration of the glass.

  3. BASE: Bayesian Astrometric and Spectroscopic Exoplanet Detection and Characterization Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze-Hartung, Tim

    2012-08-01

    BASE is a novel program for the combined or separate Bayesian analysis of astrometric and radial-velocity measurements of potential exoplanet hosts and binary stars. The tool fulfills two major tasks of exoplanet science, namely the detection of exoplanets and the characterization of their orbits. BASE was developed to provide the possibility of an integrated Bayesian analysis of stellar astrometric and Doppler-spectroscopic measurements with respect to their binary or planetary companions’ signals, correctly treating the astrometric measurement uncertainties and allowing to explore the whole parameter space without the need for informative prior constraints. The tool automatically diagnoses convergence of its Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC[2]) sampler to the posterior and regularly outputs status information. For orbit characterization, BASE delivers important results such as the probability densities and correlations of model parameters and derived quantities. BASE is a highly configurable command-line tool developed in Fortran 2008 and compiled with GFortran. Options can be used to control the program’s behaviour and supply information such as the stellar mass or prior information. Any option can be supplied in a configuration file and/or on the command line.

  4. Spectroscopic investigations of a field emission generated radiative zone: Mass spectroscopic measurements. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mitterauer, J.

    1981-10-01

    In view of the application of liquid metal field ion sources as electric thrustors for space propulsion, the basic physical features of the field ionization mechanism were analyzed experimentally. An ultrahigh vacuum test chamber and a liquid metal ion source were built. Diagnostic methods, e.g., basic measurements of the emission characteristics, probe measurements of the ion current distribution, mass spectroscopic measurements of the particles emitted from the ion source, and spectroscopic measurements of the visible radiation accompanying field ionization, were developed. Experimental data which can be transferred to prototype field ion thrusters are presented, but experimental facilities limit conclusions regarding theoretical aspects of field ionization.

  5. How specific Raman spectroscopic models are: a comparative study between different cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Kumar, K. Kalyan; Chowdary, M. V. P.; Maheedhar, K.; Krishna, C. Murali

    2010-02-01

    Optical spectroscopic methods are being contemplated as adjunct/ alternative to existing 'Gold standard' of cancer diagnosis, histopathological examination. Several groups are actively pursuing diagnostic applications of Ramanspectroscopy in cancers. We have developed Raman spectroscopic models for diagnosis of breast, oral, stomach, colon and larynx cancers. So far, specificity and applicability of spectral- models has been limited to particular tissue origin. In this study we have evaluated explicitly of spectroscopic-models by analyzing spectra from already developed spectralmodels representing normal and malignant tissues of breast (46), cervix (52), colon (25), larynx (53), and oral (47). Spectral data was analyzed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) using scores of factor, Mahalanobis distance and Spectral residuals as discriminating parameters. Multiparametric limit test approach was also explored. The preliminary unsupervised PCA of pooled data indicates that normal tissue types were always exclusive from their malignant counterparts. But when we consider tissue of different origin, large overlap among clusters was found. Supervised analysis by Mahalanobis distance and spectral residuals gave similar results. The 'limit test' approach where classification is based on match / mis-match of the given spectrum against all the available spectra has revealed that spectral models are very exclusive and specific. For example breast normal spectral model show matches only with breast normal spectra and mismatch to rest of the spectra. Same pattern was seen for most of spectral models. Therefore, results of the study indicate the exclusiveness and efficacy of Raman spectroscopic-models. Prospectively, these findings might open new application of Raman spectroscopic models in identifying a tumor as primary or metastatic.

  6. Quantitative studies of the optical and UV spectra of Galactic early B supergiants. I. Fundamental parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, S. C.; Prinja, R. K.; Massa, D.; Ryans, R.

    2008-04-01

    Aims: We undertake an optical and ultraviolet spectroscopic analysis of a sample of 20 Galactic B0-B5 supergiants of luminosity classes Ia, Ib, Iab, and II. Fundamental stellar parameters are obtained from optical diagnostics and a critical comparison of the model predictions to observed UV spectral features is made. Methods: Fundamental parameters (e.g., {T_eff}, {log L*}, mass-loss rates and CNO abundances) are derived for individual stars using CMFGEN, a nLTE, line-blanketed model atmosphere code. The impact of these newly derived parameters on the Galactic B supergiant {T_eff} scale, mass discrepancy, and wind-momentum luminosity relation is examined. Results: The B supergiant temperature scale derived here shows a reduction of about 1000-3000 K compared to previous results using unblanketed codes. Mass-loss rate estimates are in good agreement with predicted theoretical values, and all of the 20 B0-B5 supergiants analysed show evidence of CNO processing. A mass discrepancy still exists between spectroscopic and evolutionary masses, with the largest discrepancy occurring at {log (L/L⊙}) 5.4. The observed WLR values calculated for B0-B0.7 supergiants are higher than predicted values, whereas the reverse is true for B1-B5 supergiants. This means that the discrepancy between observed and theoretical values cannot be resolved by adopting clumped (i.e., lower) mass-loss rates as for O stars. The most surprising result is that, although CMFGEN succeeds in reproducing the optical stellar spectrum accurately, it fails to precisely reproduce key UV diagnostics, such as the N V and C IV P Cygni profiles. This problem arises because the models are not ionised enough and fail to reproduce the full extent of the observed absorption trough of the P Cygni profiles. Conclusions: Newly-derived fundamental parameters for early B supergiants are in good agreement with similar work in the field. The most significant discovery, however, is the failure of CMFGEN to predict the

  7. Characterizing the collision of potassium atoms with a siloxane coated glass surface using spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgus, Tyler Christophe

    2001-07-01

    We have developed a series of three experiments to characterize the collisions between potassium atoms and a siloxane coated non-stick surface on a glass substrate. The first experiment looks at the aggregate effect of multiple collisions of the potassium atoms with the surface. The atoms are observed spectroscopically. The spectroscopic information allows for the calculation of the flux, average velocity, and density of the potassium atoms. These quantities are also calculated with a computer model. The parameters of the model are the probability that a potassium atom will stick to the surface during a collision, and the probabilities that the collision is specular or diffuse. The second experiment uses the photo-desorption effect to create a spatially peaked non-equilibrium density distribution. The rate of decay of this distribution is fit with a computer model whose free parameter is proportional to the probability that an atom will stick to the siloxane coated wall during a collision. The third experiment is designed to observe the results of a single collision with a siloxane coated surface. Again, the potassium atoms are observed spectroscopically, the Doppler effect providing velocity resolution. The intensity of the fluorescence is related to the velocity-density distribution. The density is then theoretically modeled using the same simple kernel, accounting for contributions to the density from the potassium source, specular collisions, and diffuse collisions.

  8. Spectral histology of breast tissue using mid-infrared spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pounder, F. Nell; Bhargava, Rohit

    2009-02-01

    Histopathologic recognition is the gold standard in breast cancer diagnoses and is a primary determinant tool for cancer research. Unfortunately, the manual nature of histopathologic recognition leads to low throughput analysis, delays in decision-making and errors. Here, we present an automated means to accurate histologic recognition using mid-infrared molecular spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging is combined with statistical pattern recognition and high throughput sampling to provide automated tissue segmentation into constituent cell types. The method does not need dyes or probes and dispenses with human input. Results demonstrate that the technique is capable of accurate histologic segmentation that can potentially become competitive with that attained by conventional immunohistochemical analyses.

  9. Fiber-optic spectroscopic rotational Raman lidar with visible wavelength fiber Bragg grating for atmospheric temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shichun; Hua, Dengxin; Wang, Yufeng; Gao, Fei; Yan, Qing; Shi, Xiaojing

    2015-03-01

    A fiber-optic spectroscopic rotational Raman lidar is demonstrated with the visible wavelength fiber Bragg grating technique for profiling the atmospheric temperature. Two-channel pure rotational Raman optical signals are extracted from lidar echo signals by two sets of visible wavelength fiber Bragg gratings. The rejection-type of fiber Bragg grating in visible region is successfully fabricated through the zero-order nulled phase mask. Its most significant parameter, out-of-band rejection, for fiber-optic spectroscopic system is tested to ensure the spectral purity of rotational Raman channel. A temperature profile up to a 0.7-km height is obtained by pure rotational Raman lidar with 300-mJ laser pulse energy, and a 250-mm telescope. Preliminary results of observations show that this fiber-optic spectroscopic scheme with high mechanical stability has >70-dB suppression to elastic backscattering in lidar echo signals.

  10. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: single-probe measurements from CMASS anisotropic galaxy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Prada, Francisco; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Beutler, Florian; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Escoffier, Stephanie; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Manera, Marc; Nuza, Sebastián E.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Samushia, Lado; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Wang, Yuting; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Zhao, Gongbo; Brownstein, Joel R.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Maraston, Claudia; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Thomas, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    With the largest spectroscopic galaxy survey volume drawn from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), we can extract cosmological constraints from the measurements of redshift and geometric distortions at quasi-linear scales (e.g. above 50 h-1 Mpc). We analyse the broad-range shape of the monopole and quadrupole correlation functions of the BOSS Data Release 12 (DR12) CMASS galaxy sample, at the effective redshift z = 0.59, to obtain constraints on the Hubble expansion rate H(z), the angular- diameter distance DA(z), the normalized growth rate f(z)σ8(z), and the physical matter density Ωm h2. We obtain robust measurements by including a polynomial as the model for the systematic errors, and find it works very well against the systematic effects, e.g. ones induced by stars and seeing. We provide accurate measurements {DA(0.59)rs,fid/rs, H(0.59)rs/rs,fid, f(0.59)σ8(0.59), Ωm h2} = {1427 ± 26 Mpc, 97.3 ± 3.3 km s-1 Mpc-1, 0.488 ± 0.060, 0.135 ± 0.016}, where rs is the comoving sound horizon at the drag epoch and rs,fid = 147.66 Mpc is the sound scale of the fiducial cosmology used in this study. The parameters which are not well constrained by our galaxy clustering analysis are marginalized over with wide flat priors. Since no priors from other data sets, e.g. cosmic microwave background (CMB), are adopted and no dark energy models are assumed, our results from BOSS CMASS galaxy clustering alone may be combined with other data sets, i.e. CMB, SNe, lensing or other galaxy clustering data to constrain the parameters of a given cosmological model. The uncertainty on the dark energy equation of state parameter, w, from CMB+CMASS is about 8 per cent. The uncertainty on the curvature fraction, Ωk, is 0.3 per cent. We do not find deviation from flat ΛCDM.

  11. Multimodal Spectroscopic Study of Amyloid Fibril Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    VandenAkker, Corianne C; Schleeger, Michael; Bruinen, Anne L; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Velikov, Krassimir P; Heeren, Ron M A; Deckert, Volker; Bonn, Mischa; Koenderink, Gijsje H

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a large class of self-assembled protein aggregates that are formed from unstructured peptides and unfolded proteins. The fibrils are characterized by a universal β-sheet core stabilized by hydrogen bonds, but the molecular structure of the peptide subunits exposed on the fibril surface is variable. Here we show that multimodal spectroscopy using a range of bulk- and surface-sensitive techniques provides a powerful way to dissect variations in the molecular structure of polymorphic amyloid fibrils. As a model system, we use fibrils formed by the milk protein β-lactoglobulin, whose morphology can be tuned by varying the protein concentration during formation. We investigate the differences in the molecular structure and composition between long, straight fibrils versus short, wormlike fibrils. We show using mass spectrometry that the peptide composition of the two fibril types is similar. The overall molecular structure of the fibrils probed with various bulk-sensitive spectroscopic techniques shows a dominant contribution of the β-sheet core but no difference in structure between straight and wormlike fibrils. However, when probing specifically the surface of the fibrils with nanometer resolution using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS), we find that both fibril types exhibit a heterogeneous surface structure with mainly unordered or α-helical structures and that the surface of long, straight fibrils contains markedly more β-sheet structure than the surface of short, wormlike fibrils. This finding is consistent with previous surface-specific vibrational sum-frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopic results ( VandenAkker et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. , 2011 , 133 , 18030 - 18033 , DOI: 10.1021/ja206513r ). In conclusion, only advanced vibrational spectroscopic techniques sensitive to surface structure such as TERS and VSFG are able to reveal the difference in structure that underlies the distinct morphology and rigidity of different amyloid

  12. Enhancing forensic science with spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Camilla; Kazarian, Sergei G.

    2006-09-01

    This presentation outlines the research we are developing in the area of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging with the focus on materials of forensic interest. FTIR spectroscopic imaging has recently emerged as a powerful tool for characterisation of heterogeneous materials. FTIR imaging relies on the ability of the military-developed infrared array detector to simultaneously measure spectra from thousands of different locations in a sample. Recently developed application of FTIR imaging using an ATR (Attenuated Total Reflection) mode has demonstrated the ability of this method to achieve spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit of infrared light in air. Chemical visualisation with enhanced spatial resolution in micro-ATR mode broadens the range of materials studied with FTIR imaging with applications to pharmaceutical formulations or biological samples. Macro-ATR imaging has also been developed for chemical imaging analysis of large surface area samples and was applied to analyse the surface of human skin (e.g. finger), counterfeit tablets, textile materials (clothing), etc. This approach demonstrated the ability of this imaging method to detect trace materials attached to the surface of the skin. This may also prove as a valuable tool in detection of traces of explosives left or trapped on the surfaces of different materials. This FTIR imaging method is substantially superior to many of the other imaging methods due to inherent chemical specificity of infrared spectroscopy and fast acquisition times of this technique. Our preliminary data demonstrated that this methodology will provide the means to non-destructive detection method that could relate evidence to its source. This will be important in a wider crime prevention programme. In summary, intrinsic chemical specificity and enhanced visualising capability of FTIR spectroscopic imaging open a window of opportunities for counter-terrorism and crime-fighting, with applications ranging

  13. Are your Spectroscopic Data Being Used?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Iouli E.; Rothman, Laurence S.; Wilzewski, Jonas

    2014-06-01

    Spectroscopy is an established and indispensable tool in science, industry, agriculture, medicine, surveillance, etc.. The potential user of spectral data, which is not available in HITRAN or other databases, searches the spectroscopy publications. After finding the desired publication, the user very often encounters the following problems: 1) They cannot find the data described in the paper. There can be many reasons for this: nothing is provided in the paper itself or supplementary material; the authors are not responding to any requests; the web links provided in the paper have long been broken; etc. 2) The data is presented in a reduced form, for instance through the fitted spectroscopic constants. While this is a long-standing practice among spectroscopists, there are numerous serious problems with this practice, such as users getting different energy and intensity values because of different representations of the solution to the Hamiltonian, or even just despairing of trying to generate usable line lists from the published constants. Properly providing the data benefits not only users but also the authors of the spectroscopic research. We will show that this increases citations to the spectroscopy papers and visibility of the research groups. We will also address the quite common issue when researchers obtain the data, but do not feel that they have time, interest or resources to write an article describing it. There are modern tools that would allow one to make these data available to potential users and still get credit for it. However, this is a worst case scenario recommendation, i.e., publishing the data in a peer-reviewed journal is still the preferred way. L. S. Rothman, I. E. Gordon, et al. "The HITRAN 2012 molecular spectroscopic database," JQSRT 113, 4-50 (2013).

  14. PRIMitive Asteroids Spectroscopic Survey - PRIMASS: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leon, Julia; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Campins, Humberto; Lorenzi, Vania; Licandro, Javier; Morate, David; Tanga, Paolo; Cellino, Alberto; Delbo, Marco

    2015-11-01

    NASA OSIRIS-REx and JAXA Hayabusa 2 sample-return missions have targeted two near-Earth asteroids: (101955) Bennu and (162173) 1999 JU3, respectively. These are primitive asteroids that are believed to originate in the inner belt, where five distinct sources have been identified: four primitive collisional families (Polana, Erigone, Sulamitis, and Clarissa), and a population of low-albedo and low-inclination background asteroids. Identifying and characterizing the populations from which these two NEAs might originate will enchance the science return of the two missions.With this main objective in mind, we initiated in 2010 a spectroscopic survey in the visible and the near-infrared to characterize the primitive collisional families in the inner belt and the low-albedo background population. This is the PRIMitive Asteroids Spectroscopic Survey - PRIMASS. So far we have obtained more than 200 spectra using telescopes located at different observatories. PRIMASS uses a variety of ground based facilities. Most of the spectra have been obtained using the 10.4m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), and the 3.6m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG), both located at the El Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (La Palma, Spain), and the 3.0m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea (Hawai, USA).We present the first results from our on-going survey (de Leon et al. 2015; Pinilla-Alonso et al. 2015; Morate et al. 2015), focused on the Polana and the Erigone primitive families, with visible and near-infrared spectra of more than 200 objects, most of them with no previous spectroscopic data. Our survey is already the largest database of primitive asteroids spectra, and we keep obtaining data on the Sulamitis and the Clarissa families, as well as on the background low-albedo population.

  15. On estimating the background of remote sensing gamma-ray spectroscopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Meng-Hua

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we considered the inverse count accumulation process of gamma-ray spectrum and derived an iterative filtering method to estimate the background of noisy spectroscopic data for the remote sensing observations of planetary surface. Compared with the SNIP method, the proposed method avoids the calculation of the average FWHM of the whole spectrum or the peak regions, which is an important parameter for the SNIP method. The synthetic and experimental spectra are used to validate the derived method. The results show that the proposed method can estimate the background efficiently, especially for the spectroscopic data with Compton continuum. In addition, by combining the proposed method and the SNIP method, the average FWHM can be determined easily, which can be used to validate the characteristics of detector.

  16. Spectroscopic studies of the molecular parentage of radical species in cometary comae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Benjamin; Pierce, Donna; Cochran, Anita

    2015-11-01

    We have observed several comets using an integral-field unit spectrograph (the George and Cynthia Mitchell Spectrograph) on the 2.7m Harlan J. Smith telescope at McDonald Observatory. Full-coma spectroscopic images were obtained for various radical species (C2, C3, CH, CN, NH2). By constructing azimuthal average profiles from the full-coma spectroscopic images we can test Haser model parameters with our observations. The Haser model was used to determine production rates and possible parent lifetimes that would be consistent with the model. By iterating through a large range of possible parents lifetimes, we can see what range of values in which the Haser model is consistent with observations. Also, this type of analysis gives us perspective on how sensitive the model's fit quality is to changes in parent lifetimes. Here, we present the work completed to date, and we compare our results to other comet taxonomic surveys.

  17. The LAMOST Complete Spectroscopic Survey of Pointing Area at Southern Galactic Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hong; Yang, Ming; Lam, Man I.; Yang, Fan; Wu, Chao-Jian; Cao, Tian-Wen

    2016-08-01

    The LAMOST Complete Spectroscopic Survey of Pointing Area (LCSSPA) at Southern Galactic Cap (SGC), is one of the LAMOST Key Project, designed to complete the spectroscopic observations of all Galactic and extra-galactic sources in two selected fields of 20 degrees2 at SGC, with the limiting magnitude of r = 18.1 mag. The main purposes of the project are focused on the completeness of the LAMOST ExtraGAlactic Surveys (LEGAS), testing the selection methods of galaxies and stars, and obtaining the basic performance parameters of the LAMOST telescope. Meanwhile the scientific studies include galaxies, clusters of galaxies, variable sources (quasars and variable stars), infrared excess stars and luminous infrared galaxies. The project has considerable scientific value since it is the most complete spectral data in LEGAS up to now. The project completed its observation in the early of 2014, and obtained at least 5000 spectra of galaxies and 25000 spectra of stars.

  18. The spectroscopic search for the trace aerosols in the planetary atmospheres - the results of numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecka, Maria I.

    2010-05-01

    The passive remote spectrometric methods are important in examinations the atmospheres of planets. The radiance spectra inform us about values of thermodynamical parameters and composition of the atmospheres and surfaces. The spectral technology can be useful in detection of the trace aerosols like biological substances (if present) in the environments of the planets. We discuss here some of the aspects related to the spectroscopic search for the aerosols and dust in planetary atmospheres. Possibility of detection and identifications of biological aerosols with a passive InfraRed spectrometer in an open-air environment is discussed. We present numerically simulated, based on radiative transfer theory, spectroscopic observations of the Earth atmosphere. Laboratory measurements of transmittance of various kinds of aerosols, pollens and bacterias were used in modeling.

  19. Spectroscopic and thermal characterizations of Yb:LaF3 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jiaqi; Zhang, Lianhan; Hang, Yin; Xu, Min

    2016-10-01

    A Yb3+ doped LaF3 laser crystal was detailed investigated by both spectroscopic and thermal measurements. A peak absorption at 974 nm with FWHM broader than 60 nm makes the crystal suitable to InGaAs LDs. Fluorescence spectrum and calculated spectroscopic parameters show potential of Yb:LaF3 crystal to laser operations around 1009 nm. A relatively long fluorescence lifetime of 2.92 ms was detected for Yb3+:2F5/2 manifold. The thermal diffusivity and specific heat capacity in the range of 300-575 K were studied to calculate the thermal conductivity of Yb:LaF3. The results indicate that the Yb:LaF3 crystal is a good candidate for diode-pumped ∼1 μm solid-state laser applications.

  20. 77 FR 3800 - Accurate NDE & Inspection, LLC; Confirmatory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... COMMISSION Accurate NDE & Inspection, LLC; Confirmatory Order In the Matter of Accurate NDE & Docket: 150... request ADR with the NRC in an attempt to resolve issues associated with this matter. In response, on August 9, 2011, Accurate NDE requested ADR to resolve this matter with the NRC. On September 28,...

  1. Calculation of electromagnetic parameter based on interpolation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenqiang; Yuan, Liming; Zhang, Deyuan

    2015-11-01

    Wave-absorbing material is an important functional material of electromagnetic protection. The wave-absorbing characteristics depend on the electromagnetic parameter of mixed media. In order to accurately predict the electromagnetic parameter of mixed media and facilitate the design of wave-absorbing material, based on the electromagnetic parameters of spherical and flaky carbonyl iron mixture of paraffin base, this paper studied two different interpolation methods: Lagrange interpolation and Hermite interpolation of electromagnetic parameters. The results showed that Hermite interpolation is more accurate than the Lagrange interpolation, and the reflectance calculated with the electromagnetic parameter obtained by interpolation is consistent with that obtained through experiment on the whole.

  2. The Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Asplund, M.; Binney, J.; Bonifacio, P.; Drew, J.; Feltzing, S.; Ferguson, A.; Jeffries, R.; Micela, G.; Negueruela, I.; Prusti, T.; Rix, H.-W.; Vallenari, A.; Alfaro, E.; Allende-Prieto, C.; Babusiaux, C.; Bensby, T.; Blomme, R.; Bragaglia, A.; Flaccomio, E.; François, P.; Irwin, M.; Koposov, S.; Korn, A.; Lanzafame, A.; Pancino, E.; Paunzen, E.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Sacco, G.; Smiljanic, R.; Van Eck, S.; Walton, N.; Aden, D.; Aerts, C.; Affer, L.; Alcala, J.-M.; Altavilla, G.; Alves, J.; Antoja, T.; Arenou, F.; Argiroffi, C.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Bailer-Jones, C.; Balaguer-Nunez, L.; Bayo, A.; Barbuy, B.; Barisevicius, G.; Barrado y Navascues, D.; Battistini, C.; Bellas Velidis, I.; Bellazzini, M.; Belokurov, V.; Bergemann, M.; Bertelli, G.; Biazzo, K.; Bienayme, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Bonito, S.; Boudreault, S.; Bouvier, J.; Brandao, I.; Brown, A.; de Bruijne, J.; Burleigh, M.; Caballero, J.; Caffau, E.; Calura, F.; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R.; Caramazza, M.; Carraro, G.; Casagrande, L.; Casewell, S.; Chapman, S.; Chiappini, C.; Chorniy, Y.; Christlieb, N.; Cignoni, M.; Cocozza, G.; Colless, M.; Collet, R.; Collins, M.; Correnti, M.; Covino, E.; Crnojevic, D.; Cropper, M.; Cunha, M.; Damiani, F.; David, M.; Delgado, A.; Duffau, S.; Edvardsson, B.; Eldridge, J.; Enke, H.; Eriksson, K.; Evans, N. W.; Eyer, L.; Famaey, B.; Fellhauer, M.; Ferreras, I.; Figueras, F.; Fiorentino, G.; Flynn, C.; Folha, D.; Franciosini, E.; Frasca, A.; Freeman, K.; Fremat, Y.; Friel, E.; Gaensicke, B.; Gameiro, J.; Garzon, F.; Geier, S.; Geisler, D.; Gerhard, O.; Gibson, B.; Gomboc, A.; Gomez, A.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, C.; Gonzalez Hernandez, J.; Gosset, E.; Grebel, E.; Greimel, R.; Groenewegen, M.; Grundahl, F.; Guarcello, M.; Gustafsson, B.; Hadrava, P.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Hambly, N.; Hammersley, P.; Hansen, C.; Haywood, M.; Heber, U.; Heiter, U.; Held, E.; Helmi, A.; Hensler, G.; Herrero, A.; Hill, V.; Hodgkin, S.; Huelamo, N.; Huxor, A.; Ibata, R.; Jackson, R.; de Jong, R.; Jonker, P.; Jordan, S.; Jordi, C.; Jorissen, A.; Katz, D.; Kawata, D.; Keller, S.; Kharchenko, N.; Klement, R.; Klutsch, A.; Knude, J.; Koch, A.; Kochukhov, O.; Kontizas, M.; Koubsky, P.; Lallement, R.; de Laverny, P.; van Leeuwen, F.; Lemasle, B.; Lewis, G.; Lind, K.; Lindstrom, H. P. E.; Lobel, A.; Lopez Santiago, J.; Lucas, P.; Ludwig, H.; Lueftinger, T.; Magrini, L.; Maiz Apellaniz, J.; Maldonado, J.; Marconi, G.; Marino, A.; Martayan, C.; Martinez-Valpuesta, I.; Matijevic, G.; McMahon, R.; Messina, S.; Meyer, M.; Miglio, A.; Mikolaitis, S.; Minchev, I.; Minniti, D.; Moitinho, A.; Momany, Y.; Monaco, L.; Montalto, M.; Monteiro, M. J.; Monier, R.; Montes, D.; Mora, A.; Moraux, E.; Morel, T.; Mowlavi, N.; Mucciarelli, A.; Munari, U.; Napiwotzki, R.; Nardetto, N.; Naylor, T.; Naze, Y.; Nelemans, G.; Okamoto, S.; Ortolani, S.; Pace, G.; Palla, F.; Palous, J.; Parker, R.; Penarrubia, J.; Pillitteri, I.; Piotto, G.; Posbic, H.; Prisinzano, L.; Puzeras, E.; Quirrenbach, A.; Ragaini, S.; Read, J.; Read, M.; Reyle, C.; De Ridder, J.; Robichon, N.; Robin, A.; Roeser, S.; Romano, D.; Royer, F.; Ruchti, G.; Ruzicka, A.; Ryan, S.; Ryde, N.; Santos, N.; Sanz Forcada, J.; Sarro Baro, L. M.; Sbordone, L.; Schilbach, E.; Schmeja, S.; Schnurr, O.; Schoenrich, R.; Scholz, R.-D.; Seabroke, G.; Sharma, S.; De Silva, G.; Smith, M.; Solano, E.; Sordo, R.; Soubiran, C.; Sousa, S.; Spagna, A.; Steffen, M.; Steinmetz, M.; Stelzer, B.; Stempels, E.; Tabernero, H.; Tautvaisiene, G.; Thevenin, F.; Torra, J.; Tosi, M.; Tolstoy, E.; Turon, C.; Walker, M.; Wambsganss, J.; Worley, C.; Venn, K.; Vink, J.; Wyse, R.; Zaggia, S.; Zeilinger, W.; Zoccali, M.; Zorec, J.; Zucker, D.; Zwitter, T.; Gaia-ESO Survey Team

    2012-03-01

    The Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey has begun and will obtain high quality spectroscopy of some 100000 Milky Way stars, in the field and in open clusters, down to magnitude 19, systematically covering all the major components of the Milky Way. This survey will provide the first homogeneous overview of the distributions of kinematics and chemical element abundances in the Galaxy. The motivation, organisation and implementation of the Gaia-ESO Survey are described, emphasising the complementarity with the ESA Gaia mission. Spectra from the very first observing run of the survey are presented.

  3. Air pollution monitoring by advanced spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Hodgeson, J A; McClenny, W A; Hanst, P L

    1973-10-19

    The monitoring requirements related to air pollution are many and varied. The molecules of concern differ greatly in their chemical and physical properties, in the nature of their environment, and in their concentration ranges. Furthermore, the application may have specific requirements such as rapid response time, ultrasensitivity, multipollutant capability, or capability for remote measurements. For these reasons, no single spectroscopic technique appears to offer a panacea for all monitoring needs. Instead we have attempted to demonstrate in the above discussion that, regardless of the difficulty and complexity of the monitoring problems, spectroscopy offers many tools by which such problems may be solved.

  4. Asiago spectroscopic observation of four transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochner, P.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Pastorello, A.; Tartaglia, L.; Terreran, G.; Tomasella, L.; Turatto, M.

    2015-08-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic classification of PSN J23164332+3359476 in UGC 12474, discovered by C. Emmanouilidi; PS15bom in SDSS J232637.06-001723.0, discovered by the PS1 Science Consortium (Atel #7864); PSN J02484234+1418454 in UGC 2282, discovered by S. Leonini, M. Conti, P. Rosi, L.M. Tinjaca Ramirez and G. Guerrini of the Italian Supernovae Search Project (ISSP); and ASASSN-15mr, discovered by the All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN; ATel #7811).

  5. Vibrational spectroscopic study of fluticasone propionate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, H. R. H.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Kendrick, J.; Scowen, I. J.

    2009-03-01

    Fluticasone propionate is a synthetic glucocorticoid with potent anti-inflammatory activity that has been used effectively in the treatment of chronic asthma. The present work reports a vibrational spectroscopic study of fluticasone propionate and gives proposed molecular assignments on the basis of ab initio calculations using BLYP density functional theory with a 6-31G* basis set and vibrational frequencies predicted within the quasi-harmonic approximation. Several spectral features and band intensities are explained. This study generated a library of information that can be employed to aid the process monitoring of fluticasone propionate.

  6. The Spectroscopic study of {sup 33}Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Adimi, N.; Dominguez-Reyes, R.; Alcorta, M.; Borge, M. J. G.; Perea, A.; Tengblad, O.; Bey, A.; Blank, B.; Dossat, C.; Giovinazzo, J.; Matea, I.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Knudsen, H. H.; Suemmerer, K.

    2011-10-28

    The proton-rich nucleus {sup 33}Ar has been produced at the low-energy facility SPIRAL at GANIL. Spectroscopic studies of gamma and p emission of this nucleus were performed with the 'Silicon Cube' detection system. The analysis of proton and gamma singles and coincidence spectra allowed us to establish a complete decay scheme of this nucleus. The comparison of the Gamow-Teller strength distribution deduced from our experiment and the theoretical one obtained with the Shell Model permitted the determination of a quenching factor for the Gamow-Teller strength.

  7. Calculation of equilibrium constants from multiwavelength spectroscopic data--II: SPECFIT: two user-friendly programs in basic and standard FORTRAN 77.

    PubMed

    Gampp, H; Maeder, M; Meyer, C J; Zuberbühler, A D

    1985-04-01

    A new program (SPECFIT), written in HP BASIC or FORTRAN 77, for the calculation of stability constants from spectroscopic data, is presented. Stability constants have been successfully calculated from multiwavelength spectrophotometric and EPR data, but the program can be equally well applied to the numerical treatment of other spectroscopic measurements. The special features included in SPECFIT to improve convergence, increase numerical reliability, and minimize memory as well as computing time requirements, include (i) elimination of the linear parameters (i.e., molar absorptivities), (ii) the use of analytical instead of numerical derivatives and (iii) factor analysis. Calculation of stability constants from spectroscopic data is then as straightforward as from potentiometric titration curves and gives results of analogous reproducibility. The spectroscopic method has proved, however, to be superior in discrimination between chemical models.

  8. IR spectroscopic analysis of the new organic silver complex C13H13N4OAg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kabbany, F.; Taha, S.; Hafez, M.

    2013-07-01

    IR analysis in the frequency range 400-4000 cm-1 is used here to investigate the changes in different modes of thermally treated new metal complex (diphenyl carbazide silver complex DPCAg, C13H13N4OAg) during the glass transition at 91 °C and the high temperature phase transition at 167 °C. These two phase transitions in this new metal compound are studied here by detecting the changes in some IR spectroscopic parameters (e.g., mode shift, band contour, peak height and peak intensity) during the elevation of temperature. All of the vibrations of DPCAg were found to be due to ionic fundamentals 3311 cm-1, 3097 cm-1, 3052 cm-1, 1677 cm-1, 1602 cm-1, 1492 cm-1, 1306 cm-1, 1252 cm-1, 887 cm-1 and 755 cm-1. The results obtained can be considered as the first spectroscopic analysis of this new metal complex. These results strongly confirmed that the thermally treated DPCAg transverse a glass transition at 91 °C and a high temperature phase transition at 167 °C. Anomalous spectroscopic changes near the glass transition temperature Tg could be recorded. A temperature dependence of peak intensity of the two modes 810 cm-1 and 3440 cm-1 could be observed beyond Tg. Also, the high temperature phase modification at 167 °C showed anomalous change in the spectroscopic parameters before and after the phase transition process. A proposed silver position in the new silver complex DPCAg has been presented.

  9. New Teff and [Fe/H] spectroscopic calibration for FGK dwarfs and GK giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, G. D. C.; Sousa, S. G.; Tsantaki, M.; Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.; Santos, N. C.; Israelian, G.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The ever-growing number of large spectroscopic survey programs has increased the importance of fast and reliable methods with which to determine precise stellar parameters. Some of these methods are highly dependent on correct spectroscopic calibrations. Aims: The goal of this work is to obtain a new spectroscopic calibration for a fast estimate of Teff and [Fe/H] for a wide range of stellar spectral types. Methods: We used spectra from a joint sample of 708 stars, compiled from 451 FGK dwarfs and 257 GK-giant stars. We used homogeneously determined spectroscopic stellar parameters to derive temperature calibrations using a set of selected EW line-ratios, and [Fe/H] calibrations using a set of selected Fe I lines. Results: We have derived 322 EW line-ratios and 100 Fe I lines that can be used to compute Teff and [Fe/H], respectively. We show that these calibrations are effective for FGK dwarfs and GK-giant stars in the following ranges: 4500 K

  10. Interstellar Medium, Young Stars, and Astrometric Binaries in Galactic Archaeology Spectroscopic Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwitter, T.; Kos, J.; Žerjal, M.; Traven, G.

    2016-10-01

    Current ongoing stellar spectroscopic surveys (RAVE, GALAH, Gaia-ESO, LAMOST, APOGEE, Gaia) are mostly devoted to studying Galactic archaeology and the structure of the Galaxy. But they allow also for important auxiliary science: (i) the Galactic interstellar medium can be studied in four dimensions (position in space plus radial velocity) through weak but numerous diffuse interstellar bands and atomic absorptions seen in spectra of background stars, (ii) emission spectra which are quite frequent even in field stars can serve as a good indicator of their youth, pointing e.g. to stars recently ejected from young stellar environments, (iii) an astrometric solution of the photocenter of a binary to be obtained by Gaia can yield accurate masses when joined by spectroscopic information obtained serendipitously during a survey. These points are illustrated by first results from the first three surveys mentioned above. These hint at the near future: spectroscopic studies of the dynamics of the interstellar medium can identify and quantify Galactic fountains which may sustain star formation in the disk by entraining fresh gas from the halo; RAVE already provided a list of ˜ 14,000 field stars with chromospheric emission in Ca II lines, to be supplemented by many more observations by Gaia in the same band, and by GALAH and Gaia-ESO observations of Balmer lines; several millions of astrometric binaries with periods up to a few years which are being observed by Gaia can yield accurate masses when supplemented with measurements from only a few high-quality ground based spectra.

  11. Robot arm geometric link parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayati, S. A.

    A general method for estimating serial link manipulator geometric parameter errors is proposed in this paper. The positioning accuracy of the end-effector may be increased significantly by updating the nominal link parameters in the control software to represent the physical system more accurately. The proposed method is applicable for serial link manipulators with any combination of revolute or prismatic joints, and is not limited to a specific measurement technique.

  12. Distillation tray structural parameter study: Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, J. Ronald

    1991-01-01

    The purpose here is to identify the structural parameters (plate thickness, liquid level, beam size, number of beams, tray diameter, etc.) that affect the structural integrity of distillation trays in distillation columns. Once the sensitivity of the trays' dynamic response to these parameters has been established, the designer will be able to use this information to prepare more accurate specifications for the construction of new trays. Information is given on both static and dynamic analysis, modal response, and tray failure details.

  13. Factors affecting the accurate determination of cerebrovascular blood flow using high-speed droplet imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudin, Stephen; Divani, Afshin; Wakhloo, Ajay K.; Lieber, Baruch B.; Granger, William; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Yang, Chang-Ying J.

    1998-07-01

    Detailed cerebrovascular blood flow can be more accurately determined radiographically from the new droplet tracking method previously introduced by the authors than from standard soluble contrast techniques. For example, arteriovenous malformation (AVM) transit times which are crucial for proper glue embolization treatments, were shown to be about half when using droplets compared to those measured using soluble contrast techniques. In this work, factors such as x-ray pulse duration, frame rate, system spatial resolution (focal spot size), droplet size, droplet and system contrast parameters, and system noise are considered in relation to their affect on the accurate determination of droplet location and velocity.

  14. Method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    DOEpatents

    Chalmers, S.A.; Killeen, K.P.; Lear, K.L.

    1995-03-14

    The authors report a method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The method uses a single reflectivity spectrum measurement to determine the structure of the partially completed VCSEL at a critical point of growth. This information, along with the extracted growth rates, allows imprecisions in growth parameters to be compensated for during growth of the remaining structure, which can then be completed with very accurate critical dimensions. Using this method, they can now routinely grow lasing VCSELs with Fabry-Perot cavity resonance wavelengths controlled to within 0.5%. 4 figs.

  15. Method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    DOEpatents

    Chalmers, Scott A.; Killeen, Kevin P.; Lear, Kevin L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The method uses a single reflectivity spectrum measurement to determine the structure of the partially completed VCSEL at a critical point of growth. This information, along with the extracted growth rates, allows imprecisions in growth parameters to be compensated for during growth of the remaining structure, which can then be completed with very accurate critical dimensions. Using this method, we can now routinely grow lasing VCSELs with Fabry-Perot cavity resonance wavelengths controlled to within 0.5%.

  16. Toward accurate and fast iris segmentation for iris biometrics.

    PubMed

    He, Zhaofeng; Tan, Tieniu; Sun, Zhenan; Qiu, Xianchao

    2009-09-01

    Iris segmentation is an essential module in iris recognition because it defines the effective image region used for subsequent processing such as feature extraction. Traditional iris segmentation methods often involve an exhaustive search of a large parameter space, which is time consuming and sensitive to noise. To address these problems, this paper presents a novel algorithm for accurate and fast iris segmentation. After efficient reflection removal, an Adaboost-cascade iris detector is first built to extract a rough position of the iris center. Edge points of iris boundaries are then detected, and an elastic model named pulling and pushing is established. Under this model, the center and radius of the circular iris boundaries are iteratively refined in a way driven by the restoring forces of Hooke's law. Furthermore, a smoothing spline-based edge fitting scheme is presented to deal with noncircular iris boundaries. After that, eyelids are localized via edge detection followed by curve fitting. The novelty here is the adoption of a rank filter for noise elimination and a histogram filter for tackling the shape irregularity of eyelids. Finally, eyelashes and shadows are detected via a learned prediction model. This model provides an adaptive threshold for eyelash and shadow detection by analyzing the intensity distributions of different iris regions. Experimental results on three challenging iris image databases demonstrate that the proposed algorithm outperforms state-of-the-art methods in both accuracy and speed. PMID:19574626

  17. Toward accurate and fast iris segmentation for iris biometrics.

    PubMed

    He, Zhaofeng; Tan, Tieniu; Sun, Zhenan; Qiu, Xianchao

    2009-09-01

    Iris segmentation is an essential module in iris recognition because it defines the effective image region used for subsequent processing such as feature extraction. Traditional iris segmentation methods often involve an exhaustive search of a large parameter space, which is time consuming and sensitive to noise. To address these problems, this paper presents a novel algorithm for accurate and fast iris segmentation. After efficient reflection removal, an Adaboost-cascade iris detector is first built to extract a rough position of the iris center. Edge points of iris boundaries are then detected, and an elastic model named pulling and pushing is established. Under this model, the center and radius of the circular iris boundaries are iteratively refined in a way driven by the restoring forces of Hooke's law. Furthermore, a smoothing spline-based edge fitting scheme is presented to deal with noncircular iris boundaries. After that, eyelids are localized via edge detection followed by curve fitting. The novelty here is the adoption of a rank filter for noise elimination and a histogram filter for tackling the shape irregularity of eyelids. Finally, eyelashes and shadows are detected via a learned prediction model. This model provides an adaptive threshold for eyelash and shadow detection by analyzing the intensity distributions of different iris regions. Experimental results on three challenging iris image databases demonstrate that the proposed algorithm outperforms state-of-the-art methods in both accuracy and speed.

  18. Control Strategies for Accurate Force Generation and Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka, Chiaki; Fujiwara, Motoko

    2016-10-01

    Characteristics and motor strategies for force generation and force relaxation were examined using graded tasks during isometric force control. Ten female college students (M age = 20.2 yr., SD = 1.1) were instructed to accurately control the force of isometric elbow flexion using their right arm to match a target force level as quickly as possible. They performed: (1) a generation task, wherein they increased their force from 0% maximum voluntary force to 20% maximum voluntary force (0%-20%), 40% maximum voluntary force (0%-40%), or 60% maximum voluntary force (0%-60%) and (2) and a relaxation task, in which they decreased their force from 60% maximum voluntary force to 40% maximum voluntary force (60%-40%), 20% maximum voluntary force (60%-20%), or to 0% maximum voluntary force (60%-0%). Produced force parameters of point of accuracy (force level, error), quickness (reaction time, adjustment time, rate of force development), and strategy (force wave, rate of force development) were analyzed. Errors of force relaxation were all greater, and reaction times shorter, than those of force generation. Adjustment time depended on the magnitude of force and peak rates of force development and force relaxation differed. Controlled relaxation of force is more difficult with low magnitude of force control.

  19. Control Strategies for Accurate Force Generation and Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka, Chiaki; Fujiwara, Motoko

    2016-10-01

    Characteristics and motor strategies for force generation and force relaxation were examined using graded tasks during isometric force control. Ten female college students (M age = 20.2 yr., SD = 1.1) were instructed to accurately control the force of isometric elbow flexion using their right arm to match a target force level as quickly as possible. They performed: (1) a generation task, wherein they increased their force from 0% maximum voluntary force to 20% maximum voluntary force (0%-20%), 40% maximum voluntary force (0%-40%), or 60% maximum voluntary force (0%-60%) and (2) and a relaxation task, in which they decreased their force from 60% maximum voluntary force to 40% maximum voluntary force (60%-40%), 20% maximum voluntary force (60%-20%), or to 0% maximum voluntary force (60%-0%). Produced force parameters of point of accuracy (force level, error), quickness (reaction time, adjustment time, rate of force development), and strategy (force wave, rate of force development) were analyzed. Errors of force relaxation were all greater, and reaction times shorter, than those of force generation. Adjustment time depended on the magnitude of force and peak rates of force development and force relaxation differed. Controlled relaxation of force is more difficult with low magnitude of force control. PMID:27555365

  20. Accurate ionization potential of semiconductors from efficient density functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Lin-Hui

    2016-07-01

    Despite its huge successes in total-energy-related applications, the Kohn-Sham scheme of density functional theory cannot get reliable single-particle excitation energies for solids. In particular, it has not been able to calculate the ionization potential (IP), one of the most important material parameters, for semiconductors. We illustrate that an approximate exact-exchange optimized effective potential (EXX-OEP), the Becke-Johnson exchange, can be used to largely solve this long-standing problem. For a group of 17 semiconductors, we have obtained the IPs to an accuracy similar to that of the much more sophisticated G W approximation (GWA), with the computational cost of only local-density approximation/generalized gradient approximation. The EXX-OEP, therefore, is likely as useful for solids as for finite systems. For solid surfaces, the asymptotic behavior of the vx c has effects similar to those of finite systems which, when neglected, typically cause the semiconductor IPs to be underestimated. This may partially explain why standard GWA systematically underestimates the IPs and why using the same GWA procedures has not been able to get an accurate IP and band gap at the same time.

  1. HOW ACCURATE IS OUR KNOWLEDGE OF THE GALAXY BIAS?

    SciTech Connect

    More, Surhud

    2011-11-01

    Observations of the clustering of galaxies can provide useful information about the distribution of dark matter in the universe. In order to extract accurate cosmological parameters from galaxy surveys, it is important to understand how the distribution of galaxies is biased with respect to the matter distribution. The large-scale bias of galaxies can be quantified either by directly measuring the large-scale ({lambda} {approx}> 60 h{sup -1} Mpc) power spectrum of galaxies or by modeling the halo occupation distribution of galaxies using their clustering on small scales ({lambda} {approx}< 30 h{sup -1} Mpc). We compare the luminosity dependence of the galaxy bias (both the shape and the normalization) obtained by these methods and check for consistency. Our comparison reveals that the bias of galaxies obtained by the small-scale clustering measurements is systematically larger than that obtained from the large-scale power spectrum methods. We also find systematic discrepancies in the shape of the galaxy-bias-luminosity relation. We comment on the origin and possible consequences of these discrepancies which had remained unnoticed thus far.

  2. Linking vegetation structure, function and physiology through spectroscopic remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbin, S.; Singh, A.; Couture, J. J.; Shiklomanov, A. N.; Rogers, A.; Desai, A. R.; Kruger, E. L.; Townsend, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystem process models require detailed information on ecosystem states and canopy properties to properly simulate the fluxes of carbon (C), water and energy from the land to the atmosphere and assess the vulnerability of ecosystems to perturbations. Current models fail to adequately capture the magnitude, spatial variation, and seasonality of terrestrial C uptake and storage, leading to significant uncertainties in the size and fate of the terrestrial C sink. By and large, these parameter and process uncertainties arise from inadequate spatial and temporal representation of plant traits, vegetation structure, and functioning. With increases in computational power and changes to model architecture and approaches, it is now possible for models to leverage detailed, data rich and spatially explicit descriptions of ecosystems to inform parameter distributions and trait tradeoffs. In this regard, spectroscopy and imaging spectroscopy data have been shown to be invaluable observational datasets to capture broad-scale spatial and, eventually, temporal dynamics in important vegetation properties. We illustrate the linkage of plant traits and spectral observations to supply key data constraints for model parameterization. These constraints can come either in the form of the raw spectroscopic data (reflectance, absorbtance) or physiological traits derived from spectroscopy. In this presentation we highlight our ongoing work to build ecological scaling relationships between critical vegetation characteristics and optical properties across diverse and complex canopies, including temperate broadleaf and conifer forests, Mediterranean vegetation, Arctic systems, and agriculture. We focus on work at the leaf, stand, and landscape scales, illustrating the importance of capturing the underlying variability in a range of parameters (including vertical variation within canopies) to enable more efficient scaling of traits related to functional diversity of ecosystems.

  3. Theoretical spectroscopic investigations of HNS{sup q} and HSN{sup q} (q = 0, +1, −1) in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Yaghlane, S. E-mail: saidayagh@gmail.com; Jaidane, N.-E.; Cotton, C. E.; Francisco, J. S.; Al Mogren, M. M.; Linguerri, R. E-mail: saidayagh@gmail.com; Hochlaf, M.

    2014-06-28

    We performed accurate ab initio investigations of the geometric parameters and the vibrational structure of neutral HNS/HSN triatomics and their singly charged anions and cations. We used standard and explicitly correlated coupled cluster approaches in connection with large basis sets. At the highest levels of description, we show that results nicely approach those obtained at the complete basis set limit. Moreover, we generated the three-dimensional potential energy surfaces (3D PESs) for these molecular entities at the coupled cluster level with singles and doubles and a perturbative treatment of triple excitations, along with a basis set of augmented quintuple-zeta quality (aug-cc-pV5Z). A full set of spectroscopic constants are deduced from these potentials by applying perturbation theory. In addition, these 3D PESs are incorporated into variational treatment of the nuclear motions. The pattern of the lowest vibrational levels and corresponding wavefunctions, up to around 4000 cm{sup −1} above the corresponding potential energy minimum, is presented for the first time.

  4. The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer: Science and Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, A.; McConnachie, A.; MSE Team

    2016-10-01

    MSE is a project to replace the current 3.6 m CFHT with a 10 m class, segmented, wide-field telescope that will feed a dedicated suite of multi-object spectrographs, operating at resolutions from R˜2000 to R>20000, and obtaining >3000 spectra per pointing (>> 5 million spectra/yr). It will use much of the existing infrastructure of the current CFHT, including the pier, and will closely approximate the envelope of the existing facility. MSE will be the only fully dedicated, 10 m class, wide-field spectroscopic telescope at first light in ˜ 2025. It will fill arguably the single biggest "missing link" in the international network of astronomical facilities. At optical wavelengths, LSST, WFIRST, Euclid, and Gaia will identify many millions of astrophysically interesting targets that otherwise lack the dedicated, large aperture, spectroscopic followup facilities required to probe their chemodynamical properties. Elsewhere, SKA, eRosita and others will provide a revolution in our understanding of the multiwavelength Universe. Among this capability, MSE will be an essential tool by providing the optical data that will otherwise be chronically absent.

  5. Spectroscopic enhancement in nanoparticles embedded glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahar, M. R.; Ghoshal, S. K.

    2014-09-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the recent progress in the enhancement of the spectroscopic characteristics of the glass embedded with nanoparticles (NPs). Some of our research activities with few significantly new results are highlighted and facilely analyzed. The science and technology dealing with the manipulation of the physical properties of rare earth doped inorganic glasses by embedding metallic NPs or nanoclusters produce the so-called 'nanoglass'. Meanwhile, the spectroscopic enhancement relates the intensity of the luminescence measured at certain transition. The enhancement which expectedly due to the 'plasmonics wave' (referring to the coherent coupling of photons to free electron oscillations called plasmon) occurs at the interface between a conductor and a dielectric. Plasmonics being an emerging concept in advanced optical material of nanophotonics has given this material the ability to exploit the optical response at nanoscale and opened up a new avenue in metal-based glass optics. There is a vast array of plasmonic NPs concepts yet to be explored, with applications spanning solar cells, (bio) sensing, communications, lasers, solid-state lighting, waveguides, imaging, optical data transfer, display and even bio-medicine. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) can enhance the optical response of nanoglass by orders of magnitude as observed. The luminescence enhancement and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) are new paradigm of research. The enhancement of luminescence due to the influence of metallic NPs is the recurring theme of this paper.

  6. Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor); Bhartia, Rohit (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus are disclosed which employ deep ultraviolet (e.g. in the 200 nm to 300 nm spectral range) electron beam pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor light emitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers to perform non-contact, non-invasive detection of unknown chemical analytes. These deep ultraviolet sources enable dramatic size, weight and power consumption reductions of chemical analysis instruments. Chemical analysis instruments employed in some embodiments include capillary and gel plane electrophoresis, capillary electrochromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, flow cytometry, flow cells for liquids and aerosols, and surface detection instruments. In some embodiments, Raman spectroscopic detection methods and apparatus use ultra-narrow-band angle tuning filters, acousto-optic tuning filters, and temperature tuned filters to enable ultra-miniature analyzers for chemical identification. In some embodiments Raman analysis is conducted along with photoluminescence spectroscopy (i.e. fluorescence and/or phosphorescence spectroscopy) to provide high levels of sensitivity and specificity in the same instrument.

  7. Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging: The Next Generation

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging seemingly matured as a technology in the mid-2000s, with commercially successful instrumentation and reports in numerous applications. Recent developments, however, have transformed our understanding of the recorded data, provided capability for new instrumentation, and greatly enhanced the ability to extract more useful information in less time. These developments are summarized here in three broad areas— data recording, interpretation of recorded data, and information extraction—and their critical review is employed to project emerging trends. Overall, the convergence of selected components from hardware, theory, algorithms, and applications is one trend. Instead of similar, general-purpose instrumentation, another trend is likely to be diverse and application-targeted designs of instrumentation driven by emerging component technologies. The recent renaissance in both fundamental science and instrumentation will likely spur investigations at the confluence of conventional spectroscopic analyses and optical physics for improved data interpretation. While chemometrics has dominated data processing, a trend will likely lie in the development of signal processing algorithms to optimally extract spectral and spatial information prior to conventional chemometric analyses. Finally, the sum of these recent advances is likely to provide unprecedented capability in measurement and scientific insight, which will present new opportunities for the applied spectroscopist. PMID:23031693

  8. A spectroscopic investigation of MU SGR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leediarv, L.

    The results of a spectroscopic study of the binary star Mu Sgr are presented. The spectroscopic observations were carried out using the coude spectrograph attached to the two-meter reflecting telescope at the Bulgarian Astronomical Observatory. Additional photometric data were obtained using the S2/68 telescope on board the TD-1 satellite. The microturbulent velocities and the chemical composition of the atmosphere of the primary component of Mu Sgr were determined according to a growth curve, and the results were found to agree with the observations of Kohl (1932). The color excess E(B-V) was equal to about 0.32 mag, and the magnitude in violet was about 7.8 mag. The radius of the primary component is estimated to be about 105 solar radius, based on the Blackwell-Shallis (1977) method. On the basis of the spectrophotometric data, it is concluded that Mu Sgr should be classified in the B6 spectral class, instead of the B8 class as proposed by Barlow and Cohen (1977).

  9. EPSILON AURIGAE: AN IMPROVED SPECTROSCOPIC ORBITAL SOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanik, Robert P.; Torres, Guillermo; Lovegrove, Justin; Latham, David W.; Zajac, Joseph; Pera, Vivian E.; Mazeh, Tsevi

    2010-03-15

    A rare eclipse of the mysterious object {epsilon} Aurigae will occur in 2009-2011. We report an updated single-lined spectroscopic solution for the orbit of the primary star based on 20 years of monitoring at the CfA, combined with historical velocity observations dating back to 1897. There are 518 new CfA observations obtained between 1989 and 2009. Two solutions are presented. One uses the velocities outside the eclipse phases together with mid-times of previous eclipses, from photometry dating back to 1842, which provide the strongest constraint on the ephemeris. This yields a period of 9896.0 {+-} 1.6 days (27.0938 {+-} 0.0044 years) with a velocity semi-amplitude of 13.84 {+-} 0.23 km s{sup -1} and an eccentricity of 0.227 {+-} 0.011. The middle of the current ongoing eclipse predicted by this combined fit is JD 2,455,413.8 {+-} 4.8, corresponding to 2010 August 5. If we use only the radial velocities, we find that the predicted middle of the current eclipse is nine months earlier. This would imply that the gravitating companion is not the same as the eclipsing object. Alternatively, the purely spectroscopic solution may be biased by perturbations in the velocities due to the short-period oscillations of the supergiant.

  10. Spectroscopic enhancement in nanoparticles embedded glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Sahar, M. R. Ghoshal, S. K.

    2014-09-25

    This presentation provides an overview of the recent progress in the enhancement of the spectroscopic characteristics of the glass embedded with nanoparticles (NPs). Some of our research activities with few significantly new results are highlighted and facilely analyzed. The science and technology dealing with the manipulation of the physical properties of rare earth doped inorganic glasses by embedding metallic NPs or nanoclusters produce the so-called 'nanoglass'. Meanwhile, the spectroscopic enhancement relates the intensity of the luminescence measured at certain transition. The enhancement which expectedly due to the 'plasmonics wave' (referring to the coherent coupling of photons to free electron oscillations called plasmon) occurs at the interface between a conductor and a dielectric. Plasmonics being an emerging concept in advanced optical material of nanophotonics has given this material the ability to exploit the optical response at nanoscale and opened up a new avenue in metal-based glass optics. There is a vast array of plasmonic NPs concepts yet to be explored, with applications spanning solar cells, (bio) sensing, communications, lasers, solid-state lighting, waveguides, imaging, optical data transfer, display and even bio-medicine. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) can enhance the optical response of nanoglass by orders of magnitude as observed. The luminescence enhancement and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) are new paradigm of research. The enhancement of luminescence due to the influence of metallic NPs is the recurring theme of this paper.

  11. Spectroscopic observations of cool degenerate star candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintzen, P.

    1986-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations are reported for 23 Luyten Half-Second degenerate star candidates and for 13 Luyten-Palomar common proper-motion pairs containing possible degenerate star components. Twenty-five degenerate stars are identified, 20 of which lack previous spectroscopy. Most of these stars are cool - Luyten color class g or later. One star, LP 77-57, shows broad continuum depressions similar to those in LHS 1126, which Liebert and Dahn attributed to pressure-shifted C2. A second degenerate star, LHS 290, exhibits apparent strong Swan bands which are blueshifted about 75 A. Further observations, including polarimetry and photometry, are required to appraise the spectroscopic peculiarities of these stars. Finally, five cool, sharp-lined DA white dwarfs have been observed to detect lines of metals and to determine line strengths. None of these DAs show signs of Mg b or the G band, and four show no evidence of Ca II K. The attempt to detect Ca MI in the fifth star, G199-71, was inconclusive.

  12. Estimating Geophysical Parameters From Gravity Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjogren, William L.; Wimberly, Ravenel N.

    1988-01-01

    ORBSIM program developed for accurate extraction of parameters of geophysical models from Doppler-radio-tracking data acquired from orbiting planetary spacecraft. Model of proposed planetary structure used in numerical integration along simulated trajectories of spacecraft around primary body. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  13. THE BOSS EMISSION-LINE LENS SURVEY (BELLS). I. A LARGE SPECTROSCOPICALLY SELECTED SAMPLE OF LENS GALAXIES AT REDSHIFT {approx}0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Brownstein, Joel R.; Bolton, Adam S.; Pandey, Parul; Schlegel, David J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Connolly, Natalia; Maraston, Claudia; Seitz, Stella; Wake, David A.; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Brinkmann, Jon; Schneider, Donald P.; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a catalog of 25 definite and 11 probable strong galaxy-galaxy gravitational lens systems with lens redshifts 0.4 {approx}< z {approx}< 0.7, discovered spectroscopically by the presence of higher-redshift emission lines within the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of luminous galaxies, and confirmed with high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of 44 candidates. Our survey extends the methodology of the Sloan Lens Advanced Camera for Surveys survey (SLACS) to higher redshift. We describe the details of the BOSS spectroscopic candidate detections, our HST ACS image processing and analysis methods, and our strong gravitational lens modeling procedure. We report BOSS spectroscopic parameters and ACS photometric parameters for all candidates, and mass-distribution parameters for the best-fit singular isothermal ellipsoid models of definite lenses. Our sample to date was selected using only the first six months of BOSS survey-quality spectroscopic data. The full five-year BOSS database should produce a sample of several hundred strong galaxy-galaxy lenses and in combination with SLACS lenses at lower redshift, strongly constrain the redshift evolution of the structure of elliptical, bulge-dominated galaxies as a function of luminosity, stellar mass, and rest-frame color, thereby providing a powerful test for competing theories of galaxy formation and evolution.

  14. A Spectroscopic-Based Laboratory Experiment for Protein Conformational Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos, Carlos Henrique I.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a practical experiment for teaching basic spectroscopic techniques to introduce the topic of protein conformational change to students in the field of molecular biology, biochemistry, or structural biology. The spectroscopic methods employed in the experiment are absorbance, for protein concentration measurements, and…

  15. Resolving Spectral Lines with a Periscope-Type DVD Spectroscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka

    2008-01-01

    A new type of DVD spectroscope, the periscope type, is described and the numerical analysis of the observed emission and absorption spectra is demonstrated. A small and thin mirror is put inside and an eighth part of a DVD is used as a grating. Using this improved DVD spectroscope, one can observe and photograph visible spectra more easily and…

  16. Obtaining the Electron Angular Momentum Coupling Spectroscopic Terms, jj

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orofino, Hugo; Faria, Roberto B.

    2010-01-01

    A systematic procedure is developed to obtain the electron angular momentum coupling (jj) spectroscopic terms, which is based on building microstates in which each individual electron is placed in a different m[subscript j] "orbital". This approach is similar to that used to obtain the spectroscopic terms under the Russell-Saunders (LS) coupling…

  17. Spectroscopic Signature of Aging in (delta)-Pu(Ga)

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, B W; Schwartz, A J; Ebbinghaus, B B; Fluss, M J; Haslam, J J; Blobaum, K M; Tobin, J G

    2005-04-15

    Resonant Photoemission, a variant of Photoelectron Spectroscopy, has been demonstrated to have sensitivity to aging of Pu samples. The spectroscopic results are correlated with resistivity measurements and are shown to be the fingerprint of mesoscopic or nanoscale internal damage in the Pu physical structure. This means that a spectroscopic signature of internal damage due to aging in Pu has been established.

  18. H-binding groups in lignite vs. soil humic acids: NICA-Donnan and spectroscopic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Drosos, M.; Jerzykiewicz, M.; Deligiannakis, Y.

    2009-04-15

    A comparative study has been carried out for two sets of humic acids isolated from lignites and soils. H-binding data were analyzed using the NICA-Donnan model, for three Greek lignite humic acids (HA) plus IHSS Leonardite reference HA, and five Greek soil HAs plus a commercial peat HA. {sup 13}C-CP-MAS NMR and H-binding data provide quantitative estimates for functional groups, showing that lignite HAs of diverse origin have strikingly homogeneous properties, while the H-binding structural units of soil HAs are characterized by a large degree of variability. Consistent differences between soil HA vs. lignite HA are revealed at the level of functional groups' concentrations. In the pH range 4 to 10, soil HA showed a charge variation < 3 (equiv kg{sup -1}) while lignite HAs showed a higher charge variation > 3.5 (equiv kg{sup -1}).

  19. Absolute and geometric parameters of contact binary V1918 Cyg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürol, B.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of our investigation on the geometrical and physical parameters of the W UMa type binary system V1918 Cyg from analyzed CCD (BVR) light curves and radial velocity data. We used the photometric data published by Yang et al. (2013) and spectroscopic data obtained in 2012 at TUBITAK National Observatory (TUG). The light and radial velocity observations were analyzed simultaneously by using the Wilson-Devinney (2015 revision) code to obtain absolute and geometrical parameters of the system. It is confirmed that the system is an A-type W UMa as indicated by Yang et al. (2013). Combining our spectroscopic data with the photometric solution we derived masses and radii of the eclipsing system as M1 = 1.302M⊙ , M2 = 0.362M⊙ , R1 = 1.362R⊙ and R2 = 0.762R⊙ . Finally, we discuss the evolutionary status of the system.

  20. Absolute and geometric parameters of contact binary BO Arietis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürol, B.; Gürsoytrak, S. H.; Bradstreet, D. H.

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of our investigation on the geometrical and physical parameters of the W UMa type binary system BO Ari from analyzed CCD (BVRI) light curves and radial velocity data. The photometric data were obtained in 2009 and 2010 at Ankara University Observatory (AUO) and the spectroscopic observations were made in 2007 and 2010 at TUBITAK National Observatory (TUG). These light and radial velocity observations were analyzed simultaneously by using the Wilson-Devinney (2013 revision) code to obtain absolute and geometrical parameters. The system was determined to be an A-type W UMa system. Combining our photometric solution with the spectroscopic data we derived masses and radii of the eclipsing system to be M1 = 0.995M⊙,M2 = 0.189M⊙,R1 = 1.090R⊙ and R2 = 0.515R⊙ . Finally, we discuss the evolutionary status of the system.