Science.gov

Sample records for accurate structural information

  1. Combining Evolutionary Information and an Iterative Sampling Strategy for Accurate Protein Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Braun, Tatjana; Koehler Leman, Julia; Lange, Oliver F

    2015-12-01

    Recent work has shown that the accuracy of ab initio structure prediction can be significantly improved by integrating evolutionary information in form of intra-protein residue-residue contacts. Following this seminal result, much effort is put into the improvement of contact predictions. However, there is also a substantial need to develop structure prediction protocols tailored to the type of restraints gained by contact predictions. Here, we present a structure prediction protocol that combines evolutionary information with the resolution-adapted structural recombination approach of Rosetta, called RASREC. Compared to the classic Rosetta ab initio protocol, RASREC achieves improved sampling, better convergence and higher robustness against incorrect distance restraints, making it the ideal sampling strategy for the stated problem. To demonstrate the accuracy of our protocol, we tested the approach on a diverse set of 28 globular proteins. Our method is able to converge for 26 out of the 28 targets and improves the average TM-score of the entire benchmark set from 0.55 to 0.72 when compared to the top ranked models obtained by the EVFold web server using identical contact predictions. Using a smaller benchmark, we furthermore show that the prediction accuracy of our method is only slightly reduced when the contact prediction accuracy is comparatively low. This observation is of special interest for protein sequences that only have a limited number of homologs.

  2. Polyallelic structural variants can provide accurate, highly informative genetic markers focused on diagnosis and therapeutic targets: Accuracy vs. Precision.

    PubMed

    Roses, A D

    2016-02-01

    Structural variants (SVs) include all insertions, deletions, and rearrangements in the genome, with several common types of nucleotide repeats including single sequence repeats, short tandem repeats, and insertion-deletion length variants. Polyallelic SVs provide highly informative markers for association studies with well-phenotyped cohorts. SVs can influence gene regulation by affecting epigenetics, transcription, splicing, and/or translation. Accurate assays of polyallelic SV loci are required to define the range and allele frequency of variable length alleles. PMID:26517180

  3. Gap between technically accurate information and socially appropriate information for structural health monitoring system installed into tall buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mita, Akira

    2016-04-01

    The importance of the structural health monitoring system for tall buildings is now widely recognized by at least structural engineers and managers at large real estate companies to ensure the structural safety immediately after a large earthquake and appeal the quantitative safety of buildings to potential tenants. Some leading real estate companies decided to install the system into all tall buildings. Considering this tendency, a pilot project for the west area of Shinjuku Station supported by the Japan Science and Technology Agency was started by the author team to explore a possibility of using the system to provide safe spaces for commuters and residents. The system was installed into six tall buildings. From our experience, it turned out that viewing only from technological aspects was not sufficient for the system to be accepted and to be really useful. Safe spaces require not only the structural safety but also the soundness of key functions of the building. We need help from social scientists, medical doctors, city planners etc. to further improve the integrity of the system.

  4. Accurate SHAPE-directed RNA structure determination

    PubMed Central

    Deigan, Katherine E.; Li, Tian W.; Mathews, David H.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2009-01-01

    Almost all RNAs can fold to form extensive base-paired secondary structures. Many of these structures then modulate numerous fundamental elements of gene expression. Deducing these structure–function relationships requires that it be possible to predict RNA secondary structures accurately. However, RNA secondary structure prediction for large RNAs, such that a single predicted structure for a single sequence reliably represents the correct structure, has remained an unsolved problem. Here, we demonstrate that quantitative, nucleotide-resolution information from a SHAPE experiment can be interpreted as a pseudo-free energy change term and used to determine RNA secondary structure with high accuracy. Free energy minimization, by using SHAPE pseudo-free energies, in conjunction with nearest neighbor parameters, predicts the secondary structure of deproteinized Escherichia coli 16S rRNA (>1,300 nt) and a set of smaller RNAs (75–155 nt) with accuracies of up to 96–100%, which are comparable to the best accuracies achievable by comparative sequence analysis. PMID:19109441

  5. Approaching system equilibrium with accurate or not accurate feedback information in a two-route system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-mei; Xie, Dong-fan; Li, Qi

    2015-02-01

    With the development of intelligent transport system, advanced information feedback strategies have been developed to reduce traffic congestion and enhance the capacity. However, previous strategies provide accurate information to travelers and our simulation results show that accurate information brings negative effects, especially in delay case. Because travelers prefer to the best condition route with accurate information, and delayed information cannot reflect current traffic condition but past. Then travelers make wrong routing decisions, causing the decrease of the capacity and the increase of oscillations and the system deviating from the equilibrium. To avoid the negative effect, bounded rationality is taken into account by introducing a boundedly rational threshold BR. When difference between two routes is less than the BR, routes have equal probability to be chosen. The bounded rationality is helpful to improve the efficiency in terms of capacity, oscillation and the gap deviating from the system equilibrium.

  6. 78 FR 34604 - Submitting Complete and Accurate Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 50 Submitting Complete and Accurate Information AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... accurate information as would a licensee or an applicant for a license.'' DATES: Submit comments by August... may submit comments by any of the following methods (unless this document describes a different...

  7. Ultra-accurate collaborative information filtering via directed user similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Q.; Song, W.-J.; Liu, J.-G.

    2014-07-01

    A key challenge of the collaborative filtering (CF) information filtering is how to obtain the reliable and accurate results with the help of peers' recommendation. Since the similarities from small-degree users to large-degree users would be larger than the ones in opposite direction, the large-degree users' selections are recommended extensively by the traditional second-order CF algorithms. By considering the users' similarity direction and the second-order correlations to depress the influence of mainstream preferences, we present the directed second-order CF (HDCF) algorithm specifically to address the challenge of accuracy and diversity of the CF algorithm. The numerical results for two benchmark data sets, MovieLens and Netflix, show that the accuracy of the new algorithm outperforms the state-of-the-art CF algorithms. Comparing with the CF algorithm based on random walks proposed by Liu et al. (Int. J. Mod. Phys. C, 20 (2009) 285) the average ranking score could reach 0.0767 and 0.0402, which is enhanced by 27.3% and 19.1% for MovieLens and Netflix, respectively. In addition, the diversity, precision and recall are also enhanced greatly. Without relying on any context-specific information, tuning the similarity direction of CF algorithms could obtain accurate and diverse recommendations. This work suggests that the user similarity direction is an important factor to improve the personalized recommendation performance.

  8. Accurate Classification of RNA Structures Using Topological Fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kejie; Gribskov, Michael

    2016-01-01

    While RNAs are well known to possess complex structures, functionally similar RNAs often have little sequence similarity. While the exact size and spacing of base-paired regions vary, functionally similar RNAs have pronounced similarity in the arrangement, or topology, of base-paired stems. Furthermore, predicted RNA structures often lack pseudoknots (a crucial aspect of biological activity), and are only partially correct, or incomplete. A topological approach addresses all of these difficulties. In this work we describe each RNA structure as a graph that can be converted to a topological spectrum (RNA fingerprint). The set of subgraphs in an RNA structure, its RNA fingerprint, can be compared with the fingerprints of other RNA structures to identify and correctly classify functionally related RNAs. Topologically similar RNAs can be identified even when a large fraction, up to 30%, of the stems are omitted, indicating that highly accurate structures are not necessary. We investigate the performance of the RNA fingerprint approach on a set of eight highly curated RNA families, with diverse sizes and functions, containing pseudoknots, and with little sequence similarity–an especially difficult test set. In spite of the difficult test set, the RNA fingerprint approach is very successful (ROC AUC > 0.95). Due to the inclusion of pseudoknots, the RNA fingerprint approach both covers a wider range of possible structures than methods based only on secondary structure, and its tolerance for incomplete structures suggests that it can be applied even to predicted structures. Source code is freely available at https://github.rcac.purdue.edu/mgribsko/XIOS_RNA_fingerprint. PMID:27755571

  9. Isomerism of Cyanomethanimine: Accurate Structural, Energetic, and Spectroscopic Characterization.

    PubMed

    Puzzarini, Cristina

    2015-11-25

    The structures, relative stabilities, and rotational and vibrational parameters of the Z-C-, E-C-, and N-cyanomethanimine isomers have been evaluated using state-of-the-art quantum-chemical approaches. Equilibrium geometries have been calculated by means of a composite scheme based on coupled-cluster calculations that accounts for the extrapolation to the complete basis set limit and core-correlation effects. The latter approach is proved to provide molecular structures with an accuracy of 0.001-0.002 Å and 0.05-0.1° for bond lengths and angles, respectively. Systematically extrapolated ab initio energies, accounting for electron correlation through coupled-cluster theory, including up to single, double, triple, and quadruple excitations, and corrected for core-electron correlation and anharmonic zero-point vibrational energy, have been used to accurately determine relative energies and the Z-E isomerization barrier with an accuracy of about 1 kJ/mol. Vibrational and rotational spectroscopic parameters have been investigated by means of hybrid schemes that allow us to obtain rotational constants accurate to about a few megahertz and vibrational frequencies with a mean absolute error of ∼1%. Where available, for all properties considered, a very good agreement with experimental data has been observed.

  10. Automatic and Accurate Shadow Detection Using Near-Infrared Information.

    PubMed

    Rüfenacht, Dominic; Fredembach, Clément; Süsstrunk, Sabine

    2014-08-01

    We present a method to automatically detect shadows in a fast and accurate manner by taking advantage of the inherent sensitivity of digital camera sensors to the near-infrared (NIR) part of the spectrum. Dark objects, which confound many shadow detection algorithms, often have much higher reflectance in the NIR. We can thus build an accurate shadow candidate map based on image pixels that are dark both in the visible and NIR representations. We further refine the shadow map by incorporating ratios of the visible to the NIR image, based on the observation that commonly encountered light sources have very distinct spectra in the NIR band. The results are validated on a new database, which contains visible/NIR images for a large variety of real-world shadow creating illuminant conditions, as well as manually labeled shadow ground truth. Both quantitative and qualitative evaluations show that our method outperforms current state-of-the-art shadow detection algorithms in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency.

  11. A new accurate pill recognition system using imprint information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Kamata, Sei-ichiro

    2013-12-01

    Great achievements in modern medicine benefit human beings. Also, it has brought about an explosive growth of pharmaceuticals that current in the market. In daily life, pharmaceuticals sometimes confuse people when they are found unlabeled. In this paper, we propose an automatic pill recognition technique to solve this problem. It functions mainly based on the imprint feature of the pills, which is extracted by proposed MSWT (modified stroke width transform) and described by WSC (weighted shape context). Experiments show that our proposed pill recognition method can reach an accurate rate up to 92.03% within top 5 ranks when trying to classify more than 10 thousand query pill images into around 2000 categories.

  12. 16 CFR 1101.32 - Reasonable steps to assure information is accurate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reasonable steps to assure information is... Reasonable Steps Commission Will Take To Assure Information It Discloses Is Accurate, and That Disclosure Is... Administers § 1101.32 Reasonable steps to assure information is accurate. (a) The Commission considers...

  13. 16 CFR 1101.32 - Reasonable steps to assure information is accurate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reasonable steps to assure information is... Reasonable Steps Commission Will Take To Assure Information It Discloses Is Accurate, and That Disclosure Is... Administers § 1101.32 Reasonable steps to assure information is accurate. (a) The Commission considers...

  14. DR-TAMAS: Diffeomorphic Registration for Tensor Accurate Alignment of Anatomical Structures.

    PubMed

    Irfanoglu, M Okan; Nayak, Amritha; Jenkins, Jeffrey; Hutchinson, Elizabeth B; Sadeghi, Neda; Thomas, Cibu P; Pierpaoli, Carlo

    2016-05-15

    In this work, we propose DR-TAMAS (Diffeomorphic Registration for Tensor Accurate alignMent of Anatomical Structures), a novel framework for intersubject registration of Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) data sets. This framework is optimized for brain data and its main goal is to achieve an accurate alignment of all brain structures, including white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and spaces containing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Currently most DTI-based spatial normalization algorithms emphasize alignment of anisotropic structures. While some diffusion-derived metrics, such as diffusion anisotropy and tensor eigenvector orientation, are highly informative for proper alignment of WM, other tensor metrics such as the trace or mean diffusivity (MD) are fundamental for a proper alignment of GM and CSF boundaries. Moreover, it is desirable to include information from structural MRI data, e.g., T1-weighted or T2-weighted images, which are usually available together with the diffusion data. The fundamental property of DR-TAMAS is to achieve global anatomical accuracy by incorporating in its cost function the most informative metrics locally. Another important feature of DR-TAMAS is a symmetric time-varying velocity-based transformation model, which enables it to account for potentially large anatomical variability in healthy subjects and patients. The performance of DR-TAMAS is evaluated with several data sets and compared with other widely-used diffeomorphic image registration techniques employing both full tensor information and/or DTI-derived scalar maps. Our results show that the proposed method has excellent overall performance in the entire brain, while being equivalent to the best existing methods in WM.

  15. Accurate Damage Location in Complex Composite Structures and Industrial Environments using Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, M.; Pearson, M.; Lee, W.; Pullin, R.

    2015-07-01

    The ability to accurately locate damage in any given structure is a highly desirable attribute for an effective structural health monitoring system and could help to reduce operating costs and improve safety. This becomes a far greater challenge in complex geometries and materials, such as modern composite airframes. The poor translation of promising laboratory based SHM demonstrators to industrial environments forms a barrier to commercial up take of technology. The acoustic emission (AE) technique is a passive NDT method that detects elastic stress waves released by the growth of damage. It offers very sensitive damage detection, using a sparse array of sensors to detect and globally locate damage within a structure. However its application to complex structures commonly yields poor accuracy due to anisotropic wave propagation and the interruption of wave propagation by structural features such as holes and thickness changes. This work adopts an empirical mapping technique for AE location, known as Delta T Mapping, which uses experimental training data to account for such structural complexities. The technique is applied to a complex geometry composite aerospace structure undergoing certification testing. The component consists of a carbon fibre composite tube with varying wall thickness and multiple holes, that was loaded under bending. The damage location was validated using X-ray CT scanning and the Delta T Mapping technique was shown to improve location accuracy when compared with commercial algorithms. The onset and progression of damage were monitored throughout the test and used to inform future design iterations.

  16. 5D model for accurate representation and visualization of dynamic cardiac structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-te; Robb, Richard A.

    2000-05-01

    Accurate cardiac modeling is challenging due to the intricate structure and complex contraction patterns of myocardial tissues. Fast imaging techniques can provide 4D structural information acquired as a sequence of 3D images throughout the cardiac cycle. To mode. The beating heart, we created a physics-based surface model that deforms between successive time point in the cardiac cycle. 3D images of canine hearts were acquired during one complete cardiac cycle using the DSR and the EBCT. The left ventricle of the first time point is reconstructed as a triangular mesh. A mass-spring physics-based deformable mode,, which can expand and shrink with local contraction and stretching forces distributed in an anatomically accurate simulation of cardiac motion, is applied to the initial mesh and allows the initial mesh to deform to fit the left ventricle in successive time increments of the sequence. The resulting 4D model can be interactively transformed and displayed with associated regional electrical activity mapped onto anatomic surfaces, producing a 5D model, which faithfully exhibits regional cardiac contraction and relaxation patterns over the entire heart. The model faithfully represents structural changes throughout the cardiac cycle. Such models provide the framework for minimizing the number of time points required to usefully depict regional motion of myocardium and allow quantitative assessment of regional myocardial motion. The electrical activation mapping provides spatial and temporal correlation within the cardiac cycle. In procedures which as intra-cardiac catheter ablation, visualization of the dynamic model can be used to accurately localize the foci of myocardial arrhythmias and guide positioning of catheters for optimal ablation.

  17. Fast and accurate search for non-coding RNA pseudoknot structures in genomes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhibin; Wu, Yong; Robertson, Joseph; Feng, Liang; Malmberg, Russell L.; Cai, Liming

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Searching genomes for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) by their secondary structure has become an important goal for bioinformatics. For pseudoknot-free structures, ncRNA search can be effective based on the covariance model and CYK-type dynamic programming. However, the computational difficulty in aligning an RNA sequence to a pseudoknot has prohibited fast and accurate search of arbitrary RNA structures. Our previous work introduced a graph model for RNA pseudoknots and proposed to solve the structure–sequence alignment by graph optimization. Given k candidate regions in the target sequence for each of the n stems in the structure, we could compute a best alignment in time O(ktn) based upon a tree width t decomposition of the structure graph. However, to implement this method to programs that can routinely perform fast yet accurate RNA pseudoknot searches, we need novel heuristics to ensure that, without degrading the accuracy, only a small number of stem candidates need to be examined and a tree decomposition of a small tree width can always be found for the structure graph. Results: The current work builds on the previous one with newly developed preprocessing algorithms to reduce the values for parameters k and t and to implement the search method into a practical program, called RNATOPS, for RNA pseudoknot search. In particular, we introduce techniques, based on probabilistic profiling and distance penalty functions, which can identify for every stem just a small number k (e.g. k ≤ 10) of plausible regions in the target sequence to which the stem needs to align. We also devised a specialized tree decomposition algorithm that can yield tree decomposition of small tree width t (e.g. t ≤ 4) for almost all RNA structure graphs. Our experiments show that with RNATOPS it is possible to routinely search prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes for specific RNA structures of medium to large sizes, including pseudoknots, with high sensitivity and high

  18. A survey of factors contributing to accurate theoretical predictions of atomization energies and molecular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, David; Peterson, Kirk A.; Dixon, David A.

    2008-11-01

    High level electronic structure predictions of thermochemical properties and molecular structure are capable of accuracy rivaling the very best experimental measurements as a result of rapid advances in hardware, software, and methodology. Despite the progress, real world limitations require practical approaches designed for handling general chemical systems that rely on composite strategies in which a single, intractable calculation is replaced by a series of smaller calculations. As typically implemented, these approaches produce a final, or "best," estimate that is constructed from one major component, fine-tuned by multiple corrections that are assumed to be additive. Though individually much smaller than the original, unmanageable computational problem, these corrections are nonetheless extremely costly. This study presents a survey of the widely varying magnitude of the most important components contributing to the atomization energies and structures of 106 small molecules. It combines large Gaussian basis sets and coupled cluster theory up to quadruple excitations for all systems. In selected cases, the effects of quintuple excitations and/or full configuration interaction were also considered. The availability of reliable experimental data for most of the molecules permits an expanded statistical analysis of the accuracy of the approach. In cases where reliable experimental information is currently unavailable, the present results are expected to provide some of the most accurate benchmark values available.

  19. Accurate response surface approximations for weight equations based on structural optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papila, Melih

    Accurate weight prediction methods are vitally important for aircraft design optimization. Therefore, designers seek weight prediction techniques with low computational cost and high accuracy, and usually require a compromise between the two. The compromise can be achieved by combining stress analysis and response surface (RS) methodology. While stress analysis provides accurate weight information, RS techniques help to transmit effectively this information to the optimization procedure. The focus of this dissertation is structural weight equations in the form of RS approximations and their accuracy when fitted to results of structural optimizations that are based on finite element analyses. Use of RS methodology filters out the numerical noise in structural optimization results and provides a smooth weight function that can easily be used in gradient-based configuration optimization. In engineering applications RS approximations of low order polynomials are widely used, but the weight may not be modeled well by low-order polynomials, leading to bias errors. In addition, some structural optimization results may have high-amplitude errors (outliers) that may severely affect the accuracy of the weight equation. Statistical techniques associated with RS methodology are sought in order to deal with these two difficulties: (1) high-amplitude numerical noise (outliers) and (2) approximation model inadequacy. The investigation starts with reducing approximation error by identifying and repairing outliers. A potential reason for outliers in optimization results is premature convergence, and outliers of such nature may be corrected by employing different convergence settings. It is demonstrated that outlier repair can lead to accuracy improvements over the more standard approach of removing outliers. The adequacy of approximation is then studied by a modified lack-of-fit approach, and RS errors due to the approximation model are reduced by using higher order polynomials. In

  20. Fitmunk: improving protein structures by accurate, automatic modeling of side-chain conformations.

    PubMed

    Porebski, Przemyslaw Jerzy; Cymborowski, Marcin; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Minor, Wladek

    2016-02-01

    Improvements in crystallographic hardware and software have allowed automated structure-solution pipelines to approach a near-`one-click' experience for the initial determination of macromolecular structures. However, in many cases the resulting initial model requires a laborious, iterative process of refinement and validation. A new method has been developed for the automatic modeling of side-chain conformations that takes advantage of rotamer-prediction methods in a crystallographic context. The algorithm, which is based on deterministic dead-end elimination (DEE) theory, uses new dense conformer libraries and a hybrid energy function derived from experimental data and prior information about rotamer frequencies to find the optimal conformation of each side chain. In contrast to existing methods, which incorporate the electron-density term into protein-modeling frameworks, the proposed algorithm is designed to take advantage of the highly discriminatory nature of electron-density maps. This method has been implemented in the program Fitmunk, which uses extensive conformational sampling. This improves the accuracy of the modeling and makes it a versatile tool for crystallographic model building, refinement and validation. Fitmunk was extensively tested on over 115 new structures, as well as a subset of 1100 structures from the PDB. It is demonstrated that the ability of Fitmunk to model more than 95% of side chains accurately is beneficial for improving the quality of crystallographic protein models, especially at medium and low resolutions. Fitmunk can be used for model validation of existing structures and as a tool to assess whether side chains are modeled optimally or could be better fitted into electron density. Fitmunk is available as a web service at http://kniahini.med.virginia.edu/fitmunk/server/ or at http://fitmunk.bitbucket.org/.

  1. Fitmunk: improving protein structures by accurate, automatic modeling of side-chain conformations

    PubMed Central

    Porebski, Przemyslaw Jerzy; Cymborowski, Marcin; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Minor, Wladek

    2016-01-01

    Improvements in crystallographic hardware and software have allowed automated structure-solution pipelines to approach a near-‘one-click’ experience for the initial determination of macromolecular structures. However, in many cases the resulting initial model requires a laborious, iterative process of refinement and validation. A new method has been developed for the automatic modeling of side-chain conformations that takes advantage of rotamer-prediction methods in a crystallographic context. The algorithm, which is based on deterministic dead-end elimination (DEE) theory, uses new dense conformer libraries and a hybrid energy function derived from experimental data and prior information about rotamer frequencies to find the optimal conformation of each side chain. In contrast to existing methods, which incorporate the electron-density term into protein-modeling frameworks, the proposed algorithm is designed to take advantage of the highly discriminatory nature of electron-density maps. This method has been implemented in the program Fitmunk, which uses extensive conformational sampling. This improves the accuracy of the modeling and makes it a versatile tool for crystallographic model building, refinement and validation. Fitmunk was extensively tested on over 115 new structures, as well as a subset of 1100 structures from the PDB. It is demonstrated that the ability of Fitmunk to model more than 95% of side chains accurately is beneficial for improving the quality of crystallographic protein models, especially at medium and low resolutions. Fitmunk can be used for model validation of existing structures and as a tool to assess whether side chains are modeled optimally or could be better fitted into electron density. Fitmunk is available as a web service at http://kniahini.med.virginia.edu/fitmunk/server/ or at http://fitmunk.bitbucket.org/. PMID:26894674

  2. Fitmunk: improving protein structures by accurate, automatic modeling of side-chain conformations.

    PubMed

    Porebski, Przemyslaw Jerzy; Cymborowski, Marcin; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Minor, Wladek

    2016-02-01

    Improvements in crystallographic hardware and software have allowed automated structure-solution pipelines to approach a near-`one-click' experience for the initial determination of macromolecular structures. However, in many cases the resulting initial model requires a laborious, iterative process of refinement and validation. A new method has been developed for the automatic modeling of side-chain conformations that takes advantage of rotamer-prediction methods in a crystallographic context. The algorithm, which is based on deterministic dead-end elimination (DEE) theory, uses new dense conformer libraries and a hybrid energy function derived from experimental data and prior information about rotamer frequencies to find the optimal conformation of each side chain. In contrast to existing methods, which incorporate the electron-density term into protein-modeling frameworks, the proposed algorithm is designed to take advantage of the highly discriminatory nature of electron-density maps. This method has been implemented in the program Fitmunk, which uses extensive conformational sampling. This improves the accuracy of the modeling and makes it a versatile tool for crystallographic model building, refinement and validation. Fitmunk was extensively tested on over 115 new structures, as well as a subset of 1100 structures from the PDB. It is demonstrated that the ability of Fitmunk to model more than 95% of side chains accurately is beneficial for improving the quality of crystallographic protein models, especially at medium and low resolutions. Fitmunk can be used for model validation of existing structures and as a tool to assess whether side chains are modeled optimally or could be better fitted into electron density. Fitmunk is available as a web service at http://kniahini.med.virginia.edu/fitmunk/server/ or at http://fitmunk.bitbucket.org/. PMID:26894674

  3. Information Structures and Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hur-Li

    2008-01-01

    This study explores how undergraduates seek information across various information structures. Taking part in an interview, fifteen students of diverse backgrounds described their information seeking. The findings pointed to several issues relating to the underlying structures of information resources. Suggestions are made for structural…

  4. Accurate prediction of interfacial residues in two-domain proteins using evolutionary information: implications for three-dimensional modeling.

    PubMed

    Bhaskara, Ramachandra M; Padhi, Amrita; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-07-01

    With the preponderance of multidomain proteins in eukaryotic genomes, it is essential to recognize the constituent domains and their functions. Often function involves communications across the domain interfaces, and the knowledge of the interacting sites is essential to our understanding of the structure-function relationship. Using evolutionary information extracted from homologous domains in at least two diverse domain architectures (single and multidomain), we predict the interface residues corresponding to domains from the two-domain proteins. We also use information from the three-dimensional structures of individual domains of two-domain proteins to train naïve Bayes classifier model to predict the interfacial residues. Our predictions are highly accurate (∼85%) and specific (∼95%) to the domain-domain interfaces. This method is specific to multidomain proteins which contain domains in at least more than one protein architectural context. Using predicted residues to constrain domain-domain interaction, rigid-body docking was able to provide us with accurate full-length protein structures with correct orientation of domains. We believe that these results can be of considerable interest toward rational protein and interaction design, apart from providing us with valuable information on the nature of interactions.

  5. Exploratory Movement Generates Higher-Order Information That Is Sufficient for Accurate Perception of Scaled Egocentric Distance

    PubMed Central

    Mantel, Bruno; Stoffregen, Thomas A.; Campbell, Alain; Bardy, Benoît G.

    2015-01-01

    Body movement influences the structure of multiple forms of ambient energy, including optics and gravito-inertial force. Some researchers have argued that egocentric distance is derived from inferential integration of visual and non-visual stimulation. We suggest that accurate information about egocentric distance exists in perceptual stimulation as higher-order patterns that extend across optics and inertia. We formalize a pattern that specifies the egocentric distance of a stationary object across higher-order relations between optics and inertia. This higher-order parameter is created by self-generated movement of the perceiver in inertial space relative to the illuminated environment. For this reason, we placed minimal restrictions on the exploratory movements of our participants. We asked whether humans can detect and use the information available in this higher-order pattern. Participants judged whether a virtual object was within reach. We manipulated relations between body movement and the ambient structure of optics and inertia. Judgments were precise and accurate when the higher-order optical-inertial parameter was available. When only optic flow was available, judgments were poor. Our results reveal that participants perceived egocentric distance from the higher-order, optical-inertial consequences of their own exploratory activity. Analysis of participants’ movement trajectories revealed that self-selected movements were complex, and tended to optimize availability of the optical-inertial pattern that specifies egocentric distance. We argue that accurate information about egocentric distance exists in higher-order patterns of ambient energy, that self-generated movement can generate these higher-order patterns, and that these patterns can be detected and used to support perception of egocentric distance that is precise and accurate. PMID:25856410

  6. Accurate refinement of docked protein complexes using evolutionary information and deep learning.

    PubMed

    Akbal-Delibas, Bahar; Farhoodi, Roshanak; Pomplun, Marc; Haspel, Nurit

    2016-06-01

    One of the major challenges for protein docking methods is to accurately discriminate native-like structures from false positives. Docking methods are often inaccurate and the results have to be refined and re-ranked to obtain native-like complexes and remove outliers. In a previous work, we introduced AccuRefiner, a machine learning based tool for refining protein-protein complexes. Given a docked complex, the refinement tool produces a small set of refined versions of the input complex, with lower root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD) of atomic positions with respect to the native structure. The method employs a unique ranking tool that accurately predicts the RMSD of docked complexes with respect to the native structure. In this work, we use a deep learning network with a similar set of features and five layers. We show that a properly trained deep learning network can accurately predict the RMSD of a docked complex with 1.40 Å error margin on average, by approximating the complex relationship between a wide set of scoring function terms and the RMSD of a docked structure. The network was trained on 35000 unbound docking complexes generated by RosettaDock. We tested our method on 25 different putative docked complexes produced also by RosettaDock for five proteins that were not included in the training data. The results demonstrate that the high accuracy of the ranking tool enables AccuRefiner to consistently choose the refinement candidates with lower RMSD values compared to the coarsely docked input structures. PMID:26846813

  7. Accurate refinement of docked protein complexes using evolutionary information and deep learning.

    PubMed

    Akbal-Delibas, Bahar; Farhoodi, Roshanak; Pomplun, Marc; Haspel, Nurit

    2016-06-01

    One of the major challenges for protein docking methods is to accurately discriminate native-like structures from false positives. Docking methods are often inaccurate and the results have to be refined and re-ranked to obtain native-like complexes and remove outliers. In a previous work, we introduced AccuRefiner, a machine learning based tool for refining protein-protein complexes. Given a docked complex, the refinement tool produces a small set of refined versions of the input complex, with lower root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD) of atomic positions with respect to the native structure. The method employs a unique ranking tool that accurately predicts the RMSD of docked complexes with respect to the native structure. In this work, we use a deep learning network with a similar set of features and five layers. We show that a properly trained deep learning network can accurately predict the RMSD of a docked complex with 1.40 Å error margin on average, by approximating the complex relationship between a wide set of scoring function terms and the RMSD of a docked structure. The network was trained on 35000 unbound docking complexes generated by RosettaDock. We tested our method on 25 different putative docked complexes produced also by RosettaDock for five proteins that were not included in the training data. The results demonstrate that the high accuracy of the ranking tool enables AccuRefiner to consistently choose the refinement candidates with lower RMSD values compared to the coarsely docked input structures.

  8. Differential contribution of visual and auditory information to accurately predict the direction and rotational motion of a visual stimulus.

    PubMed

    Park, Seoung Hoon; Kim, Seonjin; Kwon, MinHyuk; Christou, Evangelos A

    2016-03-01

    Vision and auditory information are critical for perception and to enhance the ability of an individual to respond accurately to a stimulus. However, it is unknown whether visual and auditory information contribute differentially to identify the direction and rotational motion of the stimulus. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of an individual to accurately predict the direction and rotational motion of the stimulus based on visual and auditory information. In this study, we recruited 9 expert table-tennis players and used table-tennis service as our experimental model. Participants watched recorded services with different levels of visual and auditory information. The goal was to anticipate the direction of the service (left or right) and the rotational motion of service (topspin, sidespin, or cut). We recorded their responses and quantified the following outcomes: (i) directional accuracy and (ii) rotational motion accuracy. The response accuracy was the accurate predictions relative to the total number of trials. The ability of the participants to predict the direction of the service accurately increased with additional visual information but not with auditory information. In contrast, the ability of the participants to predict the rotational motion of the service accurately increased with the addition of auditory information to visual information but not with additional visual information alone. In conclusion, this finding demonstrates that visual information enhances the ability of an individual to accurately predict the direction of the stimulus, whereas additional auditory information enhances the ability of an individual to accurately predict the rotational motion of stimulus.

  9. COSMOS: accurate detection of somatic structural variations through asymmetric comparison between tumor and normal samples.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Koichi; Yamanishi, Ayako; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji; Sese, Jun

    2016-05-01

    An important challenge in cancer genomics is precise detection of structural variations (SVs) by high-throughput short-read sequencing, which is hampered by the high false discovery rates of existing analysis tools. Here, we propose an accurate SV detection method named COSMOS, which compares the statistics of the mapped read pairs in tumor samples with isogenic normal control samples in a distinct asymmetric manner. COSMOS also prioritizes the candidate SVs using strand-specific read-depth information. Performance tests on modeled tumor genomes revealed that COSMOS outperformed existing methods in terms of F-measure. We also applied COSMOS to an experimental mouse cell-based model, in which SVs were induced by genome engineering and gamma-ray irradiation, followed by polymerase chain reaction-based confirmation. The precision of COSMOS was 84.5%, while the next best existing method was 70.4%. Moreover, the sensitivity of COSMOS was the highest, indicating that COSMOS has great potential for cancer genome analysis.

  10. COSMOS: accurate detection of somatic structural variations through asymmetric comparison between tumor and normal samples

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, Koichi; Yamanishi, Ayako; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji; Sese, Jun

    2016-01-01

    An important challenge in cancer genomics is precise detection of structural variations (SVs) by high-throughput short-read sequencing, which is hampered by the high false discovery rates of existing analysis tools. Here, we propose an accurate SV detection method named COSMOS, which compares the statistics of the mapped read pairs in tumor samples with isogenic normal control samples in a distinct asymmetric manner. COSMOS also prioritizes the candidate SVs using strand-specific read-depth information. Performance tests on modeled tumor genomes revealed that COSMOS outperformed existing methods in terms of F-measure. We also applied COSMOS to an experimental mouse cell-based model, in which SVs were induced by genome engineering and gamma-ray irradiation, followed by polymerase chain reaction-based confirmation. The precision of COSMOS was 84.5%, while the next best existing method was 70.4%. Moreover, the sensitivity of COSMOS was the highest, indicating that COSMOS has great potential for cancer genome analysis. PMID:26833260

  11. The utility of accurate mass and LC elution time information in the analysis of complex proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Norbeck, Angela D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Daly, Don S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-08-01

    Theoretical tryptic digests of all predicted proteins from the genomes of three organisms of varying complexity were evaluated for specificity and possible utility of combined peptide accurate mass and predicted LC normalized elution time (NET) information. The uniqueness of each peptide was evaluated using its combined mass (+/- 5 ppm and 1 ppm) and NET value (no constraint, +/- 0.05 and 0.01 on a 0-1 NET scale). The set of peptides both underestimates actual biological complexity due to the lack of specific modifications, and overestimates the expected complexity since many proteins will not be present in the sample or observable on the mass spectrometer because of dynamic range limitations. Once a peptide is identified from an LCMS/MS experiment, its mass and elution time is representative of a unique fingerprint for that peptide. The uniqueness of that fingerprint in comparison to that for the other peptides present is indicative of the ability to confidently identify that peptide based on accurate mass and NET measurements. These measurements can be made using HPLC coupled with high resolution MS in a high-throughput manner. Results show that for organisms with comparatively small proteomes, such as Deinococcus radiodurans, modest mass and elution time accuracies are generally adequate for peptide identifications. For more complex proteomes, increasingly accurate easurements are required. However, the majority of proteins should be uniquely identifiable by using LC-MS with mass accuracies within +/- 1 ppm and elution time easurements within +/- 0.01 NET.

  12. Accurate determination of atomic structure of multiwalled carbon nanotubes by nondestructive nanobeam electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zejian; Zhang Qi; Qin Luchang

    2005-05-09

    We report a method that allows direct, systematic, and accurate determination of the atomic structure of multiwalled carbon nanotubes by analyzing the scattering intensities on the nonequatorial layer lines in the electron diffraction pattern. Complete structure determination of a quadruple-walled carbon nanotube is described as an example, and it was found that the intertubular distance varied from 0.36 nm to 0.5 nm with a mean value of 0.42 nm.

  13. Accurate Electron Affinity of Iron and Fine Structures of Negative Iron ions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaolin; Luo, Zhihong; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-01-01

    Ionization potential (IP) is defined as the amount of energy required to remove the most loosely bound electron of an atom, while electron affinity (EA) is defined as the amount of energy released when an electron is attached to a neutral atom. Both IP and EA are critical for understanding chemical properties of an element. In contrast to accurate IPs and structures of neutral atoms, EAs and structures of negative ions are relatively unexplored, especially for the transition metal anions. Here, we report the accurate EA value of Fe and fine structures of Fe− using the slow electron velocity imaging method. These measurements yield a very accurate EA value of Fe, 1235.93(28) cm−1 or 153.236(34) meV. The fine structures of Fe− were also successfully resolved. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations, and also paves the way for improving the EA measurements of other transition metal atoms to the sub cm−1 accuracy. PMID:27138292

  14. Accurate Electron Affinity of Iron and Fine Structures of Negative Iron ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaolin; Luo, Zhihong; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-05-01

    Ionization potential (IP) is defined as the amount of energy required to remove the most loosely bound electron of an atom, while electron affinity (EA) is defined as the amount of energy released when an electron is attached to a neutral atom. Both IP and EA are critical for understanding chemical properties of an element. In contrast to accurate IPs and structures of neutral atoms, EAs and structures of negative ions are relatively unexplored, especially for the transition metal anions. Here, we report the accurate EA value of Fe and fine structures of Fe‑ using the slow electron velocity imaging method. These measurements yield a very accurate EA value of Fe, 1235.93(28) cm‑1 or 153.236(34) meV. The fine structures of Fe‑ were also successfully resolved. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations, and also paves the way for improving the EA measurements of other transition metal atoms to the sub cm‑1 accuracy.

  15. Accurate Electron Affinity of Iron and Fine Structures of Negative Iron ions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaolin; Luo, Zhihong; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-01-01

    Ionization potential (IP) is defined as the amount of energy required to remove the most loosely bound electron of an atom, while electron affinity (EA) is defined as the amount of energy released when an electron is attached to a neutral atom. Both IP and EA are critical for understanding chemical properties of an element. In contrast to accurate IPs and structures of neutral atoms, EAs and structures of negative ions are relatively unexplored, especially for the transition metal anions. Here, we report the accurate EA value of Fe and fine structures of Fe(-) using the slow electron velocity imaging method. These measurements yield a very accurate EA value of Fe, 1235.93(28) cm(-1) or 153.236(34) meV. The fine structures of Fe(-) were also successfully resolved. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations, and also paves the way for improving the EA measurements of other transition metal atoms to the sub cm(-1) accuracy. PMID:27138292

  16. Capturing Accurate and Useful Information on Medication-Related Telenursing Triage Calls.

    PubMed

    Lake, R; Li, L; Baysari, M; Byrne, M; Robinson, M; Westbrook, J I

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses providing telenursing triage and advice services record information on the medication related calls they handle. However the quality and consistency of these data were rarely examined. Our aim was to examine medication related calls made to the healthdirect advice service in November 2014, to assess their basic characteristics and how the data entry format influenced information collected and data consistency. Registered nurses selected the patient question type from a range of categories, and entered the medications involved in a free text field. Medication names were manually extracted from the free text fields. We also compared the selected patient question type with the free text description of the call, in order to gauge data consistency. Results showed that nurses provided patients with advice on medication-related queries in a timely matter (the median call duration of 9 minutes). From 1835 calls, we were able to identify and classify 2156 medications into 384 generic names. However, in 204 cases (11.2% of calls) no medication name was entered. A further 308 (15.0%) of the medication names entered were not identifiable. When we compared the selected patient question with the free text description of calls, we found that these were consistent in 63.27% of cases. Telenursing and triage advice services provide a valuable resource to the public with quick and easily accessible advice. To support nurses provide quality services and record accurate information about the queries, appropriate data entry format and design would be beneficial. PMID:27440292

  17. An accurate, efficient algorithm for calculation of quantum transport in extended structures

    SciTech Connect

    Godin, T.J.; Haydock, R.

    1994-05-01

    In device structures with dimensions comparable to carrier inelastic scattering lengths, the quantum nature of carriers will cause interference effects that cannot be modeled by conventional techniques. The basic equations that govern these ``quantum`` circuit elements present significant numerical challenges. The authors describe the block recursion method, an accurate, efficient method for solving the quantum circuit problem. They demonstrate this method by modeling dirty inversion layers.

  18. Accurate macromolecular structures using minimal measurements from X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Hattne, Johan; Echols, Nathaniel; Tran, Rosalie; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J; Brewster, Aaron S; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Lampe, Alyssa; Han, Guangye; Gul, Sheraz; DiFiore, Dörte; Milathianaki, Despina; Fry, Alan R; Miahnahri, Alan; White, William E; Schafer, Donald W; Seibert, M Marvin; Koglin, Jason E; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sellberg, Jonas; Latimer, Matthew J; Glatzel, Pieter; Zwart, Petrus H; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W; Bogan, Michael J; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J; Boutet, Sébastien; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K; Adams, Paul D; Sauter, Nicholas K

    2014-05-01

    X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources enable the use of crystallography to solve three-dimensional macromolecular structures under native conditions and without radiation damage. Results to date, however, have been limited by the challenge of deriving accurate Bragg intensities from a heterogeneous population of microcrystals, while at the same time modeling the X-ray spectrum and detector geometry. Here we present a computational approach designed to extract meaningful high-resolution signals from fewer diffraction measurements.

  19. PROMALS3D web server for accurate multiple protein sequence and structure alignments.

    PubMed

    Pei, Jimin; Tang, Ming; Grishin, Nick V

    2008-07-01

    Multiple sequence alignments are essential in computational sequence and structural analysis, with applications in homology detection, structure modeling, function prediction and phylogenetic analysis. We report PROMALS3D web server for constructing alignments for multiple protein sequences and/or structures using information from available 3D structures, database homologs and predicted secondary structures. PROMALS3D shows higher alignment accuracy than a number of other advanced methods. Input of PROMALS3D web server can be FASTA format protein sequences, PDB format protein structures and/or user-defined alignment constraints. The output page provides alignments with several formats, including a colored alignment augmented with useful information about sequence grouping, predicted secondary structures and consensus sequences. Intermediate results of sequence and structural database searches are also available. The PROMALS3D web server is available at: http://prodata.swmed.edu/promals3d/. PMID:18503087

  20. Conditional mutual inclusive information enables accurate quantification of associations in gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiujun; Zhao, Juan; Hao, Jin-Kao; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Chen, Luonan

    2015-03-11

    Mutual information (MI), a quantity describing the nonlinear dependence between two random variables, has been widely used to construct gene regulatory networks (GRNs). Despite its good performance, MI cannot separate the direct regulations from indirect ones among genes. Although the conditional mutual information (CMI) is able to identify the direct regulations, it generally underestimates the regulation strength, i.e. it may result in false negatives when inferring gene regulations. In this work, to overcome the problems, we propose a novel concept, namely conditional mutual inclusive information (CMI2), to describe the regulations between genes. Furthermore, with CMI2, we develop a new approach, namely CMI2NI (CMI2-based network inference), for reverse-engineering GRNs. In CMI2NI, CMI2 is used to quantify the mutual information between two genes given a third one through calculating the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the postulated distributions of including and excluding the edge between the two genes. The benchmark results on the GRNs from DREAM challenge as well as the SOS DNA repair network in Escherichia coli demonstrate the superior performance of CMI2NI. Specifically, even for gene expression data with small sample size, CMI2NI can not only infer the correct topology of the regulation networks but also accurately quantify the regulation strength between genes. As a case study, CMI2NI was also used to reconstruct cancer-specific GRNs using gene expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). CMI2NI is freely accessible at http://www.comp-sysbio.org/cmi2ni.

  1. CoMOGrad and PHOG: From Computer Vision to Fast and Accurate Protein Tertiary Structure Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Rezaul; Aziz, Mohd. Momin Al; Shatabda, Swakkhar; Rahman, M. Sohel; Mia, Md. Abul Kashem; Zaman, Farhana; Rakin, Salman

    2015-01-01

    The number of entries in a structural database of proteins is increasing day by day. Methods for retrieving protein tertiary structures from such a large database have turn out to be the key to comparative analysis of structures that plays an important role to understand proteins and their functions. In this paper, we present fast and accurate methods for the retrieval of proteins having tertiary structures similar to a query protein from a large database. Our proposed methods borrow ideas from the field of computer vision. The speed and accuracy of our methods come from the two newly introduced features- the co-occurrence matrix of the oriented gradient and pyramid histogram of oriented gradient- and the use of Euclidean distance as the distance measure. Experimental results clearly indicate the superiority of our approach in both running time and accuracy. Our method is readily available for use from this website: http://research.buet.ac.bd:8080/Comograd/. PMID:26293226

  2. Accurate calculation of control-augmented structural eigenvalue sensitivities using reduced-order models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livne, Eli

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented for generating mode shapes for model order reduction in a way that leads to accurate calculation of eigenvalue derivatives and eigenvalues for a class of control augmented structures. The method is based on treating degrees of freedom where control forces act or masses are changed in a manner analogous to that used for boundary degrees of freedom in component mode synthesis. It is especially suited for structures controlled by a small number of actuators and/or tuned by a small number of concentrated masses whose positions are predetermined. A control augmented multispan beam with closely spaced natural frequencies is used for numerical experimentation. A comparison with reduced-order eigenvalue sensitivity calculations based on the normal modes of the structure shows that the method presented produces significant improvements in accuracy.

  3. Screened exchange hybrid density functional for accurate and efficient structures and interaction energies.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Caldeweyher, Eike; Grimme, Stefan

    2016-06-21

    We extend the recently introduced PBEh-3c global hybrid density functional [S. Grimme et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2015, 143, 054107] by a screened Fock exchange variant based on the Henderson-Janesko-Scuseria exchange hole model. While the excellent performance of the global hybrid is maintained for small covalently bound molecules, its performance for computed condensed phase mass densities is further improved. Most importantly, a speed up of 30 to 50% can be achieved and especially for small orbital energy gap cases, the method is numerically much more robust. The latter point is important for many applications, e.g., for metal-organic frameworks, organic semiconductors, or protein structures. This enables an accurate density functional based electronic structure calculation of a full DNA helix structure on a single core desktop computer which is presented as an example in addition to comprehensive benchmark results. PMID:27240749

  4. The crystallization of biological macromolecules under microgravity: a way to more accurate three-dimensional structures?

    PubMed

    Lorber, Bernard

    2002-09-23

    The crystallization of proteins and other biological particles (including nucleic acids, nucleo-protein complexes and large assemblies such as nucleosomes, ribosomal subunits or viruses) in a microgravity environment can produce crystals having lesser defects than crystals prepared under normal gravity on earth. Such microgravity-grown crystals can diffract X-rays to a higher resolution and have a lower mosaic spread. The inferred electron density maps can be richer in details owing to which more accurate three-dimensional structure models can be built. Major results reported in this field of research are reviewed. Novel ones obtained with the Advanced Protein Crystallization Facility are presented. For structural biology, practical applications and implications associated with crystallization and crystallography onboard the International Space Station are discussed.

  5. Highly Accurate Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions via Incorporating Evolutionary Information and Physicochemical Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng-Wei; You, Zhu-Hong; Chen, Xing; Gui, Jie; Nie, Ru

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) occur at almost all levels of cell functions and play crucial roles in various cellular processes. Thus, identification of PPIs is critical for deciphering the molecular mechanisms and further providing insight into biological processes. Although a variety of high-throughput experimental techniques have been developed to identify PPIs, existing PPI pairs by experimental approaches only cover a small fraction of the whole PPI networks, and further, those approaches hold inherent disadvantages, such as being time-consuming, expensive, and having high false positive rate. Therefore, it is urgent and imperative to develop automatic in silico approaches to predict PPIs efficiently and accurately. In this article, we propose a novel mixture of physicochemical and evolutionary-based feature extraction method for predicting PPIs using our newly developed discriminative vector machine (DVM) classifier. The improvements of the proposed method mainly consist in introducing an effective feature extraction method that can capture discriminative features from the evolutionary-based information and physicochemical characteristics, and then a powerful and robust DVM classifier is employed. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that DVM model is applied to the field of bioinformatics. When applying the proposed method to the Yeast and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) datasets, we obtain excellent prediction accuracies of 94.35% and 90.61%, respectively. The computational results indicate that our method is effective and robust for predicting PPIs, and can be taken as a useful supplementary tool to the traditional experimental methods for future proteomics research. PMID:27571061

  6. Highly Accurate Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions via Incorporating Evolutionary Information and Physicochemical Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Wei; You, Zhu-Hong; Chen, Xing; Gui, Jie; Nie, Ru

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) occur at almost all levels of cell functions and play crucial roles in various cellular processes. Thus, identification of PPIs is critical for deciphering the molecular mechanisms and further providing insight into biological processes. Although a variety of high-throughput experimental techniques have been developed to identify PPIs, existing PPI pairs by experimental approaches only cover a small fraction of the whole PPI networks, and further, those approaches hold inherent disadvantages, such as being time-consuming, expensive, and having high false positive rate. Therefore, it is urgent and imperative to develop automatic in silico approaches to predict PPIs efficiently and accurately. In this article, we propose a novel mixture of physicochemical and evolutionary-based feature extraction method for predicting PPIs using our newly developed discriminative vector machine (DVM) classifier. The improvements of the proposed method mainly consist in introducing an effective feature extraction method that can capture discriminative features from the evolutionary-based information and physicochemical characteristics, and then a powerful and robust DVM classifier is employed. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that DVM model is applied to the field of bioinformatics. When applying the proposed method to the Yeast and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) datasets, we obtain excellent prediction accuracies of 94.35% and 90.61%, respectively. The computational results indicate that our method is effective and robust for predicting PPIs, and can be taken as a useful supplementary tool to the traditional experimental methods for future proteomics research. PMID:27571061

  7. Highly Accurate Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions via Incorporating Evolutionary Information and Physicochemical Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Wei; You, Zhu-Hong; Chen, Xing; Gui, Jie; Nie, Ru

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) occur at almost all levels of cell functions and play crucial roles in various cellular processes. Thus, identification of PPIs is critical for deciphering the molecular mechanisms and further providing insight into biological processes. Although a variety of high-throughput experimental techniques have been developed to identify PPIs, existing PPI pairs by experimental approaches only cover a small fraction of the whole PPI networks, and further, those approaches hold inherent disadvantages, such as being time-consuming, expensive, and having high false positive rate. Therefore, it is urgent and imperative to develop automatic in silico approaches to predict PPIs efficiently and accurately. In this article, we propose a novel mixture of physicochemical and evolutionary-based feature extraction method for predicting PPIs using our newly developed discriminative vector machine (DVM) classifier. The improvements of the proposed method mainly consist in introducing an effective feature extraction method that can capture discriminative features from the evolutionary-based information and physicochemical characteristics, and then a powerful and robust DVM classifier is employed. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that DVM model is applied to the field of bioinformatics. When applying the proposed method to the Yeast and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) datasets, we obtain excellent prediction accuracies of 94.35% and 90.61%, respectively. The computational results indicate that our method is effective and robust for predicting PPIs, and can be taken as a useful supplementary tool to the traditional experimental methods for future proteomics research.

  8. Information processing for aerospace structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenwalner, Peter F.; White, Edward V.; Baumann, Erwin W.

    1998-06-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) technology provides a means to significantly reduce life cycle of aerospace vehicles by eliminating unnecessary inspections, minimizing inspection complexity, and providing accurate diagnostics and prognostics to support vehicle life extension. In order to accomplish this, a comprehensive SHM system will need to acquire data from a wide variety of diverse sensors including strain gages, accelerometers, acoustic emission sensors, crack growth gages, corrosion sensors, and piezoelectric transducers. Significant amounts of computer processing will then be required to convert this raw sensor data into meaningful information which indicates both the diagnostics of the current structural integrity as well as the prognostics necessary for planning and managing the future health of the structure in a cost effective manner. This paper provides a description of the key types of information processing technologies required in an effective SHM system. These include artificial intelligence techniques such as neural networks, expert systems, and fuzzy logic for nonlinear modeling, pattern recognition, and complex decision making; signal processing techniques such as Fourier and wavelet transforms for spectral analysis and feature extraction; statistical algorithms for optimal detection, estimation, prediction, and fusion; and a wide variety of other algorithms for data analysis and visualization. The intent of this paper is to provide an overview of the role of information processing for SHM, discuss various technologies which can contribute to accomplishing this role, and present some example applications of information processing for SHM implemented at the Boeing Company.

  9. Fuzzy Reasoning to More Accurately Determine Void Areas on Optical Micrographs of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominquez, Jesus A.; Tate, Lanetra C.; Wright, M. Clara; Caraccio, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Accomplishing the best-performing composite matrix (resin) requires that not only the processing method but also the cure cycle generate low-void-content structures. If voids are present, the performance of the composite matrix will be significantly reduced. This is usually noticed by significant reductions in matrix-dominated properties, such as compression and shear strength. Voids in composite materials are areas that are absent of the composite components: matrix and fibers. The characteristics of the voids and their accurate estimation are critical to determine for high performance composite structures. One widely used method of performing void analysis on a composite structure sample is acquiring optical micrographs or Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images of lateral sides of the sample and retrieving the void areas within the micrographs/images using an image analysis technique. Segmentation for the retrieval and subsequent computation of void areas within the micrographs/images is challenging as the gray-scaled values of the void areas are close to the gray-scaled values of the matrix leading to the need of manually performing the segmentation based on the histogram of the micrographs/images to retrieve the void areas. The use of an algorithm developed by NASA and based on Fuzzy Reasoning (FR) proved to overcome the difficulty of suitably differentiate void and matrix image areas with similar gray-scaled values leading not only to a more accurate estimation of void areas on composite matrix micrographs but also to a faster void analysis process as the algorithm is fully autonomous.

  10. The R-factor gap in macromolecular crystallography: an untapped potential for insights on accurate structures

    PubMed Central

    Holton, James M; Classen, Scott; Frankel, Kenneth A; Tainer, John A

    2014-01-01

    In macromolecular crystallography, the agreement between observed and predicted structure factors (Rcryst and Rfree) is seldom better than 20%. This is much larger than the estimate of experimental error (Rmerge). The difference between Rcryst and Rmerge is the R-factor gap. There is no such gap in small-molecule crystallography, for which calculated structure factors are generally considered more accurate than the experimental measurements. Perhaps the true noise level of macromolecular data is higher than expected? Or is the gap caused by inaccurate phases that trap refined models in local minima? By generating simulated diffraction patterns using the program MLFSOM, and including every conceivable source of experimental error, we show that neither is the case. Processing our simulated data yielded values that were indistinguishable from those of real data for all crystallographic statistics except the final Rcryst and Rfree. These values decreased to 3.8% and 5.5% for simulated data, suggesting that the reason for high R-factors in macromolecular crystallography is neither experimental error nor phase bias, but rather an underlying inadequacy in the models used to explain our observations. The present inability to accurately represent the entire macromolecule with both its flexibility and its protein-solvent interface may be improved by synergies between small-angle X-ray scattering, computational chemistry and crystallography. The exciting implication of our finding is that macromolecular data contain substantial hidden and untapped potential to resolve ambiguities in the true nature of the nanoscale, a task that the second century of crystallography promises to fulfill. Database Coordinates and structure factors for the real data have been submitted to the Protein Data Bank under accession 4tws. PMID:25040949

  11. Fuzzy Reasoning to More Accurately Determine Void Areas on Optical Micrographs of Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Jesus A.; Tate, Lanetra C.; Wright, M. Clara; Caraccio, Anne

    2013-12-01

    Accomplishing the best-performing composite matrix (resin) requires that not only the processing method but also the cure cycle generate low-void-content structures. If voids are present, the performance of the composite matrix will be significantly reduced. This is usually noticed by significant reductions in matrix-dominated properties, such as compression and shear strength. Voids in composite materials are areas that are absent of the composite components: matrix and fibers. The characteristics of the voids and their accurate estimation are critical to determine for high performance composite structures. One widely used method of performing void analysis on a composite structure sample is acquiring optical micrographs or Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images of lateral sides of the sample and retrieving the void areas within the micrographs/images using an image analysis technique. Segmentation for the retrieval and subsequent computation of void areas within the micrographs/images is challenging as the gray-scaled values of the void areas are close to the gray-scaled values of the matrix leading to the need of manually performing the segmentation based on the histogram of the micrographs/images to retrieve the void areas. The use of an algorithm developed by NASA and based on Fuzzy Reasoning (FR) proved to overcome the difficulty of suitably differentiate void and matrix image areas with similar gray-scaled values leading not only to a more accurate estimation of void areas on composite matrix micrographs but also to a faster void analysis process as the algorithm is fully autonomous.

  12. Accurate airway segmentation based on intensity structure analysis and graph-cut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qier; Kitsaka, Takayuki; Nimura, Yukitaka; Oda, Masahiro; Mori, Kensaku

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a novel airway segmentation method based on intensity structure analysis and graph-cut. Airway segmentation is an important step in analyzing chest CT volumes for computerized lung cancer detection, emphysema diagnosis, asthma diagnosis, and pre- and intra-operative bronchoscope navigation. However, obtaining a complete 3-D airway tree structure from a CT volume is quite challenging. Several researchers have proposed automated algorithms basically based on region growing and machine learning techniques. However these methods failed to detect the peripheral bronchi branches. They caused a large amount of leakage. This paper presents a novel approach that permits more accurate extraction of complex bronchial airway region. Our method are composed of three steps. First, the Hessian analysis is utilized for enhancing the line-like structure in CT volumes, then a multiscale cavity-enhancement filter is employed to detect the cavity-like structure from the previous enhanced result. In the second step, we utilize the support vector machine (SVM) to construct a classifier for removing the FP regions generated. Finally, the graph-cut algorithm is utilized to connect all of the candidate voxels to form an integrated airway tree. We applied this method to sixteen cases of 3D chest CT volumes. The results showed that the branch detection rate of this method can reach about 77.7% without leaking into the lung parenchyma areas.

  13. Beyond Ellipse(s): Accurately Modelling the Isophotal Structure of Galaxies with ISOFIT and CMODEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciambur, B. C.

    2015-09-01

    This work introduces a new fitting formalism for isophotes that enables more accurate modeling of galaxies with non-elliptical shapes, such as disk galaxies viewed edge-on or galaxies with X-shaped/peanut bulges. Within this scheme, the angular parameter that defines quasi-elliptical isophotes is transformed from the commonly used, but inappropriate, polar coordinate to the “eccentric anomaly.” This provides a superior description of deviations from ellipticity, better capturing the true isophotal shape. Furthermore, this makes it possible to accurately recover both the surface brightness profile, using the correct azimuthally averaged isophote, and the two-dimensional model of any galaxy: the hitherto ubiquitous, but artificial, cross-like features in residual images are completely removed. The formalism has been implemented into the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility tasks Ellipse and Bmodel to create the new tasks “Isofit,” and “Cmodel.” The new tools are demonstrated here with application to five galaxies, chosen to be representative case-studies for several areas where this technique makes it possible to gain new scientific insight. Specifically: properly quantifying boxy/disky isophotes via the fourth harmonic order in edge-on galaxies, quantifying X-shaped/peanut bulges, higher-order Fourier moments for modeling bars in disks, and complex isophote shapes. Higher order (n > 4) harmonics now become meaningful and may correlate with structural properties, as boxyness/diskyness is known to do. This work also illustrates how the accurate construction, and subtraction, of a model from a galaxy image facilitates the identification and recovery of over-lapping sources such as globular clusters and the optical counterparts of X-ray sources.

  14. Accurate electronic-structure description of Mn complexes: a GGA+U approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Elise Y.; Kulik, Heather; Marzari, Nicola

    2008-03-01

    Conventional density-functional approach often fail in offering an accurate description of the spin-resolved energetics in transition metals complexes. We will focus here on Mn complexes, where many aspects of the molecular structure and the reaction mechanisms are still unresolved - most notably in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II and the manganese catalase (MC). We apply a self-consistent GGA + U approach [1], originally designed within the DFT framework for the treatment of strongly correlated materials, to describe the geometry, the electronic and the magnetic properties of various manganese oxide complexes, finding very good agreement with higher-order ab-initio calculations. In particular, the different oxidation states of dinuclear systems containing the [Mn2O2]^n+ (n= 2, 3, 4) core are investigated, in order to mimic the basic face unit of the OEC complex. [1]. H. J. Kulik, M. Cococcioni, D. A. Scherlis, N. Marzari, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2006, 97, 103001

  15. Community structure detection based on the neighbor node degree information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Li-Ying; Li, Sheng-Nan; Lin, Jian-Hong; Guo, Qiang; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2016-11-01

    Community structure detection is of great significance for better understanding the network topology property. By taking into account the neighbor degree information of the topological network as the link weight, we present an improved Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF) method for detecting community structure. The results for empirical networks show that the largest improved ratio of the Normalized Mutual Information value could reach 63.21%. Meanwhile, for synthetic networks, the highest Normalized Mutual Information value could closely reach 1, which suggests that the improved method with the optimal λ can detect the community structure more accurately. This work is helpful for understanding the interplay between the link weight and the community structure detection.

  16. Low-energy structures of benzene clusters with a novel accurate potential surface.

    PubMed

    Bartolomei, M; Pirani, F; Marques, J M C

    2015-12-01

    The benzene-benzene (Bz-Bz) interaction is present in several chemical systems and it is known to be crucial in understanding the specificity of important biological phenomena. In this work, we propose a novel Bz-Bz analytical potential energy surface which is fine-tuned on accurate ab initio calculations in order to improve its reliability. Once the Bz-Bz interaction is modeled, an analytical function for the energy of the Bzn clusters may be obtained by summing up over all pair potentials. We apply an evolutionary algorithm (EA) to discover the lowest-energy structures of Bzn clusters (for n=2-25), and the results are compared with previous global optimization studies where different potential functions were employed. Besides the global minimum, the EA also gives the structures of other low-lying isomers ranked by the corresponding energy. Additional ab initio calculations are carried out for the low-lying isomers of Bz3 and Bz4 clusters, and the global minimum is confirmed as the most stable structure for both sizes. Finally, a detailed analysis of the low-energy isomers of the n = 13 and 19 magic-number clusters is performed. The two lowest-energy Bz13 isomers show S6 and C3 symmetry, respectively, which is compatible with the experimental results available in the literature. The Bz19 structures reported here are all non-symmetric, showing two central Bz molecules surrounded by 12 nearest-neighbor monomers in the case of the five lowest-energy structures.

  17. Accurately decoding visual information from fMRI data obtained in a realistic virtual environment

    PubMed Central

    Floren, Andrew; Naylor, Bruce; Miikkulainen, Risto; Ress, David

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional interactive virtual environments (VEs) are a powerful tool for brain-imaging based cognitive neuroscience that are presently under-utilized. This paper presents machine-learning based methods for identifying brain states induced by realistic VEs with improved accuracy as well as the capability for mapping their spatial topography on the neocortex. VEs provide the ability to study the brain under conditions closer to the environment in which humans evolved, and thus to probe deeper into the complexities of human cognition. As a test case, we designed a stimulus to reflect a military combat situation in the Middle East, motivated by the potential of using real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder. Each subject experienced moving through the virtual town where they encountered 1–6 animated combatants at different locations, while fMRI data was collected. To analyze the data from what is, compared to most studies, more complex and less controlled stimuli, we employed statistical machine learning in the form of Multi-Voxel Pattern Analysis (MVPA) with special attention given to artificial Neural Networks (NN). Extensions to NN that exploit the block structure of the stimulus were developed to improve the accuracy of the classification, achieving performances from 58 to 93% (chance was 16.7%) with six subjects. This demonstrates that MVPA can decode a complex cognitive state, viewing a number of characters, in a dynamic virtual environment. To better understand the source of this information in the brain, a novel form of sensitivity analysis was developed to use NN to quantify the degree to which each voxel contributed to classification. Compared with maps produced by general linear models and the searchlight approach, these sensitivity maps revealed a more diverse pattern of information relevant to the classification of cognitive state. PMID:26106315

  18. Toward Hamiltonian Adaptive QM/MM: Accurate Solvent Structures Using Many-Body Potentials.

    PubMed

    Boereboom, Jelle M; Potestio, Raffaello; Donadio, Davide; Bulo, Rosa E

    2016-08-01

    Adaptive quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical (MM) methods enable efficient molecular simulations of chemistry in solution. Reactive subregions are modeled with an accurate QM potential energy expression while the rest of the system is described in a more approximate manner (MM). As solvent molecules diffuse in and out of the reactive region, they are gradually included into (and excluded from) the QM expression. It would be desirable to model such a system with a single adaptive Hamiltonian, but thus far this has resulted in distorted structures at the boundary between the two regions. Solving this long outstanding problem will allow microcanonical adaptive QM/MM simulations that can be used to obtain vibrational spectra and dynamical properties. The difficulty lies in the complex QM potential energy expression, with a many-body expansion that contains higher order terms. Here, we outline a Hamiltonian adaptive multiscale scheme within the framework of many-body potentials. The adaptive expressions are entirely general, and complementary to all standard (nonadaptive) QM/MM embedding schemes available. We demonstrate the merit of our approach on a molecular system defined by two different MM potentials (MM/MM'). For the long-range interactions a numerical scheme is used (particle mesh Ewald), which yields energy expressions that are many-body in nature. Our Hamiltonian approach is the first to provide both energy conservation and the correct solvent structure everywhere in this system. PMID:27332140

  19. Accurate molecular structure and spectroscopic properties for nucleobases: A combined computational - microwave investigation of 2-thiouracil as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo; Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2015-01-01

    The computational composite scheme purposely set up for accurately describing the electronic structure and spectroscopic properties of small biomolecules has been applied to the first study of the rotational spectrum of 2-thiouracil. The experimental investigation was made possible thanks to the combination of the laser ablation technique with Fourier Transform Microwave spectrometers. The joint experimental – computational study allowed us to determine accurate molecular structure and spectroscopic properties for the title molecule, but more important, it demonstrates a reliable approach for the accurate investigation of isolated small biomolecules. PMID:24002739

  20. Informational laws of genome structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnici, Vincenzo; Manca, Vincenzo

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, the analysis of genomes by means of strings of length k occurring in the genomes, called k-mers, has provided important insights into the basic mechanisms and design principles of genome structures. In the present study, we focus on the proper choice of the value of k for applying information theoretic concepts that express intrinsic aspects of genomes. The value k = lg2(n), where n is the genome length, is determined to be the best choice in the definition of some genomic informational indexes that are studied and computed for seventy genomes. These indexes, which are based on information entropies and on suitable comparisons with random genomes, suggest five informational laws, to which all of the considered genomes obey. Moreover, an informational genome complexity measure is proposed, which is a generalized logistic map that balances entropic and anti-entropic components of genomes and is related to their evolutionary dynamics. Finally, applications to computational synthetic biology are briefly outlined.

  1. Informational laws of genome structures

    PubMed Central

    Bonnici, Vincenzo; Manca, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the analysis of genomes by means of strings of length k occurring in the genomes, called k-mers, has provided important insights into the basic mechanisms and design principles of genome structures. In the present study, we focus on the proper choice of the value of k for applying information theoretic concepts that express intrinsic aspects of genomes. The value k = lg2(n), where n is the genome length, is determined to be the best choice in the definition of some genomic informational indexes that are studied and computed for seventy genomes. These indexes, which are based on information entropies and on suitable comparisons with random genomes, suggest five informational laws, to which all of the considered genomes obey. Moreover, an informational genome complexity measure is proposed, which is a generalized logistic map that balances entropic and anti-entropic components of genomes and is related to their evolutionary dynamics. Finally, applications to computational synthetic biology are briefly outlined. PMID:27354155

  2. Informational laws of genome structures.

    PubMed

    Bonnici, Vincenzo; Manca, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the analysis of genomes by means of strings of length k occurring in the genomes, called k-mers, has provided important insights into the basic mechanisms and design principles of genome structures. In the present study, we focus on the proper choice of the value of k for applying information theoretic concepts that express intrinsic aspects of genomes. The value k = lg2(n), where n is the genome length, is determined to be the best choice in the definition of some genomic informational indexes that are studied and computed for seventy genomes. These indexes, which are based on information entropies and on suitable comparisons with random genomes, suggest five informational laws, to which all of the considered genomes obey. Moreover, an informational genome complexity measure is proposed, which is a generalized logistic map that balances entropic and anti-entropic components of genomes and is related to their evolutionary dynamics. Finally, applications to computational synthetic biology are briefly outlined. PMID:27354155

  3. Straightforward and accurate technique for post-coupler stabilization in drift tube linac structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalvati, Mohammad Reza; Ramberger, Suitbert

    2016-04-01

    The axial electric field of Alvarez drift tube linacs (DTLs) is known to be susceptible to variations due to static and dynamic effects like manufacturing tolerances and beam loading. Post-couplers are used to stabilize the accelerating fields of DTLs against tuning errors. Tilt sensitivity and its slope have been introduced as measures for the stability right from the invention of post-couplers but since then the actual stabilization has mostly been done by tedious iteration. In the present article, the local tilt-sensitivity slope TSn' is established as the principal measure for stabilization instead of tilt sensitivity or some visual slope, and its significance is developed on the basis of an equivalent-circuit diagram of the DTL. Experimental and 3D simulation results are used to analyze its behavior and to define a technique for stabilization that allows finding the best post-coupler settings with just four tilt-sensitivity measurements. CERN's Linac4 DTL Tank 2 and Tank 3 have been stabilized successfully using this technique. The final tilt-sensitivity error has been reduced from ±100 %/MHz down to ±3 %/MHz for Tank 2 and down to ±1 %/MHz for Tank 3. Finally, an accurate procedure for tuning the structure using slug tuners is discussed.

  4. Coding exon-structure aware realigner (CESAR) utilizes genome alignments for accurate comparative gene annotation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Virag; Elghafari, Anas; Hiller, Michael

    2016-06-20

    Identifying coding genes is an essential step in genome annotation. Here, we utilize existing whole genome alignments to detect conserved coding exons and then map gene annotations from one genome to many aligned genomes. We show that genome alignments contain thousands of spurious frameshifts and splice site mutations in exons that are truly conserved. To overcome these limitations, we have developed CESAR (Coding Exon-Structure Aware Realigner) that realigns coding exons, while considering reading frame and splice sites of each exon. CESAR effectively avoids spurious frameshifts in conserved genes and detects 91% of shifted splice sites. This results in the identification of thousands of additional conserved exons and 99% of the exons that lack inactivating mutations match real exons. Finally, to demonstrate the potential of using CESAR for comparative gene annotation, we applied it to 188 788 exons of 19 865 human genes to annotate human genes in 99 other vertebrates. These comparative gene annotations are available as a resource (http://bds.mpi-cbg.de/hillerlab/CESAR/). CESAR (https://github.com/hillerlab/CESAR/) can readily be applied to other alignments to accurately annotate coding genes in many other vertebrate and invertebrate genomes. PMID:27016733

  5. Can Raters with Reduced Job Descriptive Information Provide Accurate Position Analysis Questionnaire (PAQ) Ratings?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Lee; Harvey, Robert J.

    1986-01-01

    Job-naive raters provided with job descriptive information made Position Analysis Questionnaire (PAQ) ratings which were validated against ratings of job analysts who were also job content experts. None of the reduced job descriptive information conditions enabled job-naive raters to obtain either acceptable levels of convergent validity with…

  6. 16 CFR 1101.32 - Reasonable steps to assure information is accurate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to release to the public: (1) The Commission staff or a qualified person or entity outside the... will review the information in light of the comments. The degree of review by the Commission and...

  7. An examination of information quality as a moderator of accurate personality judgment.

    PubMed

    Letzring, Tera D; Human, Lauren J

    2014-10-01

    Information quality is an important moderator of the accuracy of personality judgment, and this article describes research focusing on how specific kinds of information are related to accuracy. In this study, 228 participants (159 female, 69 male; mean age = 23.43; 86.4% Caucasian) in unacquainted dyads were assigned to discuss thoughts and feelings, discuss behaviors, or engage in behaviors. Interactions lasted 25-30 min, and participants provided ratings of their partners and themselves following the interaction on the Big Five traits, ego-control, and ego-resiliency. Next, the amount of different types of information made available by each participant was objectively coded. The accuracy criterion, composed of self- and acquaintance ratings, was used to assess distinctive and normative accuracy using the Social Accuracy Model. Participants in the discussion conditions achieved higher distinctive accuracy than participants who engaged in behaviors, but normative accuracy did not differ across conditions. Information about specific behaviors and general behaviors were among the most consistent predictors of higher distinctive accuracy. Normative accuracy was more likely to decrease than increase when higher-quality information was available. Verbal information about behaviors is the most useful for learning about how people are unique.

  8. Encoding information into precipitation structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Kirsten; Bena, Ioana; Droz, Michel; Rácz, Zoltan

    2008-12-01

    Material design at submicron scales would be profoundly affected if the formation of precipitation patterns could be easily controlled. It would allow the direct building of bulk structures, in contrast to traditional techniques which consist of removing material in order to create patterns. Here, we discuss an extension of our recent proposal of using electrical currents to control precipitation bands which emerge in the wake of reaction fronts in A+ + B- → C reaction-diffusion processes. Our main result, based on simulating the reaction-diffusion-precipitation equations, is that the dynamics of the charged agents can be guided by an appropriately designed time-dependent electric current so that, in addition to the control of the band spacing, the width of the precipitation bands can also be tuned. This makes straightforward the encoding of information into precipitation patterns and, as an amusing example, we demonstrate the feasibility by showing how to encode a musical rhythm.

  9. Honey bees can perform accurately directed waggle dances based solely on information from a homeward trip.

    PubMed

    Edrich, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Honey bees were displaced several 100 m from their hive to an unfamiliar site and provisioned with honey. After feeding, almost two-thirds of the bees flew home to their hive within a 50 min observation time. About half of these returning, bees signalled the direction of the release site in waggle dances thus demonstrating that the dance can be guided entirely by information gathered on a single homeward trip. The likely reason for the bees' enthusiastic dancing on their initial return from this new site was the highly rewarding honeycomb that they were given there. The attractive nature of the site is confirmed by many of these bees revisiting the site and continuing to forage there.

  10. Computerized management information systems and organizational structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zannetos, Z. S.; Sertel, M. R.

    1970-01-01

    The computerized management of information systems and organizational structures is discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) critical factors favoring centralization and decentralization of organizations, (2) classification of organizations by relative structure, (3) attempts to measure change in organization structure, and (4) impact of information technology developments on organizational structure changes.

  11. Accurate localization of supernumerary mediastinal parathyroid adenomas by a combination of structural and functional imaging.

    PubMed

    Mackie, G C; Schlicht, S M

    2004-09-01

    Reoperation for refractory or recurrent hyperparathyroidism following parathyroidectomy carries the potential for increased morbidity and the possibility of failure to localize and remove the lesion intraoperatively. Reported herein are three cases demonstrating the combined use of sestamibi scintigraphy, CT and MR for accurate localization of mediastinal parathyroid adenomas.

  12. The Informational Text Structure Survey (ITS[superscript 2]): An Exploration of Primary Grade Teachers' Sensitivity to Text Structure in Young Children's Informational Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reutzel, D. Ray; Jones, Cindy D.; Clark, Sarah K.; Kumar, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    There has been no research reported about if or how well primary grade teachers can identify information text structures in children's authentic informational texts. The ability to do so accurately and reliably is a prerequisite for teachers to be able to teach students how to recognize and use text structures to assist them in comprehending…

  13. Dielectric-dependent Density Functionals for Accurate Electronic Structure Calculations of Molecules and Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skone, Jonathan; Govoni, Marco; Galli, Giulia

    Dielectric-dependent hybrid [DDH] functionals have recently been shown to yield highly accurate energy gaps and dielectric constants for a wide variety of solids, at a computational cost considerably less than standard GW calculations. The fraction of exact exchange included in the definition of DDH functionals depends (self-consistently) on the dielectric constant of the material. In the present talk we introduce a range-separated (RS) version of DDH functionals where short and long-range components are matched using material dependent, non-empirical parameters. Comparing with state of the art GW calculations and experiment, we show that such RS hybrids yield accurate electronic properties of both molecules and solids, including energy gaps, photoelectron spectra and absolute ionization potentials. This work was supported by NSF-CCI Grant Number NSF-CHE-0802907 and DOE-BES.

  14. Revisiting the blind tests in crystal structure prediction: accurate energy ranking of molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Asmadi, Aldi; Neumann, Marcus A; Kendrick, John; Girard, Pascale; Perrin, Marc-Antoine; Leusen, Frank J J

    2009-12-24

    In the 2007 blind test of crystal structure prediction hosted by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), a hybrid DFT/MM method correctly ranked each of the four experimental structures as having the lowest lattice energy of all the crystal structures predicted for each molecule. The work presented here further validates this hybrid method by optimizing the crystal structures (experimental and submitted) of the first three CCDC blind tests held in 1999, 2001, and 2004. Except for the crystal structures of compound IX, all structures were reminimized and ranked according to their lattice energies. The hybrid method computes the lattice energy of a crystal structure as the sum of the DFT total energy and a van der Waals (dispersion) energy correction. Considering all four blind tests, the crystal structure with the lowest lattice energy corresponds to the experimentally observed structure for 12 out of 14 molecules. Moreover, good geometrical agreement is observed between the structures determined by the hybrid method and those measured experimentally. In comparison with the correct submissions made by the blind test participants, all hybrid optimized crystal structures (apart from compound II) have the smallest calculated root mean squared deviations from the experimentally observed structures. It is predicted that a new polymorph of compound V exists under pressure.

  15. Revisiting the blind tests in crystal structure prediction: accurate energy ranking of molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Asmadi, Aldi; Neumann, Marcus A; Kendrick, John; Girard, Pascale; Perrin, Marc-Antoine; Leusen, Frank J J

    2009-12-24

    In the 2007 blind test of crystal structure prediction hosted by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), a hybrid DFT/MM method correctly ranked each of the four experimental structures as having the lowest lattice energy of all the crystal structures predicted for each molecule. The work presented here further validates this hybrid method by optimizing the crystal structures (experimental and submitted) of the first three CCDC blind tests held in 1999, 2001, and 2004. Except for the crystal structures of compound IX, all structures were reminimized and ranked according to their lattice energies. The hybrid method computes the lattice energy of a crystal structure as the sum of the DFT total energy and a van der Waals (dispersion) energy correction. Considering all four blind tests, the crystal structure with the lowest lattice energy corresponds to the experimentally observed structure for 12 out of 14 molecules. Moreover, good geometrical agreement is observed between the structures determined by the hybrid method and those measured experimentally. In comparison with the correct submissions made by the blind test participants, all hybrid optimized crystal structures (apart from compound II) have the smallest calculated root mean squared deviations from the experimentally observed structures. It is predicted that a new polymorph of compound V exists under pressure. PMID:19950907

  16. Accurate metal-site structures in proteins obtained by combining experimental data and quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ryde, Ulf

    2007-02-14

    The use of molecular mechanics calculations to supplement experimental data in standard X-ray crystallography and NMR refinements is discussed and it is shown that structures can be locally improved by the use of quantum chemical calculations. Such calculations can also be used to interpret the structures, e.g. to decide the protonation state of metal-bound ligands. They have shown that metal sites in crystal structures are frequently photoreduced or disordered, which makes the interpretation of the structures hard. Similar methods can be used for EXAFS refinements to obtain a full atomic structure, rather than a set of metal-ligand distances.

  17. Seeking: Accurate Measurement Techniques for Deep-Bone Density and Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibonga, Jean

    2009-01-01

    We are seeking a clinically-useful technology with enough sensitivity to assess the microstructure of "spongy" bone that is found in the marrow cavities of whole bones. However, this technology must be for skeletal sites surrounded by layers of soft tissues, such as the spine and the hip. Soft tissue interferes with conventional imaging and using a more accessible area -- for example, the wrist or the ankle of limbs-- as a proxy for the less accessible skeletal regions, will not be accurate. A non-radioactive technology is strongly preferred.

  18. Accurate first-principles structures and energies of diversely bonded systems from an efficient density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianwei; Remsing, Richard C.; Zhang, Yubo; Sun, Zhaoru; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Peng, Haowei; Yang, Zenghui; Paul, Arpita; Waghmare, Umesh; Wu, Xifan; Klein, Michael L.; Perdew, John P.

    2016-09-01

    One atom or molecule binds to another through various types of bond, the strengths of which range from several meV to several eV. Although some computational methods can provide accurate descriptions of all bond types, those methods are not efficient enough for many studies (for example, large systems, ab initio molecular dynamics and high-throughput searches for functional materials). Here, we show that the recently developed non-empirical strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) within the density functional theory framework predicts accurate geometries and energies of diversely bonded molecules and materials (including covalent, metallic, ionic, hydrogen and van der Waals bonds). This represents a significant improvement at comparable efficiency over its predecessors, the GGAs that currently dominate materials computation. Often, SCAN matches or improves on the accuracy of a computationally expensive hybrid functional, at almost-GGA cost. SCAN is therefore expected to have a broad impact on chemistry and materials science.

  19. Accurate first-principles structures and energies of diversely bonded systems from an efficient density functional.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianwei; Remsing, Richard C; Zhang, Yubo; Sun, Zhaoru; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Peng, Haowei; Yang, Zenghui; Paul, Arpita; Waghmare, Umesh; Wu, Xifan; Klein, Michael L; Perdew, John P

    2016-09-01

    One atom or molecule binds to another through various types of bond, the strengths of which range from several meV to several eV. Although some computational methods can provide accurate descriptions of all bond types, those methods are not efficient enough for many studies (for example, large systems, ab initio molecular dynamics and high-throughput searches for functional materials). Here, we show that the recently developed non-empirical strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) within the density functional theory framework predicts accurate geometries and energies of diversely bonded molecules and materials (including covalent, metallic, ionic, hydrogen and van der Waals bonds). This represents a significant improvement at comparable efficiency over its predecessors, the GGAs that currently dominate materials computation. Often, SCAN matches or improves on the accuracy of a computationally expensive hybrid functional, at almost-GGA cost. SCAN is therefore expected to have a broad impact on chemistry and materials science. PMID:27554409

  20. Information Content of Molecular Structures

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, David C.; Aynechi, Tiba; Voelz, Vincent A.; Kuntz, Irwin D.

    2003-01-01

    For a completely enumerated set of conformers of a macromolecule or for exhaustive lattice walks of model polymers it is straightforward to use Shannon information theory to deduce the information content of the ensemble. It is also practicable to develop numerical measures of the information content of sets of exact distance constraints applied to specific conformational ensembles. We examine the effects of experimental uncertainties by considering “noisy” constraints. The introduction of noise requires additional assumptions about noise distribution and conformational clustering protocols that make the problem of measuring information content more complex. We make use of a standard concept in communication theory, the “noise sphere,” to link uncertainty in measurements to information loss. Most of our numerical results are derived from two-dimensional lattice ensembles. Expressing results in terms of information per degree of freedom removes almost all of the chain length dependence. We also explore off-lattice polyalanine chains that yield surprisingly similar results. PMID:12829474

  1. Preferential access to genetic information from endogenous hominin ancient DNA and accurate quantitative SNP-typing via SPEX

    PubMed Central

    Brotherton, Paul; Sanchez, Juan J.; Cooper, Alan; Endicott, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of targeted genetic loci from ancient, forensic and clinical samples is usually built upon polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-generated sequence data. However, many studies have shown that PCR amplification from poor-quality DNA templates can create sequence artefacts at significant levels. With hominin (human and other hominid) samples, the pervasive presence of highly PCR-amplifiable human DNA contaminants in the vast majority of samples can lead to the creation of recombinant hybrids and other non-authentic artefacts. The resulting PCR-generated sequences can then be difficult, if not impossible, to authenticate. In contrast, single primer extension (SPEX)-based approaches can genotype single nucleotide polymorphisms from ancient fragments of DNA as accurately as modern DNA. A single SPEX-type assay can amplify just one of the duplex DNA strands at target loci and generate a multi-fold depth-of-coverage, with non-authentic recombinant hybrids reduced to undetectable levels. Crucially, SPEX-type approaches can preferentially access genetic information from damaged and degraded endogenous ancient DNA templates over modern human DNA contaminants. The development of SPEX-type assays offers the potential for highly accurate, quantitative genotyping from ancient hominin samples. PMID:19864251

  2. HAAD: A quick algorithm for accurate prediction of hydrogen atoms in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunqi; Roy, Ambrish; Zhang, Yang

    2009-08-20

    Hydrogen constitutes nearly half of all atoms in proteins and their positions are essential for analyzing hydrogen-bonding interactions and refining atomic-level structures. However, most protein structures determined by experiments or computer prediction lack hydrogen coordinates. We present a new algorithm, HAAD, to predict the positions of hydrogen atoms based on the positions of heavy atoms. The algorithm is built on the basic rules of orbital hybridization followed by the optimization of steric repulsion and electrostatic interactions. We tested the algorithm using three independent data sets: ultra-high-resolution X-ray structures, structures determined by neutron diffraction, and NOE proton-proton distances. Compared with the widely used programs CHARMM and REDUCE, HAAD has a significantly higher accuracy, with the average RMSD of the predicted hydrogen atoms to the X-ray and neutron diffraction structures decreased by 26% and 11%, respectively. Furthermore, hydrogen atoms placed by HAAD have more matches with the NOE restraints and fewer clashes with heavy atoms. The average CPU cost by HAAD is 18 and 8 times lower than that of CHARMM and REDUCE, respectively. The significant advantage of HAAD in both the accuracy and the speed of the hydrogen additions should make HAAD a useful tool for the detailed study of protein structure and function. Both an executable and the source code of HAAD are freely available at http://zhang.bioinformatics.ku.edu/HAAD.

  3. Fine structure in proton radioactivity: An accurate tool to ascertain the breaking of axial symmetry in {sup 145}Tm

    SciTech Connect

    Arumugam, P.; Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.

    2008-10-15

    With a proper formalism for proton emission from triaxially deformed nuclei, we perform exact calculations of decay widths for the decays to ground and first excited 2{sup +} states in the daughter nucleus. Our results for rotational spectrum, decay width and fine structure in the case of the nucleus {sup 145}Tm lead for the first time to an accurate identification of triaxial deformation using proton emission. This work also puts in evidence the advantage of proton emission over the conventional probes to study nuclear structure at the proton drip-line.

  4. SCAN: An Efficient Density Functional Yielding Accurate Structures and Energies of Diversely-Bonded Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianwei

    The accuracy and computational efficiency of the widely used Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) are limited by the approximation to its exchange-correlation energy Exc. The earliest local density approximation (LDA) overestimates the strengths of all bonds near equilibrium (even the vdW bonds). By adding the electron density gradient to model Exc, generalized gradient approximations (GGAs) generally soften the bonds to give robust and overall more accurate descriptions, except for the vdW interaction which is largely lost. Further improvement for covalent, ionic, and hydrogen bonds can be obtained by the computationally more expensive hybrid GGAs, which mix GGAs with the nonlocal exact exchange. Meta-GGAs are still semilocal in computation and thus efficient. Compared to GGAs, they add the kinetic energy density that enables them to recognize and accordingly treat different bonds, which no LDA or GGA can. We show here that the recently developed non-empirical strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) meta-GGA improves significantly over LDA and the standard Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof GGA for geometries and energies of diversely-bonded materials (including covalent, metallic, ionic, hydrogen, and vdW bonds) at comparable efficiency. Often SCAN matches or improves upon the accuracy of a hybrid functional, at almost-GGA cost. This work has been supported by NSF under DMR-1305135 and CNS-09-58854, and by DOE BES EFRC CCDM under DE-SC0012575.

  5. Accurate Fabrication of Hydroxyapatite Bone Models with Porous Scaffold Structures by Using Stereolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Chiaki; Tasaki, Satoko; Kirihara, Soshu

    2011-05-01

    Computer graphic models of bioscaffolds with four-coordinate lattice structures of solid rods in artificial bones were designed by using a computer aided design. The scaffold models composed of acryl resin with hydroxyapatite particles at 45vol. % were fabricated by using stereolithography of a computer aided manufacturing. After dewaxing and sintering heat treatment processes, the ceramics scaffold models with four-coordinate lattices and fine hydroxyapatite microstructures were obtained successfully. By using a computer aided analysis, it was found that bio-fluids could flow extensively inside the sintered scaffolds. This result shows that the lattice structures will realize appropriate bio-fluid circulations and promote regenerations of new bones.

  6. Accurate structure and dynamics of the metal-site of paramagnetic metalloproteins from NMR parameters using natural bond orbitals.

    PubMed

    Hansen, D Flemming; Westler, William M; Kunze, Micha B A; Markley, John L; Weinhold, Frank; Led, Jens J

    2012-03-14

    A natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis of unpaired electron spin density in metalloproteins is presented, which allows a fast and robust calculation of paramagnetic NMR parameters. Approximately 90% of the unpaired electron spin density occupies metal-ligand NBOs, allowing the majority of the density to be modeled by only a few NBOs that reflect the chemical bonding environment. We show that the paramagnetic relaxation rate of protons can be calculated accurately using only the metal-ligand NBOs and that these rates are in good agreement with corresponding rates measured experimentally. This holds, in particular, for protons of ligand residues where the point-dipole approximation breaks down. To describe the paramagnetic relaxation of heavy nuclei, also the electron spin density in the local orbitals must be taken into account. Geometric distance restraints for (15)N can be derived from the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and the Fermi contact shift when local NBOs are included in the analysis. Thus, the NBO approach allows us to include experimental paramagnetic NMR parameters of (15)N nuclei as restraints in a structure optimization protocol. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and structure determination of oxidized rubredoxin using the experimentally obtained paramagnetic NMR parameters of (15)N. The corresponding structures obtained are in good agreement with the crystal structure of rubredoxin. Thus, the NBO approach allows an accurate description of the geometric structure and the dynamics of metalloproteins, when NMR parameters are available of nuclei in the immediate vicinity of the metal-site.

  7. Accurate Structure and Dynamics of the Metal-Site of Paramagnetic Metalloproteins from NMR Parameters Using Natural Bond Orbitals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis of unpaired electron spin density in metalloproteins is presented, which allows a fast and robust calculation of paramagnetic NMR parameters. Approximately 90% of the unpaired electron spin density occupies metal–ligand NBOs, allowing the majority of the density to be modeled by only a few NBOs that reflect the chemical bonding environment. We show that the paramagnetic relaxation rate of protons can be calculated accurately using only the metal–ligand NBOs and that these rates are in good agreement with corresponding rates measured experimentally. This holds, in particular, for protons of ligand residues where the point-dipole approximation breaks down. To describe the paramagnetic relaxation of heavy nuclei, also the electron spin density in the local orbitals must be taken into account. Geometric distance restraints for 15N can be derived from the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and the Fermi contact shift when local NBOs are included in the analysis. Thus, the NBO approach allows us to include experimental paramagnetic NMR parameters of 15N nuclei as restraints in a structure optimization protocol. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and structure determination of oxidized rubredoxin using the experimentally obtained paramagnetic NMR parameters of 15N. The corresponding structures obtained are in good agreement with the crystal structure of rubredoxin. Thus, the NBO approach allows an accurate description of the geometric structure and the dynamics of metalloproteins, when NMR parameters are available of nuclei in the immediate vicinity of the metal-site. PMID:22329704

  8. Information Structure, Grammar and Strategy in Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Jon

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines two information-structural phenomena, Givenness and Focus, from the perspective of both syntax and pragmatics. Evidence from English, German and other languages suggests a "split" analysis of information structure--the notions of Focus and Givenness, often thought to be closely related, exist independently at…

  9. Information Handling, Organizational Structure, and Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckland, Michael K.

    1989-01-01

    Uses examples from military strategic communications to demonstrate that organizational structures and the distribution of power within organizational structures adapt to changes in information handling capability. It is concluded that delegation and decentralization can be viewed as indicative of inadequate information handling and that improved…

  10. CRYSpred: accurate sequence-based protein crystallization propensity prediction using sequence-derived structural characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mizianty, Marcin J; Kurgan, Lukasz A

    2012-01-01

    Relatively low success rates of X-ray crystallography, which is the most popular method for solving proteins structures, motivate development of novel methods that support selection of tractable protein targets. This aspect is particularly important in the context of the current structural genomics efforts that allow for a certain degree of flexibility in the target selection. We propose CRYSpred, a novel in-silico crystallization propensity predictor that uses a set of 15 novel features which utilize a broad range of inputs including charge, hydrophobicity, and amino acid composition derived from the protein chain, and the solvent accessibility and disorder predicted from the protein sequence. Our method outperforms seven modern crystallization propensity predictors on three, independent from training dataset, benchmark test datasets. The strong predictive performance offered by the CRYSpred is attributed to the careful design of the features, utilization of the comprehensive set of inputs, and the usage of the Support Vector Machine classifier. The inputs utilized by CRYSpred are well-aligned with the existing rules-of-thumb that are used in the structural genomics studies. PMID:21919861

  11. CRYSpred: accurate sequence-based protein crystallization propensity prediction using sequence-derived structural characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mizianty, Marcin J; Kurgan, Lukasz A

    2012-01-01

    Relatively low success rates of X-ray crystallography, which is the most popular method for solving proteins structures, motivate development of novel methods that support selection of tractable protein targets. This aspect is particularly important in the context of the current structural genomics efforts that allow for a certain degree of flexibility in the target selection. We propose CRYSpred, a novel in-silico crystallization propensity predictor that uses a set of 15 novel features which utilize a broad range of inputs including charge, hydrophobicity, and amino acid composition derived from the protein chain, and the solvent accessibility and disorder predicted from the protein sequence. Our method outperforms seven modern crystallization propensity predictors on three, independent from training dataset, benchmark test datasets. The strong predictive performance offered by the CRYSpred is attributed to the careful design of the features, utilization of the comprehensive set of inputs, and the usage of the Support Vector Machine classifier. The inputs utilized by CRYSpred are well-aligned with the existing rules-of-thumb that are used in the structural genomics studies.

  12. Accurate flexible fitting of high-resolution protein structures to small-angle x-ray scattering data using a coarse-grained model with implicit hydration shell.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjun; Tekpinar, Mustafa

    2011-12-21

    Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) is a powerful technique widely used to explore conformational states and transitions of biomolecular assemblies in solution. For accurate model reconstruction from SAXS data, one promising approach is to flexibly fit a known high-resolution protein structure to low-resolution SAXS data by computer simulations. This is a highly challenging task due to low information content in SAXS data. To meet this challenge, we have developed what we believe to be a novel method based on a coarse-grained (one-bead-per-residue) protein representation and a modified form of the elastic network model that allows large-scale conformational changes while maintaining pseudobonds and secondary structures. Our method optimizes a pseudoenergy that combines the modified elastic-network model energy with a SAXS-fitting score and a collision energy that penalizes steric collisions. Our method uses what we consider a new implicit hydration shell model that accounts for the contribution of hydration shell to SAXS data accurately without explicitly adding waters to the system. We have rigorously validated our method using five test cases with simulated SAXS data and three test cases with experimental SAXS data. Our method has successfully generated high-quality structural models with root mean-squared deviation of 1 ∼ 3 Å from the target structures.

  13. Accurate structure prediction of peptide–MHC complexes for identifying highly immunogenic antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Min-Sun; Park, Sung Yong; Miller, Keith R.; Collins, Edward J.; Lee, Ha Youn

    2013-11-01

    Designing an optimal HIV-1 vaccine faces the challenge of identifying antigens that induce a broad immune capacity. One factor to control the breadth of T cell responses is the surface morphology of a peptide–MHC complex. Here, we present an in silico protocol for predicting peptide–MHC structure. A robust signature of a conformational transition was identified during all-atom molecular dynamics, which results in a model with high accuracy. A large test set was used in constructing our protocol and we went another step further using a blind test with a wild-type peptide and two highly immunogenic mutants, which predicted substantial conformational changes in both mutants. The center residues at position five of the analogs were configured to be accessible to solvent, forming a prominent surface, while the residue of the wild-type peptide was to point laterally toward the side of the binding cleft. We then experimentally determined the structures of the blind test set, using high resolution of X-ray crystallography, which verified predicted conformational changes. Our observation strongly supports a positive association of the surface morphology of a peptide–MHC complex to its immunogenicity. Our study offers the prospect of enhancing immunogenicity of vaccines by identifying MHC binding immunogens.

  14. The Dirac equation in electronic structure calculations: Accurate evaluation of DFT predictions for actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, John M; Mattsson, Ann E

    2012-06-06

    Brooks, Johansson, and Skriver, using the LMTO-ASA method and considerable insight, were able to explain many of the ground state properties of the actinides. In the many years since this work was done, electronic structure calculations of increasing sophistication have been applied to actinide elements and compounds, attempting to quantify the applicability of DFT to actinides and actinide compounds and to try to incorporate other methodologies (i.e. DMFT) into DFT calculations. Through these calculations, the limits of both available density functionals and ad hoc methodologies are starting to become clear. However, it has also become clear that approximations used to incorporate relativity are not adequate to provide rigorous tests of the underlying equations of DFT, not to mention ad hoc additions. In this talk, we describe the result of full-potential LMTO calculations for the elemental actinides, comparing results obtained with a full Dirac basis with those obtained from scalar-relativistic bases, with and without variational spin-orbit. This comparison shows that the scalar relativistic treatment of actinides does not have sufficient accuracy to provide a rigorous test of theory and that variational spin-orbit introduces uncontrolled errors in the results of electronic structure calculations on actinide elements.

  15. A FIB-nanotomography method for accurate 3D reconstruction of open nanoporous structures.

    PubMed

    Mangipudi, K R; Radisch, V; Holzer, L; Volkert, C A

    2016-04-01

    We present an automated focused ion beam nanotomography method for nanoporous microstructures with open porosity, and apply it to reconstruct nanoporous gold (np-Au) structures with ligament sizes on the order of a few tens of nanometers. This method uses serial sectioning of a well-defined wedge-shaped geometry to determine the thickness of individual slices from the changes in the sample width in successive cross-sectional images. The pore space of a selected region of the np-Au is infiltrated with ion-beam-deposited Pt composite before serial sectioning. The cross-sectional images are binarized and stacked according to the individual slice thicknesses, and then processed using standard reconstruction methods. For the image conditions and sample geometry used here, we are able to determine the thickness of individual slices with an accuracy much smaller than a pixel. The accuracy of the new method based on actual slice thickness is assessed by comparing it with (i) a reconstruction using the same cross-sectional images but assuming a constant slice thickness, and (ii) a reconstruction using traditional FIB-tomography method employing constant slice thickness. The morphology and topology of the structures are characterized using ligament and pore size distributions, interface shape distribution functions, interface normal distributions, and genus. The results suggest that the morphology and topology of the final reconstructions are significantly influenced when a constant slice thickness is assumed. The study reveals grain-to-grain variations in the morphology and topology of np-Au. PMID:26906523

  16. Information of Structures in Galaxy Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fan

    2006-06-01

    We introduce an information-theoretic measure, the Rényi information, to describe the galaxy distribution in space. We discuss properties of the information measure and demonstrate its relationship with the probability distribution function and multifractal descriptions. Using the First Look Survey galaxy samples observed by the Infrared Array Camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, we present measurements of the Rényi information, as well as the counts-in-cells distribution and multifractal properties of galaxies in mid-infrared wavelengths. Guided by a multiplicative cascade simulation based on a binomial model, we verify our measurements and discuss the spatial selection effects on measuring information of the spatial structures. We derive structure scan functions at scales where selection effects are small for the Spitzer samples. We discuss the results and the potential of applying the Rényi information to the measurement of other spatial structures.

  17. Bottom-up coarse-grained models that accurately describe the structure, pressure, and compressibility of molecular liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Nicholas J. H.; Noid, W. G.

    2015-12-28

    The present work investigates the capability of bottom-up coarse-graining (CG) methods for accurately modeling both structural and thermodynamic properties of all-atom (AA) models for molecular liquids. In particular, we consider 1, 2, and 3-site CG models for heptane, as well as 1 and 3-site CG models for toluene. For each model, we employ the multiscale coarse-graining method to determine interaction potentials that optimally approximate the configuration dependence of the many-body potential of mean force (PMF). We employ a previously developed “pressure-matching” variational principle to determine a volume-dependent contribution to the potential, U{sub V}(V), that approximates the volume-dependence of the PMF. We demonstrate that the resulting CG models describe AA density fluctuations with qualitative, but not quantitative, accuracy. Accordingly, we develop a self-consistent approach for further optimizing U{sub V}, such that the CG models accurately reproduce the equilibrium density, compressibility, and average pressure of the AA models, although the CG models still significantly underestimate the atomic pressure fluctuations. Additionally, by comparing this array of models that accurately describe the structure and thermodynamic pressure of heptane and toluene at a range of different resolutions, we investigate the impact of bottom-up coarse-graining upon thermodynamic properties. In particular, we demonstrate that U{sub V} accounts for the reduced cohesion in the CG models. Finally, we observe that bottom-up coarse-graining introduces subtle correlations between the resolution, the cohesive energy density, and the “simplicity” of the model.

  18. Bottom-up coarse-grained models that accurately describe the structure, pressure, and compressibility of molecular liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Nicholas J. H.; Noid, W. G.

    2015-12-01

    The present work investigates the capability of bottom-up coarse-graining (CG) methods for accurately modeling both structural and thermodynamic properties of all-atom (AA) models for molecular liquids. In particular, we consider 1, 2, and 3-site CG models for heptane, as well as 1 and 3-site CG models for toluene. For each model, we employ the multiscale coarse-graining method to determine interaction potentials that optimally approximate the configuration dependence of the many-body potential of mean force (PMF). We employ a previously developed "pressure-matching" variational principle to determine a volume-dependent contribution to the potential, UV(V), that approximates the volume-dependence of the PMF. We demonstrate that the resulting CG models describe AA density fluctuations with qualitative, but not quantitative, accuracy. Accordingly, we develop a self-consistent approach for further optimizing UV, such that the CG models accurately reproduce the equilibrium density, compressibility, and average pressure of the AA models, although the CG models still significantly underestimate the atomic pressure fluctuations. Additionally, by comparing this array of models that accurately describe the structure and thermodynamic pressure of heptane and toluene at a range of different resolutions, we investigate the impact of bottom-up coarse-graining upon thermodynamic properties. In particular, we demonstrate that UV accounts for the reduced cohesion in the CG models. Finally, we observe that bottom-up coarse-graining introduces subtle correlations between the resolution, the cohesive energy density, and the "simplicity" of the model.

  19. Voronoi-cell finite difference method for accurate electronic structure calculation of polyatomic molecules on unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Sang-Kil

    2011-03-01

    We introduce a new numerical grid-based method on unstructured grids in the three-dimensional real-space to investigate the electronic structure of polyatomic molecules. The Voronoi-cell finite difference (VFD) method realizes a discrete Laplacian operator based on Voronoi cells and their natural neighbors, featuring high adaptivity and simplicity. To resolve multicenter Coulomb singularity in all-electron calculations of polyatomic molecules, this method utilizes highly adaptive molecular grids which consist of spherical atomic grids. It provides accurate and efficient solutions for the Schroedinger equation and the Poisson equation with the all-electron Coulomb potentials regardless of the coordinate system and the molecular symmetry. For numerical examples, we assess accuracy of the VFD method for electronic structures of one-electron polyatomic systems, and apply the method to the density-functional theory for many-electron polyatomic molecules.

  20. Information Access through Conceptual Structures and GIS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priss, Uta; Old, John

    1998-01-01

    Presents a new technique for information access based on a combination of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and conceptual structures as modeled in relational concept analysis. Describes a graphical interface that allows access of spatial, hierarchical, and linear data in a common manner; discusses its features and limits. (Author/AEF)

  1. A Simple and Accurate Analysis of Conductivity Loss in Millimeter-Wave Helical Slow-Wave Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, S. K.; Kumar, Lalit; Basu, B. N.

    2009-04-01

    Electromagnetic field analysis of a helix slow-wave structure was carried out and a closed form expression was derived for the inductance per unit length of the transmission-line equivalent circuit of the structure, taking into account the actual helix tape dimensions and surface current on the helix over the actual metallic area of the tape. The expression of the inductance per unit length, thus obtained, was used for estimating the increment in the inductance per unit length caused due to penetration of the magnetic flux into the conducting surfaces following Wheeler’s incremental inductance rule, which was subsequently interpreted for the attenuation constant of the propagating structure. The analysis was computationally simple and accurate, and accrues the accuracy of 3D electromagnetic analysis by allowing the use of dispersion characteristics obtainable from any standard electromagnetic modeling. The approach was benchmarked against measurement for two practical structures, and excellent agreement was observed. The analysis was subsequently applied to demonstrate the effects of conductivity on the attenuation constant of a typical broadband millimeter-wave helical slow-wave structure with respect to helix materials and copper plating on the helix, surface finish of the helix, dielectric loading effect and effect of high temperature operation - a comparative study of various such aspects are covered.

  2. Structural Information Retention in Visual Art Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koroscik, Judith Smith

    The accuracy of non-art college students' longterm retention of structural information presented in Leonardo da Vinci's "Mona Lisa" was tested. Seventeen female undergraduates viewed reproductions of the painting and copies that closely resembled structural attributes of the original. Only 3 of the 17 subjects reported having viewed a reproduction…

  3. Advanced Data Structure and Geographic Information Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peuquet, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    The current state of the art in specified areas of Geographic Information Systems GIS technology is examined. Study of the question of very large, efficient, heterogeneous spatial databases is required in order to explore the potential application of remotely sensed data for studying the long term habitability of the Earth. Research includes a review of spatial data structures and storage, development of operations required by GIS, and preparation of a testbed system to compare Vaster data structure with NASA's Topological Raster Structure.

  4. Efficient and accurate linear algebraic methods for large-scale electronic structure calculations with nonorthogonal atomic orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, H.; Fujiwara, T.; Hoshi, T.; Sogabe, T.; Zhang, S.-L.; Yamamoto, S.

    2011-04-01

    The need for large-scale electronic structure calculations arises recently in the field of material physics, and efficient and accurate algebraic methods for large simultaneous linear equations become greatly important. We investigate the generalized shifted conjugate orthogonal conjugate gradient method, the generalized Lanczos method, and the generalized Arnoldi method. They are the solver methods of large simultaneous linear equations of the one-electron Schrödinger equation and map the whole Hilbert space to a small subspace called the Krylov subspace. These methods are applied to systems of fcc Au with the NRL tight-binding Hamiltonian [F. Kirchhoff , Phys. Rev. BJCOMEL1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.63.195101 63, 195101 (2001)]. We compare results by these methods and the exact calculation and show them to be equally accurate. The system size dependence of the CPU time is also discussed. The generalized Lanczos method and the generalized Arnoldi method are the most suitable for the large-scale molecular dynamics simulations from the viewpoint of CPU time and memory size.

  5. Extraction of accurate structure-factor amplitudes from Laue data: wavelength normalization with wiggler and undulator X-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Srajer, V; Crosson, S; Schmidt, M; Key, J; Schotte, F; Anderson, S; Perman, B; Ren, Z; Teng, T Y; Bourgeois, D; Wulff, M; Moffat, K

    2000-07-01

    Wavelength normalization is an essential part of processing of Laue X-ray diffraction data and is critically important for deriving accurate structure-factor amplitudes. The results of wavelength normalization for Laue data obtained in nanosecond time-resolved experiments at the ID09 beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France, are presented. Several wiggler and undulator insertion devices with complex spectra were used. The results show that even in the most challenging cases, such as wiggler/undulator tandems or single-line undulators, accurate wavelength normalization does not require unusually redundant Laue data and can be accomplished using typical Laue data sets. Single-line undulator spectra derived from Laue data compare well with the measured incident X-ray spectra. Successful wavelength normalization of the undulator data was also confirmed by the observed signal in nanosecond time-resolved experiments. Single-line undulators, which are attractive for time-resolved experiments due to their high peak intensity and low polychromatic background, are compared with wigglers, based on data obtained on the same crystal. PMID:16609201

  6. Information structure expectations in sentence comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Katy; Dickey, Michael Walsh; Frazier, Lyn; Clifton, Charles

    2009-01-01

    In English, new information typically appears late in the sentence, as does primary accent. Because of this tendency, perceivers might expect the final constituent or constituents of a sentence to contain informational focus. This expectation should in turn affect how they comprehend focus-sensitive constructions such as ellipsis sentences. Results from four experiments on sluicing sentences (e.g., The mobster implicated the thug, but we can’t find out who else) suggest that perceivers do prefer to place focus late in the sentence, though that preference can be mitigated by prosodic information (pitch accents, Experiment 2) or syntactic information (clefted sentences, Experiment 3) indicating that focus is located elsewhere. Furthermore, it is not necessarily the direct object, but the informationally-focused constituent that is the preferred antecedent (Experiment 4). Expectations regarding the information structure of a sentence, which are only partly cancelable by means of overt focus markers, may explain persistent biases in ellipsis resolution. PMID:18609404

  7. Millimeter-wave interferometry: an attractive technique for fast and accurate sensing of civil and mechanical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seoktae; Nguyen, Cam

    2014-04-01

    This paper discusses the RF interferometry at millimeter-wave frequencies for sensing applications and reports the development of a millimeter-wave interferometric sensor operating around 35 GHz. The sensor is completely realized using microwave integrated circuits (MICs) and microwave monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs). It has been used for various sensing including displacement and velocity measurement. The sensor achieves a resolution and maximum error of only 10 μm and 27 μm, respectively, for displacement sensing and can measure velocity as low as 27.7 mm/s with a resolution about 2.7mm/s. Quick response and accurate sensing, as demonstrated by the developed millimeter-wave interferometric sensor, make the millimeter-wave interferometry attractive for sensing of various civil and mechanical structures.

  8. A novel approach to structural alignment using realistic structural and environmental information.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Crippen, Gordon M

    2005-12-01

    In the era of structural genomics, it is necessary to generate accurate structural alignments in order to build good templates for homology modeling. Although a great number of structural alignment algorithms have been developed, most of them ignore intermolecular interactions during the alignment procedure. Therefore, structures in different oligomeric states are barely distinguishable, and it is very challenging to find correct alignment in coil regions. Here we present a novel approach to structural alignment using a clique finding algorithm and environmental information (SAUCE). In this approach, we build the alignment based on not only structural coordinate information but also realistic environmental information extracted from biological unit files provided by the Protein Data Bank (PDB). At first, we eliminate all environmentally unfavorable pairings of residues. Then we identify alignments in core regions via a maximal clique finding algorithm. Two extreme value distribution (EVD) form statistics have been developed to evaluate core region alignments. With an optional extension step, global alignment can be derived based on environment-based dynamic programming linking. We show that our method is able to differentiate three-dimensional structures in different oligomeric states, and is able to find flexible alignments between multidomain structures without predetermined hinge regions. The overall performance is also evaluated on a large scale by comparisons to current structural classification databases as well as to other alignment methods. PMID:16260755

  9. Information Structure: Linguistic, Cognitive, and Processing Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Jennifer E.; Kaiser, Elsi; Kahn, Jason M.; Kim, Lucy Kyoungsook

    2013-01-01

    Language form varies as a result of the information being communicated. Some of the ways in which it varies include word order, referential form, morphological marking, and prosody. The relevant categories of information include the way a word or its referent have been used in context, for example whether a particular referent has been previously mentioned or not, and whether it plays a topical role in the current utterance or discourse. We first provide a broad review of linguistic phenomena that are sensitive to information structure. We then discuss several theoretical approaches to explaining information structure: information status as a part of the grammar; information status as a representation of the speaker’s and listener’s knowledge of common ground and/or the knowledge state of other discourse participants; and the optimal systems approach. These disparate approaches reflect the fact that there is little consensus in the field about precisely which information status categories are relevant, or how they should be represented. We consider possibilities for future work to bring these lines of work together in explicit psycholinguistic models of how people encode information status and use it for language production and comprehension. PMID:26150905

  10. Structuring medication related activities for information management.

    PubMed

    Luukkonen, Irmeli; Mykkänen, Juha; Kivekäs, Eija; Saranto, Kaija

    2014-01-01

    Medication treatment and the related information management are central parts of a patient's health care. As a cross-organizational and cooperative process, medication information management is a complex domain for development activities. We studied medication activities and related information management in a regional project in order to produce a shared broad picture of its processes and to understand the main issues and the needs for improvement. In this paper we provide a summary of the findings in a structured form, based on a six-dimensioned framework for design and analysis of activities and processes.

  11. The Cognitive Dimensions of Information Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, T. R. G.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a set of terms (viscosity, hidden dependencies, imposes guess-ahead, abstraction level, and secondary notation) intended as a set of discussion tools for nonspecialists to converse about the structural features of a range of information artifacts. Explains the terms using spreadsheets as an example. (SR)

  12. Accurate molecular structure and spectroscopic properties of nucleobases: a combined computational-microwave investigation of 2-thiouracil as a case study.

    PubMed

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo; Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L

    2013-10-21

    The computational composite scheme purposely set up for accurately describing the electronic structure and spectroscopic properties of small biomolecules has been applied to the first study of the rotational spectrum of 2-thiouracil. The experimental investigation was made possible thanks to the combination of the laser ablation technique with Fourier transform microwave spectrometers. The joint experimental-computational study allowed us to determine the accurate molecular structure and spectroscopic properties of the title molecule, but more importantly, it demonstrates a reliable approach for the accurate investigation of isolated small biomolecules.

  13. One-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of pyridine: determination of accurate ionization energy and cationic structure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu Ran; Kang, Do Won; Kim, Hong Lae; Kwon, Chan Ho

    2014-11-01

    Ionization energies and cationic structures of pyridine were intensively investigated utilizing one-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy with vacuum ultraviolet radiation generated by four-wave difference frequency mixing in Kr. The present one-photon high-resolution MATI spectrum of pyridine demonstrated a much finer and richer vibrational structure than that of the previously reported two-photon MATI spectrum. From the MATI spectrum and photoionization efficiency curve, the accurate ionization energy of the ionic ground state of pyridine was confidently determined to be 73,570 ± 6 cm(-1) (9.1215 ± 0.0007 eV). The observed spectrum was almost completely assigned by utilizing Franck-Condon factors and vibrational frequencies calculated through adjustments of the geometrical parameters of cationic pyridine at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. A unique feature unveiled through rigorous analysis was the prominent progression of the 10 vibrational mode, which corresponds to in-plane ring bending, and the combination of other totally symmetric fundamentals with the ring bending overtones, which contribute to the geometrical change upon ionization. Notably, the remaining peaks originate from the upper electronic state ((2)A2), as predicted by high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies and symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction calculations. Based on the quantitatively good agreement between the experimental and calculated results, it was concluded that upon ionization the pyridine cation in the ground electronic state should have a planar structure of C(2v) symmetry through the C-N axis.

  14. One-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of pyridine: Determination of accurate ionization energy and cationic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yu Ran; Kang, Do Won; Kim, Hong Lae E-mail: hlkim@kangwon.ac.kr; Kwon, Chan Ho E-mail: hlkim@kangwon.ac.kr

    2014-11-07

    Ionization energies and cationic structures of pyridine were intensively investigated utilizing one-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy with vacuum ultraviolet radiation generated by four-wave difference frequency mixing in Kr. The present one-photon high-resolution MATI spectrum of pyridine demonstrated a much finer and richer vibrational structure than that of the previously reported two-photon MATI spectrum. From the MATI spectrum and photoionization efficiency curve, the accurate ionization energy of the ionic ground state of pyridine was confidently determined to be 73 570 ± 6 cm{sup −1} (9.1215 ± 0.0007 eV). The observed spectrum was almost completely assigned by utilizing Franck-Condon factors and vibrational frequencies calculated through adjustments of the geometrical parameters of cationic pyridine at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. A unique feature unveiled through rigorous analysis was the prominent progression of the 10 vibrational mode, which corresponds to in-plane ring bending, and the combination of other totally symmetric fundamentals with the ring bending overtones, which contribute to the geometrical change upon ionization. Notably, the remaining peaks originate from the upper electronic state ({sup 2}A{sub 2}), as predicted by high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies and symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction calculations. Based on the quantitatively good agreement between the experimental and calculated results, it was concluded that upon ionization the pyridine cation in the ground electronic state should have a planar structure of C{sub 2v} symmetry through the C-N axis.

  15. Selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension and mutational profiling (SHAPE-MaP) for direct, versatile, and accurate RNA structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    Smola, Matthew J.; Rice, Greggory M.; Busan, Steven; Siegfried, Nathan A.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    SHAPE chemistries exploit small electrophilic reagents that react with the 2′-hydroxyl group to interrogate RNA structure at single-nucleotide resolution. Mutational profiling (MaP) identifies modified residues based on the ability of reverse transcriptase to misread a SHAPE-modified nucleotide and then counting the resulting mutations by massively parallel sequencing. The SHAPE-MaP approach measures the structure of large and transcriptome-wide systems as accurately as for simple model RNAs. This protocol describes the experimental steps, implemented over three days, required to perform SHAPE probing and construct multiplexed SHAPE-MaP libraries suitable for deep sequencing. These steps include RNA folding and SHAPE structure probing, mutational profiling by reverse transcription, library construction, and sequencing. Automated processing of MaP sequencing data is accomplished using two software packages. ShapeMapper converts raw sequencing files into mutational profiles, creates SHAPE reactivity plots, and provides useful troubleshooting information, often within an hour. SuperFold uses these data to model RNA secondary structures, identify regions with well-defined structures, and visualize probable and alternative helices, often in under a day. We illustrate these algorithms with the E. coli thiamine pyrophosphate riboswitch, E. coli 16S rRNA, and HIV-1 genomic RNAs. SHAPE-MaP can be used to make nucleotide-resolution biophysical measurements of individual RNA motifs, rare components of complex RNA ensembles, and entire transcriptomes. The straightforward MaP strategy greatly expands the number, length, and complexity of analyzable RNA structures. PMID:26426499

  16. The Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment: Accurate ranges have given a large improvement in the lunar orbit and new selenophysical information.

    PubMed

    Bender, P L; Currie, D G; Poultney, S K; Alley, C O; Dicke, R H; Wilkinson, D T; Eckhardt, D H; Faller, J E; Kaula, W M; Mulholland, J D; Plotkin, H H; Silverberg, E C; Williams, J G

    1973-10-19

    previously available knowledge of the distance to points on the lunar surface. Already, extremely complex structure has been observed in the lunar rotation and significant improvement has been achieved in our knowledge of lunar orbit. The selenocentric coordinates of the retroreflectors give improved reference points for use in lunar mapping, and new information on the lunar mass distribution has been obtained. Beyond the applications discussed in this article, however, the history of science shows many cases of previously unknown, phenomena discovered as a consequence of major improvements in the accuracy of measurements. It will be interesting to see whether this once again proves the case as we acquire an extended series of lunar distance observations with decimetric and then centimetric accuracy.

  17. The Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment: Accurate ranges have given a large improvement in the lunar orbit and new selenophysical information.

    PubMed

    Bender, P L; Currie, D G; Poultney, S K; Alley, C O; Dicke, R H; Wilkinson, D T; Eckhardt, D H; Faller, J E; Kaula, W M; Mulholland, J D; Plotkin, H H; Silverberg, E C; Williams, J G

    1973-10-19

    previously available knowledge of the distance to points on the lunar surface. Already, extremely complex structure has been observed in the lunar rotation and significant improvement has been achieved in our knowledge of lunar orbit. The selenocentric coordinates of the retroreflectors give improved reference points for use in lunar mapping, and new information on the lunar mass distribution has been obtained. Beyond the applications discussed in this article, however, the history of science shows many cases of previously unknown, phenomena discovered as a consequence of major improvements in the accuracy of measurements. It will be interesting to see whether this once again proves the case as we acquire an extended series of lunar distance observations with decimetric and then centimetric accuracy. PMID:17749298

  18. Absorption spectroscopy of the rubidium dimer in an overheated vapor: An accurate check of molecular structure and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Beuc, R.; Movre, M.; Horvatic, V.; Vadla, C.; Dulieu, O.; Aymar, M.

    2007-03-15

    Experimental studies of the absorption spectrum of the Rb{sub 2} dimer are performed in the 600-1100 nm wavelength range for temperatures between 615 and 745 K. The reduced absorption coefficient is measured by spatially resolved white light absorption in overheated rubidium vapor with a radial temperature gradient, which enables simultaneous measurements at different temperatures. Semiclassical and quantum spectral simulations are obtained by taking into account all possible transitions involving the potential curves stemming from the 5 {sup 2}S+5 {sup 2}S and 5 {sup 2}S+5 {sup 2}P asymptotes. The most accurate experimental potential curves are used where available, and newly calculated potential curves and transition dipole moments otherwise. The overall consistency of the theoretical model with the experimental interpretation is obtained only if the radial dependence of both the calculated transition dipole moments and the spin-orbit coupling is taken into account. This highlights the low-resolution absorption spectroscopy as a valuable tool for checking the accuracy of molecular electronic structure calculations.

  19. Information transfer in community structured multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solé Ribalta, Albert; Granell, Clara; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2015-08-01

    The study of complex networks that account for different types of interactions has become a subject of interest in the last few years, specially because its representational power in the description of users interactions in diverse online social platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.). The mathematical description of these interacting networks has been coined under the name of multilayer networks, where each layer accounts for a type of interaction. It has been shown that diffusive processes on top of these networks present a phenomenology that cannot be explained by the naive superposition of single layer diffusive phenomena but require the whole structure of interconnected layers. Nevertheless, the description of diffusive phenomena on multilayer networks has obviated the fact that social networks have strong mesoscopic structure represented by different communities of individuals driven by common interests, or any other social aspect. In this work, we study the transfer of information in multilayer networks with community structure. The final goal is to understand and quantify, if the existence of well-defined community structure at the level of individual layers, together with the multilayer structure of the whole network, enhances or deteriorates the diffusion of packets of information.

  20. Information and hierarchical structure in financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantegna, R. N.

    1999-09-01

    I investigate the information content present in the time series of stock prices of a portfolio of stocks traded in a financial market. By investigating the correlation coefficient between pairs of stocks I provide a working definition of a generalized distance between the stocks of the portfolio. This generalized distance is used to obtain an ultrametric distance matrix between the stocks. The ultrametric structure of the portfolio investigated has associated a taxonomy which is meaningful from an economic point of view.

  1. Bioluminescence tomography with structural and functional a priori information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Han; Unlu, Mehmet B.; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2010-02-01

    Multispectral bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is one of the seemingly promising approaches to recover 3D tomographic images of bioluminescence source distribution in vivo. In bioluminescence tomography, internal light source, such as luciferase is activated within a volume and multiple wavelength emission data from the internal bioluminescence sources is acquired for reconstruction. The underline non-uniqueness problem associated with non-spectrally resolved intensity-based bioluminescence tomography was demonstrated by Dehghani et al. and it also shown that using a spectrally resolved technique, an accurate solution for the source distribution can be calculated from the measured data if both functional and anatomical a priori information are at hand. Thus it is of great desire to develop an imaging system that is capable of simultaneously acquiring both the optical and structural a priori information as well as acquiring the bioluminescence data. In this paper we present our first combined optical tomography and CT system which constitutes with a cool CCD camera ( perkin elmer "cold blue"), laser launching units and Xray CT( Dxray proto-type). It is capable of acquiring non contact diffuse optical tomography (DOT) data which is used for functional a priori; X-ray CT images which yields the structure information; and BLT images. Physical phantom experiments are designed to verify the system accuracy, repeatability and resolution. These studies shows the feasibility of such imaging system and its potential.

  2. Structuring Broadcast Audio for Information Access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauvain, Jean-Luc; Lamel, Lori

    2003-12-01

    One rapidly expanding application area for state-of-the-art speech recognition technology is the automatic processing of broadcast audiovisual data for information access. Since much of the linguistic information is found in the audio channel, speech recognition is a key enabling technology which, when combined with information retrieval techniques, can be used for searching large audiovisual document collections. Audio indexing must take into account the specificities of audio data such as needing to deal with the continuous data stream and an imperfect word transcription. Other important considerations are dealing with language specificities and facilitating language portability. At Laboratoire d'Informatique pour la Mécanique et les Sciences de l'Ingénieur (LIMSI), broadcast news transcription systems have been developed for seven languages: English, French, German, Mandarin, Portuguese, Spanish, and Arabic. The transcription systems have been integrated into prototype demonstrators for several application areas such as audio data mining, structuring audiovisual archives, selective dissemination of information, and topic tracking for media monitoring. As examples, this paper addresses the spoken document retrieval and topic tracking tasks.

  3. An informationally structured room for robotic assistance.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Tokuo; Mozos, Oscar Martinez; Chae, Hyunuk; Pyo, Yoonseok; Kusaka, Kazuya; Hasegawa, Tsutomu; Morooka, Ken'ichi; Kurazume, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    The application of assistive technologies for elderly people is one of the most promising and interesting scenarios for intelligent technologies in the present and near future. Moreover, the improvement of the quality of life for the elderly is one of the first priorities in modern countries and societies. In this work, we present an informationally structured room that is aimed at supporting the daily life activities of elderly people. This room integrates different sensor modalities in a natural and non-invasive way inside the environment. The information gathered by the sensors is processed and sent to a centralized management system, which makes it available to a service robot assisting the people. One important restriction of our intelligent room is reducing as much as possible any interference with daily activities. Finally, this paper presents several experiments and situations using our intelligent environment in cooperation with our service robot. PMID:25912347

  4. The role of cognitive switching in head-up displays. [to determine pilot ability to accurately extract information from either of two sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, E.

    1979-01-01

    The pilot's ability to accurately extract information from either one or both of two superimposed sources of information was determined. Static, aerial, color 35 mm slides of external runway environments and slides of corresponding static head-up display (HUD) symbology were used as the sources. A three channel tachistoscope was utilized to show either the HUD alone, the scene alone, or the two slides superimposed. Cognitive performance of the pilots was assessed by determining the percentage of correct answers given to two HUD related questions, two scene related questions, or one HUD and one scene related question.

  5. Modeling mitochondrial protein evolution using structural information.

    PubMed

    Liò, Pietro; Goldman, Nick

    2002-04-01

    We present two new models of protein sequence evolution based on structural properties of mitochondrial proteins. We compare these models with others currently used in phylogenetic analyses, investigating their performance over both short and long evolutionary distances. We find that our models that incorporate secondary structure information from mitochondrial proteins are statistically comparable with existing models when studying 13 mitochondrial protein data sets from eutherian mammals. However, our models give a significantly improved description of the evolutionary process when used with 12 mitochondrial proteins from a broader range of organisms including fungi, plants, protists, and bacteria. Our models may thus be of use in estimating mitochondrial protein phylogenies and for the study of processes of mitochondrial protein evolution, in particular for distantly related organisms.

  6. Structural a priori information for reflection tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jannaud, L.; Delprat-Jannaud, F.

    1994-12-31

    The model calculated by traveltime inversion is underdetermined. One solution to this problem is to introduce a priori information so as to reduce the set of possible solutions to those satisfactory from a geological point of view. In this paper, the authors impose geological constraints on the relative position of the reflectors and in particular on the location in depth of faults. To implement this method in the context of a Gauss-Newton algorithm for the inversion, the Jacobian of the impact points with respect to the model is computed. They thus compute, using the adjoint state technique, the exact jacobian at a low computational cost. To illustrate the efficiency of the method, field data acquired on fault structures are inversed. They obtain a structural model which is satisfactory from both a kinematic and a geological point of view.

  7. Domain theoretic structures in quantum information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Johnny

    2011-12-01

    In this thesis, we continue the study of domain theoretic structures in quantum information theory initiated by Keye Martin and Bob Coecke in 2002. The first part of the thesis is focused on exploring the domain theoretic properties of qubit channels. We discover that the Scott continuous qubit channels are exactly those that are unital or constant. We then prove that the unital qubit channels form a continuous dcpo, and identify various measurements on them. We show that Holevo capacity is a measurement on unital qubit channels, and discover the natural measurement in this setting. We find that qubit channels also form a continuous dcpo, but capacity fails to be a measurement. In the second part we focus on the study of exact dcpos, a domain theoretic structure, closely related to continuous dcpos, possessed by quantum states. Exact dcpos admit a topology, called the exact topology, and we show that the exact topology has an order theoretic characterization similar to the characterization of the Scott topology on continuous dcpos. We then explore the connection between exact and continuous dcpos; first, by identifying an important set of points, called the split points, that distinguishes between exact and continuous structures; second, by exploring a continuous completion of exact dcpos, and showing that we can recover the exact topology from the Scott topology of the completion.

  8. Assignment of Calibration Information to Deeper Phylogenetic Nodes is More Effective in Obtaining Precise and Accurate Divergence Time Estimates.

    PubMed

    Mello, Beatriz; Schrago, Carlos G

    2014-01-01

    Divergence time estimation has become an essential tool for understanding macroevolutionary events. Molecular dating aims to obtain reliable inferences, which, within a statistical framework, means jointly increasing the accuracy and precision of estimates. Bayesian dating methods exhibit the propriety of a linear relationship between uncertainty and estimated divergence dates. This relationship occurs even if the number of sites approaches infinity and places a limit on the maximum precision of node ages. However, how the placement of calibration information may affect the precision of divergence time estimates remains an open question. In this study, relying on simulated and empirical data, we investigated how the location of calibration within a phylogeny affects the accuracy and precision of time estimates. We found that calibration priors set at median and deep phylogenetic nodes were associated with higher precision values compared to analyses involving calibration at the shallowest node. The results were independent of the tree symmetry. An empirical mammalian dataset produced results that were consistent with those generated by the simulated sequences. Assigning time information to the deeper nodes of a tree is crucial to guarantee the accuracy and precision of divergence times. This finding highlights the importance of the appropriate choice of outgroups in molecular dating. PMID:24855333

  9. Nuclear structure with accurate chiral perturbation theory nucleon-nucleon potential: Application to 6Li and 10B

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, P; Caurier, E

    2003-10-14

    The authors calculate properties of A = 6 system using the accurate charge-dependent nucleon-nucleon (NN) potential at fourth order of chiral perturbation theory. By application of the ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM) and a variational calculation in the harmonic oscillator basis with basis size up to 16 {h_bar}{Omega} they obtain the {sup 6}Li binding energy of 28.5(5) MeV and a converged excitation spectrum. Also, they calculate properties of {sup 10}B using the same NN potential in a basis space of up to 8 {h_bar}{Omega}. The results are consistent with results obtained by standard accurate NN potentials and demonstrate a deficiency of Hamiltonians consisting of only two-body terms. At this order of chiral perturbation theory three-body terms appear. It is expected that inclusion of such terms in the Hamiltonian will improve agreement with experiment.

  10. Subjective sense of memory strength and the objective amount of information accurately remembered are related to distinct neural correlates at encoding.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shaozheng; van Marle, Hein J F; Hermans, Erno J; Fernández, Guillén

    2011-06-15

    Although commonly used, the term memory strength is not well defined in humans. Besides durability, it has been conceptualized by retrieval characteristics, such as subjective confidence associated with retrieval, or objectively, by the amount of information accurately retrieved. Behaviorally, these measures are not necessarily correlated, indicating that distinct neural processes may underlie them. Thus, we aimed at disentangling neural activity at encoding associated with either a subsequent subjective sense of memory strength or with a subsequent objective amount of information remembered. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), participants were scanned while incidentally encoding a series of photographs of complex scenes. The next day, they underwent two memory tests, quantifying memory strength either subjectively (confidence on remembering the gist of a scene) or objectively (the number of details accurately remembered within a scene). Correlations between these measurements were mutually partialed out in subsequent memory analyses of fMRI data. Results revealed that activation in left ventral lateral prefrontal cortex and temporoparietal junction predicted subsequent confidence ratings. In contrast, parahippocampal and hippocampal activity predicted the number of details remembered. Our findings suggest that memory strength may reflect a functionally heterogeneous set of (at least two) phenomena. One phenomenon appears related to prefrontal and temporoparietal top-down modulations, resulting in the subjective sense of memory strength that is potentially based on gist memory. The other phenomenon is likely related to medial-temporal binding processes, determining the amount of information accurately encoded into memory. Thus, our study dissociated two distinct phenomena that are usually described as memory strength.

  11. Trends in information theory-based chemical structure codification.

    PubMed

    Barigye, Stephen J; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Pérez-Giménez, Facundo; Bonchev, Danail

    2014-08-01

    This report offers a chronological review of the most relevant applications of information theory in the codification of chemical structure information, through the so-called information indices. Basically, these are derived from the analysis of the statistical patterns of molecular structure representations, which include primitive global chemical formulae, chemical graphs, or matrix representations. Finally, new approaches that attempt to go "back to the roots" of information theory, in order to integrate other information-theoretic measures in chemical structure coding are discussed.

  12. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: An Accurate Image Simulation Method for High-Order Laue Zone Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Can-Ying; Zeng, Song-Jun; Liu, Hong-Rong; Yang, Qi-Bin

    2008-05-01

    A completely different formulation for simulation of the high order Laue zone (HOLZ) diffractions is derived. It refers to the new method, i.e. the Taylor series (TS) method. To check the validity and accuracy of the TS method, we take polyvinglidene fluoride (PVDF) crystal as an example to calculate the exit wavefunction by the conventional multi-slice (CMS) method and the TS method. The calculated results show that the TS method is much more accurate than the CMS method and is independent of the slice thicknesses. Moreover, the pure first order Laue zone wavefunction by the TS method can reflect the major potential distribution of the first reciprocal plane.

  13. Use of secondary structural information and C alpha-C alpha distance restraints to model protein structures with MODELLER.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Boojala V B; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2007-08-01

    Protein secondary structure predictions and amino acid long range contact map predictions from primary sequence of proteins have been explored to aid in modelling protein tertiary structures. In order to evaluate the usefulness of secondary structure and 3D-residue contact prediction methods to model protein structures we have used the known Q3 (alpha-helix,beta-strands and irregular turns/loops) secondary structure information, along with residue-residue contact information as restraints for MODELLER. We present here results of our modelling studies on 30 best resolved single domain protein structures of varied lengths. The results shows that it is very difficult to obtain useful models even with 100% accurate secondary structure predictions and accurate residue contact predictions for up to 30% of residues in a sequence. The best models that we obtained for proteins of lengths 37, 70, 118, 136 and 193 amino acid residues are of RMSDs 4.17, 5.27, 9.12, 7.89 and 9.69,respectively. The results show that one can obtain better models for the proteins which have high percent of alpha-helix content. This analysis further shows that MODELLER restrain optimization program can be useful only if we have truly homologous structure(s) as a template where it derives numerous restraints, almost identical to the templates used. This analysis also clearly indicates that even if we satisfy several true residue-residue contact distances, up to 30%of their sequence length with fully known secondary structural information, we end up predicting model structures much distant from their corresponding native structures.

  14. PSSP-RFE: Accurate Prediction of Protein Structural Class by Recursive Feature Extraction from PSI-BLAST Profile, Physical-Chemical Property and Functional Annotations

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sanjiu; Zhang, Yuan; Luo, Zhong; Yang, Hua; Zhou, Yue; Zheng, Xiaoqi

    2014-01-01

    Protein structure prediction is critical to functional annotation of the massively accumulated biological sequences, which prompts an imperative need for the development of high-throughput technologies. As a first and key step in protein structure prediction, protein structural class prediction becomes an increasingly challenging task. Amongst most homological-based approaches, the accuracies of protein structural class prediction are sufficiently high for high similarity datasets, but still far from being satisfactory for low similarity datasets, i.e., below 40% in pairwise sequence similarity. Therefore, we present a novel method for accurate and reliable protein structural class prediction for both high and low similarity datasets. This method is based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) in conjunction with integrated features from position-specific score matrix (PSSM), PROFEAT and Gene Ontology (GO). A feature selection approach, SVM-RFE, is also used to rank the integrated feature vectors through recursively removing the feature with the lowest ranking score. The definitive top features selected by SVM-RFE are input into the SVM engines to predict the structural class of a query protein. To validate our method, jackknife tests were applied to seven widely used benchmark datasets, reaching overall accuracies between 84.61% and 99.79%, which are significantly higher than those achieved by state-of-the-art tools. These results suggest that our method could serve as an accurate and cost-effective alternative to existing methods in protein structural classification, especially for low similarity datasets. PMID:24675610

  15. Information essence of chaotic surface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovieva, Anna B.; Timashev, Serge F.; Vstovsky, Grigory V.; Kotova, Svetlana L.; Belayev, Vladimir E.

    2003-05-01

    A general phenomenological approach - a Flicker Noise Spectroscopy (FNS)- to revelation of information valuable parameters characterizing the arbitrary chaotic surfaces was develop to distinguish their patterns and describe quantitatively their functional properties. The consideration was carried out in terms of correlation lengths and additional parameters characterizing the rate of correlation links lost in the sequences of surface irregularities. The parameters are obtained by fitting the Fourier spectra and structural functions (difference moments of different orders) calculated for the digitized surface profiles using the approximations derived on the base of model representation of the profiles as the sequences of irregularities of different types ("bursts", "jumps", etc.). The method developed was applied to revelation of effects of a shungit filling agent in polypropylen matrix on the composite properties, revelation of hydrogen treatment effects on the cleavage surfaces of LiF monocrystals after their dissolution in water with quantitative evaluations of their anisotropy, analysis of activity of vacuum deposited porphyrins layers in a photosensibilized gnenration of singlet oxygen into gaseous phase. The approach elaborated can be used for developing the new control tools in nano-technologies, microelectronics, production of polymeric material with the specific surface properties, and others.

  16. Information diffusion in structured online social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pei; Zhang, Yini; Qiao, Fengcai; Wang, Hui

    2015-05-01

    Nowadays, due to the word-of-mouth effect, online social networks have been considered to be efficient approaches to conduct viral marketing, which makes it of great importance to understand the diffusion dynamics in online social networks. However, most research on diffusion dynamics in epidemiology and existing social networks cannot be applied directly to characterize online social networks. In this paper, we propose models to characterize the information diffusion in structured online social networks with push-based forwarding mechanism. We introduce the term user influence to characterize the average number of times that messages are browsed which is incurred by a given type user generating a message, and study the diffusion threshold, above which the user influence of generating a message will approach infinity. We conduct simulations and provide the simulation results, which are consistent with the theoretical analysis results perfectly. These results are of use in understanding the diffusion dynamics in online social networks and also critical for advertisers in viral marketing who want to estimate the user influence before posting an advertisement.

  17. PROMALS3D: multiple protein sequence alignment enhanced with evolutionary and 3-dimensional structural information

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is an essential tool with many applications in bioinformatics and computational biology. Accurate MSA construction for divergent proteins remains a difficult computational task. The constantly increasing protein sequences and structures in public databases could be used to improve alignment quality. PROMALS3D is a tool for protein MSA construction enhanced with additional evolutionary and structural information from database searches. PROMALS3D automatically identifies homologs from sequence and structure databases for input proteins, derives structure-based constraints from alignments of 3-dimensional structures, and combines them with sequence-based constraints of profile-profile alignments in a consistency-based framework to construct high-quality multiple sequence alignments. PROMALS3D output is a consensus alignment enriched with sequence and structural information about input proteins and their homologs. PROMALS3D web server and package are available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/PROMALS3D. PMID:24170408

  18. PROMALS3D: multiple protein sequence alignment enhanced with evolutionary and three-dimensional structural information.

    PubMed

    Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is an essential tool with many applications in bioinformatics and computational biology. Accurate MSA construction for divergent proteins remains a difficult computational task. The constantly increasing protein sequences and structures in public databases could be used to improve alignment quality. PROMALS3D is a tool for protein MSA construction enhanced with additional evolutionary and structural information from database searches. PROMALS3D automatically identifies homologs from sequence and structure databases for input proteins, derives structure-based constraints from alignments of three-dimensional structures, and combines them with sequence-based constraints of profile-profile alignments in a consistency-based framework to construct high-quality multiple sequence alignments. PROMALS3D output is a consensus alignment enriched with sequence and structural information about input proteins and their homologs. PROMALS3D Web server and package are available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/PROMALS3D. PMID:24170408

  19. PROMALS3D: multiple protein sequence alignment enhanced with evolutionary and three-dimensional structural information.

    PubMed

    Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is an essential tool with many applications in bioinformatics and computational biology. Accurate MSA construction for divergent proteins remains a difficult computational task. The constantly increasing protein sequences and structures in public databases could be used to improve alignment quality. PROMALS3D is a tool for protein MSA construction enhanced with additional evolutionary and structural information from database searches. PROMALS3D automatically identifies homologs from sequence and structure databases for input proteins, derives structure-based constraints from alignments of three-dimensional structures, and combines them with sequence-based constraints of profile-profile alignments in a consistency-based framework to construct high-quality multiple sequence alignments. PROMALS3D output is a consensus alignment enriched with sequence and structural information about input proteins and their homologs. PROMALS3D Web server and package are available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/PROMALS3D.

  20. Temporal and Statistical Information in Causal Structure Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormack, Teresa; Frosch, Caren; Patrick, Fiona; Lagnado, David

    2015-01-01

    Three experiments examined children's and adults' abilities to use statistical and temporal information to distinguish between common cause and causal chain structures. In Experiment 1, participants were provided with conditional probability information and/or temporal information and asked to infer the causal structure of a 3-variable mechanical…

  1. Accurate determination of the fine-structure intervals in the 3P ground states of C-13 and C-12 by far-infrared laser magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooksy, A. L.; Saykally, R. J.; Brown, J. M.; Evenson, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    Accurate values are presented for the fine-structure intervals in the 3P ground state of neutral atomic C-12 and C-13 as obtained from laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The rigorous analysis of C-13 hyperfine structure, the measurement of resonant fields for C-12 transitions at several additional far-infrared laser frequencies, and the increased precision of the C-12 measurements, permit significant improvement in the evaluation of these energies relative to earlier work. These results will expedite the direct and precise measurement of these transitions in interstellar sources and should assist in the determination of the interstellar C-12/C-13 abundance ratio.

  2. Functional connectivity and structural covariance between regions of interest can be measured more accurately using multivariate distance correlation.

    PubMed

    Geerligs, Linda; Cam-Can; Henson, Richard N

    2016-07-15

    Studies of brain-wide functional connectivity or structural covariance typically use measures like the Pearson correlation coefficient, applied to data that have been averaged across voxels within regions of interest (ROIs). However, averaging across voxels may result in biased connectivity estimates when there is inhomogeneity within those ROIs, e.g., sub-regions that exhibit different patterns of functional connectivity or structural covariance. Here, we propose a new measure based on "distance correlation"; a test of multivariate dependence of high dimensional vectors, which allows for both linear and non-linear dependencies. We used simulations to show how distance correlation out-performs Pearson correlation in the face of inhomogeneous ROIs. To evaluate this new measure on real data, we use resting-state fMRI scans and T1 structural scans from 2 sessions on each of 214 participants from the Cambridge Centre for Ageing & Neuroscience (Cam-CAN) project. Pearson correlation and distance correlation showed similar average connectivity patterns, for both functional connectivity and structural covariance. Nevertheless, distance correlation was shown to be 1) more reliable across sessions, 2) more similar across participants, and 3) more robust to different sets of ROIs. Moreover, we found that the similarity between functional connectivity and structural covariance estimates was higher for distance correlation compared to Pearson correlation. We also explored the relative effects of different preprocessing options and motion artefacts on functional connectivity. Because distance correlation is easy to implement and fast to compute, it is a promising alternative to Pearson correlations for investigating ROI-based brain-wide connectivity patterns, for functional as well as structural data.

  3. CC/DFT Route toward Accurate Structures and Spectroscopic Features for Observed and Elusive Conformers of Flexible Molecules: Pyruvic Acid as a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Barone, Vincenzo; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien; Cimino, Paola; Penocchio, Emanuele; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    The structures and relative stabilities as well as the rotational and vibrational spectra of the three low-energy conformers of pyruvic acid (PA) have been characterized using a state-of-the-art quantum-mechanical approach designed for flexible molecules. By making use of the available experimental rotational constants for several isotopologues of the most stable PA conformer, Tc-PA, the semiexperimental equilibrium structure has been derived. The latter provides a reference for the pure theoretical determination of the equilibrium geometries for all conformers, thus confirming for these structures an accuracy of 0.001 Å and 0.1 deg for bond lengths and angles, respectively. Highly accurate relative energies of all conformers (Tc-, Tt-, and Ct-PA) and of the transition states connecting them are provided along with the thermodynamic properties at low and high temperatures, thus leading to conformational enthalpies accurate to 1 kJ mol(-1). Concerning microwave spectroscopy, rotational constants accurate to about 20 MHz are provided for the Tt- and Ct-PA conformers, together with the computed centrifugal-distortion constants and dipole moments required to simulate their rotational spectra. For Ct-PA, vibrational frequencies in the mid-infrared region accurate to 10 cm(-1) are reported along with theoretical estimates for the transitions in the near-infrared range, and the corresponding infrared spectrum including fundamental transitions, overtones, and combination bands has been simulated. In addition to the new data described above, theoretical results for the Tc- and Tt-PA conformers are compared with all available experimental data to further confirm the accuracy of the hybrid coupled-cluster/density functional theory (CC/DFT) protocol applied in the present study. Finally, we discuss in detail the accuracy of computational models fully based on double-hybrid DFT functionals (mainly at the B2PLYP/aug-cc-pVTZ level) that avoid the use of very expensive CC

  4. CC/DFT Route toward Accurate Structures and Spectroscopic Features for Observed and Elusive Conformers of Flexible Molecules: Pyruvic Acid as a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Barone, Vincenzo; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien; Cimino, Paola; Penocchio, Emanuele; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    The structures and relative stabilities as well as the rotational and vibrational spectra of the three low-energy conformers of pyruvic acid (PA) have been characterized using a state-of-the-art quantum-mechanical approach designed for flexible molecules. By making use of the available experimental rotational constants for several isotopologues of the most stable PA conformer, Tc-PA, the semiexperimental equilibrium structure has been derived. The latter provides a reference for the pure theoretical determination of the equilibrium geometries for all conformers, thus confirming for these structures an accuracy of 0.001 Å and 0.1 deg for bond lengths and angles, respectively. Highly accurate relative energies of all conformers (Tc-, Tt-, and Ct-PA) and of the transition states connecting them are provided along with the thermodynamic properties at low and high temperatures, thus leading to conformational enthalpies accurate to 1 kJ mol(-1). Concerning microwave spectroscopy, rotational constants accurate to about 20 MHz are provided for the Tt- and Ct-PA conformers, together with the computed centrifugal-distortion constants and dipole moments required to simulate their rotational spectra. For Ct-PA, vibrational frequencies in the mid-infrared region accurate to 10 cm(-1) are reported along with theoretical estimates for the transitions in the near-infrared range, and the corresponding infrared spectrum including fundamental transitions, overtones, and combination bands has been simulated. In addition to the new data described above, theoretical results for the Tc- and Tt-PA conformers are compared with all available experimental data to further confirm the accuracy of the hybrid coupled-cluster/density functional theory (CC/DFT) protocol applied in the present study. Finally, we discuss in detail the accuracy of computational models fully based on double-hybrid DFT functionals (mainly at the B2PLYP/aug-cc-pVTZ level) that avoid the use of very expensive CC

  5. Extending the molecular size in accurate quantum-chemical calculations: the equilibrium structure and spectroscopic properties of uracil.

    PubMed

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Barone, Vincenzo

    2011-04-21

    The equilibrium structure of uracil has been investigated using both theoretical and experimental data. With respect to the former, quantum-chemical calculations at the coupled-cluster level in conjunction with a triple-zeta basis set have been carried out. Extrapolation to the basis set limit, performed employing the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, and inclusion of core-correlation and diffuse-function corrections have also been considered. Based on the available rotational constants for various isotopic species together with corresponding computed vibrational corrections, the semi-experimental equilibrium structure of uracil has been determined for the first time. Theoretical and semi-experimental structures have been found in remarkably good agreement, thus pointing out the limitations of previous experimental determinations. Molecular and spectroscopic properties of uracil have then been studied by means of the composite computational approach introduced for the molecular structure evaluation. Among the results achieved, we mention the revision of the dipole moment. On the whole, it has been proved that the computational procedure presented is able to provide parameters with the proper accuracy to support experimental investigations of large molecules of biological interest.

  6. Accurate protein structure annotation through competitive diffusion of enzymatic functions over a network of local evolutionary similarities.

    PubMed

    Venner, Eric; Lisewski, Andreas Martin; Erdin, Serkan; Ward, R Matthew; Amin, Shivas R; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    High-throughput Structural Genomics yields many new protein structures without known molecular function. This study aims to uncover these missing annotations by globally comparing select functional residues across the structural proteome. First, Evolutionary Trace Annotation, or ETA, identifies which proteins have local evolutionary and structural features in common; next, these proteins are linked together into a proteomic network of ETA similarities; then, starting from proteins with known functions, competing functional labels diffuse link-by-link over the entire network. Every node is thus assigned a likelihood z-score for every function, and the most significant one at each node wins and defines its annotation. In high-throughput controls, this competitive diffusion process recovered enzyme activity annotations with 99% and 97% accuracy at half-coverage for the third and fourth Enzyme Commission (EC) levels, respectively. This corresponds to false positive rates 4-fold lower than nearest-neighbor and 5-fold lower than sequence-based annotations. In practice, experimental validation of the predicted carboxylesterase activity in a protein from Staphylococcus aureus illustrated the effectiveness of this approach in the context of an increasingly drug-resistant microbe. This study further links molecular function to a small number of evolutionarily important residues recognizable by Evolutionary Tracing and it points to the specificity and sensitivity of functional annotation by competitive global network diffusion. A web server is at http://mammoth.bcm.tmc.edu/networks.

  7. Structuring Information to Enhance Human Information Processing and Decision Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harries-Belck, Nancy

    1978-01-01

    A pretest-posttest research design was used to measure changes in three criterion variables of 150 students enrolled in an undergraduate textile class using programmed instructional materials. Findings have implications for the design of organized learning sequences to help individuals process information more efficiently for complex…

  8. Argon Cluster Sputtering Source for ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling of Insulating Materials: High Sputter Rate and Accurate Interfacial Information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoying; Liu, Bingwen; Zhao, Evan W; Jin, Ke; Du, Yingge; Neeway, James J; Ryan, Joseph V; Hu, Dehong; Zhang, Kelvin H L; Hong, Mina; Le Guernic, Solenne; Thevuthasan, Suntharampilai; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2015-08-01

    The use of an argon cluster ion sputtering source has been demonstrated to perform superiorly relative to traditional oxygen and cesium ion sputtering sources for ToF-SIMS depth profiling of insulating materials. The superior performance has been attributed to effective alleviation of surface charging. A simulated nuclear waste glass (SON68) and layered hole-perovskite oxide thin films were selected as model systems because of their fundamental and practical significance. Our results show that high sputter rates and accurate interfacial information can be achieved simultaneously for argon cluster sputtering, whereas this is not the case for cesium and oxygen sputtering. Therefore, the implementation of an argon cluster sputtering source can significantly improve the analysis efficiency of insulating materials and, thus, can expand its applications to the study of glass corrosion, perovskite oxide thin film characterization, and many other systems of interest.

  9. Ideologically Structured Information Exchange among Environmental Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lhotka, Laura; Bailey, Conner; Dubois, Mark

    2008-01-01

    We use social network analysis to test the hypothesis that group ideology affects information exchange among environmental groups. The analysis is based on interviews with leaders of 136 environmental groups in Alabama. This paper adds to the literature on resource mobilization among social movement organizations by exploring information exchange…

  10. A highly accurate protein structural class prediction approach using auto cross covariance transformation and recursive feature elimination.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Taigang; Tao, Peiying; Wang, Chunhua; Chen, Lanming

    2015-12-01

    Structural class characterizes the overall folding type of a protein or its domain. Many methods have been proposed to improve the prediction accuracy of protein structural class in recent years, but it is still a challenge for the low-similarity sequences. In this study, we introduce a feature extraction technique based on auto cross covariance (ACC) transformation of position-specific score matrix (PSSM) to represent a protein sequence. Then support vector machine-recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE) is adopted to select top K features according to their importance and these features are input to a support vector machine (SVM) to conduct the prediction. Performance evaluation of the proposed method is performed using the jackknife test on three low-similarity datasets, i.e., D640, 1189 and 25PDB. By means of this method, the overall accuracies of 97.2%, 96.2%, and 93.3% are achieved on these three datasets, which are higher than those of most existing methods. This suggests that the proposed method could serve as a very cost-effective tool for predicting protein structural class especially for low-similarity datasets.

  11. Towards accurate structural characterization of metal centres in protein crystals: the structures of Ni and Cu T{sub 6} bovine insulin derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Frankaer, Christian Grundahl; Mossin, Susanne; Ståhl, Kenny; Harris, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    The level of structural detail around the metal sites in Ni{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} T{sub 6} insulin derivatives was significantly improved by using a combination of single-crystal X-ray crystallography and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Photoreduction and subsequent radiation damage of the Cu{sup 2+} sites in Cu insulin was followed by XANES spectroscopy. Using synchrotron radiation (SR), the crystal structures of T{sub 6} bovine insulin complexed with Ni{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} were solved to 1.50 and 1.45 Å resolution, respectively. The level of detail around the metal centres in these structures was highly limited, and the coordination of water in Cu site II of the copper insulin derivative was deteriorated as a consequence of radiation damage. To provide more detail, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to improve the information level about metal coordination in each derivative. The nickel derivative contains hexacoordinated Ni{sup 2+} with trigonal symmetry, whereas the copper derivative contains tetragonally distorted hexacoordinated Cu{sup 2+} as a result of the Jahn–Teller effect, with a significantly longer coordination distance for one of the three water molecules in the coordination sphere. That the copper centre is of type II was further confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The coordination distances were refined from EXAFS with standard deviations within 0.01 Å. The insulin derivative containing Cu{sup 2+} is sensitive towards photoreduction when exposed to SR. During the reduction of Cu{sup 2+} to Cu{sup +}, the coordination geometry of copper changes towards lower coordination numbers. Primary damage, i.e. photoreduction, was followed directly by XANES as a function of radiation dose, while secondary damage in the form of structural changes around the Cu atoms after exposure to different radiation doses was studied by crystallography using a laboratory diffractometer. Protection against photoreduction and subsequent

  12. A new methodology for non-contact accurate crack width measurement through photogrammetry for automated structural safety evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahanshahi, Mohammad R.; Masri, Sami F.

    2013-03-01

    In mechanical, aerospace and civil structures, cracks are important defects that can cause catastrophes if neglected. Visual inspection is currently the predominant method for crack assessment. This approach is tedious, labor-intensive, subjective and highly qualitative. An inexpensive alternative to current monitoring methods is to use a robotic system that could perform autonomous crack detection and quantification. To reach this goal, several image-based crack detection approaches have been developed; however, the crack thickness quantification, which is an essential element for a reliable structural condition assessment, has not been sufficiently investigated. In this paper, a new contact-less crack quantification methodology, based on computer vision and image processing concepts, is introduced and evaluated against a crack quantification approach which was previously developed by the authors. The proposed approach in this study utilizes depth perception to quantify crack thickness and, as opposed to most previous studies, needs no scale attachment to the region under inspection, which makes this approach ideal for incorporation with autonomous or semi-autonomous mobile inspection systems. Validation tests are performed to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach, and the results show that the new proposed approach outperforms the previously developed one.

  13. Accurate extraction of Lagrangian coherent structures over finite domains with application to flight data analysis over Hong Kong International Airport.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wenbo; Chan, Pak Wai; Haller, George

    2010-03-01

    Locating Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) for dynamical systems defined on a spatially limited domain present a challenge because trajectory integration must be stopped at the boundary for lack of further velocity data. This effectively turns the domain boundary into an attractor, introduces edge effects resulting in spurious ridges in the associated finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field, and causes some of the real ridges of the FTLE field to be suppressed by strong spurious ridges. To address these issues, we develop a finite-domain FTLE method that renders LCS with an accuracy and fidelity that is suitable for automated feature detection. We show the application of this technique to the analysis of velocity data from aircraft landing at the Hong Kong International Airport.

  14. Towards Efficient and Accurate Description of Many-Electron Problems: Developments of Static and Time-Dependent Electronic Structure Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Feizhi

    Understanding electronic behavior in molecular and nano-scale systems is fundamental to the development and design of novel technologies and materials for application in a variety of scientific contexts from fundamental research to energy conversion. This dissertation aims to provide insights into this goal by developing novel methods and applications of first-principle electronic structure theory. Specifically, we will present new methods and applications of excited state multi-electron dynamics based on the real-time (RT) time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) formalism, and new development of the multi-configuration self-consist field theory (MCSCF) for modeling ground-state electronic structure. The RT-TDHF/TDDFT based developments and applications can be categorized into three broad and coherently integrated research areas: (1) modeling of the interaction between moleculars and external electromagnetic perturbations. In this part we will first prove both analytically and numerically the gauge invariance of the TDHF/TDDFT formalisms, then we will present a novel, efficient method for calculating molecular nonlinear optical properties, and last we will study quantum coherent plasmon in metal namowires using RT-TDDFT; (2) modeling of excited-state charge transfer in molecules. In this part, we will investigate the mechanisms of bridge-mediated electron transfer, and then we will introduce a newly developed non-equilibrium quantum/continuum embedding method for studying charge transfer dynamics in solution; (3) developments of first-principles spin-dependent many-electron dynamics. In this part, we will present an ab initio non-relativistic spin dynamics method based on the two-component generalized Hartree-Fock approach, and then we will generalized it to the two-component TDDFT framework and combine it with the Ehrenfest molecular dynamics approach for modeling the interaction between electron spins and nuclear

  15. Integrative structural annotation of de novo RNA-Seq provides an accurate reference gene set of the enormous genome of the onion (Allium cepa L.).

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungill; Kim, Myung-Shin; Kim, Yong-Min; Yeom, Seon-In; Cheong, Kyeongchae; Kim, Ki-Tae; Jeon, Jongbum; Kim, Sunggil; Kim, Do-Sun; Sohn, Seong-Han; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Choi, Doil

    2015-02-01

    The onion (Allium cepa L.) is one of the most widely cultivated and consumed vegetable crops in the world. Although a considerable amount of onion transcriptome data has been deposited into public databases, the sequences of the protein-coding genes are not accurate enough to be used, owing to non-coding sequences intermixed with the coding sequences. We generated a high-quality, annotated onion transcriptome from de novo sequence assembly and intensive structural annotation using the integrated structural gene annotation pipeline (ISGAP), which identified 54,165 protein-coding genes among 165,179 assembled transcripts totalling 203.0 Mb by eliminating the intron sequences. ISGAP performed reliable annotation, recognizing accurate gene structures based on reference proteins, and ab initio gene models of the assembled transcripts. Integrative functional annotation and gene-based SNP analysis revealed a whole biological repertoire of genes and transcriptomic variation in the onion. The method developed in this study provides a powerful tool for the construction of reference gene sets for organisms based solely on de novo transcriptome data. Furthermore, the reference genes and their variation described here for the onion represent essential tools for molecular breeding and gene cloning in Allium spp.

  16. An accurately preorganized IRES RNA structure enables eIF4G capture for initiation of viral translation.

    PubMed

    Imai, Shunsuke; Kumar, Parimal; Hellen, Christopher U T; D'Souza, Victoria M; Wagner, Gerhard

    2016-09-01

    Many viruses bypass canonical cap-dependent translation in host cells by using internal ribosomal entry sites (IRESs) in their transcripts; IRESs hijack initiation factors for the assembly of initiation complexes. However, it is currently unknown how IRES RNAs recognize initiation factors that have no endogenous RNA binding partners; in a prominent example, the IRES of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) interacts with the HEAT-1 domain of eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G). Here we report the solution structure of the J-K region of this IRES and show that its stems are precisely organized to position protein-recognition bulges. This multisite interaction mechanism operates on an all-or-nothing principle in which all domains are required. This preorganization is accomplished by an 'adjuster module': a pentaloop motif that acts as a dual-sided docking station for base-pair receptors. Because subtle changes in the orientation abrogate protein capture, our study highlights how a viral RNA acquires affinity for a target protein. PMID:27525590

  17. Informational biopolymer structure in early living forms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayhoff, M. O.; Mclaughlin, P. J.; Barker, W. C.; Hunt, L. T.

    1972-01-01

    Some studies devoted to the search in various organisms for 'relics' of the biochemical nature of ancient organisms, preserved by the conservative nature of the evolutionary process in all living species, are reviewed. Investigations of five families of informational molecules constituting such 'relics' in very diverse organisms are reported. They include: cytochrome c, ferredoxin, trypsin, transfer ribonucleic acid (RNA), and 5S ribosomal RNA. It is shown that, even from these few informational molecules, some interesting inferences about early living organisms can be drawn.

  18. IrisPlex: a sensitive DNA tool for accurate prediction of blue and brown eye colour in the absence of ancestry information.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Susan; Liu, Fan; Ballantyne, Kaye N; van Oven, Mannis; Lao, Oscar; Kayser, Manfred

    2011-06-01

    A new era of 'DNA intelligence' is arriving in forensic biology, due to the impending ability to predict externally visible characteristics (EVCs) from biological material such as those found at crime scenes. EVC prediction from forensic samples, or from body parts, is expected to help concentrate police investigations towards finding unknown individuals, at times when conventional DNA profiling fails to provide informative leads. Here we present a robust and sensitive tool, termed IrisPlex, for the accurate prediction of blue and brown eye colour from DNA in future forensic applications. We used the six currently most eye colour-informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that previously revealed prevalence-adjusted prediction accuracies of over 90% for blue and brown eye colour in 6168 Dutch Europeans. The single multiplex assay, based on SNaPshot chemistry and capillary electrophoresis, both widely used in forensic laboratories, displays high levels of genotyping sensitivity with complete profiles generated from as little as 31pg of DNA, approximately six human diploid cell equivalents. We also present a prediction model to correctly classify an individual's eye colour, via probability estimation solely based on DNA data, and illustrate the accuracy of the developed prediction test on 40 individuals from various geographic origins. Moreover, we obtained insights into the worldwide allele distribution of these six SNPs using the HGDP-CEPH samples of 51 populations. Eye colour prediction analyses from HGDP-CEPH samples provide evidence that the test and model presented here perform reliably without prior ancestry information, although future worldwide genotype and phenotype data shall confirm this notion. As our IrisPlex eye colour prediction test is capable of immediate implementation in forensic casework, it represents one of the first steps forward in the creation of a fully individualised EVC prediction system for future use in forensic DNA intelligence.

  19. Pattern information extraction from crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyan, Erhan; Güdükbay, Uğur; Gülseren, Oğuz

    2007-04-01

    Determining the crystal structure parameters of a material is an important issue in crystallography and material science. Knowing the crystal structure parameters helps in understanding the physical behavior of material. It can be difficult to obtain crystal parameters for complex structures, particularly those materials that show local symmetry as well as global symmetry. This work provides a tool that extracts crystal parameters such as primitive vectors, basis vectors and space groups from the atomic coordinates of crystal structures. A visualization tool for examining crystals is also provided. Accordingly, this work could help crystallographers, chemists and material scientists to analyze crystal structures efficiently. Program summaryTitle of program: BilKristal Catalogue identifier: ADYU_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYU_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: None Programming language used: C, C++, Microsoft .NET Framework 1.1 and OpenGL Libraries Computer: Personal Computers with Windows operating system Operating system: Windows XP Professional RAM: 20-60 MB No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:899 779 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test date, etc.:9 271 521 Distribution format:tar.gz External routines/libraries: Microsoft .NET Framework 1.1. For visualization tool, graphics card driver should also support OpenGL Nature of problem: Determining crystal structure parameters of a material is a quite important issue in crystallography. Knowing the crystal structure parameters helps to understand physical behavior of material. For complex structures, particularly, for materials which also contain local symmetry as well as global symmetry, obtaining crystal parameters can be quite hard. Solution method: The tool extracts crystal parameters such as primitive vectors, basis vectors and identify the space group from

  20. Teaching Text Structure: Examining the Affordances of Children's Informational Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Cindy D.; Clark, Sarah K.; Reutzel, D. Ray

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the affordances of informational texts to serve as model texts for teaching text structure to elementary school children. Content analysis of a random sampling of children's informational texts from top publishers was conducted on text structure organization and on the inclusion of text features as signals of text…

  1. The Interaction of Information Structure and Syntactic Representation in Chinese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Yu-Yin

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation concerns the interaction of syntax and information structure in Mandarin Chinese and puts the theoretical assumption of parallelism between clauses and noun phrases to the test. It examines and validates the information structural status of the object phrases preposed to clause-internal positions. I argue that Rizzi's (1997)…

  2. Informal Reading Inventories & Text Type/Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillis, M. K.; Olson, Mary W.

    Experienced teachers enrolled in two graduate reading classes examined seven informal reading inventories (IRIs)--three at the elementary level and four at the secondary level--to (1) discover what text types (narrative or expository) they used at each level to measure student comprehension skills and determine instructional levels and (2)…

  3. Axiomatic Evaluation Method and Content Structure for Information Appliances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Yinni

    2010-01-01

    Extensive studies have been conducted to determine how best to present information in order to enhance usability, but not what information is needed to be presented for effective decision making. Hence, this dissertation addresses the factor structure of the nature of information needed for presentation and proposes a more effective method than…

  4. Nuclear spins and moments: Fundamental structural information

    SciTech Connect

    Semmes, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    Predictions for the low energy structure of well deformed odd-A Pm and Sm nuclei in the A {approx} 130 region are given, based on the particle-rotor model. Distinctive magnetic dipole properties (static moments and transition rates) are expected for certain Nilsson configurations, and comparisons to recent data are made for {sup 133}Pm, {sup 135}Sm and {sup 133}Sm.

  5. Nuclear spins and moments: Fundamental structural information

    SciTech Connect

    Semmes, P.B.

    1991-12-31

    Predictions for the low energy structure of well deformed odd-A Pm and Sm nuclei in the A {approx} 130 region are given, based on the particle-rotor model. Distinctive magnetic dipole properties (static moments and transition rates) are expected for certain Nilsson configurations, and comparisons to recent data are made for {sup 133}Pm, {sup 135}Sm and {sup 133}Sm.

  6. Phase structure rewrite systems in information retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klingbiel, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Operational level automatic indexing requires an efficient means of normalizing natural language phrases. Subject switching requires an efficient means of translating one set of authorized terms to another. A phrase structure rewrite system called a Lexical Dictionary is explained that performs these functions. Background, operational use, other applications and ongoing research are explained.

  7. Accurate structure, thermodynamics and spectroscopy of medium-sized radicals by hybrid Coupled Cluster/Density Functional Theory approaches: the case of phenyl radical

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Vincenzo; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien; Egidi, Franco; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The CCSD(T) model coupled with extrapolation to the complete basis-set limit and additive approaches represents the “golden standard” for the structural and spectroscopic characterization of building blocks of biomolecules and nanosystems. However, when open-shell systems are considered, additional problems related to both specific computational difficulties and the need of obtaining spin-dependent properties appear. In this contribution, we present a comprehensive study of the molecular structure and spectroscopic (IR, Raman, EPR) properties of the phenyl radical with the aim of validating an accurate computational protocol able to deal with conjugated open-shell species. We succeeded in obtaining reliable and accurate results, thus confirming and, partly, extending the available experimental data. The main issue to be pointed out is the need of going beyond the CCSD(T) level by including a full treatment of triple excitations in order to fulfil the accuracy requirements. On the other hand, the reliability of density functional theory in properly treating open-shell systems has been further confirmed. PMID:23802956

  8. Information-preserving structures: A general framework for quantum zero-error information

    SciTech Connect

    Blume-Kohout, Robin; Ng, Hui Khoon; Poulin, David; Viola, Lorenza

    2010-12-15

    Quantum systems carry information. Quantum theory supports at least two distinct kinds of information (classical and quantum), and a variety of different ways to encode and preserve information in physical systems. A system's ability to carry information is constrained and defined by the noise in its dynamics. This paper introduces an operational framework, using information-preserving structures, to classify all the kinds of information that can be perfectly (i.e., with zero error) preserved by quantum dynamics. We prove that every perfectly preserved code has the same structure as a matrix algebra, and that preserved information can always be corrected. We also classify distinct operational criteria for preservation (e.g., 'noiseless','unitarily correctible', etc.) and introduce two natural criteria for measurement-stabilized and unconditionally preserved codes. Finally, for several of these operational criteria, we present efficient (polynomial in the state-space dimension) algorithms to find all of a channel's information-preserving structures.

  9. Extracting Structural information from Galaxy Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Wayne B.; Davis, D.

    2010-05-01

    The amount of data from sky images is large and growing. About 1 million galaxies can be discerned in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is being built and will scan the entire sky repeatedly, providing images of millions of galaxies and petabytes of data every night. The Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM) is a proposed orbiting satellite that will repeatedly map the entire sky from orbit, providing images of perhaps billions of galaxies. Unfortunately, given an image of a spiral galaxy, there does not exist an automated vision algorithm that can even tell us which direction the spiral arms wind, much less count them or provide any other quantitative information about them. To wit, the largest galaxy classification project is the Galaxy Zoo, in which thousands of human volunteers classify images by eye over the web. Although valuable, such human classifications will provide only limited objective quantitative measurements, and will soon be overwhelmed with more data than humans can handle. However, such information would prove an invaluable source for astronomers and cosmologists to test current theories of galaxy formation and cosmic evolution (which can now be simulated with high accuracy on large computers, producing copious predictions that cannot be tested due to a lack of objective, quantitative observational data). In this talk, I will report on preliminary results from dynamical grammars and other machine learning and vision techniques to "parse" images of galaxies, starting us on the road towards producing quantitative data that will be useful for astronomers to test theories.

  10. Molecular information structures in the brain.

    PubMed

    Conrad, M

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents a theory of memory and memory mediated learning based on the manipulation of macromolecular conformations. The main features of the theory are: 1) the brain contains primary and reference neurons; 2) inputs from the external environment produce particular patterns of primary firing; 3) the firing of a primary neuron sensitizes certain of its dendrites; 4) the sensitized primaries are loaded by the reference neuron active at the time and in such a way that they fire when called by this reference neuron, thus reconstructing the original pattern of primary activity. The reference neurons may also be loaded by primaries, thus making it possible for the reconstruction process to be initiated by some feature of the initial input. Each reference neuron loads and calls at most one primary pattern of activity, thereby preventing superposition of memories. If the primaries are loadable by sequences of impulses, this makes it possible to increase the connectivity among the various types of neurons by using party-line organization. The loading and calling processes themselves are mediated by call molecules. These are allosteric enzymes, located in the dendrites of primary and reference neurons, whose states are set either by an impulse or sequence of impulses and which catalyze events leading to impulse formation whenever this input recurs. The call molecules are capable of duplicating their setting (or conformation) using either intra- or interneuronal potentials, thereby ensuring stability of the memory trace. The theory allows for general powers of memory manipulation (by rememorization), for the construction of time ordered, content ordered, and associative data structures, and for computation with global representations of the environment. It makes a large number of testable predictions, provides a natural interpretation for the structure of the cerebral cortex, and accounts for: resistance to cooling, differential effects of chemical agents on short

  11. The Combination of Laser Scanning and Structure from Motion Technology for Creation of Accurate Exterior and Interior Orthophotos of ST. Nicholas Baroque Church

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koska, B.; Křemen, T.

    2013-02-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning technology is used for creation of building documentation and 3D building model from its emerging at the turn of the millennium. Photogrammetry has even longer tradition in this field. Both technologies have some technical limitations if they are used for creation of a façade or even an interior orthophoto, but combination of both technologies seems profitable. Laser scanning can be used for creation of an accurate 3D model and photogrammetry for consequent application of high quality colour information. Both technologies were used in synergy to create the building plans, 2D drawing documentation of facades and interior views and the orthophotos of St. Nicholas Baroque church in Prague. The case study is described in details in the paper.

  12. Under proper control, oxidation of proteins with known chemical structure provides an accurate and absolute method for the determination of their molar concentration.

    PubMed

    Guermant, C; Azarkan, M; Smolders, N; Baeyens-Volant, D; Nijs, M; Paul, C; Brygier, J; Vincentelli, J; Looze, Y

    2000-01-01

    Oxidation at 120 degrees C of inorganic and organic (including amino acids, di- and tripeptides) model compounds by K(2)Cr(2)O(7) in the presence of H(2)SO(4) (mass fraction: 0.572), Ag(2)SO(4) (catalyst), and HgSO(4) results in the quantitative conversion of their C-atoms into CO(2) within 24 h or less. Under these stressed, well-defined conditions, the S-atoms present in cysteine and cystine residues are oxidized into SO(3) while, interestingly, the oxidation states of all the other (including the N-) atoms normally present in a protein do remain quite unchanged. When the chemical structure of a given protein is available, the total number of electrons the protein is able to transfer to K(2)Cr(2)O(7) and thereof, the total number of moles of Cr(3+) ions which the protein is able to generate upon oxidation can be accurately calculated. In such cases, unknown protein molar concentrations can thus be determined through straightforward spectrophotometric measurements of Cr(3+) concentrations. The values of molar absorption coefficients for several well-characterized proteins have been redetermined on this basis and observed to be in excellent agreement with the most precise values reported in the literature, which fully assesses the validity of the method. When applied to highly purified proteins of known chemical structure (more generally of known atomic composition), this method is absolute and accurate (+/-1%). Furthermore, it is well adapted to series measurements since available commercial kits for chemical oxygen demand (COD) measurements can readily be adapted to work under the experimental conditions recommended here for the protein assay. PMID:10610688

  13. Structured Information Management Using New Techniques for Processing Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Forbes; Smart, Godfrey

    1990-01-01

    Describes the development of a software system, SIMPR (Structured Information Management: Processing and Retrieval), that will process documents by indexing them and classifying their subjects. Topics discussed include information storage and retrieval, file inversion techniques, modelling the user, natural language searching, automatic indexing,…

  14. Information on Quantifiers and Argument Structure in English Learner's Dictionaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Thomas Hun-tak

    1993-01-01

    Lexicographers have been arguing for the inclusion of abstract and complex grammatical information in dictionaries. This paper examines the extent to which information about quantifiers and the argument structure of verbs is encoded in English learner's dictionaries. The Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary (1989), the Longman Dictionary of…

  15. Creating Information Structures That Work for the New Millennium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Heather

    This paper discusses the impact of globalization and new information and communication technologies on the structures and practices of higher education. The first section addresses the integration of library and information technology services, focusing on experiences at the University of the Sunshine Coast (Queensland, Australia). The second…

  16. Structural and functional screening in human induced-pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes accurately identifies cardiotoxicity of multiple drug types

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, Kimberly R. Talbert, Dominique R.; Trusk, Patricia B.; Moran, Diarmuid M.; Shell, Scott A.; Bacus, Sarah

    2015-05-15

    Safety pharmacology studies that evaluate new drug entities for potential cardiac liability remain a critical component of drug development. Current studies have shown that in vitro tests utilizing human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CM) may be beneficial for preclinical risk evaluation. We recently demonstrated that an in vitro multi-parameter test panel assessing overall cardiac health and function could accurately reflect the associated clinical cardiotoxicity of 4 FDA-approved targeted oncology agents using hiPS-CM. The present studies expand upon this initial observation to assess whether this in vitro screen could detect cardiotoxicity across multiple drug classes with known clinical cardiac risks. Thus, 24 drugs were examined for their effect on both structural (viability, reactive oxygen species generation, lipid formation, troponin secretion) and functional (beating activity) endpoints in hiPS-CM. Using this screen, the cardiac-safe drugs showed no effects on any of the tests in our panel. However, 16 of 18 compounds with known clinical cardiac risk showed drug-induced changes in hiPS-CM by at least one method. Moreover, when taking into account the Cmax values, these 16 compounds could be further classified depending on whether the effects were structural, functional, or both. Overall, the most sensitive test assessed cardiac beating using the xCELLigence platform (88.9%) while the structural endpoints provided additional insight into the mechanism of cardiotoxicity for several drugs. These studies show that a multi-parameter approach examining both cardiac cell health and function in hiPS-CM provides a comprehensive and robust assessment that can aid in the determination of potential cardiac liability. - Highlights: • 24 drugs were tested for cardiac liability using an in vitro multi-parameter screen. • Changes in beating activity were the most sensitive in predicting cardiac risk. • Structural effects add in

  17. 75 FR 68809 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Importation Bond Structure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... information collection was previously published in the Federal Register (75 FR 50772) on August 17, 2010... Structure AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: 30-day notice... review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Importation Bond Structure. This is...

  18. Information Structure and the Licensing of English Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Jennifer Elaine

    2010-01-01

    Most approaches to argument realization in English are grounded in lexical semantic structure. While it is widely acknowledged that there is an intimate relationship between information structure and grammatical relations such as "subject," there have been few attempts to formalize this observation. This dissertation proposes an "interface model…

  19. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  20. Structural and functional screening in human induced-pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes accurately identifies cardiotoxicity of multiple drug types.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Kimberly R; Talbert, Dominique R; Trusk, Patricia B; Moran, Diarmuid M; Shell, Scott A; Bacus, Sarah

    2015-05-15

    Safety pharmacology studies that evaluate new drug entities for potential cardiac liability remain a critical component of drug development. Current studies have shown that in vitro tests utilizing human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CM) may be beneficial for preclinical risk evaluation. We recently demonstrated that an in vitro multi-parameter test panel assessing overall cardiac health and function could accurately reflect the associated clinical cardiotoxicity of 4 FDA-approved targeted oncology agents using hiPS-CM. The present studies expand upon this initial observation to assess whether this in vitro screen could detect cardiotoxicity across multiple drug classes with known clinical cardiac risks. Thus, 24 drugs were examined for their effect on both structural (viability, reactive oxygen species generation, lipid formation, troponin secretion) and functional (beating activity) endpoints in hiPS-CM. Using this screen, the cardiac-safe drugs showed no effects on any of the tests in our panel. However, 16 of 18 compounds with known clinical cardiac risk showed drug-induced changes in hiPS-CM by at least one method. Moreover, when taking into account the Cmax values, these 16 compounds could be further classified depending on whether the effects were structural, functional, or both. Overall, the most sensitive test assessed cardiac beating using the xCELLigence platform (88.9%) while the structural endpoints provided additional insight into the mechanism of cardiotoxicity for several drugs. These studies show that a multi-parameter approach examining both cardiac cell health and function in hiPS-CM provides a comprehensive and robust assessment that can aid in the determination of potential cardiac liability.

  1. Reinforcing Visual Grouping Cues to Communicate Complex Informational Structure.

    PubMed

    Bae, Juhee; Watson, Benjamin

    2014-12-01

    In his book Multimedia Learning [7], Richard Mayer asserts that viewers learn best from imagery that provides them with cues to help them organize new information into the correct knowledge structures. Designers have long been exploiting the Gestalt laws of visual grouping to deliver viewers those cues using visual hierarchy, often communicating structures much more complex than the simple organizations studied in psychological research. Unfortunately, designers are largely practical in their work, and have not paused to build a complex theory of structural communication. If we are to build a tool to help novices create effective and well structured visuals, we need a better understanding of how to create them. Our work takes a first step toward addressing this lack, studying how five of the many grouping cues (proximity, color similarity, common region, connectivity, and alignment) can be effectively combined to communicate structured text and imagery from real world examples. To measure the effectiveness of this structural communication, we applied a digital version of card sorting, a method widely used in anthropology and cognitive science to extract cognitive structures. We then used tree edit distance to measure the difference between perceived and communicated structures. Our most significant findings are: 1) with careful design, complex structure can be communicated clearly; 2) communicating complex structure is best done with multiple reinforcing grouping cues; 3) common region (use of containers such as boxes) is particularly effective at communicating structure; and 4) alignment is a weak structural communicator. PMID:26356911

  2. Informational Complexity and Functional Activity of RNA Structures

    PubMed Central

    Carothers, James M.; Oestreich, Stephanie C.; Davis, Jonathan H.

    2004-01-01

    Very little is known about the distribution of functional DNA, RNA, and protein molecules in sequence space. The question of how the number and complexity of distinct solutions to a particular biochemical problem varies with activity is an important aspect of this general problem. Here we present a comparison of the structures and activities of eleven distinct GTP-binding RNAs (aptamers). By experimentally measuring the amount of information required to specify each optimal binding structure, we show that defining a structure capable of 10-fold tighter binding requires approximately 10 additional bits of information. This increase in information content is equivalent to specifying the identity of five additional nucleotide positions and corresponds to an ∼1000-fold decrease in abundance in a sample of random sequences. We observe a similar relationship between structural complexity and activity in a comparison of two catalytic RNAs (ribozyme ligases), raising the possibility of a general relationship between the complexity of RNA structures and their functional activity. Describing how information varies with activity in other heteropolymers, both biological and synthetic, may lead to an objective means of comparing their functional properties. This approach could be useful in predicting the functional utility of novel heteropolymers. PMID:15099096

  3. Accurate crystal-structure refinement of Ca3Ga2Ge4O14 at 295 and 100 K and analysis of the disorder in the atomic positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudka, A. P.; Mill', B. V.

    2013-07-01

    The accurate X-ray diffraction study of a Ca3Ga2Ge4O14 crystal (sp. gr. P321, Z = 1) has been performed using repeated X-ray diffraction data sets collected on a diffractometer equipped with a CCD area detector at 295 and 100 K. The asymmetric disorder in the atomic positions in Ca3Ga2Ge4O14 is described in two alternative ways: with the use of anharmonic atomic displacements (at 295 K R/wR = 0.68/0.60%, 3754 reflections; at 100 K R/wR = 0.90/0.70%, 3632 reflections) and using a split model (SM) (at 295 K R/wR = 0.74/0.67%; at 100 K R/wR = 0.95/0.74%). An analysis of the probability density function that defines the probability of finding an atom at a particular point in space shows that, at 295 K, five of the seven independent atoms in the unit cell are asymmetrically disordered in the vicinity of their sites, whereas only three atoms are disordered at 100 K. At both temperatures the largest disorder is observed at the 3 f site on a twofold axis, which is a prerequisite for the formation of helicoidal chains of atoms along the c axis of the crystal and can serve as a structural basis for multiferroic properties of this family of crystals with magnetic ions.

  4. Information and computer-aided system for structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekrashevitch, Ju. G.; Nizametdinov, Sh. U.; Polkovnikov, A. V.; Rumjantzev, V. P.; Surina, O. N.; Kalinin, G. M.; Sidorenkov, A. V.; Strebkov, Ju. S.

    1992-09-01

    An information and computer-aided system for structural materials data has been developed to provide data for the fusion and fission reactor system design. It is designed for designers, industrial engineers, and material science specialists and provides a friendly interface in an interactive mode. The database for structural materials contains the master files: chemical composition, physical, mechanical, corrosion, technological properties, regulatory and technical documentation. The system is implemented on a PC/AT running the PS/2 operating system.

  5. Thesaurus of terms for information on mechanics of structural failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Moya, N.

    1973-01-01

    A Thesaurus of approximately 700 subject terms used to describe the six problem areas in the mechanics of structural failure is presented. The initial criteria for the selection of terms are their significance and frequency of use in the literature describing the mechanics of structural failure. The purpose of the Thesaurus is to provide the Aerospace Safety Research and Data Institute a list of key works and identifiers that afford effective retrieval of information regarding failure modes and mechanisms for aerospace structures. The Thesaurus includes both a conventional listing of subject terms and a Key Words In Context (KWIC) listing.

  6. Prenuclear Accentuation in English: Phonetics, Phonology, Information Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Jason Brandon

    2013-01-01

    A primary function of prosody in many languages is to convey information structure--the "packaging" of a sentence's content into categories such as "focus", "given" and "topic". In English and other West Germanic languages it is widely assumed that focus is signaled prosodically by the location of a…

  7. From Informal Strategies to Structured Procedures: Mind the Gap!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anghileri, Julia; Beishuizen, Meindert

    This paper explores written calculation methods for solving division problems used by students in England and the Netherlands at two points in the same school year. It analyzes informal strategies and identifies progression toward more structured procedures that result from different teaching approaches. Comparison of the methods used by fifth…

  8. From Informal Strategies to Structured Procedures: Mind the Gap!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anghileri, Julia; Beishuizen, Meindert; Van Putten, Kees

    2002-01-01

    Explores written calculation methods for division used by pupils in England (n=276) and the Netherlands (n=259). Analyses informal strategies and identifies progression towards more structured procedures that result from different teaching approaches. Comparison of methods used shows greater success in the Dutch approach which is based on…

  9. Impact of Information Technology Governance Structures on Strategic Alignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Fitzroy R.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation is a study of the relationship between Information Technology (IT) strategic alignment and IT governance structure within the organization. This dissertation replicates Asante (2010) among a different population where the prior results continue to hold, the non-experimental approach explored two research questions but include two…

  10. Prosodic Marking of Information Structure by Malaysian Speakers of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gut, Ulrike; Pillai, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Various researchers have shown that second language (L2) speakers have difficulties with marking information structure in English prosodically: They deviate from native speakers not only in terms of pitch accent placement (Grosser, 1997; Gut, 2009; Ramírez Verdugo, 2002) and the type of pitch accent they produce (Wennerstrom, 1994, 1998) but also…

  11. Recent Strategies for Retrieving Chemical Structure Information on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Mei Ling

    1997-01-01

    Various methods for retrieving chemical structure information on the World Wide Web are discussed. Although graphical plug-in programs provide more search capabilities, users first have to obtain a copy of the programs. Tripos's WebSketch and ACD Interactive Lab adopt a different approach; using JAVA applets, users create and display a structure…

  12. Review of "Conceptual Structures: Information Processing in Mind and Machine."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smoliar, Stephen W.

    This review of the book, "Conceptual Structures: Information Processing in Mind and Machine," by John F. Sowa, argues that anyone who plans to get involved with issues of knowledge representation should have at least a passing acquaintance with Sowa's conceptual graphs for a database interface. (Used to model the underlying semantics of a…

  13. A hierarachical data structure representation for fusing multisensor information

    SciTech Connect

    Maren, A.J. . Space Inst.); Pap, R.M.; Harston, C.T. )

    1989-01-01

    A major problem with MultiSensor Information Fusion (MSIF) is establishing the level of processing at which information should be fused. Current methodologies, whether based on fusion at the data element, segment/feature, or symbolic levels, are each inadequate for robust MSIF. Data-element fusion has problems with coregistration. Attempts to fuse information using the features of segmented data relies on a Presumed similarity between the segmentation characteristics of each data stream. Symbolic-level fusion requires too much advance processing (including object identification) to be useful. MSIF systems need to operate in real-time, must perform fusion using a variety of sensor types, and should be effective across a wide range of operating conditions or deployment environments. We address this problem through developing a new representation level which facilitates matching and information fusion. The Hierarchical Data Structure (HDS) representation, created using a multilayer, cooperative/competitive neural network, meets this need. The HDS is an intermediate representation between the raw or smoothed data stream and symbolic interpretation of the data. it represents the structural organization of the data. Fused HDSs will incorporate information from multiple sensors. Their knowledge-rich structure aids top-down scene interpretation via both model matching and knowledge-based region interpretation.

  14. A hierarachical data structure representation for fusing multisensor information

    SciTech Connect

    Maren, A.J.; Pap, R.M.; Harston, C.T.

    1989-12-31

    A major problem with MultiSensor Information Fusion (MSIF) is establishing the level of processing at which information should be fused. Current methodologies, whether based on fusion at the data element, segment/feature, or symbolic levels, are each inadequate for robust MSIF. Data-element fusion has problems with coregistration. Attempts to fuse information using the features of segmented data relies on a Presumed similarity between the segmentation characteristics of each data stream. Symbolic-level fusion requires too much advance processing (including object identification) to be useful. MSIF systems need to operate in real-time, must perform fusion using a variety of sensor types, and should be effective across a wide range of operating conditions or deployment environments. We address this problem through developing a new representation level which facilitates matching and information fusion. The Hierarchical Data Structure (HDS) representation, created using a multilayer, cooperative/competitive neural network, meets this need. The HDS is an intermediate representation between the raw or smoothed data stream and symbolic interpretation of the data. it represents the structural organization of the data. Fused HDSs will incorporate information from multiple sensors. Their knowledge-rich structure aids top-down scene interpretation via both model matching and knowledge-based region interpretation.

  15. Information diversity in structure and dynamics of simulated neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Aćimović, Jugoslava; Nykter, Matti; Kesseli, Juha; Ruohonen, Keijo; Yli-Harja, Olli; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal networks exhibit a wide diversity of structures, which contributes to the diversity of the dynamics therein. The presented work applies an information theoretic framework to simultaneously analyze structure and dynamics in neuronal networks. Information diversity within the structure and dynamics of a neuronal network is studied using the normalized compression distance. To describe the structure, a scheme for generating distance-dependent networks with identical in-degree distribution but variable strength of dependence on distance is presented. The resulting network structure classes possess differing path length and clustering coefficient distributions. In parallel, comparable realistic neuronal networks are generated with NETMORPH simulator and similar analysis is done on them. To describe the dynamics, network spike trains are simulated using different network structures and their bursting behaviors are analyzed. For the simulation of the network activity the Izhikevich model of spiking neurons is used together with the Tsodyks model of dynamical synapses. We show that the structure of the simulated neuronal networks affects the spontaneous bursting activity when measured with bursting frequency and a set of intraburst measures: the more locally connected networks produce more and longer bursts than the more random networks. The information diversity of the structure of a network is greatest in the most locally connected networks, smallest in random networks, and somewhere in between in the networks between order and disorder. As for the dynamics, the most locally connected networks and some of the in-between networks produce the most complex intraburst spike trains. The same result also holds for sparser of the two considered network densities in the case of full spike trains.

  16. Three-dimensional microwave imaging with incorporated prior structural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golnabi, Amir H.; Meaney, Paul M.; Epstein, Neil R.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-03-01

    Microwave imaging for biomedical applications, especially for early detection of breast cancer and effective treatment monitoring, has attracted increasing interest in last several decades. This fact is due to the high contrast between the dielectric properties of the normal and malignant breast tissues at microwave frequencies. The available range of dielectric properties for different soft tissue can provide important functional information about tissue health. Nonetheless, one of the limiting weaknesses of microwave imaging is that unlike conventional modalities, such as X-ray CT or MRI, it inherently cannot provide high-resolution images. The conventional modalities can produce highly resolved anatomical information but often cannot provide the functional information required for diagnoses. Previously, we have developed a regularization strategy that can incorporate prior anatomical information from MR or other sources and use it in a way to refine the resolution of the microwave images, while also retaining the functional nature of the reconstructed property values. In the present work, we extend the use of prior structural information in microwave imaging from 2D to 3D. This extra dimension adds a significant layer of complexity to the entire image reconstruction procedure. In this paper, several challenges with respect to the 3D microwave imaging will be discussed and the results of a series of 3D simulation and phantom experiments with prior structural information will be studied.

  17. Structural Simulations and Conservation Analysis -Historic Building Information Model (HBIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, C.; Murphy, M.; McCarthy, S.; Brechin, F.; Casidy, C.; Dirix, E.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper the current findings to date of the Historic Building Information Model (HBIM) of the Four Courts in Dublin are presented. The Historic Building Information Model (HBIM) forms the basis for both structural and conservation analysis to measure the impact of war damage which still impacts on the building. The laser scan survey was carried out in the summer of 2014 of the internal and external structure. After registration and processing of the laser scan survey, the HBIM was created of the damaged section of the building and is presented as two separate workflows in this paper. The first is the model created from historic data, the second a procedural and segmented model developed from laser scan survey of the war damaged drum and dome. From both models structural damage and decay simulations will be developed for documentation and conservation analysis.

  18. Effect of chemical fixatives on accurate preservation of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis structure in cells prepared by freeze-substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, L.L.; Beveridge, T.J. )

    1990-04-01

    Five chemical fixatives were evaluated for their ability to accurately preserve bacterial ultrastructure during freeze-substitution of select Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis strains. Radioisotopes were specifically incorporated into the peptidoglycan, lipopolysaccharide, and nucleic acids of E. coli SFK11 and W7 and into the peptidoglycan and RNA of B. subtilis 168 and W23. The ease of extraction of radiolabels, as assessed by liquid scintillation counting during all stages of processing for freeze-substitution, was used as an indicator of cell structural integrity and retention of cellular chemical composition. Subsequent visual examination by electron microscopy was used to confirm ultrastructural conformation. The fixatives used were: 2% (wt/vol) osmium tetroxide and 2% (wt/vol) uranyl acetate; 2% (vol/vol) glutaraldehyde and 2% (wt/vol) uranyl acetate; 2% (vol/vol) acrolein and 2% (wt/vol) uranyl acetate; 2% (wt/vol) gallic acid; and 2% (wt/vol) uranyl acetate. All fixatives were prepared in a substitution solvent of anhydrous acetone. Extraction of cellular constituents depended on the chemical fixative used. A combination of 2% osmium tetroxide-2% uranyl acetate or 2% gallic acid alone resulted in optimum fixation as ascertained by least extraction of radiolabels. In both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms, high levels of radiolabel were detected in the processing fluids in which 2% acrolein-2% uranyl acetate, 2% glutaraldehyde-2% uranyl acetate, or 2% uranyl acetate alone were used as fixatives. Ultrastructural variations were observed in cells freeze-substituted in the presence of different chemical fixatives. We recommend the use of osmium tetroxide and uranyl acetate in acetone for routine freeze-substitution of eubacteria, while gallic acid is recommended for use when microanalytical processing necessitates the omission of osmium.

  19. Evaluation of the information content of RNA structure mapping data for secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Quarrier, Scott; Martin, Joshua S; Davis-Neulander, Lauren; Beauregard, Arthur; Laederach, Alain

    2010-06-01

    Structure mapping experiments (using probes such as dimethyl sulfate [DMS], kethoxal, and T1 and V1 RNases) are used to determine the secondary structures of RNA molecules. The process is iterative, combining the results of several probes with constrained minimum free-energy calculations to produce a model of the structure. We aim to evaluate whether particular probes provide more structural information, and specifically, how noise in the data affects the predictions. Our approach involves generating "decoy" RNA structures (using the sFold Boltzmann sampling procedure) and evaluating whether we are able to identify the correct structure from this ensemble of structures. We show that with perfect information, we are always able to identify the optimal structure for five RNAs of known structure. We then collected orthogonal structure mapping data (DMS and RNase T1 digest) under several solution conditions using our high-throughput capillary automated footprinting analysis (CAFA) technique on two group I introns of known structure. Analysis of these data reveals the error rates in the data under optimal (low salt) and suboptimal solution conditions (high MgCl(2)). We show that despite these errors, our computational approach is less sensitive to experimental noise than traditional constraint-based structure prediction algorithms. Finally, we propose a novel approach for visualizing the interaction of chemical and enzymatic mapping data with RNA structure. We project the data onto the first two dimensions of a multidimensional scaling of the sFold-generated decoy structures. We are able to directly visualize the structural information content of structure mapping data and reconcile multiple data sets.

  20. Evaluation of the information content of RNA structure mapping data for secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Quarrier, Scott; Martin, Joshua S; Davis-Neulander, Lauren; Beauregard, Arthur; Laederach, Alain

    2010-06-01

    Structure mapping experiments (using probes such as dimethyl sulfate [DMS], kethoxal, and T1 and V1 RNases) are used to determine the secondary structures of RNA molecules. The process is iterative, combining the results of several probes with constrained minimum free-energy calculations to produce a model of the structure. We aim to evaluate whether particular probes provide more structural information, and specifically, how noise in the data affects the predictions. Our approach involves generating "decoy" RNA structures (using the sFold Boltzmann sampling procedure) and evaluating whether we are able to identify the correct structure from this ensemble of structures. We show that with perfect information, we are always able to identify the optimal structure for five RNAs of known structure. We then collected orthogonal structure mapping data (DMS and RNase T1 digest) under several solution conditions using our high-throughput capillary automated footprinting analysis (CAFA) technique on two group I introns of known structure. Analysis of these data reveals the error rates in the data under optimal (low salt) and suboptimal solution conditions (high MgCl(2)). We show that despite these errors, our computational approach is less sensitive to experimental noise than traditional constraint-based structure prediction algorithms. Finally, we propose a novel approach for visualizing the interaction of chemical and enzymatic mapping data with RNA structure. We project the data onto the first two dimensions of a multidimensional scaling of the sFold-generated decoy structures. We are able to directly visualize the structural information content of structure mapping data and reconcile multiple data sets. PMID:20413617

  1. A hierarchical structure approach to MultiSensor Information Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Maren, A.J.; Pap, R.M.; Harston, C.T.

    1989-12-31

    A major problem with image-based MultiSensor Information Fusion (MSIF) is establishing the level of processing at which information should be fused. Current methodologies, whether based on fusion at the pixel, segment/feature, or symbolic levels, are each inadequate for robust MSIF. Pixel-level fusion has problems with coregistration of the images or data. Attempts to fuse information using the features of segmented images or data relies an a presumed similarity between the segmentation characteristics of each image or data stream. Symbolic-level fusion requires too much advance processing to be useful, as we have seen in automatic target recognition tasks. Image-based MSIF systems need to operate in real-time, must perform fusion using a variety of sensor types, and should be effective across a wide range of operating conditions or deployment environments. We address this problem through developing a new representation level which facilitates matching and information fusion. The Hierarchical Scene Structure (HSS) representation, created using a multilayer, cooperative/competitive neural network, meets this need. The MSS is intermediate between a pixel-based representation and a scene interpretation representation, and represents the perceptual organization of an image. Fused HSSs will incorporate information from multiple sensors. Their knowledge-rich structure aids top-down scene interpretation via both model matching and knowledge-based,region interpretation.

  2. A hierarchical structure approach to MultiSensor Information Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Maren, A.J. . Space Inst.); Pap, R.M.; Harston, C.T. )

    1989-01-01

    A major problem with image-based MultiSensor Information Fusion (MSIF) is establishing the level of processing at which information should be fused. Current methodologies, whether based on fusion at the pixel, segment/feature, or symbolic levels, are each inadequate for robust MSIF. Pixel-level fusion has problems with coregistration of the images or data. Attempts to fuse information using the features of segmented images or data relies an a presumed similarity between the segmentation characteristics of each image or data stream. Symbolic-level fusion requires too much advance processing to be useful, as we have seen in automatic target recognition tasks. Image-based MSIF systems need to operate in real-time, must perform fusion using a variety of sensor types, and should be effective across a wide range of operating conditions or deployment environments. We address this problem through developing a new representation level which facilitates matching and information fusion. The Hierarchical Scene Structure (HSS) representation, created using a multilayer, cooperative/competitive neural network, meets this need. The MSS is intermediate between a pixel-based representation and a scene interpretation representation, and represents the perceptual organization of an image. Fused HSSs will incorporate information from multiple sensors. Their knowledge-rich structure aids top-down scene interpretation via both model matching and knowledge-based,region interpretation.

  3. Information-driven structural modelling of protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, João P G L M; Karaca, Ezgi; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein docking aims at predicting the three-dimensional structure of a protein complex starting from the free forms of the individual partners. As assessed in the CAPRI community-wide experiment, the most successful docking algorithms combine pure laws of physics with information derived from various experimental or bioinformatics sources. Of these so-called "information-driven" approaches, HADDOCK stands out as one of the most successful representatives. In this chapter, we briefly summarize which experimental information can be used to drive the docking prediction in HADDOCK, and then focus on the docking protocol itself. We discuss and illustrate with a tutorial example a "classical" protein-protein docking prediction, as well as more recent developments for modelling multi-body systems and large conformational changes. PMID:25330973

  4. Instruction in information structuring improves Bayesian judgment in intelligence analysts.

    PubMed

    Mandel, David R

    2015-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to test the effectiveness of brief instruction in information structuring (i.e., representing and integrating information) for improving the coherence of probability judgments and binary choices among intelligence analysts. Forty-three analysts were presented with comparable sets of Bayesian judgment problems before and immediately after instruction. After instruction, analysts' probability judgments were more coherent (i.e., more additive and compliant with Bayes theorem). Instruction also improved the coherence of binary choices regarding category membership: after instruction, subjects were more likely to invariably choose the category to which they assigned the higher probability of a target's membership. The research provides a rare example of evidence-based validation of effectiveness in instruction to improve the statistical assessment skills of intelligence analysts. Such instruction could also be used to improve the assessment quality of other types of experts who are required to integrate statistical information or make probabilistic assessments.

  5. Encoding techniques for complex information structures in connectionist systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnden, John; Srinivas, Kankanahalli

    1990-01-01

    Two general information encoding techniques called relative position encoding and pattern similarity association are presented. They are claimed to be a convenient basis for the connectionist implementation of complex, short term information processing of the sort needed in common sense reasoning, semantic/pragmatic interpretation of natural language utterances, and other types of high level cognitive processing. The relationships of the techniques to other connectionist information-structuring methods, and also to methods used in computers, are discussed in detail. The rich inter-relationships of these other connectionist and computer methods are also clarified. The particular, simple forms are discussed that the relative position encoding and pattern similarity association techniques take in the author's own connectionist system, called Conposit, in order to clarify some issues and to provide evidence that the techniques are indeed useful in practice.

  6. Instruction in information structuring improves Bayesian judgment in intelligence analysts

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, David R.

    2015-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to test the effectiveness of brief instruction in information structuring (i.e., representing and integrating information) for improving the coherence of probability judgments and binary choices among intelligence analysts. Forty-three analysts were presented with comparable sets of Bayesian judgment problems before and immediately after instruction. After instruction, analysts' probability judgments were more coherent (i.e., more additive and compliant with Bayes theorem). Instruction also improved the coherence of binary choices regarding category membership: after instruction, subjects were more likely to invariably choose the category to which they assigned the higher probability of a target's membership. The research provides a rare example of evidence-based validation of effectiveness in instruction to improve the statistical assessment skills of intelligence analysts. Such instruction could also be used to improve the assessment quality of other types of experts who are required to integrate statistical information or make probabilistic assessments. PMID:25904882

  7. Enhancing community detection by using local structural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Ju; Hu, Ke; Zhang, Yan; Bao, Mei-Hua; Tang, Liang; Tang, Yan-Ni; Gao, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Jian-Ming; Chen, Benyan; Hu, Jing-Bo

    2016-03-01

    Many real-world networks, such as gene networks, protein-protein interaction networks and metabolic networks, exhibit community structures, meaning the existence of groups of densely connected vertices in the networks. Many local similarity measures in the networks are closely related to the concept of the community structures, and may have a positive effect on community detection in the networks. Here, various local similarity measures are used to extract local structural information, which is then applied to community detection in the networks by using the edge-reweighting strategy. The effect of the local similarity measures on community detection is carefully investigated and compared in various networks. The experimental results show that the local similarity measures are crucial for the improvement of community detection methods, while the positive effect of the local similarity measures is closely related to the networks under study and applied community detection methods.

  8. Register of experts for information on mechanics of structural failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Stuhrke, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    This register is comprised of a list of approximately 300 experts from approximately 90 organizations who have published results of theoretical and/or experimental research related to six problem areas in the mechanics of structural failure: (1) life prediction for structural materials, (2) fracture toughness testing, (3) fracture mechanics analysis; (4) hydrogen embrittlement; (5) protective coatings; and (6) composite materials. The criteria for the selection of names for the register are recent contributions to the literature, participation in or support of relevant research programs, and referral by peers. Each author included is listed by organizational affiliation, address, and principal field of expertise. The purpose of the register is to present, in easy reference form, sources for dependable information regarding failure modes and mechanisms of aerospace structures. The register includes two indexes; an alphabetical listing of the experts and an alphabetical listing of the organizations with whom they are affiliated.

  9. Student Information Systems Demystified: The Increasing Demand for Accurate, Timely Data Means Schools and Districts Are Relying Heavily on SIS Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntire, Todd

    2004-01-01

    Student information systems, one of the first applications of computer technology in education, are undergoing a significant transition yet again. The first major shift in SIS technologies occurred about 15 years ago when they evolved from mainframe programs to client-server solutions. Now, vendors across the board are offering centralized…

  10. Reconstructing Information in Large-Scale Structure via Logarithmic Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szapudi, Istvan

    We propose to develop a new method to extract information from large-scale structure data combining two-point statistics and non-linear transformations; before, this information was available only with substantially more complex higher-order statistical methods. Initially, most of the cosmological information in large-scale structure lies in two-point statistics. With non- linear evolution, some of that useful information leaks into higher-order statistics. The PI and group has shown in a series of theoretical investigations how that leakage occurs, and explained the Fisher information plateau at smaller scales. This plateau means that even as more modes are added to the measurement of the power spectrum, the total cumulative information (loosely speaking the inverse errorbar) is not increasing. Recently we have shown in Neyrinck et al. (2009, 2010) that a logarithmic (and a related Gaussianization or Box-Cox) transformation on the non-linear Dark Matter or galaxy field reconstructs a surprisingly large fraction of this missing Fisher information of the initial conditions. This was predicted by the earlier wave mechanical formulation of gravitational dynamics by Szapudi & Kaiser (2003). The present proposal is focused on working out the theoretical underpinning of the method to a point that it can be used in practice to analyze data. In particular, one needs to deal with the usual real-life issues of galaxy surveys, such as complex geometry, discrete sam- pling (Poisson or sub-Poisson noise), bias (linear, or non-linear, deterministic, or stochastic), redshift distortions, pro jection effects for 2D samples, and the effects of photometric redshift errors. We will develop methods for weak lensing and Sunyaev-Zeldovich power spectra as well, the latter specifically targetting Planck. In addition, we plan to investigate the question of residual higher- order information after the non-linear mapping, and possible applications for cosmology. Our aim will be to work out

  11. Microwave imaging of the breast with incorporated structural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golnabi, Amir H.; Meaney, Paul M.; Geimer, Shireen D.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2010-03-01

    Microwave imaging for biomedical applications, especially for early detection of breast cancer and effective treatment monitoring, has attracted increasing interest in last several decades. This fact is due to the high contrast between the dielectric properties of the normal and malignant breast tissues at microwave frequencies ranging from high megahertz to low gigahertz. The available range of dielectric properties for different soft tissue can provide considerable functional information about tissue health. Nonetheless, one of the limiting weaknesses of microwave imaging is, unlike that for conventional modalities such as X-ray CT or MRI, it cannot inherently provide high-resolution images. The conventional modalities can produce highly resolved anatomical information but often cannot provide the functional information required for diagnoses. We have developed a soft prior regularization strategy that can incorporate the prior anatomical information from X-ray CT, MR or other sources, and use it in a way to exploit the resolution of these images while also retaining the functional nature of the microwave images. The anatomical information is first used to create an imaging zone mesh, which segments separate internal substructures, and an associated weighting matrix that numerically groups the values of closely related nodes within the mesh. This information is subsequently used as a regularizing term for the Gauss-Newton reconstruction algorithm. This approach exploits existing technology in a systematic way without making potentially biased assumptions about the properties of visible structures. In this paper we continue our initial investigation on this matter with a series of breast-shaped simulation and phantom experiments.

  12. An Informationally Structured Room for Robotic Assistance †

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Tokuo; Mozos, Oscar Martinez; Chae, Hyunuk; Pyo, Yoonseok; Kusaka, Kazuya; Hasegawa, Tsutomu; Morooka, Ken'ichi; Kurazume, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    The application of assistive technologies for elderly people is one of the most promising and interesting scenarios for intelligent technologies in the present and near future. Moreover, the improvement of the quality of life for the elderly is one of the first priorities in modern countries and societies. In this work, we present an informationally structured room that is aimed at supporting the daily life activities of elderly people. This room integrates different sensor modalities in a natural and non-invasive way inside the environment. The information gathered by the sensors is processed and sent to a centralized management system, which makes it available to a service robot assisting the people. One important restriction of our intelligent room is reducing as much as possible any interference with daily activities. Finally, this paper presents several experiments and situations using our intelligent environment in cooperation with our service robot. PMID:25912347

  13. Predicate argument structure frames for modeling information in operative notes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Pakhomov, Serguei; Melton, Genevieve B

    2013-01-01

    The rich information about surgical procedures contained in operative notes is a valuable data source for improving the clinical evidence base and clinical research. In this study, we propose a set of Predicate Argument Structure (PAS) frames for surgical action verbs to assist in the creation of an information extraction (IE) system to automatically extract details about the techniques, equipment, and operative steps from operative notes. We created PropBank style PAS frames for the 30 top surgical action verbs based on examination of randomly selected sample sentences from 3,000 Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy notes. To assess completeness of the PAS frames to represent usage of same action verbs, we evaluated the PAS frames created on sample sentences from operative notes of 6 other gastrointestinal surgical procedures. Our results showed that the PAS frames created with one type of surgery can successfully denote the usage of the same verbs in operative notes of broader surgical categories. PMID:23920664

  14. The importance of suppressing spin diffusion effects in the accurate determination of the spatial structure of a flexible molecule by nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodov, I. A.; Efimov, S. V.; Klochkov, V. V.; Batista de Carvalho, L. A. E.; Kiselev, M. G.

    2016-02-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy is applied to the elucidation of conformation distribution of small molecules in solution. An essential influence of the nonlinear multistep magnetization transfer (spin diffusion) on the NMR-based analysis of conformers distribution for small druglike molecules in solution was revealed. Therefore, the spin diffusion should be eliminated from the obtained NMR data in order to obtain accurate results. Efficiency of QUIET-NOESY spectroscopy in solving the problem of accurate determination of inter-proton distances in a small molecule was shown in a study of ibuprofen. Although it requires much experimental time, this technique was found to be helpful to solve the spin diffusion problem.

  15. Register of experts for information on mechanics of structural failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Moya, N.

    1973-01-01

    A list of approximately 150 experts from approximately 60 organizations who have published results of theoretical and/or experimental research related to six problem areas in the mechanics of structural failure is presented. Each author included is listed by organizational affiliation, address and principal field of expertise. The initial criteria for the selection of names for the register are recent contributions to the literature, participation in or support of relevant research programs, and referral by peers. The purpose of the register is to present, in easy reference form, sources for dependable information regarding failure modes and mechanisms of aerospace structures. The Register includes two indexes: an alphabetical listing of the experts and an alphabetical listing of the organizations with whom they are affiliated.

  16. A Framework for Preliminary Design of Aircraft Structures Based on Process Information. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rais-Rohani, Masoud

    1998-01-01

    This report discusses the general framework and development of a computational tool for preliminary design of aircraft structures based on process information. The described methodology is suitable for multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) activities associated with integrated product and process development (IPPD). The framework consists of three parts: (1) product and process definitions; (2) engineering synthesis, and (3) optimization. The product and process definitions are part of input information provided by the design team. The backbone of the system is its ability to analyze a given structural design for performance as well as manufacturability and cost assessment. The system uses a database on material systems and manufacturing processes. Based on the identified set of design variables and an objective function, the system is capable of performing optimization subject to manufacturability, cost, and performance constraints. The accuracy of the manufacturability measures and cost models discussed here depend largely on the available data on specific methods of manufacture and assembly and associated labor requirements. As such, our focus in this research has been on the methodology itself and not so much on its accurate implementation in an industrial setting. A three-tier approach is presented for an IPPD-MDO based design of aircraft structures. The variable-complexity cost estimation methodology and an approach for integrating manufacturing cost assessment into design process are also discussed. This report is presented in two parts. In the first part, the design methodology is presented, and the computational design tool is described. In the second part, a prototype model of the preliminary design Tool for Aircraft Structures based on Process Information (TASPI) is described. Part two also contains an example problem that applies the methodology described here for evaluation of six different design concepts for a wing spar.

  17. Genotyping by sequencing resolves shallow population structure to inform conservation of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Wesley A; Seeb, Lisa W; Everett, Meredith V; Waples, Ryan K; Templin, William D; Seeb, James E

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in population genomics have made it possible to detect previously unidentified structure, obtain more accurate estimates of demographic parameters, and explore adaptive divergence, potentially revolutionizing the way genetic data are used to manage wild populations. Here, we identified 10 944 single-nucleotide polymorphisms using restriction-site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing to explore population structure, demography, and adaptive divergence in five populations of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) from western Alaska. Patterns of population structure were similar to those of past studies, but our ability to assign individuals back to their region of origin was greatly improved (>90% accuracy for all populations). We also calculated effective size with and without removing physically linked loci identified from a linkage map, a novel method for nonmodel organisms. Estimates of effective size were generally above 1000 and were biased downward when physically linked loci were not removed. Outlier tests based on genetic differentiation identified 733 loci and three genomic regions under putative selection. These markers and genomic regions are excellent candidates for future research and can be used to create high-resolution panels for genetic monitoring and population assignment. This work demonstrates the utility of genomic data to inform conservation in highly exploited species with shallow population structure. PMID:24665338

  18. Profitable capitation requires accurate costing.

    PubMed

    West, D A; Hicks, L L; Balas, E A; West, T D

    1996-01-01

    In the name of costing accuracy, nurses are asked to track inventory use on per treatment basis when more significant costs, such as general overhead and nursing salaries, are usually allocated to patients or treatments on an average cost basis. Accurate treatment costing and financial viability require analysis of all resources actually consumed in treatment delivery, including nursing services and inventory. More precise costing information enables more profitable decisions as is demonstrated by comparing the ratio-of-cost-to-treatment method (aggregate costing) with alternative activity-based costing methods (ABC). Nurses must participate in this costing process to assure that capitation bids are based upon accurate costs rather than simple averages. PMID:8788799

  19. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  20. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  1. The Generalization of Mutual Information as the Information between a Set of Variables: The Information Correlation Function Hierarchy and the Information Structure of Multi-Agent Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David R.

    2004-01-01

    The topic of this paper is a hierarchy of information-like functions, here named the information correlation functions, where each function of the hierarchy may be thought of as the information between the variables it depends upon. The information correlation functions are particularly suited to the description of the emergence of complex behaviors due to many- body or many-agent processes. They are particularly well suited to the quantification of the decomposition of the information carried among a set of variables or agents, and its subsets. In more graphical language, they provide the information theoretic basis for understanding the synergistic and non-synergistic components of a system, and as such should serve as a forceful toolkit for the analysis of the complexity structure of complex many agent systems. The information correlation functions are the natural generalization to an arbitrary number of sets of variables of the sequence starting with the entropy function (one set of variables) and the mutual information function (two sets). We start by describing the traditional measures of information (entropy) and mutual information.

  2. On Added Information for ML Factor Analysis with Mean and Covariance Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yung, Yiu-Fai; Bentler, Peter M.

    1999-01-01

    Using explicit formulas for the information matrix of maximum likelihood factor analysis under multivariate normal theory, gross and net information for estimating the parameters in a covariance structure gained by adding the associated mean structure are defined. (Author/SLD)

  3. Quantitative structural information from single-molecule FRET.

    PubMed

    Beckers, M; Drechsler, F; Eilert, T; Nagy, J; Michaelis, J

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule studies can be used to study biological processes directly and in real-time. In particular, the fluorescence energy transfer between reporter dye molecules attached to specific sites on macromolecular complexes can be used to infer distance information. When several measurements are combined, the information can be used to determine the position and conformation of certain domains with respect to the complex. However, data analysis schemes that include all experimental uncertainties are highly complex, and the outcome depends on assumptions about the state of the dye molecules. Here, we present a new analysis algorithm using Bayesian parameter estimation based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling and parallel tempering termed Fast-NPS that can analyse large smFRET networks in a relatively short time and yields the position of the dye molecules together with their respective uncertainties. Moreover, we show what effects different assumptions about the dye molecules have on the outcome. We discuss the possibilities and pitfalls in structure determination based on smFRET using experimental data for an archaeal transcription pre-initiation complex, whose architecture has recently been unravelled by smFRET measurements. PMID:26407323

  4. DNA information: from digital code to analogue structure.

    PubMed

    Travers, A A; Muskhelishvili, G; Thompson, J M T

    2012-06-28

    The digital linear coding carried by the base pairs in the DNA double helix is now known to have an important component that acts by altering, along its length, the natural shape and stiffness of the molecule. In this way, one region of DNA is structurally distinguished from another, constituting an additional form of encoded information manifest in three-dimensional space. These shape and stiffness variations help in guiding and facilitating the DNA during its three-dimensional spatial interactions. Such interactions with itself allow communication between genes and enhanced wrapping and histone-octamer binding within the nucleosome core particle. Meanwhile, interactions with proteins can have a reduced entropic binding penalty owing to advantageous sequence-dependent bending anisotropy. Sequence periodicity within the DNA, giving a corresponding structural periodicity of shape and stiffness, also influences the supercoiling of the molecule, which, in turn, plays an important facilitating role. In effect, the super-helical density acts as an analogue regulatory mode in contrast to the more commonly acknowledged purely digital mode. Many of these ideas are still poorly understood, and represent a fundamental and outstanding biological question. This review gives an overview of very recent developments, and hopefully identifies promising future lines of enquiry. PMID:22615471

  5. Methods for accurate homology modeling by global optimization.

    PubMed

    Joo, Keehyoung; Lee, Jinwoo; Lee, Jooyoung

    2012-01-01

    High accuracy protein modeling from its sequence information is an important step toward revealing the sequence-structure-function relationship of proteins and nowadays it becomes increasingly more useful for practical purposes such as in drug discovery and in protein design. We have developed a protocol for protein structure prediction that can generate highly accurate protein models in terms of backbone structure, side-chain orientation, hydrogen bonding, and binding sites of ligands. To obtain accurate protein models, we have combined a powerful global optimization method with traditional homology modeling procedures such as multiple sequence alignment, chain building, and side-chain remodeling. We have built a series of specific score functions for these steps, and optimized them by utilizing conformational space annealing, which is one of the most successful combinatorial optimization algorithms currently available.

  6. Syntax Encodes Information Structure: Evidence from On-Line Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Meredith; Savova, Virginia; Gibson, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Although sentences are thought to be generally easier to process when given information precedes new information, closer examination reveals that these preferences only manifest within some syntactic structures. Here, we examine the consequences of the relative ordering of given and new information ("information structure") for the on-line…

  7. High-throughput amplicon sequencing of rRNA genes requires a copy number correction to accurately reflect the effects of management practices on soil nematode community structure.

    PubMed

    Darby, B J; Todd, T C; Herman, M A

    2013-11-01

    Nematodes are abundant consumers in grassland soils, but more sensitive and specific methods of enumeration are needed to improve our understanding of how different nematode species affect, and are affected by, ecosystem processes. High-throughput amplicon sequencing is used to enumerate microbial and invertebrate communities at a high level of taxonomic resolution, but the method requires validation against traditional specimen-based morphological identifications. To investigate the consistency between these approaches, we enumerated nematodes from a 25-year field experiment using both morphological and molecular identification techniques in order to determine the long-term effects of annual burning and nitrogen enrichment on soil nematode communities. Family-level frequencies based on amplicon sequencing were not initially consistent with specimen-based counts, but correction for differences in rRNA gene copy number using a genetic algorithm improved quantitative accuracy. Multivariate analysis of corrected sequence-based abundances of nematode families was consistent with, but not identical to, analysis of specimen-based counts. In both cases, herbivores, fungivores and predator/omnivores generally were more abundant in burned than nonburned plots, while bacterivores generally were more abundant in nonburned or nitrogen-enriched plots. Discriminate analysis of sequence-based abundances identified putative indicator species representing each trophic group. We conclude that high-throughput amplicon sequencing can be a valuable method for characterizing nematode communities at high taxonomic resolution as long as rRNA gene copy number variation is accounted for and accurate sequence databases are available. PMID:24103081

  8. High-throughput amplicon sequencing of rRNA genes requires a copy number correction to accurately reflect the effects of management practices on soil nematode community structure.

    PubMed

    Darby, B J; Todd, T C; Herman, M A

    2013-11-01

    Nematodes are abundant consumers in grassland soils, but more sensitive and specific methods of enumeration are needed to improve our understanding of how different nematode species affect, and are affected by, ecosystem processes. High-throughput amplicon sequencing is used to enumerate microbial and invertebrate communities at a high level of taxonomic resolution, but the method requires validation against traditional specimen-based morphological identifications. To investigate the consistency between these approaches, we enumerated nematodes from a 25-year field experiment using both morphological and molecular identification techniques in order to determine the long-term effects of annual burning and nitrogen enrichment on soil nematode communities. Family-level frequencies based on amplicon sequencing were not initially consistent with specimen-based counts, but correction for differences in rRNA gene copy number using a genetic algorithm improved quantitative accuracy. Multivariate analysis of corrected sequence-based abundances of nematode families was consistent with, but not identical to, analysis of specimen-based counts. In both cases, herbivores, fungivores and predator/omnivores generally were more abundant in burned than nonburned plots, while bacterivores generally were more abundant in nonburned or nitrogen-enriched plots. Discriminate analysis of sequence-based abundances identified putative indicator species representing each trophic group. We conclude that high-throughput amplicon sequencing can be a valuable method for characterizing nematode communities at high taxonomic resolution as long as rRNA gene copy number variation is accounted for and accurate sequence databases are available.

  9. GlycoMinestruct: a new bioinformatics tool for highly accurate mapping of the human N-linked and O-linked glycoproteomes by incorporating structural features

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fuyi; Li, Chen; Revote, Jerico; Zhang, Yang; Webb, Geoffrey I.; Li, Jian; Song, Jiangning; Lithgow, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation plays an important role in cell-cell adhesion, ligand-binding and subcellular recognition. Current approaches for predicting protein glycosylation are primarily based on sequence-derived features, while little work has been done to systematically assess the importance of structural features to glycosylation prediction. Here, we propose a novel bioinformatics method called GlycoMinestruct(http://glycomine.erc.monash.edu/Lab/GlycoMine_Struct/) for improved prediction of human N- and O-linked glycosylation sites by combining sequence and structural features in an integrated computational framework with a two-step feature-selection strategy. Experiments indicated that GlycoMinestruct outperformed NGlycPred, the only predictor that incorporated both sequence and structure features, achieving AUC values of 0.941 and 0.922 for N- and O-linked glycosylation, respectively, on an independent test dataset. We applied GlycoMinestruct to screen the human structural proteome and obtained high-confidence predictions for N- and O-linked glycosylation sites. GlycoMinestruct can be used as a powerful tool to expedite the discovery of glycosylation events and substrates to facilitate hypothesis-driven experimental studies. PMID:27708373

  10. Toward Accessing Spatial Structure from Building Information Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, C.; Bhatt, M.

    2011-08-01

    Data about building designs and layouts is becoming increasingly more readily available. In the near future, service personal (such as maintenance staff or emergency rescue workers) arriving at a building site will have immediate real-time access to enormous amounts of data relating to structural properties, utilities, materials, temperature, and so on. The critical problem for users is the taxing and error prone task of interpreting such a large body of facts in order to extract salient information. This is necessary for comprehending a situation and deciding on a plan of action, and is a particularly serious issue in time-critical and safety-critical activities such as firefighting. Current unifying building models such as the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC), while being comprehensive, do not directly provide data structures that focus on spatial reasoning and spatial modalities that are required for high-level analytical tasks. The aim of the research presented in this paper is to provide computational tools for higher level querying and reasoning that shift the cognitive burden of dealing with enormous amounts of data away from the user. The user can then spend more energy and time in planning and decision making in order to accomplish the tasks at hand. We present an overview of our framework that provides users with an enhanced model of "built-up space". In order to test our approach using realistic design data (in terms of both scale and the nature of the building models) we describe how our system interfaces with IFC, and we conduct timing experiments to determine the practicality of our approach. We discuss general computational approaches for deriving higher-level spatial modalities by focusing on the example of route graphs. Finally, we present a firefighting scenario with alternative route graphs to motivate the application of our framework.

  11. Scaling up the Single Transducer Thickness-Independent Ultrasonic Imaging Method for Accurate Characterization of Microstructural Gradients in Monolithic and Composite Tubular Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Carney, Dorothy V.; Baaklini, George Y.; Bodis, James R.; Rauser, Richard W.

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasonic velocity/time-of-flight imaging that uses back surface reflections to gauge volumetric material quality is highly suited for quantitative characterization of microstructural gradients including those due to pore fraction, density, fiber fraction, and chemical composition variations. However, a weakness of conventional pulse-echo ultrasonic velocity/time-of-flight imaging is that the image shows the effects of thickness as well as microstructural variations unless the part is uniformly thick. This limits this imaging method's usefulness in practical applications. Prior studies have described a pulse-echo time-of-flight-based ultrasonic imaging method that requires using a single transducer in combination with a reflector plate placed behind samples that eliminates the effect of thickness variation in the image. In those studies, this method was successful at isolating ultrasonic variations due to material microstructure in plate-like samples of silicon nitride, metal matrix composite, and polymer matrix composite. In this study, the method is engineered for inspection of more complex-shaped structures-those having (hollow) tubular/curved geometry. The experimental inspection technique and results are described as applied to (1) monolithic mullite ceramic and polymer matrix composite 'proof-of-concept' tubular structures that contain machined patches of various depths and (2) as-manufactured monolithic silicon nitride ceramic and silicon carbide/silicon carbide composite tubular structures that might be used in 'real world' applications.

  12. Insights in the electronic structure and redox reaction energy in LiFePO{sub 4} battery material from an accurate Tran-Blaha modified Becke Johnson potential

    SciTech Connect

    Araujo, Rafael B.; Almeida, J. de S; Ferreira da Silva, A.; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2015-09-28

    The main goals of this paper are to investigate the accuracy of the Tran-Blaha modified Becke Johnson (TB-mBJ) potential to predict the electronic structure of lithium iron phosphate and the related redox reaction energy with the lithium deintercalation process. The computed electronic structures show that the TB-mBJ method is able to partially localize Fe-3d electrons in LiFePO{sub 4} and FePO{sub 4} which usually is a problem for the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) due to the self interaction error. The energy band gap is also improved by the TB-mBJ calculations in comparison with the GGA results. It turned out, however, that the redox reaction energy evaluated by the TB-mBJ technique is not in good agreement with the measured one. It is speculated that this disagreement in the computed redox energy and the experimental value is due to the lack of a formal expression to evaluate the exchange and correlation energy. Therefore, the TB-mBJ is an efficient method to improve the prediction of the electronic structures coming form the standard GGA functional in LiFePO{sub 4} and FePO{sub 4}. However, it does not appear to have the same efficiency for evaluating the redox reaction energies for the investigated system.

  13. Integrated database of information from structural genomics experiments.

    PubMed

    Asada, Yukuhiko; Sugahara, Michihiro; Mizutani, Hisashi; Naitow, Hisashi; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Matsuura, Yoshinori; Agari, Yoshihiro; Ebihara, Akio; Shinkai, Akeo; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Kaminuma, Eri; Kobayashi, Norio; Nishikata, Koro; Shimoyama, Sayoko; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kunishima, Naoki

    2013-05-01

    Information from structural genomics experiments at the RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Japan has been compiled and published as an integrated database. The contents of the database are (i) experimental data from nine species of bacteria that cover a large variety of protein molecules in terms of both evolution and properties (http://database.riken.jp/db/bacpedia), (ii) experimental data from mutant proteins that were designed systematically to study the influence of mutations on the diffraction quality of protein crystals (http://database.riken.jp/db/bacpedia) and (iii) experimental data from heavy-atom-labelled proteins from the heavy-atom database HATODAS (http://database.riken.jp/db/hatodas). The database integration adopts the semantic web, which is suitable for data reuse and automatic processing, thereby allowing batch downloads of full data and data reconstruction to produce new databases. In addition, to enhance the use of data (i) and (ii) by general researchers in biosciences, a comprehensible user interface, Bacpedia (http://bacpedia.harima.riken.jp), has been developed.

  14. Accurate and Accidental Empathy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Michael

    The author offers two controversial criticisms of what are rapidly becoming standard assessment procedures for the measurement of empathic skill. First, he asserts that assessment procedures which attend exclusively to the accuracy with which subjects are able to characterize other people's feelings provide little or no useful information about…

  15. Information structure influences depth of syntactic processing: event-related potential evidence for the Chomsky illusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Bastiaansen, Marcel; Yang, Yufang; Hagoort, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Information structure facilitates communication between interlocutors by highlighting relevant information. It has previously been shown that information structure modulates the depth of semantic processing. Here we used event-related potentials to investigate whether information structure can modulate the depth of syntactic processing. In question-answer pairs, subtle (number agreement) or salient (phrase structure) syntactic violations were placed either in focus or out of focus through information structure marking. P600 effects to these violations reflect the depth of syntactic processing. For subtle violations, a P600 effect was observed in the focus condition, but not in the non-focus condition. For salient violations, comparable P600 effects were found in both conditions. These results indicate that information structure can modulate the depth of syntactic processing, but that this effect depends on the salience of the information. When subtle violations are not in focus, they are processed less elaborately. We label this phenomenon the Chomsky illusion.

  16. Population structure in Indian sheep ascertained using microsatellite information.

    PubMed

    Arora, R; Bhatia, S; Mishra, B P; Joshi, B K

    2011-06-01

    This study attempts to provide a comprehensive insight into the prevailing genetic status of Indian sheep breeds using microsatellite markers. Seventeen Indian sheep breeds from 3 agroecological zones were analysed using a panel of 25 microsatellite markers. All of the sheep breeds investigated were genetically diverse, as evident from the high allele (>6) and gene (>0.6) diversity values. The gene diversity values for all breeds ranged from 0.621 to 0.780. The within-population heterozygote deficit (F(IS)) varied from -0.098 to 0.234, reflecting significant levels for 12 of the 17 breeds investigated. The average genetic differentiation between all breeds (F(ST)) was 11.1%, revealing moderate discrimination between the indigenous sheep breeds. The genetic distance and principal component analysis revealed a separation of sheep breeds based on geographical propinquity. The Bayesian clustering approach suggested poor breed differentiation in the north-western arid and semi-arid region when compared to the breeds from the eastern and southern peninsular regions. The observed results mirror the divergent management strategies in the different agroecological regions, lack of specific selection policies, and intermixing of breeds in close proximity. Immediate steps to curb the intermixing and erosion of breed purity for some of these breeds need to be implemented, for example, by introducing measures like making proven rams available and ensuring their frequent exchange between flocks. The data generated here provides valuable information about the genetic structure of the 17 Indian sheep breeds and this can be used for designating priorities for their conservation.

  17. The Devil is in the Details: Using X-Ray Computed Tomography to Develop Accurate 3D Grain Characteristics and Bed Structure Metrics for Gravel Bed Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voepel, H.; Hodge, R. A.; Leyland, J.; Sear, D. A.; Ahmed, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainty for bedload estimates in gravel bed rivers is largely driven by our inability to characterize the arrangement and orientation of the sediment grains within the bed. The characteristics of the surface structure are produced by the water working of grains, which leads to structural differences in bedforms through differential patterns of grain sorting, packing, imbrication, mortaring and degree of bed armoring. Until recently the technical and logistical difficulties of characterizing the arrangement of sediment in 3D have prohibited a full understanding of how grains interact with stream flow and the feedback mechanisms that exist. Micro-focus X-ray CT has been used for non-destructive 3D imaging of grains within a series of intact sections of river bed taken from key morphological units (see Figure 1). Volume, center of mass, points of contact, protrusion and spatial orientation of individual surface grains are derived from these 3D images, which in turn, facilitates estimates of 3D static force properties at the grain-scale such as pivoting angles, buoyancy and gravity forces, and grain exposure. By aggregating representative samples of grain-scale properties of localized interacting sediment into overall metrics, we can compare and contrast bed stability at a macro-scale with respect to stream bed morphology. Understanding differences in bed stability through representative metrics derived at the grain-scale will ultimately lead to improved bedload estimates with reduced uncertainty and increased understanding of interactions between grain-scale properties on channel morphology. Figure 1. CT-Scans of a water worked gravel-filled pot. a. 3D rendered scan showing the outer mesh, and b. the same pot with the mesh removed. c. vertical change in porosity of the gravels sampled in 5mm volumes. Values are typical of those measured in the field and lab. d. 2-D slices through the gravels at 20% depth from surface (porosity = 0.35), and e. 75% depth from

  18. Accurate Optical Reference Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, N.

    2006-08-01

    Current and near future all-sky astrometric catalogs on the ICRF are reviewed with the emphasis on reference star data at optical wavelengths for user applications. The standard error of a Hipparcos Catalogue star position is now about 15 mas per coordinate. For the Tycho-2 data it is typically 20 to 100 mas, depending on magnitude. The USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC) observing program was completed in 2004 and reductions toward the final UCAC3 release are in progress. This all-sky reference catalogue will have positional errors of 15 to 70 mas for stars in the 10 to 16 mag range, with a high degree of completeness. Proper motions for the about 60 million UCAC stars will be derived by combining UCAC astrometry with available early epoch data, including yet unpublished scans of the complete set of AGK2, Hamburg Zone astrograph and USNO Black Birch programs. Accurate positional and proper motion data are combined in the Naval Observatory Merged Astrometric Dataset (NOMAD) which includes Hipparcos, Tycho-2, UCAC2, USNO-B1, NPM+SPM plate scan data for astrometry, and is supplemented by multi-band optical photometry as well as 2MASS near infrared photometry. The Milli-Arcsecond Pathfinder Survey (MAPS) mission is currently being planned at USNO. This is a micro-satellite to obtain 1 mas positions, parallaxes, and 1 mas/yr proper motions for all bright stars down to about 15th magnitude. This program will be supplemented by a ground-based program to reach 18th magnitude on the 5 mas level.

  19. Band-structure calculations of noble-gas and alkali halide solids using accurate Kohn-Sham potentials with self-interaction correction

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Krieger, J.B. ); Norman, M.R. ); Iafrate, G.J. )

    1991-11-15

    The optimized-effective-potential (OEP) method and a method developed recently by Krieger, Li, and Iafrate (KLI) are applied to the band-structure calculations of noble-gas and alkali halide solids employing the self-interaction-corrected (SIC) local-spin-density (LSD) approximation for the exchange-correlation energy functional. The resulting band gaps from both calculations are found to be in fair agreement with the experimental values. The discrepancies are typically within a few percent with results that are nearly the same as those of previously published orbital-dependent multipotential SIC calculations, whereas the LSD results underestimate the band gaps by as much as 40%. As in the LSD---and it is believed to be the case even for the exact Kohn-Sham potential---both the OEP and KLI predict valence-band widths which are narrower than those of experiment. In all cases, the KLI method yields essentially the same results as the OEP.

  20. Changes among Israeli Youth Movements: A Structural Analysis Based on Kahane's Code of Informality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Erik H.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-dimensional data analysis tools are applied to Reuven Kahane's data on the informality of youth organizations, yielding a graphic portrayal of Kahane's code of informality. This structure helps address questions of the whether the eight structural components exhaustively cover the field without redundancy. Further, the structure is used to…

  1. 78 FR 75576 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Importation Bond Structure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ... Structure AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: 60-day... Importation Bond Structure. This request for comment is being made pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of... Structure. OMB Number: 1651-0050. Form Number: CBP Forms 301 and 5297. Abstract: Bonds are used to...

  2. 75 FR 50772 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Importation Bond Structure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ... Structure AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ] ACTION: 60-Day... concerning the: Importation Bond Structure. This request for comment is being made pursuant to the Paperwork...: Title: Importation Bond Structure. OMB Number: 1651-0050. Form Numbers: 301 and 5297. Abstract:...

  3. Development and Validation of the Implicit Information from Lewis Structures Instrument(IILSI): Do Students Connect Structures with Properties?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Underwood, Sonia M.; Hilley, Caleb Z.

    2012-01-01

    Lewis structures are a simplified two dimensional "cartoon" of molecular structure that allow a knowledgeable user to predict the types of properties a particular substance may exhibit. However, prior research shows that many students fail to recognize these structure-property connections and are unable to decode the information contained in the…

  4. The Structure and Future of the Information Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Michael D.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the United States economy and reviews National Income Accounting concepts and evidence about future of an information economy. It is concluded that information economy growth will be in products, not services, and that it will not continue at same rate it has in past. Thirty-six references are cited. (EJS)

  5. Register of specialized sources for information on mechanics of structural failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Denny, F. J.

    1973-01-01

    Specialized information sources that generate information relative to six problem areas in aerospace mechanics of structural failure are identified. Selection for inclusion was based upon information obtained from the individual knowledge and professional contacts of Martin Marietta Aerospace staff members and the information uncovered by the staff of technical reviewers. Activities listed perform basic or applied research related to the mechanics of structural failure and publish the results of such research. The purpose of the register is to present, in easy reference form, original sources for dependable information regarding failure modes and mechanisms of aerospace structures.

  6. An approach to knowledge structuring for advanced phases of the Technical and Management Information System (TMIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goranson, H. T.

    1986-01-01

    The Technical and Management Information System (TMIS) must employ on enlightened approach to its object structure, but basic issues in conceptual structuring remain to be resolved. Sirius outlines the necessary agenda and reports on progress toward solutions.

  7. 15 CFR 50.5 - Fee structure for age search and citizenship information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fee structure for age search and citizenship information. 50.5 Section 50.5 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and... THE CENSUS § 50.5 Fee structure for age search and citizenship information. Type of service...

  8. 15 CFR 50.5 - Fee structure for age search and citizenship information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fee structure for age search and citizenship information. 50.5 Section 50.5 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and... THE CENSUS § 50.5 Fee structure for age search and citizenship information. Type of service...

  9. 15 CFR 50.5 - Fee structure for age search and citizenship information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fee structure for age search and citizenship information. 50.5 Section 50.5 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and... THE CENSUS § 50.5 Fee structure for age search and citizenship information. Type of service...

  10. 15 CFR 50.5 - Fee structure for age search and citizenship information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fee structure for age search and citizenship information. 50.5 Section 50.5 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and... THE CENSUS § 50.5 Fee structure for age search and citizenship information. Type of service...

  11. 15 CFR 50.5 - Fee structure for age search and citizenship information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fee structure for age search and citizenship information. 50.5 Section 50.5 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and... THE CENSUS § 50.5 Fee structure for age search and citizenship information. Type of service...

  12. The Structural Correlates of Statistical Information Processing during Speech Perception

    PubMed Central

    Deschamps, Isabelle; Hasson, Uri; Tremblay, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    The processing of continuous and complex auditory signals such as speech relies on the ability to use statistical cues (e.g. transitional probabilities). In this study, participants heard short auditory sequences composed either of Italian syllables or bird songs and completed a regularity-rating task. Behaviorally, participants were better at differentiating between levels of regularity in the syllable sequences than in the bird song sequences. Inter-individual differences in sensitivity to regularity for speech stimuli were correlated with variations in surface-based cortical thickness (CT). These correlations were found in several cortical areas including regions previously associated with statistical structure processing (e.g. bilateral superior temporal sulcus, left precentral sulcus and inferior frontal gyrus), as well other regions (e.g. left insula, bilateral superior frontal gyrus/sulcus and supramarginal gyrus). In all regions, this correlation was positive suggesting that thicker cortex is related to higher sensitivity to variations in the statistical structure of auditory sequences. Overall, these results suggest that inter-individual differences in CT within a distributed network of cortical regions involved in statistical structure processing, attention and memory is predictive of the ability to detect structural structure in auditory speech sequences. PMID:26919234

  13. Information fusion approach for detection of brain structures in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shademan, Azad; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents an information fusion approach for automatic detection of mid-brain nuclei (caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, and thalamus) from MRI. The method is based on fusion of anatomical information, obtained from brain atlases and expert physicians, into MRI numerical information within a fuzzy framework, employed to model intrinsic uncertainty of problem. First step of this method is segmentation of brain tissues (gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid). Physical landmarks such as inter-hemispheric plane alongside numerical information from segmentation step are then used to describe the nuclei. Each nucleus is defined according to a unique description according to physical landmarks and anatomical landmarks, most of which are the previously detected nuclei. Also, a detected nucleus in slice n serves as key landmark to detect same nucleus in slice n+1. These steps construct fuzzy decision maps. Overall decision is made after fusing all of decisions according to a fusion operator. This approach has been implemented to detect caudate, putamen, and thalamus from a sequence of axial T1-weighted brain MRI's. Our experience shows that final nuclei detection results are highly dependent upon primary tissue segmentation. The method is validated by comparing resultant nuclei volumes with those obtained using manual segmentation performed by expert physicians.

  14. Databased Information Structures for Re-Purposing Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, George H.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses repurposing content for computer-assisted instruction. Topics addressed include cost reduction; cost effectiveness; instructional quality and consistency; design issues; database design, including organizing information for repurposing and the use of courseware; and examples derived from multimedia and hypermedia applications. (LRW)

  15. Techniques for Assessing and Representing Information in Cognitive Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, James

    1980-01-01

    Describes cognitive mapping techniques compatible with the information processing view of human thinking. Student knowledge was assessed by clinical interview and performance on paper-and-pencil tasks. Concept maps and semantic networks were then constructed. Uses that these assessment tasks and representations might have in science education are…

  16. Bibliography of information on mechanics of structural failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Moya, N.; Shaffer, R. A.; Smith, D. M.

    1973-01-01

    A bibliography of approximately 1500 reference citations related to six problem areas in the mechanics of failure in aerospace structures is presented. The bibliography represents a search of the literature published in the ten year period 1962-1972 and is largely limited to documents published in the United States. Listings are subdivided into the six problem areas: (1) life prediction of structural materials; (2) fracture toughness data; (3) fracture mechanics analysis; (4) hydrogen embrittlement; (5) protective coatings; and (6) composite materials. An author index is included.

  17. [Integrating information about imaging biomarkers into structured radiology reports].

    PubMed

    Pomar-Nadal, A; Pérez-Castillo, C; Alberich-Bayarri, A; García-Martí, G; Sanz Requena, R; Martí-Bonmatí, L

    2013-01-01

    Imaging biomarkers describe objective characteristics that are related to normal biological processes, diseases, or the response to treatment. They enable radiologists to incorporate into their reports data about structure, function, and tissue components. With the aim of taking maximum advantage of the quantification of medical images, we present a procedure to integrate imaging biomarkers into radiological reports, bringing the new paradigm of personal medicine closer to radiological workflow. In this manner, the results of quantification can complement traditional radiological diagnosis, improving accuracy and the evaluation of the efficacy of treatments. A more personalized, standardized, structured radiological report should include quantitative analyses to complement conventional qualitative reporting in selected cases.

  18. Using the Text Structures of Information Books to Teach Writing in the Primary Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sarah K.; Jones, Cindy D.; Reutzel, D. Ray

    2013-01-01

    Teaching children in the primary grades the text structures and features used by authors of information text has been shown to improve comprehension of information texts and provide the scaffolding and support these children need in order to write their own information texts. As teachers implement the "English Language Arts Common Core State…

  19. Information Security: A Scientometric Study of the Profile, Structure, and Dynamics of an Emerging Scholarly Specialty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olijnyk, Nicholas Victor

    2014-01-01

    The central aim of the current research is to explore and describe the profile, dynamics, and structure of the information security specialty. This study's objectives are guided by four research questions: 1. What are the salient features of information security as a specialty? 2. How has the information security specialty emerged and evolved from…

  20. Classification of Chemicals Based On Structured Toxicity Information

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thirty years and millions of dollars worth of pesticide registration toxicity studies, historically stored as hardcopy and scanned documents, have been digitized into highly standardized and structured toxicity data within the Toxicity Reference Database (ToxRefDB). Toxicity-bas...

  1. Pathways of information transmission among wild songbirds follow experimentally imposed changes in social foraging structure.

    PubMed

    Firth, Josh A; Sheldon, Ben C; Farine, Damien R

    2016-06-01

    Animals regularly use information from others to shape their decisions. Yet, determining how changes in social structure affect information flow and social learning strategies has remained challenging. We manipulated the social structure of a large community of wild songbirds by controlling which individuals could feed together at automated feeding stations (selective feeders). We then provided novel ephemeral food patches freely accessible to all birds and recorded the spread of this new information. We demonstrate that the discovery of new food patches followed the experimentally imposed social structure and that birds disproportionately learnt from those whom they could forage with at the selective feeders. The selective feeders reduced the number of conspecific information sources available and birds subsequently increased their use of information provided by heterospecifics. Our study demonstrates that changes to social systems carry over into pathways of information transfer and that individuals learn from tutors that provide relevant information in other contexts. PMID:27247439

  2. Pathways of information transmission among wild songbirds follow experimentally imposed changes in social foraging structure

    PubMed Central

    Sheldon, Ben C.

    2016-01-01

    Animals regularly use information from others to shape their decisions. Yet, determining how changes in social structure affect information flow and social learning strategies has remained challenging. We manipulated the social structure of a large community of wild songbirds by controlling which individuals could feed together at automated feeding stations (selective feeders). We then provided novel ephemeral food patches freely accessible to all birds and recorded the spread of this new information. We demonstrate that the discovery of new food patches followed the experimentally imposed social structure and that birds disproportionately learnt from those whom they could forage with at the selective feeders. The selective feeders reduced the number of conspecific information sources available and birds subsequently increased their use of information provided by heterospecifics. Our study demonstrates that changes to social systems carry over into pathways of information transfer and that individuals learn from tutors that provide relevant information in other contexts. PMID:27247439

  3. Local structure information by EXAFS analysis using two algorithms for Fourier transform calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldea, N.; Pintea, S.; Rednic, V.; Matei, F.; Tiandou, Hu; Yaning, Xie

    2009-08-01

    The present work is a comparison study between different algorithms of Fourier transform for obtaining very accurate local structure results using Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure technique. In this paper we focus on the local structural characteristics of supported nickel catalysts and Fe3O4 core-shell nanocomposites. The radial distribution function could be efficiently calculated by the fast Fourier transform when the coordination shells are well separated while the Filon quadrature gave remarkable results for close-shell coordination.

  4. ERP evidence on the interaction between information structure and emotional salience of words.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Bastiaansen, Marcel; Yang, Yufang; Hagoort, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Both emotional words and words focused by information structure can capture attention. This study examined the interplay between emotional salience and information structure in modulating attentional resources in the service of integrating emotional words into sentence context. Event-related potentials (ERPs) to affectively negative, neutral, and positive words, which were either focused or nonfocused in question-answer pairs, were evaluated during sentence comprehension. The results revealed an early negative effect (90-200 ms), a P2 effect, as well as an effect in the N400 time window, for both emotional salience and information structure. Moreover, an interaction between emotional salience and information structure occurred within the N400 time window over right posterior electrodes, showing that information structure influences the semantic integration only for neutral words, but not for emotional words. This might reflect the fact that the linguistic salience of emotional words can override the effect of information structure on the integration of words into context. The interaction provides evidence for attention-emotion interactions at a later stage of processing. In addition, the absence of interaction in the early time window suggests that the processing of emotional information is highly automatic and independent of context. The results suggest independent attention capture systems of emotional salience and information structure at the early stage but an interaction between them at a later stage, during the semantic integration of words.

  5. Detecting structural information of scatterers using spatial frequency domain imaging.

    PubMed

    Bodenschatz, Nico; Krauter, Philipp; Nothelfer, Steffen; Foschum, Florian; Bergmann, Florian; Liemert, André; Kienle, Alwin

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate optical phantom experiments on the phase function parameter γ using spatial frequency domain imaging. The incorporation of two different types of scattering particles allows for control of the optical phantoms’ microscopic scattering properties. By laterally structuring areas with either TiO2 or Al2O3 scattering particles, we were able to obtain almost pure subdiffusive scattering contrast in a single optical phantom. Optical parameter mapping was then achieved using an analytical radiative transfer model revealing the microscopic structural contrast on a macroscopic field of view. As part of our study, we explain several correction and referencing techniques for high spatial frequency analysis and experimentally study the sampling depth of the subdiffusive parameter γ.

  6. Detecting structural information of scatterers using spatial frequency domain imaging.

    PubMed

    Bodenschatz, Nico; Krauter, Philipp; Nothelfer, Steffen; Foschum, Florian; Bergmann, Florian; Liemert, André; Kienle, Alwin

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate optical phantom experiments on the phase function parameter γ using spatial frequency domain imaging. The incorporation of two different types of scattering particles allows for control of the optical phantoms’ microscopic scattering properties. By laterally structuring areas with either TiO2 or Al2O3 scattering particles, we were able to obtain almost pure subdiffusive scattering contrast in a single optical phantom. Optical parameter mapping was then achieved using an analytical radiative transfer model revealing the microscopic structural contrast on a macroscopic field of view. As part of our study, we explain several correction and referencing techniques for high spatial frequency analysis and experimentally study the sampling depth of the subdiffusive parameter γ. PMID:26590206

  7. Method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    DOEpatents

    Chalmers, S.A.; Killeen, K.P.; Lear, K.L.

    1995-03-14

    The authors report a method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The method uses a single reflectivity spectrum measurement to determine the structure of the partially completed VCSEL at a critical point of growth. This information, along with the extracted growth rates, allows imprecisions in growth parameters to be compensated for during growth of the remaining structure, which can then be completed with very accurate critical dimensions. Using this method, they can now routinely grow lasing VCSELs with Fabry-Perot cavity resonance wavelengths controlled to within 0.5%. 4 figs.

  8. Method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    DOEpatents

    Chalmers, Scott A.; Killeen, Kevin P.; Lear, Kevin L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The method uses a single reflectivity spectrum measurement to determine the structure of the partially completed VCSEL at a critical point of growth. This information, along with the extracted growth rates, allows imprecisions in growth parameters to be compensated for during growth of the remaining structure, which can then be completed with very accurate critical dimensions. Using this method, we can now routinely grow lasing VCSELs with Fabry-Perot cavity resonance wavelengths controlled to within 0.5%.

  9. The Importance of Structuring Information and Resources within Shared Workspaces during Collaborative Design Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicol, David; Littlejohn, Allison; Grierson, Hilary

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates how the organization or structure of information and resources in shared workspaces influences team sharing and design learning. Two groupware products, BSCW and TikiWiki, were configured so that teams could structure and share resources. In BSCW the resources were structured hierarchically using folders and subfolders…

  10. Information-System Structure by Communication-Technology Concepts: A Cybernetic Model Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisig, Gerhard H. R.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the "Evidence-of-Existence" information system in which the structure is developed, with application of cybernetic concepts, as an isomorphic model in analogy to the system structure of communication technology. Three criteria of structuring are postulated: (1) source-channel-sink, with input-output characteristics, (2) filter-type…

  11. Integrating Information in Conceptual Models. Use of an Information Structure in Building Conceptual Models for Behavioural Studies. Research Bulletin 70.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kontiainen, Seppo

    This study intoduces a strategy for analysing different kinds of phenomena by building "information structures" for analysing how parts make a whole in complex systems. The strategy introduced may be of use when there is a need to understand complex systems or situations; e.g., in various studies of adult education when education is seen as…

  12. Exploring the structure and organization of information within nursing clinical handovers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Maree; Jefferies, Diana; Nicholls, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Clinical handover is the primary source of patient information for nurses; however, inadequate information transfer compromises patient safety. We investigated the content and organization of information conveyed at 81 handovers. A structure that captures and presents the information transferred at handover emerged: identification of the patient and clinical risks, clinical history/presentation, clinical status, care plan and outcomes/goals of care (ICCCO). This approach covers essential information while allowing for prioritization of information when required. Further research into the impact of ICCCO on patient safety is in progress.

  13. FINDSITE-metal: Integrating evolutionary information and machine learning for structure-based metal binding site prediction at the proteome level

    PubMed Central

    Brylinski, Michal; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The rapid accumulation of gene sequences, many of which are hypothetical proteins with unknown function, has stimulated the development of accurate computational tools for protein function prediction with evolution/structure-based approaches showing considerable promise. In this paper, we present FINDSITE-metal, a new threading-based method designed specifically to detect metal binding sites in modeled protein structures. Comprehensive benchmarks using different quality protein structures show that weakly homologous protein models provide sufficient structural information for quite accurate annotation by FINDSITE-metal. Combining structure/evolutionary information with machine learning results in highly accurate metal binding annotations; for protein models constructed by TASSER, whose average Cα RMSD from the native structure is 8.9 Å, 59.5% (71.9%) of the best of top five predicted metal locations are within 4 Å (8 Å) from a bound metal in the crystal structure. For most of the targets, multiple metal binding sites are detected with the best predicted binding site at rank 1 and within the top 2 ranks in 65.6% and 83.1% of the cases, respectively. Furthermore, for iron, copper, zinc, calcium and magnesium ions, the binding metal can be predicted with high, typically 70-90%, accuracy. FINDSITE-metal also provides a set of confidence indexes that help assess the reliability of predictions. Finally, we describe the proteome-wide application of FINDSITE-metal that quantifies the metal binding complement of the human proteome. FINDSITE-metal is freely available to the academic community at http://cssb.biology.gatech.edu/findsite-metal/. PMID:21287609

  14. Tensegrity II. How structural networks influence cellular information processing networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2003-01-01

    The major challenge in biology today is biocomplexity: the need to explain how cell and tissue behaviors emerge from collective interactions within complex molecular networks. Part I of this two-part article, described a mechanical model of cell structure based on tensegrity architecture that explains how the mechanical behavior of the cell emerges from physical interactions among the different molecular filament systems that form the cytoskeleton. Recent work shows that the cytoskeleton also orients much of the cell's metabolic and signal transduction machinery and that mechanical distortion of cells and the cytoskeleton through cell surface integrin receptors can profoundly affect cell behavior. In particular, gradual variations in this single physical control parameter (cell shape distortion) can switch cells between distinct gene programs (e.g. growth, differentiation and apoptosis), and this process can be viewed as a biological phase transition. Part II of this article covers how combined use of tensegrity and solid-state mechanochemistry by cells may mediate mechanotransduction and facilitate integration of chemical and physical signals that are responsible for control of cell behavior. In addition, it examines how cell structural networks affect gene and protein signaling networks to produce characteristic phenotypes and cell fate transitions during tissue development.

  15. Large-scale determination of previously unsolved protein structures using evolutionary information.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Sergey; Kinch, Lisa; Park, Hahnbeom; Liao, Yuxing; Pei, Jimin; Kim, David E; Kamisetty, Hetunandan; Grishin, Nick V; Baker, David

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of the structures of proteins without detectable sequence similarity to any protein of known structure remains an outstanding scientific challenge. Here we report significant progress in this area. We first describe de novo blind structure predictions of unprecendented accuracy we made for two proteins in large families in the recent CASP11 blind test of protein structure prediction methods by incorporating residue-residue co-evolution information in the Rosetta structure prediction program. We then describe the use of this method to generate structure models for 58 of the 121 large protein families in prokaryotes for which three-dimensional structures are not available. These models, which are posted online for public access, provide structural information for the over 400,000 proteins belonging to the 58 families and suggest hypotheses about mechanism for the subset for which the function is known, and hypotheses about function for the remainder. PMID:26335199

  16. FASTR: A novel data format for concomitant representation of RNA sequence and secondary structure information.

    PubMed

    Bose, Tungadri; Dutta, Anirban; Mh, Mohammed; Gandhi, Hemang; Mande, Sharmila S

    2015-09-01

    Given the importance of RNA secondary structures in defining their biological role, it would be convenient for researchers seeking RNA data if both sequence and structural information pertaining to RNA molecules are made available together. Current nucleotide data repositories archive only RNA sequence data. Furthermore, storage formats which can frugally represent RNA sequence as well as structure data in a single file, are currently unavailable. This article proposes a novel storage format, 'FASTR', for concomitant representation of RNA sequence and structure. The storage efficiency of the proposed FASTR format has been evaluated using RNA data from various microorganisms. Results indicate that the size of FASTR formatted files (containing both RNA sequence as well as structure information) are equivalent to that of FASTA-format files, which contain only RNA sequence information. RNA secondary structure is typically represented using a combination of a string of nucleotide characters along with the corresponding dot-bracket notation indicating structural attributes. 'FASTR' - the novel storage format proposed in the present study enables a frugal representation of both RNA sequence and structural information in the form of a single string. In spite of having a relatively smaller storage footprint, the resultant 'fastr' string(s) retain all sequence as well as secondary structural information that could be stored using a dot-bracket notation. An implementation of the 'FASTR' methodology is available for download at http://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/compression/fastr.

  17. Informational structure of genetic sequences and nature of gene splicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, E. N.

    1991-10-01

    Only about 1/20 of DNA of higher organisms codes for proteins, by means of classical triplet code. The rest of DNA sequences is largely silent, with unclear functions, if any. The triplet code is not the only code (message) carried by the sequences. There are three levels of molecular communication, where the same sequence ``talks'' to various bimolecules, while having, respectively, three different appearances: DNA, RNA and protein. Since the molecular structures and, hence, sequence specific preferences of these are substantially different, the original DNA sequence has to carry simultaneously three types of sequence patterns (codes, messages), thus, being a composite structure in which one had the same letter (nucleotide) is frequently involved in several overlapping codes of different nature. This multiplicity and overlapping of the codes is a unique feature of the Gnomic, language of genetic sequences. The coexisting codes have to be degenerate in various degrees to allow an optimal and concerted performance of all the encoded functions. There is an obvious conflict between the best possible performance of a given function and necessity to compromise the quality of a given sequence pattern in favor of other patterns. It appears that the major role of various changes in the sequences on their ``ontogenetic'' way from DNA to RNA to protein, like RNA editing and splicing, or protein post-translational modifications is to resolve such conflicts. New data are presented strongly indicating that the gene splicing is such a device to resolve the conflict between the code of DNA folding in chromatin and the triplet code for protein synthesis.

  18. Graduating to Postdoc: Information-Sharing in Support of Organizational Structures and Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Lucas, Paul J.; Compton, Michael M.; Stewart, Helen J.; Baya, Vinod; DelAlto, Martha

    1999-01-01

    The deployment of information-sharing systems in large organizations can significantly impact existing policies and procedures with regard to authority and control over information. Unless information-sharing systems explicitly support organizational structures and needs, these systems will be rejected summarily. The Postdoc system is a deployed Web-based information-sharing system created specifically to address organizational needs. Postdoc contains various organizational support features including a shared, globally navigable document space, as well as specialized access control, distributed administration, and mailing list features built around the key notion of hierarchical group structures. We review successes and difficulties in supporting organizational needs with Postdoc

  19. The structure of somatosensory information for human postural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeka, J. J.; Ribeiro, P.; Oie, K.; Lackner, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine the properties of the somatosensory stimulus that alter its temporal coupling to body sway. Six standing subjects were tested while touching a metal plate positioned either directly in front of or lateral to the subject. In each condition, the plate moved 4 mm at 0.2 Hz in either the medial-lateral (ML) or anterior-posterior direction (AP). The results showed that coupling between body sway and touch plate movement was strongest when the touch plate moved in a direction along the longitudinal axis of the arm. Coupling strength was weaker when the touch plate moved perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the arm. The results consistently show that a radial expansion stimulus was more effective than a lamellar-type stimulus at the fingertip. Moreover, somatosensory information from a surface is interpreted in terms of the orientation of the contact limb and the potential degrees of freedom available through its movement.

  20. NNLOPS accurate associated HW production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astill, William; Bizon, Wojciech; Re, Emanuele; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2016-06-01

    We present a next-to-next-to-leading order accurate description of associated HW production consistently matched to a parton shower. The method is based on reweighting events obtained with the HW plus one jet NLO accurate calculation implemented in POWHEG, extended with the MiNLO procedure, to reproduce NNLO accurate Born distributions. Since the Born kinematics is more complex than the cases treated before, we use a parametrization of the Collins-Soper angles to reduce the number of variables required for the reweighting. We present phenomenological results at 13 TeV, with cuts suggested by the Higgs Cross section Working Group.

  1. Integrating network structure and dynamic information for better routing strategy on scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiao-Gai; Wong, Eric W. M.; Wu, Zhi-Xi

    2009-06-01

    We study information packet routing processes on scale-free networks by mimicking the Internet traffic delivery strategies. We incorporate both the global network structure information and local queuing information in the dynamic processes. We propose several new routing strategies to guide the packet routing. The performance of the routing strategies is measured by the average transit time of the packets as well as their dependence on the traffic amount. We find that the routing strategies which integrate both global network structure information and local dynamic information perform much better than the traditional shortest-path routing protocol which takes into account only the global topological information. Moreover, from comparative studies of these routing strategies, we observe that some of our proposed methods can decrease the average transit time of packets but the performance is closely dependent on the total amount of traffic while some other proposed methods can have good performance independent of the total amount of traffic with hyper-excellent average transit time of packets. Also, numerical results show that our proposed methods integrating network structure information and local dynamic information can work much better than the methods recently proposed in [S. Sreenivasan, R. Cohen, E. López, Z. Toroczkai, H.E. Stanley, Phys. Rev. E 75 (2007) 036105, Zhi-Xi Wu, Gang Peng, Eric W.M. Wong, Kai-Hau Yeung, J. Stat. Mech. (2008) P11002.], which only considered network structure information.

  2. A versatile phenomenological model for the S-shaped temperature dependence of photoluminescence energy for an accurate determination of the exciton localization energy in bulk and quantum well structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, V. K.; Porwal, S.; Singh, S. D.; Sharma, T. K.; Ghosh, Sandip; Oak, S. M.

    2014-02-01

    Temperature dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) peak energy of bulk and quantum well (QW) structures is studied by using a new phenomenological model for including the effect of localized states. In general an anomalous S-shaped temperature dependence of the PL peak energy is observed for many materials which is usually associated with the localization of excitons in band-tail states that are formed due to potential fluctuations. Under such conditions, the conventional models of Varshni, Viña and Passler fail to replicate the S-shaped temperature dependence of the PL peak energy and provide inconsistent and unrealistic values of the fitting parameters. The proposed formalism persuasively reproduces the S-shaped temperature dependence of the PL peak energy and provides an accurate determination of the exciton localization energy in bulk and QW structures along with the appropriate values of material parameters. An example of a strained InAs0.38P0.62/InP QW is presented by performing detailed temperature and excitation intensity dependent PL measurements and subsequent in-depth analysis using the proposed model. Versatility of the new formalism is tested on a few other semiconductor materials, e.g. GaN, nanotextured GaN, AlGaN and InGaN, which are known to have a significant contribution from the localized states. A quantitative evaluation of the fractional contribution of the localized states is essential for understanding the temperature dependence of the PL peak energy of bulk and QW well structures having a large contribution of the band-tail states.

  3. The structure and size of sensory bursts encode stimulus information but only size affects behavior.

    PubMed

    Marsat, Gary; Pollack, Gerald S

    2010-04-01

    Cricket ultrasound avoidance is a classic model system for neuroethology. Avoidance steering is triggered by high-firing-rate bursts of spikes in the auditory command neuron AN2. Although bursting is common among sensory neurons, and although the detailed structure of bursts may encode information about the stimulus, it is as yet unclear whether this information is decoded. We address this question in two ways: from an information coding point of view, by showing the relationship between stimulus and burst structure; and also from a functional point of view by showing the relationship between burst structure and behavior. We conclude that the burst structure carries detailed temporal information about the stimulus but that this has little impact on the behavioral response, which is affected mainly by burst size.

  4. The structure and size of sensory bursts encode stimulus information but only size affects behavior.

    PubMed

    Marsat, Gary; Pollack, Gerald S

    2010-04-01

    Cricket ultrasound avoidance is a classic model system for neuroethology. Avoidance steering is triggered by high-firing-rate bursts of spikes in the auditory command neuron AN2. Although bursting is common among sensory neurons, and although the detailed structure of bursts may encode information about the stimulus, it is as yet unclear whether this information is decoded. We address this question in two ways: from an information coding point of view, by showing the relationship between stimulus and burst structure; and also from a functional point of view by showing the relationship between burst structure and behavior. We conclude that the burst structure carries detailed temporal information about the stimulus but that this has little impact on the behavioral response, which is affected mainly by burst size. PMID:20213110

  5. Guidance manual for the input of biological information to water-intake-structure design

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, D.A.; Simmons, M.A.; McKenzie, D.H.

    1981-12-01

    This manual is intended to provide guidance to the biologist who is asked to provide biological input during the construction or subsequent alteration of a water intake structure. Examples of the types of biological information that might be included in intake design are presented. Procedures for quantifying biological information and defining specific tasks that will generate quantifiable data are discussed. Procedures described apply both to new and modified water intake structures.

  6. Accurate mask model for advanced nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zine El Abidine, Nacer; Sundermann, Frank; Yesilada, Emek; Ndiaye, El Hadji Omar; Mishra, Kushlendra; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Bork, Ingo; Buck, Peter; Toublan, Olivier; Schanen, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    Standard OPC models consist of a physical optical model and an empirical resist model. The resist model compensates the optical model imprecision on top of modeling resist development. The optical model imprecision may result from mask topography effects and real mask information including mask ebeam writing and mask process contributions. For advanced technology nodes, significant progress has been made to model mask topography to improve optical model accuracy. However, mask information is difficult to decorrelate from standard OPC model. Our goal is to establish an accurate mask model through a dedicated calibration exercise. In this paper, we present a flow to calibrate an accurate mask enabling its implementation. The study covers the different effects that should be embedded in the mask model as well as the experiment required to model them.

  7. Information Technology Governance, Funding and Structure: A Case Analysis of a Public University in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Noor Azizi

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The paper's purpose is to investigate the issues of IT governance, funding and structure of a public university in Malaysia. Design/methodology/approach: The study uses a case study approach, i.e. a series of interviews with users and information services provider of campus information system. Findings: The university lacks a common…

  8. SAPIENS: Spreading Activation Processor for Information Encoded in Network Structures. Technical Report No. 296.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortony, Andrew; Radin, Dean I.

    The product of researchers' efforts to develop a computer processor which distinguishes between relevant and irrelevant information in the database, Spreading Activation Processor for Information Encoded in Network Structures (SAPIENS) exhibits (1) context sensitivity, (2) efficiency, (3) decreasing activation over time, (4) summation of…

  9. "Information in Context": Co-Designing Workplace Structures and Systems for Organizational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerville, Mary M.; Howard, Zaana

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: This paper discusses an "information in context" design project at Auraria Library in Denver, Colorado which aims to collaboratively create organizational structures and communication systems with and for library employees. Method: This action research project is founded within shared leadership, informed learning and organizational…

  10. Teaching Three-Dimensional Structural Chemistry Using Crystal Structure Databases. 3. The Cambridge Structural Database System: Information Content and Access Software in Educational Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battle, Gary M.; Allen, Frank H.; Ferrence, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    Parts 1 and 2 of this series described the educational value of experimental three-dimensional (3D) chemical structures determined by X-ray crystallography and retrieved from the crystallographic databases. In part 1, we described the information content of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and discussed a representative teaching subset of…

  11. Accurate thermoelastic tensor and acoustic velocities of NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcondes, Michel L.; Shukla, Gaurav; da Silveira, Pedro; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the importance of thermoelastic properties of minerals in geology and geophysics, their measurement at high pressures and temperatures are still challenging. Thus, ab initio calculations are an essential tool for predicting these properties at extreme conditions. Owing to the approximate description of the exchange-correlation energy, approximations used in calculations of vibrational effects, and numerical/methodological approximations, these methods produce systematic deviations. Hybrid schemes combining experimental data and theoretical results have emerged as a way to reconcile available information and offer more reliable predictions at experimentally inaccessible thermodynamics conditions. Here we introduce a method to improve the calculated thermoelastic tensor by using highly accurate thermal equation of state (EoS). The corrective scheme is general, applicable to crystalline solids with any symmetry, and can produce accurate results at conditions where experimental data may not exist. We apply it to rock-salt-type NaCl, a material whose structural properties have been challenging to describe accurately by standard ab initio methods and whose acoustic/seismic properties are important for the gas and oil industry.

  12. Accurate whole human genome sequencing using reversible terminator chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bentley, David R; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Swerdlow, Harold P; Smith, Geoffrey P; Milton, John; Brown, Clive G; Hall, Kevin P; Evers, Dirk J; Barnes, Colin L; Bignell, Helen R; Boutell, Jonathan M; Bryant, Jason; Carter, Richard J; Keira Cheetham, R; Cox, Anthony J; Ellis, Darren J; Flatbush, Michael R; Gormley, Niall A; Humphray, Sean J; Irving, Leslie J; Karbelashvili, Mirian S; Kirk, Scott M; Li, Heng; Liu, Xiaohai; Maisinger, Klaus S; Murray, Lisa J; Obradovic, Bojan; Ost, Tobias; Parkinson, Michael L; Pratt, Mark R; Rasolonjatovo, Isabelle M J; Reed, Mark T; Rigatti, Roberto; Rodighiero, Chiara; Ross, Mark T; Sabot, Andrea; Sankar, Subramanian V; Scally, Aylwyn; Schroth, Gary P; Smith, Mark E; Smith, Vincent P; Spiridou, Anastassia; Torrance, Peta E; Tzonev, Svilen S; Vermaas, Eric H; Walter, Klaudia; Wu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Lu; Alam, Mohammed D; Anastasi, Carole; Aniebo, Ify C; Bailey, David M D; Bancarz, Iain R; Banerjee, Saibal; Barbour, Selena G; Baybayan, Primo A; Benoit, Vincent A; Benson, Kevin F; Bevis, Claire; Black, Phillip J; Boodhun, Asha; Brennan, Joe S; Bridgham, John A; Brown, Rob C; Brown, Andrew A; Buermann, Dale H; Bundu, Abass A; Burrows, James C; Carter, Nigel P; Castillo, Nestor; Chiara E Catenazzi, Maria; Chang, Simon; Neil Cooley, R; Crake, Natasha R; Dada, Olubunmi O; Diakoumakos, Konstantinos D; Dominguez-Fernandez, Belen; Earnshaw, David J; Egbujor, Ugonna C; Elmore, David W; Etchin, Sergey S; Ewan, Mark R; Fedurco, Milan; Fraser, Louise J; Fuentes Fajardo, Karin V; Scott Furey, W; George, David; Gietzen, Kimberley J; Goddard, Colin P; Golda, George S; Granieri, Philip A; Green, David E; Gustafson, David L; Hansen, Nancy F; Harnish, Kevin; Haudenschild, Christian D; Heyer, Narinder I; Hims, Matthew M; Ho, Johnny T; Horgan, Adrian M; Hoschler, Katya; Hurwitz, Steve; Ivanov, Denis V; Johnson, Maria Q; James, Terena; Huw Jones, T A; Kang, Gyoung-Dong; Kerelska, Tzvetana H; Kersey, Alan D; Khrebtukova, Irina; Kindwall, Alex P; Kingsbury, Zoya; Kokko-Gonzales, Paula I; Kumar, Anil; Laurent, Marc A; Lawley, Cynthia T; Lee, Sarah E; Lee, Xavier; Liao, Arnold K; Loch, Jennifer A; Lok, Mitch; Luo, Shujun; Mammen, Radhika M; Martin, John W; McCauley, Patrick G; McNitt, Paul; Mehta, Parul; Moon, Keith W; Mullens, Joe W; Newington, Taksina; Ning, Zemin; Ling Ng, Bee; Novo, Sonia M; O'Neill, Michael J; Osborne, Mark A; Osnowski, Andrew; Ostadan, Omead; Paraschos, Lambros L; Pickering, Lea; Pike, Andrew C; Pike, Alger C; Chris Pinkard, D; Pliskin, Daniel P; Podhasky, Joe; Quijano, Victor J; Raczy, Come; Rae, Vicki H; Rawlings, Stephen R; Chiva Rodriguez, Ana; Roe, Phyllida M; Rogers, John; Rogert Bacigalupo, Maria C; Romanov, Nikolai; Romieu, Anthony; Roth, Rithy K; Rourke, Natalie J; Ruediger, Silke T; Rusman, Eli; Sanches-Kuiper, Raquel M; Schenker, Martin R; Seoane, Josefina M; Shaw, Richard J; Shiver, Mitch K; Short, Steven W; Sizto, Ning L; Sluis, Johannes P; Smith, Melanie A; Ernest Sohna Sohna, Jean; Spence, Eric J; Stevens, Kim; Sutton, Neil; Szajkowski, Lukasz; Tregidgo, Carolyn L; Turcatti, Gerardo; Vandevondele, Stephanie; Verhovsky, Yuli; Virk, Selene M; Wakelin, Suzanne; Walcott, Gregory C; Wang, Jingwen; Worsley, Graham J; Yan, Juying; Yau, Ling; Zuerlein, Mike; Rogers, Jane; Mullikin, James C; Hurles, Matthew E; McCooke, Nick J; West, John S; Oaks, Frank L; Lundberg, Peter L; Klenerman, David; Durbin, Richard; Smith, Anthony J

    2008-11-01

    DNA sequence information underpins genetic research, enabling discoveries of important biological or medical benefit. Sequencing projects have traditionally used long (400-800 base pair) reads, but the existence of reference sequences for the human and many other genomes makes it possible to develop new, fast approaches to re-sequencing, whereby shorter reads are compared to a reference to identify intraspecies genetic variation. Here we report an approach that generates several billion bases of accurate nucleotide sequence per experiment at low cost. Single molecules of DNA are attached to a flat surface, amplified in situ and used as templates for synthetic sequencing with fluorescent reversible terminator deoxyribonucleotides. Images of the surface are analysed to generate high-quality sequence. We demonstrate application of this approach to human genome sequencing on flow-sorted X chromosomes and then scale the approach to determine the genome sequence of a male Yoruba from Ibadan, Nigeria. We build an accurate consensus sequence from >30x average depth of paired 35-base reads. We characterize four million single-nucleotide polymorphisms and four hundred thousand structural variants, many of which were previously unknown. Our approach is effective for accurate, rapid and economical whole-genome re-sequencing and many other biomedical applications.

  13. Accurate thermoelastic tensor and acoustic velocities of NaCl

    SciTech Connect

    Marcondes, Michel L.; Shukla, Gaurav; Silveira, Pedro da; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.

    2015-12-15

    Despite the importance of thermoelastic properties of minerals in geology and geophysics, their measurement at high pressures and temperatures are still challenging. Thus, ab initio calculations are an essential tool for predicting these properties at extreme conditions. Owing to the approximate description of the exchange-correlation energy, approximations used in calculations of vibrational effects, and numerical/methodological approximations, these methods produce systematic deviations. Hybrid schemes combining experimental data and theoretical results have emerged as a way to reconcile available information and offer more reliable predictions at experimentally inaccessible thermodynamics conditions. Here we introduce a method to improve the calculated thermoelastic tensor by using highly accurate thermal equation of state (EoS). The corrective scheme is general, applicable to crystalline solids with any symmetry, and can produce accurate results at conditions where experimental data may not exist. We apply it to rock-salt-type NaCl, a material whose structural properties have been challenging to describe accurately by standard ab initio methods and whose acoustic/seismic properties are important for the gas and oil industry.

  14. 40 CFR 86.406-78 - Introduction, structure of subpart, further information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Introduction, structure of subpart..., structure of subpart, further information. (a) This subpart contains general provisions regulating the... United States. The manufacturer is required to submit an application with sales data, product...

  15. University Students' Knowledge Structures and Informal Reasoning on the Use of Genetically Modified Foods: Multidimensional Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying-Tien

    2012-12-01

    This study aims to provide insights into the role of learners' knowledge structures about a socio-scientific issue (SSI) in their informal reasoning on the issue. A total of 42 non-science major university students' knowledge structures and informal reasoning were assessed with multidimensional analyses. With both qualitative and quantitative analyses, this study revealed that those students with more extended and better-organized knowledge structures, as well as those who more frequently used higher-order information processing modes, were more oriented towards achieving a higher-level informal reasoning quality. The regression analyses further showed that the "richness" of the students' knowledge structures explained 25 % of the variation in their rebuttal construction, an important indicator of reasoning quality, indicating the significance of the role of students' sophisticated knowledge structure in SSI reasoning. Besides, this study also provides some initial evidence for the significant role of the "core" concept within one's knowledge structure in one's SSI reasoning. The findings in this study suggest that, in SSI-based instruction, science instructors should try to identify students' core concepts within their prior knowledge regarding the SSI, and then they should try to guide students to construct and structure relevant concepts or ideas regarding the SSI based on their core concepts. Thus, students could obtain extended and well-organized knowledge structures, which would then help them achieve better learning transfer in dealing with SSIs.

  16. The high cost of accurate knowledge.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Kathleen M; Weber, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    Many business thinkers believe it's the role of senior managers to scan the external environment to monitor contingencies and constraints, and to use that precise knowledge to modify the company's strategy and design. As these thinkers see it, managers need accurate and abundant information to carry out that role. According to that logic, it makes sense to invest heavily in systems for collecting and organizing competitive information. Another school of pundits contends that, since today's complex information often isn't precise anyway, it's not worth going overboard with such investments. In other words, it's not the accuracy and abundance of information that should matter most to top executives--rather, it's how that information is interpreted. After all, the role of senior managers isn't just to make decisions; it's to set direction and motivate others in the face of ambiguities and conflicting demands. Top executives must interpret information and communicate those interpretations--they must manage meaning more than they must manage information. So which of these competing views is the right one? Research conducted by academics Sutcliffe and Weber found that how accurate senior executives are about their competitive environments is indeed less important for strategy and corresponding organizational changes than the way in which they interpret information about their environments. Investments in shaping those interpretations, therefore, may create a more durable competitive advantage than investments in obtaining and organizing more information. And what kinds of interpretations are most closely linked with high performance? Their research suggests that high performers respond positively to opportunities, yet they aren't overconfident in their abilities to take advantage of those opportunities.

  17. Hierarchical mutual information for the comparison of hierarchical community structures in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perotti, Juan Ignacio; Tessone, Claudio Juan; Caldarelli, Guido

    2015-12-01

    The quest for a quantitative characterization of community and modular structure of complex networks produced a variety of methods and algorithms to classify different networks. However, it is not clear if such methods provide consistent, robust, and meaningful results when considering hierarchies as a whole. Part of the problem is the lack of a similarity measure for the comparison of hierarchical community structures. In this work we give a contribution by introducing the hierarchical mutual information, which is a generalization of the traditional mutual information and makes it possible to compare hierarchical partitions and hierarchical community structures. The normalized version of the hierarchical mutual information should behave analogously to the traditional normalized mutual information. Here the correct behavior of the hierarchical mutual information is corroborated on an extensive battery of numerical experiments. The experiments are performed on artificial hierarchies and on the hierarchical community structure of artificial and empirical networks. Furthermore, the experiments illustrate some of the practical applications of the hierarchical mutual information, namely the comparison of different community detection methods and the study of the consistency, robustness, and temporal evolution of the hierarchical modular structure of networks.

  18. The geometrical structure of quantum theory as a natural generalization of information geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Reginatto, Marcel

    2015-01-13

    Quantum mechanics has a rich geometrical structure which allows for a geometrical formulation of the theory. This formalism was introduced by Kibble and later developed by a number of other authors. The usual approach has been to start from the standard description of quantum mechanics and identify the relevant geometrical features that can be used for the reformulation of the theory. Here this procedure is inverted: the geometrical structure of quantum theory is derived from information geometry, a geometrical structure that may be considered more fundamental, and the Hilbert space of the standard formulation of quantum mechanics is constructed using geometrical quantities. This suggests that quantum theory has its roots in information geometry.

  19. Laboratory information management system for membrane protein structure initiative--from gene to crystal.

    PubMed

    Troshin, Petr V; Morris, Chris; Prince, Stephen M; Papiz, Miroslav Z

    2008-12-01

    Membrane Protein Structure Initiative (MPSI) exploits laboratory competencies to work collaboratively and distribute work among the different sites. This is possible as protein structure determination requires a series of steps, starting with target selection, through cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and finally structure determination. Distributed sites create a unique set of challenges for integrating and passing on information on the progress of targets. This role is played by the Protein Information Management System (PIMS), which is a laboratory information management system (LIMS), serving as a hub for MPSI, allowing collaborative structural proteomics to be carried out in a distributed fashion. It holds key information on the progress of cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of proteins. PIMS is employed to track the status of protein targets and to manage constructs, primers, experiments, protocols, sample locations and their detailed histories: thus playing a key role in MPSI data exchange. It also serves as the centre of a federation of interoperable information resources such as local laboratory information systems and international archival resources, like PDB or NCBI. During the challenging task of PIMS integration, within the MPSI, we discovered a number of prerequisites for successful PIMS integration. In this article we share our experiences and provide invaluable insights into the process of LIMS adaptation. This information should be of interest to partners who are thinking about using LIMS as a data centre for their collaborative efforts. PMID:18991141

  20. Laboratory information management system for membrane protein structure initiative--from gene to crystal.

    PubMed

    Troshin, Petr V; Morris, Chris; Prince, Stephen M; Papiz, Miroslav Z

    2008-12-01

    Membrane Protein Structure Initiative (MPSI) exploits laboratory competencies to work collaboratively and distribute work among the different sites. This is possible as protein structure determination requires a series of steps, starting with target selection, through cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and finally structure determination. Distributed sites create a unique set of challenges for integrating and passing on information on the progress of targets. This role is played by the Protein Information Management System (PIMS), which is a laboratory information management system (LIMS), serving as a hub for MPSI, allowing collaborative structural proteomics to be carried out in a distributed fashion. It holds key information on the progress of cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of proteins. PIMS is employed to track the status of protein targets and to manage constructs, primers, experiments, protocols, sample locations and their detailed histories: thus playing a key role in MPSI data exchange. It also serves as the centre of a federation of interoperable information resources such as local laboratory information systems and international archival resources, like PDB or NCBI. During the challenging task of PIMS integration, within the MPSI, we discovered a number of prerequisites for successful PIMS integration. In this article we share our experiences and provide invaluable insights into the process of LIMS adaptation. This information should be of interest to partners who are thinking about using LIMS as a data centre for their collaborative efforts.

  1. Use of selected toxicology information resources in assessing relationships between chemical structure and biological activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wassom, J.S.

    1985-09-01

    This paper addresses the subject of the use of the selected toxicology information resources in assessing relationships between chemical structure and specific end points. To assist the researcher in how to access the primary literature of genetic toxicology, teratogenesis, and carcinogenesis, three specific specialized information centers are discussed - Environmental Mutagen Information Center, Environmental Teratology Information Center, and Environmental Carcinogenesis Information Center. Also included are descriptions of information resources that contain evaluated (peer-reviewed) biological research results. The US Environmental Protection Agency Genetic Toxicology Program, the International Agency for Research on Cancer Monographs, and the Toxicology Data Bank are the best sources currently available to obtain peer-reviewed results for compounds tested for genotoxicity, carcinogenicity, and other toxicological end points. The value of published information lies in its use. It has become evident that most information cannot be accepted at face value for interpretation and analysis when subjected to stringent quality evaluation criteria. This deficit can be corrected by rigid editorship and the cognizance of authors. Increased interest in alternative methods to in vivo animal testing will be exemplified by use of short-term bioassays and in structure-activity relationship studies. With respect to this latter area, it must be remembered that mechanically (computer generated) derived data cannot substitute, at least at this stage, for data obtained from actual animal testing. The future of structure-activity relationship studies will rest only in their use as a predictive tool.

  2. Use of selected toxicology information resources in assessing relationships between chemical structure and biological activity.

    PubMed Central

    Wassom, J S

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses the subject of the use of selected toxicology information resources in assessing relationships between chemical structure and specific biological end points. To assist the researcher in how to access the primary literature of genetic toxicology, teratogenesis, and carcinogenesis, three specific specialized information centers are discussed--Environmental Mutagen Information Center, Environmental Teratology Information Center, and Environmental Carcinogenesis Information Center. Also included are descriptions of information resources that contain evaluated (peer-reviewed) biological research results. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Genetic Toxicology Program, the International Agency for Research on Cancer Monographs, and the Toxicology Data Bank are the best sources currently available to obtain peer-reviewed results for compounds tested for genotoxicity, carcinogenicity, and other toxicological end points. The value of published information lies in its use. It has become evident that most information cannot be accepted at face value for interpretation and analysis when subjected to stringent quality evaluation criteria. This deficit can be corrected by rigid editorship and the cognizance of authors. Increased interest in alternative methods to in vivo animal testing will be exemplified by use of short-term bioassays and in structure-activity relationship studies. With respect to this latter area, it must be remembered that mechanically (computer generated) derived data cannot substitute, at least at this stage, for data obtained from actual animal testing. The future of structure-activity relationship studies will rest only in their use as a predictive tool. PMID:4065070

  3. Knowledge structure representation and automated updates in intelligent information management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corey, Stephen; Carnahan, Richard S., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A continuing effort to apply rapid prototyping and Artificial Intelligence techniques to problems associated with projected Space Station-era information management systems is examined. In particular, timely updating of the various databases and knowledge structures within the proposed intelligent information management system (IIMS) is critical to support decision making processes. Because of the significantly large amounts of data entering the IIMS on a daily basis, information updates will need to be automatically performed with some systems requiring that data be incorporated and made available to users within a few hours. Meeting these demands depends first, on the design and implementation of information structures that are easily modified and expanded, and second, on the incorporation of intelligent automated update techniques that will allow meaningful information relationships to be established. Potential techniques are studied for developing such an automated update capability and IIMS update requirements are examined in light of results obtained from the IIMS prototyping effort.

  4. Hydrograph structure informed calibration in the frequency domain with time localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumarasamy, K.; Belmont, P.

    2015-12-01

    Complex models with large number of parameters are commonly used to estimate sediment yields and predict changes in sediment loads as a result of changes in management or conservation practice at large watershed (>2000 km2) scales. As sediment yield is a strongly non-linear function that responds to channel (peak or mean) velocity or flow depth, it is critical to accurately represent flows. The process of calibration in such models (e.g., SWAT) generally involves the adjustment of several parameters to obtain better estimates of goodness of fit metrics such as Nash Sutcliff Efficiency (NSE). However, such indicators only provide a global view of model performance, potentially obscuring accuracy of the timing or magnitude of specific flows of interest. We describe an approach for streamflow calibration that will greatly reduce the black-box nature of calibration, when response from a parameter adjustment is not clearly known. Fourier Transform or the Short Term Fourier Transform could be used to characterize model performance in the frequency domain as well, however, the ambiguity of a Fourier transform with regards to time localization renders its implementation in a model calibration setting rather useless. Brief and sudden changes (e.g. stream flow peaks) in signals carry the most interesting information from parameter adjustments, which are completely lost in the transform without time localization. Wavelet transform captures the frequency component in the signal without compromising time and is applied to contrast changes in signal response to parameter adjustments. Here we employ the mother wavelet called the Mexican hat wavelet and apply a Continuous Wavelet Transform to understand the signal in the frequency domain. Further, with the use of the cross-wavelet spectrum we examine the relationship between the two signals (prior or post parameter adjustment) in the time-scale plane (e.g., lower scales correspond to higher frequencies). The non-stationarity of

  5. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R; Holmes, William M

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models. PMID:27111139

  6. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R.; Holmes, William M.

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models.

  7. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R; Holmes, William M

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models.

  8. The closed-mindedness that wasn’t: need for structure and expectancy-inconsistent information

    PubMed Central

    Kemmelmeier, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Social-cognitive researchers have typically assumed that individuals high in need for structure or need for closure tend to be closed-minded: they are motivated to resist or ignore information that is inconsistent with existing beliefs but instead they rely on category-based expectancies. The present paper argues that this conclusion is not necessarily warranted because previous studies did not allow individual differences in categorical processing to emerge and did not consider different distributions of category-relevant information. Using a person memory paradigm, Experiments 1 and 2 shows that, when categorical processing is optional, high need-for-structure individuals are especially likely to use this type processing to reduce uncertainty, which results in superior recall for expectancy-inconsistent information. Experiment 2 demonstrates that such information is also more likely to be used in judgment making, leading to judgmental moderation among high need-for-structure individuals. Experiments 3 and 4 used a person memory paradigm which requires categorical processing regardless of levels of need for structure. Experiments 3 and 4 demonstrate that, whether expectancy-consistent or -inconsistent information is recalled better is a function of whether the majority of available information is compatible or incompatible with an initial category-based expectancy. Experiment 4 confirmed that the extent to which high need-for-structure individuals attend to different types of information varies with their distribution. The discussion highlights that task affordances have a critical influence on the consequences of categorical processing for memory and social judgment. Thus, high need for structure does not necessarily equate closed-mindedness. PMID:26191017

  9. The Comparative RNA Web (CRW) Site: an online database of comparative sequence and structure information for ribosomal, intron, and other RNAs

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Background Comparative analysis of RNA sequences is the basis for the detailed and accurate predictions of RNA structure and the determination of phylogenetic relationships for organisms that span the entire phylogenetic tree. Underlying these accomplishments are very large, well-organized, and processed collections of RNA sequences. This data, starting with the sequences organized into a database management system and aligned to reveal their higher-order structure, and patterns of conservation and variation for organisms that span the phylogenetic tree, has been collected and analyzed. This type of information can be fundamental for and have an influence on the study of phylogenetic relationships, RNA structure, and the melding of these two fields. Results We have prepared a large web site that disseminates our comparative sequence and structure models and data. The four major types of comparative information and systems available for the three ribosomal RNAs (5S, 16S, and 23S rRNA), transfer RNA (tRNA), and two of the catalytic intron RNAs (group I and group II) are: (1) Current Comparative Structure Models; (2) Nucleotide Frequency and Conservation Information; (3) Sequence and Structure Data; and (4) Data Access Systems. Conclusions This online RNA sequence and structure information, the result of extensive analysis, interpretation, data collection, and computer program and web development, is accessible at our Comparative RNA Web (CRW) Site http://www.rna.icmb.utexas.edu. In the future, more data and information will be added to these existing categories, new categories will be developed, and additional RNAs will be studied and presented at the CRW Site. PMID:11869452

  10. Syntactic Structure and Information Structure: The Acquisition of Portuguese Clefts and "Be"-Fragments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, Maria; Santos, Ana Lúcia; Soares-Jesel, Carla

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates the acquisition of different types of clefts and of "be"-fragments in European Portuguese. We first present the main syntactic and discourse properties of different cleft structures and of "be"-fragments in European Portuguese, and we discuss how data from first language acquisition may contribute to…

  11. Investigating information-processing performance of different command team structures in the NATO Problem Space.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Neville A; Rothrock, Ling; Harvey, Catherine; Sorensen, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The structure of command teams is a significant factor on their communications and ability to process, and act upon, information. The NATO Problem Space was used in this study to represent three of the main dimensions in the battle-space environment: familiarity, rate of change, and strength of information position. Results show that the five common team structures (chain, Y, circle, wheel and all-connected) did not generally perform as predicted in team literature. Findings suggest that under dynamic and highly variable conditions, high levels of synchronisation and trust should be present. On the other hand, synchronisation and trust are less important in hierarchical, highly centralised structures, because team members are more willing to accept the authority of a single leader and this tight control ensures that these teams can perform well as long as the Problem Space is familiar, information is explicit and the environment does not change. Practitioner Summary: Some types of team structures are better suited to particular constraints of the battle-space than others. This research has shown that the much touted all-connected structure is often the worst performing structure and that the traditional hierarchy of command and control has much merit in the digital information age. PMID:25992491

  12. Investigating information-processing performance of different command team structures in the NATO Problem Space.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Neville A; Rothrock, Ling; Harvey, Catherine; Sorensen, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The structure of command teams is a significant factor on their communications and ability to process, and act upon, information. The NATO Problem Space was used in this study to represent three of the main dimensions in the battle-space environment: familiarity, rate of change, and strength of information position. Results show that the five common team structures (chain, Y, circle, wheel and all-connected) did not generally perform as predicted in team literature. Findings suggest that under dynamic and highly variable conditions, high levels of synchronisation and trust should be present. On the other hand, synchronisation and trust are less important in hierarchical, highly centralised structures, because team members are more willing to accept the authority of a single leader and this tight control ensures that these teams can perform well as long as the Problem Space is familiar, information is explicit and the environment does not change. Practitioner Summary: Some types of team structures are better suited to particular constraints of the battle-space than others. This research has shown that the much touted all-connected structure is often the worst performing structure and that the traditional hierarchy of command and control has much merit in the digital information age.

  13. Hierarchical structure of the Sicilian goats revealed by Bayesian analyses of microsatellite information.

    PubMed

    Siwek, M; Finocchiaro, R; Curik, I; Portolano, B

    2011-02-01

    Genetic structure and relationship amongst the main goat populations in Sicily (Girgentana, Derivata di Siria, Maltese and Messinese) were analysed using information from 19 microsatellite markers genotyped on 173 individuals. A posterior Bayesian approach implemented in the program STRUCTURE revealed a hierarchical structure with two clusters at the first level (Girgentana vs. Messinese, Derivata di Siria and Maltese), explaining 4.8% of variation (amovaФ(ST) estimate). Seven clusters nested within these first two clusters (further differentiations of Girgentana, Derivata di Siria and Maltese), explaining 8.5% of variation (amovaФ(SC) estimate). The analyses and methods applied in this study indicate their power to detect subtle population structure.

  14. Accurate crystal-structure refinement of Ca{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}Ge{sub 4}O{sub 14} at 295 and 100 K and analysis of the disorder in the atomic positions

    SciTech Connect

    Dudka, A. P.; Mill', B. V.

    2013-07-15

    The accurate X-ray diffraction study of a Ca{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}Ge{sub 4}O{sub 14} crystal (sp. gr. P321, Z = 1) has been performed using repeated X-ray diffraction data sets collected on a diffractometer equipped with a CCD area detector at 295 and 100 K. The asymmetric disorder in the atomic positions in Ca{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}Ge{sub 4}O{sub 14} is described in two alternative ways: with the use of anharmonic atomic displacements (at 295 K R/wR = 0.68/0.60%, 3754 reflections; at 100 K R/wR = 0.90/0.70%, 3632 reflections) and using a split model (SM) (at 295 K R/wR = 0.74/0.67%; at 100 K R/wR = 0.95/0.74%). An analysis of the probability density function that defines the probability of finding an atom at a particular point in space shows that, at 295 K, five of the seven independent atoms in the unit cell are asymmetrically disordered in the vicinity of their sites, whereas only three atoms are disordered at 100 K. At both temperatures the largest disorder is observed at the 3f site on a twofold axis, which is a prerequisite for the formation of helicoidal chains of atoms along the c axis of the crystal and can serve as a structural basis for multiferroic properties of this family of crystals with magnetic ions.

  15. Sharing of information by students in an objective structured clinical examination.

    PubMed

    Rutala, P J; Witzke, D B; Leko, E O; Fulginiti, J V; Taylor, P J

    1991-03-01

    Increasing numbers of medical schools are using Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) to evaluate students. An Objective Structured Clinical Examination employs a multiple-station format and standardized patients to document students' clinical skills. A lengthy format is necessary; testing an entire class often necessitates multiple repetitions of the same examination. This dictates a need to minimize sharing of information among students. We studied six administrations of an Objective Structured Clinical Examination designed to measure skills. Analyses were conducted to detect changes in scores over the administrations as well as over the 8.5 hours of each day of testing. An increase in either might indicate information sharing had occurred. No significant increase occurred. If information was shared, it had no significant effect on scores. Skills a student uses to approach a patient should not change even if the patient's complaints are known.

  16. Focus, Newness and Their Combination: Processing of Information Structure in Discourse

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lijing; Li, Xingshan; Yang, Yufang

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between focus and new information has been unclear despite being the subject of several information structure studies. Here, we report an eye-tracking experiment that explored the relationship between them in on-line discourse processing in Chinese reading. Focus was marked by the Chinese focus-particle “shi", which is equivalent to the cleft structure “it was… who…" in English. New information was defined as the target word that was not present in previous contexts. Our results show that, in the target region, focused information was processed more quickly than non-focused information, while new information was processed more slowly than given information. These results reveal differences in processing patterns between focus and newness, and suggest that they are different concepts that relate to different aspects of cognitive processing. In addition, the effect of new/given information occurred in the post-target region for the focus condition, but not for the non-focus condition, suggesting a complex relationship between focus and newness in the discourse integration stage. PMID:22912708

  17. Focus, newness and their combination: processing of information structure in discourse.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lijing; Li, Xingshan; Yang, Yufang

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between focus and new information has been unclear despite being the subject of several information structure studies. Here, we report an eye-tracking experiment that explored the relationship between them in on-line discourse processing in Chinese reading. Focus was marked by the Chinese focus-particle "shi", which is equivalent to the cleft structure "it was... who..." in English. New information was defined as the target word that was not present in previous contexts. Our results show that, in the target region, focused information was processed more quickly than non-focused information, while new information was processed more slowly than given information. These results reveal differences in processing patterns between focus and newness, and suggest that they are different concepts that relate to different aspects of cognitive processing. In addition, the effect of new/given information occurred in the post-target region for the focus condition, but not for the non-focus condition, suggesting a complex relationship between focus and newness in the discourse integration stage.

  18. Acquisition of 3d Information for Vanished Structure by Using Only AN Ancient Picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunii, Y.; Sakamoto, R.

    2016-06-01

    In order to acquire 3D information for reconstruction of vanished historical structure, grasp of 3D shape of such structure was attempted by using an ancient picture. Generally, 3D information of a structure is acquired by photogrammetric theory which requires two or more pictures. This paper clarifies that the geometrical information of the structure was obtained only from an ancient picture, and 3D information was acquired. This kind of method was applied for an ancient picture of the Old Imperial Theatre. The Old Imperial Theatre in the picture is constituted by two-point perspective. Therefore, estimated value of focal length of camera, length of camera to the Old Imperial Theatre and some parameters were calculated by estimation of field angle, using body height as an index of length and some geometrical information. Consequently, 3D coordinate of 120 measurement points on the surface of the Old Imperial Theatre were calculated respectively, and 3DCG modeling of the Old Imperial Theatre was realized.

  19. Effects of family structure information on nurses' impression formation and verbal responses.

    PubMed

    Ganong, L H; Coleman, M

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of family structure information on how nurses (a) interpreted information, (b) gathered data, and (c) responded to a patient. Nurses were randomly assigned to see one of eight videotaped interviews portraying: married mother, married with no children, divorced mother, divorced with no children, unmarried mother, unmarried with no children, remarried with spouse's children (stepmother), and remarried with no children. The results indicate that the technical aspects of nursing may be affected only in a relatively minor way, but the affective dimensions of nursing care may be more detrimentally influenced by knowing about a patient's family structure.

  20. Large-scale determination of previously unsolved protein structures using evolutionary information

    PubMed Central

    Ovchinnikov, Sergey; Kinch, Lisa; Park, Hahnbeom; Liao, Yuxing; Pei, Jimin; Kim, David E; Kamisetty, Hetunandan; Grishin, Nick V; Baker, David

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of the structures of proteins without detectable sequence similarity to any protein of known structure remains an outstanding scientific challenge. Here we report significant progress in this area. We first describe de novo blind structure predictions of unprecendented accuracy we made for two proteins in large families in the recent CASP11 blind test of protein structure prediction methods by incorporating residue–residue co-evolution information in the Rosetta structure prediction program. We then describe the use of this method to generate structure models for 58 of the 121 large protein families in prokaryotes for which three-dimensional structures are not available. These models, which are posted online for public access, provide structural information for the over 400,000 proteins belonging to the 58 families and suggest hypotheses about mechanism for the subset for which the function is known, and hypotheses about function for the remainder. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09248.001 PMID:26335199

  1. Hierarchical assembly may be a way to make large information-rich structures.

    PubMed

    Whitelam, Stephen

    2015-11-14

    Self-assembly in the laboratory can now yield 'information-rich' nanostructures in which each component is of a distinct type and has a defined spatial position. Ensuring the thermodynamic stability of such structures requires inter-component interaction energies to increase logarithmically with structure size, in order to counter the entropy gained upon mixing component types in solution. However, self-assembly in the presence of strong interactions results in general in kinetic trapping, so suggesting a limit to the size of an (equilibrium) structure that can be self-assembled from distinguishable components. Here we study numerically a two-dimensional hierarchical assembly scheme already considered in experiment. We show that this scheme is immune to the kinetic traps associated with strong 'native' interactions (interactions designed to stabilize the intended structure), and so, in principle, offers a way to make large information-rich structures. In this scheme the size of an assembled structure scales exponentially with the stage of assembly, and assembly can continue as long as random motion is able to bring structures into contact. The resulting superstructure could provide a template for building in the third dimension. The chief drawback of this scheme is that it is particularly susceptible to kinetic traps that result from 'non-native' interactions (interactions not required to stabilize the intended structure); the scale on which such a scheme can be realized therefore depends upon how effectively this latter kind of interaction can be suppressed. PMID:26350267

  2. The Protein Model Portal—a comprehensive resource for protein structure and model information

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Juergen; Roth, Steven; Arnold, Konstantin; Kiefer, Florian; Schmidt, Tobias; Bordoli, Lorenza; Schwede, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    The Protein Model Portal (PMP) has been developed to foster effective use of 3D molecular models in biomedical research by providing convenient and comprehensive access to structural information for proteins. Both experimental structures and theoretical models for a given protein can be searched simultaneously and analyzed for structural variability. By providing a comprehensive view on structural information, PMP offers the opportunity to apply consistent assessment and validation criteria to the complete set of structural models available for proteins. PMP is an open project so that new methods developed by the community can contribute to PMP, for example, new modeling servers for creating homology models and model quality estimation servers for model validation. The accuracy of participating modeling servers is continuously evaluated by the Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn (CAMEO) project. The PMP offers a unique interface to visualize structural coverage of a protein combining both theoretical models and experimental structures, allowing straightforward assessment of the model quality and hence their utility. The portal is updated regularly and actively developed to include latest methods in the field of computational structural biology. Database URL: http://www.proteinmodelportal.org PMID:23624946

  3. Evaluation of the Information Content in Infrared Spectra for Protein Secondary Structure Determination

    PubMed Central

    Goormaghtigh, Erik; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie; Raussens, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy is a method of choice for the experimental determination of protein secondary structure. Numerous approaches have been developed during the past 15 years. A critical parameter that has not been taken into account systematically is the selection of the wavenumbers used for building the mathematical models used for structure prediction. The high quality of the current Fourier-transform infrared spectrometers makes the absorbance at every single wavenumber a valid and almost noiseless type of information. We address here the question of the amount of independent information present in the infrared spectra of proteins for the prediction of the different secondary structure contents. It appears that, at most, the absorbance at three distinct frequencies of the spectra contain all the nonredundant information that can be related to one secondary structure content. The ascending stepwise method proposed here identifies the relevance of each wavenumber of the infrared spectrum for the prediction of a given secondary structure and yields a particularly simple method for computing the secondary structure content. Using the 50-protein database built beforehand to contain as little fold redundancy as possible, the standard error of prediction in cross-validation is 5.5% for the α-helix, 6.6% for the β-sheet, and 3.4% for the β-turn. PMID:16428280

  4. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material.

  5. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material. PMID:11366835

  6. BeEP Server: using evolutionary information for quality assessment of protein structure models

    PubMed Central

    Palopoli, Nicolas; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Parisi, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    The BeEP Server (http://www.embnet.qb.fcen.uba.ar/embnet/beep.php) is an online resource aimed to help in the endgame of protein structure prediction. It is able to rank submitted structural models of a protein through an explicit use of evolutionary information, a criterion differing from structural or energetic considerations commonly used in other assessment programs. The idea behind BeEP (Best Evolutionary Pattern) is to benefit from the substitution pattern derived from structural constraints present in a set of homologous proteins adopting a given protein conformation. The BeEP method uses a model of protein evolution that takes into account the structure of a protein to build site-specific substitution matrices. The suitability of these substitution matrices is assessed through maximum likelihood calculations from which position-specific and global scores can be derived. These scores estimate how well the structural constraints derived from each structural model are represented in a sequence alignment of homologous proteins. Our assessment on a subset of proteins from the Critical Assessment of techniques for protein Structure Prediction (CASP) experiment has shown that BeEP is capable of discriminating the models and selecting one or more native-like structures. Moreover, BeEP is not explicitly parameterized to find structural similarities between models and given targets, potentially helping to explore the conformational ensemble of the native state. PMID:23729471

  7. BeEP Server: Using evolutionary information for quality assessment of protein structure models.

    PubMed

    Palopoli, Nicolas; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Parisi, Gustavo

    2013-07-01

    The BeEP Server (http://www.embnet.qb.fcen.uba.ar/embnet/beep.php) is an online resource aimed to help in the endgame of protein structure prediction. It is able to rank submitted structural models of a protein through an explicit use of evolutionary information, a criterion differing from structural or energetic considerations commonly used in other assessment programs. The idea behind BeEP (Best Evolutionary Pattern) is to benefit from the substitution pattern derived from structural constraints present in a set of homologous proteins adopting a given protein conformation. The BeEP method uses a model of protein evolution that takes into account the structure of a protein to build site-specific substitution matrices. The suitability of these substitution matrices is assessed through maximum likelihood calculations from which position-specific and global scores can be derived. These scores estimate how well the structural constraints derived from each structural model are represented in a sequence alignment of homologous proteins. Our assessment on a subset of proteins from the Critical Assessment of techniques for protein Structure Prediction (CASP) experiment has shown that BeEP is capable of discriminating the models and selecting one or more native-like structures. Moreover, BeEP is not explicitly parameterized to find structural similarities between models and given targets, potentially helping to explore the conformational ensemble of the native state.

  8. Analysis of information gain and Kolmogorov complexity for structural evaluation of cellular automata configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaheri Javid, Mohammad Ali; Blackwell, Tim; Zimmer, Robert; Majid al-Rifaie, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    Shannon entropy fails to discriminate structurally different patterns in two-dimensional images. We have adapted information gain measure and Kolmogorov complexity to overcome the shortcomings of entropy as a measure of image structure. The measures are customised to robustly quantify the complexity of images resulting from multi-state cellular automata (CA). Experiments with a two-dimensional multi-state cellular automaton demonstrate that these measures are able to predict some of the structural characteristics, symmetry and orientation of CA generated patterns.

  9. 26 CFR 1.6045-3 - Information reporting for an acquisition of control or a substantial change in capital structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... control or a substantial change in capital structure. 1.6045-3 Section 1.6045-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL... structure. (a) In general. Any broker (as defined in § 1.6045-1(a)(1)) that holds shares on behalf of a... information (including, for example, information from a clearing organization or from information published...

  10. Photoacoustic computed tomography without accurate ultrasonic transducer responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Qiwei; Wang, Kun; Xia, Jun; Zhu, Liren; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2015-03-01

    Conventional photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) image reconstruction methods assume that the object and surrounding medium are described by a constant speed-of-sound (SOS) value. In order to accurately recover fine structures, SOS heterogeneities should be quantified and compensated for during PACT reconstruction. To address this problem, several groups have proposed hybrid systems that combine PACT with ultrasound computed tomography (USCT). In such systems, a SOS map is reconstructed first via USCT. Consequently, this SOS map is employed to inform the PACT reconstruction method. Additionally, the SOS map can provide structural information regarding tissue, which is complementary to the functional information from the PACT image. We propose a paradigm shift in the way that images are reconstructed in hybrid PACT-USCT imaging. Inspired by our observation that information about the SOS distribution is encoded in PACT measurements, we propose to jointly reconstruct the absorbed optical energy density and SOS distributions from a combined set of USCT and PACT measurements, thereby reducing the two reconstruction problems into one. This innovative approach has several advantages over conventional approaches in which PACT and USCT images are reconstructed independently: (1) Variations in the SOS will automatically be accounted for, optimizing PACT image quality; (2) The reconstructed PACT and USCT images will possess minimal systematic artifacts because errors in the imaging models will be optimally balanced during the joint reconstruction; (3) Due to the exploitation of information regarding the SOS distribution in the full-view PACT data, our approach will permit high-resolution reconstruction of the SOS distribution from sparse array data.

  11. Violations of Information Structure: An Electrophysiological Study of Answers to Wh-Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowles, H. W.; Kluender, Robert; Kutas, Marta; Polinsky, Maria

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates brain responses to violations of information structure in wh-question-answer pairs, with particular emphasis on violations of focus assignment in it-clefts (It was the queen that silenced the banker). Two types of ERP responses in answers to wh-questions were found. First, all words in the focus-marking (cleft) position…

  12. Word Order and Information Structure in Czech 3- and 4-Year-Olds' Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smolík, Filip

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on an experiment that examined the comprehension of transitive sentences in Czech children and its relationship to case marking, word order and information structure. A total of 107 Czech children aged 2;9-4;5 were tested for comprehension of noun-verb-noun sentences in which word order and given-new status of individual nouns…

  13. Patterns of Thought in Scientific Writing: A Course in Information Structuring for Engineering Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, David; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Information-structuring courses offered at the Asian Institute of Technology (Bangkok, Thailand) present concepts, patterns, hypotheses, and procedures for discussion on the basis that their consideration can contribute to better idea organization, text production, and text interpretation for engineering and other technology students learning…

  14. Rhetorical Structure of Scientific Articles: The Case for Argumentational Analysis in Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kircz, Joost G.

    1991-01-01

    Addresses problems with automated bibliographic and full-text storage of scientific articles. The role of the scientific article is described, the structure is explained, current indexing and information retrieval techniques are criticized, new possibilities using a rhetoric syntax or argumentational syntax are explored, and the use of hypertext…

  15. Discovering More Chemical Concepts from 3D Chemical Information Searches of Crystal Structure Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    2016-01-01

    Three new examples are presented illustrating three-dimensional chemical information searches of the Cambridge structure database (CSD) from which basic core concepts in organic and inorganic chemistry emerge. These include connecting the regiochemistry of aromatic electrophilic substitution with the geometrical properties of hydrogen bonding…

  16. Information Structure and Practice as Facilitators of Deaf Users' Navigation in Textual Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fajardo, I.; Canas, J. J.; Salmeron, L.; Abascal, J.

    2009-01-01

    Deaf users might find it difficult to navigate through websites with textual content which, for many of them, constitutes the written representation of a non-native oral language. With the aim of testing how the information structure could compensate for this difficulty, 27 prelingual deaf users of sign language were asked to search a set of…

  17. Judgments of Information Structure in L2 French: Nativelike Performance and the Critical Period Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichle, Robert V.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies using judgments of morphosyntactic errors have shown mixed evidence for a critical period for L2 acquisition (e.g., Birdsong & Molis, Journal of Memory and Language 44: 235-249, 2001, Johnson & Newport, Cognitive Psychology 21: 60-99, 1989). This study uses anomalies in the domain of information structure, the interface between…

  18. 40 CFR 86.406-78 - Introduction, structure of subpart, further information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Introduction, structure of subpart, further information. 86.406-78 Section 86.406-78 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND...

  19. 40 CFR 86.406-78 - Introduction, structure of subpart, further information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Introduction, structure of subpart, further information. 86.406-78 Section 86.406-78 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND...

  20. The Structure of Informal Social Networks of Persons with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamstra, A.; van der Putten, A. A. J.; Vlaskamp, C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Persons with less severe disabilities are able to express their needs and show initiatives in social contacts, persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD), however, depend on others for this. This study analysed the structure of informal networks of persons with PIMD. Materials and Methods: Data concerning the…

  1. Informal Numeracy Skills: The Structure and Relations among Numbering, Relations, and Arithmetic Operations in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purpura, David J.; Lonigan, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Validating the structure of informal numeracy skills is critical to understanding the developmental trajectories of mathematics skills at early ages; however, little research has been devoted to construct evaluation of the Numbering, Relations, and Arithmetic Operations domains. This study was designed to address this knowledge gap by examining…

  2. A Structural Contingency Theory Model of Library and Technology Partnerships within an Academic Library Information Commons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuai, Cameron K.

    2011-01-01

    The integration of librarians and technologists to deliver information services represents a new and potentially costly organizational challenge for many library administrators. To understand better how to control the costs of integration, the research presented here will use structural contingency theory to study the coordination of librarians…

  3. Reversed "What"-Clefts in English: Information Structure and Discourse Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Peter

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of 572 examples taken from seven million-word corpora of written English the present study--which complements the spoken data-based studies of Oberlander & Delin (1996) and Weinert & Miller (1996)--explores the relationship between information structure and discourse role with reversed what-clefts. The study confirms the typically…

  4. Multimodal Image Reconstruction Using Supplementary Structural Information in Total Variation Regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantsev, Daniil; Lionheart, William R. B.; Withers, Philip J.; Lee, Peter D.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we propose an iterative reconstruction algorithm which uses available information from one dataset collected using one modality to increase the resolution and signal-to-noise ratio of one collected by another modality. The method operates on the structural information only which increases its suitability across various applications. Consequently, the main aim of this method is to exploit available supplementary data within the regularization framework. The source of primary and supplementary datasets can be acquired using complementary imaging modes where different types of information are obtained (e.g. in medical imaging: anatomical and functional). It is shown by extracting structural information from the supplementary image (direction of level sets) one can enhance the resolution of the other image. Notably, the method enhances edges that are common to both images while not suppressing features that show high contrast in the primary image alone. In our iterative algorithm we use available structural information within a modified total variation penalty term. We provide numerical experiments to show the advantages and feasibility of the proposed technique in comparison to other methods.

  5. Multimodal Image Reconstruction Using Supplementary Structural Information in Total Variation Regularization.

    PubMed

    Kazantsev, Daniil; Lionheart, William R B; Withers, Philip J; Lee, Peter D

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an iterative reconstruction algorithm which uses available information from one dataset collected using one modality to increase the resolution and signal-to-noise ratio of one collected by another modality. The method operates on the structural information only which increases its suitability across various applications. Consequently, the main aim of this method is to exploit available supplementary data within the regularization framework. The source of primary and supplementary datasets can be acquired using complementary imaging modes where different types of information are obtained (e.g. in medical imaging: anatomical and functional). It is shown by extracting structural information from the supplementary image (direction of level sets) one can enhance the resolution of the other image. Notably, the method enhances edges that are common to both images while not suppressing features that show high contrast in the primary image alone. In our iterative algorithm we use available structural information within a modified total variation penalty term. We provide numerical experiments to show the advantages and feasibility of the proposed technique in comparison to other methods.

  6. Multimodal Image Reconstruction Using Supplementary Structural Information in Total Variation Regularization.

    PubMed

    Kazantsev, Daniil; Lionheart, William R B; Withers, Philip J; Lee, Peter D

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an iterative reconstruction algorithm which uses available information from one dataset collected using one modality to increase the resolution and signal-to-noise ratio of one collected by another modality. The method operates on the structural information only which increases its suitability across various applications. Consequently, the main aim of this method is to exploit available supplementary data within the regularization framework. The source of primary and supplementary datasets can be acquired using complementary imaging modes where different types of information are obtained (e.g. in medical imaging: anatomical and functional). It is shown by extracting structural information from the supplementary image (direction of level sets) one can enhance the resolution of the other image. Notably, the method enhances edges that are common to both images while not suppressing features that show high contrast in the primary image alone. In our iterative algorithm we use available structural information within a modified total variation penalty term. We provide numerical experiments to show the advantages and feasibility of the proposed technique in comparison to other methods. PMID:25484635

  7. Automated refinement of macromolecular structures at low resolution using prior information

    PubMed Central

    Kovalevskiy, Oleg; Nicholls, Robert A.; Murshudov, Garib N.

    2016-01-01

    Since the ratio of the number of observations to adjustable parameters is small at low resolution, it is necessary to use complementary information for the analysis of such data. ProSMART is a program that can generate restraints for macromolecules using homologous structures, as well as generic restraints for the stabilization of secondary structures. These restraints are used by REFMAC5 to stabilize the refinement of an atomic model. However, the optimal refinement protocol varies from case to case, and it is not always obvious how to select appropriate homologous structure(s), or other sources of prior information, for restraint generation. After running extensive tests on a large data set of low-resolution models, the best-performing refinement protocols and strategies for the selection of homologous structures have been identified. These strategies and protocols have been implemented in the Low-Resolution Structure Refinement (LORESTR) pipeline. The pipeline performs auto-detection of twinning and selects the optimal scaling method and solvent parameters. LORESTR can either use user-supplied homologous structures, or run an automated BLAST search and download homologues from the PDB. The pipeline executes multiple model-refinement instances using different parameters in order to find the best protocol. Tests show that the automated pipeline improves R factors, geometry and Ramachandran statistics for 94% of the low-resolution cases from the PDB included in the test set. PMID:27710936

  8. Accurate documentation and wound measurement.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Sylvie

    This article, part 4 in a series on wound management, addresses the sometimes routine yet crucial task of documentation. Clear and accurate records of a wound enable its progress to be determined so the appropriate treatment can be applied. Thorough records mean any practitioner picking up a patient's notes will know when the wound was last checked, how it looked and what dressing and/or treatment was applied, ensuring continuity of care. Documenting every assessment also has legal implications, demonstrating due consideration and care of the patient and the rationale for any treatment carried out. Part 5 in the series discusses wound dressing characteristics and selection.

  9. Accurate Mass Measurements in Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tao; Belov, Mikhail E.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-08-01

    proteins can also be extensively modified by PTMs26-31 or by their interactions with other biomolecules or small molecules.32,33 Thus, it is highly desirable that proteins, the primary functional macromolecules involved in almost all biological activities, can be studied directly and systematically to determine their diverse properties and interplay. Such proteome-wide analysis is expected to provide a wealth of biological information, such as sequence, quantity, PTMs, interactions, activities, subcellular distribution and structure of proteins, which is critical to the comprehensive understanding of the biological systems. However, the de novo analysis of proteins isolated from cells, tissues or bodily fluids poses significant challenges due to the tremendous complexity and depth of the proteome, which necessitates high-throughput and highly sensitive analytical techniques. It is therefore not surprising that mass spectrometry (MS) has become an indispensable technology for proteome analysis.

  10. Accurate calculation of the absolute free energy of binding for drug molecules† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5sc02678d Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Aldeghi, Matteo; Heifetz, Alexander; Bodkin, Michael J.; Knapp, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of binding affinities has been a central goal of computational chemistry for decades, yet remains elusive. Despite good progress, the required accuracy for use in a drug-discovery context has not been consistently achieved for drug-like molecules. Here, we perform absolute free energy calculations based on a thermodynamic cycle for a set of diverse inhibitors binding to bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) and demonstrate that a mean absolute error of 0.6 kcal mol–1 can be achieved. We also show a similar level of accuracy (1.0 kcal mol–1) can be achieved in pseudo prospective approach. Bromodomains are epigenetic mark readers that recognize acetylation motifs and regulate gene transcription, and are currently being investigated as therapeutic targets for cancer and inflammation. The unprecedented accuracy offers the exciting prospect that the binding free energy of drug-like compounds can be predicted for pharmacologically relevant targets. PMID:26798447

  11. Command surface controlled liquid crystalline waveguide structures as optical information storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, Harald; Orendi, Horst; Buechel, Michael; Seki, Takahiro; Ito, Shinzaburo; Knoll, Wolfgang

    1994-12-01

    We report on optical waveguide structures in which light propagates within a liquid crystal (LC) thin film. In this configuration, the orientation, and therefore the optical properties of the LC waveguide structure are controlled by two photochromic command surfaces, consisting of an ultra thin film of a polymer with azobenzene side chains. When exposed to light of appropriate wavelength, the azobenzene side chains undergo a trans-cis photoisomerization process inducing a commensurate change in the LC alignment and therefore, in the set of refractive indices of the LC film. Using this effect we could reversibly write information into the LC cell. The size of our test structure was in the range of 50 micrometers. The stored information was read out by optical waveguide microscopy; the storing times were in the range of several hours.

  12. Two applications of information extraction to biological science journal articles: enzyme interactions and protein structures.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, K; Demetriou, G; Gaizauskas, R

    2000-01-01

    Information extraction technology, as defined and developed through the U.S. DARPA Message Understanding Conferences (MUCs), has proved successful at extracting information primarily from newswire texts and primarily in domains concerned with human activity. In this paper we consider the application of this technology to the extraction of information from scientific journal papers in the area of molecular biology. In particular, we describe how an information extraction system designed to participate in the MUC exercises has been modified for two bioinformatics applications: EMPathIE, concerned with enzyme and metabolic pathways; and PASTA, concerned with protein structure. Progress to date provides convincing grounds for believing that IE techniques will deliver novel and effective ways for scientists to make use of the core literature which defines their disciplines.

  13. Systematizing Web Search through a Meta-Cognitive, Systems-Based, Information Structuring Model (McSIS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abuhamdieh, Ayman H.; Harder, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a meta-cognitive, systems-based, information structuring model (McSIS) to systematize online information search behavior based on literature review of information-seeking models. The General Systems Theory's (GST) prepositions serve as its framework. Factors influencing information-seekers, such as the individual learning…

  14. Ab initio protein folding simulations using atomic burials as informational intermediates between sequence and structure.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Marx Gomes; Ferreira, Diogo César; de Oliveira, Leandro Cristante; Onuchic, José N; de Araújo, Antônio F Pereira

    2014-07-01

    The three-dimensional structure of proteins is determined by their linear amino acid sequences but decipherment of the underlying protein folding code has remained elusive. Recent studies have suggested that burials, as expressed by atomic distances to the molecular center, are sufficiently informative for structural determination while potentially obtainable from sequences. Here we provide direct evidence for this distinctive role of burials in the folding code, demonstrating that burial propensities estimated from local sequence can indeed be used to fold globular proteins in ab initio simulations. We have used a statistical scheme based on a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) to classify all heavy atoms of a protein into a small number of burial atomic types depending on sequence context. Molecular dynamics simulations were then performed with a potential that forces all atoms of each type towards their predicted burial level, while simple geometric constraints were imposed on covalent structure and hydrogen bond formation. The correct folded conformation was obtained and distinguished in simulations that started from extended chains for a selection of structures comprising all three folding classes and high burial prediction quality. These results demonstrate that atomic burials can act as informational intermediates between sequence and structure, providing a new conceptual framework for improving structural prediction and understanding the fundamentals of protein folding.

  15. Molecular dynamics of protein kinase-inhibitor complexes: a valid structural information.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Julio; Alzate-Morales, Jans H

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinases (PKs) are key components of protein phosphorylation based signaling networks in eukaryotic cells. They have been identified as being implicated in many diseases. High-resolution X-ray crystallographic data exist for many PKs and, in many cases, these structures are co-complexed with inhibitors. Although this valuable information confirms the precise structure of PKs and their complexes, it ignores the dynamic movements of the structures which are relevant to explain the affinities and selectivity of the ligands, to characterize the thermodynamics of the solvated complexes, and to derive predictive models. Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations present a convenient way to study PK-inhibitor complexes and have been increasingly used in recent years in structure-based drug design. MD is a very useful computational method and a great counterpart for experimentalists, which helps them to derive important additional molecular information. That enables them to follow and understand structure and dynamics of protein-ligand systems with extreme molecular detail on scales where motion of individual atoms can be tracked. MD can be used to sample dynamic molecular processes, and can be complemented with more advanced computational methods (e.g., free energy calculations, structure-activity relationship analysis). This review focuses on the most commonly applications to study PK-inhibitor complexes using MD simulations. Our aim is that researchers working in the design of PK inhibitors be aware of the benefits of this powerful tool in the design of potent and selective PK inhibitors. PMID:22571663

  16. Energetic loads and informational entropy during insect metamorphosis: measuring structural variability and self-organization.

    PubMed

    Damos, Petros T; Papadopoulos, Nikos T; Rigas, Alexandros; Savopoulou-Soultani, Matilda

    2011-10-01

    In this work an information theory approach is presented for measuring structural variability during insect metamorphosis. Following a self-organizational perspective, the underlying assumption is that an insect pupa is a cybernetic bio-system, which displays a homeostatic control during its metamorphosis. The description of structural variability was based on biochemical data (lipids, glycogen, carbohydrates and proteins) analysed at different time intervals during the metamorphosis of Anarsia lineatella Zeller (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae). Probabilities of biochemical variables were further treated by considering a finite countable set of progressive metamorphosis states having Markov properties at isothermal conditions (25 °C, 16:8h L:D, 65 ± 5%RH). The probabilities of the biochemical variables, as well as the related informational entropies, are affected when the system moves one step forward for each successive state. In most cases, but protein, there is some observable evidence that histolysis could be related to a decrease in informational entropy H ('disorganization of the system'), followed by a 'stable balance period' during the middle stages of metamorphosis. An initial increase in H is measured at the last stages of metamorphosis, which theoretically correspond to histogenesis ('reorganization of the system'). In this context, the temporal evolution of pupal structural variability was probabilistically quantified according to the classical information theory. The principles of the proposed holistic system are independent of its detailed dynamics and the proposed model can potentially describe part of the observable experimental data during metamorphosis of a holometabolous insect.

  17. SPLASH: Accurate OH maser positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Andrew; Gomez, Jose F.; Jones, Paul; Cunningham, Maria; Green, James; Dawson, Joanne; Ellingsen, Simon; Breen, Shari; Imai, Hiroshi; Lowe, Vicki; Jones, Courtney

    2013-10-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) 18 cm lines are powerful and versatile probes of diffuse molecular gas, that may trace a largely unstudied component of the Galactic ISM. SPLASH (the Southern Parkes Large Area Survey in Hydroxyl) is a large, unbiased and fully-sampled survey of OH emission, absorption and masers in the Galactic Plane that will achieve sensitivities an order of magnitude better than previous work. In this proposal, we request ATCA time to follow up OH maser candidates. This will give us accurate (~10") positions of the masers, which can be compared to other maser positions from HOPS, MMB and MALT-45 and will provide full polarisation measurements towards a sample of OH masers that have not been observed in MAGMO.

  18. Protein Structure and Evolution: Are They Constrained Globally by a Principle Derived from Information Theory?

    PubMed Central

    Hatton, Leslie; Warr, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    That the physicochemical properties of amino acids constrain the structure, function and evolution of proteins is not in doubt. However, principles derived from information theory may also set bounds on the structure (and thus also the evolution) of proteins. Here we analyze the global properties of the full set of proteins in release 13-11 of the SwissProt database, showing by experimental test of predictions from information theory that their collective structure exhibits properties that are consistent with their being guided by a conservation principle. This principle (Conservation of Information) defines the global properties of systems composed of discrete components each of which is in turn assembled from discrete smaller pieces. In the system of proteins, each protein is a component, and each protein is assembled from amino acids. Central to this principle is the inter-relationship of the unique amino acid count and total length of a protein and its implications for both average protein length and occurrence of proteins with specific unique amino acid counts. The unique amino acid count is simply the number of distinct amino acids (including those that are post-translationally modified) that occur in a protein, and is independent of the number of times that the particular amino acid occurs in the sequence. Conservation of Information does not operate at the local level (it is independent of the physicochemical properties of the amino acids) where the influences of natural selection are manifest in the variety of protein structure and function that is well understood. Rather, this analysis implies that Conservation of Information would define the global bounds within which the whole system of proteins is constrained; thus it appears to be acting to constrain evolution at a level different from natural selection, a conclusion that appears counter-intuitive but is supported by the studies described herein. PMID:25970335

  19. Protein structure and evolution: are they constrained globally by a principle derived from information theory?

    PubMed

    Hatton, Leslie; Warr, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    That the physicochemical properties of amino acids constrain the structure, function and evolution of proteins is not in doubt. However, principles derived from information theory may also set bounds on the structure (and thus also the evolution) of proteins. Here we analyze the global properties of the full set of proteins in release 13-11 of the SwissProt database, showing by experimental test of predictions from information theory that their collective structure exhibits properties that are consistent with their being guided by a conservation principle. This principle (Conservation of Information) defines the global properties of systems composed of discrete components each of which is in turn assembled from discrete smaller pieces. In the system of proteins, each protein is a component, and each protein is assembled from amino acids. Central to this principle is the inter-relationship of the unique amino acid count and total length of a protein and its implications for both average protein length and occurrence of proteins with specific unique amino acid counts. The unique amino acid count is simply the number of distinct amino acids (including those that are post-translationally modified) that occur in a protein, and is independent of the number of times that the particular amino acid occurs in the sequence. Conservation of Information does not operate at the local level (it is independent of the physicochemical properties of the amino acids) where the influences of natural selection are manifest in the variety of protein structure and function that is well understood. Rather, this analysis implies that Conservation of Information would define the global bounds within which the whole system of proteins is constrained; thus it appears to be acting to constrain evolution at a level different from natural selection, a conclusion that appears counter-intuitive but is supported by the studies described herein.

  20. TagLine: Information Extraction for Semi-Structured Text in Medical Progress Notes

    PubMed Central

    Finch, Dezon K.; McCart, James A.; Luther, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Statistical text mining and natural language processing have been shown to be effective for extracting useful information from medical documents. However, neither technique is effective at extracting the information stored in semi-structure text elements. A prototype system (TagLine) was developed to extract information from the semi-structured text using machine learning and a rule based annotator. Features for the learning machine were suggested by prior work, and by examining text, and selecting attributes that help distinguish classes of text lines. Classes were derived empirically from text and guided by an ontology developed by the VHA’s Consortium for Health Informatics Research (CHIR). Decision trees were evaluated for class predictions on 15,103 lines of text achieved an overall accuracy of 98.5 percent. The class labels applied to the lines were then used for annotating semi-structured text elements. TagLine achieved F-measure over 0.9 for each of the structures, which included tables, slots and fillers. PMID:25954358

  1. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Cameron J.; Slattery, Ashley D.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Gibson, Christopher T.

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  2. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Cameron J; Slattery, Ashley D; Stapleton, Andrew J; Shapter, Joseph G; Gibson, Christopher T

    2016-03-29

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  3. Resistance and Security Index of Networks: Structural Information Perspective of Network Security.

    PubMed

    Li, Angsheng; Hu, Qifu; Liu, Jun; Pan, Yicheng

    2016-01-01

    Recently, Li and Pan defined the metric of the K-dimensional structure entropy of a structured noisy dataset G to be the information that controls the formation of the K-dimensional structure of G that is evolved by the rules, order and laws of G, excluding the random variations that occur in G. Here, we propose the notion of resistance of networks based on the one- and two-dimensional structural information of graphs. Given a graph G, we define the resistance of G, written , as the greatest overall number of bits required to determine the code of the module that is accessible via random walks with stationary distribution in G, from which the random walks cannot escape. We show that the resistance of networks follows the resistance law of networks, that is, for a network G, the resistance of G is , where and are the one- and two-dimensional structure entropies of G, respectively. Based on the resistance law, we define the security index of a network G to be the normalised resistance of G, that is, . We show that the resistance and security index are both well-defined measures for the security of the networks. PMID:27255783

  4. The processing of morphological structure information in Chinese coordinative compounds: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kevin K H; Tong, Xiuhong; Liu, Phil D; McBride-Chang, Catherine; Meng, Xiangzhi

    2010-09-17

    The aim of this study was to investigate the morphological structure processing of Chinese compounds at short SOAs of 57ms. Event-related potentials were recorded while 16 Hong Kong Chinese university students were instructed to make visual lexical decisions in a decision-making task involving Chinese compound words. Only words in the category of the coordinative compounding structure were included in the present study. In this compounding structure, both morphemes comprising the compound word are of equal importance, similar to the phrase "in-and-out" in English, where neither "in" nor "out" can be considered the head or modifier in the compound; both morphemes are of equal weight in communicating meaning. While the classic N400 semantic priming effect was replicated at this short SOA, an earlier P250 component, suggested to reflect semantic memory network activation during semantic information processing, was also obtained. The morphological structure effect was only found in the P250 component, suggesting that morphological structure may automatically influence the semantic information processing during Chinese compound word processing. PMID:20627093

  5. Resistance and Security Index of Networks: Structural Information Perspective of Network Security

    PubMed Central

    Li, Angsheng; Hu, Qifu; Liu, Jun; Pan, Yicheng

    2016-01-01

    Recently, Li and Pan defined the metric of the K-dimensional structure entropy of a structured noisy dataset G to be the information that controls the formation of the K-dimensional structure of G that is evolved by the rules, order and laws of G, excluding the random variations that occur in G. Here, we propose the notion of resistance of networks based on the one- and two-dimensional structural information of graphs. Given a graph G, we define the resistance of G, written , as the greatest overall number of bits required to determine the code of the module that is accessible via random walks with stationary distribution in G, from which the random walks cannot escape. We show that the resistance of networks follows the resistance law of networks, that is, for a network G, the resistance of G is , where and are the one- and two-dimensional structure entropies of G, respectively. Based on the resistance law, we define the security index of a network G to be the normalised resistance of G, that is, . We show that the resistance and security index are both well-defined measures for the security of the networks. PMID:27255783

  6. Resistance and Security Index of Networks: Structural Information Perspective of Network Security.

    PubMed

    Li, Angsheng; Hu, Qifu; Liu, Jun; Pan, Yicheng

    2016-06-03

    Recently, Li and Pan defined the metric of the K-dimensional structure entropy of a structured noisy dataset G to be the information that controls the formation of the K-dimensional structure of G that is evolved by the rules, order and laws of G, excluding the random variations that occur in G. Here, we propose the notion of resistance of networks based on the one- and two-dimensional structural information of graphs. Given a graph G, we define the resistance of G, written , as the greatest overall number of bits required to determine the code of the module that is accessible via random walks with stationary distribution in G, from which the random walks cannot escape. We show that the resistance of networks follows the resistance law of networks, that is, for a network G, the resistance of G is , where and are the one- and two-dimensional structure entropies of G, respectively. Based on the resistance law, we define the security index of a network G to be the normalised resistance of G, that is, . We show that the resistance and security index are both well-defined measures for the security of the networks.

  7. Resistance and Security Index of Networks: Structural Information Perspective of Network Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Angsheng; Hu, Qifu; Liu, Jun; Pan, Yicheng

    2016-06-01

    Recently, Li and Pan defined the metric of the K-dimensional structure entropy of a structured noisy dataset G to be the information that controls the formation of the K-dimensional structure of G that is evolved by the rules, order and laws of G, excluding the random variations that occur in G. Here, we propose the notion of resistance of networks based on the one- and two-dimensional structural information of graphs. Given a graph G, we define the resistance of G, written , as the greatest overall number of bits required to determine the code of the module that is accessible via random walks with stationary distribution in G, from which the random walks cannot escape. We show that the resistance of networks follows the resistance law of networks, that is, for a network G, the resistance of G is , where and are the one- and two-dimensional structure entropies of G, respectively. Based on the resistance law, we define the security index of a network G to be the normalised resistance of G, that is, . We show that the resistance and security index are both well-defined measures for the security of the networks.

  8. Feature selection and the information content of Thematic Mapper simulator data for forest structural assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanner, M. A.; Brass, J. A.; Peterson, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    An assessment is made of the information content of Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS) data for the case of a forested region, in order to determine the sensitivity of such data to forest crown closure and tree size class. Principal components analysis and Monte Carlo simulation indicated that channels 4, 7, 5 and 3 were optimal for four-channel forest structure analysis. As the number of channels supplied to the Monte Carlo feature selection routine increased, classification accuracy increased. The greatest sensitivity to the forest structural parameters, which included succession within clearcuts as well as crown closure and size class, was obtained from the 7-channel TMS data.

  9. Structures data collection for The National Map using volunteered geographic information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poore, Barbara S.; Wolf, Eric B.; Korris, Erin M.; Walter, Jennifer L.; Matthews, Greg D.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has historically sponsored volunteered data collection projects to enhance its topographic paper and digital map products. This report describes one phase of an ongoing project to encourage volunteers to contribute data to The National Map using online editing tools. The USGS recruited students studying geographic information systems (GIS) at the University of Colorado Denver and the University of Denver in the spring of 2011 to add data on structures - manmade features such as schools, hospitals, and libraries - to four quadrangles covering metropolitan Denver. The USGS customized a version of the online Potlatch editor created by the OpenStreetMap project and populated it with 30 structure types drawn from the Geographic Names Information System (GNIS), a USGS database of geographic features. The students corrected the location and attributes of these points and added information on structures that were missing. There were two rounds of quality control. Student volunteers reviewed each point, and an in-house review of each point by the USGS followed. Nine-hundred and thirty-eight structure points were initially downloaded from the USGS database. Editing and quality control resulted in 1,214 structure points that were subsequently added to The National Map. A post-project analysis of the data shows that after student edit and peer review, 92 percent of the points contributed by volunteers met National Map Accuracy Standards for horizontal accuracy. Lessons from this project will be applied to later phases. These include: simplifying editing tasks and the user interfaces, stressing to volunteers the importance of adding structures that are missing, and emphasizing the importance of conforming to editorial guidelines for formatting names and addresses of structures. The next phase of the project will encompass the entire State of Colorado and will allow any citizen to contribute structures data. Volunteers will benefit from this

  10. An approach to development of an information geomechanical structural model of the Kuznetsk Coal Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Oparin, V.N.; Potapov, V.P.; Yushkin, V.F.; Kiril'tseva, N.A.; Izotov, A.S.

    2006-05-15

    The geographic information system designed at the Institute of Coal and Coal Chemistry for the Kuznetsk Coal Basin and the non-linear geomechanics researches undertaken at the Institute of Mining has served the basis for analyzing the hierarchical structure of geological faults in the Anzherskiy economic district (Kemerovo Region). The analysis is performed by a new canonical scale for structural-hierarchical representations with base root 2, where A and x are the normalized functionally related values. The recommendations are given on how to utilize the geoinformation system of the Kuznetsk Coal Basin in order to obtain a graphical-analytical representation and a system analysis of experimental geomechanical data.

  11. Enhanced Community Structure Detection in Complex Networks with Partial Background Information

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhong-Yuan; Sun, Kai-Di; Wang, Si-Qi

    2013-01-01

    Community structure detection in complex networks is important since it can help better understand the network topology and how the network works. However, there is still not a clear and widely-accepted definition of community structure, and in practice, different models may give very different results of communities, making it hard to explain the results. In this paper, different from the traditional methodologies, we design an enhanced semi-supervised learning framework for community detection, which can effectively incorporate the available prior information to guide the detection process and can make the results more explainable. By logical inference, the prior information is more fully utilized. The experiments on both the synthetic and the real-world networks confirm the effectiveness of the framework. PMID:24247657

  12. Efficient Large-Scale Structure From Motion by Fusing Auxiliary Imaging Information.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hainan; Shen, Shuhan; Gao, Wei; Hu, Zhanyi

    2015-11-01

    One of the potentially effective means for large-scale 3D scene reconstruction is to reconstruct the scene in a global manner, rather than incrementally, by fully exploiting available auxiliary information on the imaging condition, such as camera location by Global Positioning System (GPS), orientation by inertial measurement unit (or compass), focal length from EXIF, and so on. However, such auxiliary information, though informative and valuable, is usually too noisy to be directly usable. In this paper, we present an approach by taking advantage of such noisy auxiliary information to improve structure from motion solving. More specifically, we introduce two effective iterative global optimization algorithms initiated with such noisy auxiliary information. One is a robust rotation averaging algorithm to deal with contaminated epipolar graph, the other is a robust scene reconstruction algorithm to deal with noisy GPS data for camera centers initialization. We found that by exclusively focusing on the estimated inliers at the current iteration, the optimization process initialized by such noisy auxiliary information could converge well and efficiently. Our proposed method is evaluated on real images captured by unmanned aerial vehicle, StreetView car, and conventional digital cameras. Extensive experimental results show that our method performs similarly or better than many of the state-of-art reconstruction approaches, in terms of reconstruction accuracy and completeness, but is more efficient and scalable for large-scale image data sets.

  13. Efficient Large-Scale Structure From Motion by Fusing Auxiliary Imaging Information.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hainan; Shen, Shuhan; Gao, Wei; Hu, Zhanyi

    2015-11-01

    One of the potentially effective means for large-scale 3D scene reconstruction is to reconstruct the scene in a global manner, rather than incrementally, by fully exploiting available auxiliary information on the imaging condition, such as camera location by Global Positioning System (GPS), orientation by inertial measurement unit (or compass), focal length from EXIF, and so on. However, such auxiliary information, though informative and valuable, is usually too noisy to be directly usable. In this paper, we present an approach by taking advantage of such noisy auxiliary information to improve structure from motion solving. More specifically, we introduce two effective iterative global optimization algorithms initiated with such noisy auxiliary information. One is a robust rotation averaging algorithm to deal with contaminated epipolar graph, the other is a robust scene reconstruction algorithm to deal with noisy GPS data for camera centers initialization. We found that by exclusively focusing on the estimated inliers at the current iteration, the optimization process initialized by such noisy auxiliary information could converge well and efficiently. Our proposed method is evaluated on real images captured by unmanned aerial vehicle, StreetView car, and conventional digital cameras. Extensive experimental results show that our method performs similarly or better than many of the state-of-art reconstruction approaches, in terms of reconstruction accuracy and completeness, but is more efficient and scalable for large-scale image data sets. PMID:26111397

  14. Structural information content of networks: graph entropy based on local vertex functionals.

    PubMed

    Dehmer, Matthias; Emmert-Streib, Frank

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we define the structural information content of graphs as their corresponding graph entropy. This definition is based on local vertex functionals obtained by calculating j-spheres via the algorithm of Dijkstra. We prove that the graph entropy and, hence, the local vertex functionals can be computed with polynomial time complexity enabling the application of our measure for large graphs. In this paper we present numerical results for the graph entropy of chemical graphs and discuss resulting properties. PMID:18243802

  15. Structural modelling and control design under incomplete parameter information: The maximum-entropy approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyland, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    A stochastic structural control model is described. In contrast to the customary deterministic model, the stochastic minimum data/maximum entropy model directly incorporates the least possible a priori parameter information. The approach is to adopt this model as the basic design model, thus incorporating the effects of parameter uncertainty at a fundamental level, and design mean-square optimal controls (that is, choose the control law to minimize the average of a quadratic performance index over the parameter ensemble).

  16. Predictability of gene ontology slim-terms from primary structure information in Embryophyta plant proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proteins are the key elements on the path from genetic information to the development of life. The roles played by the different proteins are difficult to uncover experimentally as this process involves complex procedures such as genetic modifications, injection of fluorescent proteins, gene knock-out methods and others. The knowledge learned from each protein is usually annotated in databases through different methods such as the proposed by The Gene Ontology (GO) consortium. Different methods have been proposed in order to predict GO terms from primary structure information, but very few are available for large-scale functional annotation of plants, and reported success rates are much less than the reported by other non-plant predictors. This paper explores the predictability of GO annotations on proteins belonging to the Embryophyta group from a set of features extracted solely from their primary amino acid sequence. Results High predictability of several GO terms was found for Molecular Function and Cellular Component. As expected, a lower degree of predictability was found on Biological Process ontology annotations, although a few biological processes were easily predicted. Proteins related to transport and transcription were particularly well predicted from primary structure information. The most discriminant features for prediction were those related to electric charges of the amino-acid sequence and hydropathicity derived features. Conclusions An analysis of GO-slim terms predictability in plants was carried out, in order to determine single categories or groups of functions that are most related with primary structure information. For each highly predictable GO term, the responsible features of such successfulness were identified and discussed. In addition to most published studies, focused on few categories or single ontologies, results in this paper comprise a complete landscape of GO predictability from primary structure encompassing 75 GO

  17. Structure, Function, and Propagation of Information across Living Two, Four, and Eight Node Degree Topologies

    PubMed Central

    Alagapan, Sankaraleengam; Franca, Eric; Pan, Liangbin; Leondopulos, Stathis; Wheeler, Bruce C.; DeMarse, Thomas B.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we created four network topologies composed of living cortical neurons and compared resultant structural-functional dynamics including the nature and quality of information transmission. Each living network was composed of living cortical neurons and were created using microstamping of adhesion promoting molecules and each was “designed” with different levels of convergence embedded within each structure. Networks were cultured over a grid of electrodes that permitted detailed measurements of neural activity at each node in the network. Of the topologies we tested, the “Random” networks in which neurons connect based on their own intrinsic properties transmitted information embedded within their spike trains with higher fidelity relative to any other topology we tested. Within our patterned topologies in which we explicitly manipulated structure, the effect of convergence on fidelity was dependent on both topology and time-scale (rate vs. temporal coding). A more detailed examination using tools from network analysis revealed that these changes in fidelity were also associated with a number of other structural properties including a node’s degree, degree–degree correlations, path length, and clustering coefficients. Whereas information transmission was apparent among nodes with few connections, the greatest transmission fidelity was achieved among the few nodes possessing the highest number of connections (high degree nodes or putative hubs). These results provide a unique view into the relationship between structure and its affect on transmission fidelity, at least within these small neural populations with defined network topology. They also highlight the potential role of tools such as microstamp printing and microelectrode array recordings to construct and record from arbitrary network topologies to provide a new direction in which to advance the study of structure–function relationships. PMID:26973833

  18. Knowledge structure of form specification of the next generation GPS information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wenlong; Liu, Xiaojun; Jiang, Xiangqian; Xu, Zhengao

    2006-11-01

    The next generation GPS (Dimensional and Geometrical Product Specification and Verification) is a very important basic technique standard system for manufacturing that aims to enrich the GPS specification language to express the functional requirements of the products, thus to reduce the correlation uncertainty and specification uncertainty, etc. On one facet, it seems that the indication may be richer, precise, and therefore more verbose, and thus probably to take longer time for design. And on another facet, the designer can't use the standards effectively even if he has a well comprehension of them. To resolve the problem, this paper proposes a GPS information system, which will further help to reduce the development cycle and the cost of the products greatly. Acquisition and representation of knowledge are one of the most difficult steps on successfully developing of the knowledge base of this GPS information system, because it affects the development efficiency, speed, and maintenance of the system as data structure in ordinary programming. For knowledge modeling of this GPS information system, a new modeling mechanism based on category theory is put forward in this paper. The knowledge model based on category theory is called Geometrical Knowledge Model (GKM). This information system is built up on the category theory due to its formality and high level of abstraction. Finally, the basic knowledge structure of the next generation GPS roundness specification is given in the paper.

  19. Generation And Understanding Of Natural Language Using Information In A Frame Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Walton A.

    1989-03-01

    Many expert systems and relational database systems store factual information in the form of attributes values of objects. Problems arise in transforming from that attribute (frame) database representation into English surface structure and in transforming the English surface structure into a representation that references information in the frame database. In this paper we consider mainly the generation process, as it is this area in which we have made the most significant progress. In its interaction with the user, the expert system must generate questions, declarations, and uncertain declarations. Attributes such as COLOR, LENGTH, and ILLUMINATION can be referenced using the template: " of " for both questions and declarations. However, many other attributes, such as RATTLES, in "What is RATTLES of the light bulb?", and HAS_STREP_THROAT in, "HAS_STREP_THROAT of Dan is true." do not fit this template. We examined over 300 attributes from several knowledge bases and have grouped them into 16 classes. For each class there is one "question" template, one "declaration" template, and one "uncertain declaration" template for generating English surface structure. The internal databases identifiers (e.g., HAS_STREP_THROAT and DISEASE_35) must also be replaced by output synonyms. Classifying each attribute in combination with synonym translation remarkably improved the English surface structure that the system generated. In the area of understanding, synonym translation and knowledge of the attribute properties, such as legal values, has resulted in a robust database query capability.

  20. iProClass: an integrated database of protein family, function and structure information.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongzhan; Barker, Winona C; Chen, Yongxing; Wu, Cathy H

    2003-01-01

    The iProClass database provides comprehensive, value-added descriptions of proteins and serves as a framework for data integration in a distributed networking environment. The protein information in iProClass includes family relationships as well as structural and functional classifications and features. The current version consists of about 830 000 non-redundant PIR-PSD, SWISS-PROT, and TrEMBL proteins organized with more than 36 000 PIR superfamilies, 145 000 families, 4000 domains, 1300 motifs and 550 000 FASTA similarity clusters. It provides rich links to over 50 database of protein sequences, families, functions and pathways, protein-protein interactions, post-translational modifications, protein expressions, structures and structural classifications, genes and genomes, ontologies, literature and taxonomy. Protein and superfamily summary reports present extensive annotation information and include membership statistics and graphical display of domains and motifs. iProClass employs an open and modular architecture for interoperability and scalability. It is implemented in the Oracle object-relational database system and is updated biweekly. The database is freely accessible from the web site at http://pir.georgetown.edu/iproclass/ and searchable by sequence or text string. The data integration in iProClass supports exploration of protein relationships. Such knowledge is fundamental to the understanding of protein evolution, structure and function and crucial to functional genomic and proteomic research.

  1. Obtaining structural and functional information for GPCRs using the substituted-cysteine accessibility method (SCAM).

    PubMed

    Liapakis, George

    2014-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are proteins of the plasma membrane, which are characterized by seven membrane-spanning segments (TMs). GPCRs play an important role in almost all of our physiological and pathophysiological conditions by interacting with a large variety of ligands and stimulating different G-proteins and signaling cascades. By playing a key role in the function of our body and being involved in the pathophysiology of many disorders, GPCRs are very important therapeutic targets. Determination of the structure and function of GPCRs could advance the design of novel receptor-specific drugs against various diseases. A powerful method to obtain structural and functional information for GPCRs is the cysteine substituted accessibility method (SCAM). SCAM is used to systematically map the TM residues of GPCRs and determine their functional role. SCAM can also be used to determine differences in the structures of the TMs in different functional states of GPCRs.

  2. University Students' Knowledge Structures and Informal Reasoning on the Use of Genetically Modified Foods: Multidimensional Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Ying-Tien

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to provide insights into the role of learners' knowledge structures about a socio-scientific issue (SSI) in their informal reasoning on the issue. A total of 42 non-science major university students' knowledge structures and informal reasoning were assessed with multidimensional analyses. With both qualitative and…

  3. High School Students' Informal Reasoning Regarding a Socio-Scientific Issue, with Relation to Scientific Epistemological Beliefs and Cognitive Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Ying-Tien; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship among 68 high school students' scientific epistemological beliefs (SEBs), cognitive structures regarding nuclear power usage, and their informal reasoning regarding this issue. Moreover, the ability of students' SEBs as well as their cognitive structures for predicting their informal reasoning regarding…

  4. Shape design sensitivity analysis using domain information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seong, Hwal-Gyeong; Choi, Kyung K.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical method for obtaining accurate shape design sensitivity information for built-up structures is developed and demonstrated through analysis of examples. The basic character of the finite element method, which gives more accurate domain information than boundary information, is utilized for shape design sensitivity improvement. A domain approach for shape design sensitivity analysis of built-up structures is derived using the material derivative idea of structural mechanics and the adjoint variable method of design sensitivity analysis. Velocity elements and B-spline curves are introduced to alleviate difficulties in generating domain velocity fields. The regularity requirements of the design velocity field are studied.

  5. Using evolutionary and structural information to predict DNA-binding sites on DNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Igor B; Gou, Zhenkun; Li, Run; Hwang, Seungwoo

    2006-07-01

    Proteins that interact with DNA are involved in a number of fundamental biological activities such as DNA replication, transcription, and repair. A reliable identification of DNA-binding sites in DNA-binding proteins is important for functional annotation, site-directed mutagenesis, and modeling protein-DNA interactions. We apply Support Vector Machine (SVM), a supervised pattern recognition method, to predict DNA-binding sites in DNA-binding proteins using the following features: amino acid sequence, profile of evolutionary conservation of sequence positions, and low-resolution structural information. We use a rigorous statistical approach to study the performance of predictors that utilize different combinations of features and how this performance is affected by structural and sequence properties of proteins. Our results indicate that an SVM predictor based on a properly scaled profile of evolutionary conservation in the form of a position specific scoring matrix (PSSM) significantly outperforms a PSSM-based neural network predictor. The highest accuracy is achieved by SVM predictor that combines the profile of evolutionary conservation with low-resolution structural information. Our results also show that knowledge-based predictors of DNA-binding sites perform significantly better on proteins from mainly-alpha structural class and that the performance of these predictors is significantly correlated with certain structural and sequence properties of proteins. These observations suggest that it may be possible to assign a reliability index to the overall accuracy of the prediction of DNA-binding sites in any given protein using its sequence and structural properties. A web-server implementation of the predictors is freely available online at http://lcg.rit.albany.edu/dp-bind/.

  6. Accurate basis set truncation for wavefunction embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Taylor A.; Goodpaster, Jason D.; Manby, Frederick R.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) provides a formally exact framework for performing embedded subsystem electronic structure calculations, including DFT-in-DFT and wavefunction theory-in-DFT descriptions. In the interest of efficiency, it is desirable to truncate the atomic orbital basis set in which the subsystem calculation is performed, thus avoiding high-order scaling with respect to the size of the MO virtual space. In this study, we extend a recently introduced projection-based embedding method [F. R. Manby, M. Stella, J. D. Goodpaster, and T. F. Miller III, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2564 (2012)], 10.1021/ct300544e to allow for the systematic and accurate truncation of the embedded subsystem basis set. The approach is applied to both covalently and non-covalently bound test cases, including water clusters and polypeptide chains, and it is demonstrated that errors associated with basis set truncation are controllable to well within chemical accuracy. Furthermore, we show that this approach allows for switching between accurate projection-based embedding and DFT embedding with approximate kinetic energy (KE) functionals; in this sense, the approach provides a means of systematically improving upon the use of approximate KE functionals in DFT embedding.

  7. Processing Information about Support Exchanges in Close Relationships: The Role of a Knowledge Structure.

    PubMed

    Turan, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    People develop knowledge of interpersonal interaction patterns (e.g., prototypes and schemas), which shape how they process incoming information. One such knowledge structure based on attachment theory was examined: the secure base script (the prototypic sequence of events when an attachment figure comforts a close relationship partner in distress). In two studies (N = 53 and N = 119), participants were shown animated film clips in which geometric figures depicted the secure base script and asked to describe the animations. Both studies found that many people readily recognize the secure-base script from these minimal cues quite well, suggesting that this script is not only available in the context of specific relationships (i.e., a relationship-specific knowledge): The generalized (abstract) structure of the script is also readily accessible, which would make it possible to apply it to any relationship (including new relationships). Regression analyses suggested that participants who recognized the script were more likely to (a) include more animation elements when describing the animations, (b) see a common theme in different animations, (c) create better organized stories, and (d) later recall more details of the animations. These findings suggest that access to this knowledge structure helps a person organize and remember relevant incoming information. Furthermore, in both Study 1 and Study 2, individual differences in the ready recognition of the script were associated with individual differences in having access to another related knowledge: indicators suggesting that a potential relationship partner can be trusted to be supportive and responsive at times of stress. Results of Study 2 also suggest that recognizing the script is associated with those items of an attachment measure that concern giving and receiving support. Thus, these knowledge structures may shape how people process support-relevant information in their everyday lives, potentially affecting

  8. Processing Information about Support Exchanges in Close Relationships: The Role of a Knowledge Structure

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    People develop knowledge of interpersonal interaction patterns (e.g., prototypes and schemas), which shape how they process incoming information. One such knowledge structure based on attachment theory was examined: the secure base script (the prototypic sequence of events when an attachment figure comforts a close relationship partner in distress). In two studies (N = 53 and N = 119), participants were shown animated film clips in which geometric figures depicted the secure base script and asked to describe the animations. Both studies found that many people readily recognize the secure-base script from these minimal cues quite well, suggesting that this script is not only available in the context of specific relationships (i.e., a relationship-specific knowledge): The generalized (abstract) structure of the script is also readily accessible, which would make it possible to apply it to any relationship (including new relationships). Regression analyses suggested that participants who recognized the script were more likely to (a) include more animation elements when describing the animations, (b) see a common theme in different animations, (c) create better organized stories, and (d) later recall more details of the animations. These findings suggest that access to this knowledge structure helps a person organize and remember relevant incoming information. Furthermore, in both Study 1 and Study 2, individual differences in the ready recognition of the script were associated with individual differences in having access to another related knowledge: indicators suggesting that a potential relationship partner can be trusted to be supportive and responsive at times of stress. Results of Study 2 also suggest that recognizing the script is associated with those items of an attachment measure that concern giving and receiving support. Thus, these knowledge structures may shape how people process support-relevant information in their everyday lives, potentially affecting

  9. Processing Information about Support Exchanges in Close Relationships: The Role of a Knowledge Structure.

    PubMed

    Turan, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    People develop knowledge of interpersonal interaction patterns (e.g., prototypes and schemas), which shape how they process incoming information. One such knowledge structure based on attachment theory was examined: the secure base script (the prototypic sequence of events when an attachment figure comforts a close relationship partner in distress). In two studies (N = 53 and N = 119), participants were shown animated film clips in which geometric figures depicted the secure base script and asked to describe the animations. Both studies found that many people readily recognize the secure-base script from these minimal cues quite well, suggesting that this script is not only available in the context of specific relationships (i.e., a relationship-specific knowledge): The generalized (abstract) structure of the script is also readily accessible, which would make it possible to apply it to any relationship (including new relationships). Regression analyses suggested that participants who recognized the script were more likely to (a) include more animation elements when describing the animations, (b) see a common theme in different animations, (c) create better organized stories, and (d) later recall more details of the animations. These findings suggest that access to this knowledge structure helps a person organize and remember relevant incoming information. Furthermore, in both Study 1 and Study 2, individual differences in the ready recognition of the script were associated with individual differences in having access to another related knowledge: indicators suggesting that a potential relationship partner can be trusted to be supportive and responsive at times of stress. Results of Study 2 also suggest that recognizing the script is associated with those items of an attachment measure that concern giving and receiving support. Thus, these knowledge structures may shape how people process support-relevant information in their everyday lives, potentially affecting

  10. Non-targeted analysis of electronics waste by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry: Using accurate mass information and mass defect analysis to explore the data.

    PubMed

    Ubukata, Masaaki; Jobst, Karl J; Reiner, Eric J; Reichenbach, Stephen E; Tao, Qingping; Hang, Jiliang; Wu, Zhanpin; Dane, A John; Cody, Robert B

    2015-05-22

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) offer the best possible separation of their respective techniques. Recent commercialization of combined GC×GC-HRMS systems offers new possibilities for the analysis of complex mixtures. However, such experiments yield enormous data sets that require new informatics tools to facilitate the interpretation of the rich information content. This study reports on the analysis of dust obtained from an electronics recycling facility by using GC×GC in combination with a new high-resolution time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. New software tools for (non-traditional) Kendrick mass defect analysis were developed in this research and greatly aided in the identification of compounds containing chlorine and bromine, elements that feature in most persistent organic pollutants (POPs). In essence, the mass defect plot serves as a visual aid from which halogenated compounds are recognizable on the basis of their mass defect and isotope patterns. Mass chromatograms were generated based on specific ions identified in the plots as well as region of the plot predominantly occupied by halogenated contaminants. Tentative identification was aided by database searches, complementary electron-capture negative ionization experiments and elemental composition determinations from the exact mass data. These included known and emerging flame retardants, such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromobenzene, tetrabromo bisphenol A and tris (1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP), as well as other legacy contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated terphenyls (PCTs).

  11. Accurate Satellite-Derived Estimates of Tropospheric Ozone Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, Joanna; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Vasilkov, Alexander P.; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Platnick, Steven; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Levelt, Pieternel F.

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of the radiative forcing due to anthropogenically-produced tropospheric O3 are derived primarily from models. Here, we use tropospheric ozone and cloud data from several instruments in the A-train constellation of satellites as well as information from the GEOS-5 Data Assimilation System to accurately estimate the instantaneous radiative forcing from tropospheric O3 for January and July 2005. We improve upon previous estimates of tropospheric ozone mixing ratios from a residual approach using the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) by incorporating cloud pressure information from OMI. Since we cannot distinguish between natural and anthropogenic sources with the satellite data, our estimates reflect the total forcing due to tropospheric O3. We focus specifically on the magnitude and spatial structure of the cloud effect on both the shortand long-wave radiative forcing. The estimates presented here can be used to validate present day O3 radiative forcing produced by models.

  12. Accurate Thermal Stresses for Beams: Normal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Pilkey, Walter D.

    2003-01-01

    Formulations for a general theory of thermoelasticity to generate accurate thermal stresses for structural members of aeronautical vehicles were developed in 1954 by Boley. The formulation also provides three normal stresses and a shear stress along the entire length of the beam. The Poisson effect of the lateral and transverse normal stresses on a thermally loaded beam is taken into account in this theory by employing an Airy stress function. The Airy stress function enables the reduction of the three-dimensional thermal stress problem to a two-dimensional one. Numerical results from the general theory of thermoelasticity are compared to those obtained from strength of materials. It is concluded that the theory of thermoelasticity for prismatic beams proposed in this paper can be used instead of strength of materials when precise stress results are desired.

  13. Accurate Thermal Stresses for Beams: Normal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Pilkey, Walter D.

    2002-01-01

    Formulations for a general theory of thermoelasticity to generate accurate thermal stresses for structural members of aeronautical vehicles were developed in 1954 by Boley. The formulation also provides three normal stresses and a shear stress along the entire length of the beam. The Poisson effect of the lateral and transverse normal stresses on a thermally loaded beam is taken into account in this theory by employing an Airy stress function. The Airy stress function enables the reduction of the three-dimensional thermal stress problem to a two-dimensional one. Numerical results from the general theory of thermoelasticity are compared to those obtained from strength of materials. It is concluded that the theory of thermoelasticity for prismatic beams proposed in this paper can be used instead of strength of materials when precise stress results are desired.

  14. Protein structural information derived from NMR chemical shift with the neural network program TALOS-N.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Bax, Ad

    2015-01-01

    Chemical shifts are obtained at the first stage of any protein structural study by NMR spectroscopy. Chemical shifts are known to be impacted by a wide range of structural factors, and the artificial neural network based TALOS-N program has been trained to extract backbone and side-chain torsion angles from (1)H, (15)N, and (13)C shifts. The program is quite robust and typically yields backbone torsion angles for more than 90 % of the residues and side-chain χ 1 rotamer information for about half of these, in addition to reliably predicting secondary structure. The use of TALOS-N is illustrated for the protein DinI, and torsion angles obtained by TALOS-N analysis from the measured chemical shifts of its backbone and (13)C(β) nuclei are compared to those seen in a prior, experimentally determined structure. The program is also particularly useful for generating torsion angle restraints, which then can be used during standard NMR protein structure calculations.

  15. Using ancestry-informative markers to identify fine structure across 15 populations of European origin.

    PubMed

    Huckins, Laura M; Boraska, Vesna; Franklin, Christopher S; Floyd, James A B; Southam, Lorraine; Sullivan, Patrick F; Bulik, Cynthia M; Collier, David A; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Tachmazidou, Ioanna

    2014-10-01

    The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 anorexia nervosa genome-wide association scan includes 2907 cases from 15 different populations of European origin genotyped on the Illumina 670K chip. We compared methods for identifying population stratification, and suggest list of markers that may help to counter this problem. It is usual to identify population structure in such studies using only common variants with minor allele frequency (MAF) >5%; we find that this may result in highly informative SNPs being discarded, and suggest that instead all SNPs with MAF >1% may be used. We established informative axes of variation identified via principal component analysis and highlight important features of the genetic structure of diverse European-descent populations, some studied for the first time at this scale. Finally, we investigated the substructure within each of these 15 populations and identified SNPs that help capture hidden stratification. This work can provide information regarding the designing and interpretation of association results in the International Consortia.

  16. Method for the evaluation of structure-activity relationship information associated with coordinated activity cliffs.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Dilyana; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-08-14

    Activity cliffs are generally defined as pairs of active compounds having a large difference in potency. Although this definition of activity cliffs focuses on compound pairs, the vast majority of cliffs are formed in a coordinated manner. This means that multiple highly and weakly potent compounds form series of activity cliffs, which often overlap. In activity cliff networks, coordinated cliffs emerge as disjoint activity cliff clusters. Recently, we have identified all cliff clusters from current bioactive compounds and analyzed their topologies. For structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis, activity cliff clusters are of high interest, since they contain more SAR information than cliffs that are individually considered. For medicinal chemistry applications, a key question becomes how to best extract SAR information from activity cliff clusters. This represents a challenging problem, given the complexity of many activity cliff configurations. Herein we introduce a generally applicable methodology to organize activity cliff clusters on the basis of structural relationships, prioritize clusters, and systematically extract SAR information from them. PMID:25014781

  17. Incorporating MRI structural information into bioluminescence tomography: system, heterogeneous reconstruction and in vivo quantification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Chen, Duofang; Liang, Jimin; Xue, Huadan; Lei, Jing; Wang, Qin; Chen, Dongmei; Meng, Ming; Jin, Zhengyu; Tian, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Combining two or more imaging modalities to provide complementary information has become commonplace in clinical practice and in preclinical and basic biomedical research. By incorporating the structural information provided by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the ill poseness nature of bioluminescence tomography (BLT) can be reduced significantly, thus improve the accuracies of reconstruction and in vivo quantification. In this paper, we present a small animal imaging system combining multi-view and multi-spectral BLT with MRI. The independent MRI-compatible optical device is placed at the end of the clinical MRI scanner. The small animal is transferred between the light tight chamber of the optical device and the animal coil of MRI via a guide rail during the experiment. After the optical imaging and MRI scanning procedures are finished, the optical images are mapped onto the MRI surface by interactive registration between boundary of optical images and silhouette of MRI. Then, incorporating the MRI structural information, a heterogeneous reconstruction algorithm based on finite element method (FEM) with L 1 normalization is used to reconstruct the position, power and region of the light source. In order to validate the feasibility of the system, we conducted experiments of nude mice model implanted with artificial light source and quantitative analysis of tumor inoculation model with MDA-231-GFP-luc. Preliminary results suggest the feasibility and effectiveness of the prototype system. PMID:24940545

  18. Detection of image structures using the Fisher information and the Rao metric.

    PubMed

    Maybank, Stephen J

    2004-12-01

    In many detection problems, the structures to be detected are parameterized by the points of a parameter space. If the conditional probability density function for the measurements is known, then detection can be achieved by sampling the parameter space at a finite number of points and checking each point to see if the corresponding structure is supported by the data. The number of samples and the distances between neighboring samples are calculated using the Rao metric on the parameter space. The Rao metric is obtained from the Fisher information which is, in turn, obtained from the conditional probability density function. An upper bound is obtained for the probability of a false detection. The calculations are simplified in the low noise case by making an asymptotic approximation to the Fisher information. An application to line detection is described. Expressions are obtained for the asymptotic approximation to the Fisher information, the volume of the parameter space, and the number of samples. The time complexity for line detection is estimated. An experimental comparison is made with a Hough transform-based method for detecting lines. PMID:15573819

  19. Information Object Definition–based Unified Modeling Language Representation of DICOM Structured Reporting

    PubMed Central

    Tirado-Ramos, Alfredo; Hu, Jingkun; Lee, K.P.

    2002-01-01

    Supplement 23 to DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications for Medicine), Structured Reporting, is a specification that supports a semantically rich representation of image and waveform content, enabling experts to share image and related patient information. DICOM SR supports the representation of textual and coded data linked to images and waveforms. Nevertheless, the medical information technology community needs models that work as bridges between the DICOM relational model and open object-oriented technologies. The authors assert that representations of the DICOM Structured Reporting standard, using object-oriented modeling languages such as the Unified Modeling Language, can provide a high-level reference view of the semantically rich framework of DICOM and its complex structures. They have produced an object-oriented model to represent the DICOM SR standard and have derived XML-exchangeable representations of this model using World Wide Web Consortium specifications. They expect the model to benefit developers and system architects who are interested in developing applications that are compliant with the DICOM SR specification. PMID:11751804

  20. Pushing Structural Information into the Yeast Interactome by High-Throughput Protein Docking Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, Roberto; Pons, Carles; Fernández-Recio, Juan; Aloy, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The last several years have seen the consolidation of high-throughput proteomics initiatives to identify and characterize protein interactions and macromolecular complexes in model organisms. In particular, more that 10,000 high-confidence protein-protein interactions have been described between the roughly 6,000 proteins encoded in the budding yeast genome (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). However, unfortunately, high-resolution three-dimensional structures are only available for less than one hundred of these interacting pairs. Here, we expand this structural information on yeast protein interactions by running the first-ever high-throughput docking experiment with some of the best state-of-the-art methodologies, according to our benchmarks. To increase the coverage of the interaction space, we also explore the possibility of using homology models of varying quality in the docking experiments, instead of experimental structures, and assess how it would affect the global performance of the methods. In total, we have applied the docking procedure to 217 experimental structures and 1,023 homology models, providing putative structural models for over 3,000 protein-protein interactions in the yeast interactome. Finally, we analyze in detail the structural models obtained for the interaction between SAM1-anthranilate synthase complex and the MET30-RNA polymerase III to illustrate how our predictions can be straightforwardly used by the scientific community. The results of our experiment will be integrated into the general 3D-Repertoire pipeline, a European initiative to solve the structures of as many as possible protein complexes in yeast at the best possible resolution. All docking results are available at http://gatealoy.pcb.ub.es/HT_docking/. PMID:19714207

  1. Spatial vision processes: From the optical image to the symbolic structures of contour information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jobson, Daniel J.

    1988-01-01

    The significance of machine and natural vision is discussed together with the need for a general approach to image acquisition and processing aimed at recognition. An exploratory scheme is proposed which encompasses the definition of spatial primitives, intrinsic image properties and sampling, 2-D edge detection at the smallest scale, the construction of spatial primitives from edges, and the isolation of contour information from textural information. Concepts drawn from or suggested by natural vision at both perceptual and physiological levels are relied upon heavily to guide the development of the overall scheme. The scheme is intended to provide a larger context in which to place the emerging technology of detector array focal-plane processors. The approach differs from many recent efforts in edge detection and image coding by emphasizing smallest scale edge detection as a foundation for multi-scale symbolic processing while diminishing somewhat the importance of image convolutions with multi-scale edge operators. Cursory treatments of information theory illustrate that the direct application of this theory to structural information in images could not be realized.

  2. Handling Missing Data With Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling and Full Information Maximum Likelihood Techniques.

    PubMed

    Schminkey, Donna L; von Oertzen, Timo; Bullock, Linda

    2016-08-01

    With increasing access to population-based data and electronic health records for secondary analysis, missing data are common. In the social and behavioral sciences, missing data frequently are handled with multiple imputation methods or full information maximum likelihood (FIML) techniques, but healthcare researchers have not embraced these methodologies to the same extent and more often use either traditional imputation techniques or complete case analysis, which can compromise power and introduce unintended bias. This article is a review of options for handling missing data, concluding with a case study demonstrating the utility of multilevel structural equation modeling using full information maximum likelihood (MSEM with FIML) to handle large amounts of missing data. MSEM with FIML is a parsimonious and hypothesis-driven strategy to cope with large amounts of missing data without compromising power or introducing bias. This technique is relevant for nurse researchers faced with ever-increasing amounts of electronic data and decreasing research budgets. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Bridging the pressure gap: Can we get local quantitative structural information at 'near-ambient' pressures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, D. P.

    2016-10-01

    In recent years there have been an increasing number of investigations aimed at 'bridging the pressure gap' between UHV surface science experiments on well-characterised single crystal surfaces and the much higher (ambient and above) pressures relevant to practical catalyst applications. By applying existing photon-in/photon-out methods and developing instrumentation to allow photoelectron emission to be measured in higher-pressure sample environments, it has proved possible to obtain surface compositions and spectroscopic fingerprinting of chemical and molecular states of adsorbed species at pressures up to a few millibars. None of these methods, however, provide quantitative structural information on the local adsorption sites of isolated atomic and molecular adsorbate species under these higher-pressure reaction conditions. Methods for gaining this information are reviewed and evaluated.

  4. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  5. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  6. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  7. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  8. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  9. Cation Selectivity in Biological Cation Channels Using Experimental Structural Information and Statistical Mechanical Simulation.

    PubMed

    Finnerty, Justin John; Peyser, Alexander; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Cation selective channels constitute the gate for ion currents through the cell membrane. Here we present an improved statistical mechanical model based on atomistic structural information, cation hydration state and without tuned parameters that reproduces the selectivity of biological Na+ and Ca2+ ion channels. The importance of the inclusion of step-wise cation hydration in these results confirms the essential role partial dehydration plays in the bacterial Na+ channels. The model, proven reliable against experimental data, could be straightforwardly used for designing Na+ and Ca2+ selective nanopores. PMID:26460827

  10. Simultaneous registration of structural and diffusion weighed images using the full DTI information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Hélène; Chai, Yaqiong; Thompson, Paul; Leporé, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Banks of high-quality, multimodal neurological images offer new possibilities for analyses based on brain registration. To take full advantage of these, current algorithms should be significantly enhanced. We present here a new brain registration method driven simultaneously by the structural intensity and the total diffusion information of MRI scans. Using the two modalities together allows for a better alignment of general and specific aspects of the anatomy. Furthermore, keeping the full diffusion tensor in the cost function, rather than only some of its scalar measures, will allow for a thorough statistical analysis once the Jacobian of the transformation is obtained.

  11. Optimal Full Information Synthesis for Flexible Structures Implemented on Cray Supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, Rick; Balas, Gary J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper considers an algorithm for synthesis of optimal controllers for full information feedback. The synthesis procedure reduces to a single linear matrix inequality which may be solved via established convex optimization algorithms. The computational cost of the optimization is investigated. It is demonstrated the problem dimension and corresponding matrices can become large for practical engineering problems. This algorithm represents a process that is impractical for standard workstations for large order systems. A flexible structure is presented as a design example. Control synthesis requires several days on a workstation but may be solved in a reasonable amount of time using a Cray supercomputer.

  12. Cation Selectivity in Biological Cation Channels Using Experimental Structural Information and Statistical Mechanical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Finnerty, Justin John

    2015-01-01

    Cation selective channels constitute the gate for ion currents through the cell membrane. Here we present an improved statistical mechanical model based on atomistic structural information, cation hydration state and without tuned parameters that reproduces the selectivity of biological Na+ and Ca2+ ion channels. The importance of the inclusion of step-wise cation hydration in these results confirms the essential role partial dehydration plays in the bacterial Na+ channels. The model, proven reliable against experimental data, could be straightforwardly used for designing Na+ and Ca2+ selective nanopores. PMID:26460827

  13. The processing of temporal and nontemporal information in the remembering of event durations and musical structure.

    PubMed

    Boltz, M G

    1998-08-01

    Within the field of cognitive psychology, one issue of theoretical debate concerns the relationship between an event's temporal (e.g., rhythm, rate, total duration) and nontemporal (e.g., sequence of pitch intervals) information. Some argue these are jointly encoded into the cognitive system, whereas others claim they are encoded in an independent fashion. This issue was investigated in 2 experiments that systematically manipulated participants' attention to the temporal and pitch properties of melodies and then examined participants' subsequent remembering of these structural dimensions. The results indicate that the nature of encoding is strongly dependent on the structure of environmental events and the degree of learning experience. This relationship in turn has implications for theories of both music cognition and time estimation behavior. PMID:9706710

  14. Robust CPD Algorithm for Non-Rigid Point Set Registration Based on Structure Information

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Lei; Li, Guangyao; Xiao, Mang; Xie, Li

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the Coherent Point Drift (CPD) algorithm has become a very popular and efficient method for point set registration. However, this method does not take into consideration the neighborhood structure information of points to find the correspondence and requires a manual assignment of the outlier ratio. Therefore, CPD is not robust for large degrees of degradation. In this paper, an improved method is proposed to overcome the two limitations of CPD. A structure descriptor, such as shape context, is used to perform the auxiliary calculation of the correspondence, and the proportion of each GMM component is adjusted by the similarity. The outlier ratio is formulated in the EM framework so that it can be automatically calculated and optimized iteratively. The experimental results on both synthetic data and real data demonstrate that the proposed method described here is more robust to deformation, noise, occlusion, and outliers than CPD and other state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:26866918

  15. Robust CPD Algorithm for Non-Rigid Point Set Registration Based on Structure Information.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lei; Li, Guangyao; Xiao, Mang; Xie, Li

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the Coherent Point Drift (CPD) algorithm has become a very popular and efficient method for point set registration. However, this method does not take into consideration the neighborhood structure information of points to find the correspondence and requires a manual assignment of the outlier ratio. Therefore, CPD is not robust for large degrees of degradation. In this paper, an improved method is proposed to overcome the two limitations of CPD. A structure descriptor, such as shape context, is used to perform the auxiliary calculation of the correspondence, and the proportion of each GMM component is adjusted by the similarity. The outlier ratio is formulated in the EM framework so that it can be automatically calculated and optimized iteratively. The experimental results on both synthetic data and real data demonstrate that the proposed method described here is more robust to deformation, noise, occlusion, and outliers than CPD and other state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:26866918

  16. Accurate On-Line Intervention Practices for Efficient Improvement of Reading Skills in Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Minda B.

    2016-01-01

    Lifelong learning is the only way to sustain proficient learning in a rapidly changing world. Knowledge and information are exploding across the globe. We need accurate ways to facilitate the process of drawing external factual information into an internal perceptive advantage from which to interpret and argue new information. Accurate and…

  17. The importance of accurate atmospheric modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Dylan; Schroeder, John; Liang, Pang

    2014-11-01

    This paper will focus on the effect of atmospheric conditions on EO sensor performance using computer models. We have shown the importance of accurately modeling atmospheric effects for predicting the performance of an EO sensor. A simple example will demonstrated how real conditions for several sites in China will significantly impact on image correction, hyperspectral imaging, and remote sensing. The current state-of-the-art model for computing atmospheric transmission and radiance is, MODTRAN® 5, developed by the US Air Force Research Laboratory and Spectral Science, Inc. Research by the US Air Force, Navy and Army resulted in the public release of LOWTRAN 2 in the early 1970's. Subsequent releases of LOWTRAN and MODTRAN® have continued until the present. Please verify that (1) all pages are present, (2) all figures are correct, (3) all fonts and special characters are correct, and (4) all text and figures fit within the red margin lines shown on this review document. Complete formatting information is available at http://SPIE.org/manuscripts Return to the Manage Active Submissions page at http://spie.org/submissions/tasks.aspx and approve or disapprove this submission. Your manuscript will not be published without this approval. Please contact author_help@spie.org with any questions or concerns. The paper will demonstrate the importance of using validated models and local measured meteorological, atmospheric and aerosol conditions to accurately simulate the atmospheric transmission and radiance. Frequently default conditions are used which can produce errors of as much as 75% in these values. This can have significant impact on remote sensing applications.

  18. Investigating Information Dynamics in Living Systems through the Structure and Function of Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gatenby, Robert; Frieden, B Roy

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes are proteins that accelerate intracellular chemical reactions often by factors of 105-1012s-1. We propose the structure and function of enzymes represent the thermodynamic expression of heritable information encoded in DNA with post-translational modifications that reflect intra- and extra-cellular environmental inputs. The 3 dimensional shape of the protein, determined by the genetically-specified amino acid sequence and post translational modifications, permits geometric interactions with substrate molecules traditionally described by the key-lock best fit model. Here we apply Kullback-Leibler (K-L) divergence as metric of this geometric "fit" and the information content of the interactions. When the K-L 'distance' between interspersed substrate pn and enzyme rn positions is minimized, the information state, reaction probability, and reaction rate are maximized. The latter obeys the Arrhenius equation, which we show can be derived from the geometrical principle of minimum K-L distance. The derivation is first limited to optimum substrate positions for fixed sets of enzyme positions. However, maximally improving the key/lock fit, called 'induced fit,' requires both sets of positions to be varied optimally. We demonstrate this permits and is maximally efficient if the key and lock particles pn, rn are quantum entangled because the level of entanglement obeys the same minimized value of the Kullback-Leibler distance that occurs when all pn ≈ rn. This implies interchanges pn ⇄ brn randomly taking place during a reaction successively improves key/lock fits, reducing the activation energy Ea and increasing the reaction rate k. Our results demonstrate the summation of heritable and environmental information that determines the enzyme spatial configuration, by decreasing the K-L divergence, is converted to thermodynamic work by reducing Ea and increasing k of intracellular reactions. Macroscopically, enzyme information increases the order in living systems

  19. Vertical structure of predictability and information transport over the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ai-Xia; Wang, Qi-Gang; Gong, Zhi-Qiang; Feng, Guo-Lin

    2014-02-01

    Based on nonlinear prediction and information theory, vertical heterogeneity of predictability and information loss rate in geopotential height field are obtained over the Northern Hemisphere. On a seasonal-to-interannual time scale, the predictability is low in the lower troposphere and high in the mid-upper troposphere. However, within mid-upper troposphere over the subtropics ocean area, there is a relatively poor predictability. These conclusions also fit the seasonal time scale. Moving to the interannual time scale, the predictability becomes high in the lower troposphere and low in the mid-upper troposphere, contrary to the former case. On the whole the interannual trend is more predictable than the seasonal trend. The average information loss rate is low over the mid-east Pacific, west of North America, Atlantic and Eurasia, and the atmosphere over other places has a relatively high information loss rate on all-time scales. Two channels are found steadily over the Pacific Ocean and Atlantic Ocean in subtropics. There are also unstable channels. The four-season influence on predictability and information communication are studied. The predictability is low, no matter which season data are removed and each season plays an important role in the existence of the channels, except for the winter. The predictability and teleconnections are paramount issues in atmospheric science, and the teleconnections may be established by communication channels. So, this work is interesting since it reveals the vertical structure of predictability distribution, channel locations, and the contributions of different time scales to them and their variations under different seasons.

  20. Investigating Information Dynamics in Living Systems through the Structure and Function of Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gatenby, Robert; Frieden, B Roy

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes are proteins that accelerate intracellular chemical reactions often by factors of 105-1012s-1. We propose the structure and function of enzymes represent the thermodynamic expression of heritable information encoded in DNA with post-translational modifications that reflect intra- and extra-cellular environmental inputs. The 3 dimensional shape of the protein, determined by the genetically-specified amino acid sequence and post translational modifications, permits geometric interactions with substrate molecules traditionally described by the key-lock best fit model. Here we apply Kullback-Leibler (K-L) divergence as metric of this geometric "fit" and the information content of the interactions. When the K-L 'distance' between interspersed substrate pn and enzyme rn positions is minimized, the information state, reaction probability, and reaction rate are maximized. The latter obeys the Arrhenius equation, which we show can be derived from the geometrical principle of minimum K-L distance. The derivation is first limited to optimum substrate positions for fixed sets of enzyme positions. However, maximally improving the key/lock fit, called 'induced fit,' requires both sets of positions to be varied optimally. We demonstrate this permits and is maximally efficient if the key and lock particles pn, rn are quantum entangled because the level of entanglement obeys the same minimized value of the Kullback-Leibler distance that occurs when all pn ≈ rn. This implies interchanges pn ⇄ brn randomly taking place during a reaction successively improves key/lock fits, reducing the activation energy Ea and increasing the reaction rate k. Our results demonstrate the summation of heritable and environmental information that determines the enzyme spatial configuration, by decreasing the K-L divergence, is converted to thermodynamic work by reducing Ea and increasing k of intracellular reactions. Macroscopically, enzyme information increases the order in living systems

  1. Accurate, meshless methods for magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Raives, Matthias J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we explored new meshless finite-volume Lagrangian methods for hydrodynamics: the `meshless finite mass' (MFM) and `meshless finite volume' (MFV) methods; these capture advantages of both smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) schemes. We extend these to include ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The MHD equations are second-order consistent and conservative. We augment these with a divergence-cleaning scheme, which maintains nabla \\cdot B≈ 0. We implement these in the code GIZMO, together with state-of-the-art SPH MHD. We consider a large test suite, and show that on all problems the new methods are competitive with AMR using constrained transport (CT) to ensure nabla \\cdot B=0. They correctly capture the growth/structure of the magnetorotational instability, MHD turbulence, and launching of magnetic jets, in some cases converging more rapidly than state-of-the-art AMR. Compared to SPH, the MFM/MFV methods exhibit convergence at fixed neighbour number, sharp shock-capturing, and dramatically reduced noise, divergence errors, and diffusion. Still, `modern' SPH can handle most test problems, at the cost of larger kernels and `by hand' adjustment of artificial diffusion. Compared to non-moving meshes, the new methods exhibit enhanced `grid noise' but reduced advection errors and diffusion, easily include self-gravity, and feature velocity-independent errors and superior angular momentum conservation. They converge more slowly on some problems (smooth, slow-moving flows), but more rapidly on others (involving advection/rotation). In all cases, we show divergence control beyond the Powell 8-wave approach is necessary, or all methods can converge to unphysical answers even at high resolution.

  2. The Effect of Screen Size on Mobile Phone User Comprehension of Health Information and Application Structure: An Experimental Approach.

    PubMed

    Al Ghamdi, Ebtisam; Yunus, Faisal; Da'ar, Omar; El-Metwally, Ashraf; Khalifa, Mohamed; Aldossari, Bakheet; Househ, Mowafa

    2016-01-01

    This research analyzes the impact of mobile phone screen size on user comprehension of health information and application structure. Applying experimental approach, we asked randomly selected users to read content and conduct tasks on a commonly used diabetes mobile application using three different mobile phone screen sizes. We timed and tracked a number of parameters, including correctness, effectiveness of completing tasks, content ease of reading, clarity of information organization, and comprehension. The impact of screen size on user comprehension/retention, clarity of information organization, and reading time were mixed. It is assumed on first glance that mobile screen size would affect all qualities of information reading and comprehension, including clarity of displayed information organization, reading time and user comprehension/retention of displayed information, but actually the screen size, in this experimental research, did not have significant impact on user comprehension/retention of the content or on understanding the application structure. However, it did have significant impact on clarity of information organization and reading time. Participants with larger screen size took shorter time reading the content with a significant difference in the ease of reading. While there was no significant difference in the comprehension of information or the application structures, there were a higher task completion rate and a lower number of errors with the bigger screen size. Screen size does not directly affect user comprehension of health information. However, it does affect clarity of information organization, reading time and user's ability to recall information.

  3. Dynamic Nucleosome Movement Provides Structural Information of Topological Chromatin Domains in Living Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shinkai, Soya; Nozaki, Tadasu; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian genome is organized into submegabase-sized chromatin domains (CDs) including topologically associating domains, which have been identified using chromosome conformation capture-based methods. Single-nucleosome imaging in living mammalian cells has revealed subdiffusively dynamic nucleosome movement. It is unclear how single nucleosomes within CDs fluctuate and how the CD structure reflects the nucleosome movement. Here, we present a polymer model wherein CDs are characterized by fractal dimensions and the nucleosome fibers fluctuate in a viscoelastic medium with memory. We analytically show that the mean-squared displacement (MSD) of nucleosome fluctuations within CDs is subdiffusive. The diffusion coefficient and the subdiffusive exponent depend on the structural information of CDs. This analytical result enabled us to extract information from the single-nucleosome imaging data for HeLa cells. Our observation that the MSD is lower at the nuclear periphery region than the interior region indicates that CDs in the heterochromatin-rich nuclear periphery region are more compact than those in the euchromatin-rich interior region with respect to the fractal dimensions as well as the size. Finally, we evaluated that the average size of CDs is in the range of 100–500 nm and that the relaxation time of nucleosome movement within CDs is a few seconds. Our results provide physical and dynamic insights into the genome architecture in living cells. PMID:27764097

  4. Genome Scan for Selection in Structured Layer Chicken Populations Exploiting Linkage Disequilibrium Information.

    PubMed

    Gholami, Mahmood; Reimer, Christian; Erbe, Malena; Preisinger, Rudolf; Weigend, Annett; Weigend, Steffen; Servin, Bertrand; Simianer, Henner

    2015-01-01

    An increasing interest is being placed in the detection of genes, or genomic regions, that have been targeted by selection because identifying signatures of selection can lead to a better understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships. A common strategy for the detection of selection signatures is to compare samples from distinct populations and to search for genomic regions with outstanding genetic differentiation. The aim of this study was to detect selective signatures in layer chicken populations using a recently proposed approach, hapFLK, which exploits linkage disequilibrium information while accounting appropriately for the hierarchical structure of populations. We performed the analysis on 70 individuals from three commercial layer breeds (White Leghorn, White Rock and Rhode Island Red), genotyped for approximately 1 million SNPs. We found a total of 41 and 107 regions with outstanding differentiation or similarity using hapFLK and its single SNP counterpart FLK respectively. Annotation of selection signature regions revealed various genes and QTL corresponding to productions traits, for which layer breeds were selected. A number of the detected genes were associated with growth and carcass traits, including IGF-1R, AGRP and STAT5B. We also annotated an interesting gene associated with the dark brown feather color mutational phenotype in chickens (SOX10). We compared FST, FLK and hapFLK and demonstrated that exploiting linkage disequilibrium information and accounting for hierarchical population structure decreased the false detection rate.

  5. The effects of flow on schooling Devario aequipinnatus: school structure, startle response and information transmission

    PubMed Central

    Chicoli, A.; Butail, S.; Lun, Y.; Bak-Coleman, J.; Coombs, S.; Paley, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    To assess how flow affects school structure and threat detection, startle response rates of solitary and small groups of giant danio Devario aequipinnatus were compared to visual looming stimuli in flow and no-flow conditions. The instantaneous position and heading of each D. aequipinnatus were extracted from high-speed videos. Behavioural results indicate that (1) school structure is altered in flow such that D. aequipinnatus orient upstream while spanning out in a crosswise direction, (2) the probability of at least one D. aequipinnatus detecting the visual looming stimulus is higher in flow than no flow for both solitary D. aequipinnatus and groups of eight D. aequipinnatus, however, (3) the probability of three or more individuals responding is higher in no flow than flow. Taken together, these results indicate a higher probability of stimulus detection in flow but a higher probability of internal transmission of information in no flow. Finally, results were well predicted by a computational model of collective fright response that included the probability of direct detection (based on signal detection theory) and indirect detection (i.e. via interactions between group members) of threatening stimuli. This model provides a new theoretical framework for analysing the collective transfer of information among groups of fishes and other organisms. PMID:24773538

  6. On the mechanisms involved in the recovery of envelope information from temporal fine structure

    PubMed Central

    Apoux, Frédéric; Millman, Rebecca E.; Viemeister, Neal F.; Brown, Christopher A.; Bacon, Sid P.

    2011-01-01

    Three experiments were designed to provide psychophysical evidence for the existence of envelope information in the temporal fine structure (TFS) of stimuli that were originally amplitude modulated (AM). The original stimuli typically consisted of the sum of a sinusoidally AM tone and two unmodulated tones so that the envelope and TFS could be determined a priori. Experiment 1 showed that normal-hearing listeners not only perceive AM when presented with the Hilbert fine structure alone but AM detection thresholds are lower than those observed when presenting the original stimuli. Based on our analysis, envelope recovery resulted from the failure of the decomposition process to remove the spectral components related to the original envelope from the TFS and the introduction of spectral components related to the original envelope, suggesting that frequency- to amplitude-modulation conversion is not necessary to recover envelope information from TFS. Experiment 2 suggested that these spectral components interact in such a way that envelope fluctuations are minimized in the broadband TFS. Experiment 3 demonstrated that the modulation depth at the original carrier frequency is only slightly reduced compared to the depth of the original modulator. It also indicated that envelope recovery is not specific to the Hilbert decomposition. PMID:21786897

  7. Accurate Weather Forecasting for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddalena, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    The NRAO Green Bank Telescope routinely observes at wavelengths from 3 mm to 1 m. As with all mm-wave telescopes, observing conditions depend upon the variable atmospheric water content. The site provides over 100 days/yr when opacities are low enough for good observing at 3 mm, but winds on the open-air structure reduce the time suitable for 3-mm observing where pointing is critical. Thus, to maximum productivity the observing wavelength needs to match weather conditions. For 6 years the telescope has used a dynamic scheduling system (recently upgraded; www.gb.nrao.edu/DSS) that requires accurate multi-day forecasts for winds and opacities. Since opacity forecasts are not provided by the National Weather Services (NWS), I have developed an automated system that takes available forecasts, derives forecasted opacities, and deploys the results on the web in user-friendly graphical overviews (www.gb.nrao.edu/ rmaddale/Weather). The system relies on the "North American Mesoscale" models, which are updated by the NWS every 6 hrs, have a 12 km horizontal resolution, 1 hr temporal resolution, run to 84 hrs, and have 60 vertical layers that extend to 20 km. Each forecast consists of a time series of ground conditions, cloud coverage, etc, and, most importantly, temperature, pressure, humidity as a function of height. I use the Liebe's MWP model (Radio Science, 20, 1069, 1985) to determine the absorption in each layer for each hour for 30 observing wavelengths. Radiative transfer provides, for each hour and wavelength, the total opacity and the radio brightness of the atmosphere, which contributes substantially at some wavelengths to Tsys and the observational noise. Comparisons of measured and forecasted Tsys at 22.2 and 44 GHz imply that the forecasted opacities are good to about 0.01 Nepers, which is sufficient for forecasting and accurate calibration. Reliability is high out to 2 days and degrades slowly for longer-range forecasts.

  8. Structure and content of chronic kidney disease information on the World Wide Web: barriers to public understanding of a pandemic.

    PubMed

    Calderón, José Luis; Zadshir, Ashraf; Norris, Keith

    2004-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a pandemic and the need to inform those at risk has never been more important. The World Wide Web (WWW) is no w considered a key source of health information, but the quality and utility of this information has been challenged. In this article, we assess structural, content, and linguistic barriers to accessed CKD information and discuss the implications of limited Internet access to communicating health. Technical (number of hyperlinks), content (number of six core CKD and risk factor information domains included), and linguistic (readability and variation in readability) barriers were assessed for websites offered by 12 kidney disease associations. The Flesch Reading Ease Index method was used to estimate readability scores, and variation in the readability of information was assessed. Eleven websites met inclusion criteria. Six of 11 websites provided information in all 6 domains of CKD information. A mean of 4 hyperlinks (range 3-5) was clicked before CKD information was available and a mean of 6 hyperlinks (range 4-12) was clicked to access all available CKD information. Mean readability scores for all six domains of CKD information exceeded national average literacy skills and far exceeded the 5th grade level readability desired for informing vulnerable populations. Information about CKD and diabetes consistently had higher readability scores. The WWW currently has little utility for informing populations at greatest risk for CKD. Barriers to accessing CKD information on the WWW are socioeconomic, technical, and linguistic. Having lower socioeconomic status, less access to computers and the WWW, multiple website hyperlinks, incomplete information, difficult readability, and significant variation in readability of CKD information on the WWW are social, structural, and content barriers to communicating CKD information. This may contribute to the growing epidemics of diminished public understanding about CKD, and disparities in

  9. Advanced data structures for the interpretation of image and cartographic data in geo-based information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peuquet, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    A growing need to usse geographic information systems (GIS) to improve the flexibility and overall performance of very large, heterogeneous data bases was examined. The Vaster structure and the Topological Grid structure were compared to test whether such hybrid structures represent an improvement in performance. The use of artificial intelligence in a geographic/earth sciences data base context is being explored. The architecture of the Knowledge Based GIS (KBGIS) has a dual object/spatial data base and a three tier hierarchial search subsystem. Quadtree Spatial Spectra (QTSS) are derived, based on the quadtree data structure, to generate and represent spatial distribution information for large volumes of spatial data.

  10. Structure-Informed Design of an Enzymatically Inactive Vaccine Component for Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Henningham, Anna; Ericsson, Daniel J.; Langer, Karla; Casey, Lachlan W.; Jovcevski, Blagojce; Chhatwal, G. Singh; Aquilina, J. Andrew; Batzloff, Michael R.; Kobe, Bostjan; Walker, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) causes ~700 million human infections/year, resulting in >500,000 deaths. There is no commercial GAS vaccine available. The GAS surface protein arginine deiminase (ADI) protects mice against a lethal challenge. ADI is an enzyme that converts arginine to citrulline and ammonia. Administration of a GAS vaccine preparation containing wild-type ADI, a protein with inherent enzymatic activity, may present a safety risk. In an approach intended to maximize the vaccine safety of GAS ADI, X-ray crystallography and structural immunogenic epitope mapping were used to inform vaccine design. This study aimed to knock out ADI enzyme activity without disrupting the three-dimensional structure or the recognition of immunogenic epitopes. We determined the crystal structure of ADI at 2.5 Å resolution and used it to select a number of amino acid residues for mutagenesis to alanine (D166, E220, H275, D277, and C401). Each mutant protein displayed abrogated activity, and three of the mutant proteins (those with the D166A, H275A, and D277A mutations) possessed a secondary structure and oligomerization state equivalent to those of the wild type, produced high-titer antisera, and avoided disruption of B-cell epitopes of ADI. In addition, antisera raised against the D166A and D277A mutant proteins bound to the GAS cell surface. The inactivated D166A and D277A mutant ADIs are ideal for inclusion in a GAS vaccine preparation. There is no human ortholog of ADI, and we confirm that despite limited structural similarity in the active-site region to human peptidyl ADI 4 (PAD4), ADI does not functionally mimic PAD4 and antiserum raised against GAS ADI does not recognize human PAD4. PMID:23919999

  11. Structural Information Inference from Lanthanoid Complexing Systems: Photoluminescence Studies on Isolated Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greisch, Jean Francois; Harding, Michael E.; Chmela, Jiri; Klopper, Willem M.; Schooss, Detlef; Kappes, Manfred M.

    2016-06-01

    The application of lanthanoid complexes ranges from photovoltaics and light-emitting diodes to quantum memories and biological assays. Rationalization of their design requires a thorough understanding of intramolecular processes such as energy transfer, charge transfer, and non-radiative decay involving their subunits. Characterization of the excited states of such complexes considerably benefits from mass spectrometric methods since the associated optical transitions and processes are strongly affected by stoichiometry, symmetry, and overall charge state. We report herein spectroscopic measurements on ensembles of ions trapped in the gas phase and soft-landed in neon matrices. Their interpretation is considerably facilitated by direct comparison with computations. The combination of energy- and time-resolved measurements on isolated species with density functional as well as ligand-field and Franck-Condon computations enables us to infer structural as well as dynamical information about the species studied. The approach is first illustrated for sets of model lanthanoid complexes whose structure and electronic properties are systematically varied via the substitution of one component (lanthanoid or alkali,alkali-earth ion): (i) systematic dependence of ligand-centered phosphorescence on the lanthanoid(III) promotion energy and its impact on sensitization, and (ii) structural changes induced by the substitution of alkali or alkali-earth ions in relation with structures inferred using ion mobility spectroscopy. The temperature dependence of sensitization is briefly discussed. The focus is then shifted to measurements involving europium complexes with doxycycline an antibiotic of the tetracycline family. Besides discussing the complexes' structural and electronic features, we report on their use to monitor enzymatic processes involving hydrogen peroxide or biologically relevant molecules such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

  12. Information content and acoustic structure of male African elephant social rumbles.

    PubMed

    Stoeger, Angela S; Baotic, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, the prevailing theory about male African elephants (Loxodonta africana) was that, once adult and sexually mature, males are solitary and targeted only at finding estrous females. While this is true during the state of 'musth' (a condition characterized by aggressive behavior and elevated androgen levels), 'non-musth' males exhibit a social system seemingly based on companionship, dominance and established hierarchies. Research on elephant vocal communication has so far focused on females, and very little is known about the acoustic structure and the information content of male vocalizations. Using the source and filter theory approach, we analyzed social rumbles of 10 male African elephants. Our results reveal that male rumbles encode information about individuality and maturity (age and size), with formant frequencies and absolute fundamental frequency values having the most informative power. This first comprehensive study on male elephant vocalizations gives important indications on their potential functional relevance for male-male and male-female communication. Our results suggest that, similar to the highly social females, future research on male elephant vocal behavior will reveal a complex communication system in which social knowledge, companionship, hierarchy, reproductive competition and the need to communicate over long distances play key roles. PMID:27273586

  13. Information content and acoustic structure of male African elephant social rumbles

    PubMed Central

    Stoeger, Angela S.; Baotic, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, the prevailing theory about male African elephants (Loxodonta africana) was that, once adult and sexually mature, males are solitary and targeted only at finding estrous females. While this is true during the state of ‘musth’ (a condition characterized by aggressive behavior and elevated androgen levels), ‘non-musth’ males exhibit a social system seemingly based on companionship, dominance and established hierarchies. Research on elephant vocal communication has so far focused on females, and very little is known about the acoustic structure and the information content of male vocalizations. Using the source and filter theory approach, we analyzed social rumbles of 10 male African elephants. Our results reveal that male rumbles encode information about individuality and maturity (age and size), with formant frequencies and absolute fundamental frequency values having the most informative power. This first comprehensive study on male elephant vocalizations gives important indications on their potential functional relevance for male-male and male-female communication. Our results suggest that, similar to the highly social females, future research on male elephant vocal behavior will reveal a complex communication system in which social knowledge, companionship, hierarchy, reproductive competition and the need to communicate over long distances play key roles. PMID:27273586

  14. An evaluation of information-theoretic methods for detecting structural microbial biosignatures.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Kiri L; Corsetti, Frank A

    2010-05-01

    The first observations of extraterrestrial environments will most likely be in the form of digital images. Given an image of a rock that contains layered structures, is it possible to determine whether the layers were created by life (biogenic)? While conclusive judgments about biogenicity are unlikely to be made solely on the basis of image features, an initial assessment of the importance of a given sample can inform decisions about follow-up searches for other types of possible biosignatures (e.g., isotopic or chemical analysis). In this study, we evaluated several quantitative measures that capture the degree of complexity in visible structures, in terms of compressibility (to detect order) and the entropy (spread) of their intensity distributions. Computing complexity inside a sliding analysis window yields a map of each of these features that indicates how they vary spatially across the sample. We conducted experiments on both biogenic and abiogenic terrestrial stromatolites and on laminated structures found on Mars. The degree to which each feature separated biogenic from abiogenic samples (separability) was assessed quantitatively. None of the techniques provided a consistent, statistically significant distinction between all biogenic and abiogenic samples. However, the PNG compression ratio provided the strongest distinction (2.80 in standard deviation units) and could inform future techniques. Increasing the analysis window size or the magnification level, or both, improved the separability of the samples. Finally, data from all four Mars samples plotted well outside the biogenic field suggested by the PNG analyses, although we caution against a direct comparison of terrestrial stromatolites and martian non-stromatolites.

  15. 76 FR 59113 - Extension of the Due Date for Submitting Information on How to Structure Proposed New Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... to Structure Proposed New Program: Advanced Manufacturing Technology Consortia (AMTech) AGENCY...-private partnership program, the Advanced Manufacturing Technology Consortia (AMTech) Program, which was... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Advanced Manufacturing Technology Consortia (AMTech) Program was proposed in...

  16. Combining structure probing data on RNA mutants with evolutionary information reveals RNA-binding interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Reinharz, Vladimir; Ponty, Yann; Waldispühl, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Systematic structure probing experiments (e.g. SHAPE) of RNA mutants such as the mutate-and-map (MaM) protocol give us a direct access into the genetic robustness of ncRNA structures. Comparative studies of homologous sequences provide a distinct, yet complementary, approach to analyze structural and functional properties of non-coding RNAs. In this paper, we introduce a formal framework to combine the biochemical signal collected from MaM experiments, with the evolutionary information available in multiple sequence alignments. We apply neutral theory principles to detect complex long-range dependencies between nucleotides of a single stranded RNA, and implement these ideas into a software called aRNhAck. We illustrate the biological significance of this signal and show that the nucleotides networks calculated with aRNhAck are correlated with nucleotides located in RNA–RNA, RNA–protein, RNA–DNA and RNA–ligand interfaces. aRNhAck is freely available at http://csb.cs.mcgill.ca/arnhack. PMID:27095200

  17. Obtaining structural information of small proteins using solid-state nanopores and high-bandwidth measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzwiecki, David; Lanci, Christopher; Saven, Jeffery; Drndic, Marija

    2015-03-01

    The use of biological nanopores sensors to characterize proteins has proved a fruitful field of study. Solid-state nanopores hold several advantages over their biological counterparts, including the ability to tune pore diameter and their robustness to external conditions. Despite these advantages, the use of solid-state nanopores for protein analysis has proved difficult due to rapid translocation times of proteins and poor signal-to-noise of small peptides. Recently, improvements in high-bandwidth acquisition and in signal-to-noise have made the study of small peptides using solid-state nanopores feasible. Here we report on the detection and characterization of peptides as small as 33 amino-acids in length using sub-10 nm thin silicon nitride nanopores, giving high signal levels, combined with high-bandwidth electronics. In addition we show differentiation between monomers and dimer forms of the GCN-4 p1 leucine zipper, a coil-coil structure, and compare this with the unstructured 33-mer. The differentiation between these two forms demonstrates the possibility of extracting useful structural information from short peptide structures using modern solid-state nanopore systems.

  18. Quantum-information analysis of electronic states of different molecular structures

    SciTech Connect

    Barcza, G.; Legeza, Oe.; Marti, K. H.; Reiher, M.

    2011-01-15

    We have studied transition metal clusters from a quantum information theory perspective using the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method. We demonstrate the competition between entanglement and interaction localization and discuss the application of the configuration interaction-based dynamically extended active space procedure, which significantly reduces the effective system size and accelerates the speed of convergence for complicated molecular electronic structures. Our results indicate the importance of taking entanglement among molecular orbitals into account in order to devise an optimal DMRG orbital ordering and carry out efficient calculations on transition metal clusters. Apart from these algorithmic observations, which lead to a recipe for black-box DMRG calculations, our work provides physical understanding of electron correlation in molecular and cluster structures in terms of entropy measures of relevance also to recent work on tensor-network representations of electronic states. We also identify those molecular orbitals which are highly entangled and discuss the consequences for chemical bonding and for the structural transition from an dioxygen binding copper cluster to an bis-oxygen-bridged system with broken O-O bond.

  19. Combining structure probing data on RNA mutants with evolutionary information reveals RNA-binding interfaces.

    PubMed

    Reinharz, Vladimir; Ponty, Yann; Waldispühl, Jérôme

    2016-06-20

    Systematic structure probing experiments (e.g. SHAPE) of RNA mutants such as the mutate-and-map (MaM) protocol give us a direct access into the genetic robustness of ncRNA structures. Comparative studies of homologous sequences provide a distinct, yet complementary, approach to analyze structural and functional properties of non-coding RNAs. In this paper, we introduce a formal framework to combine the biochemical signal collected from MaM experiments, with the evolutionary information available in multiple sequence alignments. We apply neutral theory principles to detect complex long-range dependencies between nucleotides of a single stranded RNA, and implement these ideas into a software called aRNhAck We illustrate the biological significance of this signal and show that the nucleotides networks calculated with aRNhAck are correlated with nucleotides located in RNA-RNA, RNA-protein, RNA-DNA and RNA-ligand interfaces. aRNhAck is freely available at http://csb.cs.mcgill.ca/arnhack. PMID:27095200

  20. Measuring Fisher information accurately in correlated neural populations.

    PubMed

    Kanitscheider, Ingmar; Coen-Cagli, Ruben; Kohn, Adam; Pouget, Alexandre

    2015-06-01

    Neural responses are known to be variable. In order to understand how this neural variability constrains behavioral performance, we need to be able to measure the reliability with which a sensory stimulus is encoded in a given population. However, such measures are challenging for two reasons: First, they must take into account noise correlations which can have a large influence on reliability. Second, they need to be as efficient as possible, since the number of trials available in a set of neural recording is usually limited by experimental constraints. Traditionally, cross-validated decoding has been used as a reliability measure, but it only provides a lower bound on reliability and underestimates reliability substantially in small datasets. We show that, if the number of trials per condition is larger than the number of neurons, there is an alternative, direct estimate of reliability which consistently leads to smaller errors and is much faster to compute. The superior performance of the direct estimator is evident both for simulated data and for neuronal population recordings from macaque primary visual cortex. Furthermore we propose generalizations of the direct estimator which measure changes in stimulus encoding across conditions and the impact of correlations on encoding and decoding, typically denoted by Ishuffle and Idiag respectively.

  1. How to structure and prioritize information needs in support of monitoring design for Integrated Coastal Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vugteveen, Pim; van Katwijk, Marieke M.; Rouwette, Etiënne; Hanssen, Lucien

    2014-02-01

    Integrated Coastal Management cannot operate effectively without reliable information and knowledge on changes in the environment and on the causes of those changes. Monitoring is essential to provide data needed for a real understanding of socio-economic and ecological functioning in multi-user nature areas. We present a web-based and comprehensive assessment methodology to articulate, structure and prioritize information needs and ensuing monitoring needs. We applied this methodology in the Dutch Wadden Sea Region, which includes a designated UNESCO World Heritage nature reserve. The methodology consists of the following steps: i) exploring social-ecological issues of concern and defining the monitoring scope; ii) articulating information needs expressed as tractable questions; iii) elaborating monitoring needs; iv) grounding in scientific models and current monitoring; v) synthesizing assessment findings into target entities, i.e. analysis variables for monitoring. In this paper we focus on the first three steps. As part of our methodology we performed two online surveys amongst a broad range of stakeholders and amongst monitoring professionals. In the case of the Dutch Wadden Sea Region, main monitoring questions were related to biodiversity and food web relations; effects of fisheries and its pressures on the ecosystem; channel and port dredging; spatial planning and multifunctional use; sustainable energy production; and effects of changing storm regimes due to climate change. Subsequently we elaborated these general issues into analysis variables within five themes. The presented methodology enables large scale and unbiased involvement of stakeholders in articulating information needs in a multi-user nature reserve like the Wadden Sea. In addition the methodology facilitates the input and feedback of monitoring professionals by providing a detailed elaboration of monitoring needs.

  2. Hydrogen atoms can be located accurately and precisely by x-ray crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Woińska, Magdalena; Grabowsky, Simon; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2016-01-01

    Precise and accurate structural information on hydrogen atoms is crucial to the study of energies of interactions important for crystal engineering, materials science, medicine, and pharmacy, and to the estimation of physical and chemical properties in solids. However, hydrogen atoms only scatter x-radiation weakly, so x-rays have not been used routinely to locate them accurately. Textbooks and teaching classes still emphasize that hydrogen atoms cannot be located with x-rays close to heavy elements; instead, neutron diffraction is needed. We show that, contrary to widespread expectation, hydrogen atoms can be located very accurately using x-ray diffraction, yielding bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms (A–H) that are in agreement with results from neutron diffraction mostly within a single standard deviation. The precision of the determination is also comparable between x-ray and neutron diffraction results. This has been achieved at resolutions as low as 0.8 Å using Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR). We have applied HAR to 81 crystal structures of organic molecules and compared the A–H bond lengths with those from neutron measurements for A–H bonds sorted into bonds of the same class. We further show in a selection of inorganic compounds that hydrogen atoms can be located in bridging positions and close to heavy transition metals accurately and precisely. We anticipate that, in the future, conventional x-radiation sources at in-house diffractometers can be used routinely for locating hydrogen atoms in small molecules accurately instead of large-scale facilities such as spallation sources or nuclear reactors. PMID:27386545

  3. Hydrogen atoms can be located accurately and precisely by x-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Woińska, Magdalena; Grabowsky, Simon; Dominiak, Paulina M; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2016-05-01

    Precise and accurate structural information on hydrogen atoms is crucial to the study of energies of interactions important for crystal engineering, materials science, medicine, and pharmacy, and to the estimation of physical and chemical properties in solids. However, hydrogen atoms only scatter x-radiation weakly, so x-rays have not been used routinely to locate them accurately. Textbooks and teaching classes still emphasize that hydrogen atoms cannot be located with x-rays close to heavy elements; instead, neutron diffraction is needed. We show that, contrary to widespread expectation, hydrogen atoms can be located very accurately using x-ray diffraction, yielding bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms (A-H) that are in agreement with results from neutron diffraction mostly within a single standard deviation. The precision of the determination is also comparable between x-ray and neutron diffraction results. This has been achieved at resolutions as low as 0.8 Å using Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR). We have applied HAR to 81 crystal structures of organic molecules and compared the A-H bond lengths with those from neutron measurements for A-H bonds sorted into bonds of the same class. We further show in a selection of inorganic compounds that hydrogen atoms can be located in bridging positions and close to heavy transition metals accurately and precisely. We anticipate that, in the future, conventional x-radiation sources at in-house diffractometers can be used routinely for locating hydrogen atoms in small molecules accurately instead of large-scale facilities such as spallation sources or nuclear reactors. PMID:27386545

  4. Hydrogen atoms can be located accurately and precisely by x-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Woińska, Magdalena; Grabowsky, Simon; Dominiak, Paulina M; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2016-05-01

    Precise and accurate structural information on hydrogen atoms is crucial to the study of energies of interactions important for crystal engineering, materials science, medicine, and pharmacy, and to the estimation of physical and chemical properties in solids. However, hydrogen atoms only scatter x-radiation weakly, so x-rays have not been used routinely to locate them accurately. Textbooks and teaching classes still emphasize that hydrogen atoms cannot be located with x-rays close to heavy elements; instead, neutron diffraction is needed. We show that, contrary to widespread expectation, hydrogen atoms can be located very accurately using x-ray diffraction, yielding bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms (A-H) that are in agreement with results from neutron diffraction mostly within a single standard deviation. The precision of the determination is also comparable between x-ray and neutron diffraction results. This has been achieved at resolutions as low as 0.8 Å using Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR). We have applied HAR to 81 crystal structures of organic molecules and compared the A-H bond lengths with those from neutron measurements for A-H bonds sorted into bonds of the same class. We further show in a selection of inorganic compounds that hydrogen atoms can be located in bridging positions and close to heavy transition metals accurately and precisely. We anticipate that, in the future, conventional x-radiation sources at in-house diffractometers can be used routinely for locating hydrogen atoms in small molecules accurately instead of large-scale facilities such as spallation sources or nuclear reactors.

  5. Trained student pharmacists’ telephonic collection of patient medication information: Evaluation of a structured interview tool

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Amanda R.; Martin, Beth A.; Mott, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility and fidelity of student pharmacists collecting patient medication list information using a structured interview tool and the accuracy of documenting the information. The medication lists were used by a community pharmacist to provide a targeted medication therapy management (MTM) intervention. Design Descriptive analysis of patient medication lists collected via telephone interviews. Participants 10 trained student pharmacists collected the medication lists. Intervention Trained student pharmacists conducted audio-recorded telephone interviews with 80 English-speaking community dwelling older adults using a structured interview tool to collect and document medication lists. Main outcome measures Feasibility was measured using the number of completed interviews, the time student pharmacists took to collect the information, and pharmacist feedback. Fidelity to the interview tool was measured by assessing student pharmacists’ adherence to asking all scripted questions and probes. Accuracy was measured by comparing the audio recorded interviews to the medication list information documented in an electronic medical record. Results On average it took student pharmacists 26.7 minutes to collect the medication lists. The community pharmacist said the medication lists were complete and that having the medication lists saved time and allowed him to focus on assessment, recommendations, and education during the targeted MTM session. Fidelity was high with an overall proportion of asked scripted probes of 83.75% (95%CI: 80.62–86.88%). Accuracy was also high for both prescription (95.1%, 95%CI: 94.3–95.8%) and non-prescription (90.5%, 95%CI: 89.4–91.4%) medications. Conclusion Trained student pharmacists were able to use an interview tool to collect and document medication lists with a high degree of fidelity and accuracy. This study suggests that student pharmacists or trained technicians may be able to collect patient medication

  6. Informal Mealtime Pedagogies: Exploring the Influence of Family Structure on Young People's Healthy Eating Dispositions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quarmby, Thomas; Dagkas, Symeon

    2015-01-01

    Families are increasingly recognised as informal sites of learning, especially with regard to healthy eating. Through the use of Bourdieu's conceptual tools, this paper explores the role of family meals within different family structures and the informal pedagogic encounters that take place. How they help to construct young people's…

  7. The Financial Status, Organizational Structure, and Staffing of Career Information Delivery Systems in the United States: Technical Report No. 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, James P., Jr.; Norris, Debra S.

    The purpose of this study was to collect, analyze, and disseminate baseline data to aid computer-based career information delivery system (CIDS) operators and state and federal policy makers in making more informed decisions about the financing, organizational structure, and staffing of CIDS. CIDS are computer-based resources that provide…

  8. Efficient and accurate estimation of relative order tensors from λ- maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Rishi; Miao, Xijiang; Shealy, Paul; Valafar, Homayoun

    2009-06-01

    The rapid increase in the availability of RDC data from multiple alignment media in recent years has necessitated the development of more sophisticated analyses that extract the RDC data's full information content. This article presents an analysis of the distribution of RDCs from two media (2D-RDC data), using the information obtained from a λ-map. This article also introduces an efficient algorithm, which leverages these findings to extract the order tensors for each alignment medium using unassigned RDC data in the absence of any structural information. The results of applying this 2D-RDC analysis method to synthetic and experimental data are reported in this article. The relative order tensor estimates obtained from the 2D-RDC analysis are compared to order tensors obtained from the program REDCAT after using assignment and structural information. The final comparisons indicate that the relative order tensors estimated from the unassigned 2D-RDC method very closely match the results from methods that require assignment and structural information. The presented method is successful even in cases with small datasets. The results of analyzing experimental RDC data for the protein 1P7E are presented to demonstrate the potential of the presented work in accurately estimating the principal order parameters from RDC data that incompletely sample the RDC space. In addition to the new algorithm, a discussion of the uniqueness of the solutions is presented; no more than two clusters of distinct solutions have been shown to satisfy each λ-map.

  9. Accurate lineshape spectroscopy and the Boltzmann constant

    PubMed Central

    Truong, G.-W.; Anstie, J. D.; May, E. F.; Stace, T. M.; Luiten, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy has an illustrious history delivering serendipitous discoveries and providing a stringent testbed for new physical predictions, including applications from trace materials detection, to understanding the atmospheres of stars and planets, and even constraining cosmological models. Reaching fundamental-noise limits permits optimal extraction of spectroscopic information from an absorption measurement. Here, we demonstrate a quantum-limited spectrometer that delivers high-precision measurements of the absorption lineshape. These measurements yield a very accurate measurement of the excited-state (6P1/2) hyperfine splitting in Cs, and reveals a breakdown in the well-known Voigt spectral profile. We develop a theoretical model that accounts for this breakdown, explaining the observations to within the shot-noise limit. Our model enables us to infer the thermal velocity dispersion of the Cs vapour with an uncertainty of 35 p.p.m. within an hour. This allows us to determine a value for Boltzmann's constant with a precision of 6 p.p.m., and an uncertainty of 71 p.p.m. PMID:26465085

  10. Novel Cortical Thickness Pattern for Accurate Detection of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weihao; Yao, Zhijun; Hu, Bin; Gao, Xiang; Cai, Hanshu; Moore, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Brain network occupies an important position in representing abnormalities in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Currently, most studies only focused on morphological features of regions of interest without exploring the interregional alterations. In order to investigate the potential discriminative power of a morphological network in AD diagnosis and to provide supportive evidence on the feasibility of an individual structural network study, we propose a novel approach of extracting the correlative features from magnetic resonance imaging, which consists of a two-step approach for constructing an individual thickness network with low computational complexity. Firstly, multi-distance combination is utilized for accurate evaluation of between-region dissimilarity; and then the dissimilarity is transformed to connectivity via calculation of correlation function. An evaluation of the proposed approach has been conducted with 189 normal controls, 198 MCI subjects, and 163 AD patients using machine learning techniques. Results show that the observed correlative feature suggests significant promotion in classification performance compared with cortical thickness, with accuracy of 89.88% and area of 0.9588 under receiver operating characteristic curve. We further improved the performance by integrating both thickness and apolipoprotein E ɛ4 allele information with correlative features. New achieved accuracies are 92.11% and 79.37% in separating AD from normal controls and AD converters from non-converters, respectively. Differences between using diverse distance measurements and various correlation transformation functions are also discussed to explore an optimal way for network establishment. PMID:26444768

  11. Applying PolSAR and PolInSAR to Forest Structure Information Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, E.; Li, Z.; Li, W.; Feng, Q.; Zhou, W.; Pottier, E.; Hong, W.

    2013-01-01

    The key research activities and achievements in the field of applying PolSAR and PolInSAR to forest structure information extraction in DRAGON 2 are summarized in this paper. The limitation of the ALOS PolInSAR dataset acquired in the Culai test site for forest height extraction because of its long temporal baseline (46 days), and how the PolInSAR coherence optimization methods can help improve the topography inversion accuracy under forest canopy were presented. We have analyzed and evaluated the capability of multiple polarization parameters extracted from different frequency PolSAR data for forest scar mapping in the Shibazhan test site, and developed the land cover classification method based on SVM (Support Vector Machine) using PolSAR data. With the L-band E-SAR PolInSAR data acquired in the test site in Germany, we developed forest above ground biomass (AGB) estimation approach based on polarization coherence tomography (PCT).

  12. Retrieving transient conformational molecular structure information from inner-shell photoionization of laser-aligned molecules

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xu; Le, Anh -Thu; Yu, Chao; Lucchese, R. R.; Lin, C. D.

    2016-03-30

    We discuss a scheme to retrieve transient conformational molecular structure information using photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) that have averaged over partial alignments of isolated molecules. The photoelectron is pulled out from a localized inner-shell molecular orbital by an X-ray photon. We show that a transient change in the atomic positions from their equilibrium will lead to a sensitive change in the alignment-averaged PADs, which can be measured and used to retrieve the former. Exploiting the experimental convenience of changing the photon polarization direction, we show that it is advantageous to use PADs obtained from multiple photon polarization directions. Lastly, amore » simple single-scattering model is proposed and benchmarked to describe the photoionization process and to do the retrieval using a multiple-parameter fitting method.« less

  13. Retrieving transient conformational molecular structure information from inner-shell photoionization of laser-aligned molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Le, Anh-Thu; Yu, Chao; Lucchese, R R; Lin, C D

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a scheme to retrieve transient conformational molecular structure information using photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) that have averaged over partial alignments of isolated molecules. The photoelectron is pulled out from a localized inner-shell molecular orbital by an X-ray photon. We show that a transient change in the atomic positions from their equilibrium will lead to a sensitive change in the alignment-averaged PADs, which can be measured and used to retrieve the former. Exploiting the experimental convenience of changing the photon polarization direction, we show that it is advantageous to use PADs obtained from multiple photon polarization directions. A simple single-scattering model is proposed and benchmarked to describe the photoionization process and to do the retrieval using a multiple-parameter fitting method. PMID:27025410

  14. Anatomy of a Spin: The Information-Theoretic Structure of Classical Spin Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Ryan; Vijayaraghavan, Vikram; Crutchfield, James

    Collective organization in matter plays a significant role in its expressed physical properties. Typically, it is detected via an order parameter, appropriately defined for a given system's observed emergent patterns. Recent developments in information theory suggest how to quantify collective organization in a system- and phenomenon-agnostic way: decompose the system's thermodynamic entropy density into a localized entropy, that solely contained in the dynamics at a single location, and a bound entropy, that stored in space as domains, clusters, excitations, or other emergent structures. We compute this decomposition and related quantities explicitly for the nearest-neighbor Ising model on the 1D chain, the Bethe lattice with coordination number k = 3, and the 2D square lattice, illustrating its generality and the functional insights it gives near and away from phase transitions. In particular, we consider the roles that different spin motifs play (cluster bulk, cluster edges, and the like) and how these affect the dependencies between spins.

  15. Retrieving transient conformational molecular structure information from inner-shell photoionization of laser-aligned molecules

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Le, Anh-Thu; Yu, Chao; Lucchese, R. R.; Lin, C. D.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a scheme to retrieve transient conformational molecular structure information using photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) that have averaged over partial alignments of isolated molecules. The photoelectron is pulled out from a localized inner-shell molecular orbital by an X-ray photon. We show that a transient change in the atomic positions from their equilibrium will lead to a sensitive change in the alignment-averaged PADs, which can be measured and used to retrieve the former. Exploiting the experimental convenience of changing the photon polarization direction, we show that it is advantageous to use PADs obtained from multiple photon polarization directions. A simple single-scattering model is proposed and benchmarked to describe the photoionization process and to do the retrieval using a multiple-parameter fitting method. PMID:27025410

  16. Corrigendum to "The importance of suppressing spin diffusion effects in the accurate determination of the spatial structure of a flexible molecule by nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy" [J. Mol. Struct. 1106 (2016) 373-381

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodov, I. A.; Efimov, S. V.; Kiselev, M. G.; Batista de Carvalho, L. A. E.; Klochkov, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    The original article to which this erratum refers was published in Journal of Molecular Structure, vol. 1106 (2016) [1]. In the original version of this article, Table 1 contained an error in column 10 (interatom distance averaging following the (r6)-algorithm, proton pairs H9-H5 and H7-H9). Analogous mistype was also present in Table 2 in Ref. [2] for distances H7-H9. Values present in Refs. [1,2] were far too small, but they were presented only for the sake of comparison of different averaging methods and did not influence the final conformer distribution. The Table 1 is reproduced below with the error corrected.

  17. Structuring Job Related Information on the Intranet: An Experimental Comparison of Task vs. an Organization-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cozijn, Reinier; Maes, Alfons; Schackman, Didie; Ummelen, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we present a usability experiment in which participants were asked to make intensive use of information on an intranet in order to execute job-related tasks. Participants had to work with one of two versions of an intranet: one with an organization-based hyperlink structure, and one with a task-based hyperlink structure.…

  18. 26 CFR 1.6043-4 - Information returns relating to certain acquisitions of control and changes in capital structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... retirement plan, as described in § 1.6049-4(c)(1)(ii)(C). (D) The United States, as described in § 1.6049-4(c... acquisitions of control and changes in capital structure. 1.6043-4 Section 1.6043-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL... capital structure. (a) Information returns for an acquisition of control or a substantial change...

  19. 26 CFR 1.6043-4 - Information returns relating to certain acquisitions of control and changes in capital structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... retirement plan, as described in § 1.6049-4(c)(1)(ii)(C). (D) The United States, as described in § 1.6049-4(c... acquisitions of control and changes in capital structure. 1.6043-4 Section 1.6043-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL... capital structure. (a) Information returns for an acquisition of control or a substantial change...

  20. Non-Price Competition and the Structure of the Online Information Industry: Q-Analysis of Medical Databases and Hosts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Roy

    1987-01-01

    Discussion of the online information industry emphasizes the effects of non-price competition on its structure and the firms involved. Q-analysis is applied to data on medical databases and hosts, changes over a three-year period are identified, and an optimum structure for the industry based on economic theory is considered. (Author/LRW)

  1. Do You Want to Know What I Learned? Using Informational Trade Books as Models to Teach Text Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Read, Sylvia; Reutzel, D. Ray; Fawson, Parker C.

    2008-01-01

    Informational text is an important resource for classroom teachers that places unique comprehension demands on young students. Research on teaching expository text structure to young children shows that explicit instruction improves student comprehension. This practical article addresses how to use "well-structured" expository trade book titles to…

  2. The Structuring of Health Information System Options: Summary and Assessment of Methodology. Prepared as Appendix VII-A to the Final Report of the Health Information System Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, J. A.; Campbell, Robert V.D.

    The MITRE Corporation provided technical support to the Joint Center for Urban Studies in its Health Information System Project by developing a structured approach for the characterization and analysis of System Options. The approach was designed to stimulate relevant dialog and aid decision processes in the technically diverse, politically…

  3. Exploring the Structural Relationships between High School Students' Scientific Epistemological Views and Their Utilization of Information Commitments toward Online Science Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chia-Ching; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2008-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine the structural relationships between scientific epistemological views (SEVs) and information commitments (ICs) of high school students in Taiwan. Data were collected from 486 Taiwanese high school students via two self-reporting instruments: one was the SEV questionnaire, including five scales for…

  4. Investigating Information Dynamics in Living Systems through the Structure and Function of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Gatenby, Robert; Frieden, B. Roy

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes are proteins that accelerate intracellular chemical reactions often by factors of 105−1012s−1. We propose the structure and function of enzymes represent the thermodynamic expression of heritable information encoded in DNA with post-translational modifications that reflect intra- and extra-cellular environmental inputs. The 3 dimensional shape of the protein, determined by the genetically-specified amino acid sequence and post translational modifications, permits geometric interactions with substrate molecules traditionally described by the key-lock best fit model. Here we apply Kullback-Leibler (K-L) divergence as metric of this geometric “fit” and the information content of the interactions. When the K-L ‘distance’ between interspersed substrate pn and enzyme rn positions is minimized, the information state, reaction probability, and reaction rate are maximized. The latter obeys the Arrhenius equation, which we show can be derived from the geometrical principle of minimum K-L distance. The derivation is first limited to optimum substrate positions for fixed sets of enzyme positions. However, maximally improving the key/lock fit, called ‘induced fit,’ requires both sets of positions to be varied optimally. We demonstrate this permits and is maximally efficient if the key and lock particles pn, rn are quantum entangled because the level of entanglement obeys the same minimized value of the Kullback-Leibler distance that occurs when all pn ≈ rn. This implies interchanges pn ⇄ brn randomly taking place during a reaction successively improves key/lock fits, reducing the activation energy Ea and increasing the reaction rate k. Our results demonstrate the summation of heritable and environmental information that determines the enzyme spatial configuration, by decreasing the K-L divergence, is converted to thermodynamic work by reducing Ea and increasing k of intracellular reactions. Macroscopically, enzyme information increases the order in

  5. EUFODOS: European Forest Downstream Services - Improved Information on Forest Structure and Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmugl, M.; Gallaun, H.; Wack, R.; Granica, K.; Schardt, M.

    2013-05-01

    Forests play a key role in the European economy and environment. This role incorporates ecological functions which can be affected by the occurrence of insect infestations, forest fire, heavy snowfall or windfall events. Local or Regional Authorities (LRAs) thus require detailed information on the degradation status of their forests to be able to take appropriate measures for their forest management plans. In the EUFODOS project, state-of-the-art satellite and laser scanning technologies are used to provide forest authorities with cost-effective and comprehensive information on forest structure and damage. One of the six test sites is located in the Austrian province of Styria where regional forest authorities have expressed a strong need for detailed forest parameters in protective forest. As airborne laser-scanning data is available, it will be utilized to derive detailed forest parameters such as the upper forest border line, tree height, growth classes, forest density, vertical structure or volume. At the current project status, the results of (i) the forest border line, (ii) the segmentation of forest stands and (iii) the tree top detection are available and presented including accuracy assessment and interim results are shown for timber volume estimations. The final results show that the forest border can be mapped operationally with an overall accuracy of almost 99% from LiDAR data. For the segmentation of forest stands, a comparison of the automatically derived result with visual-manual delineation showed in general a more detailed segmentation result, but for all visual-manual segments a congruence of 87% within a 4 m buffer. Tree top detections were compared to stem numbers estimated based on angle-count samplings in a field campaign, which led to a correlation coefficient (R) of 0.79.

  6. Fast and accurate determination of sites along the FUT2 in vitro transcript that are accessible to antisense oligonucleotides by application of secondary structure predictions and RNase H in combination with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Gabler, Angelika; Krebs, Stefan; Seichter, Doris; Förster, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Alteration of gene expression by use of antisense oligonucleotides has considerable potential for therapeutic purposes and scientific studies. Although applied for almost 25 years, this technique is still associated with difficulties in finding antisense-effective regions along the target mRNA. This is mainly due to strong secondary structures preventing binding of antisense oligonucleotides and RNase H, playing a major role in antisense-mediated degradation of the mRNA. These difficulties make empirical testing of a large number of sequences complementary to various sites in the target mRNA a very lengthy and troublesome procedure. To overcome this problem, more recent strategies to find efficient antisense sites are based on secondary structure prediction and RNase H-dependent mechanisms. We were the first who directly combined these two strategies; antisense oligonucleotides complementary to predicted unpaired target mRNA regions were designed and hybridized to the corresponding RNAs. Incubation with RNase H led to cleavage of the RNA at the respective hybridization sites. Analysis of the RNA fragments by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry, which has not been used in this context before, allowed exact determination of the cleavage site. Thus the technique described here is very promising when searching for effective antisense sites. PMID:12888531

  7. Structural limitations of learning in a crowd: communication vulnerability and information diffusion in MOOCs.

    PubMed

    Gillani, Nabeel; Yasseri, Taha; Eynon, Rebecca; Hjorth, Isis

    2014-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) bring together a global crowd of thousands of learners for several weeks or months. In theory, the openness and scale of MOOCs can promote iterative dialogue that facilitates group cognition and knowledge construction. Using data from two successive instances of a popular business strategy MOOC, we filter observed communication patterns to arrive at the "significant" interaction networks between learners and use complex network analysis to explore the vulnerability and information diffusion potential of the discussion forums. We find that different discussion topics and pedagogical practices promote varying levels of 1) "significant" peer-to-peer engagement, 2) participant inclusiveness in dialogue, and ultimately, 3) modularity, which impacts information diffusion to prevent a truly "global" exchange of knowledge and learning. These results indicate the structural limitations of large-scale crowd-based learning and highlight the different ways that learners in MOOCs leverage, and learn within, social contexts. We conclude by exploring how these insights may inspire new developments in online education. PMID:25244925

  8. Structural limitations of learning in a crowd: communication vulnerability and information diffusion in MOOCs.

    PubMed

    Gillani, Nabeel; Yasseri, Taha; Eynon, Rebecca; Hjorth, Isis

    2014-09-23

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) bring together a global crowd of thousands of learners for several weeks or months. In theory, the openness and scale of MOOCs can promote iterative dialogue that facilitates group cognition and knowledge construction. Using data from two successive instances of a popular business strategy MOOC, we filter observed communication patterns to arrive at the "significant" interaction networks between learners and use complex network analysis to explore the vulnerability and information diffusion potential of the discussion forums. We find that different discussion topics and pedagogical practices promote varying levels of 1) "significant" peer-to-peer engagement, 2) participant inclusiveness in dialogue, and ultimately, 3) modularity, which impacts information diffusion to prevent a truly "global" exchange of knowledge and learning. These results indicate the structural limitations of large-scale crowd-based learning and highlight the different ways that learners in MOOCs leverage, and learn within, social contexts. We conclude by exploring how these insights may inspire new developments in online education.

  9. Structural limitations of learning in a crowd: communication vulnerability and information diffusion in MOOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillani, Nabeel; Yasseri, Taha; Eynon, Rebecca; Hjorth, Isis

    2014-09-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) bring together a global crowd of thousands of learners for several weeks or months. In theory, the openness and scale of MOOCs can promote iterative dialogue that facilitates group cognition and knowledge construction. Using data from two successive instances of a popular business strategy MOOC, we filter observed communication patterns to arrive at the ``significant'' interaction networks between learners and use complex network analysis to explore the vulnerability and information diffusion potential of the discussion forums. We find that different discussion topics and pedagogical practices promote varying levels of 1) ``significant'' peer-to-peer engagement, 2) participant inclusiveness in dialogue, and ultimately, 3) modularity, which impacts information diffusion to prevent a truly ``global'' exchange of knowledge and learning. These results indicate the structural limitations of large-scale crowd-based learning and highlight the different ways that learners in MOOCs leverage, and learn within, social contexts. We conclude by exploring how these insights may inspire new developments in online education.

  10. Reflection tomography based on a velocity model with implicitly described structure information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianxing; Yang, Qin; Meng, Xianhai; Li, Jigang

    2016-10-01

    Seismic reflection tomography is a poorly conditioned inverse problem. A standard tomography scheme is generally performed by adding a sparse parameterization of the model and/or regularization criteria to improve the morbidity. However, isotropic features are prone to creation in the obtained velocity model, which is often considered as geologically unrealistic. We improve the tomographic effect from two aspects: model parameterization and constraints incorporation. As for model parameters, a novel model representation method is proposed. In the model, velocity discontinuity is implicitly described as a zero-value contour of a signed distance field. All the velocity interfaces constitute a division of the entire model space and thus create a natural spatial framework for tomography. Under the constraint of this structural framework, common Tikhonov-type regularization items and other geological information are imposed easily and flexibly. Different model regions (blocks) are independent and can be inverted without mutual interference. The incorporated geological information functions locally and pertinently, and makes the inverted model be more geologically reasonable. The results from 2D field data are shown. The obtained velocity can improve the focusing of the migrated image.

  11. Structure and composition of a watershed-scale sediment information network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osterkamp, W.R.; Gray, J.R.; Laronne, J.B.; Martin, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    A 'Watershed-Scale Sediment Information Network' (WaSSIN), designed to complement UNESCO's International Sedimentation Initiative, was endorsed as an initial project by the World Association for Sedimentation and Erosion Research. WaSSIN is to address global fluvial-sediment information needs through a network approach based on consistent protocols for the collection, analysis, and storage of fluvial-sediment and ancillary information at smaller spatial scales than those of the International Sedimentation Initiative. As a second step of implementation, it is proposed herein that the WaSSIN have a general structure of two components, (1) monitoring and data acquisition and (2) research. Monitoring is to be conducted in small watersheds, each of which has an established database for discharge of water and suspended sediment and possibly for bed load, bed material, and bed topography. Ideally, documented protocols have been used for collecting, analyzing, storing, and sharing the derivative data. The research component is to continue the collection and interpretation of data, to compare those data among candidate watersheds, and to determine gradients of fluxes and processes among the selected watersheds. To define gradients and evaluate processes, the initial watersheds will have several common attributes. Watersheds of the first group will be: (1) six to ten in number, (2) less than 1000 km2 in area, (3) generally in mid-latitudes of continents, and (4) of semiarid climate. Potential candidate watersheds presently include the Weany Creek Basin, northeastern Australia, the Zhi Fanggou catchment, northern China, the Eshtemoa Watershed, southern Israel, the Metsemotlhaba River Basin, Botswana, the Aiuaba Experimental Basin, Brazil, and the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed, southwestern United States.

  12. Spatiochromatic statistics of natural scenes: first- and second-order information and their correlational structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Aaron P.; Kingdom, Frederick A. A.; Baker, Curtis L.

    2005-10-01

    Spatial filters that mimic receptive fields of visual cortex neurons provide an efficient representation of achromatic image structure, but the extension of this idea to chromatic information is at an early stage. Relatively few studies have looked at the statistical relationships between the modeled responses to natural scenes of the luminance (LUM), red-green (RG), and blue-yellow (BY) postreceptoral channels of the primate visual system. Here we consider the correlations among these channel responses in terms of pixel, first-order, and second-order information. First-order linear filtering was implemented by convolving the cosine-windowed images with oriented Gabor functions, whose gains were scaled to give equal amplitude response across spatial frequency to random fractal images. Second-order filtering was implemented via a filter-rectify-filter cascade, with Gabor functions for both first- and second-stage filters. Both signed and unsigned filter responses were obtained across a range of filter parameters (spatial frequency, 2-64 cycles/image orientation, 0-135°). The filter responses to the LUM channel images were larger than those for either RG or BY channel images. Cross correlations between the first-order channel responses and between the first- and second-order channel responses were measured. Results showed that the unsigned correlations between first-order channel responses were higher than expected on the basis of previous studies and that first-order channel responses were highly correlated with LUM, but not with RG or BY, second-order responses. These findings imply that course-scale color information correlates well with course-scale changes of fine-scale texture.

  13. Protein meta-functional signatures from combining sequence, structure, evolution, and amino acid property information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Horst, Jeremy A; Cheng, Gong; Nickle, David C; Samudrala, Ram

    2008-09-26

    Protein function is mediated by different amino acid residues, both their positions and types, in a protein sequence. Some amino acids are responsible for the stability or overall shape of the protein, playing an indirect role in protein function. Others play a functionally important role as part of active or binding sites of the protein. For a given protein sequence, the residues and their degree of functional importance can be thought of as a signature representing the function of the protein. We have developed a combination of knowledge- and biophysics-based function prediction approaches to elucidate the relationships between the structural and the functional roles of individual residues and positions. Such a meta-functional signature (MFS), which is a collection of continuous values representing the functional significance of each residue in a protein, may be used to study proteins of known function in greater detail and to aid in experimental characterization of proteins of unknown function. We demonstrate the superior performance of MFS in predicting protein functional sites and also present four real-world examples to apply MFS in a wide range of settings to elucidate protein sequence-structure-function relationships. Our results indicate that the MFS approach, which can combine multiple sources of information and also give biological interpretation to each component, greatly facilitates the understanding and characterization of protein function.

  14. Quantitative spectroscopic diffuse optical tomography of the breast guided by imperfect a priori structural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boverman, Gregory; Miller, Eric L.; Li, Ang; Zhang, Quan; Chaves, Tina; Brooks, Dana H.; Boas, David A.

    2005-09-01

    Spectroscopic diffuse optical tomography (DOT) can directly image the concentrations of physiologically significant chromophores in the body. This information may be of importance in characterizing breast tumours and distinguishing them from benign structures. This paper studies the accuracy with which lesions can be characterized given a physiologically realistic situation in which the background architecture of the breast is heterogeneous yet highly structured. Specifically, in simulation studies, we assume that the breast is segmented into distinct glandular and adipose regions. Imaging with a high-resolution imaging modality, such as magnetic resonance imaging, in conjunction with a segmentation by a clinical expert, allows the glandular/adipose boundary to be determined. We then apply a two-step approach in which the background chromophore concentrations of each region are estimated in a nonlinear fashion, and a more localized lesion is subsequently estimated using a linear perturbational approach. In addition, we examine the consequences which errors in the breast segmentation have on estimating both the background and inhomogeneity chromophore concentrations.

  15. Involving citizens in the ethics of biobank research: informing institutional policy through structured public deliberation.

    PubMed

    O'Doherty, Kieran C; Hawkins, Alice K; Burgess, Michael M

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports on the design, implementation, and results of a structured public deliberation on human tissue biobanking conducted in Vancouver, Canada, in 2009. This study builds on previous work on the use of deliberative democratic principles and methods to engage publics on the social and ethical implications of human tissue biobanking. In a significant refinement of methods, we focus on providing public input to institutional practice and governance of biobanks using a tailored workbook structure to guide participants' discussion. Our focus is on the local context and practices of a particular institution, the BC BioLibrary. However, elements of both the methodological innovations and the ethical guidance implied by our findings are generalisable for biobanking internationally. Recommendations from the deliberative forum include issues of informed consent, privacy protections, collection of biospecimens, governance of biobanks, and how to manage the process of introduction between biobanks and potential donors. Notable findings include public support for research use of anonymised un-consented tissue samples when these come from archived collections, but lack of support when they are collected prospectively.

  16. Violations of information structure: An electrophysiological study of answers to wh-questions

    PubMed Central

    Cowles, H. Wind; Kluender, Robert; Kutas, Marta; Polinsky, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates brain responses to violations of information structure in wh-question-answer pairs, with particular emphasis on violations of focus assignment in it-clefts (It was the queen that silenced the banker). Two types of ERP responses in answers to wh-questions were found. First, all words in the focus-marking (cleft) position elicited a large positivity (P3b) characteristic of sentence-final constituents, as did the final words of these sentences, which suggests that focused elements may trigger integration effects like those seen at sentence end. Second, the focusing of an inappropriate referent elicited a smaller, N400-like effect. The results show that comprehenders actively use structural focus cues and discourse-level restrictions during online sentence processing. These results, based on visual stimuli, were different from the brain response to auditory focus violations indicated by pitch-accent (Hruska et al. 2000), but similar to brain responses to newly introduced discourse referents (Bornkessel et al. 2003). PMID:17517429

  17. Automatic phylogenetic classification of bacterial beta-lactamase sequences including structural and antibiotic substrate preference information.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianmin; Eisenhaber, Frank; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian

    2013-12-01

    Beta lactams comprise the largest and still most effective group of antibiotics, but bacteria can gain resistance through different beta lactamases that can degrade these antibiotics. We developed a user friendly tree building web server that allows users to assign beta lactamase sequences to their respective molecular classes and subclasses. Further clinically relevant information includes if the gene is typically chromosomal or transferable through plasmids as well as listing the antibiotics which the most closely related reference sequences are known to target and cause resistance against. This web server can automatically build three phylogenetic trees: the first tree with closely related sequences from a Tachyon search against the NCBI nr database, the second tree with curated reference beta lactamase sequences, and the third tree built specifically from substrate binding pocket residues of the curated reference beta lactamase sequences. We show that the latter is better suited to recover antibiotic substrate assignments through nearest neighbor annotation transfer. The users can also choose to build a structural model for the query sequence and view the binding pocket residues of their query relative to other beta lactamases in the sequence alignment as well as in the 3D structure relative to bound antibiotics. This web server is freely available at http://blac.bii.a-star.edu.sg/.

  18. Model Organizational Structures and Best Practices for Successful National Collaborative Information Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libutti, Patricia O'Brien

    Linking information to education users goes beyond information organization issues, such as abstracting, indexing, and information filters. It is a social issue as well. This paper focuses upon the social dimensions of education information, as expressed in partnerships needed for the United States Educational Information Network's (USEIN)…

  19. How information structure influences the processing of rhythmic irregularities: ERP evidence from German phrases.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Karen; Wiese, Richard; Domahs, Ulrike

    2015-08-01

    This study explores the influence of focus and givenness on the cognitive processing of rhythmic irregularities occurring in natural speech. Previous ERP studies showed that even subtle rhythmic deviations are detected by the brain if attention is directed towards the rhythmic structure. By using question-answer pairs, it was investigated whether subtle rhythmic irregularities in form of stress clashes (two adjacent stressed syllables) and stress lapses (two adjacent unstressed syllables) are still perceived when presented in post-focus position in an answer sentence and attention is directed away from them, towards the meaning of the element in narrow focus position by the preceding wh-question. Moreover, by visually presenting the lexical-semantic input of the deviating structure in the question, the influence of rhythmical and lexical properties in these two forms of rhythmic deviations are disentangled. While words in the present stress clash condition do not deviate from lexical stress, stress lapses contain deviations from metrical and lexical stress. The data reveal an early negativity effect for stress clashes but not for stress lapses, supporting the assumption that they are processed differently. The absence of a negative component for stress lapses indicates that the metrical deviation alone is not salient enough to be registered in non-focus position. Moreover, the lack of a late positive component suggests that subtle rhythmic deviations are less perceivable and hence more acceptable when presented in non-focus position. Thus, these results show that attentional shift induced by information structure influences the degree of the processing of rhythm. PMID:26119922

  20. Characterizing spatial structure of sediment E. coli populations to inform sampling design.

    PubMed

    Piorkowski, Gregory S; Jamieson, Rob C; Hansen, Lisbeth Truelstrup; Bezanson, Greg S; Yost, Chris K

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli can persist in streambed sediments and influence water quality monitoring programs through their resuspension into overlying waters. This study examined the spatial patterns in E. coli concentration and population structure within streambed morphological features during baseflow and following stormflow to inform sampling strategies for representative characterization of E. coli populations within a stream reach. E. coli concentrations in bed sediments were significantly different (p = 0.002) among monitoring sites during baseflow, and significant interactive effects (p = 0.002) occurred among monitoring sites and morphological features following stormflow. Least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) regression revealed that water velocity and effective particle size (D 10) explained E. coli concentration during baseflow, whereas sediment organic carbon, water velocity and median particle diameter (D 50) were important explanatory variables following stormflow. Principle Coordinate Analysis illustrated the site-scale differences in sediment E. coli populations between disconnected stream segments. Also, E. coli populations were similar among depositional features within a reach, but differed in relation to high velocity features (e.g., riffles). Canonical correspondence analysis resolved that E. coli population structure was primarily explained by spatial (26.9–31.7 %) over environmental variables (9.2–13.1 %). Spatial autocorrelation existed among monitoring sites and morphological features for both sampling events, and gradients in mean particle diameter and water velocity influenced E. coli population structure for the baseflow and stormflow sampling events, respectively. Representative characterization of streambed E. coli requires sampling of depositional and high velocity environments to accommodate strain selectivity among these features owing to sediment and water velocity heterogeneity.

  1. Dealing with an information overload of health science data: structured utilisation of libraries, distributed knowledge in databases and Web content.

    PubMed

    Hoelzer, Simon; Schweiger, Ralf K; Rieger, Joerg; Meyer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The organizational structures of web contents and electronic information resources must adapt to the demands of a growing volume of information and user requirements. Otherwise the information society will be threatened by disinformation. The biomedical sciences are especially vulnerable in this regard, since they are strongly oriented toward text-based knowledge sources. Here sustainable improvement can only be achieved by using a comprehensive, integrated approach that not only includes data management but also specifically incorporates the editorial processes, including structuring information sources and publication. The technical resources needed to effectively master these tasks are already available in the form of the data standards and tools of the Semantic Web. They include Rich Site Summaries (RSS), which have become an established means of distributing and syndicating conventional news messages and blogs. They can also provide access to the contents of the previously mentioned information sources, which are conventionally classified as 'deep web' content. PMID:17108575

  2. Dealing with an information overload of health science data: structured utilisation of libraries, distributed knowledge in databases and Web content.

    PubMed

    Hoelzer, Simon; Schweiger, Ralf K; Rieger, Joerg; Meyer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The organizational structures of web contents and electronic information resources must adapt to the demands of a growing volume of information and user requirements. Otherwise the information society will be threatened by disinformation. The biomedical sciences are especially vulnerable in this regard, since they are strongly oriented toward text-based knowledge sources. Here sustainable improvement can only be achieved by using a comprehensive, integrated approach that not only includes data management but also specifically incorporates the editorial processes, including structuring information sources and publication. The technical resources needed to effectively master these tasks are already available in the form of the data standards and tools of the Semantic Web. They include Rich Site Summaries (RSS), which have become an established means of distributing and syndicating conventional news messages and blogs. They can also provide access to the contents of the previously mentioned information sources, which are conventionally classified as 'deep web' content.

  3. Complex Networks Reveal Persistent Global / Regional Structure and Predictive Information Content in Climate Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhaeuser, K.; Chawla, N. V.; Ganguly, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    Recent articles have posited that the skills of climate model projections, particularly for variables and scales of interest to decision makers, may need to be significantly improved. Here we hypothesize that there is information content in variables that are projected more reliably, for example, sea surface temperatures, which is relevant for improving predictions of other variables at scales which may be more crucial, for example, regional land temperature and precipitation anomalies. While this hypothesis may be partially supported based on conceptual understanding, a key question to explore is whether the relevant information content can be meaningfully extracted from observations and model simulations. Here we use climate reconstructions from reanalysis datasets to examine the question in detail. Our tool of choice is complex networks, which have provided useful insights in the context of descriptive analysis and change detection for climate in the recent literature. We describe a new adaptation of complex networks based on computational approaches which provide additional descriptive insights at both global and regional scales, specifically sea surface variables, and provide a unified framework for data-guided predictive modeling, specifically for regional temperature and precipitation over land. Complex networks were constructed from historical data to study the properties of the global climate system and characterize behavior at the global scale. Clusters based on community detection, which leverage the network distance, were used to identify regional structures. Persistence and stability of these features over time were evaluated. Predictive information content of ocean indicators with respect to land climate was extracted using a suite of regression models and validated on held-out data. Our results suggest that the new adaptation of complex networks may be well-suited to provide a unified framework for exploring climate teleconnections or long

  4. Use of Prosody and Information Structure in High Functioning Adults with Autism in Relation to Language Ability

    PubMed Central

    DePape, Anne-Marie R.; Chen, Aoju; Hall, Geoffrey B. C.; Trainor, Laurel J.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal prosody is a striking feature of the speech of those with Autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but previous reports suggest large variability among those with ASD. Here we show that part of this heterogeneity can be explained by level of language functioning. We recorded semi-spontaneous but controlled conversations in adults with and without ASD and measured features related to pitch and duration to determine (1) general use of prosodic features, (2) prosodic use in relation to marking information structure, specifically, the emphasis of new information in a sentence (focus) as opposed to information already given in the conversational context (topic), and (3) the relation between prosodic use and level of language functioning. We found that, compared to typical adults, those with ASD with high language functioning generally used a larger pitch range than controls but did not mark information structure, whereas those with moderate language functioning generally used a smaller pitch range than controls but marked information structure appropriately to a large extent. Both impaired general prosodic use and impaired marking of information structure would be expected to seriously impact social communication and thereby lead to increased difficulty in personal domains, such as making and keeping friendships, and in professional domains, such as competing for employment opportunities. PMID:22470358

  5. Accurate adjoint design sensitivities for nano metal optics.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Paul; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2015-09-01

    We present a method for obtaining accurate numerical design sensitivities for metal-optical nanostructures. Adjoint design sensitivity analysis, long used in fluid mechanics and mechanical engineering for both optimization and structural analysis, is beginning to be used for nano-optics design, but it fails for sharp-cornered metal structures because the numerical error in electromagnetic simulations of metal structures is highest at sharp corners. These locations feature strong field enhancement and contribute strongly to design sensitivities. By using high-accuracy FEM calculations and rounding sharp features to a finite radius of curvature we obtain highly-accurate design sensitivities for 3D metal devices. To provide a bridge to the existing literature on adjoint methods in other fields, we derive the sensitivity equations for Maxwell's equations in the PDE framework widely used in fluid mechanics. PMID:26368483

  6. Differential equation based method for accurate approximations in optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1990-01-01

    A method to efficiently and accurately approximate the effect of design changes on structural response is described. The key to this method is to interpret sensitivity equations as differential equations that may be solved explicitly for closed form approximations, hence, the method is denoted the Differential Equation Based (DEB) method. Approximations were developed for vibration frequencies, mode shapes and static displacements. The DEB approximation method was applied to a cantilever beam and results compared with the commonly-used linear Taylor series approximations and exact solutions. The test calculations involved perturbing the height, width, cross-sectional area, tip mass, and bending inertia of the beam. The DEB method proved to be very accurate, and in most cases, was more accurate than the linear Taylor series approximation. The method is applicable to simultaneous perturbation of several design variables. Also, the approximations may be used to calculate other system response quantities. For example, the approximations for displacements are used to approximate bending stresses.

  7. A high order accurate difference scheme for complex flow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dexun Fu; Yanwen Ma

    1997-06-01

    A high order accurate finite difference method for direct numerical simulation of coherent structure in the mixing layers is presented. The reason for oscillation production in numerical solutions is analyzed. It is caused by a nonuniform group velocity of wavepackets. A method of group velocity control for the improvement of the shock resolution is presented. In numerical simulation the fifth-order accurate upwind compact difference relation is used to approximate the derivatives in the convection terms of the compressible N-S equations, a sixth-order accurate symmetric compact difference relation is used to approximate the viscous terms, and a three-stage R-K method is used to advance in time. In order to improve the shock resolution the scheme is reconstructed with the method of diffusion analogy which is used to control the group velocity of wavepackets. 18 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Mill profiler machines soft materials accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Mill profiler machines bevels, slots, and grooves in soft materials, such as styrofoam phenolic-filled cores, to any desired thickness. A single operator can accurately control cutting depths in contour or straight line work.

  9. Correlation structure and variable selection in generalized estimating equations via composite likelihood information criteria.

    PubMed

    Nikoloulopoulos, Aristidis K

    2016-06-30

    The method of generalized estimating equations (GEE) is popular in the biostatistics literature for analyzing longitudinal binary and count data. It assumes a generalized linear model for the outcome variable, and a working correlation among repeated measurements. In this paper, we introduce a viable competitor: the weighted scores method for generalized linear model margins. We weight the univariate score equations using a working discretized multivariate normal model that is a proper multivariate model. Because the weighted scores method is a parametric method based on likelihood, we propose composite likelihood information criteria as an intermediate step for model selection. The same criteria can be used for both correlation structure and variable selection. Simulations studies and the application example show that our method outperforms other existing model selection methods in GEE. From the example, it can be seen that our methods not only improve on GEE in terms of interpretability and efficiency but also can change the inferential conclusions with respect to GEE. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Finding models to detect Alzheimer's disease by fusing structural and neuropsychological information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldo, Diana L.; García-Arteaga, Juan D.; Velasco, Nelson; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease that affects higher brain functions. Initial diagnosis of AD is based on the patient's clinical history and a battery of neuropsychological tests. The accuracy of the diagnosis is highly dependent on the examiner's skills and on the evolution of a variable clinical frame. This work presents an automatic strategy that learns probabilistic brain models for different stages of the disease, reducing the complexity, parameter adjustment and computational costs. The proposed method starts by setting a probabilistic class description using the information stored in the neuropsychological test, followed by constructing the different structural class models using membership values from the learned probabilistic functions. These models are then used as a reference frame for the classification problem: a new case is assigned to a particular class simply by projecting to the different models. The validation was performed using a leave-one-out cross-validation, two classes were used: Normal Control (NC) subjects and patients diagnosed with mild AD. In this experiment it is possible to achieve a sensibility and specificity of 80% and 79% respectively.

  11. The application of a priori structural information based regularization in image reconstruction in magnetic induction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekdouk, B.; Ktistis, C.; Yin, W.; Armitage, D. W.; Peyton, A. J.

    2010-04-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a non-invasive contactless modality that could be capable of imaging the conductivity distribution of biological tissues. In this paper we consider the possibility of using absolute MIT voltage measurements for monitoring the progress of a peripheral hemorrhagic stroke in a human brain. The pathology is modelled as a local blood accumulation in the white matter. The solution of the MIT inverse problem is nonlinear and ill-posed and hence requires the use of a regularisation method. In this paper, we describe the construction and present the performance of a regularisation matrix based on a priori structural information of the head tissues obtained from a very recent MRI scan. The method takes the MRI scan as an initial state of the stroke and constructs a learning set containing the possible conductivity distributions of the current state of the stroke. This data is used to calculate an approximation of the covariance matrix and then a subspace is constructed using principal component analysis (PCA). It is shown by simulations the method is capable of producing a representative reconstruction of a stroke compared to smoothing Tikhonov regularization in a simplified model of the head.

  12. Selecting accurate statements from the cognitive interview using confidence ratings.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Wayne T; Higham, Philip A

    2002-03-01

    Participants viewed a videotape of a simulated murder, and their recall (and confidence) was tested 1 week later with the cognitive interview. Results indicated that (a) the subset of statements assigned high confidence was more accurate than the full set of statements; (b) the accuracy benefit was limited to information that forensic experts considered relevant to an investigation, whereas peripheral information showed the opposite pattern; (c) the confidence-accuracy relationship was higher for relevant than for peripheral information; (d) the focused-retrieval phase was associated with a greater proportion of peripheral and a lesser proportion of relevant information than the other phases; and (e) only about 50% of the relevant information was elicited, and most of this was elicited in Phase 1.

  13. An Alternative Organizational Structure to Address the Technology Requirements in Health Science Library Information in the '80's

    PubMed Central

    Winant, Richard M.

    1983-01-01

    Virginia Commonwealth University's University Library Services offers through its organizational structure an opportunity for librarians to work directly with media experts. University Library Services envisions the future librarian as an information manager, information specialist, and teacher. In joining together Technical Services, Public Services, Collection Management, Special Collections, Learning Resource Centers, Media Production Center, AV Services, TV Services, Engineering and Telecommunications, the librarian is in an environment which gives the opportunity for growth and support by media expertise.

  14. Organizational structure and operation of defense/aerospace information centers in the United States of America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauter, H. E.; Lushina, L. N.

    1983-01-01

    U.S. Government aerospace and defense information centers are addressed. DTIC and NASA are described in terms of their history, operational authority, information services provided, user community, sources of information collected, efforts under way to improve services, and external agreements regarding the exchange of documents and/or data bases. Contents show how DTIC and NASA provide aerospace/defense information services in support of U.S. research and development efforts. In a general introduction, the importance of scientific and technical information and the need for information centers to acquire, handle, and disseminate it are stressed.

  15. Matrix Management Structures in Higher Education. Coombe Lodge Working Paper. Information Bank Number 1394.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuthbert, Rob

    The matrix structure as an alternative to the departmental structure for colleges and universities is discussed, and the matrix system at Middlesex Polytechnic in England is used as illustration. The major impact of the introduction of a matrix structure is its effect on teaching activities within the institution. The matrix structure formally…

  16. A database paradigm for the management of DICOM-RT structure sets using a geographic information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Weber; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Wang, Jason; Low, Daniel A.; Ruan, Dan

    2014-03-01

    We devise a paradigm for representing the DICOM-RT structure sets in a database management system, in such way that secondary calculations of geometric information can be performed quickly from the existing contour definitions. The implementation of this paradigm is achieved using the PostgreSQL database system and the PostGIS extension, a geographic information system commonly used for encoding geographical map data. The proposed paradigm eliminates the overhead of retrieving large data records from the database, as well as the need to implement various numerical and data parsing routines, when additional information related to the geometry of the anatomy is desired.

  17. Leveraging Two Kinect Sensors for Accurate Full-Body Motion Capture.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhiquan; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Yu; Du, Sidan

    2015-09-22

    Accurate motion capture plays an important role in sports analysis, the medical field and virtual reality. Current methods for motion capture often suffer from occlusions, which limits the accuracy of their pose estimation. In this paper, we propose a complete system to measure the pose parameters of the human body accurately. Different from previous monocular depth camera systems, we leverage two Kinect sensors to acquire more information about human movements, which ensures that we can still get an accurate estimation even when significant occlusion occurs. Because human motion is temporally constant, we adopt a learning analysis to mine the temporal information across the posture variations. Using this information, we estimate human pose parameters accurately, regardless of rapid movement. Our experimental results show that our system can perform an accurate pose estimation of the human body with the constraint of information from the temporal domain.

  18. Leveraging Two Kinect Sensors for Accurate Full-Body Motion Capture

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhiquan; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Yu; Du, Sidan

    2015-01-01

    Accurate motion capture plays an important role in sports analysis, the medical field and virtual reality. Current methods for motion capture often suffer from occlusions, which limits the accuracy of their pose estimation. In this paper, we propose a complete system to measure the pose parameters of the human body accurately. Different from previous monocular depth camera systems, we leverage two Kinect sensors to acquire more information about human movements, which ensures that we can still get an accurate estimation even when significant occlusion occurs. Because human motion is temporally constant, we adopt a learning analysis to mine the temporal information across the posture variations. Using this information, we estimate human pose parameters accurately, regardless of rapid movement. Our experimental results show that our system can perform an accurate pose estimation of the human body with the constraint of information from the temporal domain. PMID:26402681

  19. The enzymatic nature of an anonymous protein sequence cannot reliably be inferred from superfamily level structural information alone.

    PubMed

    Roche, Daniel Barry; Brüls, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    As the largest fraction of any proteome does not carry out enzymatic functions, and in order to leverage 3D structural data for the annotation of increasingly higher volumes of sequence data, we wanted to assess the strength of the link between coarse grained structural data (i.e., homologous superfamily level) and the enzymatic versus non-enzymatic nature of protein sequences. To probe this relationship, we took advantage of 41 phylogenetically diverse (encompassing 11 distinct phyla) genomes recently sequenced within the GEBA initiative, for which we integrated structural information, as defined by CATH, with enzyme level information, as defined by Enzyme Commission (EC) numbers. This analysis revealed that only a very small fraction (about 1%) of domain sequences occurring in the analyzed genomes was found to be associated with homologous superfamilies strongly indicative of enzymatic function. Resorting to less stringent criteria to define enzyme versus non-enzyme biased structural classes or excluding highly prevalent folds from the analysis had only modest effect on this proportion. Thus, the low genomic coverage by structurally anchored protein domains strongly associated to catalytic activities indicates that, on its own, the power of coarse grained structural information to infer the general property of being an enzyme is rather limited. PMID:25559918

  20. Use of volunteers' information to support proactive inspection of hydraulic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes Arevalo, Juliette; Sterlacchini, Simone; Bogaard, Thom; Frigerio, Simone; Junier, Sandra; Schenato, Luca; van den Giesen, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Proactive management is particularly important to deal with the increasing occurrence of hydro-meteorological hazards in mountain areas were threats are often caused by multiple and sudden onset hazards such as debris flows. Citizen volunteers can be involved in supporting technicians on inspecting the structures' functional status. Such collaborative effort between managing organizations and local volunteers becomes more important under limited resources. To consider volunteers' information in support of proactive inspection of hydraulic structures, we developed a methodology applicable in day-to-day risk management. At first, in collaboration with technicians-in-charge, a data collection approach was developed for first level or pre-screening visual inspections that can be performed by volunteers. Methods comprise of a data collection exercise, an inspection forms and a learning session based on existent procedures in the FVG region and neighbouring regions. To systematically evaluate the individual inspection reports, we designed a support method by means of a multi-criteria method with fuzzy terms. The method allows the technicians-in-charge to categorize the reports in one of three levels, each corresponding with a course of action. To facilitate the evaluation of inspection reports, we transformed the decision support method into a prototype Web-GIS application. The design process of the Web-GIS framework followed a user-centred approach. The conceptual design incorporates four modules for managing the inspection reports: 1) Registered users, 2) Inspection planning; 3) Available reports and 4) Evaluation of reports. The development of the prototype focused on the evaluation module and was implemented based on standard and interoperable open source tools. Finally, we organized a workshop with technicians in the study area to test the decision support method and get insights about the usefulness of the Web-GIS framework. Participants that took part of the