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Sample records for accurate structure determination

  1. Fuzzy Reasoning to More Accurately Determine Void Areas on Optical Micrographs of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominquez, Jesus A.; Tate, Lanetra C.; Wright, M. Clara; Caraccio, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Accomplishing the best-performing composite matrix (resin) requires that not only the processing method but also the cure cycle generate low-void-content structures. If voids are present, the performance of the composite matrix will be significantly reduced. This is usually noticed by significant reductions in matrix-dominated properties, such as compression and shear strength. Voids in composite materials are areas that are absent of the composite components: matrix and fibers. The characteristics of the voids and their accurate estimation are critical to determine for high performance composite structures. One widely used method of performing void analysis on a composite structure sample is acquiring optical micrographs or Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images of lateral sides of the sample and retrieving the void areas within the micrographs/images using an image analysis technique. Segmentation for the retrieval and subsequent computation of void areas within the micrographs/images is challenging as the gray-scaled values of the void areas are close to the gray-scaled values of the matrix leading to the need of manually performing the segmentation based on the histogram of the micrographs/images to retrieve the void areas. The use of an algorithm developed by NASA and based on Fuzzy Reasoning (FR) proved to overcome the difficulty of suitably differentiate void and matrix image areas with similar gray-scaled values leading not only to a more accurate estimation of void areas on composite matrix micrographs but also to a faster void analysis process as the algorithm is fully autonomous.

  2. Accurate Determination of the Frequency Response Function of Submerged and Confined Structures by Using PZT-Patches†.

    PubMed

    Presas, Alexandre; Valentin, David; Egusquiza, Eduard; Valero, Carme; Egusquiza, Mònica; Bossio, Matias

    2017-03-22

    To accurately determine the dynamic response of a structure is of relevant interest in many engineering applications. Particularly, it is of paramount importance to determine the Frequency Response Function (FRF) for structures subjected to dynamic loads in order to avoid resonance and fatigue problems that can drastically reduce their useful life. One challenging case is the experimental determination of the FRF of submerged and confined structures, such as hydraulic turbines, which are greatly affected by dynamic problems as reported in many cases in the past. The utilization of classical and calibrated exciters such as instrumented hammers or shakers to determine the FRF in such structures can be very complex due to the confinement of the structure and because their use can disturb the boundary conditions affecting the experimental results. For such cases, Piezoelectric Patches (PZTs), which are very light, thin and small, could be a very good option. Nevertheless, the main drawback of these exciters is that the calibration as dynamic force transducers (relationship voltage/force) has not been successfully obtained in the past. Therefore, in this paper, a method to accurately determine the FRF of submerged and confined structures by using PZTs is developed and validated. The method consists of experimentally determining some characteristic parameters that define the FRF, with an uncalibrated PZT exciting the structure. These parameters, which have been experimentally determined, are then introduced in a validated numerical model of the tested structure. In this way, the FRF of the structure can be estimated with good accuracy. With respect to previous studies, where only the natural frequencies and mode shapes were considered, this paper discuss and experimentally proves the best excitation characteristic to obtain also the damping ratios and proposes a procedure to fully determine the FRF. The method proposed here has been validated for the structure vibrating

  3. Accurate Determination of the Frequency Response Function of Submerged and Confined Structures by Using PZT-Patches †

    PubMed Central

    Presas, Alexandre; Valentin, David; Egusquiza, Eduard; Valero, Carme; Egusquiza, Mònica; Bossio, Matias

    2017-01-01

    To accurately determine the dynamic response of a structure is of relevant interest in many engineering applications. Particularly, it is of paramount importance to determine the Frequency Response Function (FRF) for structures subjected to dynamic loads in order to avoid resonance and fatigue problems that can drastically reduce their useful life. One challenging case is the experimental determination of the FRF of submerged and confined structures, such as hydraulic turbines, which are greatly affected by dynamic problems as reported in many cases in the past. The utilization of classical and calibrated exciters such as instrumented hammers or shakers to determine the FRF in such structures can be very complex due to the confinement of the structure and because their use can disturb the boundary conditions affecting the experimental results. For such cases, Piezoelectric Patches (PZTs), which are very light, thin and small, could be a very good option. Nevertheless, the main drawback of these exciters is that the calibration as dynamic force transducers (relationship voltage/force) has not been successfully obtained in the past. Therefore, in this paper, a method to accurately determine the FRF of submerged and confined structures by using PZTs is developed and validated. The method consists of experimentally determining some characteristic parameters that define the FRF, with an uncalibrated PZT exciting the structure. These parameters, which have been experimentally determined, are then introduced in a validated numerical model of the tested structure. In this way, the FRF of the structure can be estimated with good accuracy. With respect to previous studies, where only the natural frequencies and mode shapes were considered, this paper discuss and experimentally proves the best excitation characteristic to obtain also the damping ratios and proposes a procedure to fully determine the FRF. The method proposed here has been validated for the structure vibrating

  4. One-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of pyridine: Determination of accurate ionization energy and cationic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yu Ran; Kang, Do Won; Kim, Hong Lae; Kwon, Chan Ho

    2014-11-01

    Ionization energies and cationic structures of pyridine were intensively investigated utilizing one-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy with vacuum ultraviolet radiation generated by four-wave difference frequency mixing in Kr. The present one-photon high-resolution MATI spectrum of pyridine demonstrated a much finer and richer vibrational structure than that of the previously reported two-photon MATI spectrum. From the MATI spectrum and photoionization efficiency curve, the accurate ionization energy of the ionic ground state of pyridine was confidently determined to be 73 570 ± 6 cm-1 (9.1215 ± 0.0007 eV). The observed spectrum was almost completely assigned by utilizing Franck-Condon factors and vibrational frequencies calculated through adjustments of the geometrical parameters of cationic pyridine at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. A unique feature unveiled through rigorous analysis was the prominent progression of the 10 vibrational mode, which corresponds to in-plane ring bending, and the combination of other totally symmetric fundamentals with the ring bending overtones, which contribute to the geometrical change upon ionization. Notably, the remaining peaks originate from the upper electronic state (2A2), as predicted by high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies and symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction calculations. Based on the quantitatively good agreement between the experimental and calculated results, it was concluded that upon ionization the pyridine cation in the ground electronic state should have a planar structure of C2v symmetry through the C-N axis.

  5. One-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of pyridine: Determination of accurate ionization energy and cationic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yu Ran; Kang, Do Won; Kim, Hong Lae E-mail: hlkim@kangwon.ac.kr; Kwon, Chan Ho E-mail: hlkim@kangwon.ac.kr

    2014-11-07

    Ionization energies and cationic structures of pyridine were intensively investigated utilizing one-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy with vacuum ultraviolet radiation generated by four-wave difference frequency mixing in Kr. The present one-photon high-resolution MATI spectrum of pyridine demonstrated a much finer and richer vibrational structure than that of the previously reported two-photon MATI spectrum. From the MATI spectrum and photoionization efficiency curve, the accurate ionization energy of the ionic ground state of pyridine was confidently determined to be 73 570 ± 6 cm{sup −1} (9.1215 ± 0.0007 eV). The observed spectrum was almost completely assigned by utilizing Franck-Condon factors and vibrational frequencies calculated through adjustments of the geometrical parameters of cationic pyridine at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. A unique feature unveiled through rigorous analysis was the prominent progression of the 10 vibrational mode, which corresponds to in-plane ring bending, and the combination of other totally symmetric fundamentals with the ring bending overtones, which contribute to the geometrical change upon ionization. Notably, the remaining peaks originate from the upper electronic state ({sup 2}A{sub 2}), as predicted by high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies and symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction calculations. Based on the quantitatively good agreement between the experimental and calculated results, it was concluded that upon ionization the pyridine cation in the ground electronic state should have a planar structure of C{sub 2v} symmetry through the C-N axis.

  6. Accurate determination of the fine-structure intervals in the 3P ground states of C-13 and C-12 by far-infrared laser magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooksy, A. L.; Saykally, R. J.; Brown, J. M.; Evenson, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    Accurate values are presented for the fine-structure intervals in the 3P ground state of neutral atomic C-12 and C-13 as obtained from laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The rigorous analysis of C-13 hyperfine structure, the measurement of resonant fields for C-12 transitions at several additional far-infrared laser frequencies, and the increased precision of the C-12 measurements, permit significant improvement in the evaluation of these energies relative to earlier work. These results will expedite the direct and precise measurement of these transitions in interstellar sources and should assist in the determination of the interstellar C-12/C-13 abundance ratio.

  7. Determining accurate distances to nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanos, Alceste Zoe

    2005-11-01

    Determining accurate distances to nearby or distant galaxies is a very simple conceptually, yet complicated in practice, task. Presently, distances to nearby galaxies are only known to an accuracy of 10-15%. The current anchor galaxy of the extragalactic distance scale is the Large Magellanic Cloud, which has large (10-15%) systematic uncertainties associated with it, because of its morphology, its non-uniform reddening and the unknown metallicity dependence of the Cepheid period-luminosity relation. This work aims to determine accurate distances to some nearby galaxies, and subsequently help reduce the error in the extragalactic distance scale and the Hubble constant H 0 . In particular, this work presents the first distance determination of the DIRECT Project to M33 with detached eclipsing binaries. DIRECT aims to obtain a new anchor galaxy for the extragalactic distance scale by measuring direct, accurate (to 5%) distances to two Local Group galaxies, M31 and M33, with detached eclipsing binaries. It involves a massive variability survey of these galaxies and subsequent photometric and spectroscopic follow-up of the detached binaries discovered. In this work, I also present a catalog of variable stars discovered in one of the DIRECT fields, M31Y, which includes 41 eclipsing binaries. Additionally, we derive the distance to the Draco Dwarf Spheroidal galaxy, with ~100 RR Lyrae found in our first CCD variability study of this galaxy. A "hybrid" method of discovering Cepheids with ground-based telescopes is described next. It involves applying the image subtraction technique on the images obtained from ground-based telescopes and then following them up with the Hubble Space Telescope to derive Cepheid period-luminosity distances. By re-analyzing ESO Very Large Telescope data on M83 (NGC 5236), we demonstrate that this method is much more powerful for detecting variability, especially in crowded fields. I finally present photometry for the Wolf-Rayet binary WR 20a

  8. Accurate equilibrium structures for piperidine and cyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Demaison, Jean; Craig, Norman C; Groner, Peter; Écija, Patricia; Cocinero, Emilio J; Lesarri, Alberto; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter

    2015-03-05

    Extended and improved microwave (MW) measurements are reported for the isotopologues of piperidine. New ground state (GS) rotational constants are fitted to MW transitions with quartic centrifugal distortion constants taken from ab initio calculations. Predicate values for the geometric parameters of piperidine and cyclohexane are found from a high level of ab initio theory including adjustments for basis set dependence and for correlation of the core electrons. Equilibrium rotational constants are obtained from GS rotational constants corrected for vibration-rotation interactions and electronic contributions. Equilibrium structures for piperidine and cyclohexane are fitted by the mixed estimation method. In this method, structural parameters are fitted concurrently to predicate parameters (with appropriate uncertainties) and moments of inertia (with uncertainties). The new structures are regarded as being accurate to 0.001 Å and 0.2°. Comparisons are made between bond parameters in equatorial piperidine and cyclohexane. Another interesting result of this study is that a structure determination is an effective way to check the accuracy of the ground state experimental rotational constants.

  9. On accurate determination of contact angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.

    1992-01-01

    Methods are proposed that exploit a microgravity environment to obtain highly accurate measurement of contact angle. These methods, which are based on our earlier mathematical results, do not require detailed measurement of a liquid free-surface, as they incorporate discontinuous or nearly-discontinuous behavior of the liquid bulk in certain container geometries. Physical testing is planned in the forthcoming IML-2 space flight and in related preparatory ground-based experiments.

  10. Structure elucidation of degradation products of the antibiotic amoxicillin with ion trap MS(n) and accurate mass determination by ESI TOF.

    PubMed

    Nägele, Edgar; Moritz, Ralf

    2005-10-01

    Today, it is necessary to identify relevant compounds appearing in discovery and development of new drug substances in the pharmaceutical industry. For that purpose, the measurement of accurate molecular mass and empirical formula calculation is very important for structure elucidation in addition to other available analytical methods. In this work, the identification and confirmation of degradation products in a finished dosage form of the antibiotic drug amoxicillin obtained under stress conditions will be demonstrated. Structure elucidation is performed utilizing liquid chromatography (LC) ion trap MS/MS and MS3 together with accurate mass measurement of the molecular ions and of the collision induced dissociation (CID) fragments by liquid chromatography electro spray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-TOF).

  11. Accurate Method for Determining Adhesion of Cantilever Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Michalske, T.A.; de Boer, M.P.

    1999-01-08

    Using surface micromachined samples, we demonstrate the accurate measurement of cantilever beam adhesion by using test structures which are adhered over long attachment lengths. We show that this configuration has a deep energy well, such that a fracture equilibrium is easily reached. When compared to the commonly used method of determining the shortest attached beam, the present method is much less sensitive to variations in surface topography or to details of capillary drying.

  12. The importance of suppressing spin diffusion effects in the accurate determination of the spatial structure of a flexible molecule by nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodov, I. A.; Efimov, S. V.; Klochkov, V. V.; Batista de Carvalho, L. A. E.; Kiselev, M. G.

    2016-02-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy is applied to the elucidation of conformation distribution of small molecules in solution. An essential influence of the nonlinear multistep magnetization transfer (spin diffusion) on the NMR-based analysis of conformers distribution for small druglike molecules in solution was revealed. Therefore, the spin diffusion should be eliminated from the obtained NMR data in order to obtain accurate results. Efficiency of QUIET-NOESY spectroscopy in solving the problem of accurate determination of inter-proton distances in a small molecule was shown in a study of ibuprofen. Although it requires much experimental time, this technique was found to be helpful to solve the spin diffusion problem.

  13. Accurate determination of serum ASAT isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Konttinen, A; Ojala, K

    1978-01-01

    An improved electrophoretic modification for measuring aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) isoenzymes is presented. This method fulfils the clinical requirements for sensitivity and allows the detection of 1 U/l mitochondria ASAT activity at 25 degree C. The procedure is relatively simple, requiring about one hour for a series of 8 determinations. Mitochondrial ASAT activity was found in all patients suffering from acute myocardial infarction pathological activity was observed for several days longer than that of total serum ASAT enzyme. None of the 25 healthy people studied had mitochondrial ASAT in their serum.

  14. Accurate attitude determination of the LACE satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miglin, M. F.; Campion, R. E.; Lemos, P. J.; Tran, T.

    1993-01-01

    The Low-power Atmospheric Compensation Experiment (LACE) satellite, launched in February 1990 by the Naval Research Laboratory, uses a magnetic damper on a gravity gradient boom and a momentum wheel with its axis perpendicular to the plane of the orbit to stabilize and maintain its attitude. Satellite attitude is determined using three types of sensors: a conical Earth scanner, a set of sun sensors, and a magnetometer. The Ultraviolet Plume Instrument (UVPI), on board LACE, consists of two intensified CCD cameras and a gimbal led pointing mirror. The primary purpose of the UVPI is to image rocket plumes from space in the ultraviolet and visible wavelengths. Secondary objectives include imaging stars, atmospheric phenomena, and ground targets. The problem facing the UVPI experimenters is that the sensitivity of the LACF satellite attitude sensors is not always adequate to correctly point the UVPI cameras. Our solution is to point the UVPI cameras at known targets and use the information thus gained to improve attitude measurements. This paper describes the three methods developed to determine improved attitude values using the UVPI for both real-time operations and post observation analysis.

  15. Accurate protein structure modeling using sparse NMR data and homologous structure information.

    PubMed

    Thompson, James M; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; Liu, Gaohua; Rossi, Paolo; Tang, Yuefeng; Mills, Jeffrey L; Szyperski, Thomas; Montelione, Gaetano T; Baker, David

    2012-06-19

    While information from homologous structures plays a central role in X-ray structure determination by molecular replacement, such information is rarely used in NMR structure determination because it can be incorrect, both locally and globally, when evolutionary relationships are inferred incorrectly or there has been considerable evolutionary structural divergence. Here we describe a method that allows robust modeling of protein structures of up to 225 residues by combining (1)H(N), (13)C, and (15)N backbone and (13)Cβ chemical shift data, distance restraints derived from homologous structures, and a physically realistic all-atom energy function. Accurate models are distinguished from inaccurate models generated using incorrect sequence alignments by requiring that (i) the all-atom energies of models generated using the restraints are lower than models generated in unrestrained calculations and (ii) the low-energy structures converge to within 2.0 Å backbone rmsd over 75% of the protein. Benchmark calculations on known structures and blind targets show that the method can accurately model protein structures, even with very remote homology information, to a backbone rmsd of 1.2-1.9 Å relative to the conventional determined NMR ensembles and of 0.9-1.6 Å relative to X-ray structures for well-defined regions of the protein structures. This approach facilitates the accurate modeling of protein structures using backbone chemical shift data without need for side-chain resonance assignments and extensive analysis of NOESY cross-peak assignments.

  16. Accurate determination of the sedimentation flux of concentrated suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J.; Rakotomalala, N.; Salin, D.

    1995-10-01

    Flow rate jumps are used to generate propagating concentration variations in a counterflow stabilized suspension (a liquid fluidized bed). An acoustic technique is used to measure accurately the resulting concentration profiles through the bed. Depending on the experimental conditions, we have observed self-sharpening, or/and self-spreading concentration fronts. Our data are analyzed in the framework of Kynch's theory, providing an accurate determination of the sedimentation flux [CU(C); U(C) is the hindered sedimentation velocity of the suspension] and its derivatives in the concentration range 30%-60%. In the vicinity of the packing concentration, controlling the flow rate has allowed us to increase the maximum packing up to 60%.

  17. Fast and accurate automated cell boundary determination for fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, Stephen Hugo; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Tseng, Yiider

    2013-07-01

    Detailed measurement of cell phenotype information from digital fluorescence images has the potential to greatly advance biomedicine in various disciplines such as patient diagnostics or drug screening. Yet, the complexity of cell conformations presents a major barrier preventing effective determination of cell boundaries, and introduces measurement error that propagates throughout subsequent assessment of cellular parameters and statistical analysis. State-of-the-art image segmentation techniques that require user-interaction, prolonged computation time and specialized training cannot adequately provide the support for high content platforms, which often sacrifice resolution to foster the speedy collection of massive amounts of cellular data. This work introduces a strategy that allows us to rapidly obtain accurate cell boundaries from digital fluorescent images in an automated format. Hence, this new method has broad applicability to promote biotechnology.

  18. Mapping methods for computationally efficient and accurate structural reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael C.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    Mapping methods are developed to improve the accuracy and efficiency of probabilistic structural analyses with coarse finite element meshes. The mapping methods consist of: (1) deterministic structural analyses with fine (convergent) finite element meshes, (2) probabilistic structural analyses with coarse finite element meshes, (3) the relationship between the probabilistic structural responses from the coarse and fine finite element meshes, and (4) a probabilistic mapping. The results show that the scatter of the probabilistic structural responses and structural reliability can be accurately predicted using a coarse finite element model with proper mapping methods. Therefore, large structures can be analyzed probabilistically using finite element methods.

  19. A versatile phenomenological model for the S-shaped temperature dependence of photoluminescence energy for an accurate determination of the exciton localization energy in bulk and quantum well structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, V. K.; Porwal, S.; Singh, S. D.; Sharma, T. K.; Ghosh, Sandip; Oak, S. M.

    2014-02-01

    Temperature dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) peak energy of bulk and quantum well (QW) structures is studied by using a new phenomenological model for including the effect of localized states. In general an anomalous S-shaped temperature dependence of the PL peak energy is observed for many materials which is usually associated with the localization of excitons in band-tail states that are formed due to potential fluctuations. Under such conditions, the conventional models of Varshni, Viña and Passler fail to replicate the S-shaped temperature dependence of the PL peak energy and provide inconsistent and unrealistic values of the fitting parameters. The proposed formalism persuasively reproduces the S-shaped temperature dependence of the PL peak energy and provides an accurate determination of the exciton localization energy in bulk and QW structures along with the appropriate values of material parameters. An example of a strained InAs0.38P0.62/InP QW is presented by performing detailed temperature and excitation intensity dependent PL measurements and subsequent in-depth analysis using the proposed model. Versatility of the new formalism is tested on a few other semiconductor materials, e.g. GaN, nanotextured GaN, AlGaN and InGaN, which are known to have a significant contribution from the localized states. A quantitative evaluation of the fractional contribution of the localized states is essential for understanding the temperature dependence of the PL peak energy of bulk and QW well structures having a large contribution of the band-tail states.

  20. Ad hoc methods for accurate determination of Bader's atomic boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polestshuk, Pavel M.

    2013-08-01

    In addition to the recently published triangulation method [P. M. Polestshuk, J. Comput. Chem. 34, 206 (2013)], 10.1002/jcc.23121, two new highly accurate approaches, ZFSX and SINTY, for the integration over an atomic region covered by a zero-flux surface (zfs) were developed and efficiently interfaced into the TWOE program. ZFSX method was realized as three independent modules (ZFSX-1, ZFSX-3, and ZFSX-5) handling interatomic surfaces of a different complexity. Details of algorithmic implementation of ZFSX and SINTY are discussed. A special attention to an extended analysis of errors in calculations of atomic properties is paid. It was shown that uncertainties in zfs determination caused by ZFSX and SINTY approaches contribute negligibly (less than 10-6 a.u.) to the total atomic integration errors. Moreover, the new methods are able to evaluate atomic integrals with a reasonable time and can be universally applied for the systems of any complexity. It is suggested, therefore, that ZFSX and SINTY can be regarded as benchmark methods for the computation of any Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules atomic property.

  1. Ad hoc methods for accurate determination of Bader's atomic boundary.

    PubMed

    Polestshuk, Pavel M

    2013-08-07

    In addition to the recently published triangulation method [P. M. Polestshuk, J. Comput. Chem. 34, 206 (2013)], two new highly accurate approaches, ZFSX and SINTY, for the integration over an atomic region covered by a zero-flux surface (zfs) were developed and efficiently interfaced into the TWOE program. ZFSX method was realized as three independent modules (ZFSX-1, ZFSX-3, and ZFSX-5) handling interatomic surfaces of a different complexity. Details of algorithmic implementation of ZFSX and SINTY are discussed. A special attention to an extended analysis of errors in calculations of atomic properties is paid. It was shown that uncertainties in zfs determination caused by ZFSX and SINTY approaches contribute negligibly (less than 10(-6) a.u.) to the total atomic integration errors. Moreover, the new methods are able to evaluate atomic integrals with a reasonable time and can be universally applied for the systems of any complexity. It is suggested, therefore, that ZFSX and SINTY can be regarded as benchmark methods for the computation of any Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules atomic property.

  2. Nanoparticle Counting: Towards Accurate Determination of the Molar Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jing; Gao, Xiaohu

    2014-01-01

    Summary Innovations in nanotechnology have brought tremendous opportunities for the advancement of many research frontiers, ranging from electronics, photonics, energy, to medicine. To maximize the benefits of nano-scaled materials in different devices and systems, precise control of their concentration is a prerequisite. While concentrations of nanoparticles have been provided in other forms (e.g., mass), accurate determination of molar concentration, arguably the most useful one for chemical reactions and applications, has been a major challenge (especially for nanoparticles smaller than 30 nm). Towards this significant yet chronic problem, a variety of strategies are currently under development. Most of these strategies are applicable to a specialized group of nanoparticles due to their restrictions on the composition and size ranges of nanoparticles. As research and uses of nanomaterials being explored in an unprecedented speed, it is necessary to develop universal strategies that are easy to use, and compatible with nanoparticles of different sizes, compositions, and shapes. This review outlines the theories and applications of current strategies to measure nanoparticle molar concentration, discusses the advantages and limitations of these methods, and provides insights into future directions. PMID:25099190

  3. Accurate ampacity determination: Temperature-Sag Model for operational real time ratings

    SciTech Connect

    Seppa, T.O.

    1995-07-01

    This report presents a method for determining transmission line ratings based on the relationship between the conductor`s temperature and its sag. The method is based on the Ruling Span principle and the use of transmission line tension monitoring systems. The report also presents a method of accurately calibrating the final sag of the conductor and determining the actual Ruling Span length of the line sections between deadend structures. Main error sources for two other real time methods are also examined.

  4. FragBag, an accurate representation of protein structure, retrieves structural neighbors from the entire PDB quickly and accurately.

    PubMed

    Budowski-Tal, Inbal; Nov, Yuval; Kolodny, Rachel

    2010-02-23

    Fast identification of protein structures that are similar to a specified query structure in the entire Protein Data Bank (PDB) is fundamental in structure and function prediction. We present FragBag: An ultrafast and accurate method for comparing protein structures. We describe a protein structure by the collection of its overlapping short contiguous backbone segments, and discretize this set using a library of fragments. Then, we succinctly represent the protein as a "bags-of-fragments"-a vector that counts the number of occurrences of each fragment-and measure the similarity between two structures by the similarity between their vectors. Our representation has two additional benefits: (i) it can be used to construct an inverted index, for implementing a fast structural search engine of the entire PDB, and (ii) one can specify a structure as a collection of substructures, without combining them into a single structure; this is valuable for structure prediction, when there are reliable predictions only of parts of the protein. We use receiver operating characteristic curve analysis to quantify the success of FragBag in identifying neighbor candidate sets in a dataset of over 2,900 structures. The gold standard is the set of neighbors found by six state of the art structural aligners. Our best FragBag library finds more accurate candidate sets than the three other filter methods: The SGM, PRIDE, and a method by Zotenko et al. More interestingly, FragBag performs on a par with the computationally expensive, yet highly trusted structural aligners STRUCTAL and CE.

  5. Accurate determination of membrane dynamics with line-scan FCS.

    PubMed

    Ries, Jonas; Chiantia, Salvatore; Schwille, Petra

    2009-03-04

    Here we present an efficient implementation of line-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (i.e., one-dimensional spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy) using a commercial laser scanning microscope, which allows the accurate measurement of diffusion coefficients and concentrations in biological lipid membranes within seconds. Line-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is a calibration-free technique. Therefore, it is insensitive to optical artifacts, saturation, or incorrect positioning of the laser focus. In addition, it is virtually unaffected by photobleaching. Correction schemes for residual inhomogeneities and depletion of fluorophores due to photobleaching extend the applicability of line-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to more demanding systems. This technique enabled us to measure accurate diffusion coefficients and partition coefficients of fluorescent lipids in phase-separating supported bilayers of three commonly used raft-mimicking compositions. Furthermore, we probed the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient in several model membranes, and in human embryonic kidney cell membranes not affected by temperature-induced optical aberrations.

  6. Accurate SHAPE-directed RNA secondary structure modeling, including pseudoknots

    PubMed Central

    Hajdin, Christine E.; Bellaousov, Stanislav; Huggins, Wayne; Leonard, Christopher W.; Mathews, David H.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    A pseudoknot forms in an RNA when nucleotides in a loop pair with a region outside the helices that close the loop. Pseudoknots occur relatively rarely in RNA but are highly overrepresented in functionally critical motifs in large catalytic RNAs, in riboswitches, and in regulatory elements of viruses. Pseudoknots are usually excluded from RNA structure prediction algorithms. When included, these pairings are difficult to model accurately, especially in large RNAs, because allowing this structure dramatically increases the number of possible incorrect folds and because it is difficult to search the fold space for an optimal structure. We have developed a concise secondary structure modeling approach that combines SHAPE (selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) experimental chemical probing information and a simple, but robust, energy model for the entropic cost of single pseudoknot formation. Structures are predicted with iterative refinement, using a dynamic programming algorithm. This melded experimental and thermodynamic energy function predicted the secondary structures and the pseudoknots for a set of 21 challenging RNAs of known structure ranging in size from 34 to 530 nt. On average, 93% of known base pairs were predicted, and all pseudoknots in well-folded RNAs were identified. PMID:23503844

  7. Determination of sockage for accurate rough rice quality assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of dockage of freshly harvested rice is crucial for precise development of a universal rice shrinking chart. The objectives of this research were to determine the effect of different factors, including rice variety, farm location, harvest moisture and time, drying, dropping, weather ev...

  8. Accurate determination of heteroclinic orbits in chaotic dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jizhou; Tomsovic, Steven

    2017-03-01

    Accurate calculation of heteroclinic and homoclinic orbits can be of significant importance in some classes of dynamical system problems. Yet for very strongly chaotic systems initial deviations from a true orbit will be magnified by a large exponential rate making direct computational methods fail quickly. In this paper, a method is developed that avoids direct calculation of the orbit by making use of the well-known stability property of the invariant unstable and stable manifolds. Under an area-preserving map, this property assures that any initial deviation from the stable (unstable) manifold collapses onto them under inverse (forward) iterations of the map. Using a set of judiciously chosen auxiliary points on the manifolds, long orbit segments can be calculated using the stable and unstable manifold intersections of the heteroclinic (homoclinic) tangle. Detailed calculations using the example of the kicked rotor are provided along with verification of the relation between action differences and certain areas bounded by the manifolds.

  9. Efficient determination of accurate atomic polarizabilities for polarizeable embedding calculations

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Heiner

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate embedding potentials, obtained via various methods, used for polarizable embedding computations of excitation energies of para‐nitroaniline in water and organic solvents as well as of the green fluorescent protein. We found that isotropic polarizabilities derived from DFTD3 dispersion coefficients correlate well with those obtained via the LoProp method. We show that these polarizabilities in conjunction with appropriately derived point charges are in good agreement with calculations employing static multipole moments up to quadrupoles and anisotropic polarizabilities for both computed systems. The (partial) use of these easily‐accessible parameters drastically reduces the computational effort to obtain accurate embedding potentials especially for proteins. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27317509

  10. Accurate Classification of RNA Structures Using Topological Fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kejie; Gribskov, Michael

    2016-01-01

    While RNAs are well known to possess complex structures, functionally similar RNAs often have little sequence similarity. While the exact size and spacing of base-paired regions vary, functionally similar RNAs have pronounced similarity in the arrangement, or topology, of base-paired stems. Furthermore, predicted RNA structures often lack pseudoknots (a crucial aspect of biological activity), and are only partially correct, or incomplete. A topological approach addresses all of these difficulties. In this work we describe each RNA structure as a graph that can be converted to a topological spectrum (RNA fingerprint). The set of subgraphs in an RNA structure, its RNA fingerprint, can be compared with the fingerprints of other RNA structures to identify and correctly classify functionally related RNAs. Topologically similar RNAs can be identified even when a large fraction, up to 30%, of the stems are omitted, indicating that highly accurate structures are not necessary. We investigate the performance of the RNA fingerprint approach on a set of eight highly curated RNA families, with diverse sizes and functions, containing pseudoknots, and with little sequence similarity–an especially difficult test set. In spite of the difficult test set, the RNA fingerprint approach is very successful (ROC AUC > 0.95). Due to the inclusion of pseudoknots, the RNA fingerprint approach both covers a wider range of possible structures than methods based only on secondary structure, and its tolerance for incomplete structures suggests that it can be applied even to predicted structures. Source code is freely available at https://github.rcac.purdue.edu/mgribsko/XIOS_RNA_fingerprint. PMID:27755571

  11. Trace hydrazines in aqueous solutions accurately determined by gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welz, E. A., Jr.

    1967-01-01

    Trace amounts of hydrazines in aqueous solutions can be determined by using polythyleneimine /PEI/ in conjunction with the gas chromatographic column. The PEI specifically retains water without altering the separability or elution order of the hydrazine and associated constituents.

  12. Apparatus enables accurate determination of alkali oxides in alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupraw, W. A.; Gahn, R. F.; Graab, J. W.; Maple, W. E.; Rosenblum, L.

    1966-01-01

    Evacuated apparatus determines the alkali oxide content of an alkali metal by separating the metal from the oxide by amalgamation with mercury. The apparatus prevents oxygen and moisture from inadvertently entering the system during the sampling and analytical procedure.

  13. Accurate NMR structures through minimization of an extended hybrid energy.

    PubMed

    Nilges, Michael; Bernard, Aymeric; Bardiaux, Benjamin; Malliavin, Thérèse; Habeck, Michael; Rieping, Wolfgang

    2008-09-10

    The use of generous distance bounds has been the hallmark of NMR structure determination. However, bounds necessitate the estimation of data quality before the calculation, reduce the information content, introduce human bias, and allow for major errors in the structures. Here, we propose a new rapid structure calculation scheme based on Bayesian analysis. The minimization of an extended energy function, including a new type of distance restraint and a term depending on the data quality, results in an estimation of the data quality in addition to coordinates. This allows for the determination of the optimal weight on the experimental information. The resulting structures are of better quality and closer to the X-ray crystal structure of the same molecule. With the new calculation approach, the analysis of discrepancies from the target distances becomes meaningful. The strategy may be useful in other applications-for example, in homology modeling.

  14. Accurate Determination of the Volume of an Irregular Helium Balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenthal, Jack; Bradvica, Rafaela; Karl, Katherine

    2013-02-01

    In a recent paper, Zable described an experiment with a near-spherical balloon filled with impure helium. Measuring the temperature and the pressure inside and outside the balloon, the lift of the balloon, and the mass of the balloon materials, he described how to use the ideal gas laws and Archimedes' principal to compute the average molecular mass and density of the impure helium. This experiment required that the volume of the near-spherical balloon be determined by some approach, such as measuring the girth. The accuracy of the experiment was largely determined by the balloon volume, which had a reported uncertainty of about 4%.

  15. Structural Determination of Circulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenburg, William B.

    1981-01-01

    Analyzes the effects of both structural factors (demographics, economic conditions, and competition) and discretionary factors (content, design, and marketing techniques) and concludes that it is the former that determine a newspaper's circulation. (FL)

  16. An Accurate de novo Algorithm for Glycan Topology Determination from Mass Spectra.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang; Shi, Bing; Tian, Guangdong; Li, YanBo; Wang, Bing; Zhou, MengChu

    2015-01-01

    Determining the glycan topology automatically from mass spectra represents a great challenge. Existing methods fall into approximate and exact ones. The former including greedy and heuristic ones can reduce the computational complexity, but suffer from information lost in the procedure of glycan interpretation. The latter including dynamic programming and exhaustive enumeration are much slower than the former. In the past years, nearly all emerging methods adopted a tree structure to represent a glycan. They share such problems as repetitive peak counting in reconstructing a candidate structure. Besides, tree-based glycan representation methods often have to give different computational formulas for binary and ternary glycans. We propose a new directed acyclic graph structure for glycan representation. Based on it, this work develops a de novo algorithm to accurately reconstruct the tree structure iteratively from mass spectra with logical constraints and some known biosynthesis rules, by a single computational formula. The experiments on multiple complex glycans extracted from human serum show that the proposed algorithm can achieve higher accuracy to determine a glycan topology than prior methods without increasing computational burden.

  17. Accurate determination of the vapor pressure of potassium using optical absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirinzadeh, B.; Wang, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    The vapor pressure of potassium has been measured in absorption using a CW tunable laser and calibrated against the accurate radiative lifetime of the 4s-4p doublet of potassium. An accurate value of 20,850 + or - 30 cal/mol for the heat of vaporization (from the liquid phase) at the melting point was determined.

  18. Mapping methods for computationally efficient and accurate structural reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael C.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    Mapping methods are developed to improve the accuracy and efficiency of probabilistic structural analyses with coarse finite element meshes. The mapping methods consist of the following: (1) deterministic structural analyses with fine (convergent) finite element meshes; (2) probabilistic structural analyses with coarse finite element meshes; (3) the relationship between the probabilistic structural responses from the coarse and fine finite element meshes; and (4) a probabilistic mapping. The results show that the scatter in the probabilistic structural responses and structural reliability can be efficiently predicted using a coarse finite element model and proper mapping methods with good accuracy. Therefore, large structures can be efficiently analyzed probabilistically using finite element methods.

  19. Mapping methods for computationally efficient and accurate structural reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael C.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of mesh coarseness in the structural reliability is evaluated. The objectives are to describe the alternatives and to demonstrate their effectiveness. The results show that special mapping methods can be developed by using: (1) deterministic structural responses from a fine (convergent) finite element mesh; (2) probabilistic distributions of structural responses from a coarse finite element mesh; (3) the relationship between the probabilistic structural responses from the coarse and fine finite element meshes; and (4) probabilistic mapping. The structural responses from different finite element meshes are highly correlated.

  20. Fluorescence polarization immunoassays for rapid, accurate, and sensitive determination of mycotoxins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analytical methods for the determination of mycotoxins in foods are commonly based on chromatographic techniques (GC, HPLC or LC-MS). Although these methods permit a sensitive and accurate determination of the analyte, they require skilled personnel and are time-consuming, expensive, and unsuitable ...

  1. Fast and accurate automatic structure prediction with HHpred.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Andrea; Remmert, Michael; Biegert, Andreas; Söding, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Automated protein structure prediction is becoming a mainstream tool for biological research. This has been fueled by steady improvements of publicly available automated servers over the last decade, in particular their ability to build good homology models for an increasing number of targets by reliably detecting and aligning more and more remotely homologous templates. Here, we describe the three fully automated versions of the HHpred server that participated in the community-wide blind protein structure prediction competition CASP8. What makes HHpred unique is the combination of usability, short response times (typically under 15 min) and a model accuracy that is competitive with those of the best servers in CASP8.

  2. Accurate molecular structure and spectroscopic properties for nucleobases: A combined computational - microwave investigation of 2-thiouracil as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo; Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2015-01-01

    The computational composite scheme purposely set up for accurately describing the electronic structure and spectroscopic properties of small biomolecules has been applied to the first study of the rotational spectrum of 2-thiouracil. The experimental investigation was made possible thanks to the combination of the laser ablation technique with Fourier Transform Microwave spectrometers. The joint experimental – computational study allowed us to determine accurate molecular structure and spectroscopic properties for the title molecule, but more important, it demonstrates a reliable approach for the accurate investigation of isolated small biomolecules. PMID:24002739

  3. Determinants of Long Bone Structural Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleek, T. M.; Katz, B.; Whalen, R. T.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The objective of our research is to determine whether a non-invasive determination of long bone cross-sectional areal properties using only the mineral component of bone accurately predicts the true structural properties. In this study section properties of a whole long bone were compared using two methods: (1) special analysis of bone densitometry data, and (2) experimental determination of flexural rigidities from bone surface strain measurements during controlled loading.

  4. Conformational energy range of ligands in protein crystal structures: The difficult quest for accurate understanding.

    PubMed

    Peach, Megan L; Cachau, Raul E; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2017-02-24

    In this review, we address a fundamental question: What is the range of conformational energies seen in ligands in protein-ligand crystal structures? This value is important biophysically, for better understanding the protein-ligand binding process; and practically, for providing a parameter to be used in many computational drug design methods such as docking and pharmacophore searches. We synthesize a selection of previously reported conflicting results from computational studies of this issue and conclude that high ligand conformational energies really are present in some crystal structures. The main source of disagreement between different analyses appears to be due to divergent treatments of electrostatics and solvation. At the same time, however, for many ligands, a high conformational energy is in error, due to either crystal structure inaccuracies or incorrect determination of the reference state. Aside from simple chemistry mistakes, we argue that crystal structure error may mainly be because of the heuristic weighting of ligand stereochemical restraints relative to the fit of the structure to the electron density. This problem cannot be fixed with improvements to electron density fitting or with simple ligand geometry checks, though better metrics are needed for evaluating ligand and binding site chemistry in addition to geometry during structure refinement. The ultimate solution for accurately determining ligand conformational energies lies in ultrahigh-resolution crystal structures that can be refined without restraints.

  5. On canonical cylinder sections for accurate determination of contact angle in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, Paul; Finn, Robert; Zabihi, Farhad

    1992-01-01

    Large shifts of liquid arising from small changes in certain container shapes in zero gravity can be used as a basis for accurately determining contact angle. Canonical geometries for this purpose, recently developed mathematically, are investigated here computationally. It is found that the desired nearly-discontinuous behavior can be obtained and that the shifts of liquid have sufficient volume to be readily observed.

  6. Accurate determination of succinimide degradation products using high fidelity trypsin digestion peptide map analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, X Christopher; Joe, Koman; Zhang, Yu; Adriano, Andrea; Wang, Yaning; Gazzano-Santoro, Helene; Keck, Rodney G; Deperalta, Galahad; Ling, Victor

    2011-08-01

    We report an efficient, high fidelity trypsin digestion method for peptide map analysis. This method minimizes artifacts caused by the sample preparation process, and we show its utility for the accurate determination of succinimide formation in a degraded monoclonal antibody product. A basic charge variant was detected by imaged capillary isoelectric focusing and was shown with reduced antigen binding and biological activity. Samples were reduced under denaturing conditions at pH 5.0, and digestion of the reduced protein with porcine trypsin was performed at pH 7.0 for 1 h. Following reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography and online mass spectrometric analysis, succinimide formation was identified at Asp30 in the light chain. This result contrasts with the observation of only iso-Asp and Asp residues under conventional sample preparation conditions, which are therefore concluded to be artificially generated. The Asp30 residue is seen in the cocrystal structure model to participate in favorable charge interaction with an antigen molecule. Formation of succinimide and the resulting loss of negative charge are therefore hypothesized to be the degradation mechanism. After treatment of the degraded antibody sample to mildly alkaline pH conditions, we observed only Asp residue as the succinimide hydrolysis product and concurrent recovery of biological activity.

  7. How accurately can the peak skin dose in fluoroscopy be determined using indirect dose metrics?

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A. Kyle; Ensor, Joe E.; Pasciak, Alexander S.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Skin dosimetry is important for fluoroscopically-guided interventions, as peak skin doses (PSD) that result in skin reactions can be reached during these procedures. There is no consensus as to whether or not indirect skin dosimetry is sufficiently accurate for fluoroscopically-guided interventions. However, measuring PSD with film is difficult and the decision to do so must be madea priori. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of different types of indirect dose estimates and to determine if PSD can be calculated within ±50% using indirect dose metrics for embolization procedures. Methods: PSD were measured directly using radiochromic film for 41 consecutive embolization procedures at two sites. Indirect dose metrics from the procedures were collected, including reference air kerma. Four different estimates of PSD were calculated from the indirect dose metrics and compared along with reference air kerma to the measured PSD for each case. The four indirect estimates included a standard calculation method, the use of detailed information from the radiation dose structured report, and two simplified calculation methods based on the standard method. Indirect dosimetry results were compared with direct measurements, including an analysis of uncertainty associated with film dosimetry. Factors affecting the accuracy of the different indirect estimates were examined. Results: When using the standard calculation method, calculated PSD were within ±35% for all 41 procedures studied. Calculated PSD were within ±50% for a simplified method using a single source-to-patient distance for all calculations. Reference air kerma was within ±50% for all but one procedure. Cases for which reference air kerma or calculated PSD exhibited large (±35%) differences from the measured PSD were analyzed, and two main causative factors were identified: unusually small or large source-to-patient distances and large contributions to reference air kerma from cone

  8. Accurate and precise determination of isotopic ratios by MC-ICP-MS: a review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu

    2009-01-01

    For many decades the accurate and precise determination of isotope ratios has remained a very strong interest to many researchers due to its important applications in earth, environmental, biological, archeological, and medical sciences. Traditionally, thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) has been the technique of choice for achieving the highest accuracy and precision. However, recent developments in multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) have brought a new dimension to this field. In addition to its simple and robust sample introduction, high sample throughput, and high mass resolution, the flat-topped peaks generated by this technique provide for accurate and precise determination of isotope ratios with precision reaching 0.001%, comparable to that achieved with TIMS. These features, in combination with the ability of the ICP source to ionize nearly all elements in the periodic table, have resulted in an increased use of MC-ICP-MS for such measurements in various sample matrices. To determine accurate and precise isotope ratios with MC-ICP-MS, utmost care must be exercised during sample preparation, optimization of the instrument, and mass bias corrections. Unfortunately, there are inconsistencies and errors evident in many MC-ICP-MS publications, including errors in mass bias correction models. This review examines "state-of-the-art" methodologies presented in the literature for achievement of precise and accurate determinations of isotope ratios by MC-ICP-MS. Some general rules for such accurate and precise measurements are suggested, and calculations of combined uncertainty of the data using a few common mass bias correction models are outlined.

  9. Accurate Structure Parameters for Tunneling Ionization Rates of Gas-Phase Linear Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Song-Feng; Li, Jian-Ke; Wang, Guo-Li; Li, Peng-Cheng; Zhou, Xiao-Xin

    2017-03-01

    In the molecular Ammosov–Delone–Krainov (MO-ADK) model of Tong et al. [Phys. Rev. A 66 (2002) 033402], the ionization rate depends on the structure parameters of the molecular orbital from which the electron is removed. We determine systematically and tabulate accurate structure parameters of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) for 123 gas-phase linear molecules by solving time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials which are constructed numerically using the modified Leeuwen–Baerends (LBα) model. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11664035, 11674268, 11465016, 11364038, 11364039, the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China under Grant No. 20116203120001 and the Basic Scientific Research Foundation for Institution of Higher Learning of Gansu Province

  10. A fast and accurate algorithm for high-frequency trans-ionospheric path length determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijaya, Dudy D.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a fast and accurate algorithm for high-frequency trans-ionospheric path length determination. The algorithm is merely based on the solution of the Eikonal equation that is solved using the conformal theory of refraction. The main advantages of the algorithm are summarized as follows. First, the algorithm can determine the optical path length without iteratively adjusting both elevation and azimuth angles and, hence, the computational time can be reduced. Second, for the same elevation and azimuth angles, the algorithm can simultaneously determine the phase and group of both ordinary and extra-ordinary optical path lengths for different frequencies. Results from numerical simulations show that the computational time required by the proposed algorithm to accurately determine 8 different optical path lengths is almost 17 times faster than that required by a 3D ionospheric ray-tracing algorithm. It is found that the computational time to determine multiple optical path lengths is the same with that for determining a single optical path length. It is also found that the proposed algorithm is capable of determining the optical path lengths with millimeter level of accuracies, if the magnitude of the squared ratio of the plasma frequency to the transmitted frequency is less than 1.33× 10^{-3}, and hence the proposed algorithm is applicable for geodetic applications.

  11. Determining structural performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Michael A.; Kiraly, Louis J.

    1987-01-01

    An overview is given of the methods and concepts developed to enhance and predict structural dynamic characteristics of advanced aeropropulsion systems. Aeroelasticity, Vibration Control, Dynamic Systems, and Computational Structural Methods are four disciplines that make up the research program at NASA/Lewis Research Center. The Aeroelasticity program develops analytical and experimental methods to minimize flutter and forced vibration of aerospace propulsion systems. Both frequency domain and time domain methods have been developed for applications on the turbofan, turbopump, and advanced turboprop. To improve life and performance, the Vibration Control program conceives, analyzes, develops, and demonstrates new methods to control vibrations in aerospace systems. Active and passive vibration control is accomplished with electromagnetic dampers, magnetic bearings, and piezoelectric crystals to control rotor vibrations. The Dynamic Systems program analyzes and verifies the dynamics of interacting systems, as well as develops concepts and methods for high-temperature dynamic seals. The Computational Structural Methods program uses computer science to improve solutions of structural problems.

  12. Toward Accurate On-Ground Attitude Determination for the Gaia Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaan, Malak A.

    2010-03-01

    The work presented in this paper concerns the accurate On-Ground Attitude (OGA) reconstruction for the astrometry spacecraft Gaia in the presence of disturbance and of control torques acting on the spacecraft. The reconstruction of the expected environmental torques which influence the spacecraft dynamics will be also investigated. The telemetry data from the spacecraft will include the on-board real-time attitude, which is of order of several arcsec. This raw attitude is the starting point for the further attitude reconstruction. The OGA will use the inputs from the field coordinates of known stars (attitude stars) and also the field coordinate differences of objects on the Sky Mapper (SM) and Astrometric Field (AF) payload instruments to improve this raw attitude. The on-board attitude determination uses a Kalman Filter (KF) to minimize the attitude errors and produce a more accurate attitude estimation than the pure star tracker measurement. Therefore the first approach for the OGA will be an adapted version of KF. Furthermore, we will design a batch least squares algorithm to investigate how to obtain a more accurate OGA estimation. Finally, a comparison between these different attitude determination techniques in terms of accuracy, robustness, speed and memory required will be evaluated in order to choose the best attitude algorithm for the OGA. The expected resulting accuracy for the OGA determination will be on the order of milli-arcsec.

  13. Determining structural performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Michael A. (Editor); Brown, Gerald; Dirusso, Eliseo; Fleming, David; Janetzke, David; Kascak, Albert; Kaza, Krishna; Kielb, Robert; Kiraly, Louis J.; Lawrence, Charles

    1990-01-01

    An overview of the methods and concepts developed to enhance and predict structural dynamic characteristics of advanced aeropropulsion systems is presented. Aeroelasticity, vibration control, dynamic systems, and computational structural methods are four disciplines that make up the structural dynamic effort at LeRC. The aeroelasticity program develops analytical and experimental methods for minimizing flutter and forced vibration of aerospace propulsion systems. Both frequency domain and time domain methods were developed for applications on the turbofan, turbopump, and advanced turboprop. In order to improve life and performance, the vibration control program conceives, analyzes, develops, and demonstrates new methods for controlling vibrations in aerospace systems. Active and passive vibration control is accomplished with electromagnetic dampers, magnetic bearings, and piezoelectric crystals to control rotor vibrations. The dynamic systems program analyzes and verifies the dynamics of interacting systems, as well as develops concepts and methods for high-temperature dynamic seals. Work in this field involves the analysis and parametric identification of large, nonlinear, damped, stochastic systems. The computational structural methods program exploits modern computer science as an aid to the solutions of structural problems.

  14. Rapid and accurate determination of the lignin content of lignocellulosic biomass by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li; McCallum, Scott A; Miao, Jianjun; Hart, Courtney; Tudryn, Gregory J; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J

    2015-02-01

    Biofuels and biomaterials, produced from lignocellulosic feedstock, require facile access to cellulose and hemicellulose to be competitive with petroleum processing and sugar-based fermentation. Physical-chemical barriers resulting from lignin complicates the hydrolysis biomass into fermentable sugars. Thus, the amount of lignin within a substrate is critical in determining biomass processing. The application of (13)C cross-polarization, magic-angle spinning, and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance for the direct quantification of lignin content in biomass is examined. Using a standard curve constructed from pristine lignin and cellulose, the lignin content of a biomass sample is accurately determined through direct measurement without chemical or enzymatic pre-treatment.

  15. Accurate inference of subtle population structure (and other genetic discontinuities) using principal coordinates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate inference of genetic discontinuities between populations is an essential component of intraspecific biodiversity and evolution studies, as well as associative genetics. The most widely used methods to infer population structure are model based, Bayesian MCMC procedures that minimize Hardy...

  16. Accurate determination of aldehydes in amine catalysts or amines by 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatization.

    PubMed

    Barman, Bhajendra N

    2014-01-31

    Carbonyl compounds, specifically aldehydes, present in amine catalysts or amines are determined by reversed-phase liquid chromatography using ultraviolet detection of their corresponding 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones. The primary focus has been to establish optimum conditions for determining aldehydes accurately because these add exposure concerns when the amine catalysts are used to manufacture polyurethane products. Concentrations of aldehydes determined by this method are found to vary with the pH of the aqueous amine solution and the derivatization time, the latter being problematic when the derivatization reaction proceeds slowly and not to completion in neutral and basic media. Accurate determination of aldehydes in amines through derivatization can be carried out at an effective solution pH of about 2 and with derivatization time of 20min. Hydrochloric acid has been used for neutralization of an amine. For complete derivatization, it is essential to protonate all nitrogen atoms in the amine. An approach for the determination of an adequate amount of acid needed for complete derivatization has been described. Several 0.2M buffer solutions varying in pH from 4 to 8 have also been used to make amine solutions for carrying out derivatization of aldehydes. These solutions have effective pHs of 10 or higher and provide much lower aldehyde concentrations compared to their true values. Mechanisms for the formation of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones in both acidic and basic media are discussed.

  17. Highly Accurate Structure-Based Prediction of HIV-1 Coreceptor Usage Suggests Intermolecular Interactions Driving Tropism.

    PubMed

    Kieslich, Chris A; Tamamis, Phanourios; Guzman, Yannis A; Onel, Melis; Floudas, Christodoulos A

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 entry into host cells is mediated by interactions between the V3-loop of viral glycoprotein gp120 and chemokine receptor CCR5 or CXCR4, collectively known as HIV-1 coreceptors. Accurate genotypic prediction of coreceptor usage is of significant clinical interest and determination of the factors driving tropism has been the focus of extensive study. We have developed a method based on nonlinear support vector machines to elucidate the interacting residue pairs driving coreceptor usage and provide highly accurate coreceptor usage predictions. Our models utilize centroid-centroid interaction energies from computationally derived structures of the V3-loop:coreceptor complexes as primary features, while additional features based on established rules regarding V3-loop sequences are also investigated. We tested our method on 2455 V3-loop sequences of various lengths and subtypes, and produce a median area under the receiver operator curve of 0.977 based on 500 runs of 10-fold cross validation. Our study is the first to elucidate a small set of specific interacting residue pairs between the V3-loop and coreceptors capable of predicting coreceptor usage with high accuracy across major HIV-1 subtypes. The developed method has been implemented as a web tool named CRUSH, CoReceptor USage prediction for HIV-1, which is available at http://ares.tamu.edu/CRUSH/.

  18. Protein structure determination from NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Andrea; Salvatella, Xavier; Dobson, Christopher M; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2007-06-05

    NMR spectroscopy plays a major role in the determination of the structures and dynamics of proteins and other biological macromolecules. Chemical shifts are the most readily and accurately measurable NMR parameters, and they reflect with great specificity the conformations of native and nonnative states of proteins. We show, using 11 examples of proteins representative of the major structural classes and containing up to 123 residues, that it is possible to use chemical shifts as structural restraints in combination with a conventional molecular mechanics force field to determine the conformations of proteins at a resolution of 2 angstroms or better. This strategy should be widely applicable and, subject to further development, will enable quantitative structural analysis to be carried out to address a range of complex biological problems not accessible to current structural techniques.

  19. A powerful test of independent assortment that determines genome-wide significance quickly and accurately

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, W C L; Hager, V R

    2016-01-01

    In the analysis of DNA sequences on related individuals, most methods strive to incorporate as much information as possible, with little or no attention paid to the issue of statistical significance. For example, a modern workstation can easily handle the computations needed to perform a large-scale genome-wide inheritance-by-descent (IBD) scan, but accurate assessment of the significance of that scan is often hindered by inaccurate approximations and computationally intensive simulation. To address these issues, we developed gLOD—a test of co-segregation that, for large samples, models chromosome-specific IBD statistics as a collection of stationary Gaussian processes. With this simple model, the parametric bootstrap yields an accurate and rapid assessment of significance—the genome-wide corrected P-value. Furthermore, we show that (i) under the null hypothesis, the limiting distribution of the gLOD is the standard Gumbel distribution; (ii) our parametric bootstrap simulator is approximately 40 000 times faster than gene-dropping methods, and it is more powerful than methods that approximate the adjusted P-value; and, (iii) the gLOD has the same statistical power as the widely used maximum Kong and Cox LOD. Thus, our approach gives researchers the ability to determine quickly and accurately the significance of most large-scale IBD scans, which may contain multiple traits, thousands of families and tens of thousands of DNA sequences. PMID:27245422

  20. Accurate bulk density determination of irregularly shaped translucent and opaque aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, M. P.; Jones, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a volumetric method for accurate determination of bulk density of aerogels, calculated from extrapolated weight of the dry pure solid and volume estimates based on the Archimedes' principle of volume displacement, using packed 100 μm-sized monodispersed glass spheres as a "quasi-fluid" media. Hard particle packing theory is invoked to demonstrate the reproducibility of the apparent density of the quasi-fluid. Accuracy rivaling that of the refractive index method is demonstrated for both translucent and opaque aerogels with different absorptive properties, as well as for aerogels with regular and irregular shapes.

  1. Techniques for determining propulsion system forces for accurate high speed vehicle drag measurements in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaiz, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    As part of a NASA program to evaluate current methods of predicting the performance of large, supersonic airplanes, the drag of the XB-70 airplane was measured accurately in flight at Mach numbers from 0.75 to 2.5. This paper describes the techniques used to determine engine net thrust and the drag forces charged to the propulsion system that were required for the in-flight drag measurements. The accuracy of the measurements and the application of the measurement techniques to aircraft with different propulsion systems are discussed. Examples of results obtained for the XB-70 airplane are presented.

  2. Accurate orbit determination strategies for the tracking and data relay satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, D. H.; Bolvin, D. T.; Lorah, J. M.; Lee, T.; Doll, C. E.

    1995-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) System (TDRSS) for tracking and communications support of low Earth-orbiting satellites. TDRSS has the operational capability of providing 85% coverage for TDRSS-user spacecraft. TDRSS currently consists of five geosynchronous spacecraft and the White Sands Complex (WSC) at White Sands, New Mexico. The Bilateration Ranging Transponder System (BRTS) provides range and Doppler measurements for each TDRS. The ground-based BRTS transponders are tracked as if they were TDRSS-user spacecraft. Since the positions of the BRTS transponders are known, their radiometric tracking measurements can be used to provide a well-determined ephemeris for the TDRS spacecraft. For high-accuracy orbit determination of a TDRSS user, such as the Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/Poseidon spacecraft, high-accuracy TDRS orbits are required. This paper reports on successive refinements in improved techniques and procedures leading to more accurate TDRS orbit determination strategies using the Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS). These strategies range from the standard operational solution using only the BRTS tracking measurements to a sophisticated iterative process involving several successive simultaneous solutions for multiple TDRSs and a TDRSS-user spacecraft. Results are presented for GTDS-generated TDRS ephemerides produced in simultaneous solutions with the TOPEX/Poseidon spacecraft. Strategies with different user spacecraft, as well as schemes for recovering accurate TDRS orbits following a TDRS maneuver, are also presented. In addition, a comprehensive assessment and evaluation of alternative strategies for TDRS orbit determination, excluding BRTS tracking measurements, are presented.

  3. Accurate determination of rates from non-uniformly sampled relaxation data.

    PubMed

    Stetz, Matthew A; Wand, A Joshua

    2016-08-01

    The application of non-uniform sampling (NUS) to relaxation experiments traditionally used to characterize the fast internal motion of proteins is quantitatively examined. Experimentally acquired Poisson-gap sampled data reconstructed with iterative soft thresholding are compared to regular sequentially sampled (RSS) data. Using ubiquitin as a model system, it is shown that 25 % sampling is sufficient for the determination of quantitatively accurate relaxation rates. When the sampling density is fixed at 25 %, the accuracy of rates is shown to increase sharply with the total number of sampled points until eventually converging near the inherent reproducibility of the experiment. Perhaps contrary to some expectations, it is found that accurate peak height reconstruction is not required for the determination of accurate rates. Instead, inaccuracies in rates arise from inconsistencies in reconstruction across the relaxation series that primarily manifest as a non-linearity in the recovered peak height. This indicates that the performance of an NUS relaxation experiment cannot be predicted from comparison of peak heights using a single RSS reference spectrum. The generality of these findings was assessed using three alternative reconstruction algorithms, eight different relaxation measurements, and three additional proteins that exhibit varying degrees of spectral complexity. From these data, it is revealed that non-linearity in peak height reconstruction across the relaxation series is strongly correlated with errors in NUS-derived relaxation rates. Importantly, it is shown that this correlation can be exploited to reliably predict the performance of an NUS-relaxation experiment by using three or more RSS reference planes from the relaxation series. The RSS reference time points can also serve to provide estimates of the uncertainty of the sampled intensity, which for a typical relaxation times series incurs no penalty in total acquisition time.

  4. Rapid and accurate determination of the lignin content of lignocellulosic biomass by solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Li; McCallum, Scott A.; Miao, Jianjun; Hart, Courtney; Tudryn, Gregory J.; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Biofuels and biomaterials, produced from lignocellulosic feedstock, require facile access to cellulose and hemicellulose to be competitive with petroleum processing and sugar-based fermentation. Physical-chemical barriers resulting from lignin complicates the hydrolysis biomass into fermentable sugars. Thus, the amount of lignin within a substrate is critical in determining biomass processing. The application of 13C cross-polarization, magic-angle spinning, and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance for the direct quantification of lignin content in biomass is examined. Using a standard curve constructed from pristine lignin and cellulose, the lignin content of a biomass sample is accurately determined through direct measurement without chemical or enzymatic pre-treatment. PMID:25404762

  5. Accurate determination of plasmonic fields in molecular junctions by current rectification at optical frequencies.

    PubMed

    Arielly, Rani; Ofarim, Ayelet; Noy, Gilad; Selzer, Yoram

    2011-07-13

    Current rectification, i.e., induction of dc current by oscillating electromagnetic fields, is demonstrated in molecular junctions at an optical frequency. The magnitude of rectification is used to accurately determine the effective oscillating potentials in the junctions induced by the irradiating laser. Since the gap size of the junctions used in this study is precisely determined by the length of the embedded molecules, the oscillating potential can be used to calculate the plasmonic enhancement of the electromagnetic field in the junctions. With a set of junctions based on alkyl thiolated molecules with identical HOMO-LUMO gap and different lengths, an exponential dependence of the plasmonic field enhancement on gap size is observed.

  6. Fitmunk: improving protein structures by accurate, automatic modeling of side-chain conformations.

    PubMed

    Porebski, Przemyslaw Jerzy; Cymborowski, Marcin; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Minor, Wladek

    2016-02-01

    Improvements in crystallographic hardware and software have allowed automated structure-solution pipelines to approach a near-`one-click' experience for the initial determination of macromolecular structures. However, in many cases the resulting initial model requires a laborious, iterative process of refinement and validation. A new method has been developed for the automatic modeling of side-chain conformations that takes advantage of rotamer-prediction methods in a crystallographic context. The algorithm, which is based on deterministic dead-end elimination (DEE) theory, uses new dense conformer libraries and a hybrid energy function derived from experimental data and prior information about rotamer frequencies to find the optimal conformation of each side chain. In contrast to existing methods, which incorporate the electron-density term into protein-modeling frameworks, the proposed algorithm is designed to take advantage of the highly discriminatory nature of electron-density maps. This method has been implemented in the program Fitmunk, which uses extensive conformational sampling. This improves the accuracy of the modeling and makes it a versatile tool for crystallographic model building, refinement and validation. Fitmunk was extensively tested on over 115 new structures, as well as a subset of 1100 structures from the PDB. It is demonstrated that the ability of Fitmunk to model more than 95% of side chains accurately is beneficial for improving the quality of crystallographic protein models, especially at medium and low resolutions. Fitmunk can be used for model validation of existing structures and as a tool to assess whether side chains are modeled optimally or could be better fitted into electron density. Fitmunk is available as a web service at http://kniahini.med.virginia.edu/fitmunk/server/ or at http://fitmunk.bitbucket.org/.

  7. Fitmunk: improving protein structures by accurate, automatic modeling of side-chain conformations

    PubMed Central

    Porebski, Przemyslaw Jerzy; Cymborowski, Marcin; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Minor, Wladek

    2016-01-01

    Improvements in crystallographic hardware and software have allowed automated structure-solution pipelines to approach a near-‘one-click’ experience for the initial determination of macromolecular structures. However, in many cases the resulting initial model requires a laborious, iterative process of refinement and validation. A new method has been developed for the automatic modeling of side-chain conformations that takes advantage of rotamer-prediction methods in a crystallographic context. The algorithm, which is based on deterministic dead-end elimination (DEE) theory, uses new dense conformer libraries and a hybrid energy function derived from experimental data and prior information about rotamer frequencies to find the optimal conformation of each side chain. In contrast to existing methods, which incorporate the electron-density term into protein-modeling frameworks, the proposed algorithm is designed to take advantage of the highly discriminatory nature of electron-density maps. This method has been implemented in the program Fitmunk, which uses extensive conformational sampling. This improves the accuracy of the modeling and makes it a versatile tool for crystallographic model building, refinement and validation. Fitmunk was extensively tested on over 115 new structures, as well as a subset of 1100 structures from the PDB. It is demonstrated that the ability of Fitmunk to model more than 95% of side chains accurately is beneficial for improving the quality of crystallographic protein models, especially at medium and low resolutions. Fitmunk can be used for model validation of existing structures and as a tool to assess whether side chains are modeled optimally or could be better fitted into electron density. Fitmunk is available as a web service at http://kniahini.med.virginia.edu/fitmunk/server/ or at http://fitmunk.bitbucket.org/. PMID:26894674

  8. Discrete state model and accurate estimation of loop entropy of RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Lin, Ming; Chen, Rong; Wang, Wei; Liang, Jie

    2008-03-28

    Conformational entropy makes important contribution to the stability and folding of RNA molecule, but it is challenging to either measure or compute conformational entropy associated with long loops. We develop optimized discrete k-state models of RNA backbone based on known RNA structures for computing entropy of loops, which are modeled as self-avoiding walks. To estimate entropy of hairpin, bulge, internal loop, and multibranch loop of long length (up to 50), we develop an efficient sampling method based on the sequential Monte Carlo principle. Our method considers excluded volume effect. It is general and can be applied to calculating entropy of loops with longer length and arbitrary complexity. For loops of short length, our results are in good agreement with a recent theoretical model and experimental measurement. For long loops, our estimated entropy of hairpin loops is in excellent agreement with the Jacobson-Stockmayer extrapolation model. However, for bulge loops and more complex secondary structures such as internal and multibranch loops, we find that the Jacobson-Stockmayer extrapolation model has large errors. Based on estimated entropy, we have developed empirical formulae for accurate calculation of entropy of long loops in different secondary structures. Our study on the effect of asymmetric size of loops suggest that loop entropy of internal loops is largely determined by the total loop length, and is only marginally affected by the asymmetric size of the two loops. Our finding suggests that the significant asymmetric effects of loop length in internal loops measured by experiments are likely to be partially enthalpic. Our method can be applied to develop improved energy parameters important for studying RNA stability and folding, and for predicting RNA secondary and tertiary structures. The discrete model and the program used to calculate loop entropy can be downloaded at http://gila.bioengr.uic.edu/resources/RNA.html.

  9. Accurate Prediction of One-Dimensional Protein Structure Features Using SPINE-X.

    PubMed

    Faraggi, Eshel; Kloczkowski, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Accurate prediction of protein secondary structure and other one-dimensional structure features is essential for accurate sequence alignment, three-dimensional structure modeling, and function prediction. SPINE-X is a software package to predict secondary structure as well as accessible surface area and dihedral angles ϕ and ψ. For secondary structure SPINE-X achieves an accuracy of between 81 and 84 % depending on the dataset and choice of tests. The Pearson correlation coefficient for accessible surface area prediction is 0.75 and the mean absolute error from the ϕ and ψ dihedral angles are 20(∘) and 33(∘), respectively. The source code and a Linux executables for SPINE-X are available from Research and Information Systems at http://mamiris.com .

  10. Efficient construction of robust artificial neural networks for accurate determination of superficial sample optical properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2015-03-01

    In general, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) systems work with photon diffusion models to determine the absorption coefficient μa and reduced scattering coefficient μs' of turbid samples. However, in some DRS measurement scenarios, such as using short source-detector separations to investigate superficial tissues with comparable μa and μs', photon diffusion models might be invalid or might not have analytical solutions. In this study, a systematic workflow of constructing a rapid, accurate photon transport model that is valid at short source-detector separations (SDSs) and at a wide range of sample albedo is revealed. To create such a model, we first employed a GPU (Graphic Processing Unit) based Monte Carlo model to calculate the reflectance at various sample optical property combinations and established a database at high speed. The database was then utilized to train an artificial neural network (ANN) for determining the sample absorption and reduced scattering coefficients from the reflectance measured at several SDSs without applying spectral constraints. The robustness of the produced ANN model was rigorously validated. We evaluated the performance of a successfully trained ANN using tissue simulating phantoms. We also determined the 500-1000 nm absorption and reduced scattering spectra of in-vivo skin using our ANN model and found that the values agree well with those reported in several independent studies.

  11. Accurate Mass Determination of the Ancient White Dwarf ER 8 Through Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash

    2005-07-01

    We propose to determine the mass of the very cool white dwarf ER 8 through astrometric microlensing. We have predicted that ER 8 will pass very close to a 15th-mag background star in January 2006, with an impact parameter of less than 0.05 arcsec. As it passes in front, it will cause a deflection of the background star's image by >8 milliarcsec, an amount easily detectable with HST/FGS. The gravitational deflection angle depends only on the distances and relative positions of the stars, and on the mass of the white dwarf. Since the distances and positions can be determined precisely before the event, the astrometric measurement offers a unique and direct method to measure the mass of the white dwarf to high accuracy {<5%}. Unlike all other stellar mass determinations, this technique works for single stars {but only if they are nearby and of sufficient mass}. The mass of ER 8 is of special interest because it is a member of the Galactic halo, and appears to be the oldest known field white dwarf. This object can thus set a lower limit on the age of the Galactic halo, but since white-dwarf cooling rates depend on their masses, the mass is a necessary ingredient in the age determination. As a byproduct, we will obtain an accurate parallax for ER 8, and thus its luminosity and {from its effective temperature} its radius. Such quantities are at present rather poorly known for the coolest white dwarfs, and will provide strong constraints on white-dwarf physics.

  12. Accurate Mass Determination of the Ancient White Dwarf ER 8 Through Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash

    2004-07-01

    We propose to determine the mass of the very cool white dwarf ER 8 through astrometric microlensing. We have predicted that ER 8 will pass very close to a 15th-mag background star in January 2006, with an impact parameter of less than 0.05 arcsec. As it passes in front, it will cause a deflection of the background star's image by >8 milliarcsec, an amount easily detectable with HST/FGS. The gravitational deflection angle depends only on the distances and relative positions of the stars, and on the mass of the white dwarf. Since the distances and positions can be determined precisely before the event, the astrometric measurement offers a unique and direct method to measure the mass of the white dwarf to high accuracy {<5%}. Unlike all other stellar mass determinations, this technique works for single stars {but only if they are nearby and of sufficient mass}. The mass of ER 8 is of special interest because it is a member of the Galactic halo, and appears to be the oldest known field white dwarf. This object can thus set a lower limit on the age of the Galactic halo, but since white-dwarf cooling rates depend on their masses, the mass is a necessary ingredient in the age determination. As a byproduct, we will obtain an accurate parallax for ER 8, and thus its luminosity and {from its effective temperature} its radius. Such quantities are at present rather poorly known for the coolest white dwarfs, and will provide strong constraints on white-dwarf physics.

  13. Accurate Determination of the Boltzmann Constant by Doppler Spectroscopy Towards a New Definition of the Kelvin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sow, P. L. T.; Merji, S.; Tokunaga, S. K.; Lemarchand, C.; Triki, M.; Borde, C.; Chardonnet, C.; Darquie, B.; Daussy, C.

    2013-06-01

    Accurate molecular spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region allows precision measurements of fundamental constants. For instance, measuring the linewidth of an isolated Doppler-broadened absorption line of ammonia around 10 μm enables a determination of the Boltzmann constant k_{{B}}. We report on our latest measurements. The main systematic effects, including the temperature control, will be discussed and an error budget will be presented in which the global uncertainty on systematic effects is at the level of a few ppm. This is valid provided that data is recorded under the optimized experimental conditions determined by the studies of systematic effects and provided that spectra are fitted to the speed-dependent Voigt profile, identified as the most suitable lineshape for our measurements. A determination of k_{{B}} by Doppler spectroscopy with a combined uncertainty of a few ppm is within reach. This is comparable to the best current uncertainty obtained using acoustic methods and would make a significant contribution to any new value of k_{{B}} determined by the CODATA. Furthermore, having multiple independent measurements at these accuracies opens the possibility of defining the Kelvin by fixing k_{{B}}, an exciting prospect considering the upcoming redefinition of the International System of Units (SI). C. Lemarchand, M. Triki, B. Darquié, C. J. Bordé, C. Chardonnet and C. Daussy, New J. Phys. 13, 073028 (2011). M. Triki, C. Lemarchand, B. Darquié, P. L. T. Sow, V. Roncin, C. Chardonnet, and C. Daussy, Phys. Rev. A 85, 062510 (2012).

  14. Accurate determination of the complex refractive index of solid tissue-equivalent phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ye, Qing; Deng, Zhichao; Zhou, Wenyuan; Zhang, Chunping; Tian, Jianguo

    2012-06-01

    Tissue-equivalent phantom is becoming widespread as a substitute in the biological field to verify optical theories, test measuring systems and study the tissue performances for varying boundary conditions, sample size and shape at a quantitative level. Compared with phantoms made with Intralipid solution, ink and other liquid substances, phantom in solid state is stable over time, reproducible, easy to handle and has been testified to be a suitable optical simulator in the visible and near-infrared region. We present accurate determination of the complex refractive index (RI) of a solid tissueequivalent phantom using extended derivative total reflection method (EDTRM). Scattering phantoms in solid state were measured for p-polarized and s-polarized incident light respectively. The reflectance curves of the sample as a function of incident angle were recorded. The real part of RI is directly determined by derivative of the reflectance curve, and the imaginary part is obtained from nonlinear fitting based on the Fresnel equation and Nelder-Mead simplex method. The EDTRM method is applicable for RI measurement of high scattering media such as biotissue, solid tissue-equivalent phantom and bulk material. The obtained RI information can be used in the study of tissue optics and biomedical field.

  15. Accurate determination of residual acrylic acid in superabsorbent polymer of hygiene products by headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Xin; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Jiang, Ran

    2017-02-17

    This work reports on a method for the determination of residual acrylic acid (AA) in the superabsorbent polymers for hygiene products by headspace analysis. It was based on water extraction for the polymer sample at a room temperature for 50min. Then, the AA in the extractant reacted with bicarbonate solution in a closed headspace sample vial, from which the carbon dioxide generated from the reaction (within 20min at 70°C) was detected by gas chromatography (GC). It was found that there is adsorption partition equilibrium of AA between solid-liquid phases. Therefore, an equation for calculating the total AA content in the original polymers sample was derived based on the above phase equilibrium. The results show that the HS-GC method has good precision (RSD<2.51%) and good accuracy (recoveries from 93 to 105%); the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 373mg/kg. The present method is rapid, accurate, and suitable for determining total residual acrylic acid in a wide variety of applications from processing of superabsorbent polymer to commercial products quality control.

  16. Accurate Determination of Comet and Asteroid Orbits Leading to Collision With Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roithmayr, Carlos M.; Kay-Bunnell, Linda; Mazanek, Daniel D.; Kumar, Renjith R.; Seywald, Hans; Hausman, Matthew A.

    2005-01-01

    Movements of the celestial bodies in our solar system inspired Isaac Newton to work out his profound laws of gravitation and motion; with one or two notable exceptions, all of those objects move as Newton said they would. But normally harmonious orbital motion is accompanied by the risk of collision, which can be cataclysmic. The Earth s moon is thought to have been produced by such an event, and we recently witnessed magnificent bombardments of Jupiter by several pieces of what was once Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9. Other comets or asteroids may have met the Earth with such violence that dinosaurs and other forms of life became extinct; it is this possibility that causes us to ask how the human species might avoid a similar catastrophe, and the answer requires a thorough understanding of orbital motion. The two red square flags with black square centers displayed are internationally recognized as a warning of an impending hurricane. Mariners and coastal residents who know the meaning of this symbol and the signs evident in the sky and ocean can act in advance to try to protect lives and property; someone who is unfamiliar with the warning signs or chooses to ignore them is in much greater jeopardy. Although collisions between Earth and large comets or asteroids occur much less frequently than landfall of a hurricane, it is imperative that we learn to identify the harbingers of such collisions by careful examination of an object s path. An accurate determination of the orbit of a comet or asteroid is necessary in order to know if, when, and where on the Earth s surface a collision will occur. Generally speaking, the longer the warning time, the better the chance of being able to plan and execute action to prevent a collision. The more accurate the determination of an orbit, the less likely such action will be wasted effort or, what is worse, an effort that increases rather than decreases the probability of a collision. Conditions necessary for a collision to occur are

  17. Accurate and precise determination of critical properties from Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Bai, Peng; Allan, Douglas A.; Siepmann, J. Ilja

    2015-09-21

    Since the seminal paper by Panagiotopoulos [Mol. Phys. 61, 813 (1997)], the Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo (GEMC) method has been the most popular particle-based simulation approach for the computation of vapor–liquid phase equilibria. However, the validity of GEMC simulations in the near-critical region has been questioned because rigorous finite-size scaling approaches cannot be applied to simulations with fluctuating volume. Valleau [Mol. Simul. 29, 627 (2003)] has argued that GEMC simulations would lead to a spurious overestimation of the critical temperature. More recently, Patel et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 024101 (2011)] opined that the use of analytical tail corrections would be problematic in the near-critical region. To address these issues, we perform extensive GEMC simulations for Lennard-Jones particles in the near-critical region varying the system size, the overall system density, and the cutoff distance. For a system with N = 5500 particles, potential truncation at 8σ and analytical tail corrections, an extrapolation of GEMC simulation data at temperatures in the range from 1.27 to 1.305 yields T{sub c} = 1.3128 ± 0.0016, ρ{sub c} = 0.316 ± 0.004, and p{sub c} = 0.1274 ± 0.0013 in excellent agreement with the thermodynamic limit determined by Potoff and Panagiotopoulos [J. Chem. Phys. 109, 10914 (1998)] using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations and finite-size scaling. Critical properties estimated using GEMC simulations with different overall system densities (0.296 ≤ ρ{sub t} ≤ 0.336) agree to within the statistical uncertainties. For simulations with tail corrections, data obtained using r{sub cut} = 3.5σ yield T{sub c} and p{sub c} that are higher by 0.2% and 1.4% than simulations with r{sub cut} = 5 and 8σ but still with overlapping 95% confidence intervals. In contrast, GEMC simulations with a truncated and shifted potential show that r{sub cut} = 8σ is insufficient to obtain accurate results. Additional GEMC simulations for hard

  18. A versatile assay for the accurate, time-resolved determination of cellular viability.

    PubMed

    Amano, Toyoki; Hirasawa, Ken ichi; O'Donohue, Michael J; Pernolle, Jean Claude; Shioi, Yuzo

    2003-03-01

    A convenient and versatile method for the accurate, time-resolved determination of cellular viability has been developed. The conventional viability indicator fluorescein diacetate (FDA), which is converted to the fluorescent compound fluorescein in living cells, was employed as a viability probe. Fluorescence emission from cells was measured using a spectrofluorimeter equipped with a magnetic stirrer. Using this assay cell suspensions exhibiting densities in the range 0.5 x 10(5) to 2.0 x 10(5) cells displayed a linear response when FDA concentrations less than 12 micro M were employed. To calibrate the method, viability standards were elaborated using different proportions of living and dead cells, and a correlation coefficient for the viability of tobacco BY-2 suspensions was calculated as 0.998. This viability assay was also found to be applicable to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Arabidopsis thaliana cultured cells. Using this cell viability assay, kinetic analyses of cell death could be performed. Using the proteinaceous elicitor from Phytophthora cryptogea, cryptogein, to induce cell death in tobacco cell suspensions, values for the maximum velocity of death induction rate (V(max)) and the LD50 (half-maximal velocity or k(1/2)) were calculated as 17.2 (% death/h) and 65 nM, respectively.

  19. A highly accurate method for the determination of mass and center of mass of a spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, E. Y.; Trubert, M. R.; Egwuatu, A.

    1978-01-01

    An extremely accurate method for the measurement of mass and the lateral center of mass of a spacecraft has been developed. The method was needed for the Voyager spacecraft mission requirement which limited the uncertainty in the knowledge of lateral center of mass of the spacecraft system weighing 750 kg to be less than 1.0 mm (0.04 in.). The method consists of using three load cells symmetrically located at 120 deg apart on a turntable with respect to the vertical axis of the spacecraft and making six measurements for each load cell. These six measurements are taken by cyclic rotations of the load cell turntable and of the spacecraft, about the vertical axis of the measurement fixture. This method eliminates all alignment, leveling, and load cell calibration errors for the lateral center of mass determination, and permits a statistical best fit of the measurement data. An associated data reduction computer program called MASCM has been written to implement this method and has been used for the Voyager spacecraft.

  20. A miniature shoe-mounted orientation determination system for accurate indoor heading and trajectory tracking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengzhi; Yu, Shuai; Liu, Chaojun; Liu, Sheng

    2016-06-01

    Tracking the position of pedestrian is urgently demanded when the most commonly used GPS (Global Position System) is unavailable. Benefited from the small size, low-power consumption, and relatively high reliability, micro-electro-mechanical system sensors are well suited for GPS-denied indoor pedestrian heading estimation. In this paper, a real-time miniature orientation determination system (MODS) was developed for indoor heading and trajectory tracking based on a novel dual-linear Kalman filter. The proposed filter precludes the impact of geomagnetic distortions on pitch and roll that the heading is subjected to. A robust calibration approach was designed to improve the accuracy of sensors measurements based on a unified sensor model. Online tests were performed on the MODS with an improved turntable. The results demonstrate that the average RMSE (root-mean-square error) of heading estimation is less than 1°. Indoor heading experiments were carried out with the MODS mounted on the shoe of pedestrian. Besides, we integrated the existing MODS into an indoor pedestrian dead reckoning application as an example of its utility in realistic actions. A human attitude-based walking model was developed to calculate the walking distance. Test results indicate that mean percentage error of indoor trajectory tracking achieves 2% of the total walking distance. This paper provides a feasible alternative for accurate indoor heading and trajectory tracking.

  1. Rapid, accurate, and direct determination of total lycopene content in tomato paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicanic, D.; Anese, M.; Luterotti, S.; Dadarlat, D.; Gibkes, J.; Lubbers, M.

    2003-01-01

    Lycopene that imparts red color to the tomato fruit is the most potent antioxidant among carotenes, an important nutrient and also used as a color ingredient in many food formulations. Since cooked and processed foods derived from tomatoes were shown to provide optimal lycopene boost, products such as paste, puree, juice, etc. are nowadays gaining popularity as dietary sources. The analysis of lycopene in tomato paste (partially dehydrated product prepared by vacuum concentrating tomato juice) is carried out using either high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), spectrophotometry, or by evaluating the color. The instability of lycopene during processes of extraction, etc., handling, and disposal of organic solvents makes the preparation of a sample for the analysis a delicate task. Despite a recognized need for accurate and rapid assessment of lycopene in tomato products no such method is available at present. The study described here focuses on a direct determination of a total lycopene content in different tomato pastes by means of the laser optothermal window (LOW) method at 502 nm. The concentration of lycopene in tomato paste ranged between 25 and 150 mg per 100 g product; the results are in excellent agreement with those obtained by spectrophotometry. The time needed to complete LOW analysis is very short, so that decomposition of pigment and the formation of artifacts are minimized. Preliminary results indicate a good degree of reproducibility making the LOW method suitable for routine assays of lycopene content in tomato paste.

  2. Significance of accurate diffraction corrections for the second harmonic wave in determining the acoustic nonlinearity parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing; Barnard, Dan

    2015-09-15

    The accurate measurement of acoustic nonlinearity parameter β for fluids or solids generally requires making corrections for diffraction effects due to finite size geometry of transmitter and receiver. These effects are well known in linear acoustics, while those for second harmonic waves have not been well addressed and therefore not properly considered in previous studies. In this work, we explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction corrections using the multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) equations which were developed from the quasilinear solutions of the KZK equation. The effects of making these corrections are examined through the simulation of β determination in water. Diffraction corrections are found to have more significant effects than attenuation corrections, and the β values of water can be estimated experimentally with less than 5% errors when the exact second harmonic diffraction corrections are used together with the negligible attenuation correction effects on the basis of linear frequency dependence between attenuation coefficients, α{sub 2} ≃ 2α{sub 1}.

  3. Diagnostic methodology is critical for accurately determining the prevalence of ichthyophonus infections in wild fish populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.; Dolan, H.; Hershberger, P.

    2011-01-01

    Several different techniques have been employed to detect and identify Ichthyophonus spp. in infected fish hosts; these include macroscopic observation, microscopic examination of tissue squashes, histological evaluation, in vitro culture, and molecular techniques. Examination of the peer-reviewed literature revealed that when more than 1 diagnostic method is used, they often result in significantly different results; for example, when in vitro culture was used to identify infected trout in an experimentally exposed population, 98.7% of infected trout were detected, but when standard histology was used to confirm known infected tissues from wild salmon, it detected ~50% of low-intensity infections and ~85% of high-intensity infections. Other studies on different species reported similar differences. When we examined a possible mechanism to explain the disparity between different diagnostic techniques, we observed non-random distribution of the parasite in 3-dimensionally visualized tissue sections from infected hosts, thus providing a possible explanation for the different sensitivities of commonly used diagnostic techniques. Based on experimental evidence and a review of the peer-reviewed literature, we have concluded that in vitro culture is currently the most accurate diagnostic technique for determining infection prevalence of Ichthyophonus, particularly when the exposure history of the population is not known.

  4. Final Progress Report: Isotope Identification Algorithm for Rapid and Accurate Determination of Radioisotopes Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini; Bounds, John Alan; Brumby, Steven P.; Prasad, Lakshman; Sullivan, John P.

    2012-04-30

    This is the final report of the project titled, 'Isotope Identification Algorithm for Rapid and Accurate Determination of Radioisotopes,' PMIS project number LA10-HUMANID-PD03. The goal of the work was to demonstrate principles of emulating a human analysis approach towards the data collected using radiation isotope identification devices (RIIDs). It summarizes work performed over the FY10 time period. The goal of the work was to demonstrate principles of emulating a human analysis approach towards the data collected using radiation isotope identification devices (RIIDs). Human analysts begin analyzing a spectrum based on features in the spectrum - lines and shapes that are present in a given spectrum. The proposed work was to carry out a feasibility study that will pick out all gamma ray peaks and other features such as Compton edges, bremsstrahlung, presence/absence of shielding and presence of neutrons and escape peaks. Ultimately success of this feasibility study will allow us to collectively explain identified features and form a realistic scenario that produced a given spectrum in the future. We wanted to develop and demonstrate machine learning algorithms that will qualitatively enhance the automated identification capabilities of portable radiological sensors that are currently being used in the field.

  5. A miniature shoe-mounted orientation determination system for accurate indoor heading and trajectory tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengzhi; Yu, Shuai; Liu, Chaojun; Liu, Sheng

    2016-06-01

    Tracking the position of pedestrian is urgently demanded when the most commonly used GPS (Global Position System) is unavailable. Benefited from the small size, low-power consumption, and relatively high reliability, micro-electro-mechanical system sensors are well suited for GPS-denied indoor pedestrian heading estimation. In this paper, a real-time miniature orientation determination system (MODS) was developed for indoor heading and trajectory tracking based on a novel dual-linear Kalman filter. The proposed filter precludes the impact of geomagnetic distortions on pitch and roll that the heading is subjected to. A robust calibration approach was designed to improve the accuracy of sensors measurements based on a unified sensor model. Online tests were performed on the MODS with an improved turntable. The results demonstrate that the average RMSE (root-mean-square error) of heading estimation is less than 1°. Indoor heading experiments were carried out with the MODS mounted on the shoe of pedestrian. Besides, we integrated the existing MODS into an indoor pedestrian dead reckoning application as an example of its utility in realistic actions. A human attitude-based walking model was developed to calculate the walking distance. Test results indicate that mean percentage error of indoor trajectory tracking achieves 2% of the total walking distance. This paper provides a feasible alternative for accurate indoor heading and trajectory tracking.

  6. Structure-based constitutive model can accurately predict planar biaxial properties of aortic wall tissue.

    PubMed

    Polzer, S; Gasser, T C; Novak, K; Man, V; Tichy, M; Skacel, P; Bursa, J

    2015-03-01

    Structure-based constitutive models might help in exploring mechanisms by which arterial wall histology is linked to wall mechanics. This study aims to validate a recently proposed structure-based constitutive model. Specifically, the model's ability to predict mechanical biaxial response of porcine aortic tissue with predefined collagen structure was tested. Histological slices from porcine thoracic aorta wall (n=9) were automatically processed to quantify the collagen fiber organization, and mechanical testing identified the non-linear properties of the wall samples (n=18) over a wide range of biaxial stretches. Histological and mechanical experimental data were used to identify the model parameters of a recently proposed multi-scale constitutive description for arterial layers. The model predictive capability was tested with respect to interpolation and extrapolation. Collagen in the media was predominantly aligned in circumferential direction (planar von Mises distribution with concentration parameter bM=1.03 ± 0.23), and its coherence decreased gradually from the luminal to the abluminal tissue layers (inner media, b=1.54 ± 0.40; outer media, b=0.72 ± 0.20). In contrast, the collagen in the adventitia was aligned almost isotropically (bA=0.27 ± 0.11), and no features, such as families of coherent fibers, were identified. The applied constitutive model captured the aorta biaxial properties accurately (coefficient of determination R(2)=0.95 ± 0.03) over the entire range of biaxial deformations and with physically meaningful model parameters. Good predictive properties, well outside the parameter identification space, were observed (R(2)=0.92 ± 0.04). Multi-scale constitutive models equipped with realistic micro-histological data can predict macroscopic non-linear aorta wall properties. Collagen largely defines already low strain properties of media, which explains the origin of wall anisotropy seen at this strain level. The structure and mechanical

  7. Accurate Hf isotope determinations of complex zircons using the "laser ablation split stream" method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Christopher M.; Vervoort, Jeffery D.; DuFrane, S. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The "laser ablation split stream" (LASS) technique is a powerful tool for mineral-scale isotope analyses and in particular, for concurrent determination of age and Hf isotope composition of zircon. Because LASS utilizes two independent mass spectrometers, a large range of masses can be measured during a single ablation, and thus, the same sample volume can be analyzed for multiple geochemical systems. This paper describes a simple analytical setup using a laser ablation system coupled to a single-collector (for U-Pb age determination) and a multicollector (for Hf isotope analyses) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICPMS). The ability of the LASS for concurrent Hf + age technique to extract meaningful Hf isotope compositions in isotopically zoned zircon is demonstrated using zircons from two Proterozoic gneisses from northern Idaho, USA. These samples illustrate the potential problems associated with inadvertently sampling multiple age and Hf components in zircons, as well as the potential of LASS to recover meaningful Hf isotope compositions. We suggest that such inadvertent sampling of differing age and Hf components can be a significant cause of excess scatter in Hf isotope analyses and demonstrate that the LASS approach offers a robust solution to these issues. The veracity of the approach is demonstrated by accurate analyses of 10 reference zircons with well-characterized age and Hf isotopic composition, using laser spot diameters of 30 and 40 µm. In order to expand the database of high-precision Lu-Hf isotope analyses of reference zircons, we present 27 new isotope dilution-MC-ICPMS Lu-Hf isotope measurements of five U-Pb zircon standards: FC1, Temora, R33, QGNG, and 91500.

  8. Accurate Electron Affinity of Iron and Fine Structures of Negative Iron ions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaolin; Luo, Zhihong; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-01-01

    Ionization potential (IP) is defined as the amount of energy required to remove the most loosely bound electron of an atom, while electron affinity (EA) is defined as the amount of energy released when an electron is attached to a neutral atom. Both IP and EA are critical for understanding chemical properties of an element. In contrast to accurate IPs and structures of neutral atoms, EAs and structures of negative ions are relatively unexplored, especially for the transition metal anions. Here, we report the accurate EA value of Fe and fine structures of Fe− using the slow electron velocity imaging method. These measurements yield a very accurate EA value of Fe, 1235.93(28) cm−1 or 153.236(34) meV. The fine structures of Fe− were also successfully resolved. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations, and also paves the way for improving the EA measurements of other transition metal atoms to the sub cm−1 accuracy. PMID:27138292

  9. Accurate Electron Affinity of Iron and Fine Structures of Negative Iron ions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaolin; Luo, Zhihong; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-05-03

    Ionization potential (IP) is defined as the amount of energy required to remove the most loosely bound electron of an atom, while electron affinity (EA) is defined as the amount of energy released when an electron is attached to a neutral atom. Both IP and EA are critical for understanding chemical properties of an element. In contrast to accurate IPs and structures of neutral atoms, EAs and structures of negative ions are relatively unexplored, especially for the transition metal anions. Here, we report the accurate EA value of Fe and fine structures of Fe(-) using the slow electron velocity imaging method. These measurements yield a very accurate EA value of Fe, 1235.93(28) cm(-1) or 153.236(34) meV. The fine structures of Fe(-) were also successfully resolved. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations, and also paves the way for improving the EA measurements of other transition metal atoms to the sub cm(-1) accuracy.

  10. Accurate macromolecular structures using minimal measurements from X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Hattne, Johan; Echols, Nathaniel; Tran, Rosalie; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J; Brewster, Aaron S; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Lampe, Alyssa; Han, Guangye; Gul, Sheraz; DiFiore, Dörte; Milathianaki, Despina; Fry, Alan R; Miahnahri, Alan; White, William E; Schafer, Donald W; Seibert, M Marvin; Koglin, Jason E; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sellberg, Jonas; Latimer, Matthew J; Glatzel, Pieter; Zwart, Petrus H; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W; Bogan, Michael J; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J; Boutet, Sébastien; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K; Adams, Paul D; Sauter, Nicholas K

    2014-05-01

    X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources enable the use of crystallography to solve three-dimensional macromolecular structures under native conditions and without radiation damage. Results to date, however, have been limited by the challenge of deriving accurate Bragg intensities from a heterogeneous population of microcrystals, while at the same time modeling the X-ray spectrum and detector geometry. Here we present a computational approach designed to extract meaningful high-resolution signals from fewer diffraction measurements.

  11. Accurate determination of screw position in treating fifth metatarsal base fractures to shorten radiation exposure time

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Chen; Huang, Jia Zhang; Ma, Xin

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Anatomical markers can help to guide lag screw placement during surgery for internal fixation of fifth metatarsal base fractures. This study aimed to identify the optimal anatomical markers and thus reduce radiation exposure. METHODS A total of 50 patients in Huashan Hospital, Shanghai, China, who underwent oblique foot radiography in the lateral position were randomly selected. The angles between the fifth metatarsal axis and cuboid articular surface were measured to determine the optimal lag screw placement relative to anatomical markers. RESULTS The line connecting the styloid process of the fifth metatarsal base with the second metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint intersected with the fifth metatarsal base fracture line at an angle of 86.85° ± 5.44°. The line connecting the fifth metatarsal base styloid with the third and fourth MTP joints intersected with the fracture line at angles of 93.28° ± 5.24° and 100.95° ± 5.00°, respectively. The proximal articular surface of the fifth metatarsal base intersected with the line connecting the styloid process of the fifth metatarsal base with the second, third and fourth MTP joints at angles of 24.02° ± 4.77°, 30.79° ± 4.53° and 38.08° ± 4.54°, respectively. CONCLUSION The fifth metatarsal base styloid and third MTP joint can be used as anatomical markers for lag screw placement in fractures involving the fifth tarsometatarsal joint. The connection line, which is normally perpendicular to the fracture line, provides sufficient mechanical stability to facilitate accurate screw placement. The use of these anatomical markers could help to reduce unnecessary radiation exposure for patients and medical staff. PMID:26767892

  12. Linear signal noise summer accurately determines and controls S/N ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundry, J. L.

    1966-01-01

    Linear signal noise summer precisely controls the relative power levels of signal and noise, and mixes them linearly in accurately known ratios. The S/N ratio accuracy and stability are greatly improved by this technique and are attained simultaneously.

  13. Simple and accurate determination of global tau(R) in proteins using (13)C or (15)N relaxation data.

    PubMed

    Mispelter, J; Izadi-Pruneyre, N; Quiniou, E; Adjadj, E

    2000-03-01

    In the study of protein dynamics by (13)C or (15)N relaxation measurements different models from the Lipari-Szabo formalism are used in order to determine the motion parameters. The global rotational correlation time tau(R) of the molecule must be estimated prior to the analysis. In this Communication, the authors propose a new approach in determining an accurate value for tau(R) in order to realize the best fit of R(2) for the whole sequence of the protein, regardless of the different type of motions atoms may experience. The method first determines the highly structured regions of the sequence. For each corresponding site, the Lipari-Szabo parameters are calculated for R(1) and NOE, using an arbitrary value for tau(R). The chi(2) for R(2), summed over the selected sites, shows a clear minimum, as a function of tau(R). This minimum is used to better estimate a proper value for tau(R).

  14. CoMOGrad and PHOG: From Computer Vision to Fast and Accurate Protein Tertiary Structure Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Rezaul; Aziz, Mohd. Momin Al; Shatabda, Swakkhar; Rahman, M. Sohel; Mia, Md. Abul Kashem; Zaman, Farhana; Rakin, Salman

    2015-01-01

    The number of entries in a structural database of proteins is increasing day by day. Methods for retrieving protein tertiary structures from such a large database have turn out to be the key to comparative analysis of structures that plays an important role to understand proteins and their functions. In this paper, we present fast and accurate methods for the retrieval of proteins having tertiary structures similar to a query protein from a large database. Our proposed methods borrow ideas from the field of computer vision. The speed and accuracy of our methods come from the two newly introduced features- the co-occurrence matrix of the oriented gradient and pyramid histogram of oriented gradient- and the use of Euclidean distance as the distance measure. Experimental results clearly indicate the superiority of our approach in both running time and accuracy. Our method is readily available for use from this website: http://research.buet.ac.bd:8080/Comograd/. PMID:26293226

  15. Accurate structure and dynamics of the metal-site of paramagnetic metalloproteins from NMR parameters using natural bond orbitals.

    PubMed

    Hansen, D Flemming; Westler, William M; Kunze, Micha B A; Markley, John L; Weinhold, Frank; Led, Jens J

    2012-03-14

    A natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis of unpaired electron spin density in metalloproteins is presented, which allows a fast and robust calculation of paramagnetic NMR parameters. Approximately 90% of the unpaired electron spin density occupies metal-ligand NBOs, allowing the majority of the density to be modeled by only a few NBOs that reflect the chemical bonding environment. We show that the paramagnetic relaxation rate of protons can be calculated accurately using only the metal-ligand NBOs and that these rates are in good agreement with corresponding rates measured experimentally. This holds, in particular, for protons of ligand residues where the point-dipole approximation breaks down. To describe the paramagnetic relaxation of heavy nuclei, also the electron spin density in the local orbitals must be taken into account. Geometric distance restraints for (15)N can be derived from the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and the Fermi contact shift when local NBOs are included in the analysis. Thus, the NBO approach allows us to include experimental paramagnetic NMR parameters of (15)N nuclei as restraints in a structure optimization protocol. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and structure determination of oxidized rubredoxin using the experimentally obtained paramagnetic NMR parameters of (15)N. The corresponding structures obtained are in good agreement with the crystal structure of rubredoxin. Thus, the NBO approach allows an accurate description of the geometric structure and the dynamics of metalloproteins, when NMR parameters are available of nuclei in the immediate vicinity of the metal-site.

  16. Crystal structure determination of Efavirenz

    SciTech Connect

    Popeneciu, Horea Dumitru, Ristoiu; Tripon, Carmen Borodi, Gheorghe Pop, Mihaela Maria

    2015-12-23

    Needle-shaped single crystals of the title compound, C{sub 14}H{sub 9}ClF{sub 3}NO{sub 2}, were obtained from a co-crystallization experiment of Efavirenz with maleic acid in a (1:1) ratio, using methanol as solvent. Crystal structure determination at room temperature revealed a significant anisotropy of the lattice expansion compared to the previously reported low-temperature structure. In both low- and room temperature structures the cyclopropylethynyl fragment in one of the asymmetric unit molecules is disordered. While at low-temperature only one C atom exhibits positional disorder, at room temperature the disorder is present for two C atoms of the cyclopropane ring.

  17. Novel gene complex structure determination

    SciTech Connect

    Gatewood, J.M.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LORD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. `Operative` chromatin containing exclusively the minor hasten variants was successfully isolated. Linker hasten H1 is quantitatively missing from operative chromatin. One of the aims of this proposal was to determine the proteins responsible for stabilizing operative chromatin. This chromatin is stabilized by microtubule proteins tar and tubulin. Another goal of this project was the structural characterization of operate chromatin nucleosomes. Using solution scattering, nucleosomes containing the minor variants were shown to be structurally distinct from major variant containing nucleosomes. The unusual structure and stabilization of operative chromatin by microtubule proteins provides a possible mechanism for direct interaction of transcription machinery with specific chromatin domains.

  18. Secondary structure determines protein topology

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Patrick J.; Gong, Haipeng; Rose, George D.

    2006-01-01

    Using a test set of 13 small, compact proteins, we demonstrate that a remarkably simple protocol can capture native topology from secondary structure information alone, in the absence of long-range interactions. It has been a long-standing open question whether such information is sufficient to determine a protein's fold. Indeed, even the far simpler problem of reconstructing the three-dimensional structure of a protein from its exact backbone torsion angles has remained a difficult challenge owing to the small, but cumulative, deviations from ideality in backbone planarity, which, if ignored, cause large errors in structure. As a familiar example, a small change in an elbow angle causes a large displacement at the end of your arm; the longer the arm, the larger the displacement. Here, correct secondary structure assignments (α-helix, β-strand, β-turn, polyproline II, coil) were used to constrain polypeptide backbone chains devoid of side chains, and the most stable folded conformations were determined, using Monte Carlo simulation. Just three terms were used to assess stability: molecular compaction, steric exclusion, and hydrogen bonding. For nine of the 13 proteins, this protocol restricts the main chain to a surprisingly small number of energetically favorable topologies, with the native one prominent among them. PMID:16823044

  19. Exchange-Hole Dipole Dispersion Model for Accurate Energy Ranking in Molecular Crystal Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Whittleton, Sarah R; Otero-de-la-Roza, A; Johnson, Erin R

    2017-02-14

    Accurate energy ranking is a key facet to the problem of first-principles crystal-structure prediction (CSP) of molecular crystals. This work presents a systematic assessment of B86bPBE-XDM, a semilocal density functional combined with the exchange-hole dipole moment (XDM) dispersion model, for energy ranking using 14 compounds from the first five CSP blind tests. Specifically, the set of crystals studied comprises 11 rigid, planar compounds and 3 co-crystals. The experimental structure was correctly identified as the lowest in lattice energy for 12 of the 14 total crystals. One of the exceptions is 4-hydroxythiophene-2-carbonitrile, for which the experimental structure was correctly identified once a quasi-harmonic estimate of the vibrational free-energy contribution was included, evidencing the occasional importance of thermal corrections for accurate energy ranking. The other exception is an organic salt, where charge-transfer error (also called delocalization error) is expected to cause the base density functional to be unreliable. Provided the choice of base density functional is appropriate and an estimate of temperature effects is used, XDM-corrected density-functional theory is highly reliable for the energetic ranking of competing crystal structures.

  20. Modeling of Non-Gravitational Forces for Precise and Accurate Orbit Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackel, Stefan; Gisinger, Christoph; Steigenberger, Peter; Balss, Ulrich; Montenbruck, Oliver; Eineder, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Remote sensing satellites support a broad range of scientific and commercial applications. The two radar imaging satellites TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X provide spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and interferometric SAR data with a very high accuracy. The precise reconstruction of the satellite's trajectory is based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements from a geodetic-grade dual-frequency Integrated Geodetic and Occultation Receiver (IGOR) onboard the spacecraft. The increasing demand for precise radar products relies on validation methods, which require precise and accurate orbit products. An analysis of the orbit quality by means of internal and external validation methods on long and short timescales shows systematics, which reflect deficits in the employed force models. Following the proper analysis of this deficits, possible solution strategies are highlighted in the presentation. The employed Reduced Dynamic Orbit Determination (RDOD) approach utilizes models for gravitational and non-gravitational forces. A detailed satellite macro model is introduced to describe the geometry and the optical surface properties of the satellite. Two major non-gravitational forces are the direct and the indirect Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP). The satellite TerraSAR-X flies on a dusk-dawn orbit with an altitude of approximately 510 km above ground. Due to this constellation, the Sun almost constantly illuminates the satellite, which causes strong across-track accelerations on the plane rectangular to the solar rays. The indirect effect of the solar radiation is called Earth Radiation Pressure (ERP). This force depends on the sunlight, which is reflected by the illuminated Earth surface (visible spectra) and the emission of the Earth body in the infrared spectra. Both components of ERP require Earth models to describe the optical properties of the Earth surface. Therefore, the influence of different Earth models on the orbit quality is assessed. The scope of

  1. Accurate determinations of one-bond 13C-13C couplings in 13C-labeled carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azurmendi, Hugo F.; Freedberg, Darón I.

    2013-03-01

    Carbon plays a central role in the molecular architecture of carbohydrates, yet the availability of accurate methods for 1DCC determination has not been sufficiently explored, despite the importance that such data could play in structural studies of oligo- and polysaccharides. Existing methods require fitting intensity ratios of cross- to diagonal-peaks as a function of the constant-time (CT) in CT-COSY experiments, while other methods utilize measurement of peak separation. The former strategies suffer from complications due to peak overlap, primarily in regions close to the diagonal, while the latter strategies are negatively impacted by the common occurrence of strong coupling in sugars, which requires a reliable assessment of their influence in the context of RDC determination. We detail a 13C-13C CT-COSY method that combines a variation in the CT processed with diagonal filtering to yield 1JCC and RDCs. The strategy, which relies solely on cross-peak intensity modulation, is inspired in the cross-peak nulling method used for JHH determinations, but adapted and extended to applications where, like in sugars, large one-bond 13C-13C couplings coexist with relatively small long-range couplings. Because diagonal peaks are not utilized, overlap problems are greatly alleviated. Thus, one-bond couplings can be determined from different cross-peaks as either active or passive coupling. This results in increased accuracy when more than one determination is available, and in more opportunities to measure a specific coupling in the presence of severe overlap. In addition, we evaluate the influence of strong couplings on the determination of RDCs by computer simulations. We show that individual scalar couplings are notably affected by the presence of strong couplings but, at least for the simple cases studied, the obtained RDC values for use in structural calculations were not, because the errors introduced by strong couplings for the isotropic and oriented phases are very

  2. Accurate determinations of one-bond 13C-13C couplings in 13C-labeled carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Azurmendi, Hugo F; Freedberg, Darón I

    2013-03-01

    Carbon plays a central role in the molecular architecture of carbohydrates, yet the availability of accurate methods for (1)D(CC) determination has not been sufficiently explored, despite the importance that such data could play in structural studies of oligo- and polysaccharides. Existing methods require fitting intensity ratios of cross- to diagonal-peaks as a function of the constant-time (CT) in CT-COSY experiments, while other methods utilize measurement of peak separation. The former strategies suffer from complications due to peak overlap, primarily in regions close to the diagonal, while the latter strategies are negatively impacted by the common occurrence of strong coupling in sugars, which requires a reliable assessment of their influence in the context of RDC determination. We detail a (13)C-(13)C CT-COSY method that combines a variation in the CT processed with diagonal filtering to yield (1)J(CC) and RDCs. The strategy, which relies solely on cross-peak intensity modulation, is inspired in the cross-peak nulling method used for J(HH) determinations, but adapted and extended to applications where, like in sugars, large one-bond (13)C-(13)C couplings coexist with relatively small long-range couplings. Because diagonal peaks are not utilized, overlap problems are greatly alleviated. Thus, one-bond couplings can be determined from different cross-peaks as either active or passive coupling. This results in increased accuracy when more than one determination is available, and in more opportunities to measure a specific coupling in the presence of severe overlap. In addition, we evaluate the influence of strong couplings on the determination of RDCs by computer simulations. We show that individual scalar couplings are notably affected by the presence of strong couplings but, at least for the simple cases studied, the obtained RDC values for use in structural calculations were not, because the errors introduced by strong couplings for the isotropic and

  3. Screened exchange hybrid density functional for accurate and efficient structures and interaction energies.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Caldeweyher, Eike; Grimme, Stefan

    2016-06-21

    We extend the recently introduced PBEh-3c global hybrid density functional [S. Grimme et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2015, 143, 054107] by a screened Fock exchange variant based on the Henderson-Janesko-Scuseria exchange hole model. While the excellent performance of the global hybrid is maintained for small covalently bound molecules, its performance for computed condensed phase mass densities is further improved. Most importantly, a speed up of 30 to 50% can be achieved and especially for small orbital energy gap cases, the method is numerically much more robust. The latter point is important for many applications, e.g., for metal-organic frameworks, organic semiconductors, or protein structures. This enables an accurate density functional based electronic structure calculation of a full DNA helix structure on a single core desktop computer which is presented as an example in addition to comprehensive benchmark results.

  4. Accurate Damage Location in Complex Composite Structures and Industrial Environments using Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, M.; Pearson, M.; Lee, W.; Pullin, R.

    2015-07-01

    The ability to accurately locate damage in any given structure is a highly desirable attribute for an effective structural health monitoring system and could help to reduce operating costs and improve safety. This becomes a far greater challenge in complex geometries and materials, such as modern composite airframes. The poor translation of promising laboratory based SHM demonstrators to industrial environments forms a barrier to commercial up take of technology. The acoustic emission (AE) technique is a passive NDT method that detects elastic stress waves released by the growth of damage. It offers very sensitive damage detection, using a sparse array of sensors to detect and globally locate damage within a structure. However its application to complex structures commonly yields poor accuracy due to anisotropic wave propagation and the interruption of wave propagation by structural features such as holes and thickness changes. This work adopts an empirical mapping technique for AE location, known as Delta T Mapping, which uses experimental training data to account for such structural complexities. The technique is applied to a complex geometry composite aerospace structure undergoing certification testing. The component consists of a carbon fibre composite tube with varying wall thickness and multiple holes, that was loaded under bending. The damage location was validated using X-ray CT scanning and the Delta T Mapping technique was shown to improve location accuracy when compared with commercial algorithms. The onset and progression of damage were monitored throughout the test and used to inform future design iterations.

  5. 5D model for accurate representation and visualization of dynamic cardiac structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-te; Robb, Richard A.

    2000-05-01

    Accurate cardiac modeling is challenging due to the intricate structure and complex contraction patterns of myocardial tissues. Fast imaging techniques can provide 4D structural information acquired as a sequence of 3D images throughout the cardiac cycle. To mode. The beating heart, we created a physics-based surface model that deforms between successive time point in the cardiac cycle. 3D images of canine hearts were acquired during one complete cardiac cycle using the DSR and the EBCT. The left ventricle of the first time point is reconstructed as a triangular mesh. A mass-spring physics-based deformable mode,, which can expand and shrink with local contraction and stretching forces distributed in an anatomically accurate simulation of cardiac motion, is applied to the initial mesh and allows the initial mesh to deform to fit the left ventricle in successive time increments of the sequence. The resulting 4D model can be interactively transformed and displayed with associated regional electrical activity mapped onto anatomic surfaces, producing a 5D model, which faithfully exhibits regional cardiac contraction and relaxation patterns over the entire heart. The model faithfully represents structural changes throughout the cardiac cycle. Such models provide the framework for minimizing the number of time points required to usefully depict regional motion of myocardium and allow quantitative assessment of regional myocardial motion. The electrical activation mapping provides spatial and temporal correlation within the cardiac cycle. In procedures which as intra-cardiac catheter ablation, visualization of the dynamic model can be used to accurately localize the foci of myocardial arrhythmias and guide positioning of catheters for optimal ablation.

  6. Petascale self-consistent electromagnetic computations using scalable and accurate algorithms for complex structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cary, John R.; Abell, D.; Amundson, J.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Busby, R.; Carlsson, J. A.; Dimitrov, D. A.; Kashdan, E.; Messmer, P.; Nieter, C.; Smithe, D. N.; Spentzouris, P.; Stoltz, P.; Trines, R. M.; Wang, H.; Werner, G. R.

    2006-09-01

    As the size and cost of particle accelerators escalate, high-performance computing plays an increasingly important role; optimization through accurate, detailed computermodeling increases performance and reduces costs. But consequently, computer simulations face enormous challenges. Early approximation methods, such as expansions in distance from the design orbit, were unable to supply detailed accurate results, such as in the computation of wake fields in complex cavities. Since the advent of message-passing supercomputers with thousands of processors, earlier approximations are no longer necessary, and it is now possible to compute wake fields, the effects of dampers, and self-consistent dynamics in cavities accurately. In this environment, the focus has shifted towards the development and implementation of algorithms that scale to large numbers of processors. So-called charge-conserving algorithms evolve the electromagnetic fields without the need for any global solves (which are difficult to scale up to many processors). Using cut-cell (or embedded) boundaries, these algorithms can simulate the fields in complex accelerator cavities with curved walls. New implicit algorithms, which are stable for any time-step, conserve charge as well, allowing faster simulation of structures with details small compared to the characteristic wavelength. These algorithmic and computational advances have been implemented in the VORPAL7 Framework, a flexible, object-oriented, massively parallel computational application that allows run-time assembly of algorithms and objects, thus composing an application on the fly.

  7. Structure determination of enterovirus 71

    SciTech Connect

    Plevka, Pavel; Perera, Rushika; Cardosa, Jane; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2013-02-20

    Enterovirus 71 is a picornavirus that causes hand, foot and mouth disease but may induce fatal neurological illness in infants and young children. Enterovirus 71 crystallized in a body-centered orthorhombic space group with two particles in general orientations in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Determination of the particle orientations required that the locked rotation function excluded the twofold symmetry axes from the set of icosahedral symmetry operators. This avoided the occurrence of misleading high rotation-function values produced by the alignment of icosahedral and crystallographic twofold axes. Once the orientations and positions of the particles had been established, the structure was solved by molecular replacement and phase extension.

  8. Accurate determination of specific heat at high temperatures using the flash diffusivity method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, J. W.; Zoltan, A.; Wood, C.

    1989-01-01

    The flash diffusivity method of Parker et al. (1961) was used to measure accurately the specific heat of test samples simultaneously with thermal diffusivity, thus obtaining the thermal conductivity of these materials directly. The accuracy of data obtained on two types of materials (n-type silicon-germanium alloys and niobium), was + or - 3 percent. It is shown that the method is applicable up to at least 1300 K.

  9. Revisiting the blind tests in crystal structure prediction: accurate energy ranking of molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Asmadi, Aldi; Neumann, Marcus A; Kendrick, John; Girard, Pascale; Perrin, Marc-Antoine; Leusen, Frank J J

    2009-12-24

    In the 2007 blind test of crystal structure prediction hosted by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), a hybrid DFT/MM method correctly ranked each of the four experimental structures as having the lowest lattice energy of all the crystal structures predicted for each molecule. The work presented here further validates this hybrid method by optimizing the crystal structures (experimental and submitted) of the first three CCDC blind tests held in 1999, 2001, and 2004. Except for the crystal structures of compound IX, all structures were reminimized and ranked according to their lattice energies. The hybrid method computes the lattice energy of a crystal structure as the sum of the DFT total energy and a van der Waals (dispersion) energy correction. Considering all four blind tests, the crystal structure with the lowest lattice energy corresponds to the experimentally observed structure for 12 out of 14 molecules. Moreover, good geometrical agreement is observed between the structures determined by the hybrid method and those measured experimentally. In comparison with the correct submissions made by the blind test participants, all hybrid optimized crystal structures (apart from compound II) have the smallest calculated root mean squared deviations from the experimentally observed structures. It is predicted that a new polymorph of compound V exists under pressure.

  10. Fast and accurate search for non-coding RNA pseudoknot structures in genomes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhibin; Wu, Yong; Robertson, Joseph; Feng, Liang; Malmberg, Russell L.; Cai, Liming

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Searching genomes for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) by their secondary structure has become an important goal for bioinformatics. For pseudoknot-free structures, ncRNA search can be effective based on the covariance model and CYK-type dynamic programming. However, the computational difficulty in aligning an RNA sequence to a pseudoknot has prohibited fast and accurate search of arbitrary RNA structures. Our previous work introduced a graph model for RNA pseudoknots and proposed to solve the structure–sequence alignment by graph optimization. Given k candidate regions in the target sequence for each of the n stems in the structure, we could compute a best alignment in time O(ktn) based upon a tree width t decomposition of the structure graph. However, to implement this method to programs that can routinely perform fast yet accurate RNA pseudoknot searches, we need novel heuristics to ensure that, without degrading the accuracy, only a small number of stem candidates need to be examined and a tree decomposition of a small tree width can always be found for the structure graph. Results: The current work builds on the previous one with newly developed preprocessing algorithms to reduce the values for parameters k and t and to implement the search method into a practical program, called RNATOPS, for RNA pseudoknot search. In particular, we introduce techniques, based on probabilistic profiling and distance penalty functions, which can identify for every stem just a small number k (e.g. k ≤ 10) of plausible regions in the target sequence to which the stem needs to align. We also devised a specialized tree decomposition algorithm that can yield tree decomposition of small tree width t (e.g. t ≤ 4) for almost all RNA structure graphs. Our experiments show that with RNATOPS it is possible to routinely search prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes for specific RNA structures of medium to large sizes, including pseudoknots, with high sensitivity and high

  11. A Simple yet Accurate Method for Students to Determine Asteroid Rotation Periods from Fragmented Light Curve Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beare, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    Professional astronomers use specialized software not normally available to students to determine the rotation periods of asteroids from fragmented light curve data. This paper describes a simple yet accurate method based on Microsoft Excel[R] that enables students to find periods in asteroid light curve and other discontinuous time series data of…

  12. Bottom-up coarse-grained models that accurately describe the structure, pressure, and compressibility of molecular liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Nicholas J. H.; Noid, W. G.

    2015-12-28

    The present work investigates the capability of bottom-up coarse-graining (CG) methods for accurately modeling both structural and thermodynamic properties of all-atom (AA) models for molecular liquids. In particular, we consider 1, 2, and 3-site CG models for heptane, as well as 1 and 3-site CG models for toluene. For each model, we employ the multiscale coarse-graining method to determine interaction potentials that optimally approximate the configuration dependence of the many-body potential of mean force (PMF). We employ a previously developed “pressure-matching” variational principle to determine a volume-dependent contribution to the potential, U{sub V}(V), that approximates the volume-dependence of the PMF. We demonstrate that the resulting CG models describe AA density fluctuations with qualitative, but not quantitative, accuracy. Accordingly, we develop a self-consistent approach for further optimizing U{sub V}, such that the CG models accurately reproduce the equilibrium density, compressibility, and average pressure of the AA models, although the CG models still significantly underestimate the atomic pressure fluctuations. Additionally, by comparing this array of models that accurately describe the structure and thermodynamic pressure of heptane and toluene at a range of different resolutions, we investigate the impact of bottom-up coarse-graining upon thermodynamic properties. In particular, we demonstrate that U{sub V} accounts for the reduced cohesion in the CG models. Finally, we observe that bottom-up coarse-graining introduces subtle correlations between the resolution, the cohesive energy density, and the “simplicity” of the model.

  13. Accurate marker-free alignment with simultaneous geometry determination and reconstruction of tilt series in electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Hanspeter; Taylor, Kenneth A

    2006-02-01

    An image alignment method for electron tomography is presented which is based on cross-correlation techniques and which includes a simultaneous refinement of the tilt geometry. A coarsely aligned tilt series is iteratively refined with a procedure consisting of two steps for each cycle: area matching and subsequent geometry correction. The first step, area matching, brings into register equivalent specimen regions in all images of the tilt series. It determines four parameters of a linear two-dimensional transformation, not just translation and rotation as is done during the preceding coarse alignment with conventional methods. The refinement procedure also differs from earlier methods in that the alignment references are now computed from already aligned images by reprojection of a backprojected volume. The second step, geometry correction, refines the initially inaccurate estimates of the geometrical parameters, including the direction of the tilt axis, a tilt angle offset, and the inclination of the specimen with respect to the support film or specimen holder. The correction values serve as an indicator for the progress of the refinement. For each new iteration, the correction values are used to compute an updated set of geometry parameters by a least squares fit. Model calculations show that it is essential to refine the geometrical parameters as well as the accurate alignment of the images to obtain a faithful map of the original structure.

  14. The R-factor gap in macromolecular crystallography: an untapped potential for insights on accurate structures

    PubMed Central

    Holton, James M; Classen, Scott; Frankel, Kenneth A; Tainer, John A

    2014-01-01

    In macromolecular crystallography, the agreement between observed and predicted structure factors (Rcryst and Rfree) is seldom better than 20%. This is much larger than the estimate of experimental error (Rmerge). The difference between Rcryst and Rmerge is the R-factor gap. There is no such gap in small-molecule crystallography, for which calculated structure factors are generally considered more accurate than the experimental measurements. Perhaps the true noise level of macromolecular data is higher than expected? Or is the gap caused by inaccurate phases that trap refined models in local minima? By generating simulated diffraction patterns using the program MLFSOM, and including every conceivable source of experimental error, we show that neither is the case. Processing our simulated data yielded values that were indistinguishable from those of real data for all crystallographic statistics except the final Rcryst and Rfree. These values decreased to 3.8% and 5.5% for simulated data, suggesting that the reason for high R-factors in macromolecular crystallography is neither experimental error nor phase bias, but rather an underlying inadequacy in the models used to explain our observations. The present inability to accurately represent the entire macromolecule with both its flexibility and its protein-solvent interface may be improved by synergies between small-angle X-ray scattering, computational chemistry and crystallography. The exciting implication of our finding is that macromolecular data contain substantial hidden and untapped potential to resolve ambiguities in the true nature of the nanoscale, a task that the second century of crystallography promises to fulfill. Database Coordinates and structure factors for the real data have been submitted to the Protein Data Bank under accession 4tws. PMID:25040949

  15. Accurate label-free reaction kinetics determination using initial rate heat measurements

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Kourosh Honarmand; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Jacobs, Denise; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate label-free methods or assays to obtain the initial reaction rates have significant importance in fundamental studies of enzymes and in application-oriented high throughput screening of enzyme activity. Here we introduce a label-free approach for obtaining initial rates of enzyme activity from heat measurements, which we name initial rate calorimetry (IrCal). This approach is based on our new finding that the data recorded by isothermal titration calorimetry for the early stages of a reaction, which have been widely ignored, are correlated to the initial rates. Application of the IrCal approach to various enzymes led to accurate enzyme kinetics parameters as compared to spectroscopic methods and enabled enzyme kinetic studies with natural substrate, e.g. proteases with protein substrates. Because heat is a label-free property of almost all reactions, the IrCal approach holds promise in fundamental studies of various enzymes and in use of calorimetry for high throughput screening of enzyme activity. PMID:26574737

  16. Accurate determination of the free-free Gaunt factor - II. Relativistic Gaunt factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hoof, P. A. M.; Ferland, G. J.; Williams, R. J. R.; Volk, K.; Chatzikos, M.; Lykins, M.; Porter, R. L.

    2015-05-01

    When modelling an ionized plasma, all spectral synthesis codes need the thermally averaged free-free Gaunt factor defined over a very wide range of parameter space in order to produce an accurate prediction for the spectrum. Until now no data set exists that would meet these needs completely. We have therefore produced a table of relativistic Gaunt factors over a much wider range of parameter space than has ever been produced before. We present tables of the thermally averaged Gaunt factor covering the range 10log γ2 = -6 to 10 and 10log u = -16 to 13 for all atomic numbers Z = 1 through 36. The data were calculated using the relativistic Bethe-Heitler-Elwert (BHE) approximation and were subsequently merged with accurate non-relativistic results in those parts of the parameter space where the BHE approximation is not valid. These data will be incorporated in the next major release of the spectral synthesis code CLOUDY. We also produced tables of the frequency integrated Gaunt factor covering the parameter space 10log γ2 = -6 to +10 for all values of Z between 1 and 36. All the data presented in this paper are available online.

  17. Accurate airway segmentation based on intensity structure analysis and graph-cut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qier; Kitsaka, Takayuki; Nimura, Yukitaka; Oda, Masahiro; Mori, Kensaku

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a novel airway segmentation method based on intensity structure analysis and graph-cut. Airway segmentation is an important step in analyzing chest CT volumes for computerized lung cancer detection, emphysema diagnosis, asthma diagnosis, and pre- and intra-operative bronchoscope navigation. However, obtaining a complete 3-D airway tree structure from a CT volume is quite challenging. Several researchers have proposed automated algorithms basically based on region growing and machine learning techniques. However these methods failed to detect the peripheral bronchi branches. They caused a large amount of leakage. This paper presents a novel approach that permits more accurate extraction of complex bronchial airway region. Our method are composed of three steps. First, the Hessian analysis is utilized for enhancing the line-like structure in CT volumes, then a multiscale cavity-enhancement filter is employed to detect the cavity-like structure from the previous enhanced result. In the second step, we utilize the support vector machine (SVM) to construct a classifier for removing the FP regions generated. Finally, the graph-cut algorithm is utilized to connect all of the candidate voxels to form an integrated airway tree. We applied this method to sixteen cases of 3D chest CT volumes. The results showed that the branch detection rate of this method can reach about 77.7% without leaking into the lung parenchyma areas.

  18. Beyond Ellipse(s): Accurately Modelling the Isophotal Structure of Galaxies with ISOFIT and CMODEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciambur, B. C.

    2015-09-01

    This work introduces a new fitting formalism for isophotes that enables more accurate modeling of galaxies with non-elliptical shapes, such as disk galaxies viewed edge-on or galaxies with X-shaped/peanut bulges. Within this scheme, the angular parameter that defines quasi-elliptical isophotes is transformed from the commonly used, but inappropriate, polar coordinate to the “eccentric anomaly.” This provides a superior description of deviations from ellipticity, better capturing the true isophotal shape. Furthermore, this makes it possible to accurately recover both the surface brightness profile, using the correct azimuthally averaged isophote, and the two-dimensional model of any galaxy: the hitherto ubiquitous, but artificial, cross-like features in residual images are completely removed. The formalism has been implemented into the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility tasks Ellipse and Bmodel to create the new tasks “Isofit,” and “Cmodel.” The new tools are demonstrated here with application to five galaxies, chosen to be representative case-studies for several areas where this technique makes it possible to gain new scientific insight. Specifically: properly quantifying boxy/disky isophotes via the fourth harmonic order in edge-on galaxies, quantifying X-shaped/peanut bulges, higher-order Fourier moments for modeling bars in disks, and complex isophote shapes. Higher order (n > 4) harmonics now become meaningful and may correlate with structural properties, as boxyness/diskyness is known to do. This work also illustrates how the accurate construction, and subtraction, of a model from a galaxy image facilitates the identification and recovery of over-lapping sources such as globular clusters and the optical counterparts of X-ray sources.

  19. BEYOND ELLIPSE(S): ACCURATELY MODELING THE ISOPHOTAL STRUCTURE OF GALAXIES WITH ISOFIT AND CMODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ciambur, B. C.

    2015-09-10

    This work introduces a new fitting formalism for isophotes that enables more accurate modeling of galaxies with non-elliptical shapes, such as disk galaxies viewed edge-on or galaxies with X-shaped/peanut bulges. Within this scheme, the angular parameter that defines quasi-elliptical isophotes is transformed from the commonly used, but inappropriate, polar coordinate to the “eccentric anomaly.” This provides a superior description of deviations from ellipticity, better capturing the true isophotal shape. Furthermore, this makes it possible to accurately recover both the surface brightness profile, using the correct azimuthally averaged isophote, and the two-dimensional model of any galaxy: the hitherto ubiquitous, but artificial, cross-like features in residual images are completely removed. The formalism has been implemented into the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility tasks Ellipse and Bmodel to create the new tasks “Isofit,” and “Cmodel.” The new tools are demonstrated here with application to five galaxies, chosen to be representative case-studies for several areas where this technique makes it possible to gain new scientific insight. Specifically: properly quantifying boxy/disky isophotes via the fourth harmonic order in edge-on galaxies, quantifying X-shaped/peanut bulges, higher-order Fourier moments for modeling bars in disks, and complex isophote shapes. Higher order (n > 4) harmonics now become meaningful and may correlate with structural properties, as boxyness/diskyness is known to do. This work also illustrates how the accurate construction, and subtraction, of a model from a galaxy image facilitates the identification and recovery of over-lapping sources such as globular clusters and the optical counterparts of X-ray sources.

  20. Accurate electronic-structure description of Mn complexes: a GGA+U approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Elise Y.; Kulik, Heather; Marzari, Nicola

    2008-03-01

    Conventional density-functional approach often fail in offering an accurate description of the spin-resolved energetics in transition metals complexes. We will focus here on Mn complexes, where many aspects of the molecular structure and the reaction mechanisms are still unresolved - most notably in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II and the manganese catalase (MC). We apply a self-consistent GGA + U approach [1], originally designed within the DFT framework for the treatment of strongly correlated materials, to describe the geometry, the electronic and the magnetic properties of various manganese oxide complexes, finding very good agreement with higher-order ab-initio calculations. In particular, the different oxidation states of dinuclear systems containing the [Mn2O2]^n+ (n= 2, 3, 4) core are investigated, in order to mimic the basic face unit of the OEC complex. [1]. H. J. Kulik, M. Cococcioni, D. A. Scherlis, N. Marzari, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2006, 97, 103001

  1. Efficient and Accurate Multiple-Phenotype Regression Method for High Dimensional Data Considering Population Structure.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jong Wha J; Kang, Eun Yong; Org, Elin; Furlotte, Nick; Parks, Brian; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Lusis, Aldons J; Eskin, Eleazar

    2016-12-01

    A typical genome-wide association study tests correlation between a single phenotype and each genotype one at a time. However, single-phenotype analysis might miss unmeasured aspects of complex biological networks. Analyzing many phenotypes simultaneously may increase the power to capture these unmeasured aspects and detect more variants. Several multivariate approaches aim to detect variants related to more than one phenotype, but these current approaches do not consider the effects of population structure. As a result, these approaches may result in a significant amount of false positive identifications. Here, we introduce a new methodology, referred to as GAMMA for generalized analysis of molecular variance for mixed-model analysis, which is capable of simultaneously analyzing many phenotypes and correcting for population structure. In a simulated study using data implanted with true genetic effects, GAMMA accurately identifies these true effects without producing false positives induced by population structure. In simulations with this data, GAMMA is an improvement over other methods which either fail to detect true effects or produce many false positive identifications. We further apply our method to genetic studies of yeast and gut microbiome from mice and show that GAMMA identifies several variants that are likely to have true biological mechanisms.

  2. Test system accurately determines tensile properties of irradiated metals at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, P. J.; Skalka, R. J.; Vandergrift, E. F.

    1967-01-01

    Modified testing system determines tensile properties of irradiated brittle-type metals at cryogenic temperatures. The system includes a lightweight cryostat, split-screw grips, a universal joint, and a special temperature control system.

  3. Communication: Accurate determination of side-chain torsion angle χ1 in proteins: Phenylalanine residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suardíaz, R.; Crespo-Otero, R.; Pérez, C.; Fabián, J. San; de la Vega, J. M. García

    2011-02-01

    Quantitative side-chain torsion angle χ1 determinations of phenylalanine residues in Desulfovibrio vulgaris flavodoxin are carried out using exclusively the correlation between the experimental vicinal coupling constants and theoretically determined Karplus equations. Karplus coefficients for nine vicinal coupling related with the torsion angle χ1 were calculated using the B3LYP functional and basis sets of different size. Optimized χ1 angles are in outstanding agreement with those previously reported by employing x ray and NMR measurements.

  4. Low-energy structures of benzene clusters with a novel accurate potential surface.

    PubMed

    Bartolomei, M; Pirani, F; Marques, J M C

    2015-12-05

    The benzene-benzene (Bz-Bz) interaction is present in several chemical systems and it is known to be crucial in understanding the specificity of important biological phenomena. In this work, we propose a novel Bz-Bz analytical potential energy surface which is fine-tuned on accurate ab initio calculations in order to improve its reliability. Once the Bz-Bz interaction is modeled, an analytical function for the energy of the Bzn clusters may be obtained by summing up over all pair potentials. We apply an evolutionary algorithm (EA) to discover the lowest-energy structures of Bzn clusters (for n=2-25), and the results are compared with previous global optimization studies where different potential functions were employed. Besides the global minimum, the EA also gives the structures of other low-lying isomers ranked by the corresponding energy. Additional ab initio calculations are carried out for the low-lying isomers of Bz3 and Bz4 clusters, and the global minimum is confirmed as the most stable structure for both sizes. Finally, a detailed analysis of the low-energy isomers of the n = 13 and 19 magic-number clusters is performed. The two lowest-energy Bz13 isomers show S6 and C3 symmetry, respectively, which is compatible with the experimental results available in the literature. The Bz19 structures reported here are all non-symmetric, showing two central Bz molecules surrounded by 12 nearest-neighbor monomers in the case of the five lowest-energy structures.

  5. Structural determinants of glomerular permeability.

    PubMed

    Deen, W M; Lazzara, M J; Myers, B D

    2001-10-01

    Recent progress in relating the functional properties of the glomerular capillary wall to its unique structure is reviewed. The fenestrated endothelium, glomerular basement membrane (GBM), and epithelial filtration slits form a series arrangement in which the flow diverges as it enters the GBM from the fenestrae and converges again at the filtration slits. A hydrodynamic model that combines morphometric findings with water flow data in isolated GBM has predicted overall hydraulic permeabilities that are consistent with measurements in vivo. The resistance of the GBM to water flow, which accounts for roughly half that of the capillary wall, is strongly dependent on the extent to which the GBM surfaces are blocked by cells. The spatial frequency of filtration slits is predicted to be a very important determinant of the overall hydraulic permeability, in keeping with observations in several glomerular diseases in humans. Whereas the hydraulic resistances of the cell layers and GBM are additive, the overall sieving coefficient for a macromolecule (its concentration in Bowman's space divided by that in plasma) is the product of the sieving coefficients for the individual layers. Models for macromolecule filtration reveal that the individual sieving coefficients are influenced by one another and by the filtrate velocity, requiring great care in extrapolating in vitro observations to the living animal. The size selectivity of the glomerular capillary has been shown to be determined largely by the cellular layers, rather than the GBM. Controversial findings concerning glomerular charge selectivity are reviewed, and it is concluded that there is good evidence for a role of charge in restricting the transmural movement of albumin. Also discussed is an effect of albumin that has received little attention, namely, its tendency to increase the sieving coefficients of test macromolecules via steric interactions. Among the unresolved issues are the specific contributions of the

  6. Accurate response surface approximations for weight equations based on structural optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papila, Melih

    Accurate weight prediction methods are vitally important for aircraft design optimization. Therefore, designers seek weight prediction techniques with low computational cost and high accuracy, and usually require a compromise between the two. The compromise can be achieved by combining stress analysis and response surface (RS) methodology. While stress analysis provides accurate weight information, RS techniques help to transmit effectively this information to the optimization procedure. The focus of this dissertation is structural weight equations in the form of RS approximations and their accuracy when fitted to results of structural optimizations that are based on finite element analyses. Use of RS methodology filters out the numerical noise in structural optimization results and provides a smooth weight function that can easily be used in gradient-based configuration optimization. In engineering applications RS approximations of low order polynomials are widely used, but the weight may not be modeled well by low-order polynomials, leading to bias errors. In addition, some structural optimization results may have high-amplitude errors (outliers) that may severely affect the accuracy of the weight equation. Statistical techniques associated with RS methodology are sought in order to deal with these two difficulties: (1) high-amplitude numerical noise (outliers) and (2) approximation model inadequacy. The investigation starts with reducing approximation error by identifying and repairing outliers. A potential reason for outliers in optimization results is premature convergence, and outliers of such nature may be corrected by employing different convergence settings. It is demonstrated that outlier repair can lead to accuracy improvements over the more standard approach of removing outliers. The adequacy of approximation is then studied by a modified lack-of-fit approach, and RS errors due to the approximation model are reduced by using higher order polynomials. In

  7. A framework for accurate determination of the T₂ distribution from multiple echo magnitude MRI images.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ruiliang; Koay, Cheng Guan; Hutchinson, Elizabeth; Basser, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Measurement of the T2 distribution in tissues provides biologically relevant information about normal and abnormal microstructure and organization. Typically, the T2 distribution is obtained by fitting the magnitude MR images acquired by a multi-echo MRI pulse sequence using an inverse Laplace transform (ILT) algorithm. It is well known that the ideal magnitude MR signal follows a Rician distribution. Unfortunately, studies attempting to establish the validity and efficacy of the ILT algorithm assume that these input signals are Gaussian distributed. Violation of the normality (or Gaussian) assumption introduces unexpected artifacts, including spurious cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-like long T2 components; bias of the true geometric mean T2 values and in the relative fractions of various components; and blurring of nearby T2 peaks in the T2 distribution. Here we apply and extend our previously proposed magnitude signal transformation framework to map noisy Rician-distributed magnitude multi-echo MRI signals into Gaussian-distributed signals with high accuracy and precision. We then perform an ILT on the transformed data to obtain an accurate T2 distribution. Additionally, we demonstrate, by simulations and experiments, that this approach corrects the aforementioned artifacts in magnitude multi-echo MR images over a large range of signal-to-noise ratios.

  8. DFT SOLVATION STUDIES OF CARBOHYDRATES: DETERMINATION OF ACCURATE ALPHA/BETA-ANOMERIC RATIOS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solvents play an important role in carbohydrate structure. Therefore, it is important to include solvation effects in calculations to allow a better comparison with experimental data. One way to include solvation effects is via the use of continuum solvation models such as COSMO. Another possibil...

  9. GULF WAR VETERANS: Limitations of Available Data for Accurately Determining the Incidence of Tumors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    237 238 239 Total Eye Brain and other parts of nervous system Thyroid gland Other endocrine glands and related structures Hemangioma and...growth, benign Brain, new growth, malignant Brain, new growth, benign Spinal cord, new growth malignant Spinal cord, new growth, benign Number

  10. Toward Hamiltonian Adaptive QM/MM: Accurate Solvent Structures Using Many-Body Potentials.

    PubMed

    Boereboom, Jelle M; Potestio, Raffaello; Donadio, Davide; Bulo, Rosa E

    2016-08-09

    Adaptive quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical (MM) methods enable efficient molecular simulations of chemistry in solution. Reactive subregions are modeled with an accurate QM potential energy expression while the rest of the system is described in a more approximate manner (MM). As solvent molecules diffuse in and out of the reactive region, they are gradually included into (and excluded from) the QM expression. It would be desirable to model such a system with a single adaptive Hamiltonian, but thus far this has resulted in distorted structures at the boundary between the two regions. Solving this long outstanding problem will allow microcanonical adaptive QM/MM simulations that can be used to obtain vibrational spectra and dynamical properties. The difficulty lies in the complex QM potential energy expression, with a many-body expansion that contains higher order terms. Here, we outline a Hamiltonian adaptive multiscale scheme within the framework of many-body potentials. The adaptive expressions are entirely general, and complementary to all standard (nonadaptive) QM/MM embedding schemes available. We demonstrate the merit of our approach on a molecular system defined by two different MM potentials (MM/MM'). For the long-range interactions a numerical scheme is used (particle mesh Ewald), which yields energy expressions that are many-body in nature. Our Hamiltonian approach is the first to provide both energy conservation and the correct solvent structure everywhere in this system.

  11. Protein Structure Determination Using Protein Threading and Sparse NMR Data

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, O.H.; Einstein, J.R.; Xu, D.; Xu, Y.

    1999-11-14

    It is well known that the NMR method for protein structure determination applies to small proteins and that its effectiveness decreases very rapidly as the molecular weight increases beyond about 30 kD. We have recently developed a method for protein structure determination that can fully utilize partial NMR data as calculation constraints. The core of the method is a threading algorithm that guarantees to find a globally optimal alignment between a query sequence and a template structure, under distance constraints specified by NMR/NOE data. Our preliminary tests have demonstrated that a small number of NMR/NOE distance restraints can significantly improve threading performance in both fold recognition and threading-alignment accuracy, and can possibly extend threading's scope of applicability from structural homologs to structural analogs. An accurate backbone structure generated by NMR-constrained threading can then provide a significant amount of structural information, equivalent to that provided by the NMR method with many NMR/NOE restraints; and hence can greatly reduce the amount of NMR data typically required for accurate structure determination. Our preliminary study suggests that a small number of NMR/NOE restraints may suffice to determine adequately the all-atom structure when those restraints are incorporated in a procedure combining threading, modeling of loops and sidechains, and molecular dynamics simulation. Potentially, this new technique can expand NMR's capability to larger proteins.

  12. Accurate determination of volume and evaporation rate of micron-size liquid particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.; Sasagawa, N.; Sakai, K.

    2010-09-01

    We developed a noncontact method to measure the liquid droplet size of about 10 μm diameter within accuracy of 0.1 μm. A droplet ejected by an inkjet nozzle is induced into the glass windshield and falls due to the gravity against the viscosity of the atmosphere. The droplet is illuminated by a laser passing along the center of the glass windshield and the droplet diameter is determined from the falling velocity by the video analysis with the knowledge about the density of the droplet, and the viscosity of the atmosphere. The real time measurement of the droplet size through the rapid evaporation process thus becomes possible. The evaporation rate from the pure water droplet determined by the present method was found be more than 200 times larger than that from the surface with macroscopic spatial scale.

  13. Accurate determination of frequency dependent three element equivalent circuit for symmetric step microstrip discontinuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, M. J.; Easter, B.; Hornsby, J. S.

    1990-02-01

    A three element frequency dependent equivalent circuit which characterizes a symmetric step microstrip discontinuity is determined using the method of lines. This method was applied so as to exploit to the full the processing capabilities of the available Cyber 205 computer, and to obtain results with the highest possible accuracy at frequencies in the range 4-16 GHz. Numerical values of scattering parameters are given for three geometries.

  14. Accurate determination of the diffusion coefficient of proteins by Fourier analysis with whole column imaging detection.

    PubMed

    Zarabadi, Atefeh S; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2015-02-17

    Analysis in the frequency domain is considered a powerful tool to elicit precise information from spectroscopic signals. In this study, the Fourier transformation technique is employed to determine the diffusion coefficient (D) of a number of proteins in the frequency domain. Analytical approaches are investigated for determination of D from both experimental and data treatment viewpoints. The diffusion process is modeled to calculate diffusion coefficients based on the Fourier transformation solution to Fick's law equation, and its results are compared to time domain results. The simulations characterize optimum spatial and temporal conditions and demonstrate the noise tolerance of the method. The proposed model is validated by its application for the electropherograms from the diffusion path of a set of proteins. Real-time dynamic scanning is conducted to monitor dispersion by employing whole column imaging detection technology in combination with capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) and the imaging plug flow (iPF) experiment. These experimental techniques provide different peak shapes, which are utilized to demonstrate the Fourier transformation ability in extracting diffusion coefficients out of irregular shape signals. Experimental results confirmed that the Fourier transformation procedure substantially enhanced the accuracy of the determined values compared to those obtained in the time domain.

  15. Raman Spectroscopy Provides a Powerful Diagnostic Tool for Accurate Determination of Albumin Glycation

    PubMed Central

    Dingari, Narahara Chari; Horowitz, Gary L.; Kang, Jeon Woong; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Barman, Ishan

    2012-01-01

    We present the first demonstration of glycated albumin detection and quantification using Raman spectroscopy without the addition of reagents. Glycated albumin is an important marker for monitoring the long-term glycemic history of diabetics, especially as its concentrations, in contrast to glycated hemoglobin levels, are unaffected by changes in erythrocyte life times. Clinically, glycated albumin concentrations show a strong correlation with the development of serious diabetes complications including nephropathy and retinopathy. In this article, we propose and evaluate the efficacy of Raman spectroscopy for determination of this important analyte. By utilizing the pre-concentration obtained through drop-coating deposition, we show that glycation of albumin leads to subtle, but consistent, changes in vibrational features, which with the help of multivariate classification techniques can be used to discriminate glycated albumin from the unglycated variant with 100% accuracy. Moreover, we demonstrate that the calibration model developed on the glycated albumin spectral dataset shows high predictive power, even at substantially lower concentrations than those typically encountered in clinical practice. In fact, the limit of detection for glycated albumin measurements is calculated to be approximately four times lower than its minimum physiological concentration. Importantly, in relation to the existing detection methods for glycated albumin, the proposed method is also completely reagent-free, requires barely any sample preparation and has the potential for simultaneous determination of glycated hemoglobin levels as well. Given these key advantages, we believe that the proposed approach can provide a uniquely powerful tool for quantification of glycation status of proteins in biopharmaceutical development as well as for glycemic marker determination in routine clinical diagnostics in the future. PMID:22393405

  16. Optical aperture area determination for accurate illuminance and luminous efficacy measurements of LED lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dönsberg, Timo; Mäntynen, Henrik; Ikonen, Erkki

    2016-06-01

    The measurement uncertainty of illuminance and, consequently, luminous flux and luminous efficacy of LED lamps can be reduced with a recently introduced method based on the predictable quantum efficient detector (PQED). One of the most critical factors affecting the measurement uncertainty with the PQED method is the determination of the aperture area. This paper describes an upgrade to an optical method for direct determination of aperture area where superposition of equally spaced Gaussian laser beams is used to form a uniform irradiance distribution. In practice, this is accomplished by scanning the aperture in front of an intensity-stabilized laser beam. In the upgraded method, the aperture is attached to the PQED and the whole package is transversely scanned relative to the laser beam. This has the benefit of having identical geometry in the laser scanning of the aperture area and in the actual photometric measurement. Further, the aperture and detector assembly does not have to be dismantled for the aperture calibration. However, due to small acceptance angle of the PQED, differences between the diffraction effects of an overfilling plane wave and of a combination of Gaussian laser beams at the circular aperture need to be taken into account. A numerical calculation method for studying these effects is discussed in this paper. The calculation utilizes the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integral, which is applied to the geometry of the PQED and the aperture. Calculation results for various aperture diameters and two different aperture-to-detector distances are presented.

  17. [Extracting THz absorption coefficient spectrum based on accurate determination of sample thickness].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Zhang, Zhao-hui; Zhao, Xiao-yan; Su, Hai-xia; Yan, Fang

    2012-04-01

    Extracting absorption spectrum in THz band is one of the important aspects in THz applications. Sample's absorption coefficient has a complex nonlinear relationship with its thickness. However, as it is not convenient to measure the thickness directly, absorption spectrum is usually determined incorrectly. Based on the method proposed by Duvillaret which was used to precisely determine the thickness of LiNbO3, the approach to measuring the absorption coefficient spectra of glutamine and histidine in frequency range from 0.3 to 2.6 THz(1 THz = 10(12) Hz) was improved in this paper. In order to validate the correctness of this absorption spectrum, we designed a series of experiments to compare the linearity of absorption coefficient belonging to one kind amino acid in different concentrations. The results indicate that as agreed by Lambert-Beer's Law, absorption coefficient spectrum of amino acid from the improved algorithm performs better linearity with its concentration than that from the common algorithm, which can be the basis of quantitative analysis in further researches.

  18. A new sensor system for accurate and precise determination of sediment dynamics and position.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniatis, Georgios; Hoey, Trevor; Sventek, Joseph; Hodge, Rebecca

    2014-05-01

    Sediment transport processes control many significant geomorphological changes. Consequently, sediment transport dynamics are studied across a wide range of scales leading to application of a variety of conceptually different mathematical descriptions (models) and data acquisition techniques (sensing). For river sediment transport processes both Eulerian and Lagrangian formulations are used. Data are gathered using a very wide range of sensing techniques that are not always compatible with the conceptual formulation applied. We are concerned with small to medium sediment grain-scale motion in gravel-bed rivers, and other coarse-grained environments, and: a) are developing a customised environmental sensor capable of providing coherent data that reliably record the motion; and, b) provide a mathematical framework in which these data can be analysed and interpreted, this being compatible with current stochastic approaches to sediment transport theory. Here we present results from three different aspects of the above developmental process. Firstly, we present a requirement analysis for the sensor based on the state of the art of the existing technologies. We focus on the factors that enhance data coherence and representativeness, extending the common practice for optimization which is based exclusively on electronics/computing related criteria. This analysis leads to formalization of a method that permits accurate control on the physical properties of the sensor using contemporary rapid prototyping techniques [Maniatis et al. 2013]. Secondly the first results are presented from a series of entrainment experiments in a 5 x 0.8 m flume in which a prototype sensor was deployed to monitor entrainment dynamics under increasing flow conditions (0.037 m3.s-1). The sensor was enclosed in an idealized spherical case (111 mm diameter) and placed on a constructed bed of hemispheres of the same diameter. We measured 3-axial inertial acceleration (as a measure of flow stress

  19. Accurate determination of silver nanoparticles in animal tissues by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veverková, Lenka; Hradilová, Šárka; Milde, David; Panáček, Aleš; Skopalová, Jana; Kvítek, Libor; Petrželová, Kamila; Zbořil, Radek

    2014-12-01

    This study examined recoveries of silver determination in animal tissues after wet digestion by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The composition of the mineralization mixture for microwave assisted digestion was optimized and the best recoveries were obtained for mineralization with HNO3 and addition of HCl promptly after digestion. The optimization was performed on model samples of chicken meat spiked with silver nanoparticles and a solution of ionic silver. Basic calculations of theoretical distribution of Ag among various silver-containing species were implemented and the results showed that most of the silver is in the form of soluble complexes AgCl2- and AgCl32 - for the optimized composition of the mineralization mixture. Three animal tissue certified reference materials were then analyzed to verify the trueness and precision of the results.

  20. Accurate determination of the first ionization potential of actinides by laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautmann, N.

    1994-10-01

    A new method is described for the precise determination of the first ionization potential of elements which are available only in small amounts such as the heavier actinides. It is based on resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS) in the presence of an external electric field. Extrapolation of the ionization thresholds obtained with different electric field strengths to field strength zero leads directly to the first ionization potential. With samples of 10(exp 12) atoms of Np-237 and Am-243 experimental values for the first ionization potential of neptunium of IP(sub Np) = 6.2655(2) eV and of americium of IP(sub Am) = 5.9738(2) eV were obtained. This technique was also applied to thorium yielding a value of IP(sub Th) = 6.3067(2) eV. In addition the precision of the method was confirmed by the convergences of Rydberg series of americium measured by means of RIMS.

  1. Straightforward and accurate technique for post-coupler stabilization in drift tube linac structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalvati, Mohammad Reza; Ramberger, Suitbert

    2016-04-01

    The axial electric field of Alvarez drift tube linacs (DTLs) is known to be susceptible to variations due to static and dynamic effects like manufacturing tolerances and beam loading. Post-couplers are used to stabilize the accelerating fields of DTLs against tuning errors. Tilt sensitivity and its slope have been introduced as measures for the stability right from the invention of post-couplers but since then the actual stabilization has mostly been done by tedious iteration. In the present article, the local tilt-sensitivity slope TSn' is established as the principal measure for stabilization instead of tilt sensitivity or some visual slope, and its significance is developed on the basis of an equivalent-circuit diagram of the DTL. Experimental and 3D simulation results are used to analyze its behavior and to define a technique for stabilization that allows finding the best post-coupler settings with just four tilt-sensitivity measurements. CERN's Linac4 DTL Tank 2 and Tank 3 have been stabilized successfully using this technique. The final tilt-sensitivity error has been reduced from ±100 %/MHz down to ±3 %/MHz for Tank 2 and down to ±1 %/MHz for Tank 3. Finally, an accurate procedure for tuning the structure using slug tuners is discussed.

  2. Structural stability augmentation system design using BODEDIRECT: A quick and accurate approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goslin, T. J.; Ho, J. K.

    1989-01-01

    A methodology is presented for a modal suppression control law design using flight test data instead of mathematical models to obtain the required gain and phase information about the flexible airplane. This approach is referred to as BODEDIRECT. The purpose of the BODEDIRECT program is to provide a method of analyzing the modal phase relationships measured directly from the airplane. These measurements can be achieved with a frequency sweep at the control surface input while measuring the outputs of interest. The measured Bode-models can be used directly for analysis in the frequency domain, and for control law design. Besides providing a more accurate representation for the system inputs and outputs of interest, this method is quick and relatively inexpensive. To date, the BODEDIRECT program has been tested and verified for computational integrity. Its capabilities include calculation of series, parallel and loop closure connections between Bode-model representations. System PSD, together with gain and phase margins of stability may be calculated for successive loop closures of multi-input/multi-output systems. Current plans include extensive flight testing to obtain a Bode-model representation of a commercial aircraft for design of a structural stability augmentation system.

  3. COSMOS: accurate detection of somatic structural variations through asymmetric comparison between tumor and normal samples.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Koichi; Yamanishi, Ayako; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji; Sese, Jun

    2016-05-05

    An important challenge in cancer genomics is precise detection of structural variations (SVs) by high-throughput short-read sequencing, which is hampered by the high false discovery rates of existing analysis tools. Here, we propose an accurate SV detection method named COSMOS, which compares the statistics of the mapped read pairs in tumor samples with isogenic normal control samples in a distinct asymmetric manner. COSMOS also prioritizes the candidate SVs using strand-specific read-depth information. Performance tests on modeled tumor genomes revealed that COSMOS outperformed existing methods in terms of F-measure. We also applied COSMOS to an experimental mouse cell-based model, in which SVs were induced by genome engineering and gamma-ray irradiation, followed by polymerase chain reaction-based confirmation. The precision of COSMOS was 84.5%, while the next best existing method was 70.4%. Moreover, the sensitivity of COSMOS was the highest, indicating that COSMOS has great potential for cancer genome analysis.

  4. Coding exon-structure aware realigner (CESAR) utilizes genome alignments for accurate comparative gene annotation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Virag; Elghafari, Anas; Hiller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Identifying coding genes is an essential step in genome annotation. Here, we utilize existing whole genome alignments to detect conserved coding exons and then map gene annotations from one genome to many aligned genomes. We show that genome alignments contain thousands of spurious frameshifts and splice site mutations in exons that are truly conserved. To overcome these limitations, we have developed CESAR (Coding Exon-Structure Aware Realigner) that realigns coding exons, while considering reading frame and splice sites of each exon. CESAR effectively avoids spurious frameshifts in conserved genes and detects 91% of shifted splice sites. This results in the identification of thousands of additional conserved exons and 99% of the exons that lack inactivating mutations match real exons. Finally, to demonstrate the potential of using CESAR for comparative gene annotation, we applied it to 188 788 exons of 19 865 human genes to annotate human genes in 99 other vertebrates. These comparative gene annotations are available as a resource (http://bds.mpi-cbg.de/hillerlab/CESAR/). CESAR (https://github.com/hillerlab/CESAR/) can readily be applied to other alignments to accurately annotate coding genes in many other vertebrate and invertebrate genomes. PMID:27016733

  5. COSMOS: accurate detection of somatic structural variations through asymmetric comparison between tumor and normal samples

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, Koichi; Yamanishi, Ayako; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji; Sese, Jun

    2016-01-01

    An important challenge in cancer genomics is precise detection of structural variations (SVs) by high-throughput short-read sequencing, which is hampered by the high false discovery rates of existing analysis tools. Here, we propose an accurate SV detection method named COSMOS, which compares the statistics of the mapped read pairs in tumor samples with isogenic normal control samples in a distinct asymmetric manner. COSMOS also prioritizes the candidate SVs using strand-specific read-depth information. Performance tests on modeled tumor genomes revealed that COSMOS outperformed existing methods in terms of F-measure. We also applied COSMOS to an experimental mouse cell-based model, in which SVs were induced by genome engineering and gamma-ray irradiation, followed by polymerase chain reaction-based confirmation. The precision of COSMOS was 84.5%, while the next best existing method was 70.4%. Moreover, the sensitivity of COSMOS was the highest, indicating that COSMOS has great potential for cancer genome analysis. PMID:26833260

  6. Accurate structures and binding energies for small water clusters: The water trimer

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, I.M.; Seidl, E.T.; Janssen, C.L.

    1999-05-01

    The global minimum on the water trimer potential energy surface has been investigated by means of second-order Mo/ller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory employing the series of correlation-consistent basis sets aug-cc-pVXZ (X = D, T, Q, 5, 6), the largest of which contains 1329 basis functions. Definitive predictions are made for the binding energy and equilibrium structure, and improved values are presented for the harmonic vibrational frequencies. A value of 15.82{plus_minus}0.05 kcal mol{sup {minus}1} is advanced for the infinite basis set frozen core MP2 binding energy, obtained by extrapolation of MP2 correlation energies computed at the aug-cc-pVQZ MP2 geometry. Inclusion of core correlation, using the aug-cc-pCV5Z basis set, has been found to increase the binding energy by 0.08 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}, and after consideration of core correlation and higher-order correlation effects, the classical binding energy for the water trimer is estimated to be 15.9{plus_minus}0.2 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}. A zero-point vibrational correction of {minus}5.43 kcal mol{sup {minus}1} has been computed from aug-cc-pVTZ MP2 harmonic vibrational frequencies. The accuracy of different computational schemes for obtaining the binding energies of the water dimer and trimer has been investigated, and computationally feasible methods are suggested for obtaining accurate structures and binding energies for larger water clusters.{copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Absolute age Determinations on Diamond by Radioisotopic Methods: NOT the way to Accurately Identify Diamond Provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirey, S. B.

    2002-05-01

    Gem-quality diamond contains such low abundances of parent-daughter radionuclides that dating the diamond lattice directly by isotopic measurements has been and will be impossible. Absolute ages on diamonds typically are obtained through measurements of their syngenetic mineral inclusions: Rb-Sr in garnet; Sm-Nd in garnet and pyroxene; Re-Os and U-Th-Pb in sulfide; K-Ar in pyroxene; and U-Pb in zircon. The application of the first two isotope schemes in the list requires putting together many inclusions from many diamonds whereas the latter isotope schemes permit ages on single diamonds. The key limitations on the application of these decay pairs are the availability and size of the inclusions, the abundance levels of the radionuclides, and instrumental sensitivity. Practical complications of radioisotope dating of inclusions are fatal to the application of the technique for diamond provenance. In all mines, the ratio of gem-quality diamonds to stones with datable inclusions is very high. Thus there is no way to date the valuable, marketable stones that are part of the conflict diamond problem, just their rare, flawed cousins. Each analysis destroys the diamond host plus the inclusion and can only be carried out in research labs by highly trained scientists. Thus, these methods can not be automated or applied to the bulk of diamond production. The geological problems with age dating are equally fatal to its application to diamond provenance. From the geological perspective, for age determination to work as a tool for diamond provenance studies, diamond ages would have to be specific to particular kimberlites or kimberlite fields and different between fields. The southern African Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe Craton and Limpopo Mobile Belt is the only cratonic region where age determinations have been applied on a large enough scale to a number of kimberlites to illustrate the geological problems in age measurements for diamond provenance. However, this southern African example

  8. Note: Accurate determination of thickness of multiple layers of thin film deposited on a piezoelectric quartz crystal.

    PubMed

    Wajid, Abdul

    2013-10-01

    Modern day piezoelectric quartz crystal microbalances for thin film deposition control are based on Z-match equation, which is mathematically valid for deposition of a single material on a given quartz crystal. When multiple layers are deposited, thickness and deposition rate errors accumulate due to mismatch of acoustic impedance of different materials. Here we present a novel method, based on the acoustic transfer matrix formalism, for accurate determination of thickness of an arbitrary number of layers of dissimilar materials deposited on a quartz crystal. Laboratory data show excellent accuracy of the method compared to conventional Z-match equation.

  9. Note: Accurate determination of thickness of multiple layers of thin film deposited on a piezoelectric quartz crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wajid, Abdul

    2013-10-01

    Modern day piezoelectric quartz crystal microbalances for thin film deposition control are based on Z-match equation, which is mathematically valid for deposition of a single material on a given quartz crystal. When multiple layers are deposited, thickness and deposition rate errors accumulate due to mismatch of acoustic impedance of different materials. Here we present a novel method, based on the acoustic transfer matrix formalism, for accurate determination of thickness of an arbitrary number of layers of dissimilar materials deposited on a quartz crystal. Laboratory data show excellent accuracy of the method compared to conventional Z-match equation.

  10. Fast and Accurate Technique for Determination of Moisture Content in Oil Palm Fruits using Open-Ended Coaxial Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Zulkifly; Yeow, You Kok; Shaari, Abdul Halim; Zakaria, Azmi; Hassan, Jumiah; Khalid, Kaida; Saion, Elias

    2005-07-01

    A simple, fast and accurate technique employing an open-ended coaxial sensor for the determination of the moisture content in oil palm fruit is presented. For this technique, a calibration equation has been developed based on the relationship between the measured moisture content obtained by the oven drying method and the phase of the reflection coefficient of the sensor for 21 fruits. The moisture content predicted by the sensor was in good agreement with that obtained using the standard oven drying method within ± 5% accuracy when tested on 145 different fruits samples.

  11. Use of Loran-C navigation system to accurately determine sampling site location in an above ground cooling reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, R.E.; Blankinship, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    Environmental monitoring programs often require accurate determination of sampling site locations in aquatic environments. This is especially true when a {open_quotes}picture{close_quotes} of high resolution is needed for observing a changing variable in a given area and location is assumed to be important to the distribution of that variable. Sample site location can be difficult if few visible land marks are available for reference on a large body of water. The use of navigational systems such as Global Positioning System (GPS) and its predecessor, Loran-C, provide an excellent method for sample site location. McFarland (1992) discusses the practicality of GPS for location determination. This article discusses the use of Loran-C in a sampling scheme implemented at the South Texas Project Electrical Generating Station (STPEGS), Wadsworth, Texas.

  12. Determinants of Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) Structure

    PubMed Central

    Prydz, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are glycosylated proteins of biological importance at cell surfaces, in the extracellular matrix, and in the circulation. PGs are produced and modified by glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains in the secretory pathway of animal cells. The most common GAG attachment site is a serine residue followed by a glycine (-ser-gly-), from which a linker tetrasaccharide extends and may continue as a heparan sulfate, a heparin, a chondroitin sulfate, or a dermatan sulfate GAG chain. Which type of GAG chain becomes attached to the linker tetrasaccharide is influenced by the structure of the protein core, modifications occurring to the linker tetrasaccharide itself, and the biochemical environment of the Golgi apparatus, where GAG polymerization and modification by sulfation and epimerization take place. The same cell type may produce different GAG chains that vary, depending on the extent of epimerization and sulfation. However, it is not known to what extent these differences are caused by compartmental segregation of protein cores en route through the secretory pathway or by differential recruitment of modifying enzymes during synthesis of different PGs. The topic of this review is how different aspects of protein structure, cellular biochemistry, and compartmentalization may influence GAG synthesis. PMID:26308067

  13. An accurate method for determining residual stresses with magnetic non-destructive techniques in welded ferromagnetic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourna, P.

    2016-03-01

    The scope of the present research work was to investigate the proper selection criteria for developing a suitable methodology for the accurate determination of residual stresses existing in welded parts. Magnetic non-destructive testing took place by the use of two magnetic non-destructive techniques: by the measurement of the magnetic Barkhausen noise and by the evaluation of the magnetic hysteresis loop parameters. The spatial distribution of residual stresses in welded metal parts by both non-destructive magnetic methods and two diffraction methods was determined. The conduction of magnetic measurements required an initial calibration of ferromagnetic steels. Based on the examined volume of the sample, all methods used were divided into two large categories: the first one was related to the determination of surface residual stress, whereas the second one was related to bulk residual stress determination. The first category included the magnetic Barkhausen noise and the X-ray diffraction measurements, while the second one included the magnetic permeability and the neutron diffraction data. The residual stresses determined by the magnetic techniques were in a good agreement with the diffraction ones.

  14. Two-dimensional flow nanometry of biological nanoparticles for accurate determination of their size and emission intensity

    PubMed Central

    Block, Stephan; Fast, Björn Johansson; Lundgren, Anders; Zhdanov, Vladimir P.; Höök, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Biological nanoparticles (BNPs) are of high interest due to their key role in various biological processes and use as biomarkers. BNP size and composition are decisive for their functions, but simultaneous determination of both properties with high accuracy remains challenging. Optical microscopy allows precise determination of fluorescence/scattering intensity, but not the size of individual BNPs. The latter is better determined by tracking their random motion in bulk, but the limited illumination volume for tracking this motion impedes reliable intensity determination. Here, we show that by attaching BNPs to a supported lipid bilayer, subjecting them to hydrodynamic flows and tracking their motion via surface-sensitive optical imaging enable determination of their diffusion coefficients and flow-induced drifts, from which accurate quantification of both BNP size and emission intensity can be made. For vesicles, the accuracy of this approach is demonstrated by resolving the expected radius-squared dependence of their fluorescence intensity for radii down to 15 nm. PMID:27658367

  15. Accurate structure prediction of peptide–MHC complexes for identifying highly immunogenic antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Min-Sun; Park, Sung Yong; Miller, Keith R.; Collins, Edward J.; Lee, Ha Youn

    2013-11-01

    Designing an optimal HIV-1 vaccine faces the challenge of identifying antigens that induce a broad immune capacity. One factor to control the breadth of T cell responses is the surface morphology of a peptide–MHC complex. Here, we present an in silico protocol for predicting peptide–MHC structure. A robust signature of a conformational transition was identified during all-atom molecular dynamics, which results in a model with high accuracy. A large test set was used in constructing our protocol and we went another step further using a blind test with a wild-type peptide and two highly immunogenic mutants, which predicted substantial conformational changes in both mutants. The center residues at position five of the analogs were configured to be accessible to solvent, forming a prominent surface, while the residue of the wild-type peptide was to point laterally toward the side of the binding cleft. We then experimentally determined the structures of the blind test set, using high resolution of X-ray crystallography, which verified predicted conformational changes. Our observation strongly supports a positive association of the surface morphology of a peptide–MHC complex to its immunogenicity. Our study offers the prospect of enhancing immunogenicity of vaccines by identifying MHC binding immunogens.

  16. Surface structure determines dynamic wetting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiayu; Do-Quang, Minh; Cannon, James J.; Yue, Feng; Suzuki, Yuji; Amberg, Gustav; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    Liquid wetting of a surface is omnipresent in nature and the advance of micro-fabrication and assembly techniques in recent years offers increasing ability to control this phenomenon. Here, we identify how surface roughness influences the initial dynamic spreading of a partially wetting droplet by studying the spreading on a solid substrate patterned with microstructures just a few micrometers in size. We reveal that the roughness influence can be quantified in terms of a line friction coefficient for the energy dissipation rate at the contact line, and that this can be described in a simple formula in terms of the geometrical parameters of the roughness and the line-friction coefficient of the planar surface. We further identify a criterion to predict if the spreading will be controlled by this surface roughness or by liquid inertia. Our results point to the possibility of selectively controlling the wetting behavior by engineering the surface structure. PMID:25683872

  17. An efficient and accurate model of the coax cable feeding structure for FEM simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Jian; Volakis, John L.

    1995-01-01

    An efficient and accurate coax cable feed model is proposed for microstrip or cavity-backed patch antennas in the context of a hybrid finite element method (FEM). A TEM mode at the cavity-cable junction is assumed for the FEM truncation and system excitation. Of importance in this implementation is that the cavity unknowns are related to the model fields by enforcing an equipotential condition rather than field continuity. This scheme proved quite accurate and may be applied to other decomposed systems as a connectivity constraint. Comparisons of our predictions with input impedance measurements are presented and demonstrate the substantially improved accuracy of the proposed model.

  18. Accurate retention time determination of co-eluting proteins in analytical chromatography by means of spectral data.

    PubMed

    Dismer, Florian; Hansen, Sigrid; Oelmeier, Stefan Alexander; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2013-03-01

    Chromatography is the method of choice for the separation of proteins, at both analytical and preparative scale. Orthogonal purification strategies for industrial use can easily be implemented by combining different modes of adsorption. Nevertheless, with flexibility comes the freedom of choice and optimal conditions for consecutive steps need to be identified in a robust and reproducible fashion. One way to address this issue is the use of mathematical models that allow for an in silico process optimization. Although this has been shown to work, model parameter estimation for complex feedstocks becomes the bottleneck in process development. An integral part of parameter assessment is the accurate measurement of retention times in a series of isocratic or gradient elution experiments. As high-resolution analytics that can differentiate between proteins are often not readily available, pure protein is mandatory for parameter determination. In this work, we present an approach that has the potential to solve this problem. Based on the uniqueness of UV absorption spectra of proteins, we were able to accurately measure retention times in systems of up to four co-eluting compounds. The presented approach is calibration-free, meaning that prior knowledge of pure component absorption spectra is not required. Actually, pure protein spectra can be determined from co-eluting proteins as part of the methodology. The approach was tested for size-exclusion chromatograms of 38 mixtures of co-eluting proteins. Retention times were determined with an average error of 0.6 s (1.6% of average peak width), approximated and measured pure component spectra showed an average coefficient of correlation of 0.992.

  19. Algorithms for Determining Physical Responses of Structures Under Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, W. Lance; Ko, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-efficient real-time structural monitoring algorithms have been developed to provide extensive information about the physical response of structures under load. These algorithms are driven by actual strain data to measure accurately local strains at multiple locations on the surface of a structure. Through a single point load calibration test, these structural strains are then used to calculate key physical properties of the structure at each measurement location. Such properties include the structure s flexural rigidity (the product of the structure's modulus of elasticity, and its moment of inertia) and the section modulus (the moment of inertia divided by the structure s half-depth). The resulting structural properties at each location can be used to determine the structure s bending moment, shear, and structural loads in real time while the structure is in service. The amount of structural information can be maximized through the use of highly multiplexed fiber Bragg grating technology using optical time domain reflectometry and optical frequency domain reflectometry, which can provide a local strain measurement every 10 mm on a single hair-sized optical fiber. Since local strain is used as input to the algorithms, this system serves multiple purposes of measuring strains and displacements, as well as determining structural bending moment, shear, and loads for assessing real-time structural health. The first step is to install a series of strain sensors on the structure s surface in such a way as to measure bending strains at desired locations. The next step is to perform a simple ground test calibration. For a beam of length l (see example), discretized into n sections and subjected to a tip load of P that places the beam in bending, the flexural rigidity of the beam can be experimentally determined at each measurement location x. The bending moment at each station can then be determined for any general set of loads applied during operation.

  20. The Effect of Starspots on Accurate Radius Determination of the Low-Mass Double-Lined Eclipsing Binary Gu Boo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windmiller, G.; Orosz, J. A.; Etzel, P. B.

    2010-04-01

    GU Boo is one of only a relatively small number of well-studied double-lined eclipsing binaries that contain low-mass stars. López-Morales & Ribas present a comprehensive analysis of multi-color light and radial velocity curves for this system. The GU Boo light curves presented by López-Morales & Ribas had substantial asymmetries, which were attributed to large spots. In spite of the asymmetry, López-Morales & Ribas derived masses and radii accurate to sime2%. We obtained additional photometry of GU Boo using both a CCD and a single-channel photometer and modeled the light curves with the ELC software to determine if the large spots in the light curves give rise to systematic errors at the few percent level. We also modeled the original light curves from the work of López-Morales & Ribas using models with and without spots. We derived a radius of the primary of 0.6329 ± 0.0026 R sun, 0.6413 ± 0.0049 R sun, and 0.6373 ± 0.0029 R sun from the CCD, photoelectric, and López-Morales & Ribas data, respectively. Each of these measurements agrees with the value reported by López-Morales & Ribas (R 1 = 0.623 ± 0.016 R sun) at the level of ≈2%. In addition, the spread in these values is ≈1%-2% from the mean. For the secondary, we derive radii of 0.6074 ± 0.0035 R sun, 0.5944 ± 0.0069 R sun, and 0.5976 ± 0.0059 R sun from the three respective data sets. The López-Morales & Ribas value is R 2 = 0.620 ± 0.020 R sun, which is ≈2%-3% larger than each of the three values we found. The spread in these values is ≈2% from the mean. The systematic difference between our three determinations of the secondary radius and that of López-Morales & Ribas might be attributed to differences in the modeling process and codes used. Our own fits suggest that, for GU Boo at least, using accurate spot modeling of a single set of multi-color light curves results in radii determinations accurate at the ≈2% level.

  1. Accurate determination of genetic identity for a single cacao bean, using molecular markers with a nanofluidic system, ensures cocoa authentication.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wanping; Meinhardt, Lyndel W; Mischke, Sue; Bellato, Cláudia M; Motilal, Lambert; Zhang, Dapeng

    2014-01-15

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao L.), the source of cocoa, is an economically important tropical crop. One problem with the premium cacao market is contamination with off-types adulterating raw premium material. Accurate determination of the genetic identity of single cacao beans is essential for ensuring cocoa authentication. Using nanofluidic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping with 48 SNP markers, we generated SNP fingerprints for small quantities of DNA extracted from the seed coat of single cacao beans. On the basis of the SNP profiles, we identified an assumed adulterant variety, which was unambiguously distinguished from the authentic beans by multilocus matching. Assignment tests based on both Bayesian clustering analysis and allele frequency clearly separated all 30 authentic samples from the non-authentic samples. Distance-based principle coordinate analysis further supported these results. The nanofluidic SNP protocol, together with forensic statistical tools, is sufficiently robust to establish authentication and to verify gourmet cacao varieties. This method shows significant potential for practical application.

  2. Heavy metal toxicity to bacteria - are the existing growth media accurate enough to determine heavy metal toxicity?

    PubMed

    Rathnayake, I V N; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Krishnamurti, G S R; Bolan, Nanthi S; Naidu, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    A new minimal medium was formulated considering the limitations of the existing media for testing heavy metal sensitivity to bacteria. Toxicity of cadmium and copper to three bacteria was investigated in the new medium and compared with three other media commonly used to study the effect of the toxic metals. Based on speciation data arrived at using ion-selective electrodes, the available free-metal concentration in solution was highest in the MES-buffered medium. This finding was strongly supported by the estimated EC(50) values for the metals tested based on the toxicity bioassays. The free-ionic cadmium and copper concentrations in the medium provide more accurate determination of metal concentrations that affects the bacteria, than with most of other existing media. This will avoid doubts on other media and misleading conclusions relevant to the toxicity of heavy metals to bacteria and provides a better option for the study of metal-bacteria interactions.

  3. Accurate Equilibrium Structures for trans-HEXATRIENE by the Mixed Estimation Method and for the Three Isomers of Octatetraene from Theory; Structural Consequences of Electron Delocalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Norman C.; Demaison, Jean; Groner, Peter; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter; Vogt, Natalja

    2015-06-01

    An accurate equilibrium structure of trans-hexatriene has been determined by the mixed estimation method with rotational constants from 8 deuterium and carbon isotopologues and high-level quantum chemical calculations. In the mixed estimation method bond parameters are fit concurrently to moments of inertia of various isotopologues and to theoretical bond parameters, each data set carrying appropriate uncertainties. The accuracy of this structure is 0.001 Å and 0.1°. Structures of similar accuracy have been computed for the cis,cis, trans,trans, and cis,trans isomers of octatetraene at the CCSD(T) level with a basis set of wCVQZ(ae) quality adjusted in accord with the experience gained with trans-hexatriene. The structures are compared with butadiene and with cis-hexatriene to show how increasing the length of the chain in polyenes leads to increased blurring of the difference between single and double bonds in the carbon chain. In trans-hexatriene r(“C_1=C_2") = 1.339 Å and r(“C_3=C_4") = 1.346 Å compared to 1.338 Å for the “double" bond in butadiene; r(“C_2-C_3") = 1.449 Å compared to 1.454 Å for the “single" bond in butadiene. “Double" bonds increase in length; “single" bonds decrease in length.

  4. Ion chromatography as highly suitable method for rapid and accurate determination of antibiotic fosfomycin in pharmaceutical wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ping; Xie, Xiaolin; Song, Yonghui; Liu, Ruixia; Zhu, Chaowei; Galarneau, Anne; Pic, Jean-Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    A rapid and accurate ion chromatography (IC) method (limit of detection as low as 0.06 mg L(-1)) for fosfomycin concentration determination in pharmaceutical industrial wastewater was developed. This method was compared with the performance of high performance liquid chromatography determination (with a high detection limit of 96.0 mg L(-1)) and ultraviolet spectrometry after reacting with alizarin (difficult to perform in colored solutions). The accuracy of the IC method was established in the linear range of 1.0-15.0 mg L(-1) and a linear correlation was found with a correlation coefficient of 0.9998. The recoveries of fosfomycin from industrial pharmaceutical wastewater at spiking concentrations of 2.0, 5.0 and 8.0 mg L(-1) ranged from 81.91 to 94.74%, with a relative standard deviation (RSD) from 1 to 4%. The recoveries of effluent from a sequencing batch reactor treated fosfomycin with activated sludge at spiking concentrations of 5.0, 8.0, 10.0 mg L(-1) ranging from 98.25 to 99.91%, with a RSD from 1 to 2%. The developed IC procedure provided a rapid, reliable and sensitive method for the determination of fosfomycin concentration in industrial pharmaceutical wastewater and samples containing complex components.

  5. Determining crystal structures through crowdsourcing and coursework

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Scott; Koepnick, Brian; Martin, Raoul; Tymieniecki, Agnes; Winburn, Amanda A.; Cooper, Seth; Flatten, Jeff; Rogawski, David S.; Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Hailu, Tsinatkeab T.; Jain, Neha; Koldewey, Philipp; Ahlstrom, Logan S.; Chapman, Matthew R.; Sikkema, Andrew P.; Skiba, Meredith A.; Maloney, Finn P.; Beinlich, Felix R. M.; Caglar, Ahmet; Coral, Alan; Jensen, Alice Elizabeth; Lubow, Allen; Boitano, Amanda; Lisle, Amy Elizabeth; Maxwell, Andrew T.; Failer, Barb; Kaszubowski, Bartosz; Hrytsiv, Bohdan; Vincenzo, Brancaccio; de Melo Cruz, Breno Renan; McManus, Brian Joseph; Kestemont, Bruno; Vardeman, Carl; Comisky, Casey; Neilson, Catherine; Landers, Catherine R.; Ince, Christopher; Buske, Daniel Jon; Totonjian, Daniel; Copeland, David Marshall; Murray, David; Jagieła, Dawid; Janz, Dietmar; Wheeler, Douglas C.; Cali, Elie; Croze, Emmanuel; Rezae, Farah; Martin, Floyd Orville; Beecher, Gil; de Jong, Guido Alexander; Ykman, Guy; Feldmann, Harald; Chan, Hugo Paul Perez; Kovanecz, Istvan; Vasilchenko, Ivan; Connellan, James C.; Borman, Jami Lynne; Norrgard, Jane; Kanfer, Jebbie; Canfield, Jeffrey M.; Slone, Jesse David; Oh, Jimmy; Mitchell, Joanne; Bishop, John; Kroeger, John Douglas; Schinkler, Jonas; McLaughlin, Joseph; Brownlee, June M.; Bell, Justin; Fellbaum, Karl Willem; Harper, Kathleen; Abbey, Kirk J.; Isaksson, Lennart E.; Wei, Linda; Cummins, Lisa N.; Miller, Lori Anne; Bain, Lyn; Carpenter, Lynn; Desnouck, Maarten; Sharma, Manasa G.; Belcastro, Marcus; Szew, Martin; Szew, Martin; Britton, Matthew; Gaebel, Matthias; Power, Max; Cassidy, Michael; Pfützenreuter, Michael; Minett, Michele; Wesselingh, Michiel; Yi, Minjune; Cameron, Neil Haydn Tormey; Bolibruch, Nicholas I.; Benevides, Noah; Kathleen Kerr, Norah; Barlow, Nova; Crevits, Nykole Krystyne; Dunn, Paul; Roque, Paulo Sergio Silveira Belo Nascimento; Riber, Peter; Pikkanen, Petri; Shehzad, Raafay; Viosca, Randy; James Fraser, Robert; Leduc, Robert; Madala, Roman; Shnider, Scott; de Boisblanc, Sharon; Butkovich, Slava; Bliven, Spencer; Hettler, Stephen; Telehany, Stephen; Schwegmann, Steven A.; Parkes, Steven; Kleinfelter, Susan C.; Michael Holst, Sven; van der Laan, T. J. A.; Bausewein, Thomas; Simon, Vera; Pulley, Warwick; Hull, William; Kim, Annes Yukyung; Lawton, Alexis; Ruesch, Amanda; Sundar, Anjali; Lawrence, Anna-Lisa; Afrin, Antara; Maheshwer, Bhargavi; Turfe, Bilal; Huebner, Christian; Killeen, Courtney Elizabeth; Antebi-Lerrman, Dalia; Luan, Danny; Wolfe, Derek; Pham, Duc; Michewicz, Elaina; Hull, Elizabeth; Pardington, Emily; Galal, Galal Osama; Sun, Grace; Chen, Grace; Anderson, Halie E.; Chang, Jane; Hewlett, Jeffrey Thomas; Sterbenz, Jennifer; Lim, Jiho; Morof, Joshua; Lee, Junho; Inn, Juyoung Samuel; Hahm, Kaitlin; Roth, Kaitlin; Nair, Karun; Markin, Katherine; Schramm, Katie; Toni Eid, Kevin; Gam, Kristina; Murphy, Lisha; Yuan, Lucy; Kana, Lulia; Daboul, Lynn; Shammas, Mario Karam; Chason, Max; Sinan, Moaz; Andrew Tooley, Nicholas; Korakavi, Nisha; Comer, Patrick; Magur, Pragya; Savliwala, Quresh; Davison, Reid Michael; Sankaran, Roshun Rajiv; Lewe, Sam; Tamkus, Saule; Chen, Shirley; Harvey, Sho; Hwang, Sin Ye; Vatsia, Sohrab; Withrow, Stefan; Luther, Tahra K; Manett, Taylor; Johnson, Thomas James; Ryan Brash, Timothy; Kuhlman, Wyatt; Park, Yeonjung; Popović, Zoran; Baker, David; Khatib, Firas; Bardwell, James C. A.

    2016-01-01

    We show here that computer game players can build high-quality crystal structures. Introduction of a new feature into the computer game Foldit allows players to build and real-space refine structures into electron density maps. To assess the usefulness of this feature, we held a crystallographic model-building competition between trained crystallographers, undergraduate students, Foldit players and automatic model-building algorithms. After removal of disordered residues, a team of Foldit players achieved the most accurate structure. Analysing the target protein of the competition, YPL067C, uncovered a new family of histidine triad proteins apparently involved in the prevention of amyloid toxicity. From this study, we conclude that crystallographers can utilize crowdsourcing to interpret electron density information and to produce structure solutions of the highest quality. PMID:27633552

  6. Determining crystal structures through crowdsourcing and coursework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Scott; Koepnick, Brian; Martin, Raoul; Tymieniecki, Agnes; Winburn, Amanda A.; Cooper, Seth; Flatten, Jeff; Rogawski, David S.; Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Hailu, Tsinatkeab T.; Jain, Neha; Koldewey, Philipp; Ahlstrom, Logan S.; Chapman, Matthew R.; Sikkema, Andrew P.; Skiba, Meredith A.; Maloney, Finn P.; Beinlich, Felix R. M.; Caglar, Ahmet; Coral, Alan; Jensen, Alice Elizabeth; Lubow, Allen; Boitano, Amanda; Lisle, Amy Elizabeth; Maxwell, Andrew T.; Failer, Barb; Kaszubowski, Bartosz; Hrytsiv, Bohdan; Vincenzo, Brancaccio; de Melo Cruz, Breno Renan; McManus, Brian Joseph; Kestemont, Bruno; Vardeman, Carl; Comisky, Casey; Neilson, Catherine; Landers, Catherine R.; Ince, Christopher; Buske, Daniel Jon; Totonjian, Daniel; Copeland, David Marshall; Murray, David; Jagieła, Dawid; Janz, Dietmar; Wheeler, Douglas C.; Cali, Elie; Croze, Emmanuel; Rezae, Farah; Martin, Floyd Orville; Beecher, Gil; de Jong, Guido Alexander; Ykman, Guy; Feldmann, Harald; Chan, Hugo Paul Perez; Kovanecz, Istvan; Vasilchenko, Ivan; Connellan, James C.; Borman, Jami Lynne; Norrgard, Jane; Kanfer, Jebbie; Canfield, Jeffrey M.; Slone, Jesse David; Oh, Jimmy; Mitchell, Joanne; Bishop, John; Kroeger, John Douglas; Schinkler, Jonas; McLaughlin, Joseph; Brownlee, June M.; Bell, Justin; Fellbaum, Karl Willem; Harper, Kathleen; Abbey, Kirk J.; Isaksson, Lennart E.; Wei, Linda; Cummins, Lisa N.; Miller, Lori Anne; Bain, Lyn; Carpenter, Lynn; Desnouck, Maarten; Sharma, Manasa G.; Belcastro, Marcus; Szew, Martin; Szew, Martin; Britton, Matthew; Gaebel, Matthias; Power, Max; Cassidy, Michael; Pfützenreuter, Michael; Minett, Michele; Wesselingh, Michiel; Yi, Minjune; Cameron, Neil Haydn Tormey; Bolibruch, Nicholas I.; Benevides, Noah; Kathleen Kerr, Norah; Barlow, Nova; Crevits, Nykole Krystyne; Dunn, Paul; Silveira Belo Nascimento Roque, Paulo Sergio; Riber, Peter; Pikkanen, Petri; Shehzad, Raafay; Viosca, Randy; James Fraser, Robert; Leduc, Robert; Madala, Roman; Shnider, Scott; de Boisblanc, Sharon; Butkovich, Slava; Bliven, Spencer; Hettler, Stephen; Telehany, Stephen; Schwegmann, Steven A.; Parkes, Steven; Kleinfelter, Susan C.; Michael Holst, Sven; van der Laan, T. J. A.; Bausewein, Thomas; Simon, Vera; Pulley, Warwick; Hull, William; Kim, Annes Yukyung; Lawton, Alexis; Ruesch, Amanda; Sundar, Anjali; Lawrence, Anna-Lisa; Afrin, Antara; Maheshwer, Bhargavi; Turfe, Bilal; Huebner, Christian; Killeen, Courtney Elizabeth; Antebi-Lerrman, Dalia; Luan, Danny; Wolfe, Derek; Pham, Duc; Michewicz, Elaina; Hull, Elizabeth; Pardington, Emily; Galal, Galal Osama; Sun, Grace; Chen, Grace; Anderson, Halie E.; Chang, Jane; Hewlett, Jeffrey Thomas; Sterbenz, Jennifer; Lim, Jiho; Morof, Joshua; Lee, Junho; Inn, Juyoung Samuel; Hahm, Kaitlin; Roth, Kaitlin; Nair, Karun; Markin, Katherine; Schramm, Katie; Toni Eid, Kevin; Gam, Kristina; Murphy, Lisha; Yuan, Lucy; Kana, Lulia; Daboul, Lynn; Shammas, Mario Karam; Chason, Max; Sinan, Moaz; Andrew Tooley, Nicholas; Korakavi, Nisha; Comer, Patrick; Magur, Pragya; Savliwala, Quresh; Davison, Reid Michael; Sankaran, Roshun Rajiv; Lewe, Sam; Tamkus, Saule; Chen, Shirley; Harvey, Sho; Hwang, Sin Ye; Vatsia, Sohrab; Withrow, Stefan; Luther, Tahra K.; Manett, Taylor; Johnson, Thomas James; Ryan Brash, Timothy; Kuhlman, Wyatt; Park, Yeonjung; Popović, Zoran; Baker, David; Khatib, Firas; Bardwell, James C. A.

    2016-09-01

    We show here that computer game players can build high-quality crystal structures. Introduction of a new feature into the computer game Foldit allows players to build and real-space refine structures into electron density maps. To assess the usefulness of this feature, we held a crystallographic model-building competition between trained crystallographers, undergraduate students, Foldit players and automatic model-building algorithms. After removal of disordered residues, a team of Foldit players achieved the most accurate structure. Analysing the target protein of the competition, YPL067C, uncovered a new family of histidine triad proteins apparently involved in the prevention of amyloid toxicity. From this study, we conclude that crystallographers can utilize crowdsourcing to interpret electron density information and to produce structure solutions of the highest quality.

  7. Determining crystal structures through crowdsourcing and coursework.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Scott; Koepnick, Brian; Martin, Raoul; Tymieniecki, Agnes; Winburn, Amanda A; Cooper, Seth; Flatten, Jeff; Rogawski, David S; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Hailu, Tsinatkeab T; Jain, Neha; Koldewey, Philipp; Ahlstrom, Logan S; Chapman, Matthew R; Sikkema, Andrew P; Skiba, Meredith A; Maloney, Finn P; Beinlich, Felix R M; Popović, Zoran; Baker, David; Khatib, Firas; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-09-16

    We show here that computer game players can build high-quality crystal structures. Introduction of a new feature into the computer game Foldit allows players to build and real-space refine structures into electron density maps. To assess the usefulness of this feature, we held a crystallographic model-building competition between trained crystallographers, undergraduate students, Foldit players and automatic model-building algorithms. After removal of disordered residues, a team of Foldit players achieved the most accurate structure. Analysing the target protein of the competition, YPL067C, uncovered a new family of histidine triad proteins apparently involved in the prevention of amyloid toxicity. From this study, we conclude that crystallographers can utilize crowdsourcing to interpret electron density information and to produce structure solutions of the highest quality.

  8. Seeking: Accurate Measurement Techniques for Deep-Bone Density and Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibonga, Jean

    2009-01-01

    We are seeking a clinically-useful technology with enough sensitivity to assess the microstructure of "spongy" bone that is found in the marrow cavities of whole bones. However, this technology must be for skeletal sites surrounded by layers of soft tissues, such as the spine and the hip. Soft tissue interferes with conventional imaging and using a more accessible area -- for example, the wrist or the ankle of limbs-- as a proxy for the less accessible skeletal regions, will not be accurate. A non-radioactive technology is strongly preferred.

  9. Accurate determination of peptide phosphorylation stoichiometry via automated diagonal capillary electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry: proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Mou, Si; Sun, Liangliang; Dovichi, Norman J

    2013-11-19

    While reversible protein phosphorylation plays an important role in many cellular processes, simple and reliable measurement of the stoichiometry of phosphorylation can be challenging. This measurement is confounded by differences in the ionization efficiency of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated sites during analysis by mass spectrometry. Here, we demonstrate diagonal capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry for the accurate determination of this stoichiometry. Diagonal capillary electrophoresis is a two-dimensional separation method that incorporates an immobilized alkaline phosphatase microreactor at the distal end of the first capillary and employs identical electrophoretic separation modes in both dimensions. The first dimension is used to separate a mixture of the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of a peptide. Fractions are parked in the reactor where they undergo complete dephosphorylation. The products are then periodically transferred to the second capillary and analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS). Because the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms differ in charge, they are well resolved in the first dimension separation. Because the unphosphorylated and dephosphorylated peptides are identical, there is no bias in ionization efficiency, and phosphorylation stoichiometry can be determined by the ratio of the signal of the two forms. A calibration curve was generated from mixtures of a phosphorylated standard peptide and its unphosphorylated form, prepared in a bovine serum albumin tryptic digest. This proof of principle experiment demonstrated a linear response across nearly 2 orders of magnitude in stoichiometry.

  10. Accurate first-principles structures and energies of diversely bonded systems from an efficient density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianwei; Remsing, Richard C.; Zhang, Yubo; Sun, Zhaoru; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Peng, Haowei; Yang, Zenghui; Paul, Arpita; Waghmare, Umesh; Wu, Xifan; Klein, Michael L.; Perdew, John P.

    2016-09-01

    One atom or molecule binds to another through various types of bond, the strengths of which range from several meV to several eV. Although some computational methods can provide accurate descriptions of all bond types, those methods are not efficient enough for many studies (for example, large systems, ab initio molecular dynamics and high-throughput searches for functional materials). Here, we show that the recently developed non-empirical strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) within the density functional theory framework predicts accurate geometries and energies of diversely bonded molecules and materials (including covalent, metallic, ionic, hydrogen and van der Waals bonds). This represents a significant improvement at comparable efficiency over its predecessors, the GGAs that currently dominate materials computation. Often, SCAN matches or improves on the accuracy of a computationally expensive hybrid functional, at almost-GGA cost. SCAN is therefore expected to have a broad impact on chemistry and materials science.

  11. Automated and quantitative headspace in-tube extraction for the accurate determination of highly volatile compounds from wines and beers.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Julián; Mateo-Vivaracho, Laura; Lopez, Ricardo; Ferreira, Vicente

    2012-03-23

    An automatic headspace in-tube extraction (ITEX) method for the accurate determination of acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate, diacetyl and other volatile compounds from wine and beer has been developed and validated. Method accuracy is based on the nearly quantitative transference of volatile compounds from the sample to the ITEX trap. For achieving that goal most methodological aspects and parameters have been carefully examined. The vial and sample sizes and the trapping materials were found to be critical due to the pernicious saturation effects of ethanol. Small 2 mL vials containing very small amounts of sample (20 μL of 1:10 diluted sample) and a trap filled with 22 mg of Bond Elut ENV resins could guarantee a complete trapping of sample vapors. The complete extraction requires 100 × 0.5 mL pumping strokes at 60 °C and takes 24 min. Analytes are further desorbed at 240 °C into the GC injector under a 1:5 split ratio. The proportion of analytes finally transferred to the trap ranged from 85 to 99%. The validation of the method showed satisfactory figures of merit. Determination coefficients were better than 0.995 in all cases and good repeatability was also obtained (better than 7% in all cases). Reproducibility was better than 8.3% except for acetaldehyde (13.1%). Detection limits were below the odor detection thresholds of these target compounds in wine and beer and well below the normal ranges of occurrence. Recoveries were not significantly different to 100%, except in the case of acetaldehyde. In such a case it could be determined that the method is not able to break some of the adducts that this compound forms with sulfites. However, such problem was avoided after incubating the sample with glyoxal. The method can constitute a general and reliable alternative for the analysis of very volatile compounds in other difficult matrixes.

  12. Accurate, precise, and efficient theoretical methods to calculate anion-π interaction energies in model structures.

    PubMed

    Mezei, Pál D; Csonka, Gábor I; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Sun, Jianwei

    2015-01-13

    A correct description of the anion-π interaction is essential for the design of selective anion receptors and channels and important for advances in the field of supramolecular chemistry. However, it is challenging to do accurate, precise, and efficient calculations of this interaction, which are lacking in the literature. In this article, by testing sets of 20 binary anion-π complexes of fluoride, chloride, bromide, nitrate, or carbonate ions with hexafluorobenzene, 1,3,5-trifluorobenzene, 2,4,6-trifluoro-1,3,5-triazine, or 1,3,5-triazine and 30 ternary π-anion-π' sandwich complexes composed from the same monomers, we suggest domain-based local-pair natural orbital coupled cluster energies extrapolated to the complete basis-set limit as reference values. We give a detailed explanation of the origin of anion-π interactions, using the permanent quadrupole moments, static dipole polarizabilities, and electrostatic potential maps. We use symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) to calculate the components of the anion-π interaction energies. We examine the performance of the direct random phase approximation (dRPA), the second-order screened exchange (SOSEX), local-pair natural-orbital (LPNO) coupled electron pair approximation (CEPA), and several dispersion-corrected density functionals (including generalized gradient approximation (GGA), meta-GGA, and double hybrid density functional). The LPNO-CEPA/1 results show the best agreement with the reference results. The dRPA method is only slightly less accurate and precise than the LPNO-CEPA/1, but it is considerably more efficient (6-17 times faster) for the binary complexes studied in this paper. For 30 ternary π-anion-π' sandwich complexes, we give dRPA interaction energies as reference values. The double hybrid functionals are much more efficient but less accurate and precise than dRPA. The dispersion-corrected double hybrid PWPB95-D3(BJ) and B2PLYP-D3(BJ) functionals perform better than the GGA and meta

  13. Accurate description of the electronic structure of organic semiconductors by GW methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marom, Noa

    2017-03-01

    Electronic properties associated with charged excitations, such as the ionization potential (IP), the electron affinity (EA), and the energy level alignment at interfaces, are critical parameters for the performance of organic electronic devices. To computationally design organic semiconductors and functional interfaces with tailored properties for target applications it is necessary to accurately predict these properties from first principles. Many-body perturbation theory is often used for this purpose within the GW approximation, where G is the one particle Green’s function and W is the dynamically screened Coulomb interaction. Here, the formalism of GW methods at different levels of self-consistency is briefly introduced and some recent applications to organic semiconductors and interfaces are reviewed.

  14. Accurate alkynyl radical structures from density functional calculations without Hartree-Fock exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesko, Benjamin G.; Proynov, Emil

    2017-02-01

    Density functional approximations (DFAs) often suffer from self-repulsion and delocalization errors which are reduced by exact (Hartree-Fock-like) exchange admixture. Oyeyemi and co-workers recently showed that several DFAs with little exact exchange incorrectly predict bent alkynyl radical geometries, giving errors in ab initio composite methods using density functional theory geometries [V. B. Oyeyemi et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 3, 289 (2012)]. We show that the simple Hartree-Fock-Slater and Xα DFAs, which have substantial delocalization error, predict linear alkynyl radical geometries without incorporating exact exchange. Our Rung 3.5 DFAs, and rescaled generalized gradient approximations, can give either linear σ, bent σ -π , or nearly linear π radicals, all without incorporating exact exchange. This highlights the complexity of delocalization error, the utility of accurate empirical DFA geometries for ab initio composite methods, and the insights to be gained from Rung 3.5 DFAs.

  15. Direct atomic structure determination by the inspection of structural phase.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Philip N H; Moodie, Alexander F; Etheridge, Joanne

    2013-08-27

    A century has passed since Bragg solved the first atomic structure using diffraction. As with this first structure, all atomic structures to date have been deduced from the measurement of many diffracted intensities using iterative and statistical methods. We show that centrosymmetric atomic structures can be determined without the need to measure or even record a diffracted intensity. Instead, atomic structures can be determined directly and quickly from the observation of crystallographic phases in electron diffraction patterns. Furthermore, only a few phases are required to achieve high resolution. This represents a paradigm shift in structure determination methods, which we demonstrate with the moderately complex α-Al2O3. We show that the observation of just nine phases enables the location of all atoms with a resolution of better than 0.1 Å. This level of certainty previously required the measurement of thousands of diffracted intensities.

  16. Direct atomic structure determination by the inspection of structural phase

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Philip N. H.; Moodie, Alexander F.; Etheridge, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    A century has passed since Bragg solved the first atomic structure using diffraction. As with this first structure, all atomic structures to date have been deduced from the measurement of many diffracted intensities using iterative and statistical methods. We show that centrosymmetric atomic structures can be determined without the need to measure or even record a diffracted intensity. Instead, atomic structures can be determined directly and quickly from the observation of crystallographic phases in electron diffraction patterns. Furthermore, only a few phases are required to achieve high resolution. This represents a paradigm shift in structure determination methods, which we demonstrate with the moderately complex α-Al2O3. We show that the observation of just nine phases enables the location of all atoms with a resolution of better than 0.1 Å. This level of certainty previously required the measurement of thousands of diffracted intensities. PMID:23940343

  17. Polyallelic structural variants can provide accurate, highly informative genetic markers focused on diagnosis and therapeutic targets: Accuracy vs. Precision.

    PubMed

    Roses, A D

    2016-02-01

    Structural variants (SVs) include all insertions, deletions, and rearrangements in the genome, with several common types of nucleotide repeats including single sequence repeats, short tandem repeats, and insertion-deletion length variants. Polyallelic SVs provide highly informative markers for association studies with well-phenotyped cohorts. SVs can influence gene regulation by affecting epigenetics, transcription, splicing, and/or translation. Accurate assays of polyallelic SV loci are required to define the range and allele frequency of variable length alleles.

  18. Stable isotope dilution assay for the accurate determination of mycotoxins in maize by UHPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Varga, Elisabeth; Glauner, Thomas; Köppen, Robert; Mayer, Katharina; Sulyok, Michael; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Krska, Rudolf; Berthiller, Franz

    2012-03-01

    A fast, easy-to-handle and cost-effective analytical method for 11 mycotoxins currently regulated in maize and other cereal-based food products in Europe was developed and validated for maize. The method is based on two extraction steps using different acidified acetonitrile–water mixtures. Separation is achieved using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) by a linear water–methanol gradient. After electrospray ionisation, tandem mass spectrometric detection is performed in dynamic multiple reaction monitoring mode. Since accurate mass spectrometric quantification is hampered by matrix effects, uniformly [(13)C]-labelled mycotoxins for each of the 11 compounds were added to the sample extracts prior to UHPLC-MS/MS analysis. Method performance parameters were obtained by spiking blank maize samples with mycotoxins before as well as after extraction on six levels in triplicates. The twofold extraction led to total recoveries of the extraction steps between 97% and 111% for all target analytes, including fumonisins. The [(13)C]-labelled internal standards efficiently compensated all matrix effects in electrospray ionisation, leading to apparent recoveries between 88% and 105% with reasonable additional costs. The relative standard deviations of the whole method were between 4% and 11% for all analytes. The trueness of the method was verified by the measurement of several maize test materials with well-characterized concentrations. In conclusion, the developed method is capable of determining all regulated mycotoxins in maize and presuming similar matrix effects and extraction recovery also in other cereal-based foods.

  19. Accurate focal depth determination of oceanic earthquakes using water-column reverberation and some implications for the shrinking plate hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianping; Niu, Fenglin; Gordon, Richard G.; Cui, Chao

    2015-12-01

    Investigation of oceanic earthquakes is useful for constraining the lateral and depth variations of the stress and strain-rate fields in oceanic lithosphere, and the thickness of the seismogenic layer as a function of lithosphere age, thereby providing us with critical insight into thermal and dynamic processes associated with the cooling and evolution of oceanic lithosphere. With the goal of estimating hypocentral depths more accurately, we observe clear water reverberations after the direct P wave on teleseismic records of oceanic earthquakes and develop a technique to estimate earthquake depths by using these reverberations. The Z-H grid search method allows the simultaneous determination of the sea floor depth (H) and earthquake depth (Z) with an uncertainty less than 1 km, which compares favorably with alternative approaches. We apply this method to two closely located earthquakes beneath the eastern Pacific. These earthquakes occurred in ∼25 Ma-old lithosphere and were previously estimated to have similar depths of ∼10-12 km. We find that the two events actually occurred at dissimilar depths of 2.5 km and 16.8 km beneath the seafloor, respectively, within the oceanic crust and lithospheric mantle. The shallow and deep events are determined to be a thrust and normal earthquake, respectively, indicating that the stress field within the oceanic lithosphere changes from horizontal deviatoric compression to horizontal deviatoric tension as depth increases, which is consistent with the prediction of lithospheric cooling models. Furthermore, we show that the P-axis of the newly investigated thrust-faulting earthquake is perpendicular to that of the previously studied thrust event, consistent with the predictions of the shrinking-plate hypothesis.

  20. High Fidelity Non-Gravitational Force Models for Precise and Accurate Orbit Determination of TerraSAR-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackel, Stefan; Montenbruck, Oliver; Steigenberger, -Peter; Eineder, Michael; Gisinger, Christoph

    Remote sensing satellites support a broad range of scientific and commercial applications. The two radar imaging satellites TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X provide spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and interferometric SAR data with a very high accuracy. The increasing demand for precise radar products relies on sophisticated validation methods, which require precise and accurate orbit products. Basically, the precise reconstruction of the satellite’s trajectory is based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements from a geodetic-grade dual-frequency receiver onboard the spacecraft. The Reduced Dynamic Orbit Determination (RDOD) approach utilizes models for the gravitational and non-gravitational forces. Following a proper analysis of the orbit quality, systematics in the orbit products have been identified, which reflect deficits in the non-gravitational force models. A detailed satellite macro model is introduced to describe the geometry and the optical surface properties of the satellite. Two major non-gravitational forces are the direct and the indirect Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP). Due to the dusk-dawn orbit configuration of TerraSAR-X, the satellite is almost constantly illuminated by the Sun. Therefore, the direct SRP has an effect on the lateral stability of the determined orbit. The indirect effect of the solar radiation principally contributes to the Earth Radiation Pressure (ERP). The resulting force depends on the sunlight, which is reflected by the illuminated Earth surface in the visible, and the emission of the Earth body in the infrared spectra. Both components of ERP require Earth models to describe the optical properties of the Earth surface. Therefore, the influence of different Earth models on the orbit quality is assessed within the presentation. The presentation highlights the influence of non-gravitational force and satellite macro models on the orbit quality of TerraSAR-X.

  1. Development and validation of a novel, simple, and accurate spectrophotometric method for the determination of lead in human serum.

    PubMed

    Shayesteh, Tavakol Heidari; Khajavi, Farzad; Khosroshahi, Abolfazl Ghafuri; Mahjub, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The determination of blood lead levels is the most useful indicator of the determination of the amount of lead that is absorbed by the human body. Various methods, like atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), have already been used for the detection of lead in biological fluid, but most of these methods are based on complicated, expensive, and highly instructed instruments. In this study, a simple and accurate spectroscopic method for the determination of lead has been developed and applied for the investigation of lead concentration in biological samples. In this study, a silica gel column was used to extract lead and eliminate interfering agents in human serum samples. The column was washed with deionized water. The pH was adjusted to the value of 8.2 using phosphate buffer, and then tartrate and cyanide solutions were added as masking agents. The lead content was extracted into the organic phase containing dithizone as a complexion reagent and the dithizone-Pb(II) complex was formed and approved by visible spectrophotometry at 538 nm. The recovery was found to be 84.6 %. In order to validate the method, a calibration curve involving the use of various concentration levels was calculated and proven to be linear in the range of 0.01-1.5 μg/ml, with an R (2) regression coefficient of 0.9968 by statistical analysis of linear model validation. The largest error % values were found to be -5.80 and +11.6 % for intra-day and inter-day measurements, respectively. The largest RSD % values were calculated to be 6.54 and 12.32 % for intra-day and inter-day measurements, respectively. Further, the limit of detection (LOD) was calculated to be 0.002 μg/ml. The developed method was applied to determine the lead content in the human serum of voluntary miners, and it has been proven that there is no statistically significant difference between the data provided from this novel method and the data obtained from previously studied AAS.

  2. Caregiver's Country of Birth Is a Significant Determinant of Accurate Perception of Preschool-Age Children's Weight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Ruby; Uhlhorn, Susan B.; Lopez-Mitnik, Gabriela; Camejo, Stephanie; Englebert, Nicole; Delamater, Alan M.; Messiah, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: One in four preschool-age children in the United States are currently overweight or obese. Previous studies have shown that caregivers of this age group often have difficulty accurately recognizing their child's weight status. The purpose of this study was to examine factors associated with accurate/inaccurate perception of child body…

  3. Simple approach for ranking structure determining residues.

    PubMed

    Luna-Martínez, Oscar D; Vidal-Limón, Abraham; Villalba-Velázquez, Miryam I; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Garduño-Juárez, Ramón; Uversky, Vladimir N; Becerril, Baltazar

    2016-01-01

    Mutating residues has been a common task in order to study structural properties of the protein of interest. Here, we propose and validate a simple method that allows the identification of structural determinants; i.e., residues essential for preservation of the stability of global structure, regardless of the protein topology. This method evaluates all of the residues in a 3D structure of a given globular protein by ranking them according to their connectivity and movement restrictions without topology constraints. Our results matched up with sequence-based predictors that look up for intrinsically disordered segments, suggesting that protein disorder can also be described with the proposed methodology.

  4. Simple approach for ranking structure determining residues

    PubMed Central

    Luna-Martínez, Oscar D.; Vidal-Limón, Abraham; Villalba-Velázquez, Miryam I.; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Garduño-Juárez, Ramón; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2016-01-01

    Mutating residues has been a common task in order to study structural properties of the protein of interest. Here, we propose and validate a simple method that allows the identification of structural determinants; i.e., residues essential for preservation of the stability of global structure, regardless of the protein topology. This method evaluates all of the residues in a 3D structure of a given globular protein by ranking them according to their connectivity and movement restrictions without topology constraints. Our results matched up with sequence-based predictors that look up for intrinsically disordered segments, suggesting that protein disorder can also be described with the proposed methodology. PMID:27366642

  5. SCAN: An Efficient Density Functional Yielding Accurate Structures and Energies of Diversely-Bonded Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianwei

    The accuracy and computational efficiency of the widely used Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) are limited by the approximation to its exchange-correlation energy Exc. The earliest local density approximation (LDA) overestimates the strengths of all bonds near equilibrium (even the vdW bonds). By adding the electron density gradient to model Exc, generalized gradient approximations (GGAs) generally soften the bonds to give robust and overall more accurate descriptions, except for the vdW interaction which is largely lost. Further improvement for covalent, ionic, and hydrogen bonds can be obtained by the computationally more expensive hybrid GGAs, which mix GGAs with the nonlocal exact exchange. Meta-GGAs are still semilocal in computation and thus efficient. Compared to GGAs, they add the kinetic energy density that enables them to recognize and accordingly treat different bonds, which no LDA or GGA can. We show here that the recently developed non-empirical strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) meta-GGA improves significantly over LDA and the standard Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof GGA for geometries and energies of diversely-bonded materials (including covalent, metallic, ionic, hydrogen, and vdW bonds) at comparable efficiency. Often SCAN matches or improves upon the accuracy of a hybrid functional, at almost-GGA cost. This work has been supported by NSF under DMR-1305135 and CNS-09-58854, and by DOE BES EFRC CCDM under DE-SC0012575.

  6. A tailored multi-frequency EPR approach to accurately determine the magnetic resonance parameters of dynamic nuclear polarization agents: application to AMUPol.

    PubMed

    Gast, P; Mance, D; Zurlo, E; Ivanov, K L; Baldus, M; Huber, M

    2017-02-01

    To understand the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhancements of biradical polarizing agents, the magnetic resonance parameters need to be known. We describe a tailored EPR approach to accurately determine electron spin-spin coupling parameters using a combination of standard (9 GHz), high (95 GHz) and ultra-high (275 GHz) frequency EPR. Comparing liquid- and frozen-solution continuous-wave EPR spectra provides accurate anisotropic dipolar interaction D and isotropic exchange interaction J parameters of the DNP biradical AMUPol. We found that D was larger by as much as 30% compared to earlier estimates, and that J is 43 MHz, whereas before it was considered to be negligible. With the refined data, quantum mechanical calculations confirm that an increase in dipolar electron-electron couplings leads to higher cross-effect DNP efficiencies. Moreover, the DNP calculations qualitatively reproduce the difference of TOTAPOL and AMUPol DNP efficiencies found experimentally and suggest that AMUPol is particularly effective in improving the DNP efficiency at magnetic fields higher than 500 MHz. The multi-frequency EPR approach will aid in predicting the optimal structures for future DNP agents.

  7. Using chemical shifts to determine structural changes in proteins upon complex formation.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Andrea; Montalvao, Rinaldo W; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2011-08-04

    Methods for determining protein structures using only chemical shift information are progressively becoming more accurate and reliable. A major problem, however, in the use of chemical shifts for the determination of the structures of protein complexes is that the changes in the chemical shifts upon binding tend to be rather limited and indeed often smaller than the standard errors made in the predictions of chemical shifts corresponding to given structures. We present a procedure that, despite this problem, enables one to use of chemical shifts to determine accurately the conformational changes that take place upon complex formation.

  8. Computational methods toward accurate RNA structure prediction using coarse-grained and all-atom models.

    PubMed

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods can provide significant insights into RNA structure and dynamics, bridging the gap in our understanding of the relationship between structure and biological function. Simulations enrich and enhance our understanding of data derived on the bench, as well as provide feasible alternatives to costly or technically challenging experiments. Coarse-grained computational models of RNA are especially important in this regard, as they allow analysis of events occurring in timescales relevant to RNA biological function, which are inaccessible through experimental methods alone. We have developed a three-bead coarse-grained model of RNA for discrete molecular dynamics simulations. This model is efficient in de novo prediction of short RNA tertiary structure, starting from RNA primary sequences of less than 50 nucleotides. To complement this model, we have incorporated additional base-pairing constraints and have developed a bias potential reliant on data obtained from hydroxyl probing experiments that guide RNA folding to its correct state. By introducing experimentally derived constraints to our computer simulations, we are able to make reliable predictions of RNA tertiary structures up to a few hundred nucleotides. Our refined model exemplifies a valuable benefit achieved through integration of computation and experimental methods.

  9. A technique for accurately determining the cusp-region polar cap boundary using SuperDARN HF radar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisham, G.; Freeman, M. P.

    2003-04-01

    Accurately measuring the location and motion of the polar cap boundary (PCB) in the high-latitude ionosphere can be crucial for studies concerned with the dynamics of the polar cap, e.g. the measurement of reconnection rates. The Doppler spectral width characteristics of backscatter received by the SuperDARN HF radars have been previously used for locating and tracking the PCB in the cusp region. The boundary is generally observed in meridional beams of the SuperDARN radars and appears as a distinct change between low spectral width values observed equatorward of the cusp region, and high, but variable spectral width values observed within the cusp region. To identify the spectral width boundary (SWB) between these two regions, a simple algorithm employing a spectral width threshold has often been applied to the data. However, there is not, as yet, a standard algorithm, or spectral width threshold, which is universally applied. Nor has there been any rigorous assessment of the accuracy of this method of boundary determination. This study applies a series of threshold algorithms to a simulated cusp-region spectral width data set, to assess the accuracy of different algorithms. This shows that simple threshold algorithms correctly identify the boundary location in, at the most, 50% of the cases and that the average boundary error is at least ~ 1 2 range gates (~ 1° latitude). It transpires that spatial and temporal smoothing of the spectral width data (e.g. by median filtering), before application of a threshold algorithm can increase the boundary determination accuracy to over 95% and the average boundary error to much less than a range gate. However, this is sometimes at the cost of temporal resolution in the motion of the boundary location. The algorithms are also applied to a year’s worth of spectral width data from the cusp ionosphere, measured by the Halley SuperDARN radar in Antarctica. This analysis highlights the increased accuracy of the enhanced

  10. Coarse-graining away electronic structure: a rigorous route to accurate condensed phase interaction potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chris; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-05-01

    The molecular simulation of condensed phase systems with electronic structure methods can be prohibitively expensive if the length and time scales necessary to observe the desired chemical phenomena are too large. One solution is to map the results of a representative electronic structure simulation onto a computationally more efficient model that reproduces the original calculation, while allowing for statistical sampling relevant to the required length and time scales. The statistical mechanical multiscale coarse-graining procedure is one methodology in which a model can be developed by integrating over the subset of fast degrees of freedom to construct a reduced representation of the original system that reproduces thermodynamic, and in some instances dynamic, properties. The coarse-graining away of electronic structure is one application of this general method, wherein the electronic degrees of freedom are integrated out and the full dimensionality of the system is mapped to that of only the nuclei. The forces on the nuclei in this reduced representation are obtained from a variational force-matching procedure applied to the Hellman-Feynman forces of the original full electron + nuclear system. This work discusses the coarse-graining procedure and its application to ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of the aqueous hydroxide ion.

  11. Determination of accurate protein monoisotopic mass with the most abundant mass measurable using high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Fen; Chang, C Allen; Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Tsay, Yeou-Guang

    2013-09-01

    While recent developments in mass spectrometry enable direct evaluation of monoisotopic masses (M(mi)) of smaller compounds, protein M(mi) is mostly determined based on its relationship to average mass (Mav). Here, we propose an alternative approach to determining protein M(mi) based on its correlation with the most abundant mass (M(ma)) measurable using high-resolution mass spectrometry. To test this supposition, we first empirically calculated M(mi) and M(ma) of 6158 Escherichia coli proteins, which helped serendipitously uncover a linear correlation between these two protein masses. With the relationship characterized, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was employed to measure M(ma) of protein samples in its ion cluster with the highest signal in the mass spectrum. Generally, our method produces a short series of likely M(mi) in 1-Da steps, and the probability of each likely M(mi) is assigned statistically. It is remarkable that the mass error of this M(mi) is as miniscule as a few parts per million, indicating that our method is capable of determining protein M(mi) with high accuracy. Benefitting from the outstanding performance of modern mass spectrometry, our approach is a significant improvement over others and should be of great utility in the rapid assessment of protein primary structures.

  12. Accurate determination of ultra-trace levels of Ti in blood serum using ICP-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Balcaen, Lieve; Bolea-Fernandez, Eduardo; Resano, Martín; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2014-01-27

    Ti is frequently used in implants and prostheses and it has been shown before that the presence of these in the human body can lead to elevated Ti concentrations in body fluids such as serum and urine. As identification of the exact mechanisms responsible for this increase in Ti concentrations, and the risks associated with it, are not fully understood, it is important to have sound analytical methods that enable straightforward quantification of Ti levels in body fluids (for both implanted and non-implanted individuals). Until now, only double-focusing sector field ICP-mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS) offered limits of detection that are good enough to deal with the very low basal levels of Ti in human serum. This work reports on the development of a novel method for the accurate and precise determination of trace levels of Ti in human serum samples, based on the use of ICP-MS/MS. O2 and NH3/He have been compared as reaction gases. While the use of O2 did not enable to overcome all spectral interferences, it has been shown that conversion of Ti(+) ions into Ti(NH3)6(+) cluster ions by using NH3/He as a reaction gas in an ICP-QQQ-MS system, operated in MS/MS mode, provided interference-free conditions and sufficiently low limits of detection, down to 3 ng L(-1) (instrumental detection limit obtained for the most abundant Ti isotope). The accuracy of the method proposed was evaluated by analysis of a Seronorm Trace Elements Serum L-1 reference material and by comparing the results obtained with those achieved by means of SF-ICP-MS. As a proof-of-concept, the newly developed method was successfully applied to the determination of Ti in serum samples obtained from individuals with and without Ti-based implants. All results were found to be in good agreement with those obtained by means of SF-ICP-MS. The typical basal Ti level in human serum was found to be <1 μg L(-1), while values in the range of 2-6 μg L(-1) were observed for implanted patients.

  13. The Dirac equation in electronic structure calculations: Accurate evaluation of DFT predictions for actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, John M; Mattsson, Ann E

    2012-06-06

    Brooks, Johansson, and Skriver, using the LMTO-ASA method and considerable insight, were able to explain many of the ground state properties of the actinides. In the many years since this work was done, electronic structure calculations of increasing sophistication have been applied to actinide elements and compounds, attempting to quantify the applicability of DFT to actinides and actinide compounds and to try to incorporate other methodologies (i.e. DMFT) into DFT calculations. Through these calculations, the limits of both available density functionals and ad hoc methodologies are starting to become clear. However, it has also become clear that approximations used to incorporate relativity are not adequate to provide rigorous tests of the underlying equations of DFT, not to mention ad hoc additions. In this talk, we describe the result of full-potential LMTO calculations for the elemental actinides, comparing results obtained with a full Dirac basis with those obtained from scalar-relativistic bases, with and without variational spin-orbit. This comparison shows that the scalar relativistic treatment of actinides does not have sufficient accuracy to provide a rigorous test of theory and that variational spin-orbit introduces uncontrolled errors in the results of electronic structure calculations on actinide elements.

  14. An Accurate Method for Free Vibration Analysis of Structures with Application to Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KEVORKIAN, S.; PASCAL, M.

    2001-10-01

    In this work, the continuous element method which has been used as an alternative to the finite element method of vibration analysis of frames is applied to more general structures like 3-D continuum and rectangular plates. The method is based on the concept of the so-called impedance matrix giving in the frequency domain, the linear relation between the generalized displacements of the boundaries and the generalized forces exerted on these boundaries. For a 3-D continuum, the concept of impedance matrix is introduced assuming a particular kind of boundary conditions. For rectangular plates, this new development leads to the solution of vibration problems for boundary conditions other than the simply supported ones.

  15. Accurate mass determination, quantification and determination of detection limits in liquid chromatography-high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry: challenges and practical solutions.

    PubMed

    Vergeynst, Leendert; Van Langenhove, Herman; Joos, Pieter; Demeestere, Kristof

    2013-07-30

    Uniform guidelines for the data processing and validation of qualitative and quantitative multi-residue analysis using full-spectrum high-resolution mass spectrometry are scarce. Through systematic research, optimal mass accuracy and sensitivity are obtained after refining the post-processing of the HRMS data. For qualitative analysis, transforming the raw profile spectra to centroid spectra is recommended resulting in a 2.3 fold improved precision on the accurate mass determination of spectrum peaks. However, processing centroid data for quantitative purposes could lead to signal interruption when too narrow mass windows are applied for the construction of extracted ion chromatograms. Therefore, peak integration on the raw profile data is recommended. An optimal width of the mass window of 50 ppm, which is a trade-off between sensitivity and selectivity, was obtained for a TOF instrument providing a resolving power of 20,000 at full width at half maximum (FWHM). For the validation of HRMS analytical methods, widespread concepts such as the signal-to-noise ratios for the determination of decision limits and detection capabilities have shown to be not always applicable because in some cases almost no noise can be detected anymore. A statistical methodology providing a reliable alternative is extended and applied.

  16. Representing Personal Determinants in Causal Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandura, Albert

    1984-01-01

    Responds to Staddon's critique of the author's earlier article and addresses issues raised by Staddon's (1984) alternative models of causality. The author argues that it is not the formalizability of causal processes that is the issue but whether cognitive determinants of behavior are reducible to past stimulus inputs in causal structures.…

  17. Method of fan sound mode structure determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, G. F.; Sofrin, T. G.; Wells, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the determination of fan sound mode structure in the Inlet of turbofan engines using in-duct acoustic pressure measurements is presented. The method is based on the simultaneous solution of a set of equations whose unknowns are modal amplitude and phase. A computer program for the solution of the equation set was developed. An additional computer program was developed which calculates microphone locations the use of which results in an equation set that does not give rise to numerical instabilities. In addition to the development of a method for determination of coherent modal structure, experimental and analytical approaches are developed for the determination of the amplitude frequency spectrum of randomly generated sound models for use in narrow annulus ducts. Two approaches are defined: one based on the use of cross-spectral techniques and the other based on the use of an array of microphones.

  18. Accurate quantification of width and density of bone structures by computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hangartner, Thomas N.; Short, David F.

    2007-10-15

    In computed tomography (CT), the representation of edges between objects of different densities is influenced by the limited spatial resolution of the scanner. This results in the misrepresentation of density of narrow objects, leading to errors of up to 70% and more. Our interest is in the imaging and measurement of narrow bone structures, and the issues are the same for imaging with clinical CT scanners, peripheral quantitative CT scanners or micro CT scanners. Mathematical models, phantoms and tests with patient data led to the following procedures: (i) extract density profiles at one-degree increments from the CT images at right angles to the bone boundary; (ii) consider the outer and inner edge of each profile separately due to different adjacent soft tissues; (iii) measure the width of each profile based on a threshold at fixed percentage of the difference between the soft-tissue value and a first approximated bone value; (iv) correct the underlying material density of bone for each profile based on the measured width with the help of the density-versus-width curve obtained from computer simulations and phantom measurements. This latter curve is specific to a certain scanner and is not dependent on the densities of the tissues within the range seen in patients. This procedure allows the calculation of the material density of bone. Based on phantom measurements, we estimate the density error to be below 2% relative to the density of normal bone and the bone-width error about one tenth of a pixel size.

  19. Structural adjustment for accurate conditioning in large-scale subsurface systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmasebi, Pejman

    2017-03-01

    Most of the current subsurface simulation approaches consider a priority list for honoring the well and any other auxiliary data, and eventually adopt a middle ground between the quality of the model and conditioning it to hard data. However, as the number of datasets increases, such methods often produce undesirable features in the subsurface model. Due to their high flexibility, subsurface modeling based on training images (TIs) is becoming popular. Providing comprehensive TIs remains, however, an outstanding problem. In addition, identifying a pattern similar to those in the TI that honors the well and other conditioning data is often difficult. Moreover, the current subsurface modeling approaches do not account for small perturbations that may occur in a subsurface system. Such perturbations are active in most of the depositional systems. In this paper, a new methodology is presented that is based on an irregular gridding scheme that accounts for incomplete TIs and minor offsets. Use of the methodology enables one to use a small or incomplete TI and adaptively change the patterns in the simulation grid in order to simultaneously honor the well data and take into account the effect of the local offsets. Furthermore, the proposed method was used on various complex process-based models and their structures are deformed for matching with the conditioning point data. The accuracy and robustness of the proposed algorithm are successfully demonstrated by applying it to models of several complex examples.

  20. Crystal structure of meteoritic schreibersites: determination of absolute structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skála, Roman; Císařová, Ivana

    Minerals of the schreibersite nickelphosphide series (Fe,Ni)3P crystallize in the non-centrosymmetric space group Ibar 4. As a consequence, they can possess two different spatial arrangements of the constituting atoms within the unit cell, related by the inversion symmetry operation. Here, we present the crystal structure refinements from single crystal X-ray diffraction data for schreibersite grains from iron meteorites Acuña, Carlton, Hex River Mts. (three different crystals), Odessa (two different crystals), Sikhote Alin, and Toluca aiming for the determination of the absolute structure of the examined crystals. The crystals studied cover the composition range from 58 mol% to 80 mol% Fe3P end-member. Unit-cell parameter a and volume of the unit cell V, as well as certain topological structural parameters tightly correlate with Fe3P content. Unit-cell parameter c, on the other hand, does not show such strong correlation. Eight of the nine crystal structure refinements allowed unambiguous absolute structure assignment. The single crystal extracted from Toluca is, however, of poor quality and consequently the structure refinement did not provide as good results as the rest of the materials. Also, this crystal has only weak inversion distinguishing power to provide unequivocal absolute structure determination. Six of the eight unambiguous absolute structure determinations indicated inverted atomic arrangement compared to that reported in earlier structure refinements (here called standard). Only two grains, one taken from Odessa iron and the other from the Hex River Mts. meteorite, reveal the dominance of standard crystal structure setting.

  1. Structure determination of molecules of biochemical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honzatko, R. B.

    1985-10-01

    In the past year we have established a new laboratory for the determination of macromolecular structure. Currently, facilities are in place for data collection, data processing, molecular modeling and X-ray refinement of structures of up to 100,000 molecular weight in their crystallographic asymmetric unit. In parallel with establishing a new laboratory, we have pursued structure investigations of hemoglobin from the sea lamprey, aspartate carbamoyltransferase from Escherichia coli and p-nitrobenzylidine aminoguanidine, a small molecule which is an acceptor of the adenosine diphosphate ribosyl group in an enzyme mediated reaction. In addition to the structural studies above we have made a theoretical study by techniques of energy minimization of possible modes of aggregation of lamprey hemoglobin and the relationship between aggregate formation and cooperativity expressed in solutions by lamprey hemoglobin.

  2. Fast and accurate determination of K, Ca, and Mg in human serum by sector field ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lee L; Davis, W Clay; Nuevo Ordonez, Yoana; Long, Stephen E

    2013-11-01

    Electrolytes in serum are important biomarkers for skeletal and cellular health. The levels of electrolytes are monitored by measuring the Ca, Mg, K, and Na in blood serum. Many reference methods have been developed for the determination of Ca, Mg, and K in clinical measurements; however, isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) has traditionally been the primary reference method serving as an anchor for traceability and accuracy to these secondary reference methods. The sample matrix must be separated before ID-TIMS measurements, which is a slow and tedious process that hindered the adoption of the technique in routine clinical measurements. We have developed a fast and accurate method for the determination of Ca, Mg, and K in serum by taking advantage of the higher mass resolution capability of the modern sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS). Each serum sample was spiked with a mixture containing enriched (44)Ca, (26)Mg, and (41)K, and the (42)Ca(+):(44)Ca(+), (24)Mg(+):(26)Mg(+), and (39)K(+):(41)K(+) ratios were measured. The Ca and Mg ratios were measured in medium resolution mode (m/Δm ≈ 4 500), and the K ratio in high resolution mode (m/Δm ≈ 10 000). Residual (40)Ar(1)H(+) interference was still observed but the deleterious effects of the interference were minimized by measuring the sample at K > 100 ng g(-1). The interferences of Sr(++) at the two Ca isotopes were less than 0.25 % of the analyte signal, and they were corrected with the (88)Sr(+) intensity by using the Sr(++):Sr(+) ratio. The sample preparation involved only simple dilutions, and the measurement using this sample preparation approach is known as dilution-and-shoot (DNS). The DNS approach was validated with samples prepared via the traditional acid digestion approach followed by ID-SF-ICP-MS measurement. DNS and digested samples of SRM 956c were measured with ID-SF-ICP-MS for quality assurance, and the results (mean

  3. Combining Structural Modeling with Ensemble Machine Learning to Accurately Predict Protein Fold Stability and Binding Affinity Effects upon Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Lopez, Sebastian; Kim, Philip M.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in sequencing have led to a rapid accumulation of mutations, some of which are associated with diseases. However, to draw mechanistic conclusions, a biochemical understanding of these mutations is necessary. For coding mutations, accurate prediction of significant changes in either the stability of proteins or their affinity to their binding partners is required. Traditional methods have used semi-empirical force fields, while newer methods employ machine learning of sequence and structural features. Here, we show how combining both of these approaches leads to a marked boost in accuracy. We introduce ELASPIC, a novel ensemble machine learning approach that is able to predict stability effects upon mutation in both, domain cores and domain-domain interfaces. We combine semi-empirical energy terms, sequence conservation, and a wide variety of molecular details with a Stochastic Gradient Boosting of Decision Trees (SGB-DT) algorithm. The accuracy of our predictions surpasses existing methods by a considerable margin, achieving correlation coefficients of 0.77 for stability, and 0.75 for affinity predictions. Notably, we integrated homology modeling to enable proteome-wide prediction and show that accurate prediction on modeled structures is possible. Lastly, ELASPIC showed significant differences between various types of disease-associated mutations, as well as between disease and common neutral mutations. Unlike pure sequence-based prediction methods that try to predict phenotypic effects of mutations, our predictions unravel the molecular details governing the protein instability, and help us better understand the molecular causes of diseases. PMID:25243403

  4. Deducing chemical structure from crystallographically determined atomic coordinates

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Ian J.; Shields, Gregory P.; Taylor, Robin

    2011-01-01

    An improved algorithm has been developed for assigning chemical structures to incoming entries to the Cambridge Structural Database, using only the information available in the deposited CIF. Steps in the algorithm include detection of bonds, selection of polymer unit, resolution of disorder, and assignment of bond types and formal charges. The chief difficulty is posed by the large number of metallo-organic crystal structures that must be processed, given our aspiration that assigned chemical structures should accurately reflect properties such as the oxidation states of metals and redox-active ligands, metal coordination numbers and hapticities, and the aromaticity or otherwise of metal ligands. Other complications arise from disorder, especially when it is symmetry imposed or modelled with the SQUEEZE algorithm. Each assigned structure is accompanied by an estimate of reliability and, where necessary, diagnostic information indicating probable points of error. Although the algorithm was written to aid building of the Cambridge Structural Database, it has the potential to develop into a general-purpose tool for adding chemical information to newly determined crystal structures. PMID:21775812

  5. Oligossacharide structure determination on an ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Asam, M.R.; Glish, G.L.

    1995-12-31

    Oligosaccharides are important elements in intra- and inter-cellular/molecular recognition mechanisms. Linkage types are part of the information that determine the tertiary structure of oligosaccharides and the tertiary structure is what determines specific recognition, so easily obtained linkage sequences will provide valuable information for computer and other modeling of cellular signaling interactions. Hofmeister et al. have shown that lithium cationized oligosaccharides have specific MS/MS dissociation patterns indicative of the carbohydrate linkage under low energy CID conditions in a hybrid mass spectrometer. The authors have used electrospray ionization on a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer to examine MS/MS disaccharide dissociation patterns under ion trap conditions. These studies have concentrated on disaccharides complexed with lithium and sodium.

  6. Requirements for structure determination of aperiodic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Stern, E.A.; Ma, Y. )

    1991-01-15

    Using computer simulation, we compared the Patterson functions of one-dimensional (1D) randomly packed and quasiperiodic Fibonacci lattices with or without disorder, and a 2D Penrose lattice and random packing of pentagons (icosahedral glass model). Based on these comparisons, we derived some empirical guidelines for distinguishing ideal quasicrystals from aperiodic crystals with disorder using diffraction data. In contrast to periodic crystals, it is essential to include the background to obtain correct Patterson functions of the average structure since the background contains unresolved peaks. In particular, a Bragg peak scattering measurement {ital cannot}, in general, determine the structure of aperiodic crystals. Instead, a diffuse scattering measurement is required, which determines the absolute value of the diffraction background, in addition to the Bragg peaks. We further estimate that, dependent upon the disorder present, it is necessary to include up to 75% of the total diffracted intensity in any analysis.

  7. Distributed structure determination at the JCSG

    PubMed Central

    van den Bedem, Henry; Wolf, Guenter; Xu, Qingping; Deacon, Ashley M.

    2011-01-01

    The Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG), one of four large-scale structure-determination centers funded by the US Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) through the National Institute for General Medical Sciences, has been operating an automated distributed structure-solution pipeline, Xsolve, for well over half a decade. During PSI-2, Xsolve solved, traced and partially refined 90% of the JCSG’s nearly 770 MAD/SAD structures at an average resolution of about 2 Å without human intervention. Xsolve executes many well established publicly available crystallography software programs in parallel on a commodity Linux cluster, resulting in multiple traces for any given target. Additional software programs have been developed and integrated into Xsolve to further minimize human effort in structure refinement. ConsensusModeler exploits complementarities in traces from Xsolve to compute a single optimal model for manual refinement. Xpleo is a powerful robotics-inspired algorithm to build missing fragments and qFit automatically identifies and fits alternate conformations. PMID:21460455

  8. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  9. THE HYPERFINE STRUCTURE OF THE ROTATIONAL SPECTRUM OF HDO AND ITS EXTENSION TO THE THz REGION: ACCURATE REST FREQUENCIES AND SPECTROSCOPIC PARAMETERS FOR ASTROPHYSICAL OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Lattanzi, Valerio; Puzzarini, Cristina; Alonso, José Luis; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-06-10

    The rotational spectrum of the mono-deuterated isotopologue of water, HD{sup 16}O, has been investigated in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wave frequency regions, up to 1.6 THz. The Lamb-dip technique has been exploited to obtain sub-Doppler resolution and to resolve the hyperfine (hf) structure due to the deuterium and hydrogen nuclei, thus enabling the accurate determination of the corresponding hf parameters. Their experimental determination has been supported by high-level quantum-chemical calculations. The Lamb-dip measurements have been supplemented by Doppler-limited measurements (weak high-J and high-frequency transitions) in order to extend the predictive capability of the available spectroscopic constants. The possibility of resolving hf splittings in astronomical spectra has been discussed.

  10. High-Resolution Photoionization, Photoelectron and Photodissociation Studies. Determination of Accurate Energetic and Spectroscopic Database for Combustion Radicals and Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Cheuk-Yiu

    2016-04-25

    The main goal of this research program was to obtain accurate thermochemical and spectroscopic data, such as ionization energies (IEs), 0 K bond dissociation energies, 0 K heats of formation, and spectroscopic constants for radicals and molecules and their ions of relevance to combustion chemistry. Two unique, generally applicable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser photoion-photoelectron apparatuses have been developed in our group, which have used for high-resolution photoionization, photoelectron, and photodissociation studies for many small molecules of combustion relevance.

  11. Atmospheric structure determined from satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, K. S.; Scoggins, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The capabilities of the Nimbus 6 satellite sounding data for use in synoptic analysis were considered and interpreted. An evaluation of the ability of the satellite sounding data to detect and depict structural features of the atmosphere was made on the basis of vertical profiles of average difference and standard deviation of differences between satellite and rawinsonde data at nine pressure levels from 850 to 100 mb; and constant pressure charts and cross sections of satellite, rawinsonde and difference values. Results indicate that satellite measurements of temperature as well as the vertical lapse rate and horizontal gradient of temperature are accurate enough to show large scale patterns but not to precisely define fronts or tropopauses; satellite measurements of dew point temperature are smoothed enough to severely reduce contrasts between air masses across fronts; the magnitude of the standard deviation of differences between rawinsonde and satellite data for most variables increases with the synoptic activity in the region; and the most reliable variables to examine from satellite data for depiction of synoptic features are the temperature equivalent potential temperature and mixing ratio.

  12. High Resolution Powder Diffraction and Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D. E.

    1999-04-23

    It is clear that high-resolution synchrotrons X-ray powder diffraction is a very powerful and convenient tool for material characterization and structure determination. Most investigations to date have been carried out under ambient conditions and have focused on structure solution and refinement. The application of high-resolution techniques to increasingly complex structures will certainly represent an important part of future studies, and it has been seen how ab initio solution of structures with perhaps 100 atoms in the asymmetric unit is within the realms of possibility. However, the ease with which temperature-dependence measurements can be made combined with improvements in the technology of position-sensitive detectors will undoubtedly stimulate precise in situ structural studies of phase transitions and related phenomena. One challenge in this area will be to develop high-resolution techniques for ultra-high pressure investigations in diamond anvil cells. This will require highly focused beams and very precise collimation in front of the cell down to dimensions of 50 {micro}m or less. Anomalous scattering offers many interesting possibilities as well. As a means of enhancing scattering contrast it has applications not only to the determination of cation distribution in mixed systems such as the superconducting oxides discussed in Section 9.5.3, but also to the location of specific cations in partially occupied sites, such as the extra-framework positions in zeolites, for example. Another possible application is to provide phasing information for ab initio structure solution. Finally, the precise determination of f as a function of energy through an absorption edge can provide useful information about cation oxidation states, particularly in conjunction with XANES data. In contrast to many experiments at a synchrotron facility, powder diffraction is a relatively simple and user-friendly technique, and most of the procedures and software for data analysis

  13. Methods for SAXS-Based Structure Determination of Biomolecular Complexes

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Sichun

    2014-05-30

    Measurements from small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) are highly informative to determine the structures of bimolecular complexes in solution. Here, we describe current and recent SAXS-driven developments, with an emphasis on computational modeling. In particular, accurate methods to computing one theoretical scattering profile from a given structure model are discussed, with a key focus on structure factor coarse-graining and hydration contribution. Methods for reconstructing topological structures from an experimental SAXS profile are currently under active development. We report on several modeling tools designed for conformation generation that make use of either atomic-level or coarse-grained representations. Furthermore, since large, flexible biomolecules canmore » adopt multiple well-defined conformations, a traditional single-conformation SAXS analysis is inappropriate, so we also discuss recent methods that utilize the concept of ensemble optimization, weighing in on the SAXS contributions of a heterogeneous mixture of conformations. These tools will ultimately posit the usefulness of SAXS data beyond a simple space-filling approach by providing a reliable structure characterization of biomolecular complexes under physiological conditions.« less

  14. Structure Determination of Novel Polydiacetylene Materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Mrinal Kanti

    The major objective of this work has been to synthesize and characterize some novel diacetylene polymers. Monomers of the general type HC(TBOND)C-(CH(,2))(,n)-C(TBOND)CH were oxidatively coupled (Glaser coupling) to synthesize polymers of the form ( (CH(,2))(,n)-C(TBOND)C-C(TBOND)C )(,x). These polymers (n = 5, 6, 8), termed macromonomers, were subsequently exposed to CO('60)-(gamma) radiation to effect the diacetylene polymerization. The resulting materials, called crosspolymerized macromonomers, were composed of regular two-dimensional networks of polydiacetylene and hydrocarbon chains. Crystal structures of macromonomers before and after crosspolymerization were determined essentially by electron diffraction analysis, with supporting information from x-ray fiber diffraction. A detailed investigation of the crosspolymerization reaction was made by C-13 NMR in solid state. A very special type of diacetylene monomer was synthesized by dimerizing 1,11-dodecadiyne through a controlled oxidative coupling. Preliminary characterization of these dimers was accomplished by using GPC, DSC and electron diffraction. Macroscopic single crystals of polymerized dimer were obtained by radiation ((gamma)-radiation) induced polymerization and simultaneous crystallization from solution. X -ray diffraction analysis was employed for the crystal structure determination of this material. The structure was found to be composed of sheets of alternating polydiacetylene and polyacetylene chains. The nearest neighbor distance between a polydiacetylene and a polyacetylene chain was approximately 4(ANGSTROM). The electrical conductivity of this undoped material was measured and found to be reasonably high ((TURN)10('-2) (OMEGA)('-1)cm('-1)). A (pi)-electron band structure calculation indicated that such high conductivity resulted because of significant interchain interaction within the unit cell. A detailed investigation of the consequences of anharmonic interaction on diffraction intensities

  15. RNA Structure Determination Using SAXS Data

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sichun; Parisien, Marc; Major, François; Roux, Benoît

    2011-01-01

    Exploiting the experimental information from small-angle x-ray solution scattering (SAXS) in conjunction with structure prediction algorithms can be advantageous in the case of ribonucleic acids (RNA), where global restraints on the 3D fold are often lacking. Traditional usage of SAXS data often starts by attempting to reconstruct the molecular shape ab initio, which is subsequently used to assess the quality of model Here, an alternative strategy is explored whereby the models from a very large decoy set are directly sorted according to their fit to the SAXS data is developed. For rapid computation of SAXS patterns, the method developed here makes use of a coarse-grained representation of RNA. It also accounts for the explicit treatment of the contribution to the scattering of water molecules and ions surrounding the RNA. The method, called Fast-SAXS-RNA, is first calibrated using a transfer RNA (tRNA-val) and then tested on the P4-P6 fragment of group I intron (P4-P6). Fast-SAXS-RNA is then used as a filter for decoy models generated by the MC-Fold and MC-Sym pipeline, a suite of RNA 3D all-atoms structure algorithms that encode and exploit RNA 3D architectural principles. The ability of Fast-SAXS-RNA to discriminate native folds is tested against three widely used RNA molecules in molecular modeling benchmarks: the tRNA, the P4-P6, and a synthetic hairpin suspected to assemble into a homodimer. For each molecule, a large pool of decoys are generated, scored, and ranked using Fast-SAXS-RNA. The method is able to identify low-RMSD models among top ranking structures, for both tRNA and P4-P6. For the hairpin, the approach correctly identifies the dimeric state as the solution structure over the monomeric state and alternative secondary structures. The method offers a powerful strategy for recognizing native RNA conformations as well as multimeric assemblies and alternative secondary structures, thus enabling high-throughput RNA structure determination using SAXS

  16. An approach to an accurate determination of the energy spectrum of high-energy electron beams using magnetic spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, F.; Schwab, A.; Kapsch, R.-P.; Makowski, Ch; Jannek, D.

    2014-03-01

    At the national metrology institute of Germany, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, a research accelerator for dosimetry in radiation therapy has been installed. Magnetic spectrometry is used to determine the spectrum of high-energy electrons generated by this accelerator. Regarding the intended experiments at the accelerator, a high accuracy for the energy determination of the electron beam is required. For this purpose, an experimental setup is used that has a number of additional devices assembled around the spectrometer to determine geometric characteristics of the electron beam, which influence the energy analysis. For the analysis of the acquired data, a software was developed which meets specific needs. One important aspect is that the software is based on an algorithm for energy determination which considers the measured magnetic flux density of the spectrometer and geometric details of the beam and the spectrometer. The software also meets the demand that it can be used to estimate the uncertainty assigned to the energy. This paper covers the experimental and analytical background of magnetic spectrometry at the high-energy beamline of PTB's research accelerator. A comparison of results calculated with the specific algorithm for energy determination which was developed for this experimental setup and with well-known algorithms is given to show the advantage of the specific method. Results of measurements and their analysis with the algorithm are presented as well.

  17. Communication: Vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of the tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) anion and accurate determination of the electron affinity of TCNQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guo-Zhu; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) is widely used as an electron acceptor to form highly conducting organic charge-transfer solids. Surprisingly, the electron affinity (EA) of TCNQ is not well known and has never been directly measured. Here, we report vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) of the TCNQ- anion produced using electrospray and cooled in a cryogenic ion trap. Photoelectron spectrum taken at 354.7 nm represents the detachment transition from the ground state of TCNQ- to that of neutral TCNQ with a short vibrational progression. The EA of TCNQ is measured accurately to be 3.383 ± 0.001 eV (27 289 ± 8 cm-1), compared to the 2.8 ± 0.1 eV value known in the literature and measured previously using collisional ionization technique. In addition, six vibrational peaks are observed in the photoelectron spectrum, yielding vibrational frequencies for three totally symmetric modes of TCNQ. Two-photon PES via a bound electronic excited state of TCNQ- at 3.100 eV yields a broad low kinetic energy peak due to fast internal conversion to vibrationally excited levels of the anion ground electronic state. The high EA measured for TCNQ underlies its ability as a good electron acceptor.

  18. Communication: Vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of the tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) anion and accurate determination of the electron affinity of TCNQ

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Guo-Zhu; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2015-12-14

    Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) is widely used as an electron acceptor to form highly conducting organic charge-transfer solids. Surprisingly, the electron affinity (EA) of TCNQ is not well known and has never been directly measured. Here, we report vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) of the TCNQ{sup −} anion produced using electrospray and cooled in a cryogenic ion trap. Photoelectron spectrum taken at 354.7 nm represents the detachment transition from the ground state of TCNQ{sup −} to that of neutral TCNQ with a short vibrational progression. The EA of TCNQ is measured accurately to be 3.383 ± 0.001 eV (27 289 ± 8 cm{sup −1}), compared to the 2.8 ± 0.1 eV value known in the literature and measured previously using collisional ionization technique. In addition, six vibrational peaks are observed in the photoelectron spectrum, yielding vibrational frequencies for three totally symmetric modes of TCNQ. Two-photon PES via a bound electronic excited state of TCNQ{sup −} at 3.100 eV yields a broad low kinetic energy peak due to fast internal conversion to vibrationally excited levels of the anion ground electronic state. The high EA measured for TCNQ underlies its ability as a good electron acceptor.

  19. Efficient implementation of the Hiller-Sucher-Feinberg identity for the accurate determination of the electron density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challacombe, Matt; Cioslowski, Jerzy

    1994-01-01

    A new, highly optimized implementation of the Hiller-Sucher-Feinberg (HSF) identity is presented. The HSF identity, when applied to molecular wave functions calculated with Gaussian-type basis functions, not only improves the overall accuracy of the electron density by more than an order of magnitude, but also yields approximate cusps at nuclei. The three classes of molecular integrals, L, U, and V, which are encountered in the calculation of the HSF density, are derived in compact form. Efficient algorithms for the accurate evaluation of these integrals are detailed, including a novel approach to the necessary numerical quadratures and the thresholding of two-electron V integrals. Hartree-Fock (HF) electron densities calculated with both the conventional definition and from the HSF identity are compared to their respective HF limits for a variety of diatomic molecules and basis sets. The average error in the calculated HSF electron densities at non-hydrogen nuclei equals 0.17%, which constitutes a marked improvement over an error of 5.77% in the conventional densities.

  20. Communication: Vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of the tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) anion and accurate determination of the electron affinity of TCNQ.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guo-Zhu; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2015-12-14

    Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) is widely used as an electron acceptor to form highly conducting organic charge-transfer solids. Surprisingly, the electron affinity (EA) of TCNQ is not well known and has never been directly measured. Here, we report vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) of the TCNQ(-) anion produced using electrospray and cooled in a cryogenic ion trap. Photoelectron spectrum taken at 354.7 nm represents the detachment transition from the ground state of TCNQ(-) to that of neutral TCNQ with a short vibrational progression. The EA of TCNQ is measured accurately to be 3.383 ± 0.001 eV (27,289 ± 8 cm(-1)), compared to the 2.8 ± 0.1 eV value known in the literature and measured previously using collisional ionization technique. In addition, six vibrational peaks are observed in the photoelectron spectrum, yielding vibrational frequencies for three totally symmetric modes of TCNQ. Two-photon PES via a bound electronic excited state of TCNQ(-) at 3.100 eV yields a broad low kinetic energy peak due to fast internal conversion to vibrationally excited levels of the anion ground electronic state. The high EA measured for TCNQ underlies its ability as a good electron acceptor.

  1. Extending the molecular size in accurate quantum-chemical calculations: the equilibrium structure and spectroscopic properties of uracil.

    PubMed

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Barone, Vincenzo

    2011-04-21

    The equilibrium structure of uracil has been investigated using both theoretical and experimental data. With respect to the former, quantum-chemical calculations at the coupled-cluster level in conjunction with a triple-zeta basis set have been carried out. Extrapolation to the basis set limit, performed employing the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, and inclusion of core-correlation and diffuse-function corrections have also been considered. Based on the available rotational constants for various isotopic species together with corresponding computed vibrational corrections, the semi-experimental equilibrium structure of uracil has been determined for the first time. Theoretical and semi-experimental structures have been found in remarkably good agreement, thus pointing out the limitations of previous experimental determinations. Molecular and spectroscopic properties of uracil have then been studied by means of the composite computational approach introduced for the molecular structure evaluation. Among the results achieved, we mention the revision of the dipole moment. On the whole, it has been proved that the computational procedure presented is able to provide parameters with the proper accuracy to support experimental investigations of large molecules of biological interest.

  2. Development of a Star Tracker-Based Reference System for Accurate Attitude Determination of a Simulated Spacecraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    8 3 Typical Attitude Determination Process Flowchart . . . . . . . . . 9 4 Earth-Centered Inertial and...Plane Dimension vs. Vehicle Orientation - Flat Star Field . 87 2 Test 1 Mean Instrument Magnitude Data Across All Positions . . . 112 3 Test 2 Mean...Data Across All Positions . . . 119 8 Test 3 Mean Separation Angle Values Across All Positions . . . . . 122 9 Test 3 Algorithm Error Values

  3. Determination of accurate electron chiral asymmetries in fenchone and camphor in the VUV range: sensitivity to isomerism and enantiomeric purity.

    PubMed

    Nahon, Laurent; Nag, Lipsa; Garcia, Gustavo A; Myrgorodska, Iuliia; Meierhenrich, Uwe; Beaulieu, Samuel; Wanie, Vincent; Blanchet, Valérie; Géneaux, Romain; Powis, Ivan

    2016-05-14

    Photoelectron circular dichroism (PECD) manifests itself as an intense forward/backward asymmetry in the angular distribution of photoelectrons produced from randomly-oriented enantiomers by photoionization with circularly-polarized light (CPL). As a sensitive probe of both photoionization dynamics and of the chiral molecular potential, PECD attracts much interest especially with the recent performance of related experiments with visible and VUV laser sources. Here we report, by use of quasi-perfect CPL VUV synchrotron radiation and using a double imaging photoelectron/photoion coincidence (i(2)PEPICO) spectrometer, new and very accurate values of the corresponding asymmetries on showcase chiral isomers: camphor and fenchone. These data have additionally been normalized to the absolute enantiopurity of the sample as measured by a chromatographic technique. They can therefore be used as benchmarking data for new PECD experiments, as well as for theoretical models. In particular we found, especially for the outermost orbital of both molecules, a good agreement with CMS-Xα PECD modeling over the whole VUV range. We also report a spectacular sensitivity of PECD to isomerism for slow electrons, showing large and opposite asymmetries when comparing R-camphor to R-fenchone (respectively -10% and +16% around 10 eV). In the course of this study, we could also assess the analytical potential of PECD. Indeed, the accuracy of the data we provide are such that limited departure from perfect enantiopurity in the sample we purchased could be detected and estimated in excellent agreement with the analysis performed in parallel via a chromatographic technique, establishing a new standard of accuracy, in the ±1% range, for enantiomeric excess measurement via PECD. The i(2)PEPICO technique allows correlating PECD measurements to specific parent ion masses, which would allow its application to analysis of complex mixtures.

  4. Accurate determination of surface reference data in digital photographs in ice-free surfaces of Maritime Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Pina, Pedro; Vieira, Gonçalo; Bandeira, Lourenço; Mora, Carla

    2016-12-15

    The ice-free areas of Maritime Antarctica show complex mosaics of surface covers, with wide patches of diverse bare soils and rock, together with various vegetation communities dominated by lichens and mosses. The microscale variability is difficult to characterize and quantify, but is essential for ground-truthing and for defining classifiers for large areas using, for example high resolution satellite imagery, or even ultra-high resolution unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imagery. The main objective of this paper is to verify the ability and robustness of an automated approach to discriminate the variety of surface types in digital photographs acquired at ground level in ice-free regions of Maritime Antarctica. The proposed method is based on an object-based classification procedure built in two main steps: first, on the automated delineation of homogeneous regions (the objects) of the images through the watershed transform with adequate filtering to avoid an over-segmentation, and second, on labelling each identified object with a supervised decision classifier trained with samples of representative objects of ice-free surface types (bare rock, bare soil, moss and lichen formations). The method is evaluated with images acquired in summer campaigns in Fildes and Barton peninsulas (King George Island, South Shetlands). The best performances for the datasets of the two peninsulas are achieved with a SVM classifier with overall accuracies of about 92% and kappa values around 0.89. The excellent performances allow validating the adequacy of the approach for obtaining accurate surface reference data at the complete pixel scale (sub-metric) of current very high resolution (VHR) satellite images, instead of a common single point sampling.

  5. Accurate first-principles detailed-balance determination of auger recombination and impact ionization rates in semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Picozzi, S; Asahi, R; Geller, C B; Freeman, A J

    2002-11-04

    The technologically important prediction of Auger recombination lifetimes in semiconductors is addressed by means of a fully first-principles formalism, based on precise energy bands and wave functions provided by the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave code. The minority carrier Auger lifetime is determined by two related approaches: (i) a direct evaluation within Fermi's golden rule, and (ii) an indirect evaluation, based on a detailed balance formulation combining Auger recombination and its inverse process, impact ionization, in a unified framework. Lifetimes determined with the direct and indirect methods show excellent consistency between them (i) for n-doped GaAs and (ii) with measured values for GaAs and InGaAs. This indicates the computational formalism as a new sensitive tool for use in materials performance optimization.

  6. Accurate determination of electronic transport properties of silicon wafers by nonlinear photocarrier radiometry with multiple pump beam sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qian; Li, Bincheng

    2015-12-07

    In this paper, photocarrier radiometry (PCR) technique with multiple pump beam sizes is employed to determine simultaneously the electronic transport parameters (the carrier lifetime, the carrier diffusion coefficient, and the front surface recombination velocity) of silicon wafers. By employing the multiple pump beam sizes, the influence of instrumental frequency response on the multi-parameter estimation is totally eliminated. A nonlinear PCR model is developed to interpret the PCR signal. Theoretical simulations are performed to investigate the uncertainties of the estimated parameter values by investigating the dependence of a mean square variance on the corresponding transport parameters and compared to that obtained by the conventional frequency-scan method, in which only the frequency dependences of the PCR amplitude and phase are recorded at single pump beam size. Simulation results show that the proposed multiple-pump-beam-size method can improve significantly the accuracy of the determination of the electronic transport parameters. Comparative experiments with a p-type silicon wafer with resistivity 0.1–0.2 Ω·cm are performed, and the electronic transport properties are determined simultaneously. The estimated uncertainties of the carrier lifetime, diffusion coefficient, and front surface recombination velocity are approximately ±10.7%, ±8.6%, and ±35.4% by the proposed multiple-pump-beam-size method, which is much improved than ±15.9%, ±29.1%, and >±50% by the conventional frequency-scan method. The transport parameters determined by the proposed multiple-pump-beam-size PCR method are in good agreement with that obtained by a steady-state PCR imaging technique.

  7. Sub-Doppler millimetre-wave spectroscopy of DBS and HBS: accurate values of nuclear electric and magnetic hyperfine structure constants.

    PubMed

    Bizzocchi, Luca; Esposti, Claudio Degli; Dore, Luca

    2008-02-07

    The unstable thioborine molecule and its deuterated variant have been produced by a high-temperature reaction between hydrogen sulfide and crystalline boron at 1100 degrees C in a flow system. Five rotational transitions from J = 2 <-- 1, to J = 6 <-- 5 have been recorded with sub-Doppler resolution for the vibrational ground state of H10/11BS and D10/11BS using the Lamb-dip technique. The hyperfine structure due to the electric quadrupole interaction of deuterium nucleus has been resolved yielding the first experimental determination of the deuterium quadrupole coupling constant in thioborine, which is 0.1403(75) MHz in D11 BS and 0.1360(38) MHz in D10BS. Fairly accurate values of 10/11B spin-rotation coupling constants and of the hydrogen-boron spin-spin coupling constants have also been determined. Additionally, the hyperfine structure of the rotational lines for the nu2 = 1 excited state has been investigated, thus obtaining information on the asymmetry of the electric field gradient at the B nucleus in the bending state.

  8. Innovations in Mass Spectrometry for Precise and Accurate Isotope Ratio Determination from Very Small Analyte Quantities (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, N. S.; Bouman, C.; Horstwood, M. S.; Parrish, R. R.; Schwieters, J. B.

    2010-12-01

    This presentation describes progress in mass spectrometry for analysing very small analyte quantities, illustrated by example applications from nuclear forensics. In this challenging application, precise and accurate (‰) uranium isotope ratios are required from 1 - 2 µm diameter uranium oxide particles, which comprise less than 40 pg of uranium. Traditionally these are analysed using thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS), and more recently using secondary ionisation mass spectrometry (SIMS). Multicollector inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) can offer higher productivity compared to these techniques, but is traditionally limited by low efficiency of analyte utilisation (sample through to ion detection). Samples can either be introduced as a solution, or sampled directly from solid using laser ablation. Large multi-isotope ratio datasets can help identify provenance and intended use of anthropogenic uranium and other nuclear materials [1]. The Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus (Bremen, Germany) with ‘Jet Interface’ option offers unparalleled MC-ICP-MS sensitivity. An analyte utilisation of c. 4% has previously been reported for uranium [2]. This high-sensitivity configuration utilises a dry high-capacity (100 m3/h) interface pump, special skimmer and sampler cones and a desolvating nebuliser system. Coupled with new acquisition methodologies, this sensitivity enhancement makes possible the analysis of micro-particles and small sample volumes at higher precision levels than previously achieved. New, high-performance, full-size and compact discrete dynode secondary electron multipliers (SEM) exhibit excellent stability and linearity over a large dynamic range and can be configured to simultaneously measure all of the uranium isotopes. Options for high abundance-sensitivity filters on two ion beams are also available, e.g. for 236U and 234U. Additionally, amplifiers with high ohm (1012 - 1013) feedback resistors have been developed to

  9. The role of cognitive switching in head-up displays. [to determine pilot ability to accurately extract information from either of two sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, E.

    1979-01-01

    The pilot's ability to accurately extract information from either one or both of two superimposed sources of information was determined. Static, aerial, color 35 mm slides of external runway environments and slides of corresponding static head-up display (HUD) symbology were used as the sources. A three channel tachistoscope was utilized to show either the HUD alone, the scene alone, or the two slides superimposed. Cognitive performance of the pilots was assessed by determining the percentage of correct answers given to two HUD related questions, two scene related questions, or one HUD and one scene related question.

  10. Flow Curve Determination at Large Plastic Strain Levels to Accurately Constitutive Equations of AHSS in Forming Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, X.; Sriram, S.; Kergen, R.

    2011-05-01

    ArcelorMittal continuously develops new steel grades (AHSS) with high performance for the automotive industry to improve the weight reduction and the passive safety. The wide market introduction of AHSS raises a new challenge for manufacturers in terms of material models in the prediction of forming—especially formability and springback. The relatively low uniform elongation, the high UTS and the low forming limit curve of these AHSS may cause difficulties in forming simulations. One of these difficulties is the consequence of the relatively low uniform elongation on the parameters identification of isotropic hardening model. Different experimental tests allow to reach large plastic strain levels (hydraulic bulge test, stack compression test, shear test…). After a description on how to determine the flow curve in these experimental tests, a comparison of the different flow curves is made for different steel grades. The ArcelorMittal identification protocol for hardening models is only based on stress-strain curves determined in uniaxial tension. Experimental tests where large plastic strain levels are reached are used to validate our identification protocol and to recommend some hardening models. Finally, the influence of isotropic hardening models and yield loci in forming prediction for AHSS steels will be presented.

  11. Accurate electron affinity of V and fine-structure splittings of V- via slow-electron velocity-map imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaoxi; Luo, Zhihong; Chen, Xiaolin; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-10-01

    We report the high-resolution photoelectron spectra of negative vanadium ions obtained via the slow-electron velocity-map imaging method. The electron affinity of V was determined to be 4255.9(18) cm-1 or 0.527 66(20) eV. The accuracy was improved by a factor of 60 with regard to the previous measurement. The fine structure of V- was well resolved: 35.9(11) (5D1), 103.8(12) (5D2), 204.17(74) (5D3), and 330.58(40) cm-1 (5D4) above the ground state 5D0, respectively.

  12. Accurate electron affinity of V and fine-structure splittings of V(-) via slow-electron velocity-map imaging.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaoxi; Luo, Zhihong; Chen, Xiaolin; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-10-28

    We report the high-resolution photoelectron spectra of negative vanadium ions obtained via the slow-electron velocity-map imaging method. The electron affinity of V was determined to be 4255.9(18) cm(-1) or 0.527 66(20) eV. The accuracy was improved by a factor of 60 with regard to the previous measurement. The fine structure of V(-) was well resolved: 35.9(11) ((5)D1), 103.8(12) ((5)D2), 204.17(74) ((5)D3), and 330.58(40) cm(-1) ((5)D4) above the ground state (5)D0, respectively.

  13. Accurate determination of lattice parameters based on Niggli reduced cell theory by using digitized electron diffraction micrograph.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Cai, Canying; Lin, Jianguo; Gong, Lunjun; Yang, Qibin

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we used Niggli reduced cell theory to determine lattice constants of a micro/nano crystal by using electron diffraction patterns. The Niggli reduced cell method enhanced the accuracy of lattice constant measurement obviously, because the lengths and the angles of lattice vectors of a primitive cell can be measured directly on the electron micrographs instead of a double tilt holder. With the aid of digitized algorithm and least square optimization by using three digitized micrographs, a valid reciprocal Niggli reduced cell number can be obtained. Thus a reciprocal and real Bravais lattices are acquired. The results of three examples, i.e., Mg4Zn7, an unknown phase (Precipitate phase in nickel-base superalloy) and Ba4Ti13O30 showed that the maximum errors are 1.6% for lengths and are 0.3% for angles.

  14. Accurate determination of ⁴¹Ca concentrations in spent resins from the nuclear industry by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nottoli, Emmanuelle; Bourlès, Didier; Bienvenu, Philippe; Labet, Alexandre; Arnold, Maurice; Bertaux, Maité

    2013-12-01

    The radiological characterisation of nuclear waste is essential for managing storage sites. Determining the concentration of Long-Lived RadioNuclides (LLRN) is fundamental for their long-term management. This paper focuses on the measurement of low (41)Ca concentrations in ions exchange resins used for primary fluid purification in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR). (41)Ca concentrations were successfully measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) after the acid digestion of resin samples, followed by radioactive decontamination and isobaric suppression through successive hydroxide, carbonate, nitrate and final CaF2 precipitations. Measured (41)Ca concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 0.03 ng/g, i.e. from 0.06 to 0.09 Bq/g. The (41)Ca/(60)Co activity ratios obtained were remarkably reproducible and in good agreement with the current ratio used for resins management.

  15. Determination of the structure of HBr DBr

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Novick, S.E.; Walker, A.R.H.

    1995-12-31

    The authors have investigated the structure and dynamics of the weakly bound complex of the four bromine isotopomers of HBr DBr using pulsed-jet Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. In the hydrogen halide dimers, allowed transitions are across the inversion doublet caused by the geared interchange of the donor and acceptor of the hydrogen bond. While in the classic study of (HF){sub 2}{sup 1}, it was observed that this splitting results in an inversion frequency in the microwave region of the spectrum, in (HCl){sub 2} and (HBr){sub 2} the lower inversion barrier results in an inversion frequency in the infrared. In order to investigate the hydrogen bromide dimer with the high precision allowed by an FT microwave experiment, the authors have {open_quotes}quenched{close_quotes} the inversion motion by substituting a deuterium for one of the hydrogens. The Br-Br distance in the complex is 4.136 {Angstrom}. Using measurements of the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants of the bromine nuclei, the wide amplitude bending motions of the hydrogen-bonded deuterium can be determined as can the wide amplitude bending angle of the non-bonding hydrogen atom. Preliminary analysis suggests that the Br---Br-D angle undergoes excursions of 29{degrees} about zero, and that the H-Br--Br angle oscillates 36{degrees} about its 90{degrees} equilibrium angle.

  16. Accurate determination of ochratoxin A in Korean fermented soybean paste by isotope dilution-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Seonghee; Lee, Suyoung; Lee, Joonhee; Kim, Byungjoo

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a naturally occurring mycotoxin, has been frequently detected in doenjang, a traditional fermented soybean paste, when it is fermented under improper conditions. Reliable screening of OTA in traditional fermented soybean paste (doenjang) is a special food-safety issue in Korea. Our laboratory, the National Metrology Institute of Korea, established an isotope dilution-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (ID-LC/MS/MS) method as a higher-order reference method to be used for SI-traceable value-assignment of OTA in certified reference materials (CRMs). (13)C20-OTA was used as an internal standard. Sample preparation conditions and LC/MS measurement parameters were optimised for this purpose. The analytical method was validated by measuring samples fortified with OTA at various levels. Repeatability and reproducibility studies showed that the ID-LC/MS/MS method is reliable and reproducible within 2% relative standard deviation. The analytical method was applied to determine OTA in various commercial doenjang products and home-made doenjang products.

  17. Structural and functional screening in human induced-pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes accurately identifies cardiotoxicity of multiple drug types

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, Kimberly R. Talbert, Dominique R.; Trusk, Patricia B.; Moran, Diarmuid M.; Shell, Scott A.; Bacus, Sarah

    2015-05-15

    Safety pharmacology studies that evaluate new drug entities for potential cardiac liability remain a critical component of drug development. Current studies have shown that in vitro tests utilizing human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CM) may be beneficial for preclinical risk evaluation. We recently demonstrated that an in vitro multi-parameter test panel assessing overall cardiac health and function could accurately reflect the associated clinical cardiotoxicity of 4 FDA-approved targeted oncology agents using hiPS-CM. The present studies expand upon this initial observation to assess whether this in vitro screen could detect cardiotoxicity across multiple drug classes with known clinical cardiac risks. Thus, 24 drugs were examined for their effect on both structural (viability, reactive oxygen species generation, lipid formation, troponin secretion) and functional (beating activity) endpoints in hiPS-CM. Using this screen, the cardiac-safe drugs showed no effects on any of the tests in our panel. However, 16 of 18 compounds with known clinical cardiac risk showed drug-induced changes in hiPS-CM by at least one method. Moreover, when taking into account the Cmax values, these 16 compounds could be further classified depending on whether the effects were structural, functional, or both. Overall, the most sensitive test assessed cardiac beating using the xCELLigence platform (88.9%) while the structural endpoints provided additional insight into the mechanism of cardiotoxicity for several drugs. These studies show that a multi-parameter approach examining both cardiac cell health and function in hiPS-CM provides a comprehensive and robust assessment that can aid in the determination of potential cardiac liability. - Highlights: • 24 drugs were tested for cardiac liability using an in vitro multi-parameter screen. • Changes in beating activity were the most sensitive in predicting cardiac risk. • Structural effects add in

  18. {ital Ab} {ital initio} investigation of the N{sub 2}{endash}HF complex: Accurate structure and energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Woon, D.E.; Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Peterson, K.A.

    1996-04-01

    Augmented correlation consistent basis sets of double (aug-cc-pVDZ), triple (aug-cc-pVTZ), and modified quadruple zeta (aug-cc-pVQZ{prime}) quality have been employed to describe the N{sub 2}{endash}HF potential energy surface at the Hartree{endash}Fock level and with single reference correlated wave functions including Mo/ller{endash}Plesset perturbation theory (MP2, MP3, MP4) and coupled cluster methods [CCSD, CCSD(T)]. The most accurate computed equilibrium binding energies {ital D}{sub {ital e}} are (with counterpoise correction) 810 cm{sup {minus}1} (MP4/aug-cc-pVQZ{prime}) and 788 cm{sup {minus}1} [CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVQZ{prime}]. Estimated complete basis set limits of 814 cm{sup {minus}1} (MP4) and 793 cm{sup {minus}1} [CCSD(T)] indicate that the large basis set results are essentially converged. Harmonic frequencies and zero-point energies were determined through the aug-cc-pVTZ level. Combining the zero point energies computed at the aug-cc-pVTZ level with the equilibrium binding energies computed at the aug-cc-pVQZ{prime} level, we predict {ital D}{sub 0} values of 322 and 296 cm{sup {minus}1}, respectively, at the MP4 and CCSD(T) levels of theory. Using experimental anharmonic frequencies, on the other hand, the CCSD(T) value of {ital D}{sub 0} is increased to 415 cm{sup {minus}1}, in good agreement with the experimental value recently reported by Miller and co-workers, 398{plus_minus}2 cm{sup {minus}1}. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Determining Subsurface Structure From Microtremors Using a Passive Circular Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folger, D. S.; Doser, D. I.; Velasco, A. A.

    2005-12-01

    The amount of damage to a structure during an earthquake is related to the ground motion at that site. Therefore, it is important to study seismic waves that propagate through specific soil types to understand site response. However, active seismic surveys are susceptible to noise interference and are limited due to spatial need while boreholes are costly. We develop a method using a passive array to study Rayleigh waves from microtremors, waves originating from building appliances, cars, pedestrians walking, etc. By using everyday noises as the source, site-specific analysis can be done in urban areas without worrying about noise interference or disturbing the public with explosions or other loud active sources. The array is comprised of short period Texans, self contained geophones, which record continuously for 24 hours. Our technique differs slightly from traditional SPAC (SPatial Auto-Correlation) methods used in passive arrays. We first cross correlate time windows between two receivers then stack the correlations to determine a phase delay. Performing the correlation at different frequencies will create a dispersion curve that can be inverted for shear velocity. This approach is similar to the two-station phase delay method used in regional tomography studies at much longer periods. Stacking removes off-azimuth energy, so we do not need to assume a source direction. Preliminary results from a previous passive array survey conducted near El Paso, Texas show 1-D velocity models can be created by cross-correlating noise at various frequencies. We will conduct another survey in alluvium sands at Rio Bosque Park east of El Paso. We will validate the results with active seismic refraction and surface wave survey results as well as other geophysical techniques to determine if a passive array using microtremors is an accurate method of determining subsurface structure.

  20. Accurate and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic method for geometrical and structural photoisomers of bilirubin IX alpha using the relative molar absorptivity values.

    PubMed

    Itoh, S; Isobe, K; Onishi, S

    1999-07-02

    It has been reported that considerable differences exist between the relative molar absorptivity values of the geometrical and structural photoisomers of bilirubin. We have devised an accurate HPLC method for photoisomer quantification based on the following principle: the sum of both the integrated peak areas corrected by each factor for each photoisomer, and the integrated peak area of unchanged (ZZ)-bilirubin [(ZZ)-B] after an anaerobic photoirradiation, should be constant and equal to the integrated peak area of initial (ZZ)-bilirubin [(ZZ)-Bi] before photoirradiation. On this basis, the following equation can be used to determine each factor. [equation: see text] alpha, beta, gamma and delta represent the factors used to correct the integrated peak areas of individual bilirubin photoisomers, and they are arranged in the order of the formula. It was demonstrated that the relative 455 nm molar absorptivity values for (ZZ)-bilirubin and all its geometrical and structural photoisomers, i.e., (ZZ)-bilirubin, (ZE)-bilirubin (EZ)-bilirubin, (EZ)-cyclobilirubin (= lumirubin) and (EE)-cyclobilirubin in the HPLC eluent, are, respectively, 1.0, 0.81 (= alpha), 0.54 (= beta), 0.47 (= gamma) and 0.39 (= delta).

  1. Determination of the experimental equilibrium structure of solid nitromethane using path-integral molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Anthony M.; Habershon, Scott; Morrison, Carole A.; Rankin, David W. H.

    2010-03-01

    Path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulations with an empirical interaction potential have been used to determine the experimental equilibrium structure of solid nitromethane at 4.2 and 15 K. By comparing the time-averaged molecular structure determined in a PIMD simulation to the calculated minimum-energy (zero-temperature) molecular structure, we have derived structural corrections that describe the effects of thermal motion. These corrections were subsequently used to determine the equilibrium structure of nitromethane from the experimental time-averaged structure. We find that the corrections to the intramolecular and intermolecular bond distances, as well as to the torsion angles, are quite significant, particularly for those atoms participating in the anharmonic motion of the methyl group. Our results demonstrate that simple harmonic models of thermal motion may not be sufficiently accurate, even at low temperatures, while molecular simulations employing more realistic potential-energy surfaces can provide important insight into the role and magnitude of anharmonic atomic motions.

  2. Development of an accurate and high-throughput methodology for structural comprehension of chlorophylls derivatives. (II) Dephytylated derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kewei; Ríos, José Julián; Roca, María; Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio

    2015-09-18

    Dephytylated chlorophylls (chlorophyllides and pheophorbides) are the starting point of the chlorophyll catabolism in green tissues, components of the chlorophyll pattern in storage/processed food vegetables, as well as the favoured structural arrangement for chlorophyll absorption. In addition, dephytylated native chlorophylls are prone to several modifications of their structure yielding pyro-, 13(2)-hydroxy- and 15(1)-hydroxy-lactone derivatives. Despite of these outstanding remarks only few of them have been analysed by MS(n). Besides new protocols for obtaining standards, we have developed a new high throughput methodology able to determine the fragmentation pathway of 16 dephytylated chlorophyll derivatives, elucidating the structures of the new product ions and new mechanisms of fragmentation. The new methodology combines, by first time, high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry and powerful post-processing software. Native chlorophyllides and pheophorbides mainly exhibit product ions that involve the fragmentation of D ring, as well as additional exclusive product ions. The introduction of an oxygenated function at E ring enhances the progress of fragmentation reactions through the β-keto ester group, developing also exclusive product ions for 13(2)-hydroxy derivatives and for 15(1)-hydroxy-lactone ones. Consequently, while MS(2)-based reactions of phytylated chlorophyll derivatives point to fragmentations at the phytyl and propionic chains, dephytylated chlorophyll derivatives behave different as the absence of phytyl makes β-keto ester group and E ring more prone to fragmentation. Proposals of the key reaction mechanisms underlying the origin of new product ions have been made.

  3. STRUCTURE AS A DETERMINANT OF DEMOCRATIC ADMINISTRATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    COLLINS, CHARLES C.

    THE DEGREE OF OPERATIONAL DEMOCRACY WITHIN A JUNIOR COLLEGE AND, BY EXTENSION, WITHIN ANY SCHOOL OR COLLEGE IS LARGELY DEPENDENT UPON THE KIND OF ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE WHICH IS ESTABLISHED. THE STRUCTURE AND MECHANICS MOST SUPPORTIVE TO THE DEMOCRATIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE COLLEGE AND ITS INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM SHOULD HAVE MAXIMAL OPPORTUNITY FOR…

  4. 13C-labeled gluconate tracing as a direct and accurate method for determining the pentose phosphate pathway split ratio in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Kleijn, Roelco J; van Winden, Wouter A; Ras, Cor; van Gulik, Walter M; Schipper, Dick; Heijnen, Joseph J

    2006-07-01

    In this study we developed a new method for accurately determining the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) split ratio, an important metabolic parameter in the primary metabolism of a cell. This method is based on simultaneous feeding of unlabeled glucose and trace amounts of [U-13C]gluconate, followed by measurement of the mass isotopomers of the intracellular metabolites surrounding the 6-phosphogluconate node. The gluconate tracer method was used with a penicillin G-producing chemostat culture of the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. For comparison, a 13C-labeling-based metabolic flux analysis (MFA) was performed for glycolysis and the PPP of P. chrysogenum. For the first time mass isotopomer measurements of 13C-labeled primary metabolites are reported for P. chrysogenum and used for a 13C-based MFA. Estimation of the PPP split ratio of P. chrysogenum at a growth rate of 0.02 h(-1) yielded comparable values for the gluconate tracer method and the 13C-based MFA method, 51.8% and 51.1%, respectively. A sensitivity analysis of the estimated PPP split ratios showed that the 95% confidence interval was almost threefold smaller for the gluconate tracer method than for the 13C-based MFA method (40.0 to 63.5% and 46.0 to 56.5%, respectively). From these results we concluded that the gluconate tracer method permits accurate determination of the PPP split ratio but provides no information about the remaining cellular metabolism, while the 13C-based MFA method permits estimation of multiple fluxes but provides a less accurate estimate of the PPP split ratio.

  5. Structural Determination of Biomolecules in Microfluidic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, John C.; Menard, Etienne; Rogers, John A.; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2004-03-01

    Supramolecular biological complexes are often too large to be crystallized for structural studies. Here, we explore the use of microfluidic arrays to order a model self-assembled cytoskeletal system. Filamentous actin (F-actin) is a negatively charged protein rod and is a key structural component in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. In this context, F-actin can self-assemble with actin binding proteins (ABP) in a highly regulated manner to dynamically form structures for a wide range of biomechanical functions. In this work, we will systematically study the action of 3 types of actin binding proteins (a-actinin, fimbrin, cofilin) on the self-assembled structures of F-actin that have been aligned in microfluidic arrays.

  6. Accurate determination of ultra-trace impurities, including europium, in ultra-pure barium carbonate materials through inductively coupled plasma-tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuchao; Zeng, Xiangcheng; Dai, Xuefeng; Hu, Yongping; Li, Gang; Zheng, Cunjiang

    2016-09-01

    Impurities, especially ultra-trace europium (Eu), in ultra-pure barium carbonate materials were accurately determined through inductively coupled plasma-tandem mass spectrometry (ICP-MS/MS). Two reaction modes, namely, mass shift (with O2 as reaction gas) and on-mass modes(with NH3/He and He as reaction gases), were extensively investigated using Eu+ as target analyte. The use of Eu+ → EuO2+, instead of Eu+ → EuO+, as ion pairs in mass shift mode eliminated polyatomic interferences based on Ba matrix ions (135Ba16O2+ on 151Eu16O+ and 137Ba16O2+ on 153Eu16O+). This procedure exhibited enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. When the ICP-MS/MS was operated in NH3 on-mass mode, Eu+ can be determined in its original mass in interference-free conditions because NH3 did not react with Eu+ but with BaO+ to form a neutral product (BaO). The two reaction modes, especially NH3 on mass mode, were validated to be accurate because their resultant isotope ratios of 153Eu/151Eu matched well with that of the natural abundance ratio. The proposed ICP-MS/MS method is a sensitive technique with a limit of detection as low as 2.0 ng L- 1 for 153Eu+. Compared with conventional single-quadrupole (SQ) ICP-MS, both NH3 on-mass mode and O2 mass shift mode in ICP-MS/MS can be used to accurately determine Eu+ in ultra-pure BaCO3 materials. The detected concentration of Eu+ was 4.0 ng L- 1 to 15 ng L- 1, with spiked recoveries ranging from 100%-110%. ICP-MS/MS was also used to eliminate polyatomic interferences, particularly Ba-based interferences, prior to measurement of Gd and Sm. Impurities, including Na, Mg, Al, K, Mn, Fe, Cr, Sr, and Cs, in ultra-pure BaCO3 materials were also determined using ICP-MS/MS in conventional SQ mode.

  7. Structural determinants of TRIM protein function.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Diego; Koliopoulos, Marios G; Rittinger, Katrin

    2017-02-08

    Tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins constitute one of the largest subfamilies of Really Interesting New Gene (RING) E3 ubiquitin ligases and contribute to the regulation of numerous cellular activities, including innate immune responses. The conserved TRIM harbours a RING domain that imparts E3 ligase activity to TRIM family proteins, whilst a variable C-terminal region can mediate recognition of substrate proteins. The knowledge of the structure of these multidomain proteins and the functional interplay between their constituent domains is paramount to understanding their cellular roles. To date, available structural information on TRIM proteins is still largely restricted to subdomains of many TRIMs in isolation. Nevertheless, applying a combination of structural, biophysical and biochemical approaches has recently allowed important progress to be made towards providing a better understanding of the molecular features that underlie the function of TRIM family proteins and has uncovered an unexpected diversity in the link between self-association and catalytic activity.

  8. Accurate and efficient representation of intramolecular energy in ab initio generation of crystal structures. I. Adaptive local approximate models.

    PubMed

    Sugden, Isaac; Adjiman, Claire S; Pantelides, Constantinos C

    2016-12-01

    The global search stage of crystal structure prediction (CSP) methods requires a fine balance between accuracy and computational cost, particularly for the study of large flexible molecules. A major improvement in the accuracy and cost of the intramolecular energy function used in the CrystalPredictor II [Habgood et al. (2015). J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 1957-1969] program is presented, where the most efficient use of computational effort is ensured via the use of adaptive local approximate model (LAM) placement. The entire search space of the relevant molecule's conformations is initially evaluated using a coarse, low accuracy grid. Additional LAM points are then placed at appropriate points determined via an automated process, aiming to minimize the computational effort expended in high-energy regions whilst maximizing the accuracy in low-energy regions. As the size, complexity and flexibility of molecules increase, the reduction in computational cost becomes marked. This improvement is illustrated with energy calculations for benzoic acid and the ROY molecule, and a CSP study of molecule (XXVI) from the sixth blind test [Reilly et al. (2016). Acta Cryst. B72, 439-459], which is challenging due to its size and flexibility. Its known experimental form is successfully predicted as the global minimum. The computational cost of the study is tractable without the need to make unphysical simplifying assumptions.

  9. Nuclear structure with accurate chiral perturbation theory nucleon-nucleon potential: Application to 6Li and 10B

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, P; Caurier, E

    2003-10-14

    The authors calculate properties of A = 6 system using the accurate charge-dependent nucleon-nucleon (NN) potential at fourth order of chiral perturbation theory. By application of the ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM) and a variational calculation in the harmonic oscillator basis with basis size up to 16 {h_bar}{Omega} they obtain the {sup 6}Li binding energy of 28.5(5) MeV and a converged excitation spectrum. Also, they calculate properties of {sup 10}B using the same NN potential in a basis space of up to 8 {h_bar}{Omega}. The results are consistent with results obtained by standard accurate NN potentials and demonstrate a deficiency of Hamiltonians consisting of only two-body terms. At this order of chiral perturbation theory three-body terms appear. It is expected that inclusion of such terms in the Hamiltonian will improve agreement with experiment.

  10. Contemporary Methodology for Protein Structure Determination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunkapiller, Michael W.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes the nature and capabilities of methods used to characterize protein and peptide structure, indicating that they have undergone changes which have improved the speed, reliability, and applicability of the process. Also indicates that high-performance liquid chromatography and gel electrophoresis have made purifying proteins and peptides a…

  11. Electron Diffraction Determination of Nanoscale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, Joel H

    2013-03-01

    Dominant research results on adsorption on gold clusters are reviewed, including adsorption of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} on gold cluster cations and anions, kinetics of CO adsorption to middle sized gold cluster cations, adsorption of CO on Au{sub n}{sup +} with induced changes in structure, and H{sub 2}O enhancement of CO adsorption.

  12. Rapid and Accurate Determination of Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigen Types in Klebsiella pneumoniae with a Novel PCR-Based O-Genotyping Method

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Yun-Jui; Cheong, Cheng-Man; Yi, Wen-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, a Gram-negative bacillus that causes life-threatening infections in both hospitalized patients and ambulatory persons, can be classified into nine lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen serotypes. The O-antigen type has important clinical and epidemiological significance. However, K. pneumoniae O serotyping is cumbersome, and the reagents are not commercially available. To overcome the limitations of conventional serotyping methods, we aimed to create a rapid and accurate PCR method for K. pneumoniae O genotyping. We sequenced the genetic determinants of LPS O antigen from serotypes O1, O2a, O2ac, O3, O4, O5, O8, O9, and O12. We established a two-step genotyping scheme, based on the two genomic regions associated with O-antigen biosynthesis. The first set of PCR primers, which detects alleles at the wzm-wzt loci of the wb gene cluster, distinguishes between O1/O2, O3, O4, O5, O8, O9, and O12. The second set of PCR primers, which detects alleles at the wbbY region, further differentiates between O1, O2a, and O2ac. We verified the specificity of O genotyping against the O-serotype reference strains. We then tested the sensitivity and specificity of O genotyping in K. pneumoniae, using the 56 K-serotype reference strains with known O serotypes determined by an inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA). There is a very good correlation between the O genotypes and classical O serotypes. Three discrepancies were observed and resolved by nucleotide sequencing—all in favor of O genotyping. The PCR-based O genotyping, which can be easily performed in clinical and research microbiology laboratories, is a rapid and accurate method for determining the LPS O-antigen types of K. pneumoniae isolates. PMID:26719438

  13. Need for accurate and standardized determination of amino acids and bioactive peptides for evaluating protein quality and potential health effects of foods and dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Gilani, G Sarwar; Xiao, Chaowu; Lee, Nora

    2008-01-01

    Accurate standardized methods for the determination of amino acid in foods are required to assess the nutritional safety and compositional adequacy of sole source foods such as infant formulas and enteral nutritionals, and protein and amino acid supplements and their hydrolysates, and to assess protein claims of foods. Protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS), which requires information on amino acid composition, is the official method for assessing protein claims of foods and supplements sold in the United States. PDCAAS has also been adopted internationally as the most suitable method for routine evaluation of protein quality of foods by the Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization. Standardized methods for analysis of amino acids by ion-exchange chromatography have been developed. However, there is a need to develop validated methods of amino acid analysis in foods using liquid chromatographic techniques, which have replaced ion-exchange methods for quantifying amino acids in most laboratories. Bioactive peptides from animal and plant proteins have been found to potentially impact human health. A wide range of physiological effects, including blood pressure-lowering effects, cholesterol-lowering ability, antithrombotic effects, enhancement of mineral absorption, and immunomodulatory effects have been described for bioactive peptides. There is considerable commercial interest in developing functional foods containing bioactive peptides. There is also a need to develop accurate standardized methods for the characterization (amino acid sequencing) and quantification of bioactive peptides and to carry out dose-response studies in animal models and clinical trials to assess safety, potential allergenicity, potential intolerance, and efficacy of bioactive peptides. Information from these studies is needed for determining the upper safe levels of bioactive peptides and as the basis for developing potential health claims for bioactive

  14. Vascular structure determines pulmonary blood flow distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlastala, M. P.; Glenny, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    Scientific knowledge develops through the evolution of new concepts. This process is usually driven by new methodologies that provide observations not previously available. Understanding of pulmonary blood flow determinants advanced significantly in the 1960s and is now changing rapidly again, because of increased spatial resolution of regional pulmonary blood flow measurements.

  15. A simple and inclusive method to determine the habit plane in transmission electron microscope based on accurate measurement of foil thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Dong Zhang, Mingxing

    2014-08-15

    A simple and inclusive method is proposed for accurate determination of the habit plane between bicrystals in transmission electron microscope. Whilst this method can be regarded as a variant of surface trace analysis, the major innovation lies in the improved accuracy and efficiency of foil thickness measurement, which involves a simple tilt of the thin foil about a permanent tilting axis of the specimen holder, rather than cumbersome tilt about the surface trace of the habit plane. Experimental study has been done to validate this proposed method in determining the habit plane between lamellar α{sub 2} plates and γ matrix in a Ti–Al–Nb alloy. Both high accuracy (± 1°) and high precision (± 1°) have been achieved by using the new method. The source of the experimental errors as well as the applicability of this method is discussed. Some tips to minimise the experimental errors are also suggested. - Highlights: • An improved algorithm is formulated to measure the foil thickness. • Habit plane can be determined with a single tilt holder based on the new algorithm. • Better accuracy and precision within ± 1° are achievable using the proposed method. • The data for multi-facet determination can be collected simultaneously.

  16. Determination of optimum structure of backpropagation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phien, Huynh N.; Sureerattanan, Songyot

    2000-10-01

    The paper proposes the use of the Baysian Information Criterion (BIC), along with an algorithm to systematically select the appropriate structure of the backpropagation (BP) network for a given set of data. Simulation results with hydrological and economic data show that the algorithm performs very satisfactorily. Moreover, it compares with the method of Daqi and Shouyi for one hidden layer network and it is also used for the networks with more than one hidden layer.

  17. Fast and accurate determination of the relative binding affinities of small compounds to HIV-1 protease using non-equilibrium work.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Son Tung; Hung, Huynh Minh; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2016-12-05

    The fast pulling ligand (FPL) out of binding cavity using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations was demonstrated to be a rapid, accurate and low CPU demand method for the determination of the relative binding affinities of a large number of HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitors. In this approach, the ligand is pulled out of the binding cavity of the protein using external harmonic forces, and the work of pulling force corresponds to the relative binding affinity of HIV-1 PR inhibitor. The correlation coefficient between the pulling work and the experimental binding free energy of R=-0.95 shows that FPL results are in good agreement with experiment. It is thus easier to rank the binding affinities of HIV-1 PR inhibitors, that have similar binding affinities because the mean error bar of pulling work amounts to δW=7%. The nature of binding is discovered using the FPL approach. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A fast and accurate microwave-assisted digestion method for arsenic determination in complex mining residues by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pantuzzo, Fernando L; Silva, Julio César J; Ciminelli, Virginia S T

    2009-09-15

    A fast and accurate microwave-assisted digestion method for arsenic determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) in typical, complex residues from gold mining is presented. Three digestion methods were evaluated: an open vessel digestion using a mixture of HCl:HNO(3):HF acids (Method A) and two microwave digestion methods using a mixture of HCl:H(2)O(2):HNO(3) in high (Method B) and medium-pressure (Method C) vessels. The matrix effect was also investigated. Arsenic concentration from external and standard addition calibration curves (at a 95% confidence level) were statistically equal (p-value=0.122) using microwave digestion in high-pressure vessel. The results from the open vessel digestion were statistically different (p-value=0.007) whereas in the microwave digestion in medium-pressure vessel (Method C) the dissolution of the samples was incomplete.

  19. Lipase-mediated enantioselective kinetic resolution of racemic acidic drugs in non-standard organic solvents: Direct chiral liquid chromatography monitoring and accurate determination of the enantiomeric excesses.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Ashraf; Aboul-Enein, Mohammed Nabil; El-Azzouny, Aida; El-Behairy, Mohammed F

    2010-02-12

    The enantioselective resolution of a set of racemic acidic compounds such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) of the group arylpropionic acid derivatives is demonstrated. Thus, a set of lipases were screened and manipulated in either the esterification or hydrolysis mode for the enantioselective kinetic resolution of these racemates in non-standard organic solvents. The accurate determination of the enantiomeric excesses of both substrate and product during such reaction is demonstrated. This was based on the development of a direct and reliable enantioselective high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedure for the simultaneous baseline separation of both substrate and product in one run without derivatization. This was achieved using the immobilized chiral stationary phase namely Chiralpak IB, a 3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate derivative of cellulose (the immobilized version of Chiralcel OD) which proved to be versatile for the monitoring of the lipase-catalyzed kinetic resolution of racemates in non-standard organic solvents.

  20. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: An Accurate Image Simulation Method for High-Order Laue Zone Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Can-Ying; Zeng, Song-Jun; Liu, Hong-Rong; Yang, Qi-Bin

    2008-05-01

    A completely different formulation for simulation of the high order Laue zone (HOLZ) diffractions is derived. It refers to the new method, i.e. the Taylor series (TS) method. To check the validity and accuracy of the TS method, we take polyvinglidene fluoride (PVDF) crystal as an example to calculate the exit wavefunction by the conventional multi-slice (CMS) method and the TS method. The calculated results show that the TS method is much more accurate than the CMS method and is independent of the slice thicknesses. Moreover, the pure first order Laue zone wavefunction by the TS method can reflect the major potential distribution of the first reciprocal plane.

  1. Structural determinants of MALT1 protease activity.

    PubMed

    Wiesmann, Christian; Leder, Lukas; Blank, Jutta; Bernardi, Anna; Melkko, Samu; Decock, Arnaud; D'Arcy, Allan; Villard, Frederic; Erbel, Paulus; Hughes, Nicola; Freuler, Felix; Nikolay, Rainer; Alves, Juliano; Bornancin, Frederic; Renatus, Martin

    2012-05-25

    The formation of the CBM (CARD11-BCL10-MALT1) complex is pivotal for antigen-receptor-mediated activation of the transcription factor NF-κB. Signaling is dependent on MALT1 (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1), which not only acts as a scaffolding protein but also possesses proteolytic activity mediated by its caspase-like domain. It remained unclear how the CBM activates MALT1. Here, we provide biochemical and structural evidence that MALT1 activation is dependent on its dimerization and show that mutations at the dimer interface abrogate activity in cells. The unliganded protease presents itself in a dimeric yet inactive state and undergoes substantial conformational changes upon substrate binding. These structural changes also affect the conformation of the C-terminal Ig-like domain, a domain that is required for MALT1 activity. Binding to the active site is coupled to a relative movement of caspase and Ig-like domains. MALT1 binding partners thus may have the potential of tuning MALT1 protease activity without binding directly to the caspase domain.

  2. Method of fan sound mode structure determination computer program user's manual: Microphone location program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, G. F.; Wells, R. A.; Love, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A computer user's manual describing the operation and the essential features of the microphone location program is presented. The Microphone Location Program determines microphone locations that ensure accurate and stable results from the equation system used to calculate modal structures. As part of the computational procedure for the Microphone Location Program, a first-order measure of the stability of the equation system was indicated by a matrix 'conditioning' number.

  3. How Structure Determines Correlations in Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pernice, Volker; Staude, Benjamin; Cardanobile, Stefano; Rotter, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Networks are becoming a ubiquitous metaphor for the understanding of complex biological systems, spanning the range between molecular signalling pathways, neural networks in the brain, and interacting species in a food web. In many models, we face an intricate interplay between the topology of the network and the dynamics of the system, which is generally very hard to disentangle. A dynamical feature that has been subject of intense research in various fields are correlations between the noisy activity of nodes in a network. We consider a class of systems, where discrete signals are sent along the links of the network. Such systems are of particular relevance in neuroscience, because they provide models for networks of neurons that use action potentials for communication. We study correlations in dynamic networks with arbitrary topology, assuming linear pulse coupling. With our novel approach, we are able to understand in detail how specific structural motifs affect pairwise correlations. Based on a power series decomposition of the covariance matrix, we describe the conditions under which very indirect interactions will have a pronounced effect on correlations and population dynamics. In random networks, we find that indirect interactions may lead to a broad distribution of activation levels with low average but highly variable correlations. This phenomenon is even more pronounced in networks with distance dependent connectivity. In contrast, networks with highly connected hubs or patchy connections often exhibit strong average correlations. Our results are particularly relevant in view of new experimental techniques that enable the parallel recording of spiking activity from a large number of neurons, an appropriate interpretation of which is hampered by the currently limited understanding of structure-dynamics relations in complex networks. PMID:21625580

  4. Efficient determination of alloy ground-state structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seko, Atsuto; Shitara, Kazuki; Tanaka, Isao

    2014-11-01

    We propose an efficient approach to accurately finding the ground-state structures in alloys based on the cluster expansion method. In this approach, a small number of candidate ground-state structures are obtained without any information regarding the energy. To generate the candidates, we employ the convex hull constructed from the correlation functions of all possible structures by using an efficient algorithm. This approach is applicable to not only simple lattices, but also complex lattices. First, we evaluate the convex hulls for binary alloys with four types of simple lattice. Then we discuss the structures on the vertices. To examine the accuracy of this approach, we perform a set of density functional theory calculations and the cluster expansion for the Ag-Au alloy and compare the formation energies of the vertex structures with those of all possible structures. As applications, the ground-state structures of the intermetallic compounds CuAu, CuAg, CuPd, AuAg, AuPd, AgPd, MoTa, MoW, and TaW are similarly evaluated. Finally, the energy distribution is obtained for different cation arrangements in the MgAl2O4 spinel, for which long-range interactions are essential for the accurate description of its energetics.

  5. PSSP-RFE: accurate prediction of protein structural class by recursive feature extraction from PSI-BLAST profile, physical-chemical property and functional annotations.

    PubMed

    Li, Liqi; Cui, Xiang; Yu, Sanjiu; Zhang, Yuan; Luo, Zhong; Yang, Hua; Zhou, Yue; Zheng, Xiaoqi

    2014-01-01

    Protein structure prediction is critical to functional annotation of the massively accumulated biological sequences, which prompts an imperative need for the development of high-throughput technologies. As a first and key step in protein structure prediction, protein structural class prediction becomes an increasingly challenging task. Amongst most homological-based approaches, the accuracies of protein structural class prediction are sufficiently high for high similarity datasets, but still far from being satisfactory for low similarity datasets, i.e., below 40% in pairwise sequence similarity. Therefore, we present a novel method for accurate and reliable protein structural class prediction for both high and low similarity datasets. This method is based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) in conjunction with integrated features from position-specific score matrix (PSSM), PROFEAT and Gene Ontology (GO). A feature selection approach, SVM-RFE, is also used to rank the integrated feature vectors through recursively removing the feature with the lowest ranking score. The definitive top features selected by SVM-RFE are input into the SVM engines to predict the structural class of a query protein. To validate our method, jackknife tests were applied to seven widely used benchmark datasets, reaching overall accuracies between 84.61% and 99.79%, which are significantly higher than those achieved by state-of-the-art tools. These results suggest that our method could serve as an accurate and cost-effective alternative to existing methods in protein structural classification, especially for low similarity datasets.

  6. Structural determinants of criticality in biological networks

    PubMed Central

    Valverde, Sergi; Ohse, Sebastian; Turalska, Malgorzata; West, Bruce J.; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Many adaptive evolutionary systems display spatial and temporal features, such as long-range correlations, typically associated with the critical point of a phase transition in statistical physics. Empirical and theoretical studies suggest that operating near criticality enhances the functionality of biological networks, such as brain and gene networks, in terms for instance of information processing, robustness, and evolvability. While previous studies have explained criticality with specific system features, we still lack a general theory of critical behavior in biological systems. Here we look at this problem from the complex systems perspective, since in principle all critical biological circuits have in common the fact that their internal organization can be described as a complex network. An important question is how self-similar structure influences self-similar dynamics. Modularity and heterogeneity, for instance, affect the location of critical points and can be used to tune the system toward criticality. We review and discuss recent studies on the criticality of neuronal and genetic networks, and discuss the implications of network theory when assessing the evolutionary features of criticality. PMID:26005422

  7. Structural Determinants of Sleeping Beauty Transposase Activity.

    PubMed

    Abrusán, György; Yant, Stephen R; Szilágyi, András; Marsh, Joseph A; Mátés, Lajos; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Barabás, Orsolya; Ivics, Zoltán

    2016-08-01

    Transposases are important tools in genome engineering, and there is considerable interest in engineering more efficient ones. Here, we seek to understand the factors determining their activity using the Sleeping Beauty transposase. Recent work suggests that protein coevolutionary information can be used to classify groups of physically connected, coevolving residues into elements called "sectors", which have proven useful for understanding the folding, allosteric interactions, and enzymatic activity of proteins. Using extensive mutagenesis data, protein modeling and analysis of folding energies, we show that (i) The Sleeping Beauty transposase contains two sectors, which span across conserved domains, and are enriched in DNA-binding residues, indicating that the DNA binding and endonuclease functions of the transposase coevolve; (ii) Sector residues are highly sensitive to mutations, and most mutations of these residues strongly reduce transposition rate; (iii) Mutations with a strong effect on free energy of folding in the DDE domain of the transposase significantly reduce transposition rate. (iv) Mutations that influence DNA and protein-protein interactions generally reduce transposition rate, although most hyperactive mutants are also located on the protein surface, including residues with protein-protein interactions. This suggests that hyperactivity results from the modification of protein interactions, rather than the stabilization of protein fold.

  8. Structural determinants of Sleeping Beauty transposase activity

    PubMed Central

    Abrusán, György; Yant, Stephen R.; Szilágyi, András; Marsh, Joseph A.; Mátés, Lajos; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Barabás, Orsolya; Ivics, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    Transposases are important tools in genome engineering, and there is considerable interest in engineering more efficient ones. Here we seek to understand the factors determining their activity using the Sleeping Beauty transposase. Recent work suggests that protein co-evolutionary information can be used to classify groups of physically connected, co-evolving residues into elements called ‘sectors’, which have proven useful for understanding the folding, allosteric interactions, and enzymatic activity of proteins. Using extensive mutagenesis data, protein modeling and analysis of folding energies, we show that 1) The Sleeping Beauty transposase contains two sectors, which span across conserved domains, and are enriched in DNA-binding residues, indicating that the DNA binding and endonuclease functions of the transposase coevolve; 2) Sector residues are highly sensitive to mutations, and most mutations of these residues strongly reduce transposition rate; 3) Mutations with a strong effect on free energy of folding in the DDE domain of the transposase significantly reduce transposition rate. 4) Mutations that influence DNA and protein-protein interactions generally reduce transposition rate, although most hyperactive mutants are also located on the protein surface, including residues with protein-protein interactions. This suggests that hyperactivity results from the modification of protein interactions, rather than the stabilization of protein fold. PMID:27401040

  9. Syntheses and Structure Determinations of Calcium Thiolates.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Scott; Englich, Ulrich; Noll, Bruce; Ruhlandt-Senge, Karin

    1998-09-07

    The exploration of synthetic methodologies toward heavy alkaline-earth chalcogenolates resulted in the preparation and structural characterization of a family of calcium thiolates, including [Ca(SC(6)F(5))(2)(py)(4)], 1 (py = pyridine), the separated ion-triple [Ca(18-crown-6)(NH(3))(3))][SMes](2).2THF, 2 (Mes = 2,4,6-tBu(3)C(6)H(2)), and the contact triple [Ca(18-crown-6)(SMes)(2)].THF, 3. Compound 1 was prepared by treating [Ca(N(SiMe(3))(2))(2)](2) with 4 equiv of HSC(6)F(5) under addition of pyridine. The thiolates 2 and 3 were synthesized by treatment of calcium metal dissolved in dry, liquid NH(3) under addition of 2 equiv of HSMes and crown ether or, alternatively, by the reduction of MesSSMes with calcium metal in dry, liquid ammonia. We also report two reaction products isolated during attempted calcium thiolate syntheses: [CaBr(4)(THF)(2)(&mgr;(2)-Li)(2)(THF)(4)], 4, isolated as the product of a salt elimination reaction between CaBr(2) and 2 equiv of [Li(THF)(n)()S-2,4,6-(i)()Pr(3)C(6)H(2)](m)(). [(NH(4))(py)(SC(6)F(5))], 5, was obtained as the sole product in the reaction of metallic calcium with HSC(6)F(5) in liquid ammonia under addition of pyridine. All compounds were characterized by single-crystal X-ray crystallography in addition to IR and NMR spectroscopy.

  10. Determination of Ice Characteristics for Marine Hydroengineering Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kantarzhi, I. G.; Maderich, V. S. Koshebutskii, V. I.

    2016-01-15

    Problems and potential approaches to determining ice characteristics for sea hydroengineering structures design are considered. A system for numerical modeling of ice dynamics is presented. The system may be used to define ice characteristics on approaches to structures with due regard for local hydrometeorological conditions and ice loads on structures. System application examples are presented for determining computational scenarios for ice loads at structures of the Pevek floating nuclear power plant (FNPP), as well as for the breakwater pier under reconstruction in Vanino. A scenario approach is used to determined ice loads.

  11. RCK: accurate and efficient inference of sequence- and structure-based protein–RNA binding models from RNAcompete data

    PubMed Central

    Orenstein, Yaron; Wang, Yuhao; Berger, Bonnie

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Protein–RNA interactions, which play vital roles in many processes, are mediated through both RNA sequence and structure. CLIP-based methods, which measure protein–RNA binding in vivo, suffer from experimental noise and systematic biases, whereas in vitro experiments capture a clearer signal of protein RNA-binding. Among them, RNAcompete provides binding affinities of a specific protein to more than 240 000 unstructured RNA probes in one experiment. The computational challenge is to infer RNA structure- and sequence-based binding models from these data. The state-of-the-art in sequence models, Deepbind, does not model structural preferences. RNAcontext models both sequence and structure preferences, but is outperformed by GraphProt. Unfortunately, GraphProt cannot detect structural preferences from RNAcompete data due to the unstructured nature of the data, as noted by its developers, nor can it be tractably run on the full RNACompete dataset. Results: We develop RCK, an efficient, scalable algorithm that infers both sequence and structure preferences based on a new k-mer based model. Remarkably, even though RNAcompete data is designed to be unstructured, RCK can still learn structural preferences from it. RCK significantly outperforms both RNAcontext and Deepbind in in vitro binding prediction for 244 RNAcompete experiments. Moreover, RCK is also faster and uses less memory, which enables scalability. While currently on par with existing methods in in vivo binding prediction on a small scale test, we demonstrate that RCK will increasingly benefit from experimentally measured RNA structure profiles as compared to computationally predicted ones. By running RCK on the entire RNAcompete dataset, we generate and provide as a resource a set of protein–RNA structure-based models on an unprecedented scale. Availability and Implementation: Software and models are freely available at http://rck.csail.mit.edu/ Contact: bab@mit.edu Supplementary information

  12. Residual dipolar coupling constants and structure determination of large DNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Mauffret, Olivier; Tevanian, Georges; Fermandjian, Serge

    2002-12-01

    Several NMR works have shown that long-range information provided by residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) significantly improve the global structure definition of RNAs and DNAs. Most of these are based on the use of a large set of RDCs, the collect of which requires samples labeled with (13)C, (15)N, and sometimes, (2)H. Here, we carried out torsion-angle dynamics simulations on a non-self complementary DNA fragment of 17 base-pairs, d(GGAAAATATCTAGCAGT).(ACTGCTAGAGATTTTCC). This reproduces the U5 LTR distal end of the HIV-1 cDNA that contains the enzyme integrase binding site. Simulations aimed at evaluating the impact of RDCs on the structure definition of long oligonucleotides, were performed in incorporating (i) nOe-distances at both < 4.5 A and < 5 A; (ii) a small set of (13)C-(1)H RDCs, easily detectable at the natural abundance, and (iii) a larger set of RDCs only accessible through the (13)C labeling of DNAs. Agreement between a target structure and a simulated structure was measured in terms of precision and accuracy. Results allowed to define conditions in which accurate DNA structures can be determined. We confirmed the strong impact of RDCs on the structure determination, and, above all, we found that a small set of RDC constraints (ca. 50) detectable at the natural abundance is sufficient to accurately derive the global and local DNA duplex structures when used in conjunction with nOe-distances < 5 A.

  13. SU-E-T-250: Determining VMAT Machine Limitations of An Elekta Linear Accelerator with Agility MLC for Accurate Modeling in RayStation and Robust Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, K; Yu, Z; Chen, H; Mourtada, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To implement VMAT in RayStation with the Elekta Synergy linac with the new Agility MLC, and to utilize the same vendor softwares to determine the optimum Elekta VMAT machine parameters in RayStation for accurate modeling and robust delivery. Methods: iCOMCat is utilized to create various beam patterns with user defined dose rate, gantry, MLC and jaw speed for each control point. The accuracy and stability of the output and beam profile are qualified for each isolated functional component of VMAT delivery using ion chamber and Profiler2 with isocentric mounting fixture. Service graphing on linac console is used to verify the mechanical motion accuracy. The determined optimum Elekta VMAT machine parameters were configured in RayStation v4.5.1. To evaluate the system overall performance, TG-119 test cases and nine retrospective VMAT patients were planned on RayStation, and validated using both ArcCHECK (with plug and ion chamber) and MapCHECK2. Results: Machine output and profile varies <0.3% when only variable is dose rate (35MU/min-600MU/min). <0.9% output and <0.3% profile variation are observed with additional gantry motion (0.53deg/s–5.8deg/s both directions). The output and profile variation are still <1% with additional slow leaf motion (<1.5cm/s both direction). However, the profile becomes less symmetric, and >1.5% output and 7% profile deviation is seen with >2.5cm/s leaf motion. All clinical cases achieved comparable plan quality as treated IMRT plans. The gamma passing rate is 99.5±0.5% on ArcCheck (<3% iso center dose deviation) and 99.1±0.8% on MapCheck2 using 3%/3mm gamma (10% lower threshold). Mechanical motion accuracy in all VMAT deliveries is <1°/1mm. Conclusion: Accurate RayStation modeling and robust VMAT delivery is achievable on Elekta Agility for <2.5cm/s leaf motion and full range of dose rate and gantry speed determined by the same vendor softwares. Our TG-119 and patient results have provided us with the confidence to use VMAT

  14. Accurate prediction of death by serial determination of galactose elimination capacity in primary biliary cirrhosis: a comparison with the Mayo model.

    PubMed

    Reichen, J; Widmer, T; Cotting, J

    1991-09-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the predictive accuracy of serial determinations of galactose elimination capacity in 61 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Death was predicted from the time that the regression line describing the decline in galactose elimination capacity vs. time intersected a value of 4 mg.min-1.kg-1. Thirty-one patients exhibited decreasing galactose elimination capacity; in 11 patients it remained stable and in 19 patients only one value was available. Among those patients with decreasing galactose elimination capacity, 10 died and three underwent liver transplantation; prediction of death was accurate to 7 +/- 19 mo. This criterion incorrectly predicted death in two patients with portal-vein thrombosis; otherwise, it did better than or as well as the Mayo clinic score. The latter was also tested on our patients and was found to adequately describe risk in yet another independent population of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Cox regression analysis selected only bilirubin and galactose elimination capacity, however, as independent predictors of death. We submit that serial determination of galactose elimination capacity in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis may be a useful adjunct to optimize the timing of liver transplantation and to evaluate new pharmacological treatment modalities of this disease.

  15. Language Structure Is Partly Determined by Social Structure

    PubMed Central

    Lupyan, Gary; Dale, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Background Languages differ greatly both in their syntactic and morphological systems and in the social environments in which they exist. We challenge the view that language grammars are unrelated to social environments in which they are learned and used. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a statistical analysis of >2,000 languages using a combination of demographic sources and the World Atlas of Language Structures— a database of structural language properties. We found strong relationships between linguistic factors related to morphological complexity, and demographic/socio-historical factors such as the number of language users, geographic spread, and degree of language contact. The analyses suggest that languages spoken by large groups have simpler inflectional morphology than languages spoken by smaller groups as measured on a variety of factors such as case systems and complexity of conjugations. Additionally, languages spoken by large groups are much more likely to use lexical strategies in place of inflectional morphology to encode evidentiality, negation, aspect, and possession. Our findings indicate that just as biological organisms are shaped by ecological niches, language structures appear to adapt to the environment (niche) in which they are being learned and used. As adults learn a language, features that are difficult for them to acquire, are less likely to be passed on to subsequent learners. Languages used for communication in large groups that include adult learners appear to have been subjected to such selection. Conversely, the morphological complexity common to languages used in small groups increases redundancy which may facilitate language learning by infants. Conclusions/Significance We hypothesize that language structures are subjected to different evolutionary pressures in different social environments. Just as biological organisms are shaped by ecological niches, language structures appear to adapt to the environment (niche) in

  16. Accurate laboratory determination of the near-infrared water vapor self-continuum: A test of the MT_CKD model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campargue, A.; Kassi, S.; Mondelain, D.; Vasilchenko, S.; Romanini, D.

    2016-11-01

    The semi-empirical MT_CKD model of the absorption continuum of water vapor is widely used in atmospheric radiative transfer codes of the atmosphere of Earth and, recently, of exoplanets but lacks of experimental validation in the atmospheric windows. Recent laboratory measurements by Fourier transform Spectroscopy led to self-continuum cross sections much larger than the MT_CKD values in the near-infrared transparency windows. We report on accurate measurements by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and Optical Feedback-Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) at selected spectral points of the transparency windows centered around 4.0, 2.1, and 1.25 µm. The temperature dependence of the absorption continuum at 4.38 µm is measured in the 23-39°C range. The self-continuum water vapor absorption is derived either from the baseline variation of water vapor spectra recorded for a series of pressure values over a small spectral interval or from baseline monitoring at fixed laser frequency during pressure ramps. After subtraction of the local water monomer lines contribution, self-continuum cross sections, Cs, are determined with an accuracy better than 10% from the pressure squared dependence of the continuum absorption measured up to about 15 Torr. Together with our previous measurements in the 2.1 and 1.6 µm windows, the present results provide a unique set of water vapor cross sections for testing the MT_CKD model in four transparency windows. Although showing some important deviations of the absolute values (up to about a factor 4), our accurate measurements validate the overall frequency dependence of the most recent version (V2.8) of the MT_CKD model.

  17. Accurate and self-consistent procedure for determining pH in seawater desalination brines and its manifestation in reverse osmosis modeling.

    PubMed

    Nir, Oded; Marvin, Esra; Lahav, Ori

    2014-11-01

    Measuring and modeling pH in concentrated aqueous solutions in an accurate and consistent manner is of paramount importance to many R&D and industrial applications, including RO desalination. Nevertheless, unified definitions and standard procedures have yet to be developed for solutions with ionic strength higher than ∼0.7 M, while implementation of conventional pH determination approaches may lead to significant errors. In this work a systematic yet simple methodology for measuring pH in concentrated solutions (dominated by Na(+)/Cl(-)) was developed and evaluated, with the aim of achieving consistency with the Pitzer ion-interaction approach. Results indicate that the addition of 0.75 M of NaCl to NIST buffers, followed by assigning a new standard pH (calculated based on the Pitzer approach), enabled reducing measured errors to below 0.03 pH units in seawater RO brines (ionic strength up to 2 M). To facilitate its use, the method was developed to be both conceptually and practically analogous to the conventional pH measurement procedure. The method was used to measure the pH of seawater RO retentates obtained at varying recovery ratios. The results matched better the pH values predicted by an accurate RO transport model. Calibrating the model by the measured pH values enabled better boron transport prediction. A Donnan-induced phenomenon, affecting pH in both retentate and permeate streams, was identified and quantified.

  18. Functional connectivity and structural covariance between regions of interest can be measured more accurately using multivariate distance correlation.

    PubMed

    Geerligs, Linda; Cam-Can; Henson, Richard N

    2016-07-15

    Studies of brain-wide functional connectivity or structural covariance typically use measures like the Pearson correlation coefficient, applied to data that have been averaged across voxels within regions of interest (ROIs). However, averaging across voxels may result in biased connectivity estimates when there is inhomogeneity within those ROIs, e.g., sub-regions that exhibit different patterns of functional connectivity or structural covariance. Here, we propose a new measure based on "distance correlation"; a test of multivariate dependence of high dimensional vectors, which allows for both linear and non-linear dependencies. We used simulations to show how distance correlation out-performs Pearson correlation in the face of inhomogeneous ROIs. To evaluate this new measure on real data, we use resting-state fMRI scans and T1 structural scans from 2 sessions on each of 214 participants from the Cambridge Centre for Ageing & Neuroscience (Cam-CAN) project. Pearson correlation and distance correlation showed similar average connectivity patterns, for both functional connectivity and structural covariance. Nevertheless, distance correlation was shown to be 1) more reliable across sessions, 2) more similar across participants, and 3) more robust to different sets of ROIs. Moreover, we found that the similarity between functional connectivity and structural covariance estimates was higher for distance correlation compared to Pearson correlation. We also explored the relative effects of different preprocessing options and motion artefacts on functional connectivity. Because distance correlation is easy to implement and fast to compute, it is a promising alternative to Pearson correlations for investigating ROI-based brain-wide connectivity patterns, for functional as well as structural data.

  19. Improved microwave-assisted wet digestion procedures for accurate Se determination in fish and shellfish by flow injection-hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lavilla, I; González-Costas, J M; Bendicho, C

    2007-05-22

    Accurate determination of Se in biological samples, especially fish and shellfish, by hydride generation techniques has generally proven troublesome owing to the presence of organoselenium that cannot readily converted into inorganic selenium under usual oxidising conditions. Further improvements in the oxidation procedures are needed so as to obtain accurate concentration values when this type of samples is analyzed. Microwave-assisted wet digestion (MAWD) procedures of seafood based on HNO3 or the mixture HNO3/H2O2 and further thermal reduction of the Se(VI) formed to Se(IV) were evaluated. These procedures were as follows: (I) without H2O2 and without heating to dryness; (II) without H2O2 and with heating to dryness; (III) with H2O2 and without heating to dryness; (IV) with H2O2 and with heating to dryness. In general, low recoveries of selenium are obtained for several marine species (e.g., crustaceans and cephalopods), which may be ascribed to the presence of Se forms mainly associated with nonpolar proteins and lipids. Post-digestion UV irradiation proved very efficient since not only complete organoselenium decomposition was achieved but also the final step required for prereduction of Se(VI) into Se(IV) (i.e. heating at 90 degrees C for 30 min in 6M HCl) could be avoided. With the MAWD/UV procedure, the use of strong oxidising agents (persuphate, etc.) or acids (e.g. perchloric acid) which are typically applied prior to Se determination by hydride generation techniques is overcome, and as a result, sample pre-treatment is significantly simplified. The method was successfully validated against CRM DOLT-2 (dogfish liver), CRM DORM-2 (dogfish muscle) and CRM TORT-2 (lobster hepatopancreas). Automated ultrasonic slurry sampling with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry was also applied for comparison. Total Se contents in ten seafood samples were established. Se levels ranged from 0.7 to 2.9 microg g(-1).

  20. Automating the determination of 3D protein structure

    SciTech Connect

    Rayl, K.D.

    1993-12-31

    The creation of an automated method for determining 3D protein structure would be invaluable to the field of biology and presents an interesting challenge to computer science. Unfortunately, given the current level of protein knowledge, a completely automated solution method is not yet feasible, therefore, our group has decided to integrate existing databases and theories to create a software system that assists X-ray crystallographers in specifying a particular protein structure. By breaking the problem of determining overall protein structure into small subproblems, we hope to come closer to solving a novel structure by solving each component. By generating necessary information for structure determination, this method provides the first step toward designing a program to determine protein conformation automatically.

  1. RPI-Bind: a structure-based method for accurate identification of RNA-protein binding sites.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiesi; Liu, Liang; Venkateswaran, Suresh; Song, Qianqian; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2017-04-04

    RNA and protein interactions play crucial roles in multiple biological processes, while these interactions are significantly influenced by the structures and sequences of protein and RNA molecules. In this study, we first performed an analysis of RNA-protein interacting complexes, and identified interface properties of sequences and structures, which reveal the diverse nature of the binding sites. With the observations, we built a three-step prediction model, namely RPI-Bind, for the identification of RNA-protein binding regions using the sequences and structures of both proteins and RNAs. The three steps include 1) the prediction of RNA binding regions on protein, 2) the prediction of protein binding regions on RNA, and 3) the prediction of interacting regions on both RNA and protein simultaneously, with the results from steps 1) and 2). Compared with existing methods, most of which employ only sequences, our model significantly improves the prediction accuracy at each of the three steps. Especially, our model outperforms the catRAPID by >20% at the 3(rd) step. All of these results indicate the importance of structures in RNA-protein interactions, and suggest that the RPI-Bind model is a powerful theoretical framework for studying RNA-protein interactions.

  2. Gap between technically accurate information and socially appropriate information for structural health monitoring system installed into tall buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mita, Akira

    2016-04-01

    The importance of the structural health monitoring system for tall buildings is now widely recognized by at least structural engineers and managers at large real estate companies to ensure the structural safety immediately after a large earthquake and appeal the quantitative safety of buildings to potential tenants. Some leading real estate companies decided to install the system into all tall buildings. Considering this tendency, a pilot project for the west area of Shinjuku Station supported by the Japan Science and Technology Agency was started by the author team to explore a possibility of using the system to provide safe spaces for commuters and residents. The system was installed into six tall buildings. From our experience, it turned out that viewing only from technological aspects was not sufficient for the system to be accepted and to be really useful. Safe spaces require not only the structural safety but also the soundness of key functions of the building. We need help from social scientists, medical doctors, city planners etc. to further improve the integrity of the system.

  3. Accurate protein structure annotation through competitive diffusion of enzymatic functions over a network of local evolutionary similarities.

    PubMed

    Venner, Eric; Lisewski, Andreas Martin; Erdin, Serkan; Ward, R Matthew; Amin, Shivas R; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2010-12-13

    High-throughput Structural Genomics yields many new protein structures without known molecular function. This study aims to uncover these missing annotations by globally comparing select functional residues across the structural proteome. First, Evolutionary Trace Annotation, or ETA, identifies which proteins have local evolutionary and structural features in common; next, these proteins are linked together into a proteomic network of ETA similarities; then, starting from proteins with known functions, competing functional labels diffuse link-by-link over the entire network. Every node is thus assigned a likelihood z-score for every function, and the most significant one at each node wins and defines its annotation. In high-throughput controls, this competitive diffusion process recovered enzyme activity annotations with 99% and 97% accuracy at half-coverage for the third and fourth Enzyme Commission (EC) levels, respectively. This corresponds to false positive rates 4-fold lower than nearest-neighbor and 5-fold lower than sequence-based annotations. In practice, experimental validation of the predicted carboxylesterase activity in a protein from Staphylococcus aureus illustrated the effectiveness of this approach in the context of an increasingly drug-resistant microbe. This study further links molecular function to a small number of evolutionarily important residues recognizable by Evolutionary Tracing and it points to the specificity and sensitivity of functional annotation by competitive global network diffusion. A web server is at http://mammoth.bcm.tmc.edu/networks.

  4. Target selection and determination of function in structural genomics.

    PubMed

    Watson, James D; Todd, Annabel E; Bray, James; Laskowski, Roman A; Edwards, Aled; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Orengo, Christine A; Thornton, Janet M

    2003-01-01

    The first crucial step in any structural genomics project is the selection and prioritization of target proteins for structure determination. There may be a number of selection criteria to be satisfied, including that the proteins have novel folds, that they be representatives of large families for which no structure is known, and so on. The better the selection at this stage, the greater is the value of the structures obtained at the end of the experimental process. This value can be further enhanced once the protein structures have been solved if the functions of the given proteins can also be determined. Here we describe the methods used at either end of the experimental process: firstly, sensitive sequence comparison techniques for selecting a high-quality list of target proteins, and secondly the various computational methods that can be applied to the eventual 3D structures to determine the most likely biochemical function of the proteins in question.

  5. Fast and accurate approximate quasiparticle band structure calculations of ZnO, CdO, and MgO polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataide, C. A.; Pelá, R. R.; Marques, M.; Teles, L. K.; Furthmüller, J.; Bechstedt, F.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate ZnO, CdO, and MgO oxides crystallizing in rocksalt, wurtzite, and zincblende structures. Whereas in MgO calculations, the conventional LDA-1/2 method is employed through a self-energy potential (VS), the shallow d bands in ZnO and CdO are treated through an increased amplitude (A ) of VS to modulate the self-energy of the d states to place them in the quasiparticle position. The LDA+A -1/2 scheme is applied to calculate band structures and electronic density of states of ZnO and CdO. We compare the results with those of more sophisticated quasiparticle calculations and experiments. We demonstrate that this new LDA+A -1/2 method reaches accuracy comparable to state-of-the-art methods, opening a door to study more complex systems containing shallow core electrons to the prize of LDA studies.

  6. Accurate Electronic Structures of Eu-Doped SiAlON Green Phosphor with a Semilocal Exchange-Correlation Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Dong Su; Ryu, Jeong Ho; Lee, Sung-Ho; Cho, Hyun; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2011-06-01

    The crystal structure, electronic structure, and photoluminescence properties of EuxSi6-zAlzOzN8-z (x = 0.01754, z = 0.25) green phosphor were calculated by modified version of the exchange potential proposed by Becke and Johnson [J. Chem. Phys. 124 (2006) 221101]. An interstitially doped Eu atom was found in the atomic channel parallel to the [0001] axis. The additional states originated from the hybridization of Eu 4f and Eu 5d with Si 3p and N 2p. The luminescence properties were analyzed using a quantitative calculation of the energy gap and the wavelength. The calculated emission peak wavelength of Eu from the energy gap between Eu 5d and Eu 4f was 552 nm. Conventional local or semi local density functionals always underestimate the band gap for wide gap semiconductor. In contrast, the calculated results using the semi local potential well agreed with experiment.

  7. The determination of phenolic profiles of Serbian unifloral honeys using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography/high resolution accurate mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kečkeš, Silvio; Gašić, Uroš; Veličković, Tanja Ćirković; Milojković-Opsenica, Dušanka; Natić, Maja; Tešić, Živoslav

    2013-05-01

    Polyphenolic profiles of 44 unifloral Serbian honeys were analyzed using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled with hybrid mass spectrometer which combines the Linear Trap Quadrupole (LTQ) and OrbiTrap mass analyzer. Rapid UHPLC method was developed in combination with a high sensitivity accurate mass scan and a simultaneous data dependent scan. The honey samples were of different botanical origin: acacia (Robinia pseudoacacia), sunflower (Helianthus annuus), linden (Tilia cordata), basil (Ocimum basilicum), buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum), oilseed rape (Brassica napus), and goldenrod (Solidago virgaurea). The presence of 43 compounds, mainly flavonoids, was proven in all honey samples by their characteristic mass spectra and fragmentation pattern. Relatively high amounts of chrysin, pinocembrin and galangin were identified in all honey extracts. p-Coumaric acid was not detected in basil, buckwheat and goldenrod honey extracts. A larger amount of gallic acid (max value 1.45 mg/kg) was found in the sunflower honey, while a larger amount of apigenin (0.97 mg/kg) was determined in the buckwheat honey in comparison with other honeys. The samples were classified according to the botanical origin using pattern recognition technique, Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The LTQ OrbiTrap technique was proven to be reliable for the unambiguous detection of phenolic acids, their derivatives, and flavonoid aglycones based on their molecular masses and fragmentation pattern.

  8. A rapid and accurate method for determining protein content in dairy products based on asynchronous-injection alternating merging zone flow-injection spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qin-Qin; Li, Yong-Sheng

    2013-12-01

    An accurate and rapid method and a system to determine protein content using asynchronous-injection alternating merging zone flow-injection spectrophotometry based on reaction between coomassie brilliant blue G250 (CBBG) and protein was established. Main merit of our approach is that it can avoid interferences of other nitric-compounds in samples, such as melamine and urea. Optimized conditions are as follows: Concentrations of CBBG, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), NaCl and HCl are 150 mg/l, 30 mg/l, 0.1 mol/l and 1.0% (v/v), respectively; volumes of the sample and reagent are 150 μl and 30 μl, respectively; length of a reaction coil is 200 cm; total flow rate is 2.65 ml/min. The linear range of the method is 0.5-15 mg/l (BSA), its detection limit is 0.05 mg/l, relative standard deviation is less than 1.87% (n=11), and analytical speed is 60 samples per hour.

  9. Selective and Accurate Determination Method of Propofol in Human Plasma by Mixed-Mode Cation Exchange Cartridge and GC-MS

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the determination of propofol in human plasma has been developed and validated. Propofol was extracted from human plasma by using mixed-mode cation exchange/reversed-phase (MCX) cartridges. As propofol easily volatilizes during concentration, 100% methanol was injected directly into GC-MS to elute propofol. Despite avoiding concentration process of the eluted solution, lower limit of quantization (LLOQ) of propofol was 25 ng/mL. The validated method exhibited good linearity (R2 = 0.9989) with accuracy and precision −5.8%~11.7% and 3.7%~11.6%, respectively. The other validation parameters, recovery and matrix effect, ranged from 96.6% to 99.4% and 95.3% to 101.4%, respectively. Propofol standard was quantified to evaluate possible loss due to the concentration processes, nitrogen gas and centrifugal vacuum. These two concentration processes resulted in notable decrease in the quantity of propofol, signifying avoiding any concentration processes during propofol quantification. Also, to confirm suitability of the developed method, authentic human plasma samples were analyzed. The selective assay method using MCX cartridge and GC-MS facilitated quantification of propofol in plasma sample accurately by preventing any losses due to the concentration processes. PMID:27597928

  10. Accurate determination of Curium and Californium isotopic ratios by inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) in 248Cm samples for transmutation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gourgiotis, A.; Isnard, H.; Aubert, M.; Dupont, E.; AlMahamid, I.; Cassette, P.; Panebianco, S.; Letourneau, A.; Chartier, F.; Tian, G.; Rao, L.; Lukens, W.

    2011-02-01

    The French Atomic Energy Commission has carried out several experiments including the mini-INCA (INcineration of Actinides) project for the study of minor-actinide transmutation processes in high intensity thermal neutron fluxes, in view of proposing solutions to reduce the radiotoxicity of long-lived nuclear wastes. In this context, a Cm sample enriched in {sup 248}Cm ({approx}97 %) was irradiated in thermal neutron flux at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) of the Laue-Langevin Institute (ILL). This work describes a quadrupole ICP-MS (ICP-QMS) analytical procedure for precise and accurate isotopic composition determination of Cm before sample irradiation and of Cm and Cf after sample irradiation. The factors that affect the accuracy and reproducibility of isotopic ratio measurements by ICP-QMS, such as peak centre correction, detector dead time, mass bias, abundance sensitivity and hydrides formation, instrumental background, and memory blank were carefully evaluated and corrected. Uncertainties of the isotopic ratios, taking into account internal precision of isotope ratio measurements, peak tailing, and hydrides formations ranged from 0.3% to 1.3%. This uncertainties range is quite acceptable for the nuclear data to be used in transmutation studies.

  11. Realistic 3D computer model of the gerbil middle ear, featuring accurate morphology of bone and soft tissue structures.

    PubMed

    Buytaert, Jan A N; Salih, Wasil H M; Dierick, Manual; Jacobs, Patric; Dirckx, Joris J J

    2011-12-01

    In order to improve realism in middle ear (ME) finite-element modeling (FEM), comprehensive and precise morphological data are needed. To date, micro-scale X-ray computed tomography (μCT) recordings have been used as geometric input data for FEM models of the ME ossicles. Previously, attempts were made to obtain these data on ME soft tissue structures as well. However, due to low X-ray absorption of soft tissue, quality of these images is limited. Another popular approach is using histological sections as data for 3D models, delivering high in-plane resolution for the sections, but the technique is destructive in nature and registration of the sections is difficult. We combine data from high-resolution μCT recordings with data from high-resolution orthogonal-plane fluorescence optical-sectioning microscopy (OPFOS), both obtained on the same gerbil specimen. State-of-the-art μCT delivers high-resolution data on the 3D shape of ossicles and other ME bony structures, while the OPFOS setup generates data of unprecedented quality both on bone and soft tissue ME structures. Each of these techniques is tomographic and non-destructive and delivers sets of automatically aligned virtual sections. The datasets coming from different techniques need to be registered with respect to each other. By combining both datasets, we obtain a complete high-resolution morphological model of all functional components in the gerbil ME. The resulting 3D model can be readily imported in FEM software and is made freely available to the research community. In this paper, we discuss the methods used, present the resulting merged model, and discuss the morphological properties of the soft tissue structures, such as muscles and ligaments.

  12. A highly accurate protein structural class prediction approach using auto cross covariance transformation and recursive feature elimination.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Taigang; Tao, Peiying; Wang, Chunhua; Chen, Lanming

    2015-12-01

    Structural class characterizes the overall folding type of a protein or its domain. Many methods have been proposed to improve the prediction accuracy of protein structural class in recent years, but it is still a challenge for the low-similarity sequences. In this study, we introduce a feature extraction technique based on auto cross covariance (ACC) transformation of position-specific score matrix (PSSM) to represent a protein sequence. Then support vector machine-recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE) is adopted to select top K features according to their importance and these features are input to a support vector machine (SVM) to conduct the prediction. Performance evaluation of the proposed method is performed using the jackknife test on three low-similarity datasets, i.e., D640, 1189 and 25PDB. By means of this method, the overall accuracies of 97.2%, 96.2%, and 93.3% are achieved on these three datasets, which are higher than those of most existing methods. This suggests that the proposed method could serve as a very cost-effective tool for predicting protein structural class especially for low-similarity datasets.

  13. Accurate modeling of spectral fine-structure in Earth radiance spectra measured with the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment.

    PubMed

    van Deelen, Rutger; Hasekamp, Otto P; Landgraf, Jochen

    2007-01-10

    We present what we believe to be a novel approach to simulating the spectral fine structure (<1 nm) in measurements of spectrometers such as the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME). GOME measures the Earth's radiance spectra and daily solar irradiance spectra from which a reflectivity spectrum is commonly extracted. The high-frequency structures contained in such a spectrum are, apart from atmospheric absorption, caused by Raman scattering and by a shift between the solar irradiance and the Earth's radiance spectrum. Normally, an a priori high-resolution solar spectrum is used to simulate these structures. We present an alternative method in which all the required information on the solar spectrum is retrieved from the GOME measurements. We investigate two approaches for the spectral range of 390-400 nm. First, a solar spectrum is reconstructed on a fine spectral grid from the GOME solar measurement. This approach leads to undersampling errors of up to 0.5% in the modeling of the Earth's radiance spectra. Second, a combination of the solar measurement and one of the Earth's radiance measurement is used to retrieve a solar spectrum. This approach effectively removes the undersampling error and results in residuals close to the GOME measurement noise of 0.1%.

  14. New Possibilities for the Accurate in Situ Determination of Chalcophile and Siderophile Trace Elements by Laser Ablation Collision and Reaction Cell ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, P. R.

    2004-05-01

    Our knowledge of how chalcophile and siderophile elements partition in minerals is limited, mainly due to the lack of suitable techniques for their accurate in situ determination. Host minerals (e.g. sulphides) are typically of small size (<30 μ m) and highly heterogeneous in composition, requiring analysis of high spatial resolution. Concentrations of chalcophile elements in silicates and oxides are low (sub μ gg-1) and thus challenging to measure. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), offering high sensitivity and good spatial resolution (10-100 μ m) is thus highly suited for this purpose. Unfortunately, the widespread use of this technique has been limited by enhanced problems specific to chalcophile and siderophile elements. These include inaccuracy due to the presence of spectral interferences, elemental fractionation during ablation/ionization and the lack of suitable calibration standards. Polyatomic spectral interferences, present either as a background component (e.g. O2+, ArAr+) or based around the recombination of matrix elements with argon (e.g. ArS+, ArNi+) hinder accurate analysis. These depend upon the relative concentrations of major matrix components and trace elements to be measured and are significant in many relevant minerals (e.g. sulphides). The use of a collision and reaction cells in ICP-MS is a new method for selective interference attenuation, significantly improving detection limits for elements such as Fe, S and Se by between 1 and 4 orders of magnitude. ArNi+ and ArCu+ interferences in sulphides can be attenuated by at least an order of magnitude leading to improved accuracy for the measurement of the Platinum Group elements Rh and Ru. Sulphur isotopes can be measured interference-free at m/z=32 and 34 by eliminating background O2+. These improvements open up new possibilities for the use of LA-ICP-MS in trace element and isotopic studies at the lowest concentration levels or where sample

  15. Determining the surface and interface structure of nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hove, Michel A.

    2004-06-14

    This paper informally speculates on the challenges of determining the atomic-scale surface and interface structure of nanomaterials. The relative capabilities of different techniques are compared. This includes discussion of theoretical methods needed to interpret experimental techniques.

  16. Accurate unrestrained DDM refinement of crystal structures from highly distorted and low-resolution powder diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Solovyov, Leonid A

    2016-10-01

    The structure of benzene:ethane co-crystal at 90 K is refined with anisotropic displacement parameters without geometric restraints from high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) data using the derivative difference method (DDM) with properly chosen weighting schemes. The average C-C bond precision achieved is 0.005 Å and the H-atom positions in ethane are refined independently. A new DDM weighting scheme is introduced that compensates for big distortions of experimental data. The results are compared with density functional theory (DFT) calculations reported by Maynard-Casely et al. [(2016). IUCrJ, 3, 192-199] where a rigid-body Rietveld refinement was also applied to the same dataset due to severe distortions of the powder pattern attributable to experimental peculiarities. For the crystal structure of 2-aminopyridinium fumarate-fumaric acid formerly refined applying 77 geometric restraints by Dong et al. [(2013). Acta Cryst. C69, 896-900], an unrestrained DDM refinement using the same XRPD pattern surprisingly gave two times narrower dispersion of interatomic distances.

  17. Ambiguity of structure determination from a minimum of diffraction intensities.

    PubMed

    Al-Asadi, Ahmed; Leggas, Dimitri; Tsodikov, Oleg V

    2014-07-01

    Although the ambiguity of the crystal structures determined directly from diffraction intensities has been historically recognized, it is not well understood in quantitative terms. Bernstein's theorem has recently been used to obtain the number of one-dimensional crystal structures of equal point atoms, given a minimum set of diffraction intensities. By a similar approach, the number of two- and three-dimensional crystal structures that can be determined from a minimum intensity data set is estimated herein. The ambiguity of structure determination from the algebraic minimum of data increases at least exponentially fast with the increasing structure size. Substituting lower-resolution intensities by higher-resolution ones in the minimum data set has little or no effect on this ambiguity if the number of such substitutions is relatively small.

  18. Accurate extraction of Lagrangian coherent structures over finite domains with application to flight data analysis over Hong Kong International Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wenbo; Chan, Pak Wai; Haller, George

    2010-03-01

    Locating Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) for dynamical systems defined on a spatially limited domain present a challenge because trajectory integration must be stopped at the boundary for lack of further velocity data. This effectively turns the domain boundary into an attractor, introduces edge effects resulting in spurious ridges in the associated finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field, and causes some of the real ridges of the FTLE field to be suppressed by strong spurious ridges. To address these issues, we develop a finite-domain FTLE method that renders LCS with an accuracy and fidelity that is suitable for automated feature detection. We show the application of this technique to the analysis of velocity data from aircraft landing at the Hong Kong International Airport.

  19. Formalism for the determination of structural isotope effects with neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Neuefeind, Joerg C; Benmore, Chris J

    2009-01-01

    In general the analysis of neutron isotopic substitution experiments in terms of partial structure factors and partial pair distribution functions is based on the assumption that the structure of isotopic variants of a molecule is identical. This assumption is clearly only an approximation especially in the case of hydrogen bonding molecular liquids like liquid water and structural isotope effects have been measured with X-rays for more than 20 years. A analysis method of neutron isotope data is presented that avoids the necessity to assume structural equality and allows the determination of the isotope effect in the hydrogen-hydrogen partial structure factor of liquid water from neutron data. It is shown that a combination of X-ray and neutron scattering measurements allows in principle the determination of the isotope effects on all all partials structure factors of liquid water.

  20. Introducing Chemists to X-Ray Structure Determination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enemark, John H.

    1988-01-01

    Presents the organization of a one-semester graduate course in structural chemistry including lectures and problems. Discusses the coverage of diffraction from real crystals and structure determination. Summarizes experiments on real crystals conducted by students in the X-ray laboratory. (CW)

  1. Labor Market Structure and Salary Determination among Professional Basketball Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Michael

    1988-01-01

    The author investigates the labor market structure and determinants of salaries for professional basketball players. An expanded version of the resource perspective is used. A three-tiered model of labor market segmentation is revealed for professional basketball players, but other variables also are important in salary determination. (Author/CH)

  2. Integrative structural annotation of de novo RNA-Seq provides an accurate reference gene set of the enormous genome of the onion (Allium cepa L.).

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungill; Kim, Myung-Shin; Kim, Yong-Min; Yeom, Seon-In; Cheong, Kyeongchae; Kim, Ki-Tae; Jeon, Jongbum; Kim, Sunggil; Kim, Do-Sun; Sohn, Seong-Han; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Choi, Doil

    2015-02-01

    The onion (Allium cepa L.) is one of the most widely cultivated and consumed vegetable crops in the world. Although a considerable amount of onion transcriptome data has been deposited into public databases, the sequences of the protein-coding genes are not accurate enough to be used, owing to non-coding sequences intermixed with the coding sequences. We generated a high-quality, annotated onion transcriptome from de novo sequence assembly and intensive structural annotation using the integrated structural gene annotation pipeline (ISGAP), which identified 54,165 protein-coding genes among 165,179 assembled transcripts totalling 203.0 Mb by eliminating the intron sequences. ISGAP performed reliable annotation, recognizing accurate gene structures based on reference proteins, and ab initio gene models of the assembled transcripts. Integrative functional annotation and gene-based SNP analysis revealed a whole biological repertoire of genes and transcriptomic variation in the onion. The method developed in this study provides a powerful tool for the construction of reference gene sets for organisms based solely on de novo transcriptome data. Furthermore, the reference genes and their variation described here for the onion represent essential tools for molecular breeding and gene cloning in Allium spp.

  3. Fast native-SAD phasing for routine macromolecular structure determination.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Tobias; Olieric, Vincent; Waltersperger, Sandro; Panepucci, Ezequiel; Chen, Lirong; Zhang, Hua; Zhou, Dayong; Rose, John; Ebihara, Akio; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Li, Dianfan; Howe, Nicole; Schnapp, Gisela; Pautsch, Alexander; Bargsten, Katja; Prota, Andrea E; Surana, Parag; Kottur, Jithesh; Nair, Deepak T; Basilico, Federica; Cecatiello, Valentina; Pasqualato, Sebastiano; Boland, Andreas; Weichenrieder, Oliver; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Steinmetz, Michel O; Caffrey, Martin; Wang, Meitian

    2015-02-01

    We describe a data collection method that uses a single crystal to solve X-ray structures by native SAD (single-wavelength anomalous diffraction). We solved the structures of 11 real-life examples, including a human membrane protein, a protein-DNA complex and a 266-kDa multiprotein-ligand complex, using this method. The data collection strategy is suitable for routine structure determination and can be implemented at most macromolecular crystallography synchrotron beamlines.

  4. Towards Efficient and Accurate Description of Many-Electron Problems: Developments of Static and Time-Dependent Electronic Structure Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Feizhi

    Understanding electronic behavior in molecular and nano-scale systems is fundamental to the development and design of novel technologies and materials for application in a variety of scientific contexts from fundamental research to energy conversion. This dissertation aims to provide insights into this goal by developing novel methods and applications of first-principle electronic structure theory. Specifically, we will present new methods and applications of excited state multi-electron dynamics based on the real-time (RT) time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) formalism, and new development of the multi-configuration self-consist field theory (MCSCF) for modeling ground-state electronic structure. The RT-TDHF/TDDFT based developments and applications can be categorized into three broad and coherently integrated research areas: (1) modeling of the interaction between moleculars and external electromagnetic perturbations. In this part we will first prove both analytically and numerically the gauge invariance of the TDHF/TDDFT formalisms, then we will present a novel, efficient method for calculating molecular nonlinear optical properties, and last we will study quantum coherent plasmon in metal namowires using RT-TDDFT; (2) modeling of excited-state charge transfer in molecules. In this part, we will investigate the mechanisms of bridge-mediated electron transfer, and then we will introduce a newly developed non-equilibrium quantum/continuum embedding method for studying charge transfer dynamics in solution; (3) developments of first-principles spin-dependent many-electron dynamics. In this part, we will present an ab initio non-relativistic spin dynamics method based on the two-component generalized Hartree-Fock approach, and then we will generalized it to the two-component TDDFT framework and combine it with the Ehrenfest molecular dynamics approach for modeling the interaction between electron spins and nuclear

  5. Development of an accurate and high-throughput methodology for structural comprehension of chlorophylls derivatives. (I) Phytylated derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kewei; Ríos, José Julián; Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio; Roca, María

    2015-08-07

    Phytylated chlorophyll derivatives undergo specific oxidative reactions through the natural metabolism or during food processing or storage, and consequently pyro-, 13(2)-hydroxy-, 15(1)-hydroxy-lactone chlorophylls, and pheophytins (a and b) are originated. New analytical procedures have been developed here to reproduce controlled oxidation reactions that specifically, and in reasonable amounts, produce those natural target standards. At the same time and under the same conditions, 16 natural chlorophyll derivatives have been analyzed by APCI-HPLC-hrMS(2) and most of them by the first time. The combination of the high-resolution MS mode with powerful post-processing software has allowed the identification of new fragmentation patterns, characterizing specific product ions for some particular standards. In addition, new hypotheses and reaction mechanisms for the established MS(2)-based reactions have been proposed. As a general rule, the main product ions involve the phytyl and the propionic chains but the introduction of oxygenated functional groups at the isocyclic ring produces new and specific productions and at the same time inhibits some particular fragmentations. It is noteworthy that all b derivatives, except 15(1)-hydroxy-lactone compounds, undergo specific CO losses. We propose a new reaction mechanism based in the structural configuration of a and b chlorophyll derivatives that explain the exclusive CO fragmentation in all b series except for 15(1)-hydroxy-lactone b and all a series compounds.

  6. NIST method for determining model-independent structural information by X-ray reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Windover, D.; Cline, J. P.; Henins, A.; Gil, D. L.; Armstrong, N.; Hung, P. Y.; Song, S. C.; Jammy, R.; Diebold, A.

    2007-09-26

    This work provides a method for determining when X-ray reflectometry (XRR) data provides useful information about structural model parameters. State-of-the-art analysis approaches for XRR data emphasize fitting measured data to a single structural model using fast optimization methods, such as genetic algorithms (GA). Though such optimization may find the best solution for a given model, it does not adequately map the parameter space to provide uncertainty estimates or test structural model validity. We present here two approaches for determining which structural parameters convey accurate information about the physical reality. First, using GA refinement, we repeatedly fit the data to several structural models. By comparing the maximum-likelihood estimates of the parameters in each model, we identify model-independent information. Second, we perform a Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) analysis using the most self-consistent structural model to provide uncertainty estimates for structural parameters. This two step approach uses fast, optimized refinement to search a range of models to locate structural information and a more detailed MCMC sampling to estimate parameter uncertainties. Here we present an example of this approach on a ZrN/TiN/Si structure, concentrating on thickness.

  7. Improved in-cell structure determination of proteins at near-physiological concentration

    PubMed Central

    Ikeya, Teppei; Hanashima, Tomomi; Hosoya, Saori; Shimazaki, Manato; Ikeda, Shiro; Mishima, Masaki; Güntert, Peter; Ito, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Investigating three-dimensional (3D) structures of proteins in living cells by in-cell nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy opens an avenue towards understanding the structural basis of their functions and physical properties under physiological conditions inside cells. In-cell NMR provides data at atomic resolution non-invasively, and has been used to detect protein-protein interactions, thermodynamics of protein stability, the behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins, etc. in cells. However, so far only a single de novo 3D protein structure could be determined based on data derived only from in-cell NMR. Here we introduce methods that enable in-cell NMR protein structure determination for a larger number of proteins at concentrations that approach physiological ones. The new methods comprise (1) advances in the processing of non-uniformly sampled NMR data, which reduces the measurement time for the intrinsically short-lived in-cell NMR samples, (2) automatic chemical shift assignment for obtaining an optimal resonance assignment, and (3) structure refinement with Bayesian inference, which makes it possible to calculate accurate 3D protein structures from sparse data sets of conformational restraints. As an example application we determined the structure of the B1 domain of protein G at about 250 μM concentration in living E. coli cells. PMID:27910948

  8. Structural determination of intact proteins using mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Kruppa, Gary; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Young, Malin M.

    2008-05-06

    The present invention relates to novel methods of determining the sequence and structure of proteins. Specifically, the present invention allows for the analysis of intact proteins within a mass spectrometer. Therefore, preparatory separations need not be performed prior to introducing a protein sample into the mass spectrometer. Also disclosed herein are new instrumental developments for enhancing the signal from the desired modified proteins, methods for producing controlled protein fragments in the mass spectrometer, eliminating complex microseparations, and protein preparatory chemical steps necessary for cross-linking based protein structure determination.Additionally, the preferred method of the present invention involves the determination of protein structures utilizing a top-down analysis of protein structures to search for covalent modifications. In the preferred method, intact proteins are ionized and fragmented within the mass spectrometer.

  9. Structure Determination of Natural Products by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biemann, Klaus

    2015-07-01

    I review laboratory research on the development of mass spectrometric methodology for the determination of the structure of natural products of biological and medical interest, which I conducted from 1958 to the end of the twentieth century. The methodology was developed by converting small peptides to their corresponding polyamino alcohols to make them amenable to mass spectrometry, thereby making it applicable to whole proteins. The structures of alkaloids were determined by analyzing the fragmentation of a known alkaloid and then using the results to deduce the structures of related compounds. Heparin-like structures were investigated by determining their molecular weights from the mass of protonated molecular ions of complexes with highly basic, synthetic peptides. Mass spectrometry was also employed in the analysis of lunar material returned by the Apollo missions. A miniaturized gas chromatograph mass spectrometer was sent to Mars on board of the two Viking 1976 spacecrafts.

  10. Matching unknown empirical formulas to chemical structure using LC/MS TOF accurate mass and database searching: example of unknown pesticides on tomato skins.

    PubMed

    Thurman, E Michael; Ferrer, Imma; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo Rodriguez

    2005-03-04

    Traditionally, the screening of unknown pesticides in food has been accomplished by GC/MS methods using conventional library searching routines. However, many of the new polar and thermally labile pesticides and their degradates are more readily and easily analyzed by LC/MS methods and no searchable libraries currently exist (with the exception of some user libraries, which are limited). Therefore, there is a need for LC/MS approaches to detect unknown non-target pesticides in food. This report develops an identification scheme using a combination of LC/MS time-of-flight (accurate mass) and LC/MS ion trap MS (MS/MS) with searching of empirical formulas generated through accurate mass and a ChemIndex database or Merck Index database. The approach is different than conventional library searching of fragment ions. The concept here consists of four parts. First is the initial detection of a possible unknown pesticide in actual market-place vegetable extracts (tomato skins) using accurate mass and generating empirical formulas. Second is searching either the Merck Index database on CD (10,000 compounds) or the ChemIndex (77,000 compounds) for possible structures. Third is MS/MS of the unknown pesticide in the tomato-skin extract followed by fragment ion identification using chemical drawing software and comparison with accurate-mass ion fragments. Fourth is the verification with authentic standards, if available. Three examples of unknown, non-target pesticides are shown using a tomato-skin extract from an actual market place sample. Limitations of the approach are discussed including the use of A + 2 isotope signatures, extended databases, lack of authentic standards, and natural product unknowns in food extracts.

  11. Investigation of mass dependence effects for the accurate determination of molybdenum isotope amount ratios by MC-ICP-MS using synthetic isotope mixtures.

    PubMed

    Malinovsky, Dmitry; Dunn, Philip J H; Petrov, Panayot; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    Methodology for absolute Mo isotope amount ratio measurements by multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) using calibration with synthetic isotope mixtures (SIMs) is presented. For the first time, synthetic isotope mixtures prepared from seven commercially available isotopically enriched molybdenum metal powders ((92)Mo, (94)Mo, (95)Mo, (96)Mo, (97)Mo, (98)Mo, and (100)Mo) are used to investigate whether instrumental mass discrimination of Mo isotopes in MC-ICP-MS is consistent with mass-dependent isotope distribution. The parent materials were dissolved and mixed as solutions to obtain mixtures with accurately known isotope amount ratios. The level of elemental impurities in the isotopically enriched molybdenum metal powders was quantified by ICP-MS by using both high-resolution and reaction cell instruments to completely resolve spectral interferences. The Mo isotope amount ratio values with expanded uncertainty (k = 2), determined by MC-ICP-MS for a high-purity Mo rod from Johnson Matthey, were as follows: (92)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.9235(9), (94)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.5785(8), (96)Mo/(95)Mo = 1.0503(9), (97)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.6033(6), (98)Mo/(95)Mo = 1.5291(20), and (100)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.6130(7). A full uncertainty budget for the measurements is presented which shows that the largest contribution to the uncertainty budget comes from correction for elemental impurities (∼51%), followed by the contribution from weighing operations (∼26 %). The atomic weight of molybdenum was calculated to be 95.947(2); the uncertainty in parentheses is expanded uncertainty with the coverage factor of 2. A particular advantage of the developed method is that calibration factors for all six Mo isotope amount ratios, involving the (95)Mo isotope, were experimentally determined. This allows avoiding any assumption on mass-dependent isotope fractions in MC-ICP-MS, inherent to the method of double spike previously used for Mo isotope amount ratio

  12. The progress made in determining the Mycobacterium tuberculosis structural proteome

    PubMed Central

    Hecker, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a highly infectious pathogen that is still responsible for millions of deaths annually. Effectively treating this disease typically requires a course of antibiotics, most of which were developed decades ago. These drugs are, however, not effective against persistent tubercle bacilli and the emergence of drug-resistant stains threatens to make many of them obsolete. The identification of new drug targets, allowing the development of new potential drugs, is therefore imperative. Both proteomics and structural biology have important roles to play in this process, the former as a means of identifying promising drug targets and the latter allowing understanding of protein function and protein–drug interactions at atomic resolution. The determination of M. tuberculosis protein structures has been a goal of the scientific community for the last decade, who have aimed to supply a large amount of structural data that can be used in structure-based approaches for drug discovery and design. Only since the genome sequence of M. tuberculosis has been available has the determination of large numbers of tuberculosis protein structures been possible. Currently, the molecular structures of 8.5% of all the pathogen's protein-encoding ORFs have been determined. In this review, we look at the progress made in determining the M. tuberculosis structural proteome and the impact this has had on the development of potential new drugs, as well as the discovery of the function of crucial mycobaterial proteins. PMID:21674801

  13. Algebraic algorithms for structure determination in biological chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emiris, Ioannis Z.; Fritzilas, Epaminondas D.; Manocha, Dinesh

    Several problems in computational chemistry, structural molecular biology, and biological chemistry can be solved by symbolic-numerical algorithms. We introduce suitable algebraic tools and then survey their usage in concrete applications. In particular, questions on molecular structure can be modeled by systems of polynomial equations, mainly by drawing on techniques from robot kinematics. Resultant-based algorithms, including sparse resultants and their matrix formulae, are described in order to reduce the solving of polynomial systems to numerical linear algebra. As an illustration, we focus on computing all conformations of cyclic molecules and on matching pharmacophores under distance constraints; in both cases, the number of independent degrees of freedom is relatively small. We summarize some existing results as well as sketch some original work. Both lead to complete and accurate solutions for those problems in the sense that our algorithms output all solutions with sufficiently high precision for the needs of biochemical applications.

  14. Clustering algorithm for determining community structure in large networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Josep M.; Béjar, Javier; Delgado, Jordi

    2006-07-01

    We propose an algorithm to find the community structure in complex networks based on the combination of spectral analysis and modularity optimization. The clustering produced by our algorithm is as accurate as the best algorithms on the literature of modularity optimization; however, the main asset of the algorithm is its efficiency. The best match for our algorithm is Newman’s fast algorithm, which is the reference algorithm for clustering in large networks due to its efficiency. When both algorithms are compared, our algorithm outperforms the fast algorithm both in efficiency and accuracy of the clustering, in terms of modularity. Thus, the results suggest that the proposed algorithm is a good choice to analyze the community structure of medium and large networks in the range of tens and hundreds of thousand vertices.

  15. In cellulo structure determination of a novel cypovirus polyhedrin

    SciTech Connect

    Axford, Danny; Ji, Xiaoyun; Stuart, David I.; Sutton, Geoff

    2014-05-01

    The crystal structure of a previously unsolved type of cypovirus polyhedrin has been determined from data collected directly from frozen live insect cells. This work demonstrates that with the use of a microfocus synchrotron beam the structure of a novel viral polyhedrin could be successfully determined from microcrystals within cells, removing the preparatory step of sample isolation and maintaining a favourable biological environment. The data obtained are of high quality, comparable to that obtained from isolated crystals, and enabled a facile structure determination. A small but significant difference is observed between the unit-cell parameters and the mosaic spread of in cellulo and isolated crystals, suggesting that even these robust crystals are adversely affected by removal from the cell.

  16. Mixing and Matching Detergents for Membrane Protein NMR Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Columbus, Linda; Lipfert, Jan; Jambunathan, Kalyani; Fox, Daniel A.; Sim, Adelene Y.L.; Doniach, Sebastian; Lesley, Scott A.

    2009-10-21

    One major obstacle to membrane protein structure determination is the selection of a detergent micelle that mimics the native lipid bilayer. Currently, detergents are selected by exhaustive screening because the effects of protein-detergent interactions on protein structure are poorly understood. In this study, the structure and dynamics of an integral membrane protein in different detergents is investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The results suggest that matching of the micelle dimensions to the protein's hydrophobic surface avoids exchange processes that reduce the completeness of the NMR observations. Based on these dimensions, several mixed micelles were designed that improved the completeness of NMR observations. These findings provide a basis for the rational design of mixed micelles that may advance membrane protein structure determination by NMR.

  17. Optimizing an emperical scoring function for transmembrane protein structure determination.

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Malin M.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Gray, Genetha Anne; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2003-10-01

    We examine the problem of transmembrane protein structure determination. Like many other questions that arise in biological research, this problem cannot be addressed by traditional laboratory experimentation alone. An approach that integrates experiment and computation is required. We investigate a procedure which states the transmembrane protein structure determination problem as a bound constrained optimization problem using a special empirical scoring function, called Bundler, as the objective function. In this paper, we describe the optimization problem and some of its mathematical properties. We compare and contrast results obtained using two different derivative free optimization algorithms.

  18. Microgram-scale protein structure determination by NMR.

    PubMed

    Aramini, James M; Rossi, Paolo; Anklin, Clemens; Xiao, Rong; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2007-06-01

    Using conventional triple-resonance nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with a 1 mm triple-resonance microcoil NMR probe, we determined near complete resonance assignments and three-dimensional (3D) structure of the 68-residue Methanosarcina mazei TRAM protein using only 72 mug (6 microl, 1.4 mM) of protein. This first example of a complete solution NMR structure determined using microgram quantities of protein demonstrates the utility of microcoil-probe NMR technologies for protein samples that can be produced in only limited quantities.

  19. Organizational Structure as a Determinant of Job Burnout.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Atif; Ahmed, Hafiz Mushtaq

    2017-03-01

    This exploratory study determined the impact of organizational structure, particularly participation in decision making, instrumental communication, formalization, integration, and promotional opportunity, on burnout among Pakistani pediatric nurses. Data were collected from pediatric nurses working for Punjab's largest state-run hospital. The findings revealed that participation in decision making, instrumental communication, and promotional opportunity prevented burnout. Formalization contributed to burnout but integration was not related to burnout. Quite interestingly, except for supervisory status, most control variables for this study were not significantly related to emotional burnout. Hence, the hypothesis that organizational structure is a determinant of job burnout was accepted.

  20. Determinants of Market Structure and the Airline Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raduchel, W.

    1972-01-01

    The general economic determinants of market structure are outlined with special reference to the airline industry. Included are the following facets: absolute size of firms; distributions of firms by size; concentration; entry barriers; product and service differentiation; diversification; degrees of competition; vertical integration; market boundaries; and economies of scale. Also examined are the static and dynamic properties of market structure in terms of mergers, government policies, and economic growth conditions.

  1. A method of determining RNA conformational ensembles using structure-based calculations of residual dipolar couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkar, Aditi N.; De Simone, Alfonso; Montalvao, Rinaldo W.; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2013-06-01

    We describe a method of determining the conformational fluctuations of RNA based on the incorporation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) as replica-averaged structural restraints in molecular dynamics simulations. In this approach, the alignment tensor required to calculate the RDCs corresponding to a given conformation is estimated from its shape, and multiple replicas of the RNA molecule are simulated simultaneously to reproduce in silico the ensemble-averaging procedure performed in the NMR measurements. We provide initial evidence that with this approach it is possible to determine accurately structural ensembles representing the conformational fluctuations of RNA by applying the reference ensemble test to the trans-activation response element of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

  2. Structure determination of a siderophore peucechelin from Streptomyces peucetius.

    PubMed

    Kodani, Shinya; Komaki, Hisayuki; Suzuki, Masahiro; Kobayakawa, Fumiya; Hemmi, Hikaru

    2015-10-01

    Previously, Park et al. isolated a new siderophore from Streptomyces peucetius ATCC 27952 based on information of the genome sequence and the structure of the siderophore was deduced to be a cyclic peptide based on MS/MS analysis. To clarify the structure of the siderophore, we cultured S. peucetius with iron deficient medium. Through several chromatographic procedures, the siderophore named peucechelin was isolated with the yield enough to perform NMR experiments. The planar structure of peucechelin was elucidated by the combination of ESI-MS experiment and NMR spectroscopic analyses of the gallium (III) complex. Unlike the previously deduced cyclic structure, the structure was determined to be a linear peptide which was similar to a known siderophore foroxymithine. The stereochemistries of amino acids constituting peucechelin were determined by applying modified Marfey method to the hydrolysate. Since the biosynthetic gene of peucechelin was formerly determined by Park et al. the similar genes were searched using genome data of other streptomycetes. As a result, the similar genes were found in the genome data of S. venezuelae and S. purpureus. Isolation and identification of siderophore was performed from the iron deficient culture of S. venezuelae. The siderophore of S. venezuelae was identified to be known compound foroxymithine by analysis ESI-MS and NMR spectra in the similar manner with peucechelin. Production of foroxymithine was also observed in the iron deficient culture of S. purpureus. Based on the genome data, comparison of the biosynthetic genes of structurally related siderophores peucechelin and foroxymithine was accomplished in discussion.

  3. Precession technique and electron diffractometry as new tools for crystal structure analysis and chemical bonding determination.

    PubMed

    Avilov, A; Kuligin, K; Nicolopoulos, S; Nickolskiy, M; Boulahya, K; Portillo, J; Lepeshov, G; Sobolev, B; Collette, J P; Martin, N; Robins, A C; Fischione, P

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a new fast electron diffractometer working with high dynamic range and linearity for crystal structure determinations. Electron diffraction (ED) patterns can be scanned serially in front of a Faraday cage detector; the total measurement time for several hundred ED reflections can be tens of seconds having high statistical accuracy for all measured intensities (1-2%). This new tool can be installed to any type of TEM without any column modification and is linked to a specially developed electron beam precession "Spinning Star" system. Precession of the electron beam (Vincent-Midgley technique) reduces dynamical effects allowing also use of accurate intensities for crystal structure analysis. We describe the technical characteristics of this new tool together with the first experimental results. Accurate measurement of electron diffraction intensities by electron diffractometer opens new possibilities not only for revealing unknown structures, but also for electrostatic potential determination and chemical bonding investigation. As an example, we present detailed atomic bonding information of CaF(2) as revealed for the first time by precise electron diffractometry.

  4. High-Resolution Protein Structure Determination by Serial Femtosecond Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Boutet, Sébastien; Lomb, Lukas; Williams, Garth J.; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Aquila, Andrew; Doak, R. Bruce; Weierstall, Uwe; DePonte, Daniel P.; Steinbrener, Jan; Shoeman, Robert L.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A.; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kirian, Richard A.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Montanez, Paul A.; Kenney, Chris; Herbst, Ryan; Hart, Philip; Pines, Jack; Haller, Gunther; Gruner, Sol M.; Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W.; Hromalik, Marianne; Koerner, Lucas J.; van Bakel, Niels; Morse, John; Ghonsalves, Wilfred; Arnlund, David; Bogan, Michael J.; Caleman, Carl; Fromme, Raimund; Hampton, Christina Y.; Hunter, Mark S.; Johansson, Linda C.; Katona, Gergely; Kupitz, Christopher; Liang, Mengning; Martin, Andrew V.; Nass, Karol; Redecke, Lars; Stellato, Francesco; Timneanu, Nicusor; Wang, Dingjie; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Schafer, Donald; Defever, James; Neutze, Richard; Fromme, Petra; Spence, John C. H.; Chapman, Henry N.; Schlichting, Ilme

    2013-01-01

    Structure determination of proteins and other macromolecules has historically required the growth of high-quality crystals sufficiently large to diffract x-rays efficiently while withstanding radiation damage. We applied serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) to obtain high-resolution structural information from microcrystals (less than 1 micrometer by 1 micrometer by 3 micrometers) of the well-characterized model protein lysozyme. The agreement with synchrotron data demonstrates the immediate relevance of SFX for analyzing the structure of the large group of difficult-to-crystallize molecules. PMID:22653729

  5. High-resolution protein structure determination by serial femtosecond crystallography.

    PubMed

    Boutet, Sébastien; Lomb, Lukas; Williams, Garth J; Barends, Thomas R M; Aquila, Andrew; Doak, R Bruce; Weierstall, Uwe; DePonte, Daniel P; Steinbrener, Jan; Shoeman, Robert L; Messerschmidt, Marc; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kirian, Richard A; Seibert, M Marvin; Montanez, Paul A; Kenney, Chris; Herbst, Ryan; Hart, Philip; Pines, Jack; Haller, Gunther; Gruner, Sol M; Philipp, Hugh T; Tate, Mark W; Hromalik, Marianne; Koerner, Lucas J; van Bakel, Niels; Morse, John; Ghonsalves, Wilfred; Arnlund, David; Bogan, Michael J; Caleman, Carl; Fromme, Raimund; Hampton, Christina Y; Hunter, Mark S; Johansson, Linda C; Katona, Gergely; Kupitz, Christopher; Liang, Mengning; Martin, Andrew V; Nass, Karol; Redecke, Lars; Stellato, Francesco; Timneanu, Nicusor; Wang, Dingjie; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Schafer, Donald; Defever, James; Neutze, Richard; Fromme, Petra; Spence, John C H; Chapman, Henry N; Schlichting, Ilme

    2012-07-20

    Structure determination of proteins and other macromolecules has historically required the growth of high-quality crystals sufficiently large to diffract x-rays efficiently while withstanding radiation damage. We applied serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) to obtain high-resolution structural information from microcrystals (less than 1 micrometer by 1 micrometer by 3 micrometers) of the well-characterized model protein lysozyme. The agreement with synchrotron data demonstrates the immediate relevance of SFX for analyzing the structure of the large group of difficult-to-crystallize molecules.

  6. Experimental Inferential Structure Determination of Ensembles for Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Brookes, David H; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2016-04-06

    We develop a Bayesian approach to determine the most probable structural ensemble model from candidate structures for intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) that takes full advantage of NMR chemical shifts and J-coupling data, their known errors and variances, and the quality of the theoretical back-calculation from structure to experimental observables. Our approach differs from previous formulations in the optimization of experimental and back-calculation nuisance parameters that are treated as random variables with known distributions, as opposed to structural or ensemble weight optimization or use of a reference ensemble. The resulting experimental inferential structure determination (EISD) method is size extensive with O(N) scaling, with N = number of structures, that allows for the rapid ranking of large ensemble data comprising tens of thousands of conformations. We apply the EISD approach on singular folded proteins and a corresponding set of ∼25 000 misfolded states to illustrate the problems that can arise using Boltzmann weighted priors. We then apply the EISD method to rank IDP ensembles most consistent with the NMR data and show that the primary error for ranking or creating good IDP ensembles resides in the poor back-calculation from structure to simulated experimental observable. We show that a reduction by a factor of 3 in the uncertainty of the back-calculation error can improve the discrimination among qualitatively different IDP ensembles for the amyloid-beta peptide.

  7. Selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension and mutational profiling (SHAPE-MaP) for direct, versatile, and accurate RNA structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    Smola, Matthew J.; Rice, Greggory M.; Busan, Steven; Siegfried, Nathan A.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    SHAPE chemistries exploit small electrophilic reagents that react with the 2′-hydroxyl group to interrogate RNA structure at single-nucleotide resolution. Mutational profiling (MaP) identifies modified residues based on the ability of reverse transcriptase to misread a SHAPE-modified nucleotide and then counting the resulting mutations by massively parallel sequencing. The SHAPE-MaP approach measures the structure of large and transcriptome-wide systems as accurately as for simple model RNAs. This protocol describes the experimental steps, implemented over three days, required to perform SHAPE probing and construct multiplexed SHAPE-MaP libraries suitable for deep sequencing. These steps include RNA folding and SHAPE structure probing, mutational profiling by reverse transcription, library construction, and sequencing. Automated processing of MaP sequencing data is accomplished using two software packages. ShapeMapper converts raw sequencing files into mutational profiles, creates SHAPE reactivity plots, and provides useful troubleshooting information, often within an hour. SuperFold uses these data to model RNA secondary structures, identify regions with well-defined structures, and visualize probable and alternative helices, often in under a day. We illustrate these algorithms with the E. coli thiamine pyrophosphate riboswitch, E. coli 16S rRNA, and HIV-1 genomic RNAs. SHAPE-MaP can be used to make nucleotide-resolution biophysical measurements of individual RNA motifs, rare components of complex RNA ensembles, and entire transcriptomes. The straightforward MaP strategy greatly expands the number, length, and complexity of analyzable RNA structures. PMID:26426499

  8. XModeScore: a novel method for accurate protonation/tautomer-state determination using quantum-mechanically driven macromolecular X-ray crystallographic refinement

    PubMed Central

    Borbulevych, Oleg; Martin, Roger I.; Tickle, Ian J.; Westerhoff, Lance M.

    2016-01-01

    Gaining an understanding of the protein–ligand complex structure along with the proper protonation and explicit solvent effects can be important in obtaining meaningful results in structure-guided drug discovery and structure-based drug discovery. Unfortunately, protonation and tautomerism are difficult to establish with conventional methods because of difficulties in the experimental detection of H atoms owing to the well known limitations of X-ray crystallography. In the present work, it is demonstrated that semiempirical, quantum-mechanics-based macromolecular crystallographic refinement is sensitive to the choice of a protonation-state/tautomer form of ligands and residues, and can therefore be used to explore potential states. A novel scoring method, called XModeScore, is described which enumerates the possible protomeric/tautomeric modes, refines each mode against X-ray diffraction data with the semiempirical quantum-mechanics (PM6) Hamiltonian and scores each mode using a combination of energetic strain (or ligand strain) and rigorous statistical analysis of the difference electron-density distribution. It is shown that using XModeScore it is possible to consistently distinguish the correct bound protomeric/tautomeric modes based on routine X-ray data, even at lower resolutions of around 3 Å. These X-ray results are compared with the results obtained from much more expensive and laborious neutron diffraction studies for three different examples: tautomerism in the acetazolamide ligand of human carbonic anhydrase II (PDB entries 3hs4 and 4k0s), tautomerism in the 8HX ligand of urate oxidase (PDB entries 4n9s and 4n9m) and the protonation states of the catalytic aspartic acid found within the active site of an aspartic protease (PDB entry 2jjj). In each case, XModeScore applied to the X-ray diffraction data is able to determine the correct protonation state as defined by the neutron diffraction data. The impact of QM-based refinement versus conventional

  9. XModeScore: a novel method for accurate protonation/tautomer-state determination using quantum-mechanically driven macromolecular X-ray crystallographic refinement.

    PubMed

    Borbulevych, Oleg; Martin, Roger I; Tickle, Ian J; Westerhoff, Lance M

    2016-04-01

    Gaining an understanding of the protein-ligand complex structure along with the proper protonation and explicit solvent effects can be important in obtaining meaningful results in structure-guided drug discovery and structure-based drug discovery. Unfortunately, protonation and tautomerism are difficult to establish with conventional methods because of difficulties in the experimental detection of H atoms owing to the well known limitations of X-ray crystallography. In the present work, it is demonstrated that semiempirical, quantum-mechanics-based macromolecular crystallographic refinement is sensitive to the choice of a protonation-state/tautomer form of ligands and residues, and can therefore be used to explore potential states. A novel scoring method, called XModeScore, is described which enumerates the possible protomeric/tautomeric modes, refines each mode against X-ray diffraction data with the semiempirical quantum-mechanics (PM6) Hamiltonian and scores each mode using a combination of energetic strain (or ligand strain) and rigorous statistical analysis of the difference electron-density distribution. It is shown that using XModeScore it is possible to consistently distinguish the correct bound protomeric/tautomeric modes based on routine X-ray data, even at lower resolutions of around 3 Å. These X-ray results are compared with the results obtained from much more expensive and laborious neutron diffraction studies for three different examples: tautomerism in the acetazolamide ligand of human carbonic anhydrase II (PDB entries 3hs4 and 4k0s), tautomerism in the 8HX ligand of urate oxidase (PDB entries 4n9s and 4n9m) and the protonation states of the catalytic aspartic acid found within the active site of an aspartic protease (PDB entry 2jjj). In each case, XModeScore applied to the X-ray diffraction data is able to determine the correct protonation state as defined by the neutron diffraction data. The impact of QM-based refinement versus conventional

  10. Determining the Cognitive Structures of Geography Teacher Candidates on "Earthquake"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaya, Bastürk; Aladag, Caner

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the cognitive structures of the students of geography teaching department by identifying their conceptual frameworks about the concept of earthquake. A case study design from qualitative research approaches was used in this research. Sample group of the study constitutes 155 students from the Department…

  11. Birthday Cake Activity Structured Arrangement for Helping Children Determining Quantities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariana, Neni

    2010-01-01

    Few researches have been concerned about relation between children's spatial thinking and number sense. Narrowing for this small research, we focused on one component of spatial thinking, that is structuring objects, and one component of number senses, that is cardinality by determining quantities. This study focused on a design research that was…

  12. A Laboratory Exercise in the Determination of Carbohydrate Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Bernard J.; Robyt, John F.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which students are given a naturally occurring oligosaccharide as an unknown and are asked to determine both its monosaccharide composition and its structure. Discusses methods and experimental techniques including thin layer chromatography and the use of enzymes. (CW)

  13. The Determination of Molecular Structure from Rotational Spectra

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Laurie, V. W.; Herschbach, D. R.

    1962-07-01

    An analysis is presented concerning the average molecular configuration variations and their effects on molecular structure determinations. It is noted that the isotopic dependence of the zero-point is often primarily governed by the isotopic variation of the average molecular configuration. (J.R.D.)

  14. Determination of permissible applied load stress in structural elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loy, R. E.; Posever, F. C.

    1969-01-01

    Graphic method is used to select allowable stresses in thermally loaded structures. Equations are used for determining the mode of failure for specific materials in order to plot a range of stress curves. Linear assumption and iterative calculations are eliminated resulting in comparatively high accuracy.

  15. From bacterial to human dihydrouridine synthase: automated structure determination

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, Fiona Jenkins, Huw T.; Griffiths, Samuel C.; Byrne, Robert T.; Dodson, Eleanor J.; Antson, Alfred A.

    2015-06-30

    The crystal structure of a human dihydrouridine synthase, an enzyme associated with lung cancer, with 18% sequence identity to a T. maritima enzyme, has been determined at 1.9 Å resolution by molecular replacement after extensive molecular remodelling of the template. The reduction of uridine to dihydrouridine at specific positions in tRNA is catalysed by dihydrouridine synthase (Dus) enzymes. Increased expression of human dihydrouridine synthase 2 (hDus2) has been linked to pulmonary carcinogenesis, while its knockdown decreased cancer cell line viability, suggesting that it may serve as a valuable target for therapeutic intervention. Here, the X-ray crystal structure of a construct of hDus2 encompassing the catalytic and tRNA-recognition domains (residues 1–340) determined at 1.9 Å resolution is presented. It is shown that the structure can be determined automatically by phenix.mr-rosetta starting from a bacterial Dus enzyme with only 18% sequence identity and a significantly divergent structure. The overall fold of the human Dus2 is similar to that of bacterial enzymes, but has a larger recognition domain and a unique three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet insertion into the catalytic domain that packs next to the recognition domain, contributing to domain–domain interactions. The structure may inform the development of novel therapeutic approaches in the fight against lung cancer.

  16. The Shake-and-Bake structure determination of triclinic lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Deacon, A M; Weeks, C M; Miller, R; Ealick, S E

    1998-08-04

    The crystal structure of triclinic lysozyme, comprised of 1,001 non-H protein atoms and approximately 200 bound water molecules, has been determined ab initio (using native data alone) by the "Shake-and-Bake" method by using the computer program SnB. This is the largest structure determined so far by the SnB program. Initial experiments, using default SnB parameters derived from studies of smaller molecules, were unsuccessful. In fact, such experiments produced electron density maps dominated by a single large peak. This problem was overcome by considering the choice of protocol used during the parameter-shift phase refinement. When each phase was subjected to a single shift of +/-157.5 degrees during each SnB cycle, an unusually high percentage of random trials (approximately 22%) yielded correct solutions within 750 cycles. This success rate is higher than that typically observed, even for much smaller structures.

  17. Does the genetic type of collagen determine fibril structure

    SciTech Connect

    Eikenberry, E.; Brodsky, B.; Cassidy, K.

    1980-10-01

    A number of genetic types of collagen, all triple-helical but with significant variations in their amino acid sequences, have been found and the distribution of these genetic types is tissue specific. For example, tendon is composed only of type I collagen, while cartilage contains largely type II collagen. Skin contains a large amount of type I, but has a significant fraction, approx. 15%, of type III. Each of these types can form fibrils, but it is not known whether they form distinctive fibril structures that are important in determining tissue organization. We are using x-ray diffraction to analyze a variety of tissues with different collagen genetic types to compare the fibril structures and thus investigate whether genetic type is an important determinant of this structure.

  18. Accurate Size and Size-Distribution Determination of Polystyrene Latex Nanoparticles in Aqueous Medium Using Dynamic Light Scattering and Asymmetrical Flow Field Flow Fractionation with Multi-Angle Light Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Haruhisa; Nakamura, Ayako; Takahashi, Kayori; Kinugasa, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    Accurate determination of the intensity-average diameter of polystyrene latex (PS-latex) by dynamic light scattering (DLS) was carried out through extrapolation of both the concentration of PS-latex and the observed scattering angle. Intensity-average diameter and size distribution were reliably determined by asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AFFFF) using multi-angle light scattering (MALS) with consideration of band broadening in AFFFF separation. The intensity-average diameter determined by DLS and AFFFF-MALS agreed well within the estimated uncertainties, although the size distribution of PS-latex determined by DLS was less reliable in comparison with that determined by AFFFF-MALS.

  19. Crystallization, X-Ray Structure Determination and Structure-Based Drug Design for Targeted Malarial Enzymes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DAMD17-95-2-5007 TITLE: Crystallization, X-ray Structure Determination and Structure-Based Drug Design for...approach for the develpment of anti-malarial agent using structure-based drug design . This technique will enable us to identify active site inhibitors...based drug design project high resolution three domensional structure of the enzyme - inhibitor complex provides the basis for further modifications

  20. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  1. Third Structure Determination by Powder Diffractometery Round Robin (SDPDRR-3)

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bail, A.; Cranswick, L; Adil, K; Altomare, A; Avdeev, M; Cerny, R; Cuocci, C; Giacovazzo, C; Halasz, I; et al.

    2009-01-01

    The results from a third structure determination by powder diffractometry (SDPD) round robin are discussed. From the 175 potential participants having downloaded the powder data, nine sent a total of 12 solutions (8 and 4 for samples 1 and 2, respectively, a tetrahydrated calcium tartrate and a lanthanum tungstate). Participants used seven different computer programs for structure solution (ESPOIR, EXPO, FOX, PSSP, SHELXS, SUPERFLIP, and TOPAS), applying Patterson, direct methods, direct space methods, and charge flipping approach. It is concluded that solving a structure from powder data remains a challenge, at least one order of magnitude more difficult than solving a problem with similar complexity from single-crystal data. Nevertheless, a few more steps in the direction of increasing the SDPD rate of success were accomplished since the two previous round robins: this time, not only the computer program developers were successful but also some users. No result was obtained from crystal structure prediction experts.

  2. Accurate ab Initio Spin Densities.

    PubMed

    Boguslawski, Katharina; Marti, Konrad H; Legeza, Ors; Reiher, Markus

    2012-06-12

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of α and β electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740].

  3. Protein secondary structure determination by constrained single-particle cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Bartesaghi, Alberto; Lecumberry, Federico; Sapiro, Guillermo; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2012-12-05

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a powerful technique for 3D structure determination of protein complexes by averaging information from individual molecular images. The resolutions that can be achieved with single-particle cryo-EM are frequently limited by inaccuracies in assigning molecular orientations based solely on 2D projection images. Tomographic data collection schemes, however, provide powerful constraints that can be used to more accurately determine molecular orientations necessary for 3D reconstruction. Here, we propose "constrained single-particle tomography" as a general strategy for 3D structure determination in cryo-EM. A key component of our approach is the effective use of images recorded in tilt series to extract high-resolution information and correct for the contrast transfer function. By incorporating geometric constraints into the refinement to improve orientational accuracy of images, we reduce model bias and overrefinement artifacts and demonstrate that protein structures can be determined at resolutions of ∼8 Å starting from low-dose tomographic tilt series.

  4. Protein Secondary Structure Determination by Constrained Single-Particle Cryo-Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bartesaghi, Alberto; Lecumberry, Federico; Sapiro, Guillermo; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a powerful technique for 3D structure determination of protein complexes by averaging information from individual molecular images. The resolutions that can be achieved with single-particle cryo-EM are frequently limited by inaccuracies in assigning molecular orientations based solely on 2D projection images. Tomographic data collection schemes, however, provide powerful constraints that can be used to more accurately determine molecular orientations necessary for 3D reconstruction. Here, we propose “constrained single-particle tomography” as a general strategy for 3D structure determination in cryo-EM. A key component of our approach is the effective use of images recorded in tilt series to extract high-resolution information and correct for the contrast transfer function. By incorporating geometric constraints into the refinement to improve orientational accuracy of images, we reduce model bias and overrefinement artifacts and demonstrate that protein structures can be determined at resolutions of ~8 Å starting from low-dose tomographic tilt series. PMID:23217682

  5. Regional mechanics determine collagen fiber structure in healing myocardial infarcts.

    PubMed

    Fomovsky, Gregory M; Rouillard, Andrew D; Holmes, Jeffrey W

    2012-05-01

    Following myocardial infarction, the mechanical properties of the healing infarct are an important determinant of heart function and the risk of progression to heart failure. In particular, mechanical anisotropy (having different mechanical properties in different directions) in the healing infarct can preserve pump function of the heart. Based on reports of different collagen structures and mechanical properties in various animal models, we hypothesized that differences in infarct size, shape, and/or location produce different patterns of mechanical stretch that guide evolving collagen fiber structure. We tested the effects of infarct shape and location using a combined experimental and computational approach. We studied mechanics and collagen fiber structure in cryoinfarcts in 53 Sprague-Dawley rats and found that regardless of shape or orientation, cryoinfarcts near the equator of the left ventricle stretched primarily in the circumferential direction and developed circumferentially aligned collagen, while infarcts at the apex stretched similarly in the circumferential and longitudinal directions and developed randomly oriented collagen. In a computational model of infarct healing, an effect of mechanical stretch on fibroblast and collagen alignment was required to reproduce the experimental results. We conclude that mechanical environment determines collagen fiber structure in healing myocardial infarcts. Our results suggest that emerging post-infarction therapies that alter regional mechanics will also alter infarct collagen structure, offering both potential risks and novel therapeutic opportunities.

  6. Observation and Structure Determination of an Oxide Quasicrystal Approximant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, S.; Trautmann, M.; Roy, S.; Adeagbo, W. A.; Zollner, E. M.; Hammer, R.; Schumann, F. O.; Meinel, K.; Nayak, S. K.; Mohseni, K.; Hergert, W.; Meyerheim, H. L.; Widdra, W.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the first observation of an approximant structure to the recently discovered two-dimensional oxide quasicrystal. Using scanning tunneling microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, and surface x-ray diffraction in combination with ab initio calculations, the atomic structure and the bonding scheme are determined. The oxide approximant follows a 32 .4.3.4 Archimedean tiling. Ti atoms reside at the corners of each tiling element and are threefold coordinated to oxygen atoms. Ba atoms separate the TiO3 clusters, leading to a fundamental edge length of the tiling 6.7 Å.

  7. Towards accurate structural characterization of metal centres in protein crystals: the structures of Ni and Cu T{sub 6} bovine insulin derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Frankaer, Christian Grundahl; Mossin, Susanne; Ståhl, Kenny; Harris, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    The level of structural detail around the metal sites in Ni{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} T{sub 6} insulin derivatives was significantly improved by using a combination of single-crystal X-ray crystallography and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Photoreduction and subsequent radiation damage of the Cu{sup 2+} sites in Cu insulin was followed by XANES spectroscopy. Using synchrotron radiation (SR), the crystal structures of T{sub 6} bovine insulin complexed with Ni{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} were solved to 1.50 and 1.45 Å resolution, respectively. The level of detail around the metal centres in these structures was highly limited, and the coordination of water in Cu site II of the copper insulin derivative was deteriorated as a consequence of radiation damage. To provide more detail, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to improve the information level about metal coordination in each derivative. The nickel derivative contains hexacoordinated Ni{sup 2+} with trigonal symmetry, whereas the copper derivative contains tetragonally distorted hexacoordinated Cu{sup 2+} as a result of the Jahn–Teller effect, with a significantly longer coordination distance for one of the three water molecules in the coordination sphere. That the copper centre is of type II was further confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The coordination distances were refined from EXAFS with standard deviations within 0.01 Å. The insulin derivative containing Cu{sup 2+} is sensitive towards photoreduction when exposed to SR. During the reduction of Cu{sup 2+} to Cu{sup +}, the coordination geometry of copper changes towards lower coordination numbers. Primary damage, i.e. photoreduction, was followed directly by XANES as a function of radiation dose, while secondary damage in the form of structural changes around the Cu atoms after exposure to different radiation doses was studied by crystallography using a laboratory diffractometer. Protection against photoreduction and subsequent

  8. The potential for biological structure determination with pulsed neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.C.

    1994-12-31

    The potential of pulsed neutron diffraction in structural determination of biological materials is discussed. The problems and potential solutions in this area are outlined, with reference to both current and future sources and instrumentation. The importance of developing instrumentation on pulsed sources in emphasized, with reference to the likelihood of future expansion in this area. The possibilities and limitations of single crystal, fiber and powder diffraction in this area are assessed.

  9. Determination of the Basin Structure Beneath European Side of Istanbul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabulut, Savas; Cengiz Cinku, Mulla; Thomas, Michael; Lamontagne, Maurice

    2016-04-01

    Istanbul (near North Anatolian Fault Zone:NAFZ, Turkey) is located in northern part of Sea of Marmara, an area that has been influenced by possible Marmara Earthquakes. The general geology of Istanbul divided into two stratigraphic unit such as sedimentary (from Oligocene to Quaternary Deposits) and bedrock (Paleozoic and Eocene). The bedrock units consists of sand stone, clay stone to Paleozoic age and limestone to Eocene age and sedimentary unit consist of sand, clay, mil and gravel from Oligocene to Quaternary age. Earthquake disaster mitigation studies divided into two important phases, too. Firstly, earthquake, soil and engineering structure problems identify for investigation area, later on strategic emergency plan can prepare for these problems. Soil amplification play important role the disaster mitigation and the site effect analysis and basin structure is also a key parameter for determining of site effect. Some geophysical, geological and geotechnical measurements are requeired to defined this relationship. Istanbul Megacity has been waiting possible Marmara Earthquake and their related results. In order to defined to possible damage potential related to site effect, gravity measurements carried out for determining to geological structure, basin geometry and faults in Istanbul. Gravity data were collected at 640 sites by using a Scientrex CG-5 Autogravity meter Standard corrections applied to the gravity data include those for instrumental drift, Earth tides and latitude, and the free-air and Bouguer corrections. The corrected gravity data were imported into a Geosoft database to create a grid and map of the Bouguer gravity anomaly (grid cell size of 200 m). As a previously results, we determined some lineminants, faults and basins beneath Istanbul City. Especially, orientation of faults were NW-SE direction and some basin structures determined on between Buyukcekmece and Kucukcekmece Lake.

  10. MOTIVATION INTERNALIZATION AND SIMPLEX STRUCTURE IN SELF-DETERMINATION THEORY.

    PubMed

    Ünlü, Ali; Dettweiler, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    Self-determination theory, as proposed by Deci and Ryan, postulated different types of motivation regulation. As to the introjected and identified regulation of extrinsic motivation, their internalizations were described as "somewhat external" and "somewhat internal" and remained undetermined in the theory. This paper introduces a constrained regression analysis that allows these vaguely expressed motivations to be estimated in an "optimal" manner, in any given empirical context. The approach was even generalized and applied for simplex structure analysis in self-determination theory. The technique was exemplified with an empirical study comparing science teaching in a classical school class versus an expeditionary outdoor program. Based on a sample of 84 German pupils (43 girls, 41 boys, 10 to 12 years old), data were collected using the German version of the Academic Self-Regulation Questionnaire. The science-teaching format was seen to not influence the pupils' internalization of identified regulation. The internalization of introjected regulation differed and shifted more toward the external pole in the outdoor teaching format. The quantification approach supported the simplex structure of self-determination theory, whereas correlations may disconfirm the simplex structure.

  11. A form-factor method for determining the structure of distorted stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, R. H., Jr.; Kern, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    The equilibrium equations of a uniformly rotating and tidally distorted star are reduced to the same form as for a spherical star except for the inclusion of two form factors. One factor, expressing the buoyancy effects of centrifugal force, is determined directly from the integrated structure variables. The other factor, expressing the deviation from spherical shape, is shown to be relatively insensitive to errors in the assumed shape, so that accurate solutions are obtained in spite of the use of an a priori shape. The method is employed by adding computations for the factors to an existing spherical model program. Upper Main Sequence models determined by this method compare closely with results from the double approximation method even for critical rotation and tidal distortion.

  12. Strain-Based Damage Determination Using Finite Element Analysis for Structural Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Krishnamurthy, Thiagaraja; Aguilo, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    A damage determination method is presented that relies on in-service strain sensor measurements. The method employs a gradient-based optimization procedure combined with the finite element method for solution to the forward problem. It is demonstrated that strains, measured at a limited number of sensors, can be used to accurately determine the location, size, and orientation of damage. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the general procedure. This work is motivated by the need to provide structural health management systems with a real-time damage characterization. The damage cases investigated herein are characteristic of point-source damage, which can attain critical size during flight. The procedure described can be used to provide prognosis tools with the current damage configuration.

  13. Structural properties for determining mechanisms of toxic action

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, S.P.; Lipnick, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a workshop co-sponsored by EPA through the Health and Environmental Review Division, Office of Toxic Substances and the Environmental Research Laboratory-Duluth, of the Office of Research and Development are briefly summarized as an introduction to a series of manuscripts dealing with the structural properties of chemicals that determine their toxic mechanisms. Results of the workshop are intended to be incorporated in an expert system to predict mechanisms from chemical structure and aid in predictive toxicology applications in the Agency. The goal of the workshop was to review current understanding of fundamental mechanisms, and develop an initial knowledge base on chemical features and properties from which toxic mechanisms could be predicted from structure. Areas addressed included general anesthesia, or narcosis, oxidative phosphorylation uncoupling, electrophile and free-radical reactivity, and a variety of pesticide-based mechanisms.

  14. Local magnetic structure determination using polarized neutron holography

    SciTech Connect

    Szakál, Alex Markó, Márton Cser, László

    2015-05-07

    A unique and important property of the neutron is that it possesses magnetic moment. This property is widely used for determination of magnetic structure of crystalline samples observing the magnetic components of the diffraction peaks. Investigations of diffraction patterns give information only about the averaged structure of a crystal but for discovering of local spin arrangement around a specific (e.g., impurity) nucleus remains still a challenging problem. Neutron holography is a useful tool to investigate the local structure around a specific nucleus embedded in a crystal lattice. The method has been successfully applied experimentally in several cases using non-magnetic short range interaction of the neutron and the nucleus. A mathematical model of the hologram using interaction between magnetic moment of the atom and the neutron spin for polarized neutron holography is provided. Validity of a polarized neutron holographic experiment is demonstrated by applying the proposed method on model systems.

  15. Local magnetic structure determination using polarized neutron holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szakál, Alex; Markó, Márton; Cser, László

    2015-05-01

    A unique and important property of the neutron is that it possesses magnetic moment. This property is widely used for determination of magnetic structure of crystalline samples observing the magnetic components of the diffraction peaks. Investigations of diffraction patterns give information only about the averaged structure of a crystal but for discovering of local spin arrangement around a specific (e.g., impurity) nucleus remains still a challenging problem. Neutron holography is a useful tool to investigate the local structure around a specific nucleus embedded in a crystal lattice. The method has been successfully applied experimentally in several cases using non-magnetic short range interaction of the neutron and the nucleus. A mathematical model of the hologram using interaction between magnetic moment of the atom and the neutron spin for polarized neutron holography is provided. Validity of a polarized neutron holographic experiment is demonstrated by applying the proposed method on model systems.

  16. Structural Determinants and Mechanism of HIV-1 Genome Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kun; Heng, Xiao; Summers, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Like all retroviruses, the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) selectively packages two copies of its unspliced RNA genome, both of which are utilized for strand-transfer mediated recombination during reverse transcription – a process that enables rapid evolution under environmental and chemotherapeutic pressures. The viral RNA appears to be selected for packaging as a dimer, and there is evidence that dimerization and packaging are mechanistically coupled. Both processes are mediated by interactions between the nucleocapsid (NC) domains of a small number of assembling viral Gag polyproteins and RNA elements within the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) of the genome. A number of secondary structures have been predicted for regions of the genome that are responsible for packaging, and high-resolution structures have been determined for a few small RNA fragments and protein-RNA complexes. However, major questions remain open regarding the RNA structures, and potentially the structural changes, that are responsible for dimeric genome selection. Here we review efforts that have been made to identify the molecular determinants and mechanism of HIV-1 genome packaging. PMID:21762803

  17. From bacterial to human dihydrouridine synthase: automated structure determination

    PubMed Central

    Whelan, Fiona; Jenkins, Huw T.; Griffiths, Samuel C.; Byrne, Robert T.; Dodson, Eleanor J.; Antson, Alfred A.

    2015-01-01

    The reduction of uridine to dihydrouridine at specific positions in tRNA is catalysed by dihydrouridine synthase (Dus) enzymes. Increased expression of human dihydrouridine synthase 2 (hDus2) has been linked to pulmonary carcinogenesis, while its knockdown decreased cancer cell line viability, suggesting that it may serve as a valuable target for therapeutic intervention. Here, the X-ray crystal structure of a construct of hDus2 encompassing the catalytic and tRNA-recognition domains (residues 1–340) determined at 1.9 Å resolution is presented. It is shown that the structure can be determined automatically by phenix.mr_rosetta starting from a bacterial Dus enzyme with only 18% sequence identity and a significantly divergent structure. The overall fold of the human Dus2 is similar to that of bacterial enzymes, but has a larger recognition domain and a unique three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet insertion into the catalytic domain that packs next to the recognition domain, contributing to domain–domain interactions. The structure may inform the development of novel therapeutic approaches in the fight against lung cancer. PMID:26143927

  18. Annotation and structural elucidation of bovine milk oligosaccharides and determination of novel fucosylated structures.

    PubMed

    Aldredge, Danielle L; Geronimo, Maria R; Hua, Serenus; Nwosu, Charles C; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Barile, Daniela

    2013-06-01

    Bovine milk oligosaccharides (BMOs) are recognized by the dairy and food industries, as well as by infant formula manufacturers, as novel, high-potential bioactive food ingredients. Recent studies revealed that bovine milk contains complex oligosaccharides structurally related to those previously thought to be present in only human milk. These BMOs are microbiotic modulators involved in important biological activities, including preventing pathogen binding to the intestinal epithelium and serving as nutrients for a selected class of beneficial bacteria. Only a small number of BMO structures are fully elucidated. To better understand the potential of BMOs as a class of biotherapeutics, their detailed structure analysis is needed. This study initiated the development of a structure library of BMOs and a comprehensive evaluation of structure-related specificity. The bovine milk glycome was profiled by high-performance mass spectrometry and advanced separation techniques to obtain a comprehensive catalog of BMOs, including several novel, lower abundant neutral and fucosylated oligosaccharides that are often overlooked during analysis. Structures were identified using isomer-specific tandem mass spectroscopy and targeted exoglycosidase digestions to produce a BMO library detailing retention time, accurate mass and structure to allow their rapid identification in future studies.

  19. Annotation and structural elucidation of bovine milk oligosaccharides and determination of novel fucosylated structures

    PubMed Central

    Aldredge, Danielle L; Geronimo, Maria R; Hua, Serenus; Nwosu, Charles C; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Barile, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Bovine milk oligosaccharides (BMOs) are recognized by the dairy and food industries, as well as by infant formula manufacturers, as novel, high-potential bioactive food ingredients. Recent studies revealed that bovine milk contains complex oligosaccharides structurally related to those previously thought to be present in only human milk. These BMOs are microbiotic modulators involved in important biological activities, including preventing pathogen binding to the intestinal epithelium and serving as nutrients for a selected class of beneficial bacteria. Only a small number of BMO structures are fully elucidated. To better understand the potential of BMOs as a class of biotherapeutics, their detailed structure analysis is needed. This study initiated the development of a structure library of BMOs and a comprehensive evaluation of structure-related specificity. The bovine milk glycome was profiled by high-performance mass spectrometry and advanced separation techniques to obtain a comprehensive catalog of BMOs, including several novel, lower abundant neutral and fucosylated oligosaccharides that are often overlooked during analysis. Structures were identified using isomer-specific tandem mass spectroscopy and targeted exoglycosidase digestions to produce a BMO library detailing retention time, accurate mass and structure to allow their rapid identification in future studies. PMID:23436288

  20. Method and apparatus for determining material structural integrity

    DOEpatents

    Pechersky, Martin

    1996-01-01

    A non-destructive method and apparatus for determining the structural integrity of materials by combining laser vibrometry with damping analysis techniques to determine the damping loss factor of a material. The method comprises the steps of vibrating the area being tested over a known frequency range and measuring vibrational force and velocity as a function of time over the known frequency range. Vibrational velocity is preferably measured by a laser vibrometer. Measurement of the vibrational force depends on the vibration method. If an electromagnetic coil is used to vibrate a magnet secured to the area being tested, then the vibrational force is determined by the amount of coil current used in vibrating the magnet. If a reciprocating transducer is used to vibrate a magnet secured to the area being tested, then the vibrational force is determined by a force gauge in the reciprocating transducer. Using known vibrational analysis methods, a plot of the drive point mobility of the material over the preselected frequency range is generated from the vibrational force and velocity measurements. The damping loss factor is derived from a plot of the drive point mobility over the preselected frequency range using the resonance dwell method and compared with a reference damping loss factor for structural integrity evaluation.

  1. Method and apparatus for determining material structural integrity

    DOEpatents

    Pechersky, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed are a nondestructive method and apparatus for determining the structural integrity of materials by combining laser vibrometry with damping analysis to determine the damping loss factor. The method comprises the steps of vibrating the area being tested over a known frequency range and measuring vibrational force and velocity vs time over the known frequency range. Vibrational velocity is preferably measured by a laser vibrometer. Measurement of the vibrational force depends on the vibration method: if an electromagnetic coil is used to vibrate a magnet secured to the area being tested, then the vibrational force is determined by the coil current. If a reciprocating transducer is used, the vibrational force is determined by a force gauge in the transducer. Using vibrational analysis, a plot of the drive point mobility of the material over the preselected frequency range is generated from the vibrational force and velocity data. Damping loss factor is derived from a plot of the drive point mobility over the preselected frequency range using the resonance dwell method and compared with a reference damping loss factor for structural integrity evaluation.

  2. Single Crystal Structure Determination of Alumina to 1 Mbar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, H.; Zhang, L.; Prakapenka, V.; Mao, H.

    2014-12-01

    Aluminum oxide (Al2O3) is an important ceramic material and a major oxide in the earth. Additionally, alumina is a widely used pressure standard in static high-pressure experiments (Cr3+-bearing corundum, ruby). The changes of its crystal structure with pressure (P) and temperature (T) are important for its applications and understanding its physical properties in the deep Earth. There have been numerous reports on the high P-T polymorphs of alumina. Previous theoretical calculations and experiments suggest that the crystal structure of Al2O3 evolves greatly at high P-T. In this study, we used the newly developed multigrain crystallography method combined with single-crystal x-ray diffraction analysis technique for the structure determination of alumina at high P-T to provide single-crystal structure refinement for high-pressure phases of Al2O3. Alumina powder was mixed with ~10% Pt and Ne was used as both pressure transmitting media and thermal insulating layers during laser-heating. Coarse-grained aggregates of Al2O3 were synthesized in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The structure change of Al2O3 was monitored by in situ x-ray diffraction at ~1 Mbar and 2700 K. The results allow us to distinguish the structural differences between the Rh2O3 (II) structure (space group Pbcn) and perovskite structure (space group Pbnm) for the first high-pressure phase of Al2O3. More detailed results will be discussed in the later work.

  3. Clathrate Structure Determination by Combining Crystal Structure Prediction with Computational and Experimental (129) Xe NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Selent, Marcin; Nyman, Jonas; Roukala, Juho; Ilczyszyn, Marek; Oilunkaniemi, Raija; Bygrave, Peter J; Laitinen, Risto; Jokisaari, Jukka; Day, Graeme M; Lantto, Perttu

    2017-01-23

    An approach is presented for the structure determination of clathrates using NMR spectroscopy of enclathrated xenon to select from a set of predicted crystal structures. Crystal structure prediction methods have been used to generate an ensemble of putative structures of o- and m-fluorophenol, whose previously unknown clathrate structures have been studied by (129) Xe NMR spectroscopy. The high sensitivity of the (129) Xe chemical shift tensor to the chemical environment and shape of the crystalline cavity makes it ideal as a probe for porous materials. The experimental powder NMR spectra can be used to directly confirm or reject hypothetical crystal structures generated by computational prediction, whose chemical shift tensors have been simulated using density functional theory. For each fluorophenol isomer one predicted crystal structure was found, whose measured and computed chemical shift tensors agree within experimental and computational error margins and these are thus proposed as the true fluorophenol xenon clathrate structures.

  4. Extension of the AMBER force field for nitroxide radicals and combined QM/MM/PCM approach to the accurate determination of EPR parameters of DMPOH in solution

    PubMed Central

    Hermosilla, Laura; Prampolini, Giacomo; Calle, Paloma; García de la Vega, José Manuel; Brancato, Giuseppe; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    A computational strategy that combines both time-dependent and time-independent approaches is exploited to accurately model molecular dynamics and solvent effects on the isotropic hyperfine coupling constants of the DMPO-H nitroxide. Our recent general force field for nitroxides derived from AMBER ff99SB is further extended to systems involving hydrogen atoms in β-positions with respect to NO. The resulting force-field has been employed in a series of classical molecular dynamics simulations, comparing the computed EPR parameters from selected molecular configurations to the corresponding experimental data in different solvents. The effect of vibrational averaging on the spectroscopic parameters is also taken into account, by second order vibrational perturbation theory involving semi-diagonal third energy derivatives together first and second property derivatives. PMID:26584116

  5. Space-grown protein crystals are more useful for structure determination.

    PubMed

    Ng, Joseph D

    2002-10-01

    The usefulness of X-ray data derived from space-grown protein crystals for calculating a more accurate structure is reviewed here for three model proteins. These include the plant sweetening protein, thaumatin, from Thaumatococcus daniellii; the aspartyl-tRNA synthetase from Thermus thermophilus; and pea lectin from Pisum sativum. In all three cases, X-ray diffraction data collected from protein crystals obtained under reduced gravity lead to better defined initial electron density maps, facilitating model building and improved crystallographic statistics. With thaumatin, the phasing power of the anomalous scattering atom, sulfur, is used to determine protein crystal quality in terms of its usefulness for ab initio structure determination. Thaumatin crystals grown under microgravity provided improved phasing statistics compared to those of Earth-grown crystals. Consequently, generating a de novo protein model of higher quality was facilitated using X-ray diffraction data from space-grown crystals. This lends evidence to the possibility that a microgravity environment can favor protein crystal growth and, subsequently, be more useful for structure determination.

  6. Sexing the Sciuridae: a simple and accurate set of molecular methods to determine sex in tree squirrels, ground squirrels and marmots.

    PubMed

    Gorrell, Jamieson C; Boutin, Stan; Raveh, Shirley; Neuhaus, Peter; Côté, Steeve D; Coltman, David W

    2012-09-01

    We determined the sequence of the male-specific minor histocompatibility complex antigen (Smcy) from the Y chromosome of seven squirrel species (Sciuridae, Rodentia). Based on conserved regions inside the Smcy intron sequence, we designed PCR primers for sex determination in these species that can be co-amplified with nuclear loci as controls. PCR co-amplification yields two products for males and one for females that are easily visualized as bands by agarose gel electrophoresis. Our method provides simple and reliable sex determination across a wide range of squirrel species.

  7. Meeting Report: Structural Determination of Environmentally Responsive Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Reinlib, Leslie

    2005-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of gene products continues to be a missing lynchpin between linear genome sequences and our understanding of the normal and abnormal function of proteins and pathways. Enhanced activity in this area is likely to lead to better understanding of how discrete changes in molecular patterns and conformation underlie functional changes in protein complexes and, with it, sensitivity of an individual to an exposure. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences convened a workshop of experts in structural determination and environmental health to solicit advice for future research in structural resolution relative to environmentally responsive proteins and pathways. The highest priorities recommended by the workshop were to support studies of structure, analysis, control, and design of conformational and functional states at molecular resolution for environmentally responsive molecules and complexes; promote understanding of dynamics, kinetics, and ligand responses; investigate the mechanisms and steps in posttranslational modifications, protein partnering, impact of genetic polymorphisms on structure/function, and ligand interactions; and encourage integrated experimental and computational approaches. The workshop participants also saw value in improving the throughput and purity of protein samples and macromolecular assemblies; developing optimal processes for design, production, and assembly of macromolecular complexes; encouraging studies on protein–protein and macromolecular interactions; and examining assemblies of individual proteins and their functions in pathways of interest for environmental health. PMID:16263521

  8. Mesopore quality determines the lifetime of hierarchically structured zeolite catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milina, Maria; Mitchell, Sharon; Crivelli, Paolo; Cooke, David; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2014-05-01

    Deactivation due to coking limits the lifetime of zeolite catalysts in the production of chemicals and fuels. Superior performance can be achieved through hierarchically structuring the zeolite porosity, yet no relation has been established between the mesopore architecture and the catalyst lifetime. Here we introduce a top-down demetallation strategy to locate mesopores in different regions of MFI-type crystals with identical bulk porous and acidic properties. In contrast, well-established bottom-up strategies as carbon templating and seed silanization fail to yield materials with matching characteristics. Advanced characterization tools capable of accurately discriminating the mesopore size, distribution and connectivity are applied to corroborate the concept of mesopore quality. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy proves powerful to quantify the global connectivity of the intracrystalline pore network, which, as demonstrated in the conversions of methanol or of propanal to hydrocarbons, is closely linked to the lifetime of zeolite catalysts. The findings emphasize the need to aptly tailor hierarchical materials for maximal catalytic advantage.

  9. Study on the applicability of a precise, accurate method for rapid evaluation of engine and lubricant performance. [determination of wear metal in used lubricating oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinard, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    The development of a procedure for obtaining data related to wear metal determinations in used lubricants is discussed. The procedure makes it possible to obtain rapid, simultaneous determinations of a number of wear metals at levels of parts per thousand to low parts per billion using a small amount of sample. The electrode assembly and instrumentation used in the process are described. Samples of data obtained from tests conducted under controlled conditions are tabulated.

  10. Determining the 3-D structure and motion of objects using a scanning laser range sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandhakumar, N.; Smith, Philip W.

    1993-12-01

    In order for the EVAHR robot to autonomously track and grasp objects, its vision system must be able to determine the 3-D structure and motion of an object from a sequence of sensory images. This task is accomplished by the use of a laser radar range sensor which provides dense range maps of the scene. Unfortunately, the currently available laser radar range cameras use a sequential scanning approach which complicates image analysis. Although many algorithms have been developed for recognizing objects from range images, none are suited for use with single beam, scanning, time-of-flight sensors because all previous algorithms assume instantaneous acquisition of the entire image. This assumption is invalid since the EVAHR robot is equipped with a sequential scanning laser range sensor. If an object is moving while being imaged by the device, the apparent structure of the object can be significantly distorted due to the significant non-zero delay time between sampling each image pixel. If an estimate of the motion of the object can be determined, this distortion can be eliminated; but, this leads to the motion-structure paradox - most existing algorithms for 3-D motion estimation use the structure of objects to parameterize their motions. The goal of this research is to design a rigid-body motion recovery technique which overcomes this limitation. The method being developed is an iterative, linear, feature-based approach which uses the non-zero image acquisition time constraint to accurately recover the motion parameters from the distorted structure of the 3-D range maps. Once the motion parameters are determined, the structural distortion in the range images is corrected.

  11. Accurate Crystal Structure Refinement of La3Ta0.25Zr0.50Ga5.25O14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudka, A. P.; Chitra, R.; Choudhury, R. R.; Pisarevsky, Yu. V.; Simonov, V. I.

    2010-11-01

    An accurate X-ray diffraction study of a La3Ta0.25Zr0.50Ga5.25O14 single crystal ( a = 8.2574(4) Å, c = 5.1465(4) Å, sp. gr. P321, Z = 1, R/ R w = 0.62/0.57% for 4144 unique reflections and 91 parameters) has been performed with a simultaneous neutron diffraction analysis. Tantalum, zirconium, and gallium atoms are found to occupy the mixed octahedral position (symmetry 32). Gallium atoms and a few zirconium atoms are in the position on axis 2 in the tetrahedron. The tetrahedral position on axis 3 is completely occupied by gallium atoms, while the large polyhedron on axis 2 is occupied by lanthanum atoms. The high resolution and averaging of the results obtained in two independent X-ray experiments with the same sample provided accu- rate structural data, in particular, on the anharmonicity of thermal atomic vibrations (atomic displacements). The X-ray and neutron diffraction data on the atomic displacements are compared.

  12. X-ray structure determination and deuteration of nattokinase

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, Yasuhide; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Naito, Sawa; Ohsugi, Tadanori; Yatagai, Chieko; Sumi, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Akio; Chiba-Kamosida, Kaori; Ogawa, Megumi; Adachi, Tatsumi; Morimoto, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    Nattokinase (NK) is a strong fibrinolytic enzyme, which is produced in abundance by Bacillus subtilis natto. Although NK is a member of the subtilisin family, it displays different substrate specificity when compared with other subtilisins. The results of molecular simulations predict that hydrogen arrangements around Ser221 at the active site probably account for the substrate specificity of NK. Therefore, neutron crystallographic analysis should provide valuable information that reveals the enzymatic mechanism of NK. In this report, the X-ray structure of the non-hydrogen form of undeuterated NK was determined, and the preparation of deuterated NK was successfully achieved. The non-hydrogen NK structure was determined at 1.74 Å resolution. The three-dimensional structures of NK and subtilisin E from Bacillus subtilis DB104 are near identical. Deuteration of NK was carried out by cultivating Bacillus subtilis natto in deuterated medium. The D2O resistant strain of Bacillus subtilis natto was obtained by successive cultivation rounds, in which the concentration of D2O in the medium was gradually increased. NK was purified from the culture medium and its activity was confirmed by the fibrin plate method. The results lay the framework for neutron protein crystallography analysis. PMID:24121331

  13. X-ray structure determination and deuteration of nattokinase.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Yasuhide; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Naito, Sawa; Ohsugi, Tadanori; Yatagai, Chieko; Sumi, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Akio; Chiba-Kamosida, Kaori; Ogawa, Megumi; Adachi, Tatsumi; Morimoto, Yukio

    2013-11-01

    Nattokinase (NK) is a strong fibrinolytic enzyme, which is produced in abundance by Bacillus subtilis natto. Although NK is a member of the subtilisin family, it displays different substrate specificity when compared with other subtilisins. The results of molecular simulations predict that hydrogen arrangements around Ser221 at the active site probably account for the substrate specificity of NK. Therefore, neutron crystallographic analysis should provide valuable information that reveals the enzymatic mechanism of NK. In this report, the X-ray structure of the non-hydrogen form of undeuterated NK was determined, and the preparation of deuterated NK was successfully achieved. The non-hydrogen NK structure was determined at 1.74 Å resolution. The three-dimensional structures of NK and subtilisin E from Bacillus subtilis DB104 are near identical. Deuteration of NK was carried out by cultivating Bacillus subtilis natto in deuterated medium. The D2O resistant strain of Bacillus subtilis natto was obtained by successive cultivation rounds, in which the concentration of D2O in the medium was gradually increased. NK was purified from the culture medium and its activity was confirmed by the fibrin plate method. The results lay the framework for neutron protein crystallography analysis.

  14. Tackling the crystallographic structure determination of the COP9 signalosome

    PubMed Central

    Bunker, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    The COP9 signalosome (CSN) is an essential multi-protein complex in eukaryotes. CSN is a master regulator of intracellular protein degradation, controlling the vast family of cullin–RING ubiquitin (E3) ligases (CRLs). Important in many cellular processes, CSN has prominent roles in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and differentiation. The recent crystal structure of human CSN provides insight into its exquisite regulation and functionality [Lingaraju et al. (2014 ▸), Nature (London), 512, 161–165]. Structure determination was complicated by low-resolution diffraction from crystals affected by twinning and rotational pseudo-symmetry. Crystal instability and non-isomorphism strongly influenced by flash-cooling, radiation damage and difficulty in obtaining heavy-atom derivatives, were overcome. Many different subunits of the same fold class were distinguished at low resolution aided by combinatorial selenomethionine labelling. As an example of how challenging projects can be approached, the structure determination of CSN is described as it unfolded using cluster-compound MIRAS phasing, MR-SAD with electron-density models and cross-crystal averaging exploiting non-isomorphism among unit-cell variants of the same crystal form. PMID:26960120

  15. Velocity Structure Determination Through Seismic Waveform Modeling and Time Deviations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, B.; Zhu, L.; Tan, Y.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2001-12-01

    Through the use of seismic waveforms recorded by TriNet, a dataset of earthquake focal mechanisms and deviations (time shifts) relative to a standard model facilitates the investigation of the crust and uppermost mantle of southern California. The CAP method of focal mechanism determination, in use by TriNet on a routine basis, provides time shifts for surface waves and Pnl arrivals independently relative to the reference model. These shifts serve as initial data for calibration of local and regional seismic paths. Time shifts from the CAP method are derived by splitting the Pnl section of the waveform, the first arriving Pn to just before the arrival of the S wave, from the much slower surface waves then cross-correlating the data with synthetic waveforms computed from a standard model. Surface waves interact with the entire crust, but the upper crust causes the greatest effect. Whereas, Pnl arrivals sample the deeper crust, upper mantle, and source region. This natural division separates the upper from lower crust for regional calibration and structural modeling and allows 3-D velocity maps to be created using the resulting time shifts. Further examination of Pnl and other arrivals which interact with the Moho illuminate the complex nature of this boundary. Initial attempts at using the first 10 seconds of the Pnl section to determine upper most mantle structure have proven insightful. Two large earthquakes north of southern California in Nevada and Mammoth Lakes, CA allow the creation of record sections from 200 to 600 km. As the paths swing from east to west across southern California, simple 1-D models turn into complex structure, dramatically changing the waveform character. Using finite difference models to explain the structure, we determine that a low velocity zone is present at the base of the crust and extends to 100 km in depth. Velocity variations of 5 percent of the mantle in combination with steeply sloping edges produces complex waveform variations

  16. Accurate Prediction of Glucuronidation of Structurally Diverse Phenolics by Human UGT1A9 Using Combined Experimental and In Silico Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Baojian; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Shuxing; Hu, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The catalytic selectivity of human UGT1A9, an important membrane-bound enzyme catalyzing glucuronidation of xenobiotics were determined experimentally using 145 phenolics, and analyzed by 3D-QSAR methods. Methods The catalytic efficiency of UGT1A9 was determined by kinetic profiling. Quantitative structure activity relationships were analyzed using the CoMFA and CoMSIA techniques. Molecular alignment of the substrate structures was made by superimposing the glucuronidation site and its adjacent aromatic ring to achieve maximal steric overlap. For a substrate with multiple active glucuronidation sites, each site was considered as a separate substrate. Results The 3D-QSAR analyses produced statistically reliable models with good predictive power (CoMFA: q2 = 0.548, r2= 0.949, r2pred = 0.775; CoMSIA: q2 = 0.579, r2= 0.876, r2pred = 0.700). The contour coefficient maps were applied to elucidate structural features among substrates that are responsible for the selectivity differences. Furthermore, the contour coefficient maps were overlaid in the catalytic pocket of a homology model of UGT1A9; this enabled us to identify the UGT1A9 catalytic pocket with a high degree of confidence. Conclusion The CoMFA/CoMSIA models can predict the substrate selectivity and in vitro clearance of UGT1A9. Our findings also provide a possible molecular basis for understanding UGT1A9 functions and its substrate selectivity. PMID:22302521

  17. On the determination of the crystal-vapor surface free energy, and why a Gaussian expression can be accurate for a system far from Gaussian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modak, Viraj P.; Wyslouzil, Barbara E.; Singer, Sherwin J.

    2016-08-01

    The crystal-vapor surface free energy γ is an important physical parameter governing physical processes, such as wetting and adhesion. We explore exact and approximate routes to calculate γ based on cleaving an intact crystal into non-interacting sub-systems with crystal-vapor interfaces. We do this by turning off the interactions, ΔV, between the sub-systems. Using the soft-core scheme for turning off ΔV, we find that the free energy varies smoothly with the coupling parameter λ, and a single thermodynamic integration yields the exact γ. We generate another exact method, and a cumulant expansion for γ by expressing the surface free energy in terms of an average of e-βΔV in the intact crystal. The second cumulant, or Gaussian approximation for γ is surprisingly accurate in most situations, even though we find that the underlying probability distribution for ΔV is clearly not Gaussian. We account for this fact by developing a non-Gaussian theory for γ and find that the difference between the non-Gaussian and Gaussian expressions for γ consist of terms that are negligible in many situations. Exact and approximate methods are applied to the (111) surface of a Lennard-Jones crystal and are also tested for more complex molecular solids, the surface of octane and nonadecane. Alkane surfaces were chosen for study because their crystal-vapor surface free energy has been of particular interest for understanding surface freezing in these systems.

  18. On the determination of the crystal-vapor surface free energy, and why a Gaussian expression can be accurate for a system far from Gaussian.

    PubMed

    Modak, Viraj P; Wyslouzil, Barbara E; Singer, Sherwin J

    2016-08-07

    The crystal-vapor surface free energy γ is an important physical parameter governing physical processes, such as wetting and adhesion. We explore exact and approximate routes to calculate γ based on cleaving an intact crystal into non-interacting sub-systems with crystal-vapor interfaces. We do this by turning off the interactions, ΔV, between the sub-systems. Using the soft-core scheme for turning off ΔV, we find that the free energy varies smoothly with the coupling parameter λ, and a single thermodynamic integration yields the exact γ. We generate another exact method, and a cumulant expansion for γ by expressing the surface free energy in terms of an average of e(-βΔV) in the intact crystal. The second cumulant, or Gaussian approximation for γ is surprisingly accurate in most situations, even though we find that the underlying probability distribution for ΔV is clearly not Gaussian. We account for this fact by developing a non-Gaussian theory for γ and find that the difference between the non-Gaussian and Gaussian expressions for γ consist of terms that are negligible in many situations. Exact and approximate methods are applied to the (111) surface of a Lennard-Jones crystal and are also tested for more complex molecular solids, the surface of octane and nonadecane. Alkane surfaces were chosen for study because their crystal-vapor surface free energy has been of particular interest for understanding surface freezing in these systems.

  19. Accurate determination of the reaction course in HY2 <−> Y + YH (Y = O, S): detailed analysis of the covalent- to hydrogen-bonding transition.

    PubMed

    Varandas, A J C

    2013-08-15

    The accurate prediction of a bond-breaking/bond-forming reaction course is useful but very difficult. Toward this goal, a cost-effective multireference scheme (A. J. C. Varandas, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2012, 8, 428) is tested that provides a generalization of the Hartree-Fock plus dispersion model for closed-shell interactions, and hence is based on the popular but largely untested idea of performing single point calculations with a high-level method at stationary points or along paths located using a lower level method. The energetics so calculated for the reaction HO2 <−> O + OH is predicted in excellent agreement with the experimental data, whereas the reaction path shows a scar at the onset of hydrogen-bonding: a weak van der Waals type minimum separated from the deep covalent well by a small barrier, all below the O + OH asymptote. The O-OH long-range interaction potential is also examined and possible implications in reaction dynamics discussed. Corresponding attributes for the reaction HS2 <−> S + SH are predicted, in good agreement with the best theoretical and experimental results. A perspective on the general utility of the approach is presented.

  20. High-resolution photoelectron imaging of cold C{sub 60}{sup −} anions and accurate determination of the electron affinity of C{sub 60}

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Dao-Ling; Dau, Phuong Diem; Liu, Hong-Tao; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-06-14

    High-resolution photoelectron imaging and spectroscopy of cold C{sub 60}{sup −} anions are reported using a newly built photoelectron imaging apparatus coupled with an electrospray ionization source and a temperature-controlled cryogenic ion trap. Vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectra are obtained for the detachment transition from the ground state of C{sub 60}{sup −} to that of C{sub 60} at various detachment wavelengths from 354.84 nm to 461.35 nm. The electron affinity of C{sub 60} is accurately measured to be 2.6835 ± 0.0006 eV. Numerous unexpected vibrational excitations are observed in the photoelectron spectra due to the Jahn-Teller effect in C{sub 60}{sup −} and Hertzberg-Teller vibronic coupling in both C{sub 60}{sup −} and C{sub 60}. Both the relative intensities of vibrational peaks and their photoelectron angular distributions provide evidence for the vibronic couplings. The observed p-wave-like behavior in the angular distribution of the 0{sub 0}{sup 0} transition suggests that the electron is detached from an s-type orbital.

  1. Solving a generalized distance geometry problem for protein structure determination.

    PubMed

    Sit, Atilla; Wu, Zhijun

    2011-12-01

    We propose a new approach to the problem of determining an ensemble of protein structures with a set of interatomic distance bounds in NMR protein modeling. Similarly to X-ray crystallography, we assume that the protein has an equilibrium structure and the atoms fluctuate around their equilibrium positions. Then, the problem can be formulated as a generalized distance geometry problem, to find the equilibrium positions and maximal possible fluctuation radii for the atoms in the protein, subject to the condition that the fluctuations should be within the given distance bounds. We describe the scientific background of the work, the motivation of the new approach and the formulation of the problem. We develop a geometric buildup algorithm for an approximate solution to the problem and present some preliminary test results as a first step concept proofing. We also discuss related theoretical and computational issues and potential impacts of this work in NMR protein modeling.

  2. Structure Determination of Natural Products by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Du.

    High-field NMR experiments were used to determine the full structures of six new natural products extracted from plants. These are: four saponins (PT-2, P1, P2 and P3) from the plant Alphitonia zizyphoides found in Samoa; one sesquiterpene (DF-4) from Douglas fir and one diterpene derivative (E-2) from a Chinese medicinal herb. By concerted use of various 1D and 2D NMR techniques, the structures of the above compounds were established and complete resonance assignments were achieved. The 2D INADEQUATE technique coupled with a computerized spectral analysis was extensively used. When carried out on concentrations as low as 60 mg of sample, this technique provided absolute confirmation of the assignments for 35 of the possible 53 C-C bonds for PT-2. On 30 mg of sample of E-21, it revealed 22 of 28 possible C-C bonds.

  3. Theoretical challenge to the experimentally determined geometrical structure of dimethylsilaethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshioka, Yasunori; Goddard, John D.; Schaefer, III, Henry F.

    1981-05-01

    The equilibrium geometries of (CH3)2Si=CH2 and H{2Si=CH2 have been determined at the self-consistent-field level of electronic structure theory using a double zeta basis set augmented with d functions on all heavy atoms. For the parent silaethylene, large scale configuration interaction (6920 configurations) demonstrates that electron correlation effects do not qualitatively alter the predicted structure. Because of this, it is concluded that the experimental electron diffraction geometry of Mahaffy, Gutowsky, and Montgomery is likely to be seriously incorrect. Specifically the theoretical prediction for the dimethylsilaethylene Si=C distance is 1.692 Å, while the range of experimental values presented was 1.815 - 1.835 Å.

  4. Application of SAIL phenylalanine and tyrosine with alternative isotope-labeling patterns for protein structure determination.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Ono, Akira M; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2010-01-01

    The extensive collection of NOE constraint data involving the aromatic ring signals is essential for accurate protein structure determination, although it is often hampered in practice by the pervasive signal overlapping and tight spin couplings for aromatic rings. We have prepared various types of stereo-array isotope labeled phenylalanines (epsilon- and zeta-SAIL Phe) and tyrosine (epsilon-SAIL Tyr) to overcome these problems (Torizawa et al. 2005), and proven that these SAIL amino acids provide dramatic spectral simplification and sensitivity enhancement for the aromatic ring NMR signals. In addition to these SAIL aromatic amino acids, we recently synthesized delta-SAIL Phe and delta-SAIL Tyr, which allow us to observe and assign delta-(13)C/(1)H signals very efficiently. Each of the various types of SAIL Phe and SAIL Tyr yields well-resolved resonances for the delta-, epsilon- or zeta-(13)C/(1)H signals, respectively, which can readily be assigned by simple and robust pulse sequences. Since the delta-, epsilon-, and zeta-proton signals of Phe/Tyr residues give rise to complementary NOE constraints, the concomitant use of various types of SAIL-Phe and SAIL-Tyr would generate more accurate protein structures, as compared to those obtained by using conventional uniformly (13)C, (15)N-double labeled proteins. We illustrated this with the case of an 18.2 kDa protein, Escherichia coli peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase b (EPPIb), and concluded that the combined use of zeta-SAIL Phe and epsilon-SAIL Tyr would be practically the best choice for protein structural determinations.

  5. A use of Ramachandran potentials in protein solution structure determinations.

    PubMed

    Bertini, Ivano; Cavallaro, Gabriele; Luchinat, Claudio; Poli, Irene

    2003-08-01

    A strategy is developed to use database-derived phi-psi constraints during simulated annealing procedures for protein solution structure determination in order to improve the Ramachandran plot statistics, while maintaining the agreement with the experimental constraints as the sole criterion for the selection of the family. The procedure, fully automated, consists of two consecutive simulated annealing runs. In the first run, the database-derived phi-psi constraints are enforced for all amino acids (but prolines and glycines). A family of structures is then selected on the ground of the lowest violations of the experimental constraints only, and the phi-psi values for each residue are examined. In the second and final run, the database-derived phi-psi constraints are enforced only for those residues which in the first run have ended in one and the same favored phi-psi region. For residues which are either spread over different favored regions or concentrated in disallowed regions, the constraints are not enforced. The final family is then selected, after the second run, again only based on the agreement with the experimental constraints. This automated approach was implemented in DYANA and was tested on as many as 12 proteins, including some containing paramagnetic metals, whose structures had been previously solved in our laboratory. The quality of the structures, and of Ramachandran plot statistics in particular, was notably improved while preserving the agreement with the experimental constraints.

  6. The Phenix software for automated determination of macromolecular structures.

    PubMed

    Adams, Paul D; Afonine, Pavel V; Bunkóczi, Gábor; Chen, Vincent B; Echols, Nathaniel; Headd, Jeffrey J; Hung, Li-Wei; Jain, Swati; Kapral, Gary J; Grosse Kunstleve, Ralf W; McCoy, Airlie J; Moriarty, Nigel W; Oeffner, Robert D; Read, Randy J; Richardson, David C; Richardson, Jane S; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Zwart, Peter H

    2011-09-01

    X-ray crystallography is a critical tool in the study of biological systems. It is able to provide information that has been a prerequisite to understanding the fundamentals of life. It is also a method that is central to the development of new therapeutics for human disease. Significant time and effort are required to determine and optimize many macromolecular structures because of the need for manual interpretation of complex numerical data, often using many different software packages, and the repeated use of interactive three-dimensional graphics. The Phenix software package has been developed to provide a comprehensive system for macromolecular crystallographic structure solution with an emphasis on automation. This has required the development of new algorithms that minimize or eliminate subjective input in favor of built-in expert-systems knowledge, the automation of procedures that are traditionally performed by hand, and the development of a computational framework that allows a tight integration between the algorithms. The application of automated methods is particularly appropriate in the field of structural proteomics, where high throughput is desired. Features in Phenix for the automation of experimental phasing with subsequent model building, molecular replacement, structure refinement and validation are described and examples given of running Phenix from both the command line and graphical user interface.

  7. Shallow lunar structure determined from the passive seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Dorman, J.; Duennebier, F.; Lammlein, D.; Latham, G.

    1975-01-01

    Data relevant to the shallow structure of the moon obtained at the Apollo seismic stations are compared with previously published results of the active seismic experiments. It is concluded that the lunar surface is covered by a layer of low seismic velocity which appears to be equivalent to the lunar regolith defined previously by geological observations. This layer is underlain by a zone of distinctly higher seismic velocity at all of the Apollo landing sites. The regolith thicknesses at the Apollo 11, 12, and 15 sites are estimated from the shear-wave resonance to be 4.4, 3.7, and 4.4 m, respectively. These thicknesses and those determined at the other Apollo sites by the active seismic experiments appear to be correlated with the age determinations and the abundances of extralunar components at the sites.

  8. Toward structure determination using membrane-protein nanocrystals and microcrystals

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Mark S.; Fromme, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Membrane proteins are very important for all living cells, being involved in respiration, photosynthesis, cellular uptake and signal transduction, amongst other vital functions. However, less than 300 unique membrane protein structures have been determined to date, often due to difficulties associated with the growth of sufficiently large and well-ordered crystals. This work has been focused on showing the first proof of concept for using membrane protein nanocrystals and microcrystals for high-resolution structure determination. Upon determining that crystals of the membrane protein Photosystem I, which is the largest and most complex membrane protein crystallized to date, exist with only a hundred unit cells with sizes of less than 200 nm on an edge, work was done to develop a technique that could exploit the growth of the Photosystem I nanocrystals and microcrystals. Femtosecond X-ray protein nanocrystallography was developed for use at the first high-energy X-ray free electron laser, the LCLS at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, in which a liquid jet brought fully-hydrated Photosystem I nanocrystals into the interaction region of the pulsed X-ray source. Diffraction patterns were recorded from millions of individual PSI nanocrystals and data from thousands of different, randomly oriented crystallites were integrated using Monte Carlo integration of the peak intensities. The short pulses (~ 70 fs) provided by the LCLS allowed the possibility to collect the diffraction data before the onset of radiation damage, exploiting the diffract-before-destroy principle. During the initial experiments at the AMO beamline using 6.9-Å wavelength, Bragg peaks were recorded to 8.5-Å resolution, and an electron-density map was determined that did not show any effects of X-ray-induced radiation damage [Chapman H.N., et al. Femtosecond X-ray protein nanocrystallography, Nature 470 (2011) 73–81]. Many additional techniques still need to be developed to explore the

  9. Applications of polarizable continuum models to determine accurate solution-phase thermochemical values across a broad range of cation charge - the case of U(III-VI).

    PubMed

    Parmar, Payal; Samuels, Alex; Clark, Aurora E

    2015-01-13

    Contributing factors to the solution-phase correction to the free energy of the molecular clusters U(H2O)n(3+/4+) and UO2(H2O)m(1+/2+) (n = 8, 9, 30, 41, 77; m = 4, 5, 30, 41, 77) have been examined as a function of cavity type in the integrated-equation-formalism-protocol (IEF) and SMD polarizable continuum models (PCMs). It is observed that the free energy correction, Gcorr, does not smoothly converge to zero as the number of explicitly solvating water molecules approaches the bulk limit, and the convergence behavior varies significantly with cavity and model. The rates of convergence of the gas-phase hydration energy, ΔGhyd, wherein the bare metal ion is inserted into a molecular water cluster and ΔGcorr for the reaction exhibit wide variations as a function of ion charge, cavity, and model. This is the likely source of previously reported discrepancies in predicted free energies of solvation for metal ions when using different PCM cavities and/or models. The cancellation of errors in ΔGhyd and ΔGcorr is optimal for clusters consisting of only a second solvation shell of explicit water molecules (n = m = 30). The UFF cavity within IEF, in particular, exhibits the most consistent cancellation of errors when using a molecular cluster consisting of a second shell of solvating water for all oxidation states of uranium, leading to accurate free energies of solvation ΔGsolv for these species.

  10. New Photometry and Spectra of AB Doradus C: An Accurate Mass Determination of a Young Low-Mass Object with Theoretical Evolutionary Tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Laird M.; Thatte, Niranjan; Nielsen, Eric L.; Abuter, Roberto; Clarke, Fraser; Tecza, Matthias

    2007-08-01

    We present new photometric and spectroscopic measurements for the unique, young, low-mass evolutionary track calibrator AB Dor C. While the new Ks photometry is similar to that we have previously published, the spectral type is found to be much earlier. Based on new H and K IFS spectra of AB Dor C from Thatte et al. (Paper I), we adopt a spectral type of M5.5+/-1.0 for AB Dor C. This is considerably earlier than the M8+/-1 previously estimated by Close et al. and Nielsen et al. yet is consistent with the M6+/-1 independently derived by Luhman & Potter. However, the spectrum presented in Paper I and analyzed here is a significant improvement over any previous spectrum of AB Dor C. We also present new astrometry for the system, which further supports a 0.090+/-0.005 Msolar mass for the system. Once armed with an accurate spectrum and Ks flux, we find L=0.0021+/-0.0005 Lsolar and Teff=2925+170-145 K for AB Dor C. These values are consistent with a ~75 Myr, 0.090+/-0.005 Msolar object like AB Dor C according to the DUSTY evolutionary tracks. Hence, masses can be estimated from the H-R diagram with the DUSTY tracks for young low-mass objects such as AB Dor C. However, we cautiously note that underestimates of the mass from the tracks can occur if one lacks a proper (continuum-preserved) spectrum or is relying on near-infrared fluxes alone. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the Paranal Observatories under program 276.C-5013.

  11. Performance of a Micro-Strip Gas Chamber for event wise, high rate thermal neutron detection with accurate 2D position determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindur, B.; Alimov, S.; Fiutowski, T.; Schulz, C.; Wilpert, T.

    2014-12-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) position sensitive detector for neutron scattering applications based on low-pressure gas amplification and micro-strip technology was built and tested with an innovative readout electronics and data acquisition system. This detector contains a thin solid neutron converter and was developed for time- and thus wavelength-resolved neutron detection in single-event counting mode, which improves the image contrast in comparison with integrating detectors. The prototype detector of a Micro-Strip Gas Chamber (MSGC) was built with a solid natGd/CsI thermal neutron converter for spatial resolutions of about 100 μm and counting rates up to 107 neutrons/s. For attaining very high spatial resolutions and counting rates via micro-strip readout with centre-of-gravity evaluation of the signal amplitude distributions, a fast, channel-wise, self-triggering ASIC was developed. The front-end chips (MSGCROCs), which are very first signal processing components, are read out into powerful ADC-FPGA boards for on-line data processing and thereafter via Gigabit Ethernet link into the data receiving PC. The workstation PC is controlled by a modular, high performance dedicated software suite. Such a fast and accurate system is crucial for efficient radiography/tomography, diffraction or imaging applications based on high flux thermal neutron beam. In this paper a brief description of the detector concept with its operation principles, readout electronics requirements and design together with the signals processing stages performed in hardware and software are presented. In more detail the neutron test beam conditions and measurement results are reported. The focus of this paper is on the system integration, two dimensional spatial resolution, the time resolution of the readout system and the imaging capabilities of the overall setup. The detection efficiency of the detector prototype is estimated as well.

  12. Accurate determination of ¹²⁹I concentrations and ¹²⁹I/¹³⁷Cs ratios in spent nuclear resins by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nottoli, Emmanuelle; Bienvenu, Philippe; Labet, Alexandre; Bourlès, Didier; Arnold, Maurice; Bertaux, Maité

    2014-04-01

    Determining long-lived radionuclide concentrations in radioactive waste has fundamental implications for the long-term management of storage sites. This paper focuses on the measurement of low (129)I contents in ion exchange resins used for primary fluid purification in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR). Iodine-129 concentrations were successfully determined using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) following a chemical procedure which included (1) acid digestion of resin samples in HNO3/HClO4, (2) radioactive decontamination by selective iodine extraction using a new chromatographic resin (CL Resin), and (3) AgI precipitation. Measured (129)I concentrations ranged from 4 to 12 ng/g, i.e. from 0.03 to 0.08 Bq/g. The calculation of (129)I/(137)Cs activity ratios used for routine waste management produced values in agreement with the few available data for PWR resin samples.

  13. Application of a modified Haug and Lantzsch method for the rapid and accurate photometrical phytate determination in soybean, wheat, and maize meals.

    PubMed

    Reichwald, Kirsten; Hatzack, Frank

    2008-05-14

    A modified version of the Haug and Lantzsch method for rapid photometrical phytate determination was applied for the analysis of phytate in soybean, wheat, and maize meals. In comparison to the original protocol, the amount of the toxic reagent thioglycolic acid is reduced substantially to minimize potential health risks for laboratory personnel. Different extraction conditions for soybean meal were tested, and boiling for at least 30 min was found to be necessary to remove an interfering compound in soybean meal extracts. Phytate contents determined according to the modified Haug and Lantzsch method did not differ from those obtained by measuring total precipitated phosphorus or by sensitive and specific high-performance ion chromatography. Applicability and accuracy of the modified method for phytate analysis in major feed substrates, including soy-based textured vegetable protein, were demonstrated.

  14. Structural determinants of tobacco vein mottling virus protease substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping; Austin, Brian P; Tözsér, József; Waugh, David S

    2010-11-01

    Tobacco vein mottling virus (TVMV) is a member of the Potyviridae, one of the largest families of plant viruses. The TVMV genome is translated into a single large polyprotein that is subsequently processed by three virally encoded proteases. Seven of the nine cleavage events are carried out by the NIa protease. Its homolog from the tobacco etch virus (TEV) is a widely used reagent for the removal of affinity tags from recombinant proteins. Although TVMV protease is a close relative of TEV protease, they exhibit distinct sequence specificities. We report here the crystal structure of a catalytically inactive mutant TVMV protease (K65A/K67A/C151A) in complex with a canonical peptide substrate (Ac-RETVRFQSD) at 1.7-Å resolution. As observed in several crystal structures of TEV protease, the C-terminus (∼20 residues) of TVMV protease is disordered. Unexpectedly, although deleting the disordered residues from TEV protease reduces its catalytic activity by ∼10-fold, an analogous truncation mutant of TVMV protease is significantly more active. Comparison of the structures of TEV and TVMV protease in complex with their respective canonical substrate peptides reveals that the S3 and S4 pockets are mainly responsible for the differing substrate specificities. The structure of TVMV protease suggests that it is less tolerant of variation at the P1' position than TEV protease. This conjecture was confirmed experimentally by determining kinetic parameters k(cat) and K(m) for a series of oligopeptide substrates. Also, as predicted by the cocrystal structure, we confirm that substitutions in the P6 position are more readily tolerated by TVMV than TEV protease.

  15. Structural determinants of tobacco vein mottling virus protease substrate specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ping; Austin, Brian P.; Tozer, Jozsef; Waugh, David

    2010-10-28

    Tobacco vein mottling virus (TVMV) is a member of the Potyviridae, one of the largest families of plant viruses. The TVMV genome is translated into a single large polyprotein that is subsequently processed by three virally encoded proteases. Seven of the nine cleavage events are carried out by the NIa protease. Its homolog from the tobacco etch virus (TEV) is a widely used reagent for the removal of affinity tags from recombinant proteins. Although TVMV protease is a close relative of TEV protease, they exhibit distinct sequence specificities. We report here the crystal structure of a catalytically inactive mutant TVMV protease (K65A/K67A/C151A) in complex with a canonical peptide substrate (Ac-RETVRFQSD) at 1.7-{angstrom} resolution. As observed in several crystal structures of TEV protease, the C-terminus ({approx}20 residues) of TVMV protease is disordered. Unexpectedly, although deleting the disordered residues from TEV protease reduces its catalytic activity by {approx}10-fold, an analogous truncation mutant of TVMV protease is significantly more active. Comparison of the structures of TEV and TVMV protease in complex with their respective canonical substrate peptides reveals that the S3 and S4 pockets are mainly responsible for the differing substrate specificities. The structure of TVMV protease suggests that it is less tolerant of variation at the P1{prime} position than TEV protease. This conjecture was confirmed experimentally by determining kinetic parameters k{sub cat} and K{sub m} for a series of oligopeptide substrates. Also, as predicted by the cocrystal structure, we confirm that substitutions in the P6 position are more readily tolerated by TVMV than TEV protease.

  16. Eddy current measurement system evaluation for corrosion depth determination on cast aluminum aircraft structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Surendra; Greving, Dan; Kinney, Andy; Vensel, Fred; Ohm, Jim; Peeler, Mike

    2013-01-01

    An eddy current (EC) technique was developed to determine the corrosion depth on a bare flange face of a cast aluminum A356-T6 aircraft engine structure. The EC response and the corrosion depths determined through metallurgical cross sections were used to develop an empirical relation between EC response and depth. The EC technique and depth determination are used to inspect the engine structures during overhaul to determine if they are fit for continued service. An accurate and reliable Non-Destructive Inspection is required to ensure that structures returned to service are safe for continued operation. NDE system reliability demonstrations of the eddy current technique are traditionally reported in terms of Probability of Detection (POD) data using MIL-HDBK-1823A. However, the calculation of POD data is based on a simple linear predictive model that is valid only if certain criteria are met. These are: 1) NDE system response is measurable (i.e. continuous data), 2) Flaw size is known and measurable (i.e. continuous data), 3) relationship between the NDE system response and flaw size is linear (or linear on a log scale), 4) variation in measured responseresponse around a predicted response for a given flaw size is normally distributed, 5) the variation around the predicted response is constant (i.e. variation does not change with flaw size), and 6) inherent variability in the NDE system is known and fully understood. In this work, a Measurement System Evaluation (MSE) of the Eddy Current System was used to address some of these concerns. This work was completed on two aircraft structures having varying corrosion depths. The data were acquired in a random manner at fifty regions of interests (ROIs). Three operators participated in this study, and each operator measured Eddy Current response three times in each ROI. In total, there were four hundred and fifty data points collected. Following this, the two structures were sectioned for measuring corrosion depth. The

  17. Effect of chemical fixatives on accurate preservation of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis structure in cells prepared by freeze-substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, L.L.; Beveridge, T.J. )

    1990-04-01

    Five chemical fixatives were evaluated for their ability to accurately preserve bacterial ultrastructure during freeze-substitution of select Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis strains. Radioisotopes were specifically incorporated into the peptidoglycan, lipopolysaccharide, and nucleic acids of E. coli SFK11 and W7 and into the peptidoglycan and RNA of B. subtilis 168 and W23. The ease of extraction of radiolabels, as assessed by liquid scintillation counting during all stages of processing for freeze-substitution, was used as an indicator of cell structural integrity and retention of cellular chemical composition. Subsequent visual examination by electron microscopy was used to confirm ultrastructural conformation. The fixatives used were: 2% (wt/vol) osmium tetroxide and 2% (wt/vol) uranyl acetate; 2% (vol/vol) glutaraldehyde and 2% (wt/vol) uranyl acetate; 2% (vol/vol) acrolein and 2% (wt/vol) uranyl acetate; 2% (wt/vol) gallic acid; and 2% (wt/vol) uranyl acetate. All fixatives were prepared in a substitution solvent of anhydrous acetone. Extraction of cellular constituents depended on the chemical fixative used. A combination of 2% osmium tetroxide-2% uranyl acetate or 2% gallic acid alone resulted in optimum fixation as ascertained by least extraction of radiolabels. In both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms, high levels of radiolabel were detected in the processing fluids in which 2% acrolein-2% uranyl acetate, 2% glutaraldehyde-2% uranyl acetate, or 2% uranyl acetate alone were used as fixatives. Ultrastructural variations were observed in cells freeze-substituted in the presence of different chemical fixatives. We recommend the use of osmium tetroxide and uranyl acetate in acetone for routine freeze-substitution of eubacteria, while gallic acid is recommended for use when microanalytical processing necessitates the omission of osmium.

  18. Global search algorithms in surface structure determination using photoelectron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, D. A.; Choi, J. I. J.; Woodruff, D. P.

    2012-02-01

    Three different algorithms to effect global searches of the variable-parameter hyperspace are compared for application to the determination of surface structure using the technique of scanned-energy mode photoelectron diffraction (PhD). Specifically, a new method not previously used in any surface science methods, the swarm-intelligence-based particle swarm optimisation (PSO) method, is presented and its results compared with implementations of fast simulated annealing (FSA) and a genetic algorithm (GA). These three techniques have been applied to experimental data from three adsorption structures that had previously been solved by standard trial-and-error methods, namely H2O on TiO2(110), SO2 on Ni(111) and CN on Cu(111). The performance of the three algorithms is compared to the results of a purely random sampling of the structural parameter hyperspace. For all three adsorbate systems, the PSO out-performs the other techniques as a fitting routine, although for two of the three systems studied the advantage relative to the GA and random sampling approaches is modest. The implementation of FSA failed to achieve acceptable fits in these tests.

  19. BIOACCESSIBILITY TESTS ACCURATELY ESTIMATE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hazards of soil-borne Pb to wild birds may be more accurately quantified if the bioavailability of that Pb is known. To better understand the bioavailability of Pb to birds, we measured blood Pb concentrations in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) fed diets containing Pb-contaminated soils. Relative bioavailabilities were expressed by comparison with blood Pb concentrations in quail fed a Pb acetate reference diet. Diets containing soil from five Pb-contaminated Superfund sites had relative bioavailabilities from 33%-63%, with a mean of about 50%. Treatment of two of the soils with P significantly reduced the bioavailability of Pb. The bioaccessibility of the Pb in the test soils was then measured in six in vitro tests and regressed on bioavailability. They were: the “Relative Bioavailability Leaching Procedure” (RBALP) at pH 1.5, the same test conducted at pH 2.5, the “Ohio State University In vitro Gastrointestinal” method (OSU IVG), the “Urban Soil Bioaccessible Lead Test”, the modified “Physiologically Based Extraction Test” and the “Waterfowl Physiologically Based Extraction Test.” All regressions had positive slopes. Based on criteria of slope and coefficient of determination, the RBALP pH 2.5 and OSU IVG tests performed very well. Speciation by X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that, on average, most of the Pb in the sampled soils was sorbed to minerals (30%), bound to organic matter 24%, or present as Pb sulfate 18%. Ad

  20. Distribution of nuclear bomb Pu in Nishiyama area, Nagasaki, estimated by accurate and precise determination of 240Pu/239Pu ratio in soils.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, S; Muramatsu, Y; Yamazaki, S; Ban-Nai, T

    2007-01-01

    Plutonium isotopes in forest soils collected in Nishiyama area, Nagasaki, were successfully determined by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after the treatment with a microwave decomposition system. The (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios observed in the samples in the Nishiyama area were obviously lower than the range of the global fallout. The low ratios (minimum 0.032) observed in Nishiyama area indicated the influence of detonation of the Pu nuclear weapon in 1945. Since the area is contaminated also by global fallout, the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio can be more sensitive indicator of bomb-derived Pu than Pu activity concentration.

  1. Determination of structure parameters in strong-field tunneling ionization theory of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Songfeng; Jin Cheng; Le, Anh-Thu; Lin, C. D.; Jiang, T. F.

    2010-03-15

    In the strong field molecular tunneling ionization theory of Tong et al. [Phys. Rev. A 66, 033402 (2002)], the ionization rate depends on the asymptotic wave function of the molecular orbital from which the electron is removed. The orbital wave functions obtained from standard quantum chemistry packages in general are not good enough in the asymptotic region. Here we construct a one-electron model potential for several linear molecules using density functional theory. We show that the asymptotic wave function can be improved with an iteration method and after one iteration accurate asymptotic wave functions and structure parameters are determined. With the new parameters we examine the alignment-dependent tunneling ionization probabilities for several molecules and compare with other calculations and with recent measurements, including ionization from inner molecular orbitals.

  2. Simple surface structure determination from Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Y. |; Shirley, D.A.

    1995-02-01

    The authors show by Fourier analyses of experimental data, with no further treatment, that the positions of all the strong peaks in Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) from adsorbed surfaces can be explicitly predicted from a trial structure with an accuracy of about {+-} 0.3 {angstrom} based on a single-scattering cluster model together with the concept of a strong backscattering cone, and without any additional analysis. This characteristic of ARPEFS Fourier transforms can be developed as a simple method for determining the structures of adsorbed surfaces to an accuracy of about {+-} 0.1 {angstrom}.

  3. Nanoscale structural features determined by AFM for single virus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shu-Wen W.; Odorico, Michael; Meillan, Matthieu; Vellutini, Luc; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Parot, Pierre; Bennetau, Bernard; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2013-10-01

    In this work, we propose ``single-image analysis'', as opposed to multi-image averaging, for extracting valuable information from AFM images of single bio-particles. This approach allows us to study molecular systems imaged by AFM under general circumstances without restrictions on their structural forms. As feature exhibition is a resolution correlation, we have performed AFM imaging on surfaces of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to demonstrate variations of structural patterns with probing resolution. Two AFM images were acquired with the same tip at different probing resolutions in terms of pixel width, i.e., 1.95 and 0.49 nm per pixel. For assessment, we have constructed an in silico topograph based on the three-dimensional crystal structure of TMV as a reference. The prominent artifacts observed in the AFM-determined shape of TMV were attributed to tip convolutions. The width of TMV rod was systematically overestimated by ~10 nm at both probing resolutions of AFM. Nevertheless, the effects of tip convolution were less severe in vertical orientation so that the estimated height of TMV by AFM imaging was in close agreement with the in silico X-ray topograph. Using dedicated image processing algorithms, we found that at low resolution (i.e., 1.95 nm per pixel), the extracted surface features of TMV can be interpreted as a partial or full helical repeat (three complete turns with ~7.0 nm in length), while individual protein subunits (~2.5 nm) were perceivable only at high resolution. The present study shows that the scales of revealed structural features in AFM images are subject to both probing resolution and processing algorithms for image analysis.

  4. WE-E-18A-03: How Accurately Can the Peak Skin Dose in Fluoroscopy Be Determined Using Indirect Dose Metrics?

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A; Pasciak, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Skin dosimetry is important for fluoroscopically-guided interventions, as peak skin doses (PSD) that Result in skin reactions can be reached during these procedures. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of different indirect dose estimates and to determine if PSD can be calculated within ±50% for embolization procedures. Methods: PSD were measured directly using radiochromic film for 41 consecutive embolization procedures. Indirect dose metrics from procedures were collected, including reference air kerma (RAK). Four different estimates of PSD were calculated and compared along with RAK to the measured PSD. The indirect estimates included a standard method, use of detailed information from the RDSR, and two simplified calculation methods. Indirect dosimetry was compared with direct measurements, including an analysis of uncertainty associated with film dosimetry. Factors affecting the accuracy of the indirect estimates were examined. Results: PSD calculated with the standard calculation method were within ±50% for all 41 procedures. This was also true for a simplified method using a single source-to-patient distance (SPD) for all calculations. RAK was within ±50% for all but one procedure. Cases for which RAK or calculated PSD exhibited large differences from the measured PSD were analyzed, and two causative factors were identified: ‘extreme’ SPD and large contributions to RAK from rotational angiography or runs acquired at large gantry angles. When calculated uncertainty limits [−12.8%, 10%] were applied to directly measured PSD, most indirect PSD estimates remained within ±50% of the measured PSD. Conclusions: Using indirect dose metrics, PSD can be determined within ±50% for embolization procedures, and usually to within ±35%. RAK can be used without modification to set notification limits and substantial radiation dose levels. These results can be extended to similar procedures, including vascular and interventional oncology

  5. Structural Determinants of Clostridium difficile Toxin A Glucosyltransferase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Pruitt, Rory N.; Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Farrow, Melissa A.; Friedman, David B.; Spiller, Ben; Lacy, D. Borden

    2012-03-28

    The principle virulence factors in Clostridium difficile pathogenesis are TcdA and TcdB, homologous glucosyltransferases capable of inactivating small GTPases within the host cell. We present crystal structures of the TcdA glucosyltransferase domain in the presence and absence of the co-substrate UDP-glucose. Although the enzymatic core is similar to that of TcdB, the proposed GTPase-binding surface differs significantly. We show that TcdA is comparable with TcdB in its modification of Rho family substrates and that, unlike TcdB, TcdA is also capable of modifying Rap family GTPases both in vitro and in cells. The glucosyltransferase activities of both toxins are reduced in the context of the holotoxin but can be restored with autoproteolytic activation and glucosyltransferase domain release. These studies highlight the importance of cellular activation in determining the array of substrates available to the toxins once delivered into the cell.

  6. Shape determination and control for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, C. J.

    1981-01-01

    An integral operator approach is used to derive solutions to static shape determination and control problems associated with large space structures. Problem assumptions include a linear self-adjoint system model, observations and control forces at discrete points, and performance criteria for the comparison of estimates or control forms. Results are illustrated by simulations in the one dimensional case with a flexible beam model, and in the multidimensional case with a finite model of a large space antenna. Modal expansions for terms in the solution algorithms are presented, using modes from the static or associated dynamic mode. These expansions provide approximated solutions in the event that a used form analytical solution to the system boundary value problem is not available.

  7. Annular dark field transmission electron microscopy for protein structure determination.

    PubMed

    Koeck, Philip J B

    2016-02-01

    Recently annular dark field (ADF) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been advocated as a means of recording images of biological specimens with better signal to noise ratio (SNR) than regular bright field images. I investigate whether and how such images could be used to determine the three-dimensional structure of proteins given that an ADF aperture with a suitable pass-band can be manufactured and used in practice. I develop an approximate theory of ADF-TEM image formation for weak amplitude and phase objects and test this theory using computer simulations. I also test whether these simulated images can be used to calculate a three-dimensional model of the protein using standard software and discuss problems and possible ways to overcome these.

  8. Impact of geometric mean imaging in the accurate determination of partial function in MAG3 renal scanning in a patient with retroperitoneal mass.

    PubMed

    Takesh, Mustafa; Zechmann, Christian M; Haufe, Sabine; Giesel, Frederik L; Kratochwil, Clemens

    2011-01-01

    Liposarcoma frequently occurs in the retroperitoneum and lower extremities, accounting for 20% of all mesenchymal malignancies. Liposarcomas vary by histology and can be classified into four types. Those four types are well differentiated, myxoid/round cell, pleomorphic and dedifferentiated. Due to retroperitoneal location of this tumor, it is expected to affect the kidney position. Renography has provided a unique tool for noninvasive evaluation of various functional parameters e.g. relative renal function. Most renography studies are carried out using the posterior view, under the assumption that the depths of both kidneys are similar so that the radiotracer counts in the region of interest will be attenuated to the same extent. Errors in estimation of the relative renal function may arise if the kidneys are at different depths e.g. secondary to a pushing tumor. Geometric mean imaging from combined anterior and posterior views helps to overcome this issue. This case shows the impact of geometric mean imaging in the truthful determination of partial function in patients with retroperitoneal liposarcoma.

  9. More accurate determination of the quantity of ice crystallized at low cooling rates in the glycerol and 1,2-propanediol aqueous solutions: comparison with equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Boutron, P

    1984-04-01

    It is generally assumed that when cells are cooled at rates close to those corresponding to the maximum of survival, once supercooling has ceased, above the eutectic melting temperature the extracellular ice is in equilibrium with the residual solution. This did not seem evident to us due to the difficulty of ice crystallization in cryoprotective solutions. The maximum quantities of ice crystallized in glycerol and 1,2-propanediol solutions have been calculated from the area of the solidification and fusion peaks obtained with a Perkin-Elmer DSC-2 differential scanning calorimeter. The accuracy has been improved by several corrections: better defined baseline, thermal variation of the heat of fusion of the ice, heat of solution of the water from its melting with the residual solution. More ice crystallizes in the glycerol than in the 1,2-propanediol solutions, of which the amorphous residue contains about 40 to 55% 1,2-propanediol. The equilibrium values are unknown in the presence of 1,2-propanediol. With glycerol, in our experiments, the maximum is first lower than the equilibrium but approaches it as the concentration increases. It is not completely determined by the colligative properties of the solutes.

  10. Accurate determination of arsenic in arsenobetaine standard solutions of BCR-626 and NMIJ CRM 7901-a by neutron activation analysis coupled with internal standard method.

    PubMed

    Miura, Tsutomu; Chiba, Koichi; Kuroiwa, Takayoshi; Narukawa, Tomohiro; Hioki, Akiharu; Matsue, Hideaki

    2010-09-15

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) coupled with an internal standard method was applied for the determination of As in the certified reference material (CRM) of arsenobetaine (AB) standard solutions to verify their certified values. Gold was used as an internal standard to compensate for the difference of the neutron exposure in an irradiation capsule and to improve the sample-to-sample repeatability. Application of the internal standard method significantly improved linearity of the calibration curve up to 1 microg of As, too. The analytical reliability of the proposed method was evaluated by k(0)-standardization NAA. The analytical results of As in AB standard solutions of BCR-626 and NMIJ CRM 7901-a were (499+/-55)mgkg(-1) (k=2) and (10.16+/-0.15)mgkg(-1) (k=2), respectively. These values were found to be 15-20% higher than the certified values. The between-bottle variation of BCR-626 was much larger than the expanded uncertainty of the certified value, although that of NMIJ CRM 7901-a was almost negligible.

  11. Protein structure determination with paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Ishita; Nadaud, Philippe S; Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2013-09-17

    Many structures of the proteins and protein assemblies that play central roles in fundamental biological processes and disease pathogenesis are not readily accessible via the conventional techniques of single-crystal X-ray diffraction and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). On the other hand, many of these challenging biological systems are suitable targets for atomic-level structural and dynamic analysis by magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that has far less stringent limitations on the molecular size and crystalline state. Over the past decade, major advances in instrumentation and methodology have prompted rapid growth in the field of biological solid-state NMR. However, despite this progress, one challenge for the elucidation of three-dimensional (3D) protein structures via conventional MAS NMR methods is the relative lack of long-distance data. Specifically, extracting unambiguous interatomic distance restraints larger than ∼5 Å from through-space magnetic dipole-dipole couplings among the protein (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N nuclei has proven to be a considerable challenge for researchers. It is possible to circumvent this problem by extending the structural studies to include several analogs of the protein of interest, intentionally modified to contain covalently attached paramagnetic tags at selected sites. In these paramagnetic proteins, the hyperfine couplings between the nuclei and unpaired electrons can manifest themselves in NMR spectra in the form of relaxation enhancements of the nuclear spins that depend on the electron-nucleus distance. These effects can be significant for nuclei located up to ∼20 Å away from the paramagnetic center. In this Account, we discuss MAS NMR structural studies of nitroxide and EDTA-Cu(2+) labeled variants of a model 56 amino acid globular protein, B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G (GB1), in the microcrystalline solid phase. We used a set of six EDTA-Cu(2

  12. Unhealthy prisons: exploring structural determinants of prison health.

    PubMed

    de Viggiani, Nick

    2007-01-01

    Prisoner health is influenced as much by structural determinants (institutional, environmental, political, economic and social) as it is by physical and mental constitutions of prisoners themselves. Prison health may therefore be better understood with greater insight into how people respond to imprisonment - the psychological pressures of incarceration, the social world of prison, being dislocated from society, and the impact of the institution itself with its regime and architecture. As agencies of disempowerment and deprivation, prisons epitomise the antithesis of a healthy setting. The World Health Organisation's notion of a 'healthy prison' is in this sense an oxymoron, yet the UK government has signalled that it is committed to WHO's core health promotion principles as a route to reducing health inequalities. This paper reports on the findings of an ethnographic study which was conducted in an adult male training prison in England, using participant observation, group interviewing, and one-to-one semi-structured interviews with prisoners and prison officers. The paper explores how different layers of prison life impact on the health of prisoners, arguing that health inequalities are enmeshed within the workings of the prison system itself.

  13. Historical and ecological determinants of genetic structure in arctic canids.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, L E; Krizan, J; Nagy, J A; Fuglei, E; Dumond, M; Johnson, D; Veitch, A; Berteaux, D; Strobeck, C

    2007-08-01

    Wolves (Canis lupus) and arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus) are the only canid species found throughout the mainland tundra and arctic islands of North America. Contrasting evolutionary histories, and the contemporary ecology of each species, have combined to produce their divergent population genetic characteristics. Arctic foxes are more variable than wolves, and both island and mainland fox populations possess similarly high microsatellite variation. These differences result from larger effective population sizes in arctic foxes, and the fact that, unlike wolves, foxes were not isolated in discrete refugia during the Pleistocene. Despite the large physical distances and distinct ecotypes represented, a single, panmictic population of arctic foxes was found which spans the Svalbard Archipelago and the North American range of the species. This pattern likely reflects both the absence of historical population bottlenecks and current, high levels of gene flow following frequent long-distance foraging movements. In contrast, genetic structure in wolves correlates strongly to transitions in habitat type, and is probably determined by natal habitat-biased dispersal. Nonrandom dispersal may be cued by relative levels of vegetation cover between tundra and forest habitats, but especially by wolf prey specialization on ungulate species of familiar type and behaviour (sedentary or migratory). Results presented here suggest that, through its influence on sea ice, vegetation, prey dynamics and distribution, continued arctic climate change may have effects as dramatic as those of the Pleistocene on the genetic structure of arctic canid species.

  14. Determining the structure of supersymmetry breaking with renormalization group invariants

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Draper, Patrick; Shah, Nausheen R.; Wagner, Carlos E. M.

    2010-10-01

    If collider experiments demonstrate that the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) is a good description of nature at the weak scale, the experimental priority will be the precise determination of superpartner masses. These masses are governed by the weak scale values of the soft supersymmetry-breaking (SUSY-breaking) parameters, which are in turn highly dependent on the SUSY-breaking scheme present at high scales. It is therefore of great interest to find patterns in the soft parameters that can distinguish different high-scale SUSY-breaking structures, identify the scale at which the breaking is communicated to the visible sector, and determine the soft breaking parameters at that scale. In this work, we demonstrate that 1-loop renormalization group invariant quantities present in the MSSM may be used to answer each of these questions. We apply our method first to generic flavor-blind models of SUSY breaking, and then we examine in detail the subset of these models described by general gauge mediation and the constrained MSSM with nonuniversal Higgs masses. As renormalization group invariance generally does not hold beyond leading-log order, we investigate the magnitude and direction of the 2-loop corrections. We find that with superpartners at the TeV scale, these 2-loop effects are either negligible, or they are of the order of optimistic experimental uncertainties and have definite signs, which allows them to be easily accounted for in the overall uncertainty.

  15. Optimization of Stripping Voltammetric Sensor by a Back Propagation Artificial Neural Network for the Accurate Determination of Pb(II) in the Presence of Cd(II)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guo; Wang, Hui; Liu, Gang; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    An easy, but effective, method has been proposed to detect and quantify the Pb(II) in the presence of Cd(II) based on a Bi/glassy carbon electrode (Bi/GCE) with the combination of a back propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN) and square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) without further electrode modification. The effects of Cd(II) in different concentrations on stripping responses of Pb(II) was studied. The results indicate that the presence of Cd(II) will reduce the prediction precision of a direct calibration model. Therefore, a two-input and one-output BP-ANN was built for the optimization of a stripping voltammetric sensor, which considering the combined effects of Cd(II) and Pb(II) on the SWASV detection of Pb(II) and establishing the nonlinear relationship between the stripping peak currents of Pb(II) and Cd(II) and the concentration of Pb(II). The key parameters of the BP-ANN and the factors affecting the SWASV detection of Pb(II) were optimized. The prediction performance of direct calibration model and BP-ANN model were tested with regard to the mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), average relative error (ARE), and correlation coefficient. The results proved that the BP-ANN model exhibited higher prediction accuracy than the direct calibration model. Finally, a real samples analysis was performed to determine trace Pb(II) in some soil specimens with satisfactory results. PMID:27657083

  16. Optimization of Stripping Voltammetric Sensor by a Back Propagation Artificial Neural Network for the Accurate Determination of Pb(II) in the Presence of Cd(II).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guo; Wang, Hui; Liu, Gang; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2016-09-21

    An easy, but effective, method has been proposed to detect and quantify the Pb(II) in the presence of Cd(II) based on a Bi/glassy carbon electrode (Bi/GCE) with the combination of a back propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN) and square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) without further electrode modification. The effects of Cd(II) in different concentrations on stripping responses of Pb(II) was studied. The results indicate that the presence of Cd(II) will reduce the prediction precision of a direct calibration model. Therefore, a two-input and one-output BP-ANN was built for the optimization of a stripping voltammetric sensor, which considering the combined effects of Cd(II) and Pb(II) on the SWASV detection of Pb(II) and establishing the nonlinear relationship between the stripping peak currents of Pb(II) and Cd(II) and the concentration of Pb(II). The key parameters of the BP-ANN and the factors affecting the SWASV detection of Pb(II) were optimized. The prediction performance of direct calibration model and BP-ANN model were tested with regard to the mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), average relative error (ARE), and correlation coefficient. The results proved that the BP-ANN model exhibited higher prediction accuracy than the direct calibration model. Finally, a real samples analysis was performed to determine trace Pb(II) in some soil specimens with satisfactory results.

  17. Novel, Precise, Accurate Ion-Pairing Method to Determine the Related Substances of the Fondaparinux Sodium Drug Substance: Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Amol A.; Madhavan, P.; Deshpande, Girish R.; Chandel, Ravi Kumar; Yarbagi, Kaviraj M.; Joshi, Alok R.; Moses Babu, J.; Murali Krishna, R.; Rao, I. M.

    2016-01-01

    Fondaparinux sodium is a synthetic low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH). This medication is an anticoagulant or a blood thinner, prescribed for the treatment of pulmonary embolism and prevention and treatment of deep vein thrombosis. Its determination in the presence of related impurities was studied and validated by a novel ion-pair HPLC method. The separation of the drug and its degradation products was achieved with the polymer-based PLRPs column (250 mm × 4.6 mm; 5 μm) in gradient elution mode. The mixture of 100 mM n-hexylamine and 100 mM acetic acid in water was used as buffer solution. Mobile phase A and mobile phase B were prepared by mixing the buffer and acetonitrile in the ratio of 90:10 (v/v) and 20:80 (v/v), respectively. Mobile phases were delivered in isocratic mode (2% B for 0–5 min) followed by gradient mode (2–85% B in 5–60 min). An Evaporative Light Scattering Detector (ELSD) was connected to the LC system to detect the responses of chromatographic separation. Further, the drug was subjected to stress studies for acidic, basic, oxidative, photolytic, and thermal degradations as per ICH guidelines and the drug was found to be labile in acid, base hydrolysis, and oxidation, while stable in neutral, thermal, and photolytic degradation conditions. The method provided linear responses over the concentration range of the LOQ to 0.30% for each impurity with respect to the analyte concentration of 12.5 mg/mL, and regression analysis showed a correlation coefficient value (r2) of more than 0.99 for all the impurities. The LOD and LOQ were found to be 1.4 µg/mL and 4.1 µg/mL, respectively, for fondaparinux. The developed ion-pair method was validated as per ICH guidelines with respect to accuracy, selectivity, precision, linearity, and robustness. PMID:27110496

  18. Fitting-determined formulation of effective medium approximation for 3D trench structures in model-based infrared reflectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuanwei; Liu, Shiyuan; Shi, Tielin; Tang, Zirong

    2011-02-01

    The success of the model-based infrared reflectrometry (MBIR) technique relies heavily on accurate modeling and fast calculation of the infrared metrology process, which continues to be a challenge, especially for three-dimensional (3D) trench structures. In this paper, we present a simplified formulation for effective medium approximation (EMA), determined by a fitting-based method for the modeling of 3D trench structures. Intensive investigations have been performed with an emphasis on the generality of the fitting-determined (FD)-EMA formulation in terms of trench depth, trench pitch, and incidence angle so that its application is not limited to a particular configuration. Simulations conducted on a taper trench structure have further verified the proposed FD-EMA and demonstrated that the MBIR metrology with the FD-EMA-based model achieves an accuracy one order higher than that of the conventional zeroth-order EMA-based model.

  19. Determining Protein Structures from NOESY Distance Constraints by Semidefinite Programming

    PubMed Central

    Alipanahi, Babak; Krislock, Nathan; Ghodsi, Ali; Wolkowicz, Henry; Donaldson, Logan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Contemporary practical methods for protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure determination use molecular dynamics coupled with a simulated annealing schedule. The objective of these methods is to minimize the error of deviating from the nuclear overhauser effect (NOE) distance constraints. However, the corresponding objective function is highly nonconvex and, consequently, difficult to optimize. Euclidean distance matrix (EDM) methods based on semidefinite programming (SDP) provide a natural framework for these problems. However, the high complexity of SDP solvers and the often noisy distance constraints provide major challenges to this approach. The main contribution of this article is a new SDP formulation for the EDM approach that overcomes these two difficulties. We model the protein as a set of intersecting two- and three-dimensional cliques. Then, we adapt and extend a technique called semidefinite facial reduction to reduce the SDP problem size to approximately one quarter of the size of the original problem. The reduced SDP problem can be solved approximately 100 times faster, and it is also more resistant to numerical problems from erroneous and inexact distance bounds. PMID:23113706

  20. Advances in direct and diffraction methods for surface structural determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, S. Y.

    1999-08-01

    I describe recent advances in low-energy electron diffraction holography and photoelectron diffraction holography. These are direct methods for determining the surface structure. I show that for LEED and PD spectra taken in an energy and angular mesh, the relative phase between the reference wave and the scattered wave has a known geometric form if the spectra are always taken from within a small angular cone in the near backscattering direction. By using data in the backscattering small cone at each direction of interest, a simple algorithm is developed to invert the spectra and extract object atomic positions with no input of calculated dynamic factors. I also describe the use of a convergent iterative method of PD and LEED. The computation time of this method scales as N2, where N is the dimension of the propagator matrix, rather than N3 as in conventional Gaussian substitutional methods. Both the Rehr-Albers separable-propagator cluster approach and the slab-type non-separable approach can be cast in the new iterative form. With substantial savings in computational time and no loss in numerical accuracy, this method is very useful in applications of multiple scattering theory, particularly for systems involving either very large unit cells (>300 atoms) or where no long-range order is present.

  1. Determining discharge-coefficient ratings for selected coastal control structures in Broward and Palm Beach counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillis, G.M.; Swain, E.D.

    1998-01-01

    Discharges through 10 selected coastal control structures in Broward and Palm Beach Counties, Florida, are presently computed using the theoretical discharge-coefficient ratings developed from scale modeling, theoretical discharge coefficients, and some field calibrations whose accuracies for specific sites are unknown. To achieve more accurate discharge-coefficient ratings for the coastal control structures, field discharge measurements were taken with an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler at the coastal control structures under a variety of flow conditions. These measurements were used to determine computed discharge-coefficient ratings for the coastal control structures under different flow regimes: submerged orifice flow, submerged weir flow, free orifice flow, and free weir flow. Theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings for submerged orifice and weir flows were determined at seven coastal control structures, and discharge ratings for free orifice and weir flows were determined at three coastal control structures. The difference between the theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings varied from structure to structure. The theoretical and computed dischargecoefficient ratings for submerged orifice flow were within 10 percent at four of seven coastal control structures; however, differences greater than 20 percent were found at two of the seven structures. The theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings for submerged weir flow were within 10 percent at three of seven coastal control structures; however, differences greater than 20 percent were found at four of the seven coastal control structures. The difference between theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings for free orifice and free weir flows ranged from 5 to 32 percent. Some differences between the theoretical and computed discharge-coefficient ratings could be better defined with more data collected over a greater distribution of measuring conditions.

  2. Accurate and efficient representation of intra­molecular energy in ab initio generation of crystal structures. I. Adaptive local approximate models

    PubMed Central

    Sugden, Isaac; Adjiman, Claire S.; Pantelides, Constantinos C.

    2016-01-01

    The global search stage of crystal structure prediction (CSP) methods requires a fine balance between accuracy and computational cost, particularly for the study of large flexible molecules. A major improvement in the accuracy and cost of the intramolecular energy function used in the CrystalPredictor II [Habgood et al. (2015 ▸). J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 1957–1969] program is presented, where the most efficient use of computational effort is ensured via the use of adaptive local approximate model (LAM) placement. The entire search space of the relevant molecule’s conformations is initially evaluated using a coarse, low accuracy grid. Additional LAM points are then placed at appropriate points determined via an automated process, aiming to minimize the computational effort expended in high-energy regions whilst maximizing the accuracy in low-energy regions. As the size, complexity and flexibility of molecules increase, the reduction in computational cost becomes marked. This improvement is illustrated with energy calculations for benzoic acid and the ROY molecule, and a CSP study of molecule (XXVI) from the sixth blind test [Reilly et al. (2016 ▸). Acta Cryst. B72, 439–459], which is challenging due to its size and flexibility. Its known experimental form is successfully predicted as the global minimum. The computational cost of the study is tractable without the need to make unphysical simplifying assumptions. PMID:27910837

  3. Crystal Structure of the 30S Ribosomal Subunit from Thermus Thermophilus. Purification, Crystallization and Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Clemons, William M.; Brodersen, Ditlev E.; McCutcheonn, John P.; May, Joanna L.C.; Carter, Andrew P.; Morgan-Warren, Robert J.; Wimberly, Brian T.; Ramakrishnan, Venki

    2009-10-07

    We describe the crystallization and structure determination of the 30 S ribosomal subunit from Thermus thermophilus. Previous reports of crystals that diffracted to 10 {angstrom} resolution were used as a starting point to improve the quality of the diffraction. Eventually, ideas such as the addition of substrates or factors to eliminate conformational heterogeneity proved less important than attention to detail in yielding crystals that diffracted beyond 3 {angstrom} resolution. Despite improvements in technology and methodology in the last decade, the structure determination of the 30 S subunit presented some very challenging technical problems because of the size of the asymmetric unit, crystal variability and sensitivity to radiation damage. Some steps that were useful for determination of the atomic structure were: the use of anomalous scattering from the LIII edges of osmium and lutetium to obtain the necessary phasing signal; the use of tunable, third-generation synchrotron sources to obtain data of reasonable quality at high resolution; collection of derivative data precisely about a mirror plane to preserve small anomalous differences between Bijvoet mates despite extensive radiation damage and multi-crystal scaling; the pre-screening of crystals to ensure quality, isomorphism and the efficient use of scarce third-generation synchrotron time; pre-incubation of crystals in cobalt hexaammine to ensure isomorphism with other derivatives; and finally, the placement of proteins whose structures had been previously solved in isolation, in conjunction with biochemical data on protein-RNA interactions, to map out the architecture of the 30 S subunit prior to the construction of a detailed atomic-resolution model.

  4. Accurate determination of pair potentials for a C{sub w}H{sub x}N{sub y}O{sub z} system of molecules: A semiempirical method

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, M. van; Ree, F.H.; Haselman, L.C.

    1995-03-01

    Statistical mechanical chemical equilibrium calculations of the properties of high-pressure high-temperature reactive C,H,N,O mixtures are made to derive an accurate self-consistent set of inter-molecular potentials for the product molecules. Previous theoretical efforts to predict such properties relied in part on Corresponding States theory and shock wave data of argon. More recent high-pressure Hugoniot measurements on a number of elements and molecules allow more accurate determination of the potentials of these materials, and explicit inclusion of additional dissociation products. The present discussion briefly reviews the previous analysis and the method used to produce a self-consistent set of potentials from shock data on N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, NO, an N{sub 2} + O{sub 2} mixture, carbon, CO{sub 2}, and CO, as well as some simple explosive product mixtures from detonation of hexanitrobenzene, PETN, and a mixture of hydrazine nitrate, hydrazine and water. The results are tested using the data from an HMX explosive formulations. The effect of the non-equilibrium nature of carbon clusters is estimated using data for TNT as a standard to determine a nonequilibrium equation of state for carbon. The resulting parameter set is used in a survey of 27 explosives. For the subset that contains no fluorine or two-phase carbon effects the rms deviation from experimental detonation velocity is 1.2%.

  5. Isolation and structure determination of oxidative degradation products of atorvastatin.

    PubMed

    Kracun, Matjaz; Kocijan, Andrej; Bastarda, Andrej; Grahek, Rok; Plavec, Janez; Kocjan, Darko

    2009-12-05

    Methods were developed for the preparation and isolation of four oxidative degradation products of atorvastatin. ATV-FX1 was prepared in the alkaline acetonitrile solution of atorvastatin with the addition of hydrogen peroxide. The exposition of aqueous acetonitrile solution of atorvastatin to sunlight for several hours followed by the alkalization of the solution with potassium hydroxide to pH 8-9 gave ATV-FXA. By the acidification of the solution with phosphoric acid to pH 3 ATV-FXA1 and FXA2 were prepared. The isolation of oxidative degradation products was carried out on a reversed-phase chromatographic column Luna prep C18(2) 10 microm applying several separation steps. The liquid chromatography coupled with a mass spectrometer (LC-MS), high resolution MS (HR-MS), 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy methods were applied for the structure elucidation. All degradants are due to the oxidation of the pyrrole ring. The most probable reaction mechanism is intermediate endoperoxide formation with subsequent rearrangement and nucleophilic attack by the 5-hydroxy group of the heptanoic fragment. ATV-FX1 is 4-[1b-(4-Fluoro-phenyl)-6-hydroxy-6-isopropyl-1a-phenyl-6a-phenylcarbamoyl-hexahydro-1,2-dioxa-5a-aza-cyclopropa[a]inden-3-yl]-3-(R)-hydroxy-butyric acid and has a molecular mass increased by two oxygen atoms with regard to atorvastatin. ATV-FXA is the regioisomeric compound, 4-[6-(4-Fluoro-phenyl)-6-hydroxy-1b-isopropyl-6a-phenyl-1a-phenylcarbamoyl-hexahydro-1,2-dioxa-5a-aza-cyclopropa[a]inden-3-yl]-3-(R)-hydroxy-butyric acid. Its descendants ATV-FXA1 and FXA2 appeared without the atorvastatin heptanoic fragment and are 3-(4-Fluoro-benzoyl)-2-isobutyryl-3-phenyl-oxirane-2-carboxylic acid phenylamide and 4-(4-Fluoro-phenyl)-2,4-dihydroxy-2-isopropyl-5-phenyl-3,6-dioxa-bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-1-carboxylic acid phenylamide, respectively. Quantitative NMR spectroscopy was employed for the assay determination of isolated oxidative degradation products. The results obtained were used

  6. Discovery and Structure Determination of the Orphan Enzyme Isoxanthopterin Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.S.; Swaminathan, S.; Agarwal, R.; Hitchcock, D.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Raushel, F. M.

    2010-05-25

    Two previously uncharacterized proteins have been identified that efficiently catalyze the deamination of isoxanthopterin and pterin 6-carboxylate. The genes encoding these two enzymes, NYSGXRC-9339a (gi|44585104) and NYSGXRC-9236b (gi|44611670), were first identified from DNA isolated from the Sargasso Sea as part of the Global Ocean Sampling Project. The genes were synthesized, and the proteins were subsequently expressed and purified. The X-ray structure of Sgx9339a was determined at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution (Protein Data Bank entry 2PAJ). This protein folds as a distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrel and contains a single zinc ion in the active site. These enzymes are members of the amidohydrolase superfamily and belong to cog0402 within the clusters of orthologous groups (COG). Enzymes in cog0402 have previously been shown to catalyze the deamination of guanine, cytosine, S-adenosylhomocysteine, and 8-oxoguanine. A small compound library of pteridines, purines, and pyrimidines was used to probe catalytic activity. The only substrates identified in this search were isoxanthopterin and pterin 6-carboxylate. The kinetic constants for the deamination of isoxanthopterin with Sgx9339a were determined to be 1.0 s{sup -1}, 8.0 {micro}M, and 1.3 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} (k{sub cat}, K{sub m}, and k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, respectively). The active site of Sgx9339a most closely resembles the active site for 8-oxoguanine deaminase (Protein Data Bank entry 2UZ9). A model for substrate recognition of isoxanthopterin by Sgx9339a was proposed on the basis of the binding of guanine and xanthine in the active site of guanine deaminase. Residues critical for substrate binding appear to be conserved glutamine and tyrosine residues that form hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl oxygen at C4, a conserved threonine residue that forms hydrogen bonds with N5, and another conserved threonine residue that forms hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl group at C7. These conserved active site

  7. NMR Structure of Francisella tularensis Virulence Determinant Reveals Structural Homology to Bet v1 Allergen Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zook, James; Mo, Gina; Sisco, Nicholas J; Craciunescu, Felicia M; Hansen, Debra T; Baravati, Bobby; Cherry, Brian R; Sykes, Kathryn; Wachter, Rebekka; Van Horn, Wade D; Fromme, Petra

    2015-06-02

    Tularemia is a potentially fatal bacterial infection caused by Francisella tularensis, and is endemic to North America and many parts of northern Europe and Asia. The outer membrane lipoprotein, Flpp3, has been identified as a virulence determinant as well as a potential subunit template for vaccine development. Here we present the first structure for the soluble domain of Flpp3 from the highly infectious Type A SCHU S4 strain, derived through high-resolution solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy; the first structure of a lipoprotein from the genus Francisella. The Flpp3 structure demonstrates a globular protein with an electrostatically polarized surface containing an internal cavity-a putative binding site based on the structurally homologous Bet v1 protein family of allergens. NMR-based relaxation studies suggest loop regions that potentially modulate access to the internal cavity. The Flpp3 structure may add to the understanding of F. tularensis virulence and contribute to the development of effective vaccines.

  8. Denatured state structural property determines protein stabilization by macromolecular crowding: a thermodynamic and structural approach.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Shruti; Singh, Laishram Rajendrakumar

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of protein structure and stability gained to date has been acquired through investigations made under dilute conditions where total macromolecular concentration never surpasses 10 g l(-1). However, biological macromolecules are known to evolve and function under crowded intracellular environments that comprises of proteins, nucleic acids, ribosomes and carbohydrates etc. Crowded environment is known to result in altered biological properties including thermodynamic, structural and functional aspect of macromolecules as compared to the macromolecules present in our commonly used experimental dilute buffers (for example, Tris HCl or phosphate buffer). In this study, we have investigated the thermodynamic and structural consequences of synthetic crowding agent (Ficoll 70) on three different proteins (Ribonuclease-A, lysozyme and holo α-lactalbumin) at different pH values. We report here that the effect of crowding is protein dependent in terms of protein thermal stability and structure. We also observed that the structural characteristics of the denatured state determines if crowding will have an effect or not on the protein stability.

  9. Fluid bilayer structure determination: Joint refinement in composition space using X-ray and neutron diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    White, S.H.; Wiener, M.C.

    1994-12-31

    Experimentally-determined structural models of fluid lipid bilayers are essential for verifying molecular dynamics simulations of bilayers and for understanding the structural consequences of peptide interactions. The extreme thermal motion of bilayers precludes the possibility of atomic-level structural models. Defining {open_quote}the structure{close_quote} of a bilayer as the time-averaged transbilayer distribution of the water and the principal lipid structural groups such as the carbonyls and double-bonds (quasimolecular fragments), one can represent the bilayer structure as a sum of Gaussian functions referred to collectively as the quasimolecular structure. One method of determining the structure is by neutron diffraction combined with exhaustive specific deuteration. This method is impractical because of the expense of the chemical syntheses and the limited amount of neutron beam time currently available. We have therefore developed the composition space refinement method for combining X-ray and minimal neutron diffraction data to arrive at remarkably detailed and accurate structures of fluid bilayers. The composition space representation of the bilayer describes the probability of occupancy per unit length across the width of the bilayer of each quasimolecular component and permits the joint refinement of X-ray and neutron lamellar diffraction data by means of a single quasimolecular structure that is fitted simultaneously to both data sets. Scaling of each component by the appropriate neutron or X-ray scattering length maps the composition-space profile to the appropriate scattering length space for comparison to experimental data. The difficulty with the method is that fluid bilayer structures are generally only marginally determined by the experimental data. This means that the space of possible solutions must be extensively explored in conjunction with a thorough analysis of errors.

  10. Determination of boiling point of petrochemicals by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and multivariate regression analysis of structural activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Fakayode, Sayo O; Mitchell, Breanna S; Pollard, David A

    2014-08-01

    Accurate understanding of analyte boiling points (BP) is of critical importance in gas chromatographic (GC) separation and crude oil refinery operation in petrochemical industries. This study reported the first combined use of GC separation and partial-least-square (PLS1) multivariate regression analysis of petrochemical structural activity relationship (SAR) for accurate BP determination of two commercially available (D3710 and MA VHP) calibration gas mix samples. The results of the BP determination using PLS1 multivariate regression were further compared with the results of traditional simulated distillation method of BP determination. The developed PLS1 regression was able to correctly predict analytes BP in D3710 and MA VHP calibration gas mix samples, with a root-mean-square-%-relative-error (RMS%RE) of 6.4%, and 10.8% respectively. In contrast, the overall RMS%RE of 32.9% and 40.4%, respectively obtained for BP determination in D3710 and MA VHP using a traditional simulated distillation method were approximately four times larger than the corresponding RMS%RE of BP prediction using MRA, demonstrating the better predictive ability of MRA. The reported method is rapid, robust, and promising, and can be potentially used routinely for fast analysis, pattern recognition, and analyte BP determination in petrochemical industries.

  11. Synthesis and structure determination of uranyl peroxide nanospheres in the presence of organic structure directing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, T. Z.; Burns, P. C.

    2007-12-01

    Recently, actinyl peroxide nanoclusters containing 20, 24, 28, or 32 actinyl polyhedra have been synthesized and their structures identified with single crystal X-ray diffraction [1]. Most nanomaterials are composed of main group elements or transition metals, therefore, these actinyl nanospheres may display vastly different chemical and physical properties due to the presence of filled f-orbitals. A major goal of our research group is to create novel actinyl materials, focusing on nano- and mesoporous materials. The original nanosphere syntheses were limited to inorganic crystallization agents, such as monovalent cations. Over the last decade, the use of organic compounds and surfactants have received increased attention as structure-directing agents for the generation of novel inorganic materials. Using structure-directing organic amines we have successfully synthesized and determined the structures of uranyl nanospheres containing 40 and 50 uranyl polyhedra. The topology of the skeletal U-50 nanosphere is identical to the C50Cl10 fullerene [2]. The topographical relationship between the actinyl nanospheres and fullerene or fullerene-like material may provide additional insight into stable configurations for lower fullerenes. [1] Burns et al., Actinyl peroxide nanospheres. Angewandte Chemie, International Edition, 2005. 44(14): p. 2135. [2] Xie et al., Capturing the Labile Fullerene[50] as C50Cl10. Science, (2004) 305(5671): p. 699.

  12. [Genomic structure and sex determination in squamate reptiles].

    PubMed

    Kichigin, I G; Trifonov, V A

    2013-01-01

    Squamata is the largest reptilian order including snakes and lizards which occupies a key position in phylogeny of amniotes. A variety of sex determination modes in lizards is one of the most interesting parts of the biology of this order. These mechanisms are genomic sex determination (both XY and ZW systems) and temperature-dependent sex determination. Studies of squamata sex chromosomes are pivotal for understanding evolution of other vertebrate sex chromosomes. Unfortunately, this clade has long been neglected by molecular geneticists. In this paper, we describe recent data on molecular cytogenetics and genomics of squamates, evolution of their sex chromosomes and sex determination mechanisms.

  13. Phase Determination by Multiple-Wavelength X-ray Diffraction: Crystal Structure of a Basic ``Blue'' Copper Protein from Cucumbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guss, J. Mitchell; Merritt, Ethan A.; Phizackerley, R. Paul; Hedman, Britt; Murata, Mitsuo; Hodgson, Keith O.; Freeman, Hans C.

    1988-08-01

    A novel x-ray diffraction technique, multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing, has been applied to the de novo determination of an unknown protein structure, that of the ``blue'' copper protein isolated from cucumber seedlings. This method makes use of crystallographic phases determined from measurements made at several wavelengths and has recently been made technically feasible through the use of intense, polychromatic synchrotron radiation together with accurate data collection from multiwire electronic area detectors. In contrast with all of the conventional methods of solving protein structures, which require either multiple isomorphous derivatives or coordinates of a similar structure for molecular replacement, this technique allows direct solution of the classical ``phase problem'' in x-ray crystallography. MAD phase assignment should be particularly useful for determining structures of small to medium-sized metalloproteins for which isomorphous derivatives are difficult or impossible to make. The structure of this particular protein provides new insights into the spectroscopic and redox properties of blue copper proteins, an important class of metalloproteins widely distributed in nature.

  14. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  15. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  16. Determining the Mechanical Properties of Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Lattice block structures and shape memory alloys possess several traits ideal for solving intriguing new engineering problems in industries such as aerospace, military, and transportation. Recent testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center has investigated the material properties of lattice block structures cast from a conventional aerospace titanium alloy as well as lattice block structures cast from nickel-titanium shape memory alloy. The lattice block structures for both materials were sectioned into smaller subelements for tension and compression testing. The results from the cast conventional titanium material showed that the expected mechanical properties were maintained. The shape memory alloy material was found to be extremely brittle from the casting process and only compression testing was completed. Future shape memory alloy lattice block structures will utilize an adjusted material composition that will provide a better quality casting. The testing effort resulted in baseline mechanical property data from the conventional titanium material for comparison to shape memory alloy materials once suitable castings are available.

  17. An Inverse Interpolation Method Utilizing In-Flight Strain Measurements for Determining Loads and Structural Response of Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shkarayev, S.; Krashantisa, R.; Tessler, A.

    2004-01-01

    An important and challenging technology aimed at the next generation of aerospace vehicles is that of structural health monitoring. The key problem is to determine accurately, reliably, and in real time the applied loads, stresses, and displacements experienced in flight, with such data establishing an information database for structural health monitoring. The present effort is aimed at developing a finite element-based methodology involving an inverse formulation that employs measured surface strains to recover the applied loads, stresses, and displacements in an aerospace vehicle in real time. The computational procedure uses a standard finite element model (i.e., "direct analysis") of a given airframe, with the subsequent application of the inverse interpolation approach. The inverse interpolation formulation is based on a parametric approximation of the loading and is further constructed through a least-squares minimization of calculated and measured strains. This procedure results in the governing system of linear algebraic equations, providing the unknown coefficients that accurately define the load approximation. Numerical simulations are carried out for problems involving various levels of structural approximation. These include plate-loading examples and an aircraft wing box. Accuracy and computational efficiency of the proposed method are discussed in detail. The experimental validation of the methodology by way of structural testing of an aircraft wing is also discussed.

  18. Environmental filtering determines metacommunity structure in wetland microcrustaceans.

    PubMed

    Gascón, Stéphanie; Arranz, Ignasi; Cañedo-Argüelles, Miguel; Nebra, Alfonso; Ruhí, Albert; Rieradevall, Maria; Caiola, Nuno; Sala, Jordi; Ibàñez, Carles; Quintana, Xavier D; Boix, Dani

    2016-05-01

    Metacommunity approaches are becoming popular when analyzing factors driving species distribution at the regional scale. However, until the popularization of the variation partitioning technique it was difficult to assess the main drivers of the observed patterns (spatial or environmental). Here we propose a new framework linking the emergence of different metacommunity structures (e.g., nested, Gleasonian, Clementsian) to spatial and environmental filters. This is a novel approach that provides a more profound analysis of how both drivers could lead to similar metacommunity structures. We tested this framework on 110 sites covering a strong environmental gradient (i.e., microcrustacean assemblages organized along a salinity gradient, from freshwater to brackish water wetlands). First we identified the metacommunity structure that better fitted these microcrustacean assemblages. Then, we used hierarchical variation partitioning to quantify the relative influences of environmental filters and the distance among wetlands on the identified structure. Our results showed that under strong environmental filtering metacommunity structures were non-random. We also noted that even passive dispersers, that are supposed to be poorly spatially filtered, showed spatial signals at a large geographical scale. However, some difficulties arose when inferring biotic interactions at finer-scale spatial signals. Overall, our study shows the potential of elements of metacommunity structure combined with variation partition techniques to detect environmental drivers and broadscale patterns of metacommunity structure, and that some caution is needed when interpreting finer-scale spatial signals.

  19. The Combination of Laser Scanning and Structure from Motion Technology for Creation of Accurate Exterior and Interior Orthophotos of ST. Nicholas Baroque Church

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koska, B.; Křemen, T.

    2013-02-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning technology is used for creation of building documentation and 3D building model from its emerging at the turn of the millennium. Photogrammetry has even longer tradition in this field. Both technologies have some technical limitations if they are used for creation of a façade or even an interior orthophoto, but combination of both technologies seems profitable. Laser scanning can be used for creation of an accurate 3D model and photogrammetry for consequent application of high quality colour information. Both technologies were used in synergy to create the building plans, 2D drawing documentation of facades and interior views and the orthophotos of St. Nicholas Baroque church in Prague. The case study is described in details in the paper.

  20. Polyglutamine Aggregation in Huntington Disease: Does Structure Determine Toxicity?

    PubMed

    Hoffner, Guylaine; Djian, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Huntington disease is a dominantly inherited disease of the central nervous system. The mutational expansion of polyglutamine beyond a critical length produces a toxic gain of function in huntingtin and results in neuronal death. In the course of the disease, expanded huntingtin is proteolyzed, becomes abnormally folded, and accumulates in oligomers, fibrils, and microscopic inclusions. The aggregated forms of the expanded protein are structurally diverse. Structural heterogeneity may explain why polyglutamine-containing aggregates could paradoxically be either toxic or neuroprotective. When defined, the toxic structures could then specifically be targeted by prophylactic or therapeutic drugs aimed at inhibiting polyglutamine aggregation.

  1. Accurate absolute frequencies of the {nu}{sub 1}+{nu}{sub 3} band of {sup 13}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} determined using an infrared mode-locked Cr:YAG laser frequency comb

    SciTech Connect

    Madej, Alan A.; Bernard, John E.; John Alcock, A.; Czajkowski, Andrzej; Chepurov, Sergei

    2006-04-15

    Absolute frequency measurements, with up to 1x10{sup -11} level accuracies, are presented for 60 lines of the P and R branches for the {nu}{sub 1}+{nu}{sub 3} band of {sup 13}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} at 1.5 {mu}m (194 THz). The measurements were made using cavity-enhanced, diode-laser-based saturation spectroscopy. With one laser system stabilized to the P(16) line and a second laser system stabilized to the line whose frequency was to be determined, a Cr:YAG frequency comb was employed to accurately measure the tetrahertz level frequency intervals. The results are compared with recent work from other groups and indicate that these lines would form a basis for a high-quality atlas of reference frequencies for this region of the spectrum.

  2. Protein Structure Determination by Assembling Super-Secondary Structure Motifs Using Pseudocontact Shifts.

    PubMed

    Pilla, Kala Bharath; Otting, Gottfried; Huber, Thomas

    2017-03-07

    Computational and nuclear magnetic resonance hybrid approaches provide efficient tools for 3D structure determination of small proteins, but currently available algorithms struggle to perform with larger proteins. Here we demonstrate a new computational algorithm that assembles the 3D structure of a protein from its constituent super-secondary structural motifs (Smotifs) with the help of pseudocontact shift (PCS) restraints for backbone amide protons, where the PCSs are produced from different metal centers. The algorithm, DINGO-PCS (3D assembly of Individual Smotifs to Near-native Geometry as Orchestrated by PCSs), employs the PCSs to recognize, orient, and assemble the constituent Smotifs of the target protein without any other experimental data or computational force fields. Using a universal Smotif database, the DINGO-PCS algorithm exhaustively enumerates any given Smotif. We benchmarked the program against ten different protein targets ranging from 100 to 220 residues with different topologies. For nine of these targets, the method was able to identify near-native Smotifs.

  3. Using Surface NMR Nuclear Magnetic Resonance to Determine Sediment Structure and Properties Beneath Thermokarst Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creighton, A.; Parsekian, A.; Arp, C. D.; Jones, B. M.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Bondurant, A.

    2015-12-01

    Thermokarst lakes form following the subsidence of ice-rich permafrost terrain and concurrent infilling of the depression with water. Areas of unfrozen sediment, called taliks, can form under lakes that have a mean annual bottom temperature greater than 0°C. Taliks are thought to play an important role in permafrost hydrology and carbon cycling. Sub-lake taliks can extend to depths of tens of meters, making them difficult and costly to measure by direct methods such as boreholes. Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides an unambiguous measurement of the liquid water content associated with unfrozen taliks; however, limitations of the measurements and the interpretation of the data still remain. Forward models were created to test the effect of varying water column thicknesses on the ability to resolve the depth and water content of taliks with parameters similar to geometries measured in late-winter field studies in the Arctic and Boreal regions of Alaska. The results of the forward modeling show that talik depth resolution decreases with a larger water column thickness, a shallower talik depth, and a lower water content. These results place constraints on our field measurements, with lakes greater than 9 m deep yielding potentially misleading inversion results. Field data was collected at a small, 4.6 m deep thermokarst lake near Fairbanks, Alaska, which had a known subsurface structure including talik depth, and available talik sediments from cores. Known subsurface structure was not used to inform the inversion model to determine how well talik depth could be resolved in lakes with unknown structure. With constraints placed on ice and water thickness, which are easily measured in the field, the blocky inversion model was able to accurately resolve the talik depth and water content for lakes less than 9 m deep.

  4. Structural determinants of SMAD function in TGF-β signaling

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Maria J.; Martin-Malpartida, Pau; Massagué, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Smad transcription factors are central to the signal transduction pathway that mediates the numerous effects of the TGF-β superfamily of cytokines in metazoan embryo development and adult tissue regeneration and homeostasis. Although Smad proteins are conserved, recent genome-sequencing projects have revealed their sequence variation in metazoan evolution, human polymorphism, and cancer. Structural studies of Smads bound to partner proteins and target DNA provided a framework to understand the significance of these evolutionary and pathologic sequence variations. Here we synthesize the extant mutational and structural data to suggest how genetic variation in Smads may affect the structure, regulation, and function of these proteins. Furthermore, we present a web-app that compares Smad sequences and displays Smad protein structures and their disease-associated variants. PMID:25935112

  5. Determination of amyloid core structure using chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Skora, Lukasz; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2012-12-01

    Amyloid fibrils are the pathological hallmark of a large variety of neurodegenerative disorders. The structural characterization of amyloid fibrils, however, is challenging due to their non-crystalline, heterogeneous, and often dynamic nature. Thus, the structure of amyloid fibrils of many proteins is still unknown. We here show that the structure calculation program CS-Rosetta can be used to obtain insight into the core structure of amyloid fibrils. Driven by experimental solid-state NMR chemical shifts and taking into account the polymeric nature of fibrils CS-Rosetta allows modeling of the core of amyloid fibrils. Application to the Y145X stop mutant of the human prion protein reveals a left-handed β-helix.

  6. Determining population structure and hybridization for two iris species

    PubMed Central

    Hamlin, Jennafer A P; Arnold, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    Identifying processes that promote or limit gene flow can help define the ecological and evolutionary history of a species. Furthermore, defining those factors that make up “species boundaries” can provide a definition of the independent evolutionary trajectories of related taxa. For many species, the historic processes that account for their distribution of genetic variation remain unresolved. In this study, we examine the geographic distribution of genetic diversity for two species of Louisiana Irises, Iris brevicaulis and Iris fulva. Specifically, we asked how populations are structured and if population structure coincides with potential barriers to gene flow. We also asked whether there is evidence of hybridization between these two species outside Louisiana hybrid zones. We used a genotyping-by-sequencing approach and sampled a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms across these species' genomes. Two different population assignment methods were used to resolve population structure in I. brevicaulis; however, there was considerably less population structure in I. fulva. We used a species tree approach to infer phylogenies both within and between populations and species. For I. brevicaulis, the geography of the collection locality was reflected in the phylogeny. The I. fulva phylogeny reflected much less structure than detected for I. brevicaulis. Lastly, combining both species into a phylogenetic analysis resolved two of six populations of I. brevicaulis that shared alleles with I. fulva. Taken together, our results suggest major differences in the level and pattern of connectivity among populations of these two Louisiana Iris species. PMID:24683457

  7. Structural Determinants of Cadherin-23 Function in Hearing and Deafness

    SciTech Connect

    Sotomayor, Marcos; Weihofen, Wilhelm A.; Gaudet, Rachelle; Corey, David P.

    2010-06-21

    The hair-cell tip link, a fine filament directly conveying force to mechanosensitive transduction channels, is composed of two proteins, protocadherin-15 and cadherin-23, whose mutation causes deafness. However, their molecular structure, elasticity, and deafness-related structural defects are unknown. We present crystal structures of the first and second extracellular cadherin repeats of cadherin-23. Overall, structures show typical cadherin folds, but reveal an elongated N terminus that precludes classical cadherin interactions and contributes to an N-terminal Ca{sup 2+}-binding site. The deafness mutation D101G, in the linker region between the repeats, causes a slight bend between repeats and decreases Ca{sup 2+} affinity. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that cadherin-23 repeats are stiff and that either removing Ca{sup 2+} or mutating Ca{sup 2+}-binding residues reduces rigidity and unfolding strength. The structures define an uncharacterized cadherin family and, with simulations, suggest mechanisms underlying inherited deafness and how cadherin-23 may bind with itself and with protocadherin-15 to form the tip link.

  8. Structure Determination of Unknown Organic Liquids Using NMR and IR Spectroscopy: A General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavel, John T.; Hyde, Erin C.; Bruch, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment introduced general chemistry students to the basic concepts of organic structures and to the power of spectroscopic methods for structure determination. Students employed a combination of IR and NMR spectroscopy to perform de novo structure determination of unknown alcohols, without being provided with a list of possible…

  9. Determination of Structural and Morphological Parameters of Human Bulbar Conjunctiva from Optical Diffuse Reflectance Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenko, S. A.; Firago, V. A.; Kugeiko, M. M.; Kubarko, A. I.

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a method for on-the-fl y retrieval of the volume concentration of blood vessels, the average diameter of the blood vessels, the blood oxygenation level, and the molar concentrations of chromophores in the bulbar conjunctiva from its diffuse reflectance spectra, measured when the radiation delivery and detection channels are spatially separated. The relationship between the diffuse reflectance spectrum of the conjunctiva and its unknown parameters is described in terms of an analytical model, constructed on the basis of a highly accurate approximation analog of the Monte Carlo method. We have studied the effect of localization of hemoglobin in erythrocytes and localization of erythrocytes in the blood vessels on the power of the retrieval of structural and morphological parameters for the conjunctiva. We developed a device for obtaining video images of the conjunctiva and contactless measurements of its diffuse reflectance spectrum. By comparing simulated diffuse reflectance spectra of the conjunctiva with the experimental measurements, we established a set of chromophores which must be taken into account in the model for reproducing the experimental data within the measurement error. We observed absorption bands for neuroglobin in the experimental spectra, and provided a theoretical basis for the possibility of determining its absolute concentrations in the conjunctiva. We have shown that our method can detect low bilirubin concentrations in blood.

  10. Crystal structure solution from experimentally determined atomic pair distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    Juhas, P.; Granlund, L.; Gujarathi, S.R.; Duxbury, P.M.; Billinge, S.J.L.

    2010-05-25

    An extension of the Liga algorithm for structure solution from atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs), to handle periodic crystal structures with multiple elements in the unit cell, is described. The procedure is performed in three separate steps. First, pair distances are extracted from the experimental PDF. In the second step the Liga algorithm is used to find unit-cell sites consistent with these pair distances. Finally, the atom species are assigned over the cell sites by minimizing the overlap of their empirical atomic radii. The procedure has been demonstrated on synchrotron X-ray PDF data from 16 test samples. The structure solution was successful for 14 samples, including cases with enlarged supercells. The algorithm success rate and the reasons for the failed cases are discussed, together with enhancements that should improve its convergence and usability.

  11. Recent Methods for Purification and Structure Determination of Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiulong; Lv, Huanhuan; Wang, Lili; Chen, Man; Li, Fangfei; Liang, Chao; Yu, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Feng; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that can interact with target molecules through specific three-dimensional structures. The excellent features, such as high specificity and affinity for target proteins, small size, chemical stability, low immunogenicity, facile chemical synthesis, versatility in structural design and engineering, and accessible for site-specific modifications with functional moieties, make aptamers attractive molecules in the fields of clinical diagnostics and biopharmaceutical therapeutics. However, difficulties in purification and structural identification of aptamers remain a major impediment to their broad clinical application. In this mini-review, we present the recently attractive developments regarding the purification and identification of aptamers. We also discuss the advantages, limitations, and prospects for the major methods applied in purifying and identifying aptamers, which could facilitate the application of aptamers. PMID:27999357

  12. Local Factors Determine Plant Community Structure on Closely Neighbored Islands

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianbo; Jiang, Lin; Yu, Lin; Sun, Que

    2011-01-01

    Despite the recent popularity of the metacommunity concept, ecologists have not evaluated the applicability of different metacommunity frameworks to insular organisms. We surveyed 50 closely spaced islands in the Thousand-Island Lake of China to examine the role of local (environmental) and regional (dispersal) factors in structuring woody plant assemblages (tree and shrub species) on these islands. By partitioning the variation in plant community structure into local and regional causes, we showed that local environmental conditions, specifically island morphometric characteristics, accounted for the majority of the variation in plant community structure among the studied islands. Spatial variables, representing the potential importance of species dispersal, explained little variation. We conclude that one metacommunity framework–species sorting–best characterizes these plant communities. This result reinforces the idea that the traditional approach of emphasizing the local perspective when studying ecological communities continues to hold its value. PMID:21572960

  13. Determining protein similarity by comparing hydrophobic core structure.

    PubMed

    Gadzała, M; Kalinowska, B; Banach, M; Konieczny, L; Roterman, I

    2017-02-01

    Formal assessment of structural similarity is - next to protein structure prediction - arguably the most important unsolved problem in proteomics. In this paper we propose a similarity criterion based on commonalities between the proteins' hydrophobic cores. The hydrophobic core emerges as a result of conformational changes through which each residue reaches its intended position in the protein body. A quantitative criterion based on this phenomenon has been proposed in the framework of the CASP challenge. The structure of the hydrophobic core - including the placement and scope of any deviations from the idealized model - may indirectly point to areas of importance from the point of view of the protein's biological function. Our analysis focuses on an arbitrarily selected target from the CASP11 challenge. The proposed measure, while compliant with CASP criteria (70-80% correlation), involves certain adjustments which acknowledge the presence of factors other than simple spatial arrangement of solids.

  14. Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers: Structure Determination and Trends in Antibacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbing; Lohith, Katheryn; Rosario, Margaret; Pulliam, Thomas H; O'Connor, Robert D; Bell, Lori J; Bewley, Carole A

    2016-07-22

    Antibacterial-guided fractionation of the Dictyoceratid sponges Lamellodysidea sp. and two samples of Dysidea granulosa yielded 14 polybrominated, diphenyl ethers including one new methoxy-containing compound (8). Their structures were elucidated by interpretation of spectroscopic data of the natural product and their methoxy derivatives. Most of the compounds showed strong antimicrobial activity with low- to sub-microgram mL(-1) minimum inhibitory concentrations against drug-susceptible and drug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecium, and two compounds inhibited Escherichia coli in a structure-dependent manner.

  15. Unified approach for determining tetragonal tungsten bronze crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, M; Saint-Grégoire, P

    2014-05-01

    Tetragonal tungsten bronze (TTB) oxides are one of the most important classes of ferroelectrics. Many of these framework structures undergo ferroelastic transformations related to octahedron tilting deformations. Such tilting deformations are closely related to the rigid unit modes (RUMs). This paper discusses the whole set of RUMs in an ideal TTB lattice and possible crystal structures which can emerge owing to the condensation of some of them. Analysis of available experimental data for the TTB-like niobates lends credence to the obtained theoretical predictions.

  16. Compressed Sensing Electron Tomography for Determining Biological Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guay, Matthew D.; Czaja, Wojciech; Aronova, Maria A.; Leapman, Richard D.

    2016-06-01

    There has been growing interest in applying compressed sensing (CS) theory and practice to reconstruct 3D volumes at the nanoscale from electron tomography datasets of inorganic materials, based on known sparsity in the structure of interest. Here we explore the application of CS for visualizing the 3D structure of biological specimens from tomographic tilt series acquired in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). CS-ET reconstructions match or outperform commonly used alternative methods in full and undersampled tomogram recovery, but with less significant performance gains than observed for the imaging of inorganic materials. We propose that this disparity stems from the increased structural complexity of biological systems, as supported by theoretical CS sampling considerations and numerical results in simulated phantom datasets. A detailed analysis of the efficacy of CS-ET for undersampled recovery is therefore complicated by the structure of the object being imaged. The numerical nonlinear decoding process of CS shares strong connections with popular regularized least-squares methods, and the use of such numerical recovery techniques for mitigating artifacts and denoising in reconstructions of fully sampled datasets remains advantageous. This article provides a link to the software that has been developed for CS-ET reconstruction of electron tomographic data sets.

  17. Conformations and Coherences in Structure Determination by Ultrafast Electron Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Milo M.; Shorokhov, Dmitry; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we consider consequences of spatial coherences and conformations in diffraction of (macro)molecules with different potential energy landscapes. The emphasis is on using this understanding to extract structural and temporal information from diffraction experiments. The theoretical analysis of structural interconversions spans an increased range of complexity, from small hydrocarbons to proteins. For each molecule considered, we construct the potential energy landscape and assess the characteristic conformational states available. For molecules that are quasi-harmonic in the vicinity of energy minima, we find that the distinct conformer model is sufficient even at high temperatures. If, however, the energy surface is either locally flat around the minima or the molecule includes many degrees of conformational freedom, a Boltzmann ensemble must be used, in what we define as the pseudoconformer approach, to reproduce the diffraction. For macromolecules with numerous energy minima, the ensemble of hundreds of structures is considered, but we also utilize the concept of the persistence length to provide information on orientational coherence and its use to assess the degree of resonance contribution to diffraction. It is shown that the erosion of the resonant features in diffraction which are characteristic of some quasi-periodic structural motifs can be exploited in experimental studies of conformational interconversions triggered by a laser-induced temperature jump. PMID:19320469

  18. Radar determination of the spatial structure of hydraulic conductivity.

    PubMed

    Oldenborger, Greg A; Schincariol, Robert A; Mansinha, Lalu

    2003-01-01

    Spatial variability of hydraulic conductivity exerts a predominant control on the flow of fluid through porous media. Heterogeneities influence advective pathways, hydrodynamic dispersion, and density-dependent dispersion; they are, therefore, a key concern for studies of ground water resource development, contaminant transport, and reservoir engineering. Ground-penetrating radar contributes to the remote, geophysical characterization of the macroscale variability of natural porous media. On a controlled excavation of a glacial-fluvial sand and gravel deposit in the Fanshawe Delta area (Ontario, Canada), the hydraulic conductivity field of a 45 x 3 m vertical exposure was characterized using constant-head permeameter measurements performed on undisturbed horizontal sediment cores. Ground-penetrating radar data were collected along the excavation face in the form of both reflection and common midpoint surveys. Comparison of geostatistical analyses of the permeameter measurements and the radar data suggests thatthe horizontal correlation structure of radar stack velocity can be used to directly infer the horizontal correlation structure of hydraulic conductivity. The averaging nature of the common midpoint survey is manifest in the vertical correlation structure of stack velocity, making it less useful. Radar reflection data do not exhibit a spatial structure similar to that of hydraulic conductivity possibly because reflections are a result of material property contrasts rather than the material properties themselves.

  19. Structural Determinants of Intergroup Association: Interracial Marriage and Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South, Scott J.; Messner, Steven F.

    1986-01-01

    Using data from a sample of 25 U. S. metropolitan cities, this study investigates the relationship between interracial marriage and violent interracial crime. Results show a positive relationship, one which was predicted by Blau's macrosociological theory of social structure. (Author/JDH)

  20. Compressed Sensing Electron Tomography for Determining Biological Structure

    PubMed Central

    Guay, Matthew D.; Czaja, Wojciech; Aronova, Maria A.; Leapman, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    There has been growing interest in applying compressed sensing (CS) theory and practice to reconstruct 3D volumes at the nanoscale from electron tomography datasets of inorganic materials, based on known sparsity in the structure of interest. Here we explore the application of CS for visualizing the 3D structure of biological specimens from tomographic tilt series acquired in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). CS-ET reconstructions match or outperform commonly used alternative methods in full and undersampled tomogram recovery, but with less significant performance gains than observed for the imaging of inorganic materials. We propose that this disparity stems from the increased structural complexity of biological systems, as supported by theoretical CS sampling considerations and numerical results in simulated phantom datasets. A detailed analysis of the efficacy of CS-ET for undersampled recovery is therefore complicated by the structure of the object being imaged. The numerical nonlinear decoding process of CS shares strong connections with popular regularized least-squares methods, and the use of such numerical recovery techniques for mitigating artifacts and denoising in reconstructions of fully sampled datasets remains advantageous. This article provides a link to the software that has been developed for CS-ET reconstruction of electron tomographic data sets. PMID:27291259

  1. Membrane Proteins in Four Acts: Function Precedes Structure Determination

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, W. A.; Zakharov, S. D.; Hasan, S. Saif; Zhang, H.; Baniulis, D.; Zhalnina, M. V.; Soriano, G. M.; Sharma, O.; Rochet, J. C.; Ryan, C.; Whitelegge., J.; Kurisu, G.; Yamashita, E.

    2011-01-01

    Studies on four membrane protein systems, which combine information derived from crystal structures and biophysical studies have emphasized, as a precursor to crystallization, demonstration of functional activity. These assays have relied on sensitive spectrophotometric, electrophysiological, and microbiological assays of activity to select purification procedures that lead to functional complexes and with greater likelihood to successful crystallization: (I), Hetero-oligomeric proteins involved in electron transport/ proton translocation). (1) Crystal structures of the eight subunit heterooligomeric trans-membrane dimeric cytochrome b6f complex were obtained from cyanobacteria using a protocol that allowed an analysis of the structure and function of internal lipids at specific intra-membrane, intra-protein sites. Proteolysis and monomerization that inactivated the complex and prevented crystallization was minimized through the use of filamentous cyanobacterial strains that seem to have a different set of membrane-active proteases. (2) An NADPH-quinone oxido-reductase isolated from cyanobacteria contains an expanded set of seventeen monotopic and polytopic hetero-subunits. (II) β-barrel outer membrane proteins (OMPs). High resolution structures of the vitamin B12 binding protein, BtuB, solved in meso and in surfo, provide the best example of the differences in such structures that were anticipated in the first application of the lipid cubic phase to membrane proteins (1). A structure of the complex of BtuB with the colicin E3 and E2 receptor binding domain established a “fishing pole” model for outer membrane receptor function in cellular import of nuclease colicins. (III) A modified faster purification procedure contributed to significantly improved resolution (1.83 Å) of the universal porin, OmpF, the first membrane protein for which meaningful 3D crystals have been obtained (2). A crystal structure of the N-terminal translocation domain of colicin E3

  2. Spatial and temporal determinants of genetic structure in Gentianella bohemica

    PubMed Central

    Königer, Julia; Rebernig, Carolin A; Brabec, Jiří; Kiehl, Kathrin; Greimler, Josef

    2012-01-01

    The biennial plant Gentianella bohemica is a subendemic of the Bohemian Massif, where it occurs in seminatural grasslands. It has become rare in recent decades as a result of profound changes in land use. Using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) fingerprint data, we investigated the genetic structure within and among populations of G. bohemica in Bavaria, the Czech Republic, and the Austrian border region. The aim of our study was (1) to analyze the genetic structure among populations and to discuss these findings in the context of present and historical patterns of connectivity and isolation of populations, (2) to analyze genetic structure among consecutive generations (cohorts of two consecutive years), and (3) to investigate relationships between intrapopulational diversity and effective population size (Ne) as well as plant traits. (1) The German populations were strongly isolated from each other (pairwise FST= 0.29–0.60) and from all other populations (FST= 0.24–0.49). We found a pattern of near panmixis among the latter (FST= 0.15–0.35) with geographical distance explaining only 8% of the genetic variance. These results were congruent with a principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and analysis using STRUCTURE to identify genetically coherent groups. These findings are in line with the strong physical barrier and historical constraints, resulting in separation of the German populations from the others. (2) We found pronounced genetic differences between consecutive cohorts of the German populations (pairwise FST= 0.23 and 0.31), which can be explained by local population history (land use, disturbance). (3) Genetic diversity within populations (Shannon index, HSh) was significantly correlated with Ne (RS= 0.733) and reflected a loss of diversity due to several demographic bottlenecks. Overall, we found that the genetic structure in G. bohemica is strongly influenced by historical periods of high connectivity and isolation as well as by marked

  3. Embarras de richesses – It is not good to be too anomalous: Accurate structure of selenourea, a chiral crystal of planar molecules

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhipu

    2017-01-01

    Selenourea, SeC(NH2)2, recently found an application as a derivatization reagent providing a significant anomalous diffraction signal used for phasing macromolecular crystal structures. The crystal structure of selenourea itself was solved about 50 years ago, from data recorded on films and evaluated by eye and refined to R = 0.15 with errors of bond lengths and angles about 0.1 Å and 6°. In the current work this structure is re-evaluated on the basis of synchrotron data and refined to R1 = 0.021 with bond and angle errors about 0.007 Å and 0.5°. The nine planar molecules of selenourea pack either in the P31 or in the P32 unit cell. All unique molecules are connected by a complex network of Se•••H-N hydrogen bonds and Se•••Se contacts. The packing of selenourea molecules is highly pseudosymmetric, approximating either of the P31(2)12, R3, and R32 space groups. Because the overwhelming majority of diffracted X-ray intensity originates form the anomalously scattering selenium atoms, the measurable anomalous Bijvoet differences are diminished and it was not possible to solve this crystal structure based on the anomalous signal alone. PMID:28207770

  4. GlycoMinestruct: a new bioinformatics tool for highly accurate mapping of the human N-linked and O-linked glycoproteomes by incorporating structural features

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fuyi; Li, Chen; Revote, Jerico; Zhang, Yang; Webb, Geoffrey I.; Li, Jian; Song, Jiangning; Lithgow, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation plays an important role in cell-cell adhesion, ligand-binding and subcellular recognition. Current approaches for predicting protein glycosylation are primarily based on sequence-derived features, while little work has been done to systematically assess the importance of structural features to glycosylation prediction. Here, we propose a novel bioinformatics method called GlycoMinestruct(http://glycomine.erc.monash.edu/Lab/GlycoMine_Struct/) for improved prediction of human N- and O-linked glycosylation sites by combining sequence and structural features in an integrated computational framework with a two-step feature-selection strategy. Experiments indicated that GlycoMinestruct outperformed NGlycPred, the only predictor that incorporated both sequence and structure features, achieving AUC values of 0.941 and 0.922 for N- and O-linked glycosylation, respectively, on an independent test dataset. We applied GlycoMinestruct to screen the human structural proteome and obtained high-confidence predictions for N- and O-linked glycosylation sites. GlycoMinestruct can be used as a powerful tool to expedite the discovery of glycosylation events and substrates to facilitate hypothesis-driven experimental studies. PMID:27708373

  5. An integrated strategy for rapid and accurate determination of free and cell-bound microcystins and related peptides in natural blooms by liquid chromatography-electrospray-high resolution mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry using both positive and negative ionization modes.

    PubMed

    Flores, Cintia; Caixach, Josep

    2015-08-14

    An integrated high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) strategy has been developed for rapid and accurate determination of free and cell-bound microcystins (MCs) and related peptides in water blooms. The natural samples (water and algae) were filtered for independent analysis of aqueous and sestonic fractions. These fractions were analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and ESI-Orbitrap-HCD-MS. MALDI, ESI and the study of fragmentation sequences have been provided crucial structural information. The potential of combined positive and negative ionization modes, full scan and fragmentation acquisition modes (TOF/TOF and HCD) by HRMS and high resolution and accurate mass was investigated in order to allow unequivocal determination of MCs. Besides, a reliable quantitation has been possible by HRMS. This composition helped to decrease the probability of false positives and negatives, as alternative to commonly used LC-ESI-MS/MS methods. The analysis was non-target, therefore covered the possibility to analyze all MC analogs concurrently without any pre-selection of target MC. Furthermore, archived data was subjected to retrospective "post-targeted" analysis and a screening of other potential toxins and related peptides as anabaenopeptins in the samples was done. Finally, the MS protocol and identification tools suggested were applied to the analysis of characteristic water blooms from Spanish reservoirs.

  6. Iron phosphate glasses: Structure determination and radiation tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolley, Kenny; Smith, Roger

    2016-05-01

    Iron phosphate glass (IPG) has gained recent interest for use in encapsulating radioactive waste for long term storage. In this work, we investigate 5 different compositions of iron phosphate glass. We consider amorphous structures of 3 known crystalline phases: Fe2+Fe23+ (P2O7)2, Fe43+ (P2O7)3 and Fe3+(PO3)3, and structures of IPG (40 mol% Fe2O3 and 60 mol% P2O5), with 4% and 17% Fe2+ ion concentrations. Using constant volume molecular dynamics (MD), we quench a set of structures for each glass composition, to find the optimal density structure. We found that the lowest energy structures of IPG with 4% and 17% concentration of Fe2+, have a density of 3.25 and 3.28 g/cm3 respectively. This is slightly higher than the experimentally measured values of 2.9 and 2.95 g/cm3 respectively. We also estimate an upper and lower bound on the melting temperatures of each glass, then for each glass, we simulate radiation damage cascades at 4 keV. The cascade structures can be in the form of either a concentrated thermal spike or more diffuse with sub-cascade branching. We found that the glass compositions with a higher Fe/P atomic ratio, contained a greater number of displacements after the cascade. We also found that the IPG with 4% Fe2+, contained slightly fewer displacements than the IPG with 17% Fe2+. This is consistent with our previous work, which showed that the threshold displacement energies are lower for glasses with a lower Fe2+ content. In all the simulations, many PO4 polyhedra are destroyed during the early stages of irradiation, but recover strongly over a time scale of picoseconds, leaving very few over or under co-ordinated P atoms at the end of the ballistic phase. This is in contrast to recent work in apatite. The strong recovery indicates that phosphate glasses with a low Fe2+ content could be good materials for waste encapsulation.

  7. FILMPAR: A parallel algorithm designed for the efficient and accurate computation of thin film flow on functional surfaces containing micro-structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. C.; Thompson, H. M.; Gaskell, P. H.

    2009-12-01

    , industrial and physical applications. However, despite recent modelling advances, the accurate numerical solution of the equations governing such problems is still at a relatively early stage. Indeed, recent studies employing a simplifying long-wave approximation have shown that highly efficient numerical methods are necessary to solve the resulting lubrication equations in order to achieve the level of grid resolution required to accurately capture the effects of micro- and nano-scale topographical features. Solution method: A portable parallel multigrid algorithm has been developed for the above purpose, for the particular case of flow over submerged topographical features. Within the multigrid framework adopted, a W-cycle is used to accelerate convergence in respect of the time dependent nature of the problem, with relaxation sweeps performed using a fixed number of pre- and post-Red-Black Gauss-Seidel Newton iterations. In addition, the algorithm incorporates automatic adaptive time-stepping to avoid the computational expense associated with repeated time-step failure. Running time: 1.31 minutes using 128 processors on BlueGene/P with a problem size of over 16.7 million mesh points.

  8. Benchmark calculations with correlated molecular wave functions. V. The determination of accurate [ital ab] [ital initio] intermolecular potentials for He[sub 2], Ne[sub 2], and Ar[sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Woon, D.E. )

    1994-02-15

    Dimer interactions of helium, neon, and argon have been studied using the augmented correlation consistent basis sets of Dunning and co-workers. Two correlation methods have been employed throughout; Moller--Plesset perturbation theory through fourth-order (MP4) and single and double excitation coupled-cluster theory with perturbative treatment of triple excitations [CCSD(T)]. Full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations were performed on He[sub 2] for some basis sets. In general, only valence electrons were correlated, although some calculations which also correlated the [ital n]=2 shell of Ar[sub 2] were performed. Dimer potential energy curves were determined using the supermolecule method with and without the counterpoise correction. A series of additional basis sets beyond the augmented correlation consistent sets were explored in which the diffuse region of the radial function space has been systematically saturated. In combination with the systematic expansion across angular function space which is inherent to the correlation consistent prescription, this approach guarantees very accurate atomic polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities and should lead to an accurate description of dispersion forces. The best counterpoise-corrected MP4 values for the well depths of the three dimers are (in microhartrees, empirical values in parentheses) He[sub 2], 31.9 (34.6); Ne[sub 2], 123 (134); and Ar[sub 2], 430 (454). The corresponding CCSD(T) values are He[sub 2], 33.1; Ne[sub 2], 128; and Ar[sub 2], 417. Although these values are very good, the nearly exponential convergence of well depth as a function of basis quality afforded by using the various series of correlation consistent basis sets allows estimation of complete basis set (CBS) limiting values. The MP4 estimated CBS limits are He[sub 2], 32.2; Ne[sub 2], 126; and Ar[sub 2], 447.

  9. Vibrational frequencies and structural determinations of 1,4-thioxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellzy, Michael W.; Jensen, James O.; Hameka, Hendrik F.; Kay, Jack G.; Zeroka, Daniel

    2001-10-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the structure and infrared spectra of 1,4-thioxane. The vibrational frequencies of the 1,4-thioxane molecule were analyzed using standard quantum chemical techniques. Frequencies were calculated at the MP2 and DFT levels of theory using the standard 6-31G* basis set. The structural transformation of the chemical agent bis (2-chloroethyl) sulfide (HD, mustard gas) and the related symmetry to a previously study compound (4) makes the symmetry of the 1,4-thioxane molecule an interesting candidate for study. The molecule exists normally in a C s configuration similar to the chair form of cyclohexane. High-energy forms of 1,4-thioxane with C 1 and C 2 symmetry also exist.

  10. Vibrational frequencies and structural determinations of di-vinyl sulfone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellzy, Michael W.; Jensen, James O.; Kay, Jack G.

    2003-03-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the structure and infrared spectra of di-vinyl sulfone. The vibrational frequencies of the di-vinyl sulfone molecule were analyzed using standard quantum chemical techniques. Frequencies were calculated at the MP2 and DFT levels of theory using the standard 6-311G* basis set. The structural transformation of the chemical agent bis(2-chloroehtyl) sulfide (HD, mustard gas) and the related symmetry to a previously study compounds [Spectrochim. Acta Part A 55 (1999) 121; Spectrochim. Acta Part A 57 (2001) 2417] makes the symmetry of the di-vinyl sulfone molecule an interesting candidate for study. The molecule exists normally in a C2 configuration. High-energy forms of di-vinyl sulfone with CS and C1 symmetries also exist.

  11. Structural Determinants of Oligomerization of the Aquaporin-4 Channel.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Philip; Conner, Matthew T; Bill, Roslyn M; Conner, Alex C

    2016-03-25

    The aquaporin (AQP) family of integral membrane protein channels mediate cellular water and solute flow. Although qualitative and quantitative differences in channel permeability, selectivity, subcellular localization, and trafficking responses have been observed for different members of the AQP family, the signature homotetrameric quaternary structure is conserved. Using a variety of biophysical techniques, we show that mutations to an intracellular loop (loop D) of human AQP4 reduce oligomerization. Non-tetrameric AQP4 mutants are unable to relocalize to the plasma membrane in response to changes in extracellular tonicity, despite equivalent constitutive surface expression levels and water permeability to wild-type AQP4. A network of AQP4 loop D hydrogen bonding interactions, identified using molecular dynamics simulations and based on a comparative mutagenic analysis of AQPs 1, 3, and 4, suggest that loop D interactions may provide a general structural framework for tetrameric assembly within the AQP family.

  12. Automatic RNA secondary structure determination stochastic context-free grammars

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, L.

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a method for predicting the common secondary structure of large RNA multiple alignments using only the information in the alignment. It uses a series of progressively more sensitive searches of the data in an iterative manner to discover regions of base pairing; the first pass examines the entire multiple alignment. The searching uses two methods to find base pairings. Mutual information is used to measure covariation between pairs of columns in the multiple alignment and a minimum length encoding method is used to detect column pairs with high potential to base pair. Dynamic programming is used to recover the optimal tree made up of the best potential base pairs and to create a stochastic context-free grammar. The information in the tree guides the next iteration of searching. The method is similar to the traditional comparative sequence analysis technique. The method correctly identifies most of the common secondary structure in 16S and 23S rRNA.

  13. Structural determinants of RNA recognition and cleavage by Dicer.

    PubMed

    MacRae, Ian J; Zhou, Kaihong; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2007-10-01

    A hallmark of RNA interference is the production of short double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules 21-28 nucleotides in length by the specialized RNase III protein Dicer. Dicer enzymes uniquely generate RNA products of specific lengths by mechanisms that have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that the PAZ domain responsible for dsRNA end recognition confers this measuring ability through both its structural position and RNA-binding specificity. Point mutations define the dsRNA-binding surface and reveal a protein loop important for cleavage of substrates containing perfect or imperfect base pairing. On the basis of these results, we reengineered Dicer with a U1A RNA-binding domain in place of the PAZ domain to create an enzyme with altered end-recognition specificity and RNA product length. These results explain how Dicer functions as a molecular ruler and provide a structural basis for modifying its activity in cells.

  14. Model Structure Determination and Identifiability Problems in System Identification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    System identification has become one of the most active areas in system theory and its applications. In many engineering applications where the...estimation. As the authors extend the concept of system identification to those classes of problems where prior knowledge on structure is limited, some...basic problems other than parameter estimation become important. System identification consists of three basic sub-problems: (1) pre-estimation

  15. Determinants of fish assemblage structure in Northwestern Great Plains streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullen, J.A.; Bramblett, R.G.; Guy, C.S.; Zale, A.V.; Roberts, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    Prairie streams are known for their harsh and stochastic physical conditions, and the fish assemblages therein have been shown to be temporally variable. We assessed the spatial and temporal variation in fish assemblage structure in five intermittent, adventitious northwestern Great Plains streams representing a gradient of watershed areas. Fish assemblages and abiotic conditions varied more spatially than temporally. The most important variables explaining fish assemblage structure were longitudinal position and the proportion of fine substrates. The proportion of fine substrates increased proceeding upstream, approaching 100% in all five streams, and species richness declined upstream with increasing fine substrates. High levels of fine substrate in the upper reaches appeared to limit the distribution of obligate lithophilic fish species to reaches further downstream. Species richness and substrates were similar among all five streams at the lowermost and uppermost sites. However, in the middle reaches, species richness increased, the amount of fine substrate decreased, and connectivity increased as watershed area increased. Season and some dimensions of habitat (including thalweg depth, absolute distance to the main-stem river, and watershed size) were not essential in explaining the variation in fish assemblages. Fish species richness varied more temporally than overall fish assemblage structure did because common species were consistently abundant across seasons, whereas rare species were sometimes absent or perhaps not detected by sampling. The similarity in our results among five streams varying in watershed size and those from other studies supports the generalization that spatial variation exceeds temporal variation in the fish assemblages of prairie and warmwater streams. Furthermore, given longitudinal position, substrate, and stream size, general predictions regarding fish assemblage structure and function in prairie streams are possible. ?? American

  16. Structural determination of two new steroidal saponins from Smilax china.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Lian; Liu, Rong-Hua; Shao, Feng

    2009-09-01

    Two new steroidal saponins (1 and 2) were isolated from the BuOH fraction of the 70% EtOH extract of the tubes of Smilax china, together with four known analogues, 3-6. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by means of chemical evidence and spectroscopic analyses, including HR-MS, IR, (1)H- and (13)C-NMR, and 2D experiments ((1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC and HMBC).

  17. Structural determinants of reductive terpene cyclization in iridoid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Kamileen, Mohammed O.; Sherden, Nathaniel H.; Geu-Flores, Fernando; Lawson, David M.; O’Connor, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    The carbon skeleton of ecologically and pharmacologically important iridoid monoterpenes is formed in a reductive cyclization reaction unrelated to canonical terpene cyclization. Here we report the crystal structure of the recently discovered iridoid cyclase (Catharanthus roseus) bound to a mechanism-inspired inhibitor that illuminates substrate binding and catalytic function of the enzyme. Key features that distinguish iridoid synthase from its close homologue, progesterone 5β-reductase, are highlighted. PMID:26551396

  18. Structural determinants of skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor gating.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Chakraborty, Asima; Xu, Le; Mei, Yingwu; Samsó, Montserrat; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Meissner, Gerhard

    2013-03-01

    Ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) releases Ca(2+) from intracellular stores upon nerve impulse to trigger skeletal muscle contraction. Effector binding at the cytoplasmic domain tightly controls gating of the pore domain of RyR1 to release Ca(2+). However, the molecular mechanism that links effector binding to channel gating is unknown due to lack of structural data. Here, we used a combination of computational and electrophysiological methods and cryo-EM densities to generate structural models of the open and closed states of RyR1. Using our structural models, we identified an interface between the pore-lining helix (Tyr-4912-Glu-4948) and a linker helix (Val-4830-Val-4841) that lies parallel to the cytoplasmic membrane leaflet. To test the hypothesis that this interface controls RyR1 gating, we designed mutations in the linker helix to stabilize either the open (V4830W and T4840W) or closed (H4832W and G4834W) state and validated them using single channel experiments. To further confirm this interface, we designed mutations in the pore-lining helix to stabilize the closed state (Q4947N, Q4947T, and Q4947S), which we also validated using single channel experiments. The channel conductance and selectivity of the mutations that we designed in the linker and pore-lining helices were indistinguishable from those of WT RyR1, demonstrating our ability to modulate RyR1 gating without affecting ion permeation. Our integrated computational and experimental approach significantly advances the understanding of the structure and function of an unusually large ion channel.

  19. Music structure determines heart rate variability of singers

    PubMed Central

    Vickhoff, Björn; Malmgren, Helge; Åström, Rickard; Nyberg, Gunnar; Ekström, Seth-Reino; Engwall, Mathias; Snygg, Johan; Nilsson, Michael; Jörnsten, Rebecka

    2013-01-01

    Choir singing is known to promote wellbeing. One reason for this may be that singing demands a slower than normal respiration, which may in turn affect heart activity. Coupling of heart rate variability (HRV) to respiration is called Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). This coupling has a subjective as well as a biologically soothing effect, and it is beneficial for cardiovascular function. RSA is seen to be more marked during slow-paced breathing and at lower respiration rates (0.1 Hz and below). In this study, we investigate how singing, which is a form of guided breathing, affects HRV and RSA. The study comprises a group of healthy 18 year olds of mixed gender. The subjects are asked to; (1) hum a single tone and breathe whenever they need to; (2) sing a hymn with free, unguided breathing; and (3) sing a slow mantra and breathe solely between phrases. Heart rate (HR) is measured continuously during the study. The study design makes it possible to compare above three levels of song structure. In a separate case study, we examine five individuals performing singing tasks (1–3). We collect data with more advanced equipment, simultaneously recording HR, respiration, skin conductance and finger temperature. We show how song structure, respiration and HR are connected. Unison singing of regular song structures makes the hearts of the singers accelerate and decelerate simultaneously. Implications concerning the effect on wellbeing and health are discussed as well as the question how this inner entrainment may affect perception and behavior. PMID:23847555

  20. Automated determination of fibrillar structures by simultaneous model building and fiber diffraction refinement.

    PubMed

    Potrzebowski, Wojciech; André, Ingemar

    2015-07-01

    For highly oriented fibrillar molecules, three-dimensional structures can often be determined from X-ray fiber diffraction data. However, because of limited information content, structure determination and validation can be challenging. We demonstrate that automated structure determination of protein fibers can be achieved by guiding the building of macromolecular models with fiber diffraction data. We illustrate the power of our approach by determining the structures of six bacteriophage viruses de novo using fiber diffraction data alone and together with solid-state NMR data. Furthermore, we demonstrate the feasibility of molecular replacement from monomeric and fibrillar templates by solving the structure of a plant virus using homology modeling and protein-protein docking. The generated models explain the experimental data to the same degree as deposited reference structures but with improved structural quality. We also developed a cross-validation method for model selection. The results highlight the power of fiber diffraction data as structural constraints.

  1. Experimental Determination of Shock Structures in Hetrogeneous Layered Material Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-19

    2004). The failure and ultimate strength of the composites were both reported to increase with strain rate. Haque et al. (2003) used SHPB technique...Sierakowski and Chaturvedi, 1997). These material systems can be engineered to have the same strength and stiffness as high- strength steels , yet they...Hugoniot curve of GRP were determined. The spall strength of GRP was also studied by conducting a series of both normal-impact and combined pressure

  2. EM-fold: de novo atomic-detail protein structure determination from medium-resolution density maps.

    PubMed

    Lindert, Steffen; Alexander, Nathan; Wötzel, Nils; Karakaş, Mert; Stewart, Phoebe L; Meiler, Jens

    2012-03-07

    Electron density maps of membrane proteins or large macromolecular complexes are frequently only determined at medium resolution between 4 Å and 10 Å, either by cryo-electron microscopy or X-ray crystallography. In these density maps, the general arrangement of secondary structure elements (SSEs) is revealed, whereas their directionality and connectivity remain elusive. We demonstrate that the topology of proteins with up to 250 amino acids can be determined from such density maps when combined with a computational protein folding protocol. Furthermore, we accurately reconstruct atomic detail in loop regions and amino acid side chains not visible in the experimental data. The EM-Fold algorithm assembles the SSEs de novo before atomic detail is added using Rosetta. In a benchmark of 27 proteins, the protocol consistently and reproducibly achieves models with root mean square deviation values <3 Å.

  3. Membrane proteins in four acts: function precedes structure determination.

    PubMed

    Cramer, W A; Zakharov, S D; Saif Hasan, S; Zhang, H; Baniulis, D; Zhalnina, M V; Soriano, G M; Sharma, O; Rochet, J C; Ryan, C; Whitelegge, J; Kurisu, G; Yamashita, E

    2011-12-01

    Studies on four membrane protein systems, which combine information derived from crystal structures and biophysical studies have emphasized, as a precursor to crystallization, demonstration of functional activity. These assays have relied on sensitive spectrophotometric, electrophysiological, and microbiological assays of activity to select purification procedures that lead to functional complexes and with greater likelihood to successful crystallization: (I), Hetero-oligomeric proteins involved in electron transport/proton translocation. (1) Crystal structures of the eight subunit hetero-oligomeric trans-membrane dimeric cytochrome b(6)f complex were obtained from cyanobacteria using a protocol that allowed an analysis of the structure and function of internal lipids at specific intra-membrane, intra-protein sites. Proteolysis and monomerization that inactivated the complex and prevented crystallization was minimized through the use of filamentous cyanobacterial strains that seem to have a different set of membrane-active proteases. (2) An NADPH-quinone oxido-reductase isolated from cyanobacteria contains an expanded set of 17 monotopic and polytopic hetero-subunits. (II) β-Barrel outer membrane proteins (OMPs). High resolution structures of the vitamin B(12) binding protein, BtuB, solved in meso and in surfo, provide the best example of the differences in such structures that were anticipated in the first application of the lipid cubic phase to membrane proteins [1]. A structure of the complex of BtuB with the colicin E3 and E2 receptor binding domain established a "fishing pole" model for outer membrane receptor function in cellular import of nuclease colicins. (III) A modified faster purification procedure contributed to significantly improved resolution (1.83Å) of the universal porin, OmpF, the first membrane protein for which meaningful 3D crystals have been obtained [2]. A crystal structure of the N-terminal translocation domain of colicin E3 complexed to

  4. Accurate Assessment of the Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalytic Activity of Mn/Polypyrrole Nanocomposites Based on Rotating Disk Electrode Measurements, Complemented with Multitechnique Structural Characterizations.

    PubMed

    Bocchetta, Patrizia; Sánchez, Carolina Ramírez; Taurino, Antonietta; Bozzini, Benedetto

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the quantitative assessment of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalytic activity of electrodeposited Mn/polypyrrole (PPy) nanocomposites for alkaline aqueous solutions, based on the Rotating Disk Electrode (RDE) method and accompanied by structural characterizations relevant to the establishment of structure-function relationships. The characterization of Mn/PPy films is addressed to the following: (i) morphology, as assessed by Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM); (ii) local electrical conductivity, as measured by Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM); and (iii) molecular structure, accessed by Raman Spectroscopy; these data provide the background against which the electrocatalytic activity can be rationalised. For comparison, the properties of Mn/PPy are gauged against those of graphite, PPy, and polycrystalline-Pt (poly-Pt). Due to the literature lack of accepted protocols for precise catalytic activity measurement at poly-Pt electrode in alkaline solution using the RDE methodology, we have also worked on the obtainment of an intralaboratory benchmark by evidencing some of the time-consuming parameters which drastically affect the reliability and repeatability of the measurement.

  5. Accurate Assessment of the Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalytic Activity of Mn/Polypyrrole Nanocomposites Based on Rotating Disk Electrode Measurements, Complemented with Multitechnique Structural Characterizations

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Carolina Ramírez; Taurino, Antonietta; Bozzini, Benedetto

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the quantitative assessment of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalytic activity of electrodeposited Mn/polypyrrole (PPy) nanocomposites for alkaline aqueous solutions, based on the Rotating Disk Electrode (RDE) method and accompanied by structural characterizations relevant to the establishment of structure-function relationships. The characterization of Mn/PPy films is addressed to the following: (i) morphology, as assessed by Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM); (ii) local electrical conductivity, as measured by Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM); and (iii) molecular structure, accessed by Raman Spectroscopy; these data provide the background against which the electrocatalytic activity can be rationalised. For comparison, the properties of Mn/PPy are gauged against those of graphite, PPy, and polycrystalline-Pt (poly-Pt). Due to the literature lack of accepted protocols for precise catalytic activity measurement at poly-Pt electrode in alkaline solution using the RDE methodology, we have also worked on the obtainment of an intralaboratory benchmark by evidencing some of the time-consuming parameters which drastically affect the reliability and repeatability of the measurement. PMID:28042491

  6. Scaling up the Single Transducer Thickness-Independent Ultrasonic Imaging Method for Accurate Characterization of Microstructural Gradients in Monolithic and Composite Tubular Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Carney, Dorothy V.; Baaklini, George Y.; Bodis, James R.; Rauser, Richard W.

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasonic velocity/time-of-flight imaging that uses back surface reflections to gauge volumetric material quality is highly suited for quantitative characterization of microstructural gradients including those due to pore fraction, density, fiber fraction, and chemical composition variations. However, a weakness of conventional pulse-echo ultrasonic velocity/time-of-flight imaging is that the image shows the effects of thickness as well as microstructural variations unless the part is uniformly thick. This limits this imaging method's usefulness in practical applications. Prior studies have described a pulse-echo time-of-flight-based ultrasonic imaging method that requires using a single transducer in combination with a reflector plate placed behind samples that eliminates the effect of thickness variation in the image. In those studies, this method was successful at isolating ultrasonic variations due to material microstructure in plate-like samples of silicon nitride, metal matrix composite, and polymer matrix composite. In this study, the method is engineered for inspection of more complex-shaped structures-those having (hollow) tubular/curved geometry. The experimental inspection technique and results are described as applied to (1) monolithic mullite ceramic and polymer matrix composite 'proof-of-concept' tubular structures that contain machined patches of various depths and (2) as-manufactured monolithic silicon nitride ceramic and silicon carbide/silicon carbide composite tubular structures that might be used in 'real world' applications.

  7. Molecular Structure and Chirality Determination from Pulsed-Jet Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobsiger, Simon; Perez, Cristobal; Evangelisti, Luca; Seifert, Nathan A.; Pate, Brooks; Lehmann, Kevin

    2014-06-01

    Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectroscopy has been used for many years as one of the most accurate methods to determine gas-phase structures of molecules and small molecular clusters. In the last years two pioneering works ushered in a new era applications. First, by exploiting the reduced measurement time and the high sensitivity, the development of chirped-pulse CP-FTMW spectrometers enabled the full structural determination of molecules of increasing size as well as molecular clusters. Second, and more recently, Patterson et al. showed that rotational spectroscopy can also be used for enantiomer-specific detection. Here we present an experimental approach that combines both in a single spectrometer. This set-up is capable to rapidly obtain the full heavy-atom substitution structure using the CP-FTMW features. The inclusion of an extra set of broadband horns allows for a chirality-sensitive measurement of the sample. The measurement we implement is a three-wave mixing experiment that uses time-separated pulses to optimally create the chiral coherence - an approach that was proposed recently. Using samples of R-, S- and racemic Solketal, the physical properties of the three-wave mixing experiment were studied. This involved the measurement of the corresponding nutation curves (molecular signal intensity vs excitation pulse duration) to demonstrate the optimal pulse sequence. The phase stability of the chiral signal, required to assign the absolute stereochemistry, has been studied as a function of the measurement signal-to-noise ratio using a "phasogram" method. G. G. Brown, B. C. Dian, K. O. Douglass, S. M. Geyer, S. T. Shipman, B. H. Pate, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 2008, 79, 053103. D. Patterson, M. Schnell, J. M. Doyle, Nature 2013, 497, 475-477. D. Patterson, J. M. Doyle, Phys. Rev. Lett. 2013, 111, 023008. V. A. Shubert, D. Schmitz, D. Patterson, J. M. Doyle, M. Schnell, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2014, 53, 1152-1155. J.-U. Grabow, Angew. Chem. 2013, 125, 11914

  8. Determination of HART I Blade Structural Properties by Laboratory Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Sung N.; Lau, Benton H.

    2012-01-01

    The structural properties of higher harmonic Aeroacoustic Rotor Test (HART I) blades were measured using the original set of blades tested in the German-dutch wind tunnel (DNW) in 1994. the measurements include bending and torsion stiffness, geometric offsets, and mass and inertia properties of the blade. the measured properties were compared to the estimated values obtained initially from the blade manufacturer. The previously estimated blade properties showed consistently higher stiffness, up to 30 percent for the flap bending in the blade inboard root section.

  9. Structural determinants of product specificity of sucrose isomerases.

    PubMed

    Ravaud, Stéphanie; Robert, Xavier; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Haser, Richard; Mattes, Ralf; Aghajari, Nushin

    2009-06-18

    The healthy sweetener isomaltulose is industrially produced from the conversion of sucrose by the sucrose isomerase SmuA from Protaminobacter rubrum. Crystal structures of SmuA in native and deoxynojirimycin complexed forms completed with modeling studies unravel the characteristics of the isomaltulose synthases catalytic pocket and their substrate binding mode. Comparison with the trehalulose synthase MutB highlights the role of Arg(298) and Arg(306) active site residues and surface charges in controlling product specificity of sucrose isomerases (isoma