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Sample records for accurate subsurface image

  1. Endoscopic subsurface imaging in tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Staggs, M; Radousky, H B

    2001-02-12

    The objective of this work is to develop endoscopic subsurface optical imaging technology that will be able to image different tissue components located underneath the surface of the tissue at an imaging depth of up to 1 centimeter. This effort is based on the utilization of existing technology and components developed for medical endoscopes with the incorporation of the appropriate modifications to implement the spectral and polarization difference imaging technique. This subsurface imaging technique employs polarization and spectral light discrimination in combination with image processing to remove a large portion of the image information from the outer layers of the tissue which leads to enhancement of the contrast and image quality of subsurface tissue structures.

  2. Imaging the Subsurface with Upgoing Muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonal, N.; Preston, L. A.; Schwellenbach, D.; Dreesen, W.; Green, A.

    2014-12-01

    We assess the feasibility of imaging the subsurface using upgoing muons. Traditional muon imaging focuses on more-prevalent downgoing muons. Muons are subatomic particles capable of penetrating the earth's crust several kilometers. Downgoing muons have been used to image the Pyramid of Khafre of Giza, various volcanoes, and smaller targets like cargo. Unfortunately, utilizing downgoing muons requires below-target detectors. For aboveground objects like a volcano, the detector is placed at the volcano's base and the top portion of the volcano is imaged. For underground targets like tunnels, the detector would have to be placed below the tunnel in a deeper tunnel or adjacent borehole, which can be costly and impractical for some locations. Additionally, detecting and characterizing subsurface features like voids from tunnels can be difficult. Typical characterization methods like sonar, seismic, and ground penetrating radar have shown mixed success. Voids have a marked density contrast with surrounding materials, so using methods sensitive to density variations would be ideal. High-energy cosmic ray muons are more sensitive to density variation than other phenomena, including gravity. Their absorption rate depends on the density of the materials through which they pass. Measurements of muon flux rate at differing directions provide density variations of the materials between the muon source (cosmic rays and neutrino interactions) and detector, much like a CAT scan. Currently, tomography using downgoing muons can resolve features to the sub-meter scale. We present results of exploratory work, which demonstrates that upgoing muon fluxes appear sufficient to achieve target detection within a few months. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Seismic Imaging of Open Subsurface Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, S. C.; Pitarka, A.; Matzel, E.; Aguiar, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Injection of high-pressure fluid into the subsurface is proven to stimulate geothermal, oil, and gas production by opening cracks that increase permeability. The effectiveness of increasing permeability by high-pressure injection has been revolutionized by the introduction of "proppants" into the injected fluid to keep cracks open after the pressure of the stimulation activity ends. The network of fractures produced during stimulation is most commonly inferred by the location of micro-earthquakes. However, existing (closed) fractures may open aseismically, so the whole fracture network may not be imaged by micro-seismic locations alone. Further, whether all new fractures remain open and for how long remains unclear. Open cracks, even fluid-filled cracks, scatter seismic waves because traction forces are not transmitted across the gap. Numerical simulation confirms that an open crack with dimensions on the order of 10 meters can scatter enough seismic energy to change the coda of seismic signals. Our simulations show that changes in seismic coda due to newly opened fractures are only a few percent of peak seismogram amplitudes, making signals from open cracks difficult to identify. We are developing advanced signal processing methods to identify candidate signals that originate from open cracks. These methods are based on differencing seismograms that are recorded before and after high-pressure fluid injection events to identify changes in the coda. The origins of candidate signals are located using time-reversal techniques to determine if the signals are indeed associated with a coherent structure. The source of scattered energy is compared to micro-seismic event locations to determine whether cracks opened seismically or aseismically. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-675612.

  4. Geophysical subsurface imaging and interface identification.

    SciTech Connect

    Pendley, Kevin; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Day, David Minot; Robinson, Allen Conrad; Weiss, Chester Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Electromagnetic induction is a classic geophysical exploration method designed for subsurface characterization--in particular, sensing the presence of geologic heterogeneities and fluids such as groundwater and hydrocarbons. Several approaches to the computational problems associated with predicting and interpreting electromagnetic phenomena in and around the earth are addressed herein. Publications resulting from the project include [31]. To obtain accurate and physically meaningful numerical simulations of natural phenomena, computational algorithms should operate in discrete settings that reflect the structure of governing mathematical models. In section 2, the extension of algebraic multigrid methods for the time domain eddy current equations to the frequency domain problem is discussed. Software was developed and is available in Trilinos ML package. In section 3 we consider finite element approximations of De Rham's complex. We describe how to develop a family of finite element spaces that forms an exact sequence on hexahedral grids. The ensuing family of non-affine finite elements is called a van Welij complex, after the work [37] of van Welij who first proposed a general method for developing tangentially and normally continuous vector fields on hexahedral elements. The use of this complex is illustrated for the eddy current equations and a conservation law problem. Software was developed and is available in the Ptenos finite element package. The more popular methods of geophysical inversion seek solutions to an unconstrained optimization problem by imposing stabilizing constraints in the form of smoothing operators on some enormous set of model parameters (i.e. ''over-parametrize and regularize''). In contrast we investigate an alternative approach whereby sharp jumps in material properties are preserved in the solution by choosing as model parameters a modest set of variables which describe an interface between adjacent regions in physical space. While

  5. Acoustic subwavelength imaging of subsurface objects with acoustic resonant metalens

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ying; Liu, XiaoJun; Zhou, Chen; Wei, Qi; Wu, DaJian

    2013-11-25

    Early research into acoustic metamaterials has shown the possibility of achieving subwavelength near-field acoustic imaging. However, a major restriction of acoustic metamaterials is that the imaging objects must be placed in close vicinity of the devices. Here, we present an approach for acoustic imaging of subsurface objects far below the diffraction limit. An acoustic metalens made of holey-structured metamaterials is used to magnify evanescent waves, which can rebuild an image at the central plane. Without changing the physical structure of the metalens, our proposed approach can image objects located at certain distances from the input surface, which provides subsurface signatures of the objects with subwavelength spatial resolution.

  6. Fibre optic confocal imaging (FOCI) for subsurface microscopy of the colon in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, P M; King, R G; Lambert, J R; Harris, M R

    1994-01-01

    Fibre optic confocal imaging (FOCI) is a new type of microscopy which has been recently developed (Delaney et al. 1993). In contrast to conventional light microscopy, FOCI and other confocal techniques allow clear imaging of subsurface structures within translucent objects. However, unlike conventional confocal microscopes which are bulky (because of a need for accurate alignment of large components) FOCI allows the imaging end to be miniaturised and relatively mobile. FOCI is thus particularly suited for clear subsurface imaging of structures within living animals or subjects. The aim of the present study was to assess the suitability of using FOCI for imaging of subsurface structures within the colon, both in vitro (human and rat biopsies) and in vivo (in rats). Images were obtained in fluorescence mode (excitation 488 nm, detection above 515 nm) following topical application of fluorescein. By this technique the glandular structure of the colon was imaged. FOCI is thus suitable for subsurface imaging of the colon in vivo. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8157487

  7. Light Field Imaging Based Accurate Image Specular Highlight Removal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haoqian; Xu, Chenxue; Wang, Xingzheng; Zhang, Yongbing; Peng, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Specular reflection removal is indispensable to many computer vision tasks. However, most existing methods fail or degrade in complex real scenarios for their individual drawbacks. Benefiting from the light field imaging technology, this paper proposes a novel and accurate approach to remove specularity and improve image quality. We first capture images with specularity by the light field camera (Lytro ILLUM). After accurately estimating the image depth, a simple and concise threshold strategy is adopted to cluster the specular pixels into "unsaturated" and "saturated" category. Finally, a color variance analysis of multiple views and a local color refinement are individually conducted on the two categories to recover diffuse color information. Experimental evaluation by comparison with existed methods based on our light field dataset together with Stanford light field archive verifies the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm. PMID:27253083

  8. Light Field Imaging Based Accurate Image Specular Highlight Removal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haoqian; Xu, Chenxue; Wang, Xingzheng; Zhang, Yongbing; Peng, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Specular reflection removal is indispensable to many computer vision tasks. However, most existing methods fail or degrade in complex real scenarios for their individual drawbacks. Benefiting from the light field imaging technology, this paper proposes a novel and accurate approach to remove specularity and improve image quality. We first capture images with specularity by the light field camera (Lytro ILLUM). After accurately estimating the image depth, a simple and concise threshold strategy is adopted to cluster the specular pixels into “unsaturated” and “saturated” category. Finally, a color variance analysis of multiple views and a local color refinement are individually conducted on the two categories to recover diffuse color information. Experimental evaluation by comparison with existed methods based on our light field dataset together with Stanford light field archive verifies the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm. PMID:27253083

  9. Subsurface imaging of silicon nanowire circuits and iron oxide nanoparticles with sub-10 nm spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Perrino, A P; Ryu, Y K; Amo, C A; Morales, M P; Garcia, R

    2016-07-01

    Non-destructive subsurface characterization of nanoscale structures and devices is of significant interest in nanolithography and nanomanufacturing. In those areas, the accurate location of the buried structures and their nanomechanical properties are relevant for optimization of the nanofabrication process and the functionality of the system. Here we demonstrate the capabilities of bimodal and trimodal force microscopy for imaging silicon nanowire devices buried under an ultrathin polymer film. We resolve the morphology and periodicities of silicon nanowire pairs. We report a spatial resolution in the sub-10 nm range for nanostructures buried under a 70 nm thick polymer film. By using numerical simulations we explain the role of the excited modes in the subsurface imaging process. Independent of the bimodal or trimodal atomic force microscopy approach, the fundamental mode is the most suitable for tracking the topography while the higher modes modulate the interaction of the tip with the buried nanostructures and provide subsurface contrast.

  10. Subsurface imaging of silicon nanowire circuits and iron oxide nanoparticles with sub-10 nm spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrino, A. P.; Ryu, Y. K.; Amo, C. A.; Morales, M. P.; Garcia, R.

    2016-07-01

    Non-destructive subsurface characterization of nanoscale structures and devices is of significant interest in nanolithography and nanomanufacturing. In those areas, the accurate location of the buried structures and their nanomechanical properties are relevant for optimization of the nanofabrication process and the functionality of the system. Here we demonstrate the capabilities of bimodal and trimodal force microscopy for imaging silicon nanowire devices buried under an ultrathin polymer film. We resolve the morphology and periodicities of silicon nanowire pairs. We report a spatial resolution in the sub-10 nm range for nanostructures buried under a 70 nm thick polymer film. By using numerical simulations we explain the role of the excited modes in the subsurface imaging process. Independent of the bimodal or trimodal atomic force microscopy approach, the fundamental mode is the most suitable for tracking the topography while the higher modes modulate the interaction of the tip with the buried nanostructures and provide subsurface contrast.

  11. Imaging subsurface geology and volatile organic compound plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Qualheim, B.J.; Daley, P.F.; Johnson, V.; McPherrin, R.V.; Laguna, G.

    1992-03-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) (Fig. 1) is in the final stages of the Superfund decisionmaking process for site remediation and restoration. In the process of characterizing the subsurface of the LLNL site, we have developed unique methods of collecting, storing, retrieving, and imaging geologic and chemical data from more than 350 drill holes. The lateral and vertical continuity of subsurface paleostream channels were mapped for the entire LLNL site using geologic descriptions from core samples, cuttings, and interpretations from geophysical logs. A computer-aided design and drafting program, SLICE, written at LLNL, was used to create two-dimensional maps of subsurface sediments, and state-of-the-art software produced three-dimensional images of the volatile organic compound (VOC) plumes using data from water and core fluid analyses.

  12. Using ground-based geophysics to rapidly and accurately map sub-surface acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Vanessa; Triantafilis, John; Johnston, Scott; Nhan, Terence; Page, Donald; Wege, Richard; Hirst, Phillip; Slavich, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Globally, large areas of coastal and estuarine floodplains are underlain by sulfidic sediments and acid sulfate soils (ASS). These soils can be environmentally hazardous due to their high acidity and large pool of potentially mobile metals. The floodplains are characterised by high spatial and temporal heterogeneity. On coastal floodplains, ASS are of moderate to high salinity, with salts derived mainly from either connate marine sources or oxidation of biogenic sulfides and the subsequent increases in soluble ions (e.g. SO42-) and acidity that follow oxidation. Enhanced acidity also increases the mobilisation of pH-sensitive trace metals such as Fe, Al, Mn, Zn and Ni and contributes to increasing apparent salinity. Ground-based geophysics using electromagnetic (EM) induction techniques have been used successfully and extensively to rapidly map soils for salinity management and precision agriculture. EM induction techniques measure apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa), which is a function of salinity, clay content, water content, soil mineralogy and temperature to determine the spatial distribution of sub-surface conductivity. In this study, we used ECa as a proxy to map the surface and sub-surface spatial distribution of ASS and associated acidic groundwater. Three EM instruments were used, EM38, DUALEM-421 and EM34, which focus on different depth layers, in a survey of a coastal floodplain in eastern Australia. The EM surveys were calibrated with limited soil sampling and analysis (pH, EC, soluble and exchangeable salts and metals, particle size and titratable actual acidity (TAA)). Using fuzzy k-means clustering analysis, the EM38 and elevation data, from a digital elevation model, clearly identified three classes in the near-surface (0-2m) layers: i) levee soils, ii) fluvial sediment capping and iii) ASS (Fig. 4). Increasing the number of classes did not alter the classes identified. Joint inversion of the DUALEM-421 and EM34 data also identified

  13. Shallow depth subsurface imaging with microwave holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravlev, Andrei; Ivashov, Sergey; Razevig, Vladimir; Vasiliev, Igor; Bechtel, Timothy

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, microwave holography is considered as a tool to obtain high resolution images of shallowly buried objects. Signal acquisition is performed at multiple frequencies on a grid using a two-dimensional mechanical scanner moving a single transceiver over an area of interest in close proximity to the surface. The described FFT-based reconstruction technique is used to obtain a stack of plan view images each using only one selected frequency from the operating waveband of the radar. The extent of a synthetically-formed aperture and the signal wavelength define the plan view resolution, which at sounding frequencies near 7 GHz amounts to 2 cm. The system has a short depth of focus which allows easy selection of proper focusing plane. The small distance from the buried objects to the antenna does not prevent recording of clean images due to multiple reflections (as happens with impulse radars). The description of the system hardware and signal processing technique is illustrated using experiments conducted in dry sand. The microwave images of inert anti-personnel mines are demonstrated as examples. The images allow target discrimination based on the same visually-discernible small features that a human observer would employ. The demonstrated technology shows promise for modification to meet the specific practical needs required for humanitarian demining or in multi-sensor survey systems.

  14. Imaging subsurface photodisruption in human sclera with FD-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Bin; Su, Jianping; Chai, Dongyul; Chaudhary, Gautam; Chen, Zhongping; Juhasz, Tibor

    2007-02-01

    Photodisruption of femtosecond laser at 1700nm wavelength has been demonstrated as a potential subsurface surgical method that can be used in trabeculectomy for glaucoma treatment without causing failure due to scarring at the level of conjunctiva and underlying tissue [1, 2]. In this study, Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) technology is used to demonstrate high speed non-invasive imaging of high precision photodisruption in human sclera. Photodisruption cavities of different size in human sclera can reveal itself in its 3D FDOCT image. Transclera channel cut from back to surface and partial transclera channel are easily identified in 3D OCT image. The whole 3D data set acquired with high speed frequency domain OCT system permits further quantitative analysis of subsurface phtodisruption incisions. The preliminary results indicate that high speed frequency domain OCT system is a good candidate for imaging subsurface photodisruption with femtosecond laser and its 3D image may provide good guidance during surgical procedures when it is integrated with laser ablation system.

  15. Ultrasonic Imaging of Subsurface Objects Using Photorefractive Dynamic Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

    2001-07-01

    The INEEL has developed a photorefractive ultrasonic imaging technology that records both phase and amplitude of ultrasonic waves on the surface of solids. Phase locked dynamic holography provides full field images of these waves scattered from subsurface defects in solids, and these data are compared with theoretical predictions. Laser light reflected by a vibrating surface is imaged into a photorefractive material where it is mixed in a heterodyne technique with a reference wave. This demodulates the data and provides an image of the ultrasonic waves in either 2 wave or 4 wave mixing mode. These data images are recorded at video frame rates and show phase locked traveling or resonant acoustic waves. This technique can be used over a broad range of ultrasonic frequencies. Acoustic frequencies from 2 kHz to 10 MHz have been imaged, and a point measuring (non-imaging) version of the system has measured picometer amplitudes at 1 GHz.

  16. Ultrasonic imaging of subsurface objects using photorefractive dynamic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deason, Vance A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.; Watson, Scott M.

    2001-11-01

    The INEEL has developed a photorefractive ultrasonic imaging technology that records both phase and amplitude of ultrasonic waves on the surface of solids. Phase locked dynamic holography provides full field images of these waves scattered from subsurface defects in solids, and these data are compared with theoretical predictions. Laser light reflected by a vibrating surface is imaged into a photorefractive material where it is mixed in a heterodyne technique with a reference wave. This demodulates the data and provides an image of the ultrasonic waves in either 2 wave or 4 wave mixing mode. These data images are recorded at video frame rates and show phase locked traveling or resonant acoustic waves. This technique can be used over a broad range of ultrasonic frequencies. Acoustic frequencies from 2 kHz to 10 MHz have been imaged, and a point measuring (non-imaging) version of the system has measured picometer amplitudes at 1 Ghz.

  17. Accurate statistical tests for smooth classification images.

    PubMed

    Chauvin, Alan; Worsley, Keith J; Schyns, Philippe G; Arguin, Martin; Gosselin, Frédéric

    2005-10-05

    Despite an obvious demand for a variety of statistical tests adapted to classification images, few have been proposed. We argue that two statistical tests based on random field theory (RFT) satisfy this need for smooth classification images. We illustrate these tests on classification images representative of the literature from F. Gosselin and P. G. Schyns (2001) and from A. B. Sekuler, C. M. Gaspar, J. M. Gold, and P. J. Bennett (2004). The necessary computations are performed using the Stat4Ci Matlab toolbox.

  18. AMISS - Active and passive MIcrowaves for Security and Subsurface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Slob, Evert; Turk, Ahmet Serdar; Crocco, Lorenzo; Catapano, Ilaria; Di Matteo, Francesca

    2013-04-01

    The FP7-IRSES project AMISS - Active and passive MIcrowaves for Security and Subsurface imaging is based on a well-combined network among research institutions of EU, Associate and Third Countries (National Research Council of Italy - Italy, Technische Universiteit Delft - The Netherlands, Yildiz Technical University - Turkey, Bauman Moscow State Technical University - Russia, Usikov Institute for Radio-physics and Electronics and State Research Centre of Superconductive Radioelectronics "Iceberg" - Ukraine and University of Sao Paulo - Brazil) with the aims of achieving scientific advances in the framework of microwave and millimeter imaging systems and techniques for security and safety social issues. In particular, the involved partners are leaders in the scientific areas of passive and active imaging and are sharing their complementary knowledge to address two main research lines. The first one regards the design, characterization and performance evaluation of new passive and active microwave devices, sensors and measurement set-ups able to mitigate clutter and increase information content. The second line faces the requirements to make State-of-the-Art processing tools compliant with the instrumentations developed in the first line, suitable to work in electromagnetically complex scenarios and able to exploit the unexplored possibilities offered by new instrumentations. The main goals of the project are: 1) Development/improvement and characterization of new sensors and systems for active and passive microwave imaging; 2) Set up, analysis and validation of state of art/novel data processing approach for GPR in critical infrastructure and subsurface imaging; 3) Integration of state of art and novel imaging hardware and characterization approaches to tackle realistic situations in security, safety and subsurface prospecting applications; 4) Development and feasibility study of bio-radar technology (system and data processing) for vital signs detection and

  19. Roadside IED detection using subsurface imaging radar and rotary UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yexian; Twumasi, Jones O.; Le, Viet Q.; Ren, Yu-Jiun; Lai, C. P.; Yu, Tzuyang

    2016-05-01

    Modern improvised explosive device (IED) and mine detection sensors using microwave technology are based on ground penetrating radar operated by a ground vehicle. Vehicle size, road conditions, and obstacles along the troop marching direction limit operation of such sensors. This paper presents a new conceptual design using a rotary unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to carry subsurface imaging radar for roadside IED detection. We have built a UAV flight simulator with the subsurface imaging radar running in a laboratory environment and tested it with non-metallic and metallic IED-like targets. From the initial lab results, we can detect the IED-like target 10-cm below road surface while carried by a UAV platform. One of the challenges is to design the radar and antenna system for a very small payload (less than 3 lb). The motion compensation algorithm is also critical to the imaging quality. In this paper, we also demonstrated the algorithm simulation and experimental imaging results with different IED target materials, sizes, and clutters.

  20. Subsurface imaging across the 2001 Spokane, Washington earthquake swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, S.; Stephenson, W. J.; Wicks, C. W.; Pratt, T. L.; Odum, J. K.; Angster, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    We acquired 4 km of minivibe reflection seismic data in Spokane, Washington, to image subsurface deformation associated with the 2001 swarm of shallow (<2 km) earthquakes. These data were collected by USGS as part of ongoing earthquake hazards investigations in the area. In 2001 unexplained earthquake ground shaking as well as audible "booms" were reported over a span of six months (June to November) in the Emerson-Garfield and West Central neighborhoods of Spokane.; the area has since been seismically quiescent. Seismograph recordings of the earthquake swarm suggest shallow depths of hypocenters, yet the local subsurface geology is not well known. Although the source region of this swarm is poorly constrained within Spokane due to sparse seismic station coverage in the area at that time, recent InSAR data analysis has revealed a zone of surface deformation that may be related to the earthquake swarm. This surface deformation consists of an elliptical area about 3 km across that had as much as 15 mm of uplift during 2001. Preliminary processing of the two new seismic profiles provides the first subsurface images of the upper 500 m within the Spokane area across the inferred source region. One seismic profile through downtown Spokane shows a three-layer structure of Holocene valley fill and Quaternary Lake Missoula flood deposits underlain by Tertiary Columbia River basalts. We observe a Columbia River basalt bedrock high of 100 m located between seismic profiles and verified by geologic and aeromagnetic maps. The seismic data also image a paleochannel showing the migration of the Spokane River through time. An inflection within the Quaternary basin sediment reflections suggests uplift from faulting that is consistent with the sense of deformation observed in the InSAR data.

  1. Evaluation of a low-cost and accurate ocean temperature logger on subsurface mooring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Chuan; Deng, Zhiqun; Lu, Jun; Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Ming

    2014-06-23

    Monitoring seawater temperature is important to understanding evolving ocean processes. To monitor internal waves or ocean mixing, a large number of temperature loggers are typically mounted on subsurface mooring systems to obtain high-resolution temperature data at different water depths. In this study, we redesigned and evaluated a compact, low-cost, self-contained, high-resolution and high-accuracy ocean temperature logger, TC-1121. The newly designed TC-1121 loggers are smaller, more robust, and their sampling intervals can be automatically changed by indicated events. They have been widely used in many mooring systems to study internal wave and ocean mixing. The logger’s fundamental design, noise analysis, calibration, drift test, and a long-term sea trial are discussed in this paper.

  2. MA_MISS: Mars Multispectral Imager for Subsurface Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Sanctis, M. C.; Coradini, A.; Ammannito, E.; Boccaccini, A.; Di Iorio, T.; Battistelli, E.; Capanni, A.

    2012-04-01

    A Drilling system, coupled with an in situ analysis package, is installed on the ExoMars Pasteur Rover to perform in situ investigations up to 2m in the Mars soil. Ma_Miss (Mars Multispectral Imager for Subsurface Studies) is a spectrometer devoted to observe the lateral wall of the borehole generated by the Drilling system. The instrument is fully integrated with the Drill and shares its structure and electronics. For the first time in Mars exploration experiments the water/geochemical environment will be investigated as function of depth in the shallow subsurface. Samples from the subsurface of Martian soil are unaltered by weathering process, oxidation and erosion. Subsurface access can be the key to look for signs of present and past environmental conditions, associated to the possibility for life (water, volatiles and weathering process). The analysis of uncontaminated samples by means of instrumented Drill and in situ observations is the solution for unambiguous interpretation of the original environment that leading to the formation of rocks. Ma_Miss experiment is perfectly suited to perform multispectral imaging of the drilled layers. Ma_Miss is a miniaturized near-infrared imaging spectrometer in the range 0.4-2.2 µm with 20nm spectral sampling. The task of illuminating the borehole wall and collecting the diffused light from the illuminated spot on the target requires a transparent window on the Drill tool, which shall prevent the dust contamination of the optical and mechanical elements inside. Hardness of sapphire is the closest to diamond one, thus avoiding the risk of scratches on its surface. The Sapphire window is cylindrical, and bounded such as to realize a continuous auger profile. Ma_Miss Optical Head performs the double task of illuminating the borehole wall with a spot around 1 mm diameter and of collecting the scattered light coming from a 0.1 mm diameter spot of the target. The signal from the Optical Head to the spectrometer is transferred

  3. Geophysical data fusion for subsurface imaging. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, P.; Vandergraft, J.; Blohm, M.; Porter, D.

    1993-08-01

    A geophysical data fusion methodology is under development to combine data from complementary geophysical sensors and incorporate geophysical understanding to obtain three dimensional images of the subsurface. The research reported here is the first phase of a three phase project. The project focuses on the characterization of thin clay lenses (aquitards) in a highly stratified sand and clay coastal geology to depths of up to 300 feet. The sensor suite used in this work includes time-domain electromagnetic induction (TDEM) and near surface seismic techniques. During this first phase of the project, enhancements to the acquisition and processing of TDEM data were studied, by use of simulated data, to assess improvements for the detection of thin clay layers. Secondly, studies were made of the use of compressional wave and shear wave seismic reflection data by using state-of-the-art high frequency vibrator technology. Finally, a newly developed processing technique, called ``data fusion,`` was implemented to process the geophysical data, and to incorporate a mathematical model of the subsurface strata. Examples are given of the results when applied to real seismic data collected at Hanford, WA, and for simulated data based on the geology of the Savannah River Site.

  4. Fast 3D subsurface imaging with stepped-frequency GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masarik, Matthew P.; Burns, Joseph; Thelen, Brian T.; Sutter, Lena

    2015-05-01

    This paper investigates an algorithm for forming 3D images of the subsurface using stepped-frequency GPR data. The algorithm is specifically designed for a handheld GPR and therefore accounts for the irregular sampling pattern in the data and the spatially-variant air-ground interface by estimating an effective "ground-plane" and then registering the data to the plane. The algorithm efficiently solves the 4th-order polynomial for the Snell reflection points using a fully vectorized iterative scheme. The forward operator is implemented efficiently using an accelerated nonuniform FFT (Greengard and Lee, 2004); the adjoint operator is implemented efficiently using an interpolation step coupled with an upsampled FFT. The imaging is done as a linearized version of the full inverse problem, which is regularized using a sparsity constraint to reduce sidelobes and therefore improve image localization. Applying an appropriate sparsity constraint, the algorithm is able to eliminate most the surrounding clutter and sidelobes, while still rendering valuable image properties such as shape and size. The algorithm is applied to simulated data, controlled experimental data (made available by Dr. Waymond Scott, Georgia Institute of Technology), and government-provided data with irregular sampling and air-ground interface.

  5. Optimum frequency for subsurface-imaging synthetic-aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, B.C.; Patitz, W.E.

    1993-05-01

    A subsurface-imaging synthetic-aperture radar (SISAR) has potential for application in areas as diverse as non-proliferation programs for nuclear weapons to environmental monitoring. However, most conventional synthetic-aperture radars operate at higher microwave frequencies which do not significantly penetrate below the soil surface. This study attempts to provide a basis for determining optimum frequencies and frequency ranges which will allow synthetic-aperture imaging of buried targets. Since the radar return from a buried object must compete with the return from surface clutter, the signal-to-clutter ratio is an appropriate measure of performance for a SISAR. A parameter-based modeling approach is used to model the complex dielectric constant of the soil from measured data obtained from the literature. Theoretical random-surface scattering models, based on statistical solutions to Maxwell's equations, are used to model the clutter. These models are combined to estimate the signal-to-clutter ratio for canonical targets buried in several soil configurations. Initial results indicate that the HF spectrum (3--30 MHz), although it could be used to detect certain targets under some conditions, has limited practical value for use with SISAR, while the upper vhf through uhf spectrum ([approximately]100 MHz--1 GHz) shows the most promise for a general purpose SISAR system. Recommendations are included for additional research.

  6. A fast and accurate method for echocardiography strain rate imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Vahid; Sahba, Nima; Hajebi, Nima; Nambakhsh, Mohammad Saleh

    2009-02-01

    Recently Strain and strain rate imaging have proved their superiority with respect to classical motion estimation methods in myocardial evaluation as a novel technique for quantitative analysis of myocardial function. Here in this paper, we propose a novel strain rate imaging algorithm using a new optical flow technique which is more rapid and accurate than the previous correlation-based methods. The new method presumes a spatiotemporal constancy of intensity and Magnitude of the image. Moreover the method makes use of the spline moment in a multiresolution approach. Moreover cardiac central point is obtained using a combination of center of mass and endocardial tracking. It is proved that the proposed method helps overcome the intensity variations of ultrasound texture while preserving the ability of motion estimation technique for different motions and orientations. Evaluation is performed on simulated, phantom (a contractile rubber balloon) and real sequences and proves that this technique is more accurate and faster than the previous methods.

  7. Novel methods for acoustic and elastic wave-based subsurface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, Amir Homayoun

    Novel, accurate and computationally efficient methods for wave-based subsurface imaging in acoustic and elastic media are developed. The methods are based on Arbitrarily Wide-Angle Wave Equations (AWWE), which are highly-accurate space domain one-way wave equations, formulated in terms of displacement components. Main contributions of this research are as follows: (I) Acoustic-AWWE Imaging, a new time-domain migration technique that is highly accurate for imaging steep dips in heterogeneous media. Similar in form to conventional 15° equation, the acoustic AWWE is implemented using an efficient double-marching explicit finite-difference scheme. Its accuracy and efficiency is studied both analytically and through numerical experiments. The method is able to achieve highly accurate images with only a few times the computational cost of the conventional low-order methods. (II) A new class of highly-accurate Absorbing Boundary Conditions (ABCs) for modeling and imaging with high-order one-way wave equations and parabolic equations. These ABCs, are developed using special imaginary-length finite elements. They effectively absorb the incident wave front and generate artifact-free images with as few as three absorbing layers. They are essential tools in imaging in truncated domains and underwater acoustics. (III) Elastic-AWWE imaging: The first high-order space-domain displacement-based elastic imaging method is developed in this research. The method, which is applicable to complex elastic media, is implemented using a unique downward continuation technique. At each depth step, a half-space is attached to the physical layer to simulate one-way propagation. The half-space is effectively approximated using special imaginary-length finite elements. The method is eventually implemented in frequency-space domain using a finite difference method. Numerical instabilities due to improper mapping of complex wave modes are suppressed by rotating the AWWE parameters in complex

  8. CMP reflection imaging via interferometry of distributed subsurface sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Brown, L. D.; Quiros, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The theoretical foundations of recovering body wave energy via seismic interferometry are well established. However in practice, such recovery remains problematic. Here, synthetic seismograms computed for subsurface sources are used to evaluate the geometrical combinations of realistic ambient source and receiver distributions that result in useful recovery of virtual body waves. This study illustrates how surface receiver arrays that span a limited distribution suite of sources, can be processed to reproduce virtual shot gathers that result in CMP gathers which can be effectively stacked with traditional normal moveout corrections. To verify the feasibility of the approach in practice, seismic recordings of 50 aftershocks following the magnitude of 5.8 Virginia earthquake occurred in August, 2011 have been processed using seismic interferometry to produce seismic reflection images of the crustal structure above and beneath the aftershock cluster. Although monotonic noise proved to be problematic by significantly reducing the number of usable recordings, the edited dataset resulted in stacked seismic sections characterized by coherent reflections that resemble those seen on a nearby conventional reflection survey. In particular, "virtual" reflections at travel times of 3 to 4 seconds suggest reflector sat approximately 7 to 12 km depth that would seem to correspond to imbricate thrust structures formed during the Appalachian orogeny. The approach described here represents a promising new means of body wave imaging of 3D structure that can be applied to a wide array of geologic and energy problems. Unlike other imaging techniques using natural sources, this technique does not require precise source locations or times. It can thus exploit aftershocks too small for conventional analyses. This method can be applied to any type of microseismic cloud, whether tectonic, volcanic or man-made.

  9. Cross-polarization confocal imaging of subsurface flaws in silicon nitride.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.; Sun, J. G.; Pei, Z.

    2011-03-01

    A cross-polarization confocal microscopy (CPCM) method was developed to image subsurface flaws in optically translucent silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramics. Unlike conventional confocal microscopy, which measures reflected light so is applicable only to transparent and semi-transparent materials, CPCM detects scattered light from subsurface while filtering out the reflected light from ceramic surface. For subsurface imaging, the refractive-index mismatch between imaging (air) and imaged (ceramic) medium may cause image distortion and reduce resolution in the depth direction. This effect, characterized by an axial scaling factor (ASF), was analyzed and experimentally determined for glass and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials. The experimental CPCM system was used to image Hertzian C-cracks generated by various indentation loads in the subsurface of a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} specimen. It was demonstrated that CPCM may provide detailed information of subsurface cracks, such as crack angle and path, and subsurface microstructural variations.

  10. Calibrating X-ray Imaging Devices for Accurate Intensity Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J.

    2011-07-28

    The purpose of the project presented is to develop methods to accurately calibrate X-ray imaging devices. The approach was to develop X-ray source systems suitable for this endeavor and to develop methods to calibrate solid state detectors to measure source intensity. NSTec X-ray sources used for the absolute calibration of cameras are described, as well as the method of calibrating the source by calibrating the detectors. The work resulted in calibration measurements for several types of X-ray cameras. X-ray camera calibration measured efficiency and efficiency variation over the CCD. Camera types calibrated include: CCD, CID, back thinned (back illuminated), front illuminated.

  11. A novel automated image analysis method for accurate adipocyte quantification

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Osman S; Selway, Joanne L; Kępczyńska, Małgorzata A; Stocker, Claire J; O’Dowd, Jacqueline F; Cawthorne, Michael A; Arch, Jonathan RS; Jassim, Sabah; Langlands, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Increased adipocyte size and number are associated with many of the adverse effects observed in metabolic disease states. While methods to quantify such changes in the adipocyte are of scientific and clinical interest, manual methods to determine adipocyte size are both laborious and intractable to large scale investigations. Moreover, existing computational methods are not fully automated. We, therefore, developed a novel automatic method to provide accurate measurements of the cross-sectional area of adipocytes in histological sections, allowing rapid high-throughput quantification of fat cell size and number. Photomicrographs of H&E-stained paraffin sections of murine gonadal adipose were transformed using standard image processing/analysis algorithms to reduce background and enhance edge-detection. This allowed the isolation of individual adipocytes from which their area could be calculated. Performance was compared with manual measurements made from the same images, in which adipocyte area was calculated from estimates of the major and minor axes of individual adipocytes. Both methods identified an increase in mean adipocyte size in a murine model of obesity, with good concordance, although the calculation used to identify cell area from manual measurements was found to consistently over-estimate cell size. Here we report an accurate method to determine adipocyte area in histological sections that provides a considerable time saving over manual methods. PMID:23991362

  12. Subsurface imaging using the spectral polarization difference technique and NIR illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Alfano, R R; Demos, S G; Radousky, H B

    1999-01-26

    A subsurface imaging system is utilized to test the ability of the spectral polarization difference imaging technique for deep subsurface imaging in tissues. The illumination of the system is derived from compact class III lasers in the red and NIR spectral region and, alternatively, from a white light source and selection of the appropriate illumination wavelength using band-pass optical filters. The experimental results demonstrate detection and imaging of a high-scattering object located up to 1.5 cm underneath the surface of a host chicken tissue.

  13. Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Investigations for Imaging the Grouting Injection in Shallow Subsurface Cavities

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Muhammad; Kim, Jung Ho; Song, Young Soo; Amjad Sabir, Mohammad; Umar, Muhammad; Tariq, Mohammad; Muhammad, Said

    2014-01-01

    The highway of Yongweol-ri, Muan-gun, south-western part of the South Korean Peninsula, is underlain by the abandoned of subsurface cavities, which were discovered in 2005. These cavities lie at shallow depths with the range of 5∼15 meters below the ground surface. Numerous subsidence events have repeatedly occurred in the past few years, damaging infrastructure and highway. As a result of continuing subsidence issues, the Korean Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) was requested by local administration to resolve the issue. The KIGAM used geophysical methods to delineate subsurface cavities and improve more refined understanding of the cavities network in the study area. Cement based grouting has been widely employed in the construction industry to reinforce subsurface ground. In this research work, time-lapse electrical resistivity surveys were accomplished to monitor the grouting injection in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway, which have provided a quasi-real-time monitoring for modifying the subsurface cavities related to ground reinforcement, which would be difficult with direct methods. The results obtained from time-lapse electrical resistivity technique have satisfactory imaged the grouting injection experiment in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway. Furthermore, the borehole camera confirmed the presence of grouting material in the subsurface cavities, and hence this procedure increases the mechanical resistance of subsurface cavities below the highway. PMID:24578621

  14. Visual detection of subsurface defects using enhanced magneto-optic imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yu Hua H.; Liu, Xingmake; Tian, Gui Y.; Bai, Libing

    2013-01-01

    An enhanced magneto-optic (MO) imaging system is presented to detect the invisible and buried subsurface flaws in metallic specimens. The choice of the MO thin films, the design of the magnetic excitation device and the development of the image processing approaches are presented in this paper and the quality improvement in MO imaging has been demonstrated due to the proposed methods. Experimental results have been provided and verify the reliability and accuracy of the enhanced MO imaging system.

  15. Iterative feature refinement for accurate undersampled MR image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shanshan; Liu, Jianbo; Liu, Qiegen; Ying, Leslie; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong; Liang, Dong

    2016-05-01

    Accelerating MR scan is of great significance for clinical, research and advanced applications, and one main effort to achieve this is the utilization of compressed sensing (CS) theory. Nevertheless, the existing CSMRI approaches still have limitations such as fine structure loss or high computational complexity. This paper proposes a novel iterative feature refinement (IFR) module for accurate MR image reconstruction from undersampled K-space data. Integrating IFR with CSMRI which is equipped with fixed transforms, we develop an IFR-CS method to restore meaningful structures and details that are originally discarded without introducing too much additional complexity. Specifically, the proposed IFR-CS is realized with three iterative steps, namely sparsity-promoting denoising, feature refinement and Tikhonov regularization. Experimental results on both simulated and in vivo MR datasets have shown that the proposed module has a strong capability to capture image details, and that IFR-CS is comparable and even superior to other state-of-the-art reconstruction approaches.

  16. Color images of Kansas subsurface geology from well logs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, D.R.; Doveton, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Modern wireline log combinations give highly diagnostic information that goes beyond the basic shale content, pore volume, and fluid saturation of older logs. Pattern recognition of geology from logs is made conventionally through either the examination of log overlays or log crossplots. Both methods can be combined through the use of color as a medium of information by setting the three color primaries of blue, green, and red light as axes of three dimensional color space. Multiple log readings of zones are rendered as composite color mixtures which, when plotted sequentially with depth, show lithological successions in a striking manner. The method is extremely simple to program and display on a color monitor. Illustrative examples are described from the Kansas subsurface. ?? 1986.

  17. A new high-resolution electromagnetic method for subsurface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wanjie

    For most electromagnetic (EM) geophysical systems, the contamination of primary fields on secondary fields ultimately limits the capability of the controlled-source EM methods. Null coupling techniques were proposed to solve this problem. However, the small orientation errors in the null coupling systems greatly restrict the applications of these systems. Another problem encountered by most EM systems is the surface interference and geologic noise, which sometimes make the geophysical survey impossible to carry out. In order to solve these problems, the alternating target antenna coupling (ATAC) method was introduced, which greatly removed the influence of the primary field and reduced the surface interference. But this system has limitations on the maximum transmitter moment that can be used. The differential target antenna coupling (DTAC) method was proposed to allow much larger transmitter moments and at the same time maintain the advantages of the ATAC method. In this dissertation, first, the theoretical DTAC calculations were derived mathematically using Born and Wolf's complex magnetic vector. 1D layered and 2D blocked earth models were used to demonstrate that the DTAC method has no responses for 1D and 2D structures. Analytical studies of the plate model influenced by conductive and resistive backgrounds were presented to explain the physical phenomenology behind the DTAC method, which is the magnetic fields of the subsurface targets are required to be frequency dependent. Then, the advantages of the DTAC method, e.g., high-resolution, reducing the geologic noise and insensitive to surface interference, were analyzed using surface and subsurface numerical examples in the EMGIMA software. Next, the theoretical advantages, such as high resolution and insensitive to surface interference, were verified by designing and developing a low-power (moment of 50 Am 2) vertical-array DTAC system and testing it on controlled targets and scaled target coils. At last, a

  18. Advances in quantitative nanoscale subsurface imaging by mode-synthesizing atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vitry, P.; Bourillot, E.; Plassard, C.; Lacroute, Y.; Lesniewska, E.; Tetard, L.

    2014-08-04

    This paper reports on advances toward quantitative non-destructive nanoscale subsurface investigation of a nanofabricated sample based on mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy with heterodyne detection, addressing the need to correlate the role of actuation frequencies of the probe f{sub p} and the sample f{sub s} with depth resolution for 3D tomography reconstruction. Here, by developing a simple model and validating the approach experimentally through the study of the nanofabricated calibration depth samples consisting of buried metallic patterns, we demonstrate avenues for quantitative nanoscale subsurface imaging. Our findings enable the reconstruction of the sample depth profile and allow high fidelity resolution of the buried nanostructures. Non-destructive quantitative nanoscale subsurface imaging offers great promise in the study of the structures and properties of complex systems at the nanoscale.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of water content in the subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hendricks; T. Yao; A. Kearns

    1999-01-21

    Previous theoretical and experimental studies indicated that surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has the potential to provide cost-effective water content measurements in the subsurface and is a technology ripe for exploitation in practice. The objectives of this investigation are (a) to test the technique under a wide range of hydrogeological conditions and (b) to generalize existing NMR theories in order to correctly model NMR response from conductive ground and to assess properties of the inverse problem. Twenty-four sites with different hydrogeologic settings were selected in New Mexico and Colorado for testing. The greatest limitation of surface NMR technology appears to be the lack of understanding in which manner the NMR signal is influenced by soil-water factors such as pore size distribution, surface-to-volume ratio, paramagnetic ions dissolved in the ground water, and the presence of ferromagnetic minerals. Although the theoretical basis is found to be sound, several advances need to be made to make surface NMR a viable technology for hydrological investigations. There is a research need to investigate, under controlled laboratory conditions, how the complex factors of soil-water systems affect NMR relaxation times.

  20. Subsurface polarimetric migration imaging for full polarimetric ground-penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xuan; Yu, Yue; Liu, Cai; Fehler, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Polarization is a property of electromagnetic wave that generally refers to the locus of the electric field vector, which can be used to characterize surface properties by polarimetric radar. However, its use has been less common in the ground-penetrating radar (GPR) community. Full polarimetric GPR data include scattering matrices, by which the polarization properties can be extracted, at each survey point. Different components of the measured scattering matrix are sensitive to different types of subsurface objects, which offers a potential improvement in the detection ability of GPR. This paper develops a polarimetric migration imaging method. By merging the Pauli polarimetric decomposition technique with the Krichhoff migration equation, we develop a polarimetric migration algorithm, which can extract three migrated coefficients that are sensitive to different types of objects. Then fusing the three migrated coefficients, we can obtain subsurface colour-coded reconstructed object images, which can be employed to interpret both the geometrical information and the scattering mechanism of the subsurface objects. A 3-D full polarimetric GPR data set was acquired in a laboratory experiment and was used to test the method. In the laboratory experiment, four objects-a scatterer, a ball, a plate and a dihedral target-were buried in homogeneous dry sand under a flat ground surface. By merging the reconstructed image with polarization properties, we enhanced the subsurface image and improved the classification ability of GPR.

  1. Nondestructive SEM for surface and subsurface wafer imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Propst, Roy H.; Bagnell, C. Robert; Cole, Edward I., Jr.; Davies, Brian G.; Dibianca, Frank A.; Johnson, Darryl G.; Oxford, William V.; Smith, Craig A.

    1987-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM) is considered as a tool for both failure analysis as well as device characterization. A survey is made of various operational SEM modes and their applicability to image processing methods on semiconductor devices.

  2. Subsurface Super-resolution Imaging of Unstained Polymer Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Ben E.; Dong, Biqin; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Backman, Vadim; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-01-01

    Optical imaging has offered unique advantages in material researches, such as spectroscopy and lifetime measurements of deeply embedded materials, which cannot be matched using electron or scanning-probe microscopy. Unfortunately, conventional optical imaging cannot provide the spatial resolutions necessary for many nanoscopic studies. Despite recent rapid progress, super-resolution optical imaging has yet to be widely applied to non-biological materials. Herein we describe a method for nanoscopic optical imaging of buried polymer nanostructures without the need for extrinsic staining. We observed intrinsic stochastic fluorescence emission or blinking from unstained polymers and performed spatial-temporal spectral analysis to investigate its origin. We further applied photon localization super-resolution imaging reconstruction to the detected stochastic blinking, and achieved a spatial resolution of at least 100 nm, which corresponds to a six-fold increase over the optical diffraction limit. This work demonstrates the potential for studying the static heterogeneities of intrinsic polymer molecular-specific properties at sub-diffraction-limited optical resolutions. PMID:27354178

  3. Subsurface Super-resolution Imaging of Unstained Polymer Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Ben E.; Dong, Biqin; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Backman, Vadim; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-06-01

    Optical imaging has offered unique advantages in material researches, such as spectroscopy and lifetime measurements of deeply embedded materials, which cannot be matched using electron or scanning-probe microscopy. Unfortunately, conventional optical imaging cannot provide the spatial resolutions necessary for many nanoscopic studies. Despite recent rapid progress, super-resolution optical imaging has yet to be widely applied to non-biological materials. Herein we describe a method for nanoscopic optical imaging of buried polymer nanostructures without the need for extrinsic staining. We observed intrinsic stochastic fluorescence emission or blinking from unstained polymers and performed spatial-temporal spectral analysis to investigate its origin. We further applied photon localization super-resolution imaging reconstruction to the detected stochastic blinking, and achieved a spatial resolution of at least 100 nm, which corresponds to a six-fold increase over the optical diffraction limit. This work demonstrates the potential for studying the static heterogeneities of intrinsic polymer molecular-specific properties at sub-diffraction-limited optical resolutions.

  4. Depth-Resolved Multispectral Sub-Surface Imaging Using Multifunctional Upconversion Phosphors with Paramagnetic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Ovanesyan, Zaven; Mimun, L. Christopher; Kumar, Gangadharan Ajith; Yust, Brian G.; Dannangoda, Chamath; Martirosyan, Karen S.; Sardar, Dhiraj K.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging is very promising technique used for surgical guidance, which requires advancements related to properties of imaging agents and subsequent data retrieval methods from measured multispectral images. In this article, an upconversion material is introduced for subsurface near-infrared imaging and for the depth recovery of the material embedded below the biological tissue. The results confirm significant correlation between the analytical depth estimate of the material under the tissue and the measured ratio of emitted light from the material at two different wavelengths. Experiments with biological tissue samples demonstrate depth resolved imaging using the rare earth doped multifunctional phosphors. In vitro tests reveal no significant toxicity, whereas the magnetic measurements of the phosphors show that the particles are suitable as magnetic resonance imaging agents. The confocal imaging of fibroblast cells with these phosphors reveals their potential for in vivo imaging. The depth-resolved imaging technique with such phosphors has broad implications for real-time intraoperative surgical guidance. PMID:26322519

  5. New insights into subsurface imaging of carbon nanotubes in polymer composites via scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Minhua; Ming, Bin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Gibbons, Luke J.; Gu, Xiaohong; Nguyen, Tinh; Park, Cheol; Lillehei, Peter T.; Villarrubia, J. S.; Vladár, András E.; Liddle, J. Alexander

    2015-02-01

    Despite many studies of subsurface imaging of carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer composites via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), significant controversy exists concerning the imaging depth and contrast mechanisms. We studied CNT-polyimide composites and, by three-dimensional reconstructions of captured stereo-pair images, determined that the maximum SEM imaging depth was typically hundreds of nanometers. The contrast mechanisms were investigated over a broad range of beam accelerating voltages from 0.3 to 30 kV, and ascribed to modulation by embedded CNTs of the effective secondary electron (SE) emission yield at the polymer surface. This modulation of the SE yield is due to non-uniform surface potential distribution resulting from current flows due to leakage and electron beam induced current. The importance of an external electric field on SEM subsurface imaging was also demonstrated. The insights gained from this study can be generally applied to SEM nondestructive subsurface imaging of conducting nanostructures embedded in dielectric matrices such as graphene-polymer composites, silicon-based single electron transistors, high resolution SEM overlay metrology or e-beam lithography, and have significant implications in nanotechnology.

  6. Searching for the Blind fault: Haiti Subsurface Imaging Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocel, E.; Stewart, R.; Mann, P.; Dowla, N.

    2013-12-01

    The impact of the 12 January 2010 Haiti earthquake was catastrophic, causing serious damage to infrastructure and more than 200000 deaths. Initially, the Haiti earthquake was assumed to occur with the movement of Enriquillo Plantain Garden Fault Zone (EPGFZ), but recent scientific studies have shown that the primary rupture occurred on an unmapped blind thrust fault in the Léogâne fan (associated as Léogâne fault) near the EPGFZ (Figure 1a and 1b). The main purpose of this project are: characterizing and analyzing subsurface structures and associated hazards, characterizing the physical properties of near-surface, locating and understanding the blind faults theorized to have caused the 2010 earthquake (Léogâne fault). Surveys were conducted by a research group from the University of Houston in 2013 to address some of these goals. Surveys were mainly concentrated on Léogâne fan (Figure 1c) and Lake Enriquillo (Figure 1d). For Léogâne surveys, multiple 2D Seismic lines were deployed with approximately N-S orientation. We performed both P wave and S wave refraction analyses and time-migrated the P wave data. The prominent change in both P wave and S wave velocities are interpreted as the effects of faulting. The CMP stacked section shows a multiple discontinuity profile whose location coincides with the anomalies observed at P wave and S wave refraction velocity profile. Extracted reflection coefficients also support a reflective structure at these offsets. We interpret the anomalous structure as North dipping thrust fault. The dip of the fault is estimated around 60°. Near-surface reflection seismic analysis provided deeper information indicating multiple layers with varying velocities, intersected by a number of faults. Gravity surveys were conducted along the main seismic line over Léogâne fan, with additional surveys conducted from Jacmel to Léogâne and around the Port Au Prince area. The estimated Free air gravity profile suggests that the

  7. Geophysical data fusion for subsurface imaging. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This report contains the results of a three year, three-phase project whose long-range goal has been to create a means for the more detailed and accurate definition of the near-surface (0--300 ft) geology beneath a site that had been subjected to environmental pollution. The two major areas of research and development have been: improved geophysical field data acquisition techniques; and analytical tools for providing the total integration (fusion) of all site data. The long-range goal of this project has been to mathematically, integrate the geophysical data that could be derived from multiple sensors with site geologic information and any other type of available site data, to provide a detailed characterization of thin clay layers and geological discontinuities at hazardous waste sites.

  8. Imaging lateral groundwater flow in the shallow subsurface using stochastic temperature fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairley, Jerry P.; Nicholson, Kirsten N.

    2006-04-01

    Although temperature has often been used as an indication of vertical groundwater movement, its usefulness for identifying horizontal fluid flow has been limited by the difficulty of obtaining sufficient data to draw defensible conclusions. Here we use stochastic simulation to develop a high-resolution image of fluid temperatures in the shallow subsurface at Borax Lake, Oregon. The temperature field inferred from the geostatistical simulations clearly shows geothermal fluids discharging from a group of fault-controlled hydrothermal springs, moving laterally through the subsurface, and mixing with shallow subsurface flow originating from nearby Borax Lake. This interpretation of the data is supported by independent geochemical and isotopic evidence, which show a simple mixing trend between Borax Lake water and discharge from the thermal springs. It is generally agreed that stochastic simulation can be a useful tool for extracting information from complex and/or noisy data and, although not appropriate in all situations, geostatistical analysis may provide good definition of flow paths in the shallow subsurface. Although stochastic imaging techniques are well known in problems involving transport of species, e.g. delineation of contaminant plumes from soil gas survey data, we are unaware of previous applications to the transport of thermal energy for the purpose of inferring shallow groundwater flow.

  9. Subsurface imaging of flood embankment erosional-piping collapse using a combined MASW and ERI approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Martin

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, non-destructive investigations and management of civil engineering structures is increasingly improving, and assessments are now supported by national and international standards. However, the literature on the applicability of different geophysical techniques to the problem of levee and river embankment monitoring is still limited. Accurate flood levee embankment stability assessment is critically important because embankments and earth dams are subject to water infiltration and internal erosion, which may lead to mechanical weakness and breaching. This study includes a 2D analysis of the instability of an earthen levee, using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and electrical resistivity imaging (ERI), along with direct observations of the site engineering geology and geomorphology. Both the modeled Vs and Ω indicate a horizontally-layered subsurface with rapid vertical transitions in both stiffness and conductivity. This conclusion is supported by a covariance analysis of Vs and Ω at varying depths and chainages along the levee. Together with a geomorphic assessment, this indicates that the structure is being destabilized by water infiltration, which is causing erosional-piping, leading to surface subsidence. While the key reason for applying various types of geophysical methods to embankment stability assessment is to undertake a safety examination of the embankment, a secondary reason is to compare and contrast the efficacy of the geophysical methods. To this end, it was found that the integration of covariance analysis of 2D geophysical datasets, alongside sedimentary and topographic data, can help the rapid location of anomalous zones in sub-levee soils between geotechnical boreholes.

  10. Advances in interpretation of subsurface processes with time-lapse electrical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Singha, Kamini; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Slater, Lee D.

    2015-03-15

    Electrical geophysical methods, including electrical resistivity, time-domain induced polarization, and complex resistivity, have become commonly used to image the near subsurface. Here, we outline their utility for time-lapse imaging of hydrological, geochemical, and biogeochemical processes, focusing on new instrumentation, processing, and analysis techniques specific to monitoring. We review data collection procedures, parameters measured, and petrophysical relationships and then outline the state of the science with respect to inversion methodologies, including coupled inversion. We conclude by highlighting recent research focused on innovative applications of time-lapse imaging in hydrology, biology, ecology, and geochemistry, among other areas of interest.

  11. Improving JWST Coronagraphic Performance with Accurate Image Registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Gorkom, Kyle; Pueyo, Laurent; Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; JWST Coronagraphs Working Group

    2016-06-01

    The coronagraphs on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will enable high-contrast observations of faint objects at small separations from bright hosts, such as circumstellar disks, exoplanets, and quasar disks. Despite attenuation by the coronagraphic mask, bright speckles in the host’s point spread function (PSF) remain, effectively washing out the signal from the faint companion. Suppression of these bright speckles is typically accomplished by repeating the observation with a star that lacks a faint companion, creating a reference PSF that can be subtracted from the science image to reveal any faint objects. Before this reference PSF can be subtracted, however, the science and reference images must be aligned precisely, typically to 1/20 of a pixel. Here, we present several such algorithms for performing image registration on JWST coronagraphic images. Using both simulated and pre-flight test data (taken in cryovacuum), we assess (1) the accuracy of each algorithm at recovering misaligned scenes and (2) the impact of image registration on achievable contrast. Proper image registration, combined with post-processing techniques such as KLIP or LOCI, will greatly improve the performance of the JWST coronagraphs.

  12. Radiometrically accurate thermal imaging in the Landsat program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lansing, Jack C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Methods of calibrating Landsat TM thermal IR data have been developed so that the residual error is reduced to 0.9 K (1 standard deviation). Methods for verifying the radiometric performance of TM on orbit and ground calibration methods are discussed. The preliminary design of the enhanced TM for Landsat-6 is considered. A technique for accurately reducing raw data from the Landsat-5 thermal band is described in detail.

  13. Three-dimensional subsurface imaging synthetic aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Moussally, G.J.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this applied research and development project is to develop a system known as `3-D SISAR`. This system consists of a ground penetrating radar with software algorithms designed for the detection, location, and identification of buried objects in the underground hazardous waste environments found at DOE storage sites. Three-dimensional maps of the object locations will be produced which can assist the development of remediation strategies and the characterization of the digface during remediation operations. It is expected that the 3-D SISAR will also prove useful for monitoring hydrocarbon based contaminant migration after remediation. The underground imaging technique being developed under this contract utilizes a spotlight mode Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) approach which, due to its inherent stand-off capability, will permit the rapid survey of a site and achieve a high degree of productivity over large areas. When deployed from an airborne platform, the stand-off techniques is also seen as a way to overcome practical survey limitations encountered at vegetated sites.

  14. Characterization and monitoring of subsurface processes using parallel computing and electrical resistivity imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Truex, Michael J.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Marble, Justin

    2011-12-01

    This newsletter discusses recent advancement in subsurface resistivity characterization and monitoring capabilities. The BC Cribs field desiccation treatability test resistivity monitoring data is use an example to demonstrate near-real time 3D subsurface imaging capabilities. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a method of imaging the electrical resistivity distribution of the subsurface. An ERT data collection system consists of an array of electrodes, deployed on the ground surface or within boreholes, that are connected to a control unit which can access each electrode independently (Figure 1). A single measurement is collected by injecting current across a pair of current injection electrodes (source and sink), and measuring the resulting potential generated across a pair of potential measurement electrodes (positive and negative). An ERT data set is generated by collecting many such measurements using strategically selected current and potential electrode pairs. This data set is then processed using an inversion algorithm, which reconstructs an estimate (or image) of the electrical conductivity (i.e. the inverse of resistivity) distribution that gave rise to the measured data.

  15. An accurate test for acute appendicitis: In-111 WBC imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, D.A.; Weber, P.M.; Kang, I.Y.; dosRemedios, L.V.; Jasko, I.A.

    1985-05-01

    The decision to operate when acute appendicitis (APPY) is suspected is often difficult. Surgeons accept up to a 20% false positive rate to avoid any delay that may result in appendiceal rupture and peritonitis. The authors have successfully improved early diagnostic accuracy by using abdominal imaging beginning 2 hours after injecting In-111 labeled WBC. Patients with clear-cut (APPY) had laparotomy and were not studied. Those who were to be observed in the ER for possible (APPY) had their leukocytes harvested, labeled with In-111 oxine, and reinjected. Abnormal localized activity in the right lower quadrant (RLQ) imaged at 2 hours was graded relative to bone marrow activity (8M): 0, 1+BM. When available the surgical specimen was imaged for In-111 activity. Of 31 patients studied there were 13 with positive scans for (APPY) all surgically confirmed. There were 4 additional abnormal studies all demonstrating known diagnostic patterns, 2 of pertonitis and 2 of colitis. There were 14 negative studies in 8 of whom the clinical course was benign; the remaining 6 had laparotomy with 3 having (APPY) and 3 not. Thus there were no false positives and 3 false negatives. One case negative at 2 hours had appendiceal activity later. The 3 cases with 3+ activity all had apendiceal abscesses. This new application of In-111 oxine WBC imaging is safe, simple, sensitive and specific. It shortens the time to surgical intervention and should reduce the surgical false positive rate.

  16. Imaging the shallow subsurface with surface waves: dispersion curve analysis versus full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés Pérez Solano, Carlos; Donno, Daniela; Strobbia, Claudio; Chauris, Hervé

    2014-05-01

    Seismic surface wave analysis is a standard tool in geotechnical engineering for imaging the shallow subsurface. Most current surface wave analysis methods assume a horizontally layered medium, and estimate the near-surface shear velocity profile from dispersion curves, which are picked on frequency-wavenumber (f-k) gathers and then inverted using 1D modelling approaches. Media containing high velocity contrasts and irregular lateral variations might be difficult to be handled with the local 1D approximation. For 2D model estimation, full waveform inversion (FWI) is an alternative and can estimate high resolution models. The classical FWI objective function consists of the least-squares misfit between observed and modelled shot gathers (Tarantola, 1986). Classical FWI needs an accurate initial model for achieving convergence. Data sets containing surface waves could be inverted, without falling into secondary minima, if the data contains sufficiently low frequencies and large offsets such that multi-scale and time windowing approaches can be applied. We propose to invert surface waves with an alternative FWI-based approach that uses a modified objective function. It is based on the least-squares misfit between the absolute value of the f-k transform of windowed shot gathers. We refer to this approach as the windowed-Amplitude Waveform Inversion (w-AWI). Some secondary minima problems are mitigated: the choice of an initial model is easier in w-AWI than in FWI. The alternative objective function is intermediary between the one used in the 1D inversion approach (dispersion curves) and classical FWI. As most of the phase information is neglected in w-AWI, we use it as a first step before classical FWI. This sequential inversion approach using w-AWI followed by classical FWI aims at estimating a high-resolution near-surface velocity model, by explaining the complete elastic wavefield, even when the initial velocity model is far from the exact one. The proposed approach

  17. Imaging the Shallow Subsurface for a New Underground Subway Line in Barcelona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, D.; Flecha, I.; Palomeras, I.; Vazquez-Sune, E.; Font-Capo, J.; Carbonell, R.; Perez-Estaun, A.

    2006-12-01

    A detailed characterization of the shallow subsurface by seismic techniques has been used to aid horizontal drilling of tunnels for a new subway line in Barcelona (Spain). Seismic data acquisition in densely populated cities is very difficult. The street layout determines the geometry of the seismic data acquisition experiments. The instrumentation (source and receivers) can not always be located on the surface projection of the tunnel trace, therefore, pseudo 3D acquisition is required deploying the instrumentation were it is possible. Furthermore, the shallow subsurface features extremely heterogeneous "weathered" layer of variable thickness (building foundations, sewage system, water supply conductions, etc), and the background noise is very high (car traffic, electricity lines, etc). Relatively old cities also lack a detailed geological control of the subsurface. The seismic data was acquired using as source a 8 s long Vibroseis sweep which provided relatively good S/N ratio. The shallow subsurface featured an extremely heterogeneous weathered layer characterized by very low seismic velocities (1000-1300 m/s) of variable thickness that made difficult to interpret the seismic reflection images at target depth. The first-arrival seismic tomography revealed as a key tool to clearly differentiate the different rock volumes characterized by different physical properties, especially the contact between the weathered layer and the more competent rock. Several high velocity anomalies (up to 5500 m/s) were observed at tunnel depth that were correlated with sub vertical porphyric dykes. This were surrounded by low velocity anomalies that correspond to fault systems that cut and displace dykes. The tomographic velocity models also provide a new image of an important Miocene fault, quite different to the previous geological section derived from the core interpretation.

  18. Characterization of multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy for subsurface brain tissue diagnosis and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Sudhir; Cullum, Brian M.

    2016-04-01

    The development and demonstration of a multiphoton photoacoustic imaging technique capable of providing high spatial resolution chemical images of subsurface tissue components as deep as 1.4 cm below the tissue surface is described. By combining multiphoton excitation in the diagnostic window (650 to 1100 nm), with ultrasonic detection of nonradiative relaxation events, it is possible to rapidly reconstruct three-dimensional, chemical specific, images of samples underneath overlying structures as well as chemical species of the same material. Demonstration of this technique for subsurface tissue differentiation is shown, with the ability to distinguish between grade III astrocytoma tissue and adjacent healthy tissue in blind studies. By employing photoacoustic signal detection, the high nonradiative relaxation rates of most biological tissue components (>90%) and the minimal signal attenuation of the resulting ultrasound compensate for excitation efficiency losses associated with two-photon absorption. Furthermore, the two-photon absorption process results in a highly localized excitation volume (ca., 60 μm). Characterization of the probing depth, spatial resolution, and ability to image through overlying structures is also demonstrated in this paper using tissue phantoms with well-characterized optical scattering properties, mimicking those of tissues.

  19. Characterization of multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy for subsurface brain tissue diagnosis and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Sudhir; Cullum, Brian M.

    2016-04-01

    The development and demonstration of a multiphoton photoacoustic imaging technique capable of providing high spatial resolution chemical images of subsurface tissue components as deep as 1.4 cm below the tissue surface is described. By combining multiphoton excitation in the diagnostic window (650 to 1100 nm), with ultrasonic detection of nonradiative relaxation events, it is possible to rapidly reconstruct three-dimensional, chemical specific, images of samples underneath overlying structures as well as chemical species of the same material. Demonstration of this technique for subsurface tissue differentiation is shown, with the ability to distinguish between grade III astrocytoma tissue and adjacent healthy tissue in blind studies. By employing photoacoustic signal detection, the high nonradiative relaxation rates of most biological tissue components (>90%) and the minimal signal attenuation of the resulting ultrasound compensate for excitation efficiency losses associated with two-photon absorption. Furthermore, the two-photon absorption process results in a highly localized excitation volume (ca., 60 μm). Characterization of the probing depth, spatial resolution, and ability to image through overlying structures is also demonstrated in this paper using tissue phantoms with well-characterized optical scattering properties, mimicking those of tissues.

  20. Enhancements to and Characterization of the Very Early Time Electromagnetic (VETEM) Prototype Instrument and Applications to Shallow Subsurface Imaging at Sites in the DOE Complex - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, D.L.; Chew, W.C.

    2000-12-01

    Field tests and deployments of VETEM is a flexible and highly effective new system for electromagnetic imaging that offers significant new 3D electromagnetic imaging capabilities in the shallow subsurface. Important new numerical modeling techniques have been produced, which are applicable to electromagnetic subsurface imaging, and suggest further research and development. In addition, this research has also produced a flexible, fast, and fully functional prototype VETEM system that has produced some remarkable subsurface images, has bridged the gap between pure research and applications, and is now available for use at DOE sites that have shallow subsurface imaging needs.

  1. Spatially resolved, diffuse reflectance imaging for subsurface pattern visualization toward development of a lensless imaging platform: phantom experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelkanova, Irina; Pandya, Aditya; Saiko, Guennadi; Nacy, Lidia; Babar, Hannan; Shah, Duoaud; Lilge, Lothar; Douplik, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    A portable, spatially resolved, diffuse reflectance lensless imaging technique based on the charge-coupled device or complementary metal-oxide semiconductor sensor directly coupled to the fiber optic bundle is proposed for visualization of subsurface structures such as superficial microvasculature in the epithelium. We discuss an experimental method for emulating a lensless imaging setup via raster scanning a single fiber-optic cable over a microfluidic phantom containing periodic hemoglobin absorption contrast. To evaluate the ability of the technique to recover information about the subsurface linear structures, scattering layers formed of the Sylgard® 184 Silicone Elastomer and titanium dioxide were placed atop the microfluidic phantom. Thickness of the layers ranged from 0.2 to 0.7 mm, and the values of the reduced scattering coefficient (μs‧) were between 0.85 and 4.25 mm-1. The results demonstrate that fiber-optic, lensless platform can be used for two-dimensional imaging of absorbing inclusions in diffuse reflectance mode. In these experiments, it was shown that diffuse reflectance imaging can provide sufficient spatial sampling of the phantom for differentiation of 30 μm structural features of the embedded absorbing pattern inside the scattering media.

  2. High-resolution subsurface imaging and neural network recognition: Non-intrusive buried substance location. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1997-01-26

    A high-frequency, high-resolution electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) elimination of electric-field interference at high frequencies, (5) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (6) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (7) visualization of complex structures during the survey. Four major experiments were conducted with the system: (1) Data were collected for several targets in our physical modeling facility. (2) The authors tested the system over targets buried in soil. (3) The authors conducted an extensive survey at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Cold Test Pit (CTP). The location of the buried waste, category of waste, and thickness of the clay cap were successfully mapped. (4) The authors ran surveys over the acid pit at INEL. This was an operational survey over a hot site. The interpreted low-resistivity region correlated closely with the known extent of the acid pit.

  3. High-resolution subsurface imaging and neural network recognition: Non-intrusive buried substance location. Final report, January 26, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1998-12-31

    A high-frequency, high-resolution electromagnetic (EIVI) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHZ), (4) elimination of electric-field interference at high frequencies, (5) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (6) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (7) visualization of complex structures during the survey. Four major experiments were conducted with the system: (1) Data were collected for several targets in our physical modeling facility. (2) We tested the system over targets buried in soil. (3) We conducted an extensive survey at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Cold Test Pit (CTP). The location of the buried waste, category of waste, and thickness of the clay cap were successfully mapped. (4) We ran surveys over the acid pit at INEL. This was an operational survey over a hot site. The interpreted low-resistivity region correlated closely with the known extent of the acid pit.

  4. Filtering reflection data to construct a subsurface image of primary reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunziker, J.; Slob, E. C.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic Interferometry by cross-correlation for active sources allows to redatum sources from the surface to receivers located in a borehole without knowing the velocity model, but assuming a loss-less medium (e.g., Bakulin & Calvert, 2006; Schuster, 2009; Wapenaar, 2006). In this way, a complex overburden can be circumvented. An alternative to seismic interferometry by cross-correlation is seismic interferometry by multidimensional deconvolution (e.g., Wapenaar et al., 2008), which is also valid in media featuring losses. However, both approaches require subsurface receivers to which the sources can be redatumed to. A new approach is being developed, which allows to redatum surface sources to any depth level in the subsurface without requiring subsurface receivers (Broggini et al., 2011; Wapenaar et al., 2011, 2012). This so-called autofocusing allows creating an image of the subsurface as a function of time that is free of internal multiples by creating virtual sources and receivers everywhere in the subsurface. No velocity model is required, but the medium is assumed to be loss-less as in interferometry by cross-correlation. Our method directly retrieves the primary reflection coefficients and eliminates all internal multiples by filtering the measured reflection data. This reflection response must be free of surface-related multiples. In this study, we apply the 1D-version of the method to synthetic data which are bandlimited and noisy. We show a processing flow which allows to apply our algorithm to quite realistic data making this approach ready for a try-out on real data. References: Bakulin, A., & Calvert, R. 2006. The virtual source method: Theory and case study. Geophysics, 71, SI139-SI150. Broggini, F., Snieder, R., & Wapenaar, C. P. A. 2011. Connection of scattering principles: focusing the wavefield without source or receiver. 81st annual SEG meeting, San Antonio, 3845-3850. Schuster, G. 2009. Seismic Interferometry. Cambridge University Press

  5. Registration of liver images to minimally invasive intraoperative surface and subsurface data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yifei; Rucker, D. C.; Conley, Rebekah H.; Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Simpson, Amber L.; Geevarghese, Sunil K.; Miga, Michael I.

    2014-03-01

    Laparoscopic liver resection is increasingly being performed with results comparable to open cases while incurring less trauma and reducing recovery time. The tradeoff is increased difficulty due to limited visibility and restricted freedom of movement. Image-guided surgical navigation systems have the potential to help localize anatomical features to improve procedural safety and achieve better surgical resection outcome. Previous research has demonstrated that intraoperative surface data can be used to drive a finite element tissue mechanics organ model such that high resolution preoperative scans are registered and visualized in the context of the current surgical pose. In this paper we present an investigation of using sparse data as imposed by laparoscopic limitations to drive a registration model. Non-contact laparoscopicallyacquired surface swabbing and mock-ultrasound subsurface data were used within the context of a nonrigid registration methodology to align mock deformed intraoperative surface data to the corresponding preoperative liver model as derived from pre-operative image segmentations. The mock testing setup to validate the potential of this approach used a tissue-mimicking liver phantom with a realistic abdomen-port patient configuration. Experimental results demonstrates a range of target registration errors (TRE) on the order of 5mm were achieving using only surface swab data, while use of only subsurface data yielded errors on the order of 6mm. Registrations using a combination of both datasets achieved TRE on the order of 2.5mm and represent a sizeable improvement over either dataset alone.

  6. Application of Fourier descriptors and fuzzy logic to classification of radar subsurface images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsiani, Hamed; Tolstoy, Leonid

    2004-02-01

    This paper presents an application of Fourier Descriptors and Fuzzy Logic for the recognition of archeological artifacts in Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) images of a surveyed site. 2-D GPR survey images of a site are made available by NASA-SSC center. The buried artifacts in these images appear in the form of hyperbolas which are the results of radar backscatter from the artifacts. The Fourier Descriptors of an image are applied as inputs to a Fuzzy C-Mean Classifier (FCMC). The FCMC algorithm has to recognize different types of shapes, in order to separate hyperbola-like shapes from non-hyperbola shapes in the sub-surface images. The procedure consisted of removing background noise using a suitable threshold filter, locating the separate shapes in the image using N8(p) connectivity algorithm, calculating a short sequence of Fourier Descriptors (FD) of each isolated shape, and obtaining an unsupervised classification by applying Fuzzy C-Mean clustering algorithm to the FD sequences. The classes obtained depend upon the requirements of the user, namely, two classes of hyperbola/no-hyperbola objects, or several classes from symmetric hyperbolas to total rejects could be obtained. The results consisting of recognized hyperbolas indicate the presence of buried artifacts. Also, our previous results of supervised FD-Neural Network (FD-NNC) published in the proceedings of SPIE 2002 are compared with unsupervised FD-FCMC. The compared results in terms of the quality of classification are presented in this work.

  7. Tracking snowmelt in the subsurface: time-lapse electrical resistivity imaging on an alpine hill slope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, D.; Parsekian, A.; Hyde, K.; Beverly, D.; Speckman, H. N.; Ewers, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    In the mountain West region the winter snowpack provides more than 70% of our annual water supply. Modeling and predicting the timing and magnitude of snowmelt-driven water yield is difficult due to the complexities of hydrologic systems that move meltwater from snow to rivers. Particular challenges are understanding the temporal and spatial domain of subsurface hydraulic processes at relevant scales, which range from points to catchments. Subsurface characterization often requires borehole instrumentation, which is expensive and extremely difficult to install in remote, rugged terrain. Advancements in non-invasive geophysical methods allow us to monitor changes in geophysical parameters over time and infer changes in hydraulic processes. In the No-Name experimental catchment in the Medicine Bow National Forest in Wyoming, we are conducting a multi-season, time-lapse electrical resistivity imaging survey on a sub-alpine hill slope. This south-facing, partially forested slope ranges from 5 degrees to 35 degrees in steepness and consists of a soil mantle covering buried glacial talus deposits of unknown depth. A permanent grid of down-slope and cross-slope electrode arrays is monitored up to four times a day. The arrays span the entire vertical distance of the slope, from an exposed bedrock ridge to a seasonal drainage below, and cover treed and non-treed areas. Geophysical measurements are augmented by temperature and moisture time-series instrumented below the surface in a contiguous 3 meter borehole. A time-series of multiple resistivity models each day from May to July shows the changing distribution of subsurface moisture during a seasonal drying sequence punctuated by isolated rain events. Spatial patterns of changing moisture indicate that soil and gravel in the top two meters drain into a saturated layer parallel to the slope which overlies less saturated material. These results suggest that water from snowmelt and rain events tends to move down-slope beneath

  8. Accurate band-to-band registration of AOTF imaging spectrometer using motion detection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Pengwei; Zhao, Huijie; Jin, Shangzhong; Li, Ningchuan

    2016-05-01

    This paper concerns the problem of platform vibration induced band-to-band misregistration with acousto-optic imaging spectrometer in spaceborne application. Registrating images of different bands formed at different time or different position is difficult, especially for hyperspectral images form acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) imaging spectrometer. In this study, a motion detection method is presented using the polychromatic undiffracted beam of AOTF. The factors affecting motion detect accuracy are analyzed theoretically, and calculations show that optical distortion is an easily overlooked factor to achieve accurate band-to-band registration. Hence, a reflective dual-path optical system has been proposed for the first time, with reduction of distortion and chromatic aberration, indicating the potential of higher registration accuracy. Consequently, a spectra restoration experiment using additional motion detect channel is presented for the first time, which shows the accurate spectral image registration capability of this technique.

  9. An accurate method of extracting fat droplets in liver images for quantitative evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Naoki; Komagata, Hideki; Shinoda, Kazuma; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Abe, Tokiya; Hashiguchi, Akinori; Sakamoto, Michiie

    2015-03-01

    The steatosis in liver pathological tissue images is a promising indicator of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the possible risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The resulting values are also important for ensuring the automatic and accurate classification of HCC images, because the existence of many fat droplets is likely to create errors in quantifying the morphological features used in the process. In this study we propose a method that can automatically detect, and exclude regions with many fat droplets by using the feature values of colors, shapes and the arrangement of cell nuclei. We implement the method and confirm that it can accurately detect fat droplets and quantify the fat droplet ratio of actual images. This investigation also clarifies the effective characteristics that contribute to accurate detection.

  10. Highly accurate SNR measurement using the covariance of two SEM images with the identical view.

    PubMed

    Oho, Eisaku; Suzuki, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Quality of an SEM image is strongly influenced by the extent of noise. As a well-known method in the field of SEM, the covariance is applied to measure the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This method has potential ability for highly accurate measurement of the SNR, which is hardly known until now. If the precautions discussed in this article are adopted, that method can demonstrate its real ability. These precautions are strongly related to "proper acquisition of two images with the identical view," "alignment of an aperture diaphragm," "reduction of charging phenomena," "elimination of particular noises," and "accurate focusing," As necessary, characteristics in SEM signal and noise are investigated from a few standpoints. When using the maximum performance of this measurement, SNR of many SEM images obtained in a variety of the SEM operating conditions and specimens can be measured accurately.

  11. SHUTTLE IMAGING RADAR PROVIDES FRAMEWORK FOR SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC EXPLORATION IN EGYPT AND SUDAN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breed, Carol S.; McCauley, John F.; Schaber, Gerald G.

    1984-01-01

    Shuttle Imaging Radar provides a pictorial framework to guide exploration for mineral resources (potential placers), groundwater sources, and prehistoric archaeological sites in the Western Desert of Egypt and Sudan. Documented penetration by the SIR-A signal of dry surficial sediment to depths of a meter or more revealed bedrock geologic features and networks of former stream valleys otherwise concealed beneath windblown sand, alluvium, and colluvial deposits. 'Radar units' mapped on SIR-A images according to relative brightness and degree of mottling correspond to subsurface geologic and topographic features identified in more than 50 test pits. Petrologic examination of pit samples confirms that a variety of depositional environments existed in this now hyper-arid region before it was mantled by windblown sand sheets and dunes. Wet sand was discovered in two buried valleys shown on the radar images and located in the field with the aid of co-registered maps and Landsat images, and a satellite navigation device. Buried valleys whose streams once traversed mineralized zones are potential sites of placers (gold, tin).

  12. Using Copula Distributions to Support More Accurate Imaging-Based Diagnostic Classifiers for Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ravi; Hao, Xuejun; Liu, Jun; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2014-01-01

    Many investigators have tried to apply machine learning techniques to magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of the brain in order to diagnose neuropsychiatric disorders. Usually the number of brain imaging measures (such as measures of cortical thickness and measures of local surface morphology) derived from the MRIs (i.e., their dimensionality) has been large (e.g. >10) relative to the number of participants who provide the MRI data (<100). Sparse data in a high dimensional space increases the variability of the classification rules that machine learning algorithms generate, thereby limiting the validity, reproducibility, and generalizability of those classifiers. The accuracy and stability of the classifiers can improve significantly if the multivariate distributions of the imaging measures can be estimated accurately. To accurately estimate the multivariate distributions using sparse data, we propose to estimate first the univariate distributions of imaging data and then combine them using a Copula to generate more accurate estimates of their multivariate distributions. We then sample the estimated Copula distributions to generate dense sets of imaging measures and use those measures to train classifiers. We hypothesize that the dense sets of brain imaging measures will generate classifiers that are stable to variations in brain imaging measures, thereby improving the reproducibility, validity, and generalizability of diagnostic classification algorithms in imaging datasets from clinical populations. In our experiments, we used both computer-generated and real-world brain imaging datasets to assess the accuracy of multivariate Copula distributions in estimating the corresponding multivariate distributions of real-world imaging data. Our experiments showed that diagnostic classifiers generated using imaging measures sampled from the Copula were significantly more accurate and more reproducible than were the classifiers generated using either the real-world imaging

  13. Immobilization Using Dental Material Casts Facilitates Accurate Serial and Multimodality Small Animal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Haney, Chad R.; Fan, Xiaobing; Parasca, Adrian D.; Karczmar, Gregory S.; Halpern, Howard J.; Pelizzari, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Custom disposable patient immobilization systems that conform to the patient’s body contours are commonly used to facilitate accurate repeated patient setup for imaging and treatment in radiation therapy. However, in small-animal imaging, immobilization is often overlooked or done in a way that is not conducive to reproducible positioning. This has a negative impact on the potential for accurate analysis of serial or multimodality imaging. We present the use of vinyl polysiloxane dental impression material for immobilization of mice for imaging. Four different materials were examined to identify any potential artifacts using magnetic resonance techniques. A water phantom placed inside the cast was used at 4.7 T with magnetic resonance imaging and showed no effect at the center of the image when compared with images without the cast. A negligible effect was seen near the ends of the coil. Each material had no detectable signal using electron paramagnetic resonance imaging at 9 mT. The use of dental material also greatly enhances the use of fiducial markers that can be embedded in the mold. Therefore, image registration is simplified as the immobilization of the animal and fiducials together helps in translating from one image coordinate system to another. PMID:20827425

  14. Subsurface imaging of an abandoned solid waste landfill site in Norman, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zume, J.T.; Tarhule, A.; Christenson, S.

    2006-01-01

    Leachate plume emanating from an old unlined municipal landfill site near the city of Norman, Oklahoma, is discharging into the underlying alluvial aquifer. Subsurface imaging techniques, electrical resistivity tomography and electrical conductivity (EC) logging, were used on the site to detect and map the position of the leachate plume. Anomalous EC zones, delineated with the two methods, correlated with the occurrence of the plume detected by water chemistry analyses from multilevel monitoring wells. Specific conductance, a potential indicator of leachate contamination, ranged from 1861 to 7710 ??S/cm in contaminated zones and from 465 to 2180 ??S/cm in uncontaminated ground water. Results are in agreement with those from earlier studies that the leachate plume emerges from the landfill along preferential pathways. Additionally, there are indications that the leading edge of the plume has migrated, at least, 200 m away from the landfill in the direction of ground water flow. ?? 2006 National Ground Water Association.

  15. Evaluation of automated threshold selection methods for accurately sizing microscopic fluorescent cells by image analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Sieracki, M E; Reichenbach, S E; Webb, K L

    1989-01-01

    The accurate measurement of bacterial and protistan cell biomass is necessary for understanding their population and trophic dynamics in nature. Direct measurement of fluorescently stained cells is often the method of choice. The tedium of making such measurements visually on the large numbers of cells required has prompted the use of automatic image analysis for this purpose. Accurate measurements by image analysis require an accurate, reliable method of segmenting the image, that is, distinguishing the brightly fluorescing cells from a dark background. This is commonly done by visually choosing a threshold intensity value which most closely coincides with the outline of the cells as perceived by the operator. Ideally, an automated method based on the cell image characteristics should be used. Since the optical nature of edges in images of light-emitting, microscopic fluorescent objects is different from that of images generated by transmitted or reflected light, it seemed that automatic segmentation of such images may require special considerations. We tested nine automated threshold selection methods using standard fluorescent microspheres ranging in size and fluorescence intensity and fluorochrome-stained samples of cells from cultures of cyanobacteria, flagellates, and ciliates. The methods included several variations based on the maximum intensity gradient of the sphere profile (first derivative), the minimum in the second derivative of the sphere profile, the minimum of the image histogram, and the midpoint intensity. Our results indicated that thresholds determined visually and by first-derivative methods tended to overestimate the threshold, causing an underestimation of microsphere size. The method based on the minimum of the second derivative of the profile yielded the most accurate area estimates for spheres of different sizes and brightnesses and for four of the five cell types tested. A simple model of the optical properties of fluorescing objects and

  16. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for β-cell mass assessments

    PubMed Central

    Eter, Wael A.; Parween, Saba; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Eriksson, Maria; Brom, Maarten; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in β-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total β-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Alternative methods are therefore warranted to cross-validate β-cell imaging using radiotracers. In this study, we introduce multimodal SPECT - optical projection tomography (OPT) imaging as an accurate approach to cross-validate radionuclide-based imaging of β-cells. Uptake of a promising radiotracer for β-cell imaging by SPECT, 111In-exendin-3, was measured by ex vivo-SPECT and cross evaluated by 3D quantitative OPT imaging as well as with histology within healthy and alloxan-treated Brown Norway rat pancreata. SPECT signal was in excellent linear correlation with OPT data as compared to histology. While histological determination of islet spatial distribution was challenging, SPECT and OPT revealed similar distribution patterns of 111In-exendin-3 and insulin positive β-cell volumes between different pancreatic lobes, both visually and quantitatively. We propose ex vivo SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging as a highly accurate strategy for validating the performance of β-cell radiotracers. PMID:27080529

  17. SHUTTLE IMAGING RADAR: PHYSICAL CONTROLS ON SIGNAL PENETRATION AND SUBSURFACE SCATTERING IN THE EASTERN SAHARA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaber, Gerald G.; McCauley, John F.; Breed, Carol S.; Olhoeft, Gary R.

    1986-01-01

    It is found that the Shuttle Imaging Radar A (SIR-A) signal penetration and subsurface backscatter within the upper meter or so of the sediment blanket in the Eastern Sahara of southern Egypt and northern Sudan are enhanced both by radar sensor parameters and by the physical and chemical characteristics of eolian and alluvial materials. The near-surface stratigraphy, the electrical properties of materials, and the types of radar interfaces found to be responsible for different classes of SIR-A tonal response are summarized. The dominant factors related to efficient microwave signal penetration into the sediment blanket include 1) favorable distribution of particle sizes, 2) extremely low moisture content and 3) reduced geometric scattering at the SIR-A frequency (1. 3 GHz). The depth of signal penetration that results in a recorded backscatter, called radar imaging depth, was documented in the field to be a maximum of 1. 5 m, or 0. 25 times the calculated skin depth, for the sediment blanket. The radar imaging depth is estimated to be between 2 and 3 m for active sand dune materials.

  18. Subsurface Imaging by UWB Radar: Application to Humanitarian Demining in Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Motoyuki

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) has been widely used applications which include detection of subsurface facilities, concrete inspection and archaeology. Among these applications, humanitarian demining is still difficult task. Since 2002, we have developed a new hand-held land mine detection dual-sensor ALIS. ALIS is equipped with a metal detector and a GPR, and it has a sensor tracking system, which can record the GPR and Metal detector signal with its location. ALIS can process the data and is used for image re-construction by migration processing. ALIS is the only one mine detection system in the world which can visualize the GPR image by hand scanning. We found that the migration processing can reduce the clutter and gives us clear images of buried mines. After several tests of ALIS in mine affected courtiers, operation of ALIS in mine fields in Cambodia started in summer 2009. Two sets of ALIS have been operated in Cambodia and more than 77 antipersonnel mines have been detected and 137,000m2 farmland was cleaned.

  19. Accurate Construction of Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (PALM) Images for Quantitative Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Coltharp, Carla; Kessler, Rene P.; Xiao, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Localization-based superresolution microscopy techniques such as Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (PALM) and Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM) have allowed investigations of cellular structures with unprecedented optical resolutions. One major obstacle to interpreting superresolution images, however, is the overcounting of molecule numbers caused by fluorophore photoblinking. Using both experimental and simulated images, we determined the effects of photoblinking on the accurate reconstruction of superresolution images and on quantitative measurements of structural dimension and molecule density made from those images. We found that structural dimension and relative density measurements can be made reliably from images that contain photoblinking-related overcounting, but accurate absolute density measurements, and consequently faithful representations of molecule counts and positions in cellular structures, require the application of a clustering algorithm to group localizations that originate from the same molecule. We analyzed how applying a simple algorithm with different clustering thresholds (tThresh and dThresh) affects the accuracy of reconstructed images, and developed an easy method to select optimal thresholds. We also identified an empirical criterion to evaluate whether an imaging condition is appropriate for accurate superresolution image reconstruction with the clustering algorithm. Both the threshold selection method and imaging condition criterion are easy to implement within existing PALM clustering algorithms and experimental conditions. The main advantage of our method is that it generates a superresolution image and molecule position list that faithfully represents molecule counts and positions within a cellular structure, rather than only summarizing structural properties into ensemble parameters. This feature makes it particularly useful for cellular structures of heterogeneous densities and irregular geometries, and

  20. Imaging subsurface density distribution beneath Montserrat (West Indies) from Bouguer gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hautmann, S.; Camacho, A. G.; Gottsmann, J.; Odbert, H. M.; Syers, T.

    2012-12-01

    High resolution static gravity data allow to resolve for spatial inhomogeneities in the Earth's gravity field by providing information on the density distribution in the shallow subsurface. Images of the subsurface density distribution and identification of structural discontinuities in the ground are of particular interest in active volcanic regions, as they bear implications for fluid migration, edifice stability and the subsurface transmission of volcanically induced stresses. Although the persistently active Soufrière Hills Volcano (SHV; Montserrat, West Indies) is currently one of the most extensively studied actively erupting stratovolcanos, a local Bouguer anomaly map of the volcano and the island of Montserrat is missing to date. In June/July 2012 we conducted a static gravity survey on Montserrat. Using a Scintrex CG-5 Autograv a total of 160 new gravity data were collected on the entire island. Site positions and elevations were obtained via a TOPCON Hiperpro dual frequency GNSS receiver/antenna. Our Bouguer gravity network provides a dense coverage (distance of 200 m between adjacent sites) of the accessible regions of the older volcanic complexes Silver Hills and Centre Hills, while (due to operator's safety) the network coverage around the active SHV is more sparse with about 1 km distance between adjacent sites. The recorded gravity data were corrected for Solid Earth Tides and ocean loading and reduced for the effect of benchmark elevation (free-air effect) and latitude. The correction for topographic effects was done via an automated algorithm based on a digital elevation model and bathymetric data. In order to model our data we performed a non-linear inversion using the inversion package GROWTH 2.0. The inversion is based on a 3-D aggregation of M parallelepiped cells, which are filled, in a growth process, by means of prescribed positive and/or negative density contrasts. This methodology provides, via an automatic approach, a free 3-D geometry

  1. Ultra-Wideband Vivaldi Antenna Array for High Resolution Subsurface Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yedlin, M. J.; Cresp, A.; Pichot, C.; Aliferis, I.; Dauvignac, J.; Fortino, N.; Gaffet, S.

    2008-05-01

    Use of ultra-wideband electromagnetic waves to image the subsurface yields enhanced resolution, provided sources, antennas and recording equipment can be developed and calibrated over the complete bandwidth of interest. We present a demonstration of the latest microwave transmission and recording technology to obtain high-resolution images. Our transmitter and receiver electronics are embodied in the vector network analyzer (PNA series) from Agilent, an eight-port vector network analyzer that records amplitude and phase. The analyzer is connected through a microwave multiplexer and microwave switch to an 8 element, balanced, antipodal Vivaldi antenna array, which can transmit or receive data over a bandwidth from 1.3 to 20 GHz. The bandwidth of the integrated system is determined by the bandwidth of the microwave switch, from DC to 18GHz, which interfaces the multiplexer to the PNA. The capabilities of a microwave multiplexer are employed to collect multi-channel data, by using one channel for transmission and reception on all 8 channels. The demonstration of this integrated system will be focussed on scattering from a single conducting cylinder as well as two cylinders, a dielectric and conducting cylinder, spaced at different intervals. The increased bandwidth, over that obtained in conventional GPR recording will result in pulses that have little ringing, allowing the detection of deeper reflections and eliminating any post-processing distortions that arise from deconvolving the traditional oscillatory waveform. Although the demonstration will be presented in the GHz bandwidth, suitable for imaging over a length scale to 1m, this integrated system will scale to lower bandwidths and can operate from 100 MHz to 3 GHz, with a resultant penetration depth of 10 to 20 m depending on the subsurface properties. Given the electronic constraints of the switch and the PNA, this scaling is simply achieved by enlarging the Vivaldi antenna dimensions. The advantage of using

  2. Developing Training Image-Based Priors for Inversion of Subsurface Geophysical and Flow Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caers, J.

    2014-12-01

    Forecasting in subsurface formations, whether for groundwater, storage or oil & gas production, can rely on a wealth of geological information. Currently, most of this information remains underused in both the theory and practice of forecasting based on inverse models which heavily relies on spatial covariances and multi-Gaussian theory. By means of real field studies, I will provide an outline of how such geological information can be accounted through the construction and validation of a large set of training images and the generation of model realizations with MPS (multiple-point geostatistics). Often most critical in solving such inverse problems is the development of prior models that are later used for posterior sampling or stochastic search. I propose therefore a two-stage approach where the first stage consists of a validation of the training image-based prior with the geophysical and flow data. This stage will require only the generation of a few (100s) geological models and the forward modeling of the data response on these models. For geophysical data, the validation consists of comparing histograms of multi-scale wavelet transforms between the forward models and the field data. For flow data, the validation is based on a reduction of dimensionality of the forward response and the data using multi-dimensional scaling. The outcome of this validation is an estimate of the prior probability assigned to each training image, with several training images getting assigned zero probability (incompatible with field data). These prior probabilities are used in the second stage to actually invert for the data using stochastic search. In such stochastic search, I avoid parameterizing the model space and present methods that efficiently perform a direct search in the space of the validated training image-based prior model realizations.

  3. Medical Image Watermarking Technique for Accurate Tamper Detection in ROI and Exact Recovery of ROI.

    PubMed

    Eswaraiah, R; Sreenivasa Reddy, E

    2014-01-01

    In telemedicine while transferring medical images tampers may be introduced. Before making any diagnostic decisions, the integrity of region of interest (ROI) of the received medical image must be verified to avoid misdiagnosis. In this paper, we propose a novel fragile block based medical image watermarking technique to avoid embedding distortion inside ROI, verify integrity of ROI, detect accurately the tampered blocks inside ROI, and recover the original ROI with zero loss. In this proposed method, the medical image is segmented into three sets of pixels: ROI pixels, region of noninterest (RONI) pixels, and border pixels. Then, authentication data and information of ROI are embedded in border pixels. Recovery data of ROI is embedded into RONI. Results of experiments conducted on a number of medical images reveal that the proposed method produces high quality watermarked medical images, identifies the presence of tampers inside ROI with 100% accuracy, and recovers the original ROI without any loss.

  4. Medical Image Watermarking Technique for Accurate Tamper Detection in ROI and Exact Recovery of ROI

    PubMed Central

    Eswaraiah, R.; Sreenivasa Reddy, E.

    2014-01-01

    In telemedicine while transferring medical images tampers may be introduced. Before making any diagnostic decisions, the integrity of region of interest (ROI) of the received medical image must be verified to avoid misdiagnosis. In this paper, we propose a novel fragile block based medical image watermarking technique to avoid embedding distortion inside ROI, verify integrity of ROI, detect accurately the tampered blocks inside ROI, and recover the original ROI with zero loss. In this proposed method, the medical image is segmented into three sets of pixels: ROI pixels, region of noninterest (RONI) pixels, and border pixels. Then, authentication data and information of ROI are embedded in border pixels. Recovery data of ROI is embedded into RONI. Results of experiments conducted on a number of medical images reveal that the proposed method produces high quality watermarked medical images, identifies the presence of tampers inside ROI with 100% accuracy, and recovers the original ROI without any loss. PMID:25328515

  5. PROCEDURES FOR ACCURATE PRODUCTION OF COLOR IMAGES FROM SATELLITE OR AIRCRAFT MULTISPECTRAL DIGITAL DATA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duval, Joseph S.

    1985-01-01

    Because the display and interpretation of satellite and aircraft remote-sensing data make extensive use of color film products, accurate reproduction of the color images is important. To achieve accurate color reproduction, the exposure and chemical processing of the film must be monitored and controlled. By using a combination of sensitometry, densitometry, and transfer functions that control film response curves, all of the different steps in the making of film images can be monitored and controlled. Because a sensitometer produces a calibrated exposure, the resulting step wedge can be used to monitor the chemical processing of the film. Step wedges put on film by image recording machines provide a means of monitoring the film exposure and color balance of the machines.

  6. Numerical studies of imaging subsurface waterfloods using CSERT with time-lapse inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; Liu, De-Jun; Wang, Li-Yang; Ai, Qing-Hui; Qin, Min-Jun

    2015-12-01

    During the operation of the waterflooding technique, it is necessary to identify the waterflooding areas to enhance oil displacement efficiency. A casing-surface electrical resistivity tomography (CSERT) system using a well casing as a long electrode is able to detect a wide lateral scope, but its vertical resolution and ability to identify deep anomalies in the reservoir are limited, particularly for reservoirs with high-conductivity anomalies in the shallow subsurface, which disturb the response from the water floods at depth. In this study, we first simplified this kind of reservoir into a dual layered anomaly model. Then the log-inject-log method with time-lapse inversion was proposed and evaluated regarding its ability to improve the imaging of the deep waterflooding areas and the shallow anomaly. The results were compared with the commonly used static measurement with static inversion. In the static inversion results, the shallow anomaly was imaged well but the deep anomaly was unobservable. The results of the proposed log-inject-log method with time-lapse inversion showed that it is able to identify the shallow and deep anomalies better under various conditions, thus validating its ability to improve the vertical resolution of the CSERT system.

  7. Nanoscale Subsurface Imaging of Nanocomposites via Resonant Difference-Frequency Atomic Force Ultrasonic Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, Sean A.; Cantrell, John H.; Lillehei, Peter T.

    2007-01-01

    A scanning probe microscope methodology, called resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), has been developed. The method employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope engages the sample top surface. The cantilever is driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by one of the contact resonance frequencies of the cantilever. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave at the sample surface generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever contact resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create amplitude and phase-generated images of nanoscale near-surface and subsurface features. RDF-AFUM phase images of LaRC-CP2 polyimide polymer containing embedded nanostructures are presented. A RDF-AFUM micrograph of a 12.7 micrometer thick film of LaRC-CP2 containing a monolayer of gold nanoparticles embedded 7 micrometers below the specimen surface reveals the occurrence of contiguous amorphous and crystalline phases within the bulk of the polymer and a preferential growth of the crystalline phase in the vicinity of the gold nanoparticles. A RDF-AFUM micrograph of LaRC-CP2 film containing randomly dispersed carbon nanotubes reveals the growth of an interphase region at certain nanotube-polymer interfaces.

  8. Accurate determination of imaging modality using an ensemble of text- and image-based classifiers.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Charles E; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Lam, Cesar A; Eldredge, Christina E

    2012-02-01

    Imaging modality can aid retrieval of medical images for clinical practice, research, and education. We evaluated whether an ensemble classifier could outperform its constituent individual classifiers in determining the modality of figures from radiology journals. Seventeen automated classifiers analyzed 77,495 images from two radiology journals. Each classifier assigned one of eight imaging modalities--computed tomography, graphic, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine, positron emission tomography, photograph, ultrasound, or radiograph-to each image based on visual and/or textual information. Three physicians determined the modality of 5,000 randomly selected images as a reference standard. A "Simple Vote" ensemble classifier assigned each image to the modality that received the greatest number of individual classifiers' votes. A "Weighted Vote" classifier weighted each individual classifier's vote based on performance over a training set. For each image, this classifier's output was the imaging modality that received the greatest weighted vote score. We measured precision, recall, and F score (the harmonic mean of precision and recall) for each classifier. Individual classifiers' F scores ranged from 0.184 to 0.892. The simple vote and weighted vote classifiers correctly assigned 4,565 images (F score, 0.913; 95% confidence interval, 0.905-0.921) and 4,672 images (F score, 0.934; 95% confidence interval, 0.927-0.941), respectively. The weighted vote classifier performed significantly better than all individual classifiers. An ensemble classifier correctly determined the imaging modality of 93% of figures in our sample. The imaging modality of figures published in radiology journals can be determined with high accuracy, which will improve systems for image retrieval.

  9. Estimating the Effective Permittivity for Reconstructing Accurate Microwave-Radar Images.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Benjamin R; Okoniewski, Michal; Fear, Elise C

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a method for estimating the optimal effective permittivity for reconstructing microwave-radar images. Using knowledge of how microwave-radar images are formed, we identify characteristics that are typical of good images, and define a fitness function to measure the relative image quality. We build a polynomial interpolant of the fitness function in order to identify the most likely permittivity values of the tissue. To make the estimation process more efficient, the polynomial interpolant is constructed using a locally and dimensionally adaptive sampling method that is a novel combination of stochastic collocation and polynomial chaos. Examples, using a series of simulated, experimental and patient data collected using the Tissue Sensing Adaptive Radar system, which is under development at the University of Calgary, are presented. These examples show how, using our method, accurate images can be reconstructed starting with only a broad estimate of the permittivity range.

  10. Estimating the Effective Permittivity for Reconstructing Accurate Microwave-Radar Images

    PubMed Central

    Lavoie, Benjamin R.; Okoniewski, Michal; Fear, Elise C.

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a method for estimating the optimal effective permittivity for reconstructing microwave-radar images. Using knowledge of how microwave-radar images are formed, we identify characteristics that are typical of good images, and define a fitness function to measure the relative image quality. We build a polynomial interpolant of the fitness function in order to identify the most likely permittivity values of the tissue. To make the estimation process more efficient, the polynomial interpolant is constructed using a locally and dimensionally adaptive sampling method that is a novel combination of stochastic collocation and polynomial chaos. Examples, using a series of simulated, experimental and patient data collected using the Tissue Sensing Adaptive Radar system, which is under development at the University of Calgary, are presented. These examples show how, using our method, accurate images can be reconstructed starting with only a broad estimate of the permittivity range. PMID:27611785

  11. Estimating the Effective Permittivity for Reconstructing Accurate Microwave-Radar Images.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Benjamin R; Okoniewski, Michal; Fear, Elise C

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a method for estimating the optimal effective permittivity for reconstructing microwave-radar images. Using knowledge of how microwave-radar images are formed, we identify characteristics that are typical of good images, and define a fitness function to measure the relative image quality. We build a polynomial interpolant of the fitness function in order to identify the most likely permittivity values of the tissue. To make the estimation process more efficient, the polynomial interpolant is constructed using a locally and dimensionally adaptive sampling method that is a novel combination of stochastic collocation and polynomial chaos. Examples, using a series of simulated, experimental and patient data collected using the Tissue Sensing Adaptive Radar system, which is under development at the University of Calgary, are presented. These examples show how, using our method, accurate images can be reconstructed starting with only a broad estimate of the permittivity range. PMID:27611785

  12. Creation of Anatomically Accurate Computer-Aided Design (CAD) Solid Models from Medical Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, John E.; Graham, R. Scott; Samareh, Jamshid A.; Oberlander, Eric J.; Broaddus, William C.

    1999-01-01

    Most surgical instrumentation and implants used in the world today are designed with sophisticated Computer-Aided Design (CAD)/Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) software. This software automates the mechanical development of a product from its conceptual design through manufacturing. CAD software also provides a means of manipulating solid models prior to Finite Element Modeling (FEM). Few surgical products are designed in conjunction with accurate CAD models of human anatomy because of the difficulty with which these models are created. We have developed a novel technique that creates anatomically accurate, patient specific CAD solids from medical images in a matter of minutes.

  13. Accurate estimation of motion blur parameters in noisy remote sensing image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xueyan; Wang, Lin; Shao, Xiaopeng; Wang, Huilin; Tao, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    The relative motion between remote sensing satellite sensor and objects is one of the most common reasons for remote sensing image degradation. It seriously weakens image data interpretation and information extraction. In practice, point spread function (PSF) should be estimated firstly for image restoration. Identifying motion blur direction and length accurately is very crucial for PSF and restoring image with precision. In general, the regular light-and-dark stripes in the spectrum can be employed to obtain the parameters by using Radon transform. However, serious noise existing in actual remote sensing images often causes the stripes unobvious. The parameters would be difficult to calculate and the error of the result relatively big. In this paper, an improved motion blur parameter identification method to noisy remote sensing image is proposed to solve this problem. The spectrum characteristic of noisy remote sensing image is analyzed firstly. An interactive image segmentation method based on graph theory called GrabCut is adopted to effectively extract the edge of the light center in the spectrum. Motion blur direction is estimated by applying Radon transform on the segmentation result. In order to reduce random error, a method based on whole column statistics is used during calculating blur length. Finally, Lucy-Richardson algorithm is applied to restore the remote sensing images of the moon after estimating blur parameters. The experimental results verify the effectiveness and robustness of our algorithm.

  14. Subsurface Imaging and Sensing of Charge Carrier Movements in the Earth’s Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlgren, R.; Freund, F. T.; Lazarus, M.; Wang, J. S.; Rekenthaler, D.; Peters, R. D.; Duma, G.

    2009-12-01

    The DUSEL facility will enable unique opportunities for field experiments that would otherwise not be possible at surface facilities (Lesko, K.T., TAUP, 2007) and support a host of undergraduate and graduate educational projects. In this presentation, some of the proposed geophysics experiments will be described as part of the subsurface Imaging and Sensing (SIS) project to study charge carrier movement in crustal rock as a function of various perturbations. The electric conductivity of the Earth’s crust is dominated by positive hole charge carriers, e.g. mobile electron vacancy defects (EVD) in the oxygen anion sublattice of minerals that make up the bulk of crustal rocks. We are interested in (i) coupling of fundamental processes linked to the activation of additional EVDs in rocks deep in the crust subjected to tectonic stresses and the outflow of these charge carriers into the surrounding rocks, (ii) their manifestation across the electromagnetic spectrum and other measuands, (iii) induced forces that arise when these charge carriers are subjected to the episodic or daily magnetic field variations coming from geomagnetic storms or from the ionospheric current vortex, and (iv) in the movement of positive holes in the shallow crust when a thunderstorm system drifts overhead, dragging along a charge cloud in the ground. We propose to conduct active rock stressing experiments in situ using expanding grout technique (performing electrical, electromagnetic, and VolksMeter tilt measurements) and to monitor the electric and magnetic field variations penetrating into the Earth’s crust. Additionally optical phenomena will be investigated (anomalous infrared signatures, visible light arising from atomic oxygen and corona discharge, and infrared imaging). If budget permits, measurement of changes of acoustic velocity, evolution of chemical species (H2, O*, Rn, etc) and radar reflectivity as a function of stresses will also be attempted. We propose to study the charge

  15. Testing & Validating: 3D Seismic Travel Time Tomography (Detailed Shallow Subsurface Imaging)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, David; Marzan, Ignacio; Alvarez-Marron, Joaquina; Carbonell, Ramon

    2016-04-01

    A detailed full 3 dimensional P wave seismic velocity model was constrained by a high-resolution seismic tomography experiment. A regular and dense grid of shots and receivers was use to image a 500x500x200 m volume of the shallow subsurface. 10 GEODE's resulting in a 240 channels recording system and a 250 kg weight drop were used for the acquisition. The recording geometry consisted in 10x20m geophone grid spacing, and a 20x20 m stagered source spacing. A total of 1200 receivers and 676 source points. The study area is located within the Iberian Meseta, in Villar de Cañas (Cuenca, Spain). The lithological/geological target consisted in a Neogen sedimentary sequence formed from bottom to top by a transition from gyspum to silstones. The main objectives consisted in resolving the underground structure: contacts/discontinuities; constrain the 3D geometry of the lithology (possible cavities, faults/fractures). These targets were achieved by mapping the 3D distribution of the physical properties (P-wave velocity). The regularly space dense acquisition grid forced to acquire the survey in different stages and with a variety of weather conditions. Therefore, a careful quality control was required. More than a half million first arrivals were inverted to provide a 3D Vp velocity model that reached depths of 120 m in the areas with the highest ray coverage. An extended borehole campaign, that included borehole geophysical measurements in some wells provided unique tight constraints on the lithology an a validation scheme for the tomographic results. The final image reveals a laterally variable structure consisting of four different lithological units. In this methodological validation test travel-time tomography features a high capacity of imaging in detail the lithological contrasts for complex structures located at very shallow depths.

  16. Targeting accurate object extraction from an image: a comprehensive study of natural image matting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qingsong; Shao, Ling; Li, Xuelong; Wang, Lei

    2015-02-01

    With the development of digital multimedia technologies, image matting has gained increasing interests from both academic and industrial communities. The purpose of image matting is to precisely extract the foreground objects with arbitrary shapes from an image or a video frame for further editing. It is generally known that image matting is inherently an ill-posed problem because we need to output three images out of only one input image. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive survey of the existing image matting algorithms and evaluate their performance. In addition to the blue screen matting, we systematically divide all existing natural image matting methods into four categories: 1) color sampling-based; 2) propagation-based; 3) combination of sampling-based and propagation-based; and 4) learning-based approaches. Sampling-based methods assume that the foreground and background colors of an unknown pixel can be explicitly estimated by examining nearby pixels. Propagation-based methods are instead based on the assumption that foreground and background colors are locally smooth. Learning-based methods treat the matting process as a supervised or semisupervised learning problem. Via the learning process, users can construct a linear or nonlinear model between the alpha mattes and the image colors using a training set to estimate the alpha matte of an unknown pixel without any assumption about the characteristics of the testing image. With three benchmark data sets, the various matting algorithms are evaluated and compared using several metrics to demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of each method both quantitatively and qualitatively. Finally, we conclude this paper by outlining the research trends and suggesting a number of promising directions for future development. PMID:25423658

  17. Development of anatomically and dielectrically accurate breast phantoms for microwave imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Halloran, M.; Lohfeld, S.; Ruvio, G.; Browne, J.; Krewer, F.; Ribeiro, C. O.; Inacio Pita, V. C.; Conceicao, R. C.; Jones, E.; Glavin, M.

    2014-05-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women. In the United States alone, it accounts for 31% of new cancer cases, and is second only to lung cancer as the leading cause of deaths in American women. More than 184,000 new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed each year resulting in approximately 41,000 deaths. Early detection and intervention is one of the most significant factors in improving the survival rates and quality of life experienced by breast cancer sufferers, since this is the time when treatment is most effective. One of the most promising breast imaging modalities is microwave imaging. The physical basis of active microwave imaging is the dielectric contrast between normal and malignant breast tissue that exists at microwave frequencies. The dielectric contrast is mainly due to the increased water content present in the cancerous tissue. Microwave imaging is non-ionizing, does not require breast compression, is less invasive than X-ray mammography, and is potentially low cost. While several prototype microwave breast imaging systems are currently in various stages of development, the design and fabrication of anatomically and dielectrically representative breast phantoms to evaluate these systems is often problematic. While some existing phantoms are composed of dielectrically representative materials, they rarely accurately represent the shape and size of a typical breast. Conversely, several phantoms have been developed to accurately model the shape of the human breast, but have inappropriate dielectric properties. This study will brie y review existing phantoms before describing the development of a more accurate and practical breast phantom for the evaluation of microwave breast imaging systems.

  18. Accurate three-dimensional pose recognition from monocular images using template matched filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picos, Kenia; Diaz-Ramirez, Victor H.; Kober, Vitaly; Montemayor, Antonio S.; Pantrigo, Juan J.

    2016-06-01

    An accurate algorithm for three-dimensional (3-D) pose recognition of a rigid object is presented. The algorithm is based on adaptive template matched filtering and local search optimization. When a scene image is captured, a bank of correlation filters is constructed to find the best correspondence between the current view of the target in the scene and a target image synthesized by means of computer graphics. The synthetic image is created using a known 3-D model of the target and an iterative procedure based on local search. Computer simulation results obtained with the proposed algorithm in synthetic and real-life scenes are presented and discussed in terms of accuracy of pose recognition in the presence of noise, cluttered background, and occlusion. Experimental results show that our proposal presents high accuracy for 3-D pose estimation using monocular images.

  19. Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements in an Anatomically-Accurate Scaled Model of the Mammalian Nasal Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumple, Christopher; Krane, Michael; Richter, Joseph; Craven, Brent

    2013-11-01

    The mammalian nose is a multi-purpose organ that houses a convoluted airway labyrinth responsible for respiratory air conditioning, filtering of environmental contaminants, and chemical sensing. Because of the complexity of the nasal cavity, the anatomy and function of these upper airways remain poorly understood in most mammals. However, recent advances in high-resolution medical imaging, computational modeling, and experimental flow measurement techniques are now permitting the study of respiratory airflow and olfactory transport phenomena in anatomically-accurate reconstructions of the nasal cavity. Here, we focus on efforts to manufacture an anatomically-accurate transparent model for stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) measurements. Challenges in the design and manufacture of an index-matched anatomical model are addressed. PIV measurements are presented, which are used to validate concurrent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of mammalian nasal airflow. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  20. Evaluating the capability of time-of-flight cameras for accurately imaging a cyclically loaded beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahamy, Hervé; Lichti, Derek; El-Badry, Mamdouh; Qi, Xiaojuan; Detchev, Ivan; Steward, Jeremy; Moravvej, Mohammad

    2015-05-01

    Time-of-flight cameras are used for diverse applications ranging from human-machine interfaces and gaming to robotics and earth topography. This paper aims at evaluating the capability of the Mesa Imaging SR4000 and the Microsoft Kinect 2.0 time-of-flight cameras for accurately imaging the top surface of a concrete beam subjected to fatigue loading in laboratory conditions. Whereas previous work has demonstrated the success of such sensors for measuring the response at point locations, the aim here is to measure the entire beam surface in support of the overall objective of evaluating the effectiveness of concrete beam reinforcement with steel fibre reinforced polymer sheets. After applying corrections for lens distortions to the data and differencing images over time to remove systematic errors due to internal scattering, the periodic deflections experienced by the beam have been estimated for the entire top surface of the beam and at witness plates attached. The results have been assessed by comparison with measurements from highly-accurate laser displacement transducers. This study concludes that both the Microsoft Kinect 2.0 and the Mesa Imaging SR4000s are capable of sensing a moving surface with sub-millimeter accuracy once the image distortions have been modeled and removed.

  1. Accurate color synthesis of three-dimensional objects in an image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, John H.; Shen, Hui-Liang

    2004-05-01

    Our study deals with color synthesis of a three-dimensional object in an image; i.e., given a single image, a target color can be accurately mapped onto the object such that the color appearance of the synthesized object closely resembles that of the actual one. As it is almost impossible to acquire the complete geometric description of the surfaces of an object in an image, this study attempted to recover the implicit description of geometry for the color synthesis. The description was obtained from either a series of spectral reflectances or the RGB signals at different surface positions on the basis of the dichromatic reflection model. The experimental results showed that this implicit image-based representation is related to the object geometry and is sufficient for accurate color synthesis of three-dimensional objects in an image. The method established is applicable to the color synthesis of both rigid and deformable objects and should contribute to color fidelity in virtual design, manufacturing, and retailing.

  2. Accurate color synthesis of three-dimensional objects in an image.

    PubMed

    Xin, John H; Shen, Hui-Liang

    2004-05-01

    Our study deals with color synthesis of a three-dimensional object in an image; i.e., given a single image, a target color can be accurately mapped onto the object such that the color appearance of the synthesized object closely resembles that of the actual one. As it is almost impossible to acquire the complete geometric description of the surfaces of an object in an image, this study attempted to recover the implicit description of geometry for the color synthesis. The description was obtained from either a series of spectral reflectances or the RGB signals at different surface positions on the basis of the dichromatic reflection model. The experimental results showed that this implicit image-based representation is related to the object geometry and is sufficient for accurate color synthesis of three-dimensional objects in an image. The method established is applicable to the color synthesis of both rigid and deformable objects and should contribute to color fidelity in virtual design, manufacturing, and retailing. PMID:15139423

  3. Accurate and reliable segmentation of the optic disc in digital fundus images

    PubMed Central

    Giachetti, Andrea; Ballerini, Lucia; Trucco, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We describe a complete pipeline for the detection and accurate automatic segmentation of the optic disc in digital fundus images. This procedure provides separation of vascular information and accurate inpainting of vessel-removed images, symmetry-based optic disc localization, and fitting of incrementally complex contour models at increasing resolutions using information related to inpainted images and vessel masks. Validation experiments, performed on a large dataset of images of healthy and pathological eyes, annotated by experts and partially graded with a quality label, demonstrate the good performances of the proposed approach. The method is able to detect the optic disc and trace its contours better than the other systems presented in the literature and tested on the same data. The average error in the obtained contour masks is reasonably close to the interoperator errors and suitable for practical applications. The optic disc segmentation pipeline is currently integrated in a complete software suite for the semiautomatic quantification of retinal vessel properties from fundus camera images (VAMPIRE). PMID:26158034

  4. A mobile laboratory for surface and subsurface imaging in geo-hazard monitoring activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornacchia, Carmela; Bavusi, Massimo; Loperte, Antonio; Pergola, Nicola; Pignatti, Stefano; Ponzo, Felice; Lapenna, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    high data acquisition repetition rate up to 500.000 pxl/sec with a range resolution of 0.1 mm, vertical and horizontal FoV of 310° and 360° respectively with a resolution of 0.0018°. The system is also equipped with a metric camera allows to georeference the high resolution images acquired. The electromagnetic sensors allow to obtain in near real time high-resolution 2D and 3D subsurface tomographic images. The main components are a fully automatic resistivity meter for DC electrical surveys (resistivity) and Induced Polarization, a Ground Penetrating Radar with antennas covering range for 400 MHz to 1.5 GHz and a gradiometric magnetometric system. All the sensors can be installed on a mobile van and remotely controlled using wi-fi technologies. An all-time network connection capability is guaranteed by a self-configurable satellite link for data communication, which allows to transmit in near-real time experimental data coming from the field surveys and to share other geospatial information. This ICT facility is well suited for emergency response activities during and after catastrophic events. Sensor synergy, multi-temporal and multi-scale resolutions of surface and sub-surface imaging are the key technical features of this instrumental facility. Finally, in this work we shortly present some first preliminary results obtained during the emergence phase of Abruzzo earthquake (Central Italy).

  5. STM images of subsurface Mn atoms in GaAs: evidence of hybridization of surface and impurity states.

    PubMed

    Jancu, J-M; Girard, J-Ch; Nestoklon, M O; Lemaître, A; Glas, F; Wang, Z Z; Voisin, P

    2008-11-01

    We show that scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of subsurface Mn atoms in GaAs are formed by hybridization of the impurity state with intrinsic surface states. They cannot be interpreted in terms of bulk-impurity wave-function imaging. Atomic-resolution images obtained using a low-temperature apparatus are compared with advanced, parameter-free tight-binding simulations accounting for both the buckled (110) surface and vacuum electronic properties. Splitting of the acceptor state due to buckling is shown to play a prominent role.

  6. Time-lapse 3-D seismic imaging of shallow subsurface contaminant flow.

    PubMed

    McKenna, J; Sherlock, D; Evans, B

    2001-12-01

    This paper presents a physical modelling study outlining a technique whereby buoyant contaminant flow within water-saturated unconsolidated sand was remotely monitored utilizing the time-lapse 3-D (TL3-D) seismic response. The controlled temperature and pressure conditions, along with the high level of acquisition repeatability attainable using sandbox physical models, allow the TL3-D seismic response to pore fluid movement to be distinguished from all other effects. TL3-D seismic techniques are currently being developed to monitor hydrocarbon reserves within producing reservoirs in an endeavour to improve overall recovery. However, in many ways, sandbox models under atmospheric conditions more accurately simulate the shallow subsurface than petroleum reservoirs. For this reason, perhaps the greatest application for analogue sandbox modelling is to improve our understanding of shallow groundwater and environmental flow mechanisms. Two fluid flow simulations were conducted whereby air and kerosene were injected into separate water-saturated unconsolidated sand models. In both experiments, a base 3-D seismic volume was recorded and compared with six later monitor surveys recorded while the injection program was conducted. Normal incidence amplitude and P-wave velocity information were extracted from the TL3-D seismic data to provide visualization of contaminant migration. Reflection amplitudes displayed qualitative areal distribution of fluids when a suitable impedance contrast existed between pore fluids. TL3-D seismic reflection tomography can potentially monitor the change in areal distribution of fluid contaminants over time, indicating flow patterns. However, other research and this current work have not established a quantifiable relationship between either normal reflection amplitudes and attenuation and fluid saturation. Generally, different pore fluids will have unique seismic velocities due to differences in compressibility and density. The predictable

  7. [Research on maize multispectral image accurate segmentation and chlorophyll index estimation].

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Sun, Hong; Li, Min-zan; Song, Yuan-yuan; Zhang, Yan-e

    2015-01-01

    In order to rapidly acquire maize growing information in the field, a non-destructive method of maize chlorophyll content index measurement was conducted based on multi-spectral imaging technique and imaging processing technology. The experiment was conducted at Yangling in Shaanxi province of China and the crop was Zheng-dan 958 planted in about 1 000 m X 600 m experiment field. Firstly, a 2-CCD multi-spectral image monitoring system was available to acquire the canopy images. The system was based on a dichroic prism, allowing precise separation of the visible (Blue (B), Green (G), Red (R): 400-700 nm) and near-infrared (NIR, 760-1 000 nm) band. The multispectral images were output as RGB and NIR images via the system vertically fixed to the ground with vertical distance of 2 m and angular field of 50°. SPAD index of each sample was'measured synchronously to show the chlorophyll content index. Secondly, after the image smoothing using adaptive smooth filtering algorithm, the NIR maize image was selected to segment the maize leaves from background, because there was a big difference showed in gray histogram between plant and soil background. The NIR image segmentation algorithm was conducted following steps of preliminary and accuracy segmentation: (1) The results of OTSU image segmentation method and the variable threshold algorithm were discussed. It was revealed that the latter was better one in corn plant and weed segmentation. As a result, the variable threshold algorithm based on local statistics was selected for the preliminary image segmentation. The expansion and corrosion were used to optimize the segmented image. (2) The region labeling algorithm was used to segment corn plants from soil and weed background with an accuracy of 95. 59 %. And then, the multi-spectral image of maize canopy was accurately segmented in R, G and B band separately. Thirdly, the image parameters were abstracted based on the segmented visible and NIR images. The average gray

  8. Subsurface Imaging at Mount St. Helens with a Large-N Geophone Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, S. M.; Schmandt, B.; Levander, A.; Kiser, E.; Vidale, J. E.; Moran, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    The 900-instrument Mount St. Helens nodal array recorded continuous data for approximately two weeks in the summer of 2014 and provides a remarkable opportunity to interrogate the structure beneath an active arc volcano. Two separate imaging techniques are applied to constrain both the distribution of microseismicity and subsurface velocity structure. Reverse-time source imaging is applied to the 10 km3 region beneath the volcanic edifice where most of cataloged seismicity occurred during the experiment. These efforts resulted in an order of magnitude increase in earthquake detections over the normal monitoring operations of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network. Earthquake locations resolve a narrow, ≤1 km wide, vertical lineament of seismicity that extends from the surface to 4 km depth directly beneath the summit crater, consistent with the historical event distribution of Waite and Moran[2009]. This feature is interpreted as a fracture network that acts as a conduit connecting an underlying magma chamber to the surface. Moho imaging is achieved using the near-offset (< 30 km) PmP phase generated by the iMUSH active source shots that occurred during the deployment. The PmP arrivals are enhanced using short-term-average over long-term-average processing and then migrated using a 3D velocity model. The observed Moho depths range from 35-40 km with a slight eastward deepening across the Mt St Helens fracture zone. Significant variations are observed in the Moho reflectivity. Large amplitude PmP energy is observed in shots originating from the north and east whereas shots from the south-west display little-to-no PmP energy. The region above the reflective Moho is approximately coincident with areas displaying reduced lower-crustal velocities in the initial iMUSH tomography models and may therefore contain fluids and/or partial melt. Additional evidence for lower crustal fluids in this region is provided by deep-long-period (DLP) events which have historically been

  9. Neuron Image Analyzer: Automated and Accurate Extraction of Neuronal Data from Low Quality Images.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-Min; Son, Kilho; Palmore, G Tayhas R

    2015-01-01

    Image analysis software is an essential tool used in neuroscience and neural engineering to evaluate changes in neuronal structure following extracellular stimuli. Both manual and automated methods in current use are severely inadequate at detecting and quantifying changes in neuronal morphology when the images analyzed have a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This inadequacy derives from the fact that these methods often include data from non-neuronal structures or artifacts by simply tracing pixels with high intensity. In this paper, we describe Neuron Image Analyzer (NIA), a novel algorithm that overcomes these inadequacies by employing Laplacian of Gaussian filter and graphical models (i.e., Hidden Markov Model, Fully Connected Chain Model) to specifically extract relational pixel information corresponding to neuronal structures (i.e., soma, neurite). As such, NIA that is based on vector representation is less likely to detect false signals (i.e., non-neuronal structures) or generate artifact signals (i.e., deformation of original structures) than current image analysis algorithms that are based on raster representation. We demonstrate that NIA enables precise quantification of neuronal processes (e.g., length and orientation of neurites) in low quality images with a significant increase in the accuracy of detecting neuronal changes post-stimulation. PMID:26593337

  10. Neuron Image Analyzer: Automated and Accurate Extraction of Neuronal Data from Low Quality Images

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang-Min; Son, Kilho; Palmore, G. Tayhas R.

    2015-01-01

    Image analysis software is an essential tool used in neuroscience and neural engineering to evaluate changes in neuronal structure following extracellular stimuli. Both manual and automated methods in current use are severely inadequate at detecting and quantifying changes in neuronal morphology when the images analyzed have a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This inadequacy derives from the fact that these methods often include data from non-neuronal structures or artifacts by simply tracing pixels with high intensity. In this paper, we describe Neuron Image Analyzer (NIA), a novel algorithm that overcomes these inadequacies by employing Laplacian of Gaussian filter and graphical models (i.e., Hidden Markov Model, Fully Connected Chain Model) to specifically extract relational pixel information corresponding to neuronal structures (i.e., soma, neurite). As such, NIA that is based on vector representation is less likely to detect false signals (i.e., non-neuronal structures) or generate artifact signals (i.e., deformation of original structures) than current image analysis algorithms that are based on raster representation. We demonstrate that NIA enables precise quantification of neuronal processes (e.g., length and orientation of neurites) in low quality images with a significant increase in the accuracy of detecting neuronal changes post-stimulation. PMID:26593337

  11. Curvelet-based sampling for accurate and efficient multimodal image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safran, M. N.; Freiman, M.; Werman, M.; Joskowicz, L.

    2009-02-01

    We present a new non-uniform adaptive sampling method for the estimation of mutual information in multi-modal image registration. The method uses the Fast Discrete Curvelet Transform to identify regions along anatomical curves on which the mutual information is computed. Its main advantages of over other non-uniform sampling schemes are that it captures the most informative regions, that it is invariant to feature shapes, orientations, and sizes, that it is efficient, and that it yields accurate results. Extensive evaluation on 20 validated clinical brain CT images to Proton Density (PD) and T1 and T2-weighted MRI images from the public RIRE database show the effectiveness of our method. Rigid registration accuracy measured at 10 clinical targets and compared to ground truth measurements yield a mean target registration error of 0.68mm(std=0.4mm) for CT-PD and 0.82mm(std=0.43mm) for CT-T2. This is 0.3mm (1mm) more accurate in the average (worst) case than five existing sampling methods. Our method has the lowest registration errors recorded to date for the registration of CT-PD and CT-T2 images in the RIRE website when compared to methods that were tested on at least three patient datasets.

  12. Faults dominant structure? -Seismic images of the subsurface structure for the Ilan geothermal field in Taiwan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu-Chun; Shih, Ruey-Chyuan; Wang, Chien-Ying; Kuo, Hsuan-Yu; Chen, Wen-Shan

    2016-04-01

    A prototype deep geothermal power plant is to be constructed at the Ilan plain in northeastern Taiwan. The site will be chosen from one of the two potential areas, one in the west and the other in the eastern side of the plain. The triangle-shaped Ilan plane is bounded by two mountain ranges at the northwest and the south, with argillite and slate outcrops exposed, respectively. The Ilan plane is believed situating in a structure extending area at the southwestern end of the Okinawa Trough. Many studies about subsurface structure of the plain have been conducted for years. The results showed that the thickest sediments, around 900 m, is located at the eastern coast of the plain, at north of the largest river in the plain, the Lanyang river, and then became shallower to the edges of the plain. Since the plane is covered by thick sediments, formations and structures beneath the sediments are barely known. However, the observed high geothermal gradient and the abundant hot spring in the Ilan area indicate that this area is having a high potential of geothermal energy. In order to build up a conceptual model for tracing the possible paths of geothermal water and search for a suitable site for the geothermal well, we used the seismic reflection method to delineate the subsurface structure. The seismic profiles showed a clear unconformity separating the sediments and the metamorphic bedrock, and some events dipping to the east in the bedrock. Seismic images above the unconformity are clear; however, seismic signals in the metamorphic bedrock are sort of ambiguous. There were two models interpreted by using around 10 seismic images that collected by us in the past 3 years by using two mini-vibrators (EnviroVibe) and a 360-channel seismic data acquisition system. In the first model, seismic signals in the bedrock were interpreted as layer boundaries, and a fractured metamorphic layer down the depth of 1200m was thought as the source of geothermal water reservoir. In the

  13. An accurate algorithm to match imperfectly matched images for lung tumor detection without markers.

    PubMed

    Rozario, Timothy; Bereg, Sergey; Yan, Yulong; Chiu, Tsuicheng; Liu, Honghuan; Kearney, Vasant; Jiang, Lan; Mao, Weihua

    2015-05-08

    In order to locate lung tumors on kV projection images without internal markers, digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) are created and compared with projection images. However, lung tumors always move due to respiration and their locations change on projection images while they are static on DRRs. In addition, global image intensity discrepancies exist between DRRs and projections due to their different image orientations, scattering, and noises. This adversely affects comparison accuracy. A simple but efficient comparison algorithm is reported to match imperfectly matched projection images and DRRs. The kV projection images were matched with different DRRs in two steps. Preprocessing was performed in advance to generate two sets of DRRs. The tumors were removed from the planning 3D CT for a single phase of planning 4D CT images using planning contours of tumors. DRRs of background and DRRs of tumors were generated separately for every projection angle. The first step was to match projection images with DRRs of background signals. This method divided global images into a matrix of small tiles and similarities were evaluated by calculating normalized cross-correlation (NCC) between corresponding tiles on projections and DRRs. The tile configuration (tile locations) was automatically optimized to keep the tumor within a single projection tile that had a bad matching with the corresponding DRR tile. A pixel-based linear transformation was determined by linear interpolations of tile transformation results obtained during tile matching. The background DRRs were transformed to the projection image level and subtracted from it. The resulting subtracted image now contained only the tumor. The second step was to register DRRs of tumors to the subtracted image to locate the tumor. This method was successfully applied to kV fluoro images (about 1000 images) acquired on a Vero (BrainLAB) for dynamic tumor tracking on phantom studies. Radiation opaque markers were

  14. In Situ Casting and Imaging of the Rat Airway Tree for Accurate 3D Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rick E.; Colby, Sean M.; Kabilan, Senthil; Einstein, Daniel R.; Carson, James P.

    2013-08-01

    The use of anatomically accurate, animal-specific airway geometries is important for understanding and modeling the physiology of the respiratory system. One approach for acquiring detailed airway architecture is to create a bronchial cast of the conducting airways. However, typical casting procedures either do not faithfully preserve the in vivo branching angles, or produce rigid casts that when removed for imaging are fragile and thus easily damaged. We address these problems by creating an in situ bronchial cast of the conducting airways in rats that can be subsequently imaged in situ using 3D micro-CT imaging. We also demonstrate that deformations in airway branch angles resulting from the casting procedure are small, and that these angle deformations can be reversed through an interactive adjustment of the segmented cast geometry. Animal work was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  15. Accurate estimation of object location in an image sequence using helicopter flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Yuan-Liang; Kasturi, Rangachar

    1994-01-01

    In autonomous navigation, it is essential to obtain a three-dimensional (3D) description of the static environment in which the vehicle is traveling. For a rotorcraft conducting low-latitude flight, this description is particularly useful for obstacle detection and avoidance. In this paper, we address the problem of 3D position estimation for static objects from a monocular sequence of images captured from a low-latitude flying helicopter. Since the environment is static, it is well known that the optical flow in the image will produce a radiating pattern from the focus of expansion. We propose a motion analysis system which utilizes the epipolar constraint to accurately estimate 3D positions of scene objects in a real world image sequence taken from a low-altitude flying helicopter. Results show that this approach gives good estimates of object positions near the rotorcraft's intended flight-path.

  16. A correlative imaging based methodology for accurate quantitative assessment of bone formation in additive manufactured implants.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hua; Todd, Naomi M; Devlin-Mullin, Aine; Poologasundarampillai, Gowsihan; Kim, Taek Bo; Madi, Kamel; Cartmell, Sarah; Mitchell, Christopher A; Jones, Julian R; Lee, Peter D

    2016-06-01

    A correlative imaging methodology was developed to accurately quantify bone formation in the complex lattice structure of additive manufactured implants. Micro computed tomography (μCT) and histomorphometry were combined, integrating the best features from both, while demonstrating the limitations of each imaging modality. This semi-automatic methodology registered each modality using a coarse graining technique to speed the registration of 2D histology sections to high resolution 3D μCT datasets. Once registered, histomorphometric qualitative and quantitative bone descriptors were directly correlated to 3D quantitative bone descriptors, such as bone ingrowth and bone contact. The correlative imaging allowed the significant volumetric shrinkage of histology sections to be quantified for the first time (~15 %). This technique demonstrated the importance of location of the histological section, demonstrating that up to a 30 % offset can be introduced. The results were used to quantitatively demonstrate the effectiveness of 3D printed titanium lattice implants.

  17. In Situ Casting and Imaging of the Rat Airway Tree for Accurate 3D Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Richard E.; Colby, Sean M.; Kabilan, Senthil; Einstein, Daniel R.; Carson, James P.

    2014-01-01

    The use of anatomically accurate, animal-specific airway geometries is important for understanding and modeling the physiology of the respiratory system. One approach for acquiring detailed airway architecture is to create a bronchial cast of the conducting airways. However, typical casting procedures either do not faithfully preserve the in vivo branching angles or produce rigid casts that when removed for imaging are fragile and thus easily damaged. We address these problems by creating an in situ bronchial cast of the conducting airways in rats that can be subsequently imaged in situ using 3D micro-CT imaging. We also demonstrate that deformations in airway branch angles resulting from the casting procedure are small, and that these angle deformations can be reversed through an interactive adjustment of the segmented cast geometry. Animal work was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. PMID:23786464

  18. Geometrically invariant and high capacity image watermarking scheme using accurate radial transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Chandan; Ranade, Sukhjeet K.

    2013-12-01

    Angular radial transform (ART) is a region based descriptor and possesses many attractive features such as rotation invariance, low computational complexity and resilience to noise which make them more suitable for invariant image watermarking than that of many transform domain based image watermarking techniques. In this paper, we introduce ART for fast and geometrically invariant image watermarking scheme with high embedding capacity. We also develop an accurate and fast framework for the computation of ART coefficients based on Gaussian quadrature numerical integration, 8-way symmetry/anti-symmetry properties and recursive relations for the calculation of sinusoidal kernel functions. ART coefficients so computed are then used for embedding the binary watermark using dither modulation. Experimental studies reveal that the proposed watermarking scheme not only provides better robustness against geometric transformations and other signal processing distortions, but also has superior advantages over the existing ones in terms of embedding capacity, speed and visual imperceptibility.

  19. Seismic Imaging Beneath the Kanto Plain, Japan, Inferred from S-wavevector Receiver Functions Obtained at Virtual Subsurface Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakoshi, T.; Takenaka, H.

    2013-12-01

    This study describes the seismic images of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the Kanto plain, Japan, by using S-wavevector receiver function (SWV-RF) analysis at subsurface receivers. The SWV-RF is the time series deconvolving the upgoing SV-wave component by the upgoing P-wave one. This method for ground surface records was originally introduced by Reading et al. (2003, GRL). To calculate deep borehole and/or ocean bottom records, Takenaka and Murakoshi (2010, AGU) proposed the SWV-RF at subsurface station, which obtain it from the seismograms observed at a subsurface station using the structure model from the top to the receiver level. This method has a great advantage that the problem of unclearly seismic images beneath very thick sedimentary basin due to the records include strong effect of reverberation within the sedimentary layer can be overcome. Takenaka and Murakoshi (2012, AGU) applied the method to the teleseismic waveform records observed at not only deep borehole but also shallow borehole and ground surface stations in Kanto plain, Japan. To obtain clearly and continuous seismic images, we increased events for SWV-RFs in the period from April 2004 to July 2013, that is almost three times the number in Takenaka and Murakoshi (2012, AGU). We will show the three-dimensional Seismic Features of the crustal and deeper structures beneath the Kanto plain, Japan, which is derived from the vertical cross-sections of the depth-converted SWV-RFs.

  20. ILT based defect simulation of inspection images accurately predicts mask defect printability on wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deep, Prakash; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter

    2016-05-01

    At advanced technology nodes mask complexity has been increased because of large-scale use of resolution enhancement technologies (RET) which includes Optical Proximity Correction (OPC), Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) and Source Mask Optimization (SMO). The number of defects detected during inspection of such mask increased drastically and differentiation of critical and non-critical defects are more challenging, complex and time consuming. Because of significant defectivity of EUVL masks and non-availability of actinic inspection, it is important and also challenging to predict the criticality of defects for printability on wafer. This is one of the significant barriers for the adoption of EUVL for semiconductor manufacturing. Techniques to decide criticality of defects from images captured using non actinic inspection images is desired till actinic inspection is not available. High resolution inspection of photomask images detects many defects which are used for process and mask qualification. Repairing all defects is not practical and probably not required, however it's imperative to know which defects are severe enough to impact wafer before repair. Additionally, wafer printability check is always desired after repairing a defect. AIMSTM review is the industry standard for this, however doing AIMSTM review for all defects is expensive and very time consuming. Fast, accurate and an economical mechanism is desired which can predict defect printability on wafer accurately and quickly from images captured using high resolution inspection machine. Predicting defect printability from such images is challenging due to the fact that the high resolution images do not correlate with actual mask contours. The challenge is increased due to use of different optical condition during inspection other than actual scanner condition, and defects found in such images do not have correlation with actual impact on wafer. Our automated defect simulation tool predicts

  1. Noise-free accurate count of microbial colonies by time-lapse shadow image analysis.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Nasu, Senshi; Takeshige, Motomu; Funabashi, Hisakage; Saito, Mikako; Matsuoka, Hideaki

    2012-12-01

    Microbial colonies in food matrices could be counted accurately by a novel noise-free method based on time-lapse shadow image analysis. An agar plate containing many clusters of microbial colonies and/or meat fragments was trans-illuminated to project their 2-dimensional (2D) shadow images on a color CCD camera. The 2D shadow images of every cluster distributed within a 3-mm thick agar layer were captured in focus simultaneously by means of a multiple focusing system, and were then converted to 3-dimensional (3D) shadow images. By time-lapse analysis of the 3D shadow images, it was determined whether each cluster comprised single or multiple colonies or a meat fragment. The analytical precision was high enough to be able to distinguish a microbial colony from a meat fragment, to recognize an oval image as two colonies contacting each other, and to detect microbial colonies hidden under a food fragment. The detection of hidden colonies is its outstanding performance in comparison with other systems. The present system attained accuracy for counting fewer than 5 colonies and is therefore of practical importance.

  2. Accurate Permittivity Measurements for Microwave Imaging via Ultra-Wideband Removal of Spurious Reflectors

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Mathew G.; Viera, Joseph A.; Wanjura, John; Holt, Greg

    2010-01-01

    The use of microwave imaging is becoming more prevalent for detection of interior hidden defects in manufactured and packaged materials. In applications for detection of hidden moisture, microwave tomography can be used to image the material and then perform an inverse calculation to derive an estimate of the variability of the hidden material, such internal moisture, thereby alerting personnel to damaging levels of the hidden moisture before material degradation occurs. One impediment to this type of imaging occurs with nearby objects create strong reflections that create destructive and constructive interference, at the receiver, as the material is conveyed past the imaging antenna array. In an effort to remove the influence of the reflectors, such as metal bale ties, research was conducted to develop an algorithm for removal of the influence of the local proximity reflectors from the microwave images. This research effort produced a technique, based upon the use of ultra-wideband signals, for the removal of spurious reflections created by local proximity reflectors. This improvement enables accurate microwave measurements of moisture in such products as cotton bales, as well as other physical properties such as density or material composition. The proposed algorithm was shown to reduce errors by a 4:1 ratio and is an enabling technology for imaging applications in the presence of metal bale ties. PMID:22163668

  3. Fast and Accurate Semiautomatic Segmentation of Individual Teeth from Dental CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ho Chul; Choi, Chankyu; Shin, Juneseuk; Lee, Jeongjin; Shin, Yeong-Gil

    2015-01-01

    DIn this paper, we propose a fast and accurate semiautomatic method to effectively distinguish individual teeth from the sockets of teeth in dental CT images. Parameter values of thresholding and shapes of the teeth are propagated to the neighboring slice, based on the separated teeth from reference images. After the propagation of threshold values and shapes of the teeth, the histogram of the current slice was analyzed. The individual teeth are automatically separated and segmented by using seeded region growing. Then, the newly generated separation information is iteratively propagated to the neighboring slice. Our method was validated by ten sets of dental CT scans, and the results were compared with the manually segmented result and conventional methods. The average error of absolute value of volume measurement was 2.29 ± 0.56%, which was more accurate than conventional methods. Boosting up the speed with the multicore processors was shown to be 2.4 times faster than a single core processor. The proposed method identified the individual teeth accurately, demonstrating that it can give dentists substantial assistance during dental surgery. PMID:26413143

  4. Fast and Accurate Semiautomatic Segmentation of Individual Teeth from Dental CT Images.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ho Chul; Choi, Chankyu; Shin, Juneseuk; Lee, Jeongjin; Shin, Yeong-Gil

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a fast and accurate semiautomatic method to effectively distinguish individual teeth from the sockets of teeth in dental CT images. Parameter values of thresholding and shapes of the teeth are propagated to the neighboring slice, based on the separated teeth from reference images. After the propagation of threshold values and shapes of the teeth, the histogram of the current slice was analyzed. The individual teeth are automatically separated and segmented by using seeded region growing. Then, the newly generated separation information is iteratively propagated to the neighboring slice. Our method was validated by ten sets of dental CT scans, and the results were compared with the manually segmented result and conventional methods. The average error of absolute value of volume measurement was 2.29 ± 0.56%, which was more accurate than conventional methods. Boosting up the speed with the multicore processors was shown to be 2.4 times faster than a single core processor. The proposed method identified the individual teeth accurately, demonstrating that it can give dentists substantial assistance during dental surgery. PMID:26413143

  5. An accurate and practical method for inference of weak gravitational lensing from galaxy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Gary M.; Armstrong, Robert; Krawiec, Christina; March, Marisa C.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate highly accurate recovery of weak gravitational lensing shear using an implementation of the Bayesian Fourier Domain (BFD) method proposed by Bernstein & Armstrong, extended to correct for selection biases. The BFD formalism is rigorously correct for Nyquist-sampled, background-limited, uncrowded images of background galaxies. BFD does not assign shapes to galaxies, instead compressing the pixel data D into a vector of moments M, such that we have an analytic expression for the probability P(M|g) of obtaining the observations with gravitational lensing distortion g along the line of sight. We implement an algorithm for conducting BFD's integrations over the population of unlensed source galaxies which measures ≈10 galaxies s-1 core-1 with good scaling properties. Initial tests of this code on ≈109 simulated lensed galaxy images recover the simulated shear to a fractional accuracy of m = (2.1 ± 0.4) × 10-3, substantially more accurate than has been demonstrated previously for any generally applicable method. Deep sky exposures generate a sufficiently accurate approximation to the noiseless, unlensed galaxy population distribution assumed as input to BFD. Potential extensions of the method include simultaneous measurement of magnification and shear; multiple-exposure, multiband observations; and joint inference of photometric redshifts and lensing tomography.

  6. Subsurface imaging of metal lines embedded in a dielectric with a scanning microwave microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Lin; Ahn, Jung-Joon; Obeng, Yaw S.; Kopanski, Joseph J.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate the ability of the scanning microwave microscope (SMM) to detect subsurface metal lines embedded in a dielectric film with sub-micrometer resolution. The SMM was used to image 1.2 μm-wide Al-Si-Cu metal lines encapsulated with either 800 nm or 2300 nm of plasma deposited silicon dioxide. Both the reflected microwave (S 11) amplitude and phase shifted near resonance frequency while the tip scanned across these buried lines. The shallower line edge could be resolved within 900 nm  ±  70 nm, while the deeper line was resolved within 1200 nm  ±  260 nm. The spatial resolution obtained in this work is substantially better that the 50 μm previously reported in the literature. Our observations agree very well with the calculated change in peak frequency and phase using a simple lumped element model for an SMM with a resonant transmission line. By conducting experiments at various eigenmodes, different contrast levels and signal-to-noise ratios have been compared. With detailed sensitivity studies, centered around 9.3 GHz, it has been revealed that the highest amplitude contrast is obtained when the probe microwave frequency matches the exact resonance frequency of the experimental setup. By RLC equivalent circuit modeling of the tip-sample system, two competing effects have been identified to account for the positive and negative S 11 amplitude and phase contrasts, which can be leveraged to further improve the contrast and resolution. Official contribution of the National Institute of Standards and Technology; not subject to copyright in the United States.

  7. Sub-surface terahertz imaging through uneven surfaces: visualizing Neolithic wall paintings in Çatalhöyük.

    PubMed

    Walker, Gillian C; Bowen, John W; Matthews, Wendy; Roychowdhury, Soumali; Labaune, Julien; Mourou, Gerard; Menu, Michel; Hodder, Ian; Jackson, J Bianca

    2013-04-01

    Pulsed terahertz imaging is being developed as a technique to image obscured mural paintings. Due to significant advances in terahertz technology, portable systems are now capable of operating in unregulated environments and this has prompted their use on archaeological excavations. August 2011 saw the first use of pulsed terahertz imaging at the archaeological site of Çatalhöyük, Turkey, where mural paintings dating from the Neolithic period are continuously being uncovered by archaeologists. In these particular paintings the paint is applied onto an uneven surface, and then covered by an equally uneven surface. Traditional terahertz data analysis has proven unsuccessful at sub-surface imaging of these paintings due to the effect of these uneven surfaces. For the first time, an image processing technique is presented, based around Gaussian beam-mode coupling, which enables the visualization of the obscured painting.

  8. Computational Chemical Imaging for Cardiovascular Pathology: Chemical Microscopic Imaging Accurately Determines Cardiac Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Saumya; Reddy, Vijaya B.; Bhargava, Rohit; Raman, Jaishankar

    2015-01-01

    Rejection is a common problem after cardiac transplants leading to significant number of adverse events and deaths, particularly in the first year of transplantation. The gold standard to identify rejection is endomyocardial biopsy. This technique is complex, cumbersome and requires a lot of expertise in the correct interpretation of stained biopsy sections. Traditional histopathology cannot be used actively or quickly during cardiac interventions or surgery. Our objective was to develop a stain-less approach using an emerging technology, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging to identify different components of cardiac tissue by their chemical and molecular basis aided by computer recognition, rather than by visual examination using optical microscopy. We studied this technique in assessment of cardiac transplant rejection to evaluate efficacy in an example of complex cardiovascular pathology. We recorded data from human cardiac transplant patients’ biopsies, used a Bayesian classification protocol and developed a visualization scheme to observe chemical differences without the need of stains or human supervision. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, we observed probabilities of detection greater than 95% for four out of five histological classes at 10% probability of false alarm at the cellular level while correctly identifying samples with the hallmarks of the immune response in all cases. The efficacy of manual examination can be significantly increased by observing the inherent biochemical changes in tissues, which enables us to achieve greater diagnostic confidence in an automated, label-free manner. We developed a computational pathology system that gives high contrast images and seems superior to traditional staining procedures. This study is a prelude to the development of real time in situ imaging systems, which can assist interventionists and surgeons actively during procedures. PMID:25932912

  9. Evanescent waves in high numerical aperture aplanatic solid immersion microscopy: effects of forbidden light on subsurface imaging.

    PubMed

    Yurt, Abdulkadir; Uyar, Aydan; Cilingiroglu, T Berkin; Goldberg, Bennett B; Ünlü, M Selim

    2014-04-01

    The collection of light at very high numerical aperture allows detection of evanescent waves above the critical angle of total internal reflection in solid immersion lens microscopy. We investigate the effect of such evanescent modes, so-called forbidden light, on the far-field imaging properties of an aplanatic solid immersion microscope by developing a dyadic Green's function formalism in the context of subsurface semiconductor integrated circuit imaging. We demonstrate that the collection of forbidden light allows for sub-diffraction spatial resolution and substantial enhancement of photon collection efficiency albeit inducing wave-front discontinuities and aberrations.

  10. k-Space Image Correlation Spectroscopy: A Method for Accurate Transport Measurements Independent of Fluorophore Photophysics

    PubMed Central

    Kolin, David L.; Ronis, David; Wiseman, Paul W.

    2006-01-01

    We present the theory and application of reciprocal space image correlation spectroscopy (kICS). This technique measures the number density, diffusion coefficient, and velocity of fluorescently labeled macromolecules in a cell membrane imaged on a confocal, two-photon, or total internal reflection fluorescence microscope. In contrast to r-space correlation techniques, we show kICS can recover accurate dynamics even in the presence of complex fluorophore photobleaching and/or “blinking”. Furthermore, these quantities can be calculated without nonlinear curve fitting, or any knowledge of the beam radius of the exciting laser. The number densities calculated by kICS are less sensitive to spatial inhomogeneity of the fluorophore distribution than densities measured using image correlation spectroscopy. We use simulations as a proof-of-principle to show that number densities and transport coefficients can be extracted using this technique. We present calibration measurements with fluorescent microspheres imaged on a confocal microscope, which recover Stokes-Einstein diffusion coefficients, and flow velocities that agree with single particle tracking measurements. We also show the application of kICS to measurements of the transport dynamics of α5-integrin/enhanced green fluorescent protein constructs in a transfected CHO cell imaged on a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope using charge-coupled device area detection. PMID:16861272

  11. Accurate 3D reconstruction of complex blood vessel geometries from intravascular ultrasound images: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, K R; Thubrikar, M J; Fowler, B; Mostafavi, M T; Funk, M W

    2000-01-01

    We present a technique that accurately reconstructs complex three dimensional blood vessel geometry from 2D intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images. Biplane x-ray fluoroscopy is used to image the ultrasound catheter tip at a few key points along its path as the catheter is pulled through the blood vessel. An interpolating spline describes the continuous catheter path. The IVUS images are located orthogonal to the path, resulting in a non-uniform structured scalar volume of echo densities. Isocontour surfaces are used to view the vessel geometry, while transparency and clipping enable interactive exploration of interior structures. The two geometries studied are a bovine artery vascular graft having U-shape and a constriction, and a canine carotid artery having multiple branches and a constriction. Accuracy of the reconstructions is established by comparing the reconstructions to (1) silicone moulds of the vessel interior, (2) biplane x-ray images, and (3) the original echo images. Excellent shape and geometry correspondence was observed in both geometries. Quantitative measurements made at key locations of the 3D reconstructions also were in good agreement with those made in silicone moulds. The proposed technique is easily adoptable in clinical practice, since it uses x-rays with minimal exposure and existing IVUS technology. PMID:11105284

  12. Fast and accurate border detection in dermoscopy images using statistical region merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celebi, M. Emre; Kingravi, Hassan A.; Iyatomi, Hitoshi; Lee, JeongKyu; Aslandogan, Y. Alp; Van Stoecker, William; Moss, Randy; Malters, Joseph M.; Marghoob, Ashfaq A.

    2007-03-01

    As a result of advances in skin imaging technology and the development of suitable image processing techniques during the last decade, there has been a significant increase of interest in the computer-aided diagnosis of melanoma. Automated border detection is one of the most important steps in this procedure, since the accuracy of the subsequent steps crucially depends on it. In this paper, a fast and unsupervised approach to border detection in dermoscopy images of pigmented skin lesions based on the Statistical Region Merging algorithm is presented. The method is tested on a set of 90 dermoscopy images. The border detection error is quantified by a metric in which a set of dermatologist-determined borders is used as the ground-truth. The proposed method is compared to six state-of-the-art automated methods (optimized histogram thresholding, orientation-sensitive fuzzy c-means, gradient vector flow snakes, dermatologist-like tumor extraction algorithm, meanshift clustering, and the modified JSEG method) and borders determined by a second dermatologist. The results demonstrate that the presented method achieves both fast and accurate border detection in dermoscopy images.

  13. Quick and accurate estimation of the elastic constants using the minimum image method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiakov, Konstantin V.; Wojciechowski, Krzysztof W.

    2015-04-01

    A method for determining the elastic properties using the minimum image method (MIM) is proposed and tested on a model system of particles interacting by the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential. The elastic constants of the LJ system are determined in the thermodynamic limit, N → ∞, using the Monte Carlo (MC) method in the NVT and NPT ensembles. The simulation results show that when determining the elastic constants, the contribution of long-range interactions cannot be ignored, because that would lead to erroneous results. In addition, the simulations have revealed that the inclusion of further interactions of each particle with all its minimum image neighbors even in case of small systems leads to results which are very close to the values of elastic constants in the thermodynamic limit. This enables one for a quick and accurate estimation of the elastic constants using very small samples.

  14. Detection of Subsurface Defects Using X-Ray Lateral Migration Radiography - A New Backscatter Imaging Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Edward T. Dugan; Alan M. Jacobs

    2003-02-10

    A new Compton X-ray backscatter imaging technique called lateral migration radiography (LMR) is applied to detecting a class of sub-surface defects in materials and structures of industrial importance. These include flaws and defects for which there is either no known method or an effective method for detection. Examples are delamination in layered composite structures, defects in deposited coatings on metal surfaces such as in aircraft jet engine components and geometrical structural/composition changes (e.g. due to corrosion) on the inside of shell-like components with only outside surface area access.Research efforts include: the construction of simulated flawed test objects on which experimental measurements are performed to establish LMR flaw detection capabilities; performance of Monte Carlo simulations of these measurements to assist in predicting optimum source-detector configurations and to help obtain a detailed understanding of the physics of lateral migration in small voids and how this impacts the resulting LMR image contrasts; the procurement of samples of materials of industrial importance with flaws and defects; the application of LMR to the detection of flaws and defects in these samples; the development of a multi-detector scanning system to provide for faster, more effective flaw detection; and a determination, for the types of samples examined, of the limits and capabilities of flaw detection using LMR.LMR imaging measurements on the machined samples showed that the optimum contrast in flaw-to-background signal intensity occurred at an X-ray energy of 75 kVp for the aluminum samples and at 35 kVp for the Delrin sample. Monte Carlo simulations and experimental measurements on the aluminum samples showed that LMR is capable of detecting defects down to the tens of microns range. Measurements on the aluminum samples also showed that LMR is capable of detecting relatively small composition variations; a 30 % difference in image intensity was

  15. Subsurface images of the northern Newark basin, New York, USA and their implications for carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, P. E.; Withjack, M. O.; Schlische, R. W.; Goldberg, D.; Kent, D. V.; Tamulonis, K.; Couëslan, M.; Collins, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Triassic-Jurassic Newark rift, a large onshore sedimentary basin close to northeast US metropolitan areas, may have potential for safe geological storage of CO2 in a suitably deep formation overlain by appropriate confining units. Filled with continental synrift sedimentary rocks and CAMP (Central Atlantic Magmatic Province) basaltic intrusions and flows, the basin is bounded on the NW by the NE-striking, SE-dipping Ramapo fault. Funded by the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Carbon Sequestration Program's portion of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) and NYSERDA, the TriCarb Consortium for Carbon Sequestration acquired two seismic-reflection profiles in Rockland County, NY that were processed to obtain depth-migrated images of the basin's subsurface geometry. The E-trending dip profile crosses most of the basin, while the shorter N-trending profile provides a strike-view. Five seismic facies are present: (1) shallow continuous, closely spaced, W-dipping reflections suggestive of lacustrine deposits; (2) short, non-coherent reflections suggestive of conglomeritic fluvial strata; (3) high-amplitude parallel reflections, locally exhibiting reverse separation, suggestive of prerift early Paleozoic strata Cambro-Ordovician carbonates; (4) a facies at the bottom of both lines and the western end of the ESE-trending line that lacks reflections, suggestive of prerift metamorphic rocks such as Precambrian gneiss, and/or highly deformed Taconic (Ordovician) phyllites; and (5) a seismically transparent band commonly bounded by high-amplitude reflections that cuts across the stratigraphy of facies 1-3, suggestive of a scoop-shaped intrusive diabase sheet that projects to the surface to outcrops of the CAMP-related Palisade sill. Basin geometry is well-imaged conforming to a deeply eroded half graben. Reflections of facies 3 are truncated by facies 2 marking the angular pre-rift unconformity. Distinct

  16. Does optical microangiography provide accurate imaging of capillary vessels?: validation using multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hequn; Baran, Utku; Li, Yuandong; Qin, Wan; Wang, Wenbo; Zeng, Haishan; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Optical microangiography (OMAG) has been extensively utilized to study three-dimensional tissue vasculature in vivo. However, with the limited image resolution (∼10  μm) of the commonly used systems, some concerns were raised: (1) whether OMAG is capable of providing the imaging of capillary vessels that are of an average diameter of ∼6  μm; (2) if yes, whether OMAG can provide meaningful quantification of vascular density within the scanned tissue volume. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is capable of depth-resolved high-resolution (∼1  μm) imaging of biological tissue structures. With externally labeled plasma, the vascular network including single capillaries can be well visualized. We compare the vascular images of in vivo mouse brain acquired by both OMAG and MPM systems. We found that within the penetration depth range of the MPM system, OMAG is able to accurately visualize blood vessels including capillaries. Although the resolution of OMAG may not be able to 100% resolve two closely packed tiny capillaries in tissue, it is still capable of visualizing most of the capillaries because there are interstitial tissue spaces between them. We believe our validation results reinforce the application of OMAG in microvasculature-related studies. PMID:25341071

  17. Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements in Anatomically-Accurate Models of the Mammalian Nasal Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumple, C.; Richter, J.; Craven, B. A.; Krane, M.

    2012-11-01

    A summary of the research being carried out by our multidisciplinary team to better understand the form and function of the nose in different mammalian species that include humans, carnivores, ungulates, rodents, and marine animals will be presented. The mammalian nose houses a convoluted airway labyrinth, where two hallmark features of mammals occur, endothermy and olfaction. Because of the complexity of the nasal cavity, the anatomy and function of these upper airways remain poorly understood in most mammals. However, recent advances in high-resolution medical imaging, computational modeling, and experimental flow measurement techniques are now permitting the study of airflow and respiratory and olfactory transport phenomena in anatomically-accurate reconstructions of the nasal cavity. Here, we focus on efforts to manufacture transparent, anatomically-accurate models for stereo particle image velocimetry (SPIV) measurements of nasal airflow. Challenges in the design and manufacture of index-matched anatomical models are addressed and preliminary SPIV measurements are presented. Such measurements will constitute a validation database for concurrent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of mammalian respiration and olfaction. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  18. Macroscopic-imaging technique for subsurface quantification of near-infrared markers during surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jermyn, Michael; Kolste, Kolbein; Pichette, Julien; Sheehy, Guillaume; Angulo-Rodríguez, Leticia; Paulsen, Keith D.; Roberts, David W.; Wilson, Brian C.; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frederic

    2015-03-01

    Obtaining accurate quantitative information on the concentration and distribution of fluorescent markers lying at a depth below the surface of optically turbid media, such as tissue, is a significant challenge. Here, we introduce a fluorescence reconstruction technique based on a diffusion light transport model that can be used during surgery, including guiding resection of brain tumors, for depth-resolved quantitative imaging of near-infrared fluorescent markers. Hyperspectral fluorescence images are used to compute a topographic map of the fluorophore distribution, which yields structural and optical constraints for a three-dimensional subsequent hyperspectral diffuse fluorescence reconstruction algorithm. Using the model fluorophore Alexa Fluor 647 and brain-like tissue phantoms, the technique yielded estimates of fluorophore concentration within ±25% of the true value to depths of 5 to 9 mm, depending on the concentration. The approach is practical for integration into a neurosurgical fluorescence microscope and has potential to further extend fluorescence-guided resection using objective and quantified metrics of the presence of residual tumor tissue.

  19. The Use of Ultrasonic Seismic Wave Attenuation (Q) for Better Subsurface Imaging, Energy Exploration, and Tracking of Sequestrated Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, D.; Purcell, C. C.; Mur, A. J.; Haljasmaa, I.; Soong, Y.; Harbert, W.

    2012-12-01

    allowed us to more accurately represent subsurface conditions. Pore filling fluids consisted of deionized water, oil, gas, and supercritical CO2. We have found that Q for the P, S1, and S2 seismic waves is strongly dependent on and proportional to the effective pressure of the rock. Also our experiments indicate that the presence of different pore filling fluids such as water, oil, and CO2 alter the value of Q. Carbonate samples were tested dry (atmospheric gas as pore fluid) and with deionized water, oil, and CO2. With the substitution of each of these fluids into the dry rock core sample, we see the value of Q shift as much as 20% lower for the P, S1, and S2 seismic waves. Our experiments indicate that the presence of oil, water, or CO2 lowers the value of Q of a rock. For all effective pressures we see this shift in the value of Q, it would seem that with the introduction of these pore-filling fluids the quality factor value is typically lowered, however at higher effective pressures (about 40 MPa) the shift in Q is less. By understanding how seismic waves attenuate we can better understand what collected seismic signals traveled through. This knowledge and understanding of seismic wave attenuation could prove to be a powerful tool for better subsurface imaging, tracking of sequestrated CO2, and energy exploration.

  20. Broadband Ground Penetrating Radar with conformal antennas for subsurface imaging from a rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillman, D. E.; Oden, C. P.; Grimm, R. E.; Ragusa, M.

    2015-12-01

    Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) allows subsurface imaging to provide geologic context and will be flown on the next two martian rovers (WISDOM on ExoMars and RIMFAX on Mars 2020). The motivation of our research is to minimize the engineering challenges of mounting a GPR antenna to a spacecraft, while maximizing the scientific capabilities of the GPR. The scientific capabilities increase with the bandwidth as it controls the resolution. Furthermore, ultra-wide bandwidth surveys allow certain mineralogies and rock units to be discriminated based on their frequency-dependent EM or scattering properties. We have designed and field-tested a prototype GPR that utilizes bi-static circularly polarized spiral antennas. Each antenna has a physical size of 61 x 61 x 4 cm, therefore two antennas could be mounted to the underbelly of a MSL-class rover. Spiral antennas were chosen because they have an inherent broadband response and provide a better low frequency response compared with similarly sized linearly polarized antennas. A horizontal spiral radiator emits energy both upward and downward directions. After the radiator is mounted to a metal surface (i.e. the underside of a rover), a cavity is formed that causes the upward traveling energy to reverberate and cause unwanted interference. This interference is minimized by 1) using a high metallization ratio on the spiral to reduce cavity emissions, and 2) placing absorbing material inside the cavity. The resulting antennas provide high gain (0 to 8 dBi) from 200 to 1000 MHz. The low frequency response can be improved by increasing the antenna thickness (i.e., cavity depth). In an initial field test, the antennas were combined with impulse GPR electronics that had ~140 dB of dynamic range (not including antennas) and a sand/clay interface 7 feet deep was detected. To utilize the full bandwidth the antennas, a gated Frequency Modulated Continuous Waveform system will be developed - similar to RIMFAX. The goal is to reach a

  1. Multi-reference-based multiple alignment statistics enables accurate protein-particle pickup from noisy images.

    PubMed

    Kawata, Masaaki; Sato, Chikara

    2013-04-01

    Data mining from noisy data/images is one of the most important themes in modern science and technology. Statistical image processing is a promising technique for analysing such data. Automation of particle pickup from noisy electron micrographs is essential, especially when improvement of the resolution of single particle analysis requires a huge number of particle images. For such a purpose, reference-based matching using primary three-dimensional (3D) model projections is mainly adopted. In the matching, however, the highest peaks of the correlation may not accurately indicate particles when the image is very noisy. In contrast, the density and the heights of the peaks should reflect the probability distribution of the particles. To statistically determine the particle positions from the peak distributions, we have developed a density-based peak search followed by a peak selection based on average peak height, using multi-reference alignment (MRA). Its extension, using multi-reference multiple alignment (MRMA), was found to enable particle pickup at higher accuracy even from extremely noisy images with a signal-to-noise ratio of 0.001. We refer to these new methods as stochastic pickup with MRA (MRA-StoPICK) or with MRMA (MRMA-StoPICK). MRMA-StoPICK has a higher pickup accuracy and furthermore, is almost independent of parameter settings. They were successfully applied to cryo-electron micrographs of Rice dwarf virus. Because current computational resources and parallel data processing environments allow somewhat CPU-intensive MRA-StoPICK and MRMA-StoPICK to be performed in a short period, these methods are expected to allow high-resolution analysis of the 3D structure of particles.

  2. Novel Accurate and Fast Optic Disc Detection in Retinal Images With Vessel Distribution and Directional Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongbo; Zhao, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    A novel accurate and fast optic disc (OD) detection method is proposed by using vessel distribution and directional characteristics. A feature combining three vessel distribution characteristics, i.e., local vessel density, compactness, and uniformity, is designed to find possible horizontal coordinate of OD. Then, according to the global vessel direction characteristic, a General Hough Transformation is introduced to identify the vertical coordinate of OD. By confining the possible OD vertical range and by simplifying vessel structure with blocks, we greatly decrease the computational cost of the algorithm. Four public datasets have been tested. The OD localization accuracy lies from 93.8% to 99.7%, when 8-20% vessel detection results are adopted to achieve OD detection. Average computation times for STARE images are about 3.4-11.5 s, which relate to image size. The proposed method shows satisfactory robustness on both normal and diseased images. It is better than many previous methods with respect to accuracy and efficiency.

  3. An accurate skull stripping method based on simplex meshes and histogram analysis for magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Galdames, Francisco J; Jaillet, Fabrice; Perez, Claudio A

    2012-01-01

    Skull stripping methods are designed to eliminate the non-brain tissue in magnetic resonance (MR) brain images. Removal of non-brain tissues is a fundamental step in enabling the processing of brain MR images. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic accurate skull stripping method based on deformable models and histogram analysis. A rough-segmentation step is used to find the optimal starting point for the deformation and is based on thresholds and morphological operators. Thresholds are computed using comparisons with an atlas, and modeling by Gaussians. The deformable model is based on a simplex mesh and its deformation is controlled by the image local gray levels and the information obtained on the gray level modeling of the rough-segmentation. Our Simplex Mesh and Histogram Analysis Skull Stripping (SMHASS) method was tested on the following international databases commonly used in scientific articles: BrainWeb, Internet Brain Segmentation Repository (IBSR), and Segmentation Validation Engine (SVE). A comparison was performed against three of the best skull stripping methods previously published: Brain Extraction Tool (BET), Brain Surface Extractor (BSE), and Hybrid Watershed Algorithm (HWA). Performance was measured using the Jaccard index (J) and Dice coefficient (κ). Our method showed the best performance and differences were statistically significant (p<0.05): J=0.904 and κ=0.950 on BrainWeb; J=0.905 and κ=0.950 on IBSR; J=0.946 and κ=0.972 on SVE.

  4. Subsurface PpIX imaging in vivo with ultrasound-guided tomographic spectroscopy: reconstruction vs. born-normalized data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Brendan P.; D'Souza, Alisha V.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Maytin, Edward; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    Aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX)-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective treatment for skin cancers including basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Topically applied ALA promotes PpIX production preferentially in tumors, and many strategies have been developed to increase PpIX distribution and PDT treatment efficacy at depths > 1mm is not fully understood. While surface imaging techniques provide useful diagnosis, dosimetry, and efficacy information for superficial tumors, these methods cannot interrogate deeper tumors to provide in situ insight into spatial PpIX distributions. We have developed an ultrasound-guided, white-light-informed, tomographics spectroscopy system for the spatial measurement of subsurface PpIX. Detailed imaging system specifications, methodology, and optical-phantom-based characterization will be presented separately. Here we evaluate preliminary in vivo results using both full tomographic reconstruction and by plotting individual tomographic source-detector pair data against US images.

  5. Subsurface imaging of coupled carrier transport in GaAs/AlGaAs core-shell nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guannan; McGuckin, Terrence; Hawley, Christopher J; Gallo, Eric M; Prete, Paola; Miccoli, Ilio; Lovergine, Nico; Spanier, Jonathan E

    2015-01-14

    We demonstrate spatial probing of carrier transport within GaAs/AlGaAs core-shell nanowires with nanometer lateral resolution and subsurface sensitivity by energy-variable electron beam induced current imaging. Carrier drift that evolves with applied electric field is distinguished from a coupled drift-diffusion length. Along with simulation of injected electron trajectories, combining beam energy tuning with precise positioning for selective probing of core and shell reveals axial position- and bias-dependent differences in carrier type and transport along parallel conduction channels. These results indicate how analysis of transport within heterostructured nanomaterials is no longer limited to nonlocal or surface measurements.

  6. Toward accurate tooth segmentation from computed tomography images using a hybrid level set model

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Yangzhou; Zhao, Qunfei; Xia, Zeyang E-mail: jing.xiong@siat.ac.cn; Hu, Ying; Xiong, Jing E-mail: jing.xiong@siat.ac.cn; Zhang, Jianwei

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: A three-dimensional (3D) model of the teeth provides important information for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. Tooth segmentation is an essential step in generating the 3D digital model from computed tomography (CT) images. The aim of this study is to develop an accurate and efficient tooth segmentation method from CT images. Methods: The 3D dental CT volumetric images are segmented slice by slice in a two-dimensional (2D) transverse plane. The 2D segmentation is composed of a manual initialization step and an automatic slice by slice segmentation step. In the manual initialization step, the user manually picks a starting slice and selects a seed point for each tooth in this slice. In the automatic slice segmentation step, a developed hybrid level set model is applied to segment tooth contours from each slice. Tooth contour propagation strategy is employed to initialize the level set function automatically. Cone beam CT (CBCT) images of two subjects were used to tune the parameters. Images of 16 additional subjects were used to validate the performance of the method. Volume overlap metrics and surface distance metrics were adopted to assess the segmentation accuracy quantitatively. The volume overlap metrics were volume difference (VD, mm{sup 3}) and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC, %). The surface distance metrics were average symmetric surface distance (ASSD, mm), RMS (root mean square) symmetric surface distance (RMSSSD, mm), and maximum symmetric surface distance (MSSD, mm). Computation time was recorded to assess the efficiency. The performance of the proposed method has been compared with two state-of-the-art methods. Results: For the tested CBCT images, the VD, DSC, ASSD, RMSSSD, and MSSD for the incisor were 38.16 ± 12.94 mm{sup 3}, 88.82 ± 2.14%, 0.29 ± 0.03 mm, 0.32 ± 0.08 mm, and 1.25 ± 0.58 mm, respectively; the VD, DSC, ASSD, RMSSSD, and MSSD for the canine were 49.12 ± 9.33 mm{sup 3}, 91.57 ± 0.82%, 0.27 ± 0.02 mm, 0

  7. Feasibility study for image guided kidney surgery: assessment of required intraoperative surface for accurate image to physical space registrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benincasa, Anne B.; Clements, Logan W.; Herrell, S. Duke; Chang, Sam S.; Cookson, Michael S.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2006-03-01

    Currently, the removal of kidney tumor masses uses only direct or laparoscopic visualizations, resulting in prolonged procedure and recovery times and reduced clear margin. Applying current image guided surgery (IGS) techniques, as those used in liver cases, to kidney resections (nephrectomies) presents a number of complications. Most notably is the limited field of view of the intraoperative kidney surface, which constrains the ability to obtain a surface delineation that is geometrically descriptive enough to drive a surface-based registration. Two different phantom orientations were used to model the laparoscopic and traditional partial nephrectomy views. For the laparoscopic view, fiducial point sets were compiled from a CT image volume using anatomical features such as the renal artery and vein. For the traditional view, markers attached to the phantom set-up were used for fiducials and targets. The fiducial points were used to perform a point-based registration, which then served as a guide for the surface-based registration. Laser range scanner (LRS) obtained surfaces were registered to each phantom surface using a rigid iterative closest point algorithm. Subsets of each phantom's LRS surface were used in a robustness test to determine the predictability of their registrations to transform the entire surface. Results from both orientations suggest that about half of the kidney's surface needs to be obtained intraoperatively for accurate registrations between the image surface and the LRS surface, suggesting the obtained kidney surfaces were geometrically descriptive enough to perform accurate registrations. This preliminary work paves the way for further development of kidney IGS systems.

  8. Radio-interferometric imaging of the subsurface emissions from the planet Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. O.; Zeilik, M.; Gisler, G. R.; Borovsky, J. E.; Baker, D. N.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of total and polarized intensities from Mercury's subsurface layers have been mapped using VLA observations. The first detection of a hot pole along the Hermean equator is reported and modeled as black-body reradiation from preferential diurnal heating. These observations appear to rule out any internal sources of heat within Mercury. Polarized emission from the limb of the planet is also found, and is understood in terms of the dielectric properties of the Hermean surface.

  9. MASCG: Multi-Atlas Segmentation Constrained Graph method for accurate segmentation of hip CT images.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chengwen; Bai, Junjie; Wu, Xiaodong; Zheng, Guoyan

    2015-12-01

    This paper addresses the issue of fully automatic segmentation of a hip CT image with the goal to preserve the joint structure for clinical applications in hip disease diagnosis and treatment. For this purpose, we propose a Multi-Atlas Segmentation Constrained Graph (MASCG) method. The MASCG method uses multi-atlas based mesh fusion results to initialize a bone sheetness based multi-label graph cut for an accurate hip CT segmentation which has the inherent advantage of automatic separation of the pelvic region from the bilateral proximal femoral regions. We then introduce a graph cut constrained graph search algorithm to further improve the segmentation accuracy around the bilateral hip joint regions. Taking manual segmentation as the ground truth, we evaluated the present approach on 30 hip CT images (60 hips) with a 15-fold cross validation. When the present approach was compared to manual segmentation, an average surface distance error of 0.30 mm, 0.29 mm, and 0.30 mm was found for the pelvis, the left proximal femur, and the right proximal femur, respectively. A further look at the bilateral hip joint regions demonstrated an average surface distance error of 0.16 mm, 0.21 mm and 0.20 mm for the acetabulum, the left femoral head, and the right femoral head, respectively.

  10. Accurate detection of blood vessels improves the detection of exudates in color fundus images.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Doaa; Solouma, Nahed H

    2012-12-01

    Exudates are one of the earliest and most prevalent symptoms of diseases leading to blindness such as diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration. Certain areas of the retina with such conditions are to be photocoagulated by laser to stop the disease progress and prevent blindness. Outlining these areas is dependent on outlining the lesions and the anatomic structures of the retina. In this paper, we provide a new method for the detection of blood vessels that improves the detection of exudates in fundus photographs. The method starts with an edge detection algorithm which results in a over segmented image. Then the new feature-based algorithm can be used to accurately detect the blood vessels. This algorithm considers the characteristics of a retinal blood vessel such as its width range, intensities and orientations for the purpose of selective segmentation. Because of its bulb shape and its color similarity with exudates, the optic disc can be detected using the common Hough transform technique. The extracted blood vessel tree and optic disc could be subtracted from the over segmented image to get an initial estimate of exudates. The final estimation of exudates can then be obtained by morphological reconstruction based on the appearance of exudates. This method is shown to be promising since it increases the sensitivity and specificity of exudates detection to 80% and 100% respectively.

  11. Determining suitable image resolutions for accurate supervised crop classification using remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löw, Fabian; Duveiller, Grégory

    2013-10-01

    Mapping the spatial distribution of crops has become a fundamental input for agricultural production monitoring using remote sensing. However, the multi-temporality that is often necessary to accurately identify crops and to monitor crop growth generally comes at the expense of coarser observation supports, and can lead to increasingly erroneous class allocations caused by mixed pixels. For a given application like crop classification, the spatial resolution requirement (e.g. in terms of a maximum tolerable pixel size) differs considerably over different landscapes. To analyse the spatial resolution requirements for accurate crop identification via image classification, this study builds upon and extends a conceptual framework established in a previous work1. This framework allows defining quantitatively the spatial resolution requirements for crop monitoring based on simulating how agricultural landscapes, and more specifically the fields covered by a crop of interest, are seen by instruments with increasingly coarser resolving power. The concept of crop specific pixel purity, defined as the degree of homogeneity of the signal encoded in a pixel with respect to the target crop type, is used to analyse how mixed the pixels can be (as they become coarser), without undermining their capacity to describe the desired surface properties. In this case, this framework has been steered towards answering the question: "What is the spatial resolution requirement for crop identification via supervised image classification, in particular minimum and coarsest acceptable pixel sizes, and how do these requirements change over different landscapes?" The framework is applied over four contrasting agro-ecological landscapes in Middle Asia. Inputs to the experiment were eight multi-temporal images from the RapidEye sensor, the simulated pixel sizes range from 6.5 m to 396.5 m. Constraining parameters for crop identification were defined by setting thresholds for classification

  12. Accurate 3D kinematic measurement of temporomandibular joint using X-ray fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Takaharu; Matsumoto, Akiko; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Matsumoto, Ken; Kakimoto, Naoya; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2014-04-01

    Accurate measurement and analysis of 3D kinematics of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very important for assisting clinical diagnosis and treatment of prosthodontics and orthodontics, and oral surgery. This study presents a new 3D kinematic measurement technique of the TMJ using X-ray fluoroscopic images, which can easily obtain the TMJ kinematic data in natural motion. In vivo kinematics of the TMJ (maxilla and mandibular bone) is determined using a feature-based 2D/3D registration, which uses beads silhouette on fluoroscopic images and 3D surface bone models with beads. The 3D surface models of maxilla and mandibular bone with beads were created from CT scans data of the subject using the mouthpiece with the seven strategically placed beads. In order to validate the accuracy of pose estimation for the maxilla and mandibular bone, computer simulation test was performed using five patterns of synthetic tantalum beads silhouette images. In the clinical applications, dynamic movement during jaw opening and closing was conducted, and the relative pose of the mandibular bone with respect to the maxilla bone was determined. The results of computer simulation test showed that the root mean square errors were sufficiently smaller than 1.0 mm and 1.0 degree. In the results of clinical application, during jaw opening from 0.0 to 36.8 degree of rotation, mandibular condyle exhibited 19.8 mm of anterior sliding relative to maxillary articular fossa, and these measurement values were clinically similar to the previous reports. Consequently, present technique was thought to be suitable for the 3D TMJ kinematic analysis.

  13. Visualizing the Subsurface of Soft Matter: Simultaneous Topographical Imaging, Depth Modulation, and Compositional Mapping with Triple Frequency Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solares, Santiago; Ebeling, Daniel; Eslami, Babak

    2014-03-01

    Characterization of subsurface morphology and mechanical properties with nanoscale resolution and depth control is of significant interest in soft matter fields like biology and polymer science, where buried structural and compositional features can be important. However, controllably ``feeling'' the subsurface is a challenging task for which the available imaging tools are relatively limited. This presentation describes a trimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging scheme, whereby three eigenmodes of the microcantilever probe are used as separate control ``knobs'' to simultaneously measure the topography, modulate sample indentation by the tip during tip-sample impact, and map compositional contrast, respectively. This method is illustrated through computational simulation and experiments conducted on ultrathin polymer films with embedded glass nanoparticles. By actively increasing the tip-sample indentation using a higher eigenmode of the cantilever, one is able to gradually and controllably reveal glass nanoparticles that are buried tens of nanometers deep under the surface, while still being able to refocus on the surface. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from the U.S. Department of Energy (conceptual method development and experimental work, award DESC-0008115) and the U.S. National Science Foundation (computational work, award CMMI-0841840).

  14. Accurate CT-MR image registration for deep brain stimulation: a multi-observer evaluation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, Jan; Derksen, Alexander; Heldmann, Stefan; Hallmann, Marc; Meine, Hans

    2015-03-01

    Since the first clinical interventions in the late 1980s, Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus has evolved into a very effective treatment option for patients with severe Parkinson's disease. DBS entails the implantation of an electrode that performs high frequency stimulations to a target area deep inside the brain. A very accurate placement of the electrode is a prerequisite for positive therapy outcome. The assessment of the intervention result is of central importance in DBS treatment and involves the registration of pre- and postinterventional scans. In this paper, we present an image processing pipeline for highly accurate registration of postoperative CT to preoperative MR. Our method consists of two steps: a fully automatic pre-alignment using a detection of the skull tip in the CT based on fuzzy connectedness, and an intensity-based rigid registration. The registration uses the Normalized Gradient Fields distance measure in a multilevel Gauss-Newton optimization framework and focuses on a region around the subthalamic nucleus in the MR. The accuracy of our method was extensively evaluated on 20 DBS datasets from clinical routine and compared with manual expert registrations. For each dataset, three independent registrations were available, thus allowing to relate algorithmic with expert performance. Our method achieved an average registration error of 0.95mm in the target region around the subthalamic nucleus as compared to an inter-observer variability of 1.12 mm. Together with the short registration time of about five seconds on average, our method forms a very attractive package that can be considered ready for clinical use.

  15. Image Capture with Synchronized Multiple-Cameras for Extraction of Accurate Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehl, M.; Delacourt, T.; Boutry, C.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a project of recording and modelling tunnels, traffic circles and roads from multiple sensors. The aim is the representation and the accurate 3D modelling of a selection of road infrastructures as dense point clouds in order to extract profiles and metrics from it. Indeed, these models will be used for the sizing of infrastructures in order to simulate exceptional convoy truck routes. The objective is to extract directly from the point clouds the heights, widths and lengths of bridges and tunnels, the diameter of gyrating and to highlight potential obstacles for a convoy. Light, mobile and fast acquisition approaches based on images and videos from a set of synchronized sensors have been tested in order to obtain useable point clouds. The presented solution is based on a combination of multiple low-cost cameras designed on an on-boarded device allowing dynamic captures. The experimental device containing GoPro Hero4 cameras has been set up and used for tests in static or mobile acquisitions. That way, various configurations have been tested by using multiple synchronized cameras. These configurations are discussed in order to highlight the best operational configuration according to the shape of the acquired objects. As the precise calibration of each sensor and its optics are major factors in the process of creation of accurate dense point clouds, and in order to reach the best quality available from such cameras, the estimation of the internal parameters of fisheye lenses of the cameras has been processed. Reference measures were also realized by using a 3D TLS (Faro Focus 3D) to allow the accuracy assessment.

  16. Subsurface Structure of the Suspicious Hsiaokangshan Fault in Southern Taiwan From Seismic Reflection Images and Core Borings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, C.; Shih, R.; Wang, W.; Lee, Y.; Chen, W.; Liu, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The Hsiaokangshan fault in southern Taiwan was suspected as an active fault, which strikes in NS direction for about 8 km long. Existence of the Hsiaokangshan fault was originally proposed from its geomorphic characteristics, several lineation structures were found situated at west of the Dakangshan anticline. From evidences of regional seismic reflection surveys, gravity anomaly and borehole lithology, the Dakangshan anticline was thought formed by intrusion of a mud diaper. Since the area nearby the Hsiaokangshan fault was over developed, barely any geologic evidence was able to find to verify the fault. Currently, several boreholes were drilled by the Central Geological Survey of Taiwan to across one of the lineation structures, the borehole records show that the shallowest bedrock (Pleistocene mud formation) was reached at 36m deep and deepened westward. The Holocene marine environment sediments were laid down above the unconformity. In this paper, we will show our studies of the fault by using shallow seismic reflection method, core borings and regional subsurface seismic reflection images. To collect the shallow seismic reflection data, we used 96-channel data acquisition system to collect the seismic data and used a mini impactor, JMS Mini65 to generate seismic wave. To image the shallow unconformity, we deployed the geophone groups at every 5 m and set the minimum nearest offset at 5m. Although there is no reflection signal appeared in the mud formation, we are able to trace the unconformity and image the reflections of marine environmental sediments down to 1000m deep. Combining the shallow seismic reflection images, regional subsurface structures, and core borings, we are able to illustrate the detailed structures across the suspicious Hsiaokangshan fault and clarify the relationship between those lineation structures and the Dakangshan anticline.

  17. Deep subsurface electronic defect image contrast and resolution amplification in Si wafers using infrared photocarrier radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Jerias; Mandelis, Andreas; Shaughnessy, Derrick; Li, Bincheng

    2004-09-01

    A photocarrier radiometry technique using a secondary subband-gap dc light source is introduced, along with the applications to deep subsurface electronic defect analysis in Si wafers. It is shown that the use of a dc light source, in addition to the modulated laser beam, drastically enhances the potential of the technique in resolving low-level damage otherwise virtually indistinguishable by conventional photothermal techniques. Using this methodology, the overall contrast enhancement was about 386% for amplitude and 5586% in phase over conventional photocarrier radiometry.

  18. CALIBRATION OF X-RAY IMAGING DEVICES FOR ACCURATE INTENSITY MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M J; Charest, M R; Ross, P W; Lee, J J; Schneider, M B; Palmer, N E; Teruya, A T

    2012-02-16

    National Security Technologies (NSTec) has developed calibration procedures for X-ray imaging systems. The X-ray sources that are used for calibration are both diode type and diode/fluorescer combinations. Calibrating the X-ray detectors is key to accurate calibration of the X-ray sources. Both energy dispersive detectors and photodiodes measuring total flux were used. We have developed calibration techniques for the detectors using radioactive sources that are traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The German synchrotron at Physikalische Technische Bundestalt (PTB) is used to calibrate silicon photodiodes over the energy range from 50 eV to 60 keV. The measurements on X-ray cameras made using the NSTec X-ray sources have included quantum efficiency averaged over all pixels, camera counts per photon per pixel, and response variation across the sensor. The instrumentation required to accomplish the calibrations is described. X-ray energies ranged from 720 eV to 22.7 keV. The X-ray sources produce narrow energy bands, allowing us to determine the properties as a function of X-ray energy. The calibrations were done for several types of imaging devices. There were back illuminated and front illuminated CCD (charge coupled device) sensors, and a CID (charge injection device) type camera. The CCD and CID camera types differ significantly in some of their properties that affect the accuracy of X-ray intensity measurements. All cameras discussed here are silicon based. The measurements of quantum efficiency variation with X-ray energy are compared to models for the sensor structure. Cameras that are not back-thinned are compared to those that are.

  19. Reconstruction of applicator positions from multiple-view images for accurate superficial hyperthermia treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drizdal, T.; Paulides, M. M.; Linthorst, M.; van Rhoon, G. C.

    2012-05-01

    In the current clinical practice, prior to superficial hyperthermia treatments (HT), temperature probes are placed in tissue to document a thermal dose. To investigate whether the painful procedure of catheter placement can be replaced by superficial HT planning, we study if the specific absorption rate (SAR) coverage is predictive for treatment outcome. An absolute requirement for such a study is the accurate reconstruction of the applicator setup. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of the applicator setup reconstruction from multiple-view images. The accuracy of the multiple-view reconstruction method has been assessed for two experimental setups using six lucite cone applicators (LCAs) representing the largest array applied at our clinic and also the most difficult scenario for the reconstruction. For the two experimental setups and 112 distances, the mean difference between photogrametry reconstructed and manually measured distances was 0.25 ± 0.79 mm (mean±1 standard deviation). By a parameter study of translation T (mm) and rotation R (°) of LCAs, we showed that these inaccuracies are clinically acceptable, i.e. they are either from ±1.02 mm error in translation or ±0.48° in rotation, or combinations expressed by 4.35R2 + 0.97T2 = 1. We anticipate that such small errors will not have a relevant influence on the SAR distribution in the treated region. The clinical applicability of the procedure is shown on a patient with a breast cancer recurrence treated with reirradiation plus superficial hyperthermia using the six-LCA array. The total reconstruction procedure of six LCAs from a set of ten photos currently takes around 1.5 h. We conclude that the reconstruction of superficial HT setup from multiple-view images is feasible and only minor errors are found that will have a negligible influence on treatment planning quality.

  20. Accurate means of detecting and characterizing abnormal patterns of ventricular activation by phase image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botvinick, E.H.; Frais, M.A.; Shosa, D.W.; O'Connell, J.W.; Pacheco-Alvarez, J.A.; Scheinman, M.; Hattner, R.S.; Morady, F.; Faulkner, D.B.

    1982-08-01

    The ability of scintigraphic phase image analysis to characterize patterns of abnormal ventricular activation was investigated. The pattern of phase distribution and sequential phase changes over both right and left ventricular regions of interest were evaluated in 16 patients with normal electrical activation and wall motion and compared with those in 8 patients with an artificial pacemaker and 4 patients with sinus rhythm with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and delta waves. Normally, the site of earliest phase angle was seen at the base of the interventricular septum, with sequential change affecting the body of the septum and the cardiac apex and then spreading laterally to involve the body of both ventricles. The site of earliest phase angle was located at the apex of the right ventricle in seven patients with a right ventricular endocardial pacemaker and on the lateral left ventricular wall in one patient with a left ventricular epicardial pacemaker. In each case the site corresponded exactly to the position of the pacing electrode as seen on posteroanterior and left lateral chest X-ray films, and sequential phase changes spread from the initial focus to affect both ventricles. In each of the patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, the site of earliest ventricular phase angle was located, and it corresponded exactly to the site of the bypass tract as determined by endocardial mapping. In this way, four bypass pathways, two posterior left paraseptal, one left lateral and one right lateral, were correctly localized scintigraphically. On the basis of the sequence of mechanical contraction, phase image analysis provides an accurate noninvasive method of detecting abnormal foci of ventricular activation.

  1. Method for accurate sizing of pulmonary vessels from 3D medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, Walter G.

    2015-03-01

    Detailed characterization of vascular anatomy, in particular the quantification of changes in the distribution of vessel sizes and of vascular pruning, is essential for the diagnosis and management of a variety of pulmonary vascular diseases and for the care of cancer survivors who have received radiation to the thorax. Clinical estimates of vessel radii are typically based on setting a pixel intensity threshold and counting how many "On" pixels are present across the vessel cross-section. A more objective approach introduced recently involves fitting the image with a library of spherical Gaussian filters and utilizing the size of the best matching filter as the estimate of vessel diameter. However, both these approaches have significant accuracy limitations including mis-match between a Gaussian intensity distribution and that of real vessels. Here we introduce and demonstrate a novel approach for accurate vessel sizing using 3D appearance models of a tubular structure along a curvilinear trajectory in 3D space. The vessel branch trajectories are represented with cubic Hermite splines and the tubular branch surfaces represented as a finite element surface mesh. An iterative parameter adjustment scheme is employed to optimally match the appearance models to a patient's chest X-ray computed tomography (CT) scan to generate estimates for branch radii and trajectories with subpixel resolution. The method is demonstrated on pulmonary vasculature in an adult human CT scan, and on 2D simulated test cases.

  2. Imaging near-subsurface subrosion structures and faults using SH-wave reflection seismics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadas, Sonja; Polom, Ulrich; Buness, Hermann; Krawczyk, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    Subrosion is a term for underground leaching of soluble rocks and is a global phenomenon. It involves dissolution of evaporites due to the presence of unsaturated water, fractures and faults. Fractures and faults are pathways for water to circulate and to generate subsurface cavities. Depending on the leached material and the parameters of the generation process, especially the dissolution rate, different kinds of subrosion structures evolve in the subsurface. The two end members are collapse and depression structures. Subrosion is a natural process, but it can be enhanced by anthropogenic factors like manipulation of the aquifer system and groundwater flow and by e.g. extraction of saline water. The formation of sinkholes and depressions are a dangerous geohazard, especially if they occur in urban areas, which often leads to building and infrastructural damage and life-threatening situations. For this reason investigations of the processes that induce subrosion and a detailed analysis of the resulting structures are of importance. To develop a comprehensive model of near-subsurface subrosion structures, reflection seismics is one of the methods used by the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics. The study area is located in the city of Bad Frankenhausen in northern Thuringia, Germany. Most of the geological underground of Thuringia is characterized by Permian deposits. Bad Frankenhausen is situated directly south of the Kyffhäuser mountain range at the Kyffhäuser Southern Margin Fault. This major fault is one of the main pathways for the circulating ground- and meteoric waters that leach the Permian deposits, especially the Leine-, Staßfurt- and Werra Formations. 2014 and 2015 eight shear wave reflection seismic profiles were carried out in the urban area of Bad Frankenhausen and three profiles in the countrified surroundings. Altogether ca. 3.6 km were surveyed using a landstreamer as receiver and an electro-dynamic vibrator as source. The surveys were

  3. Fast, Accurate and Precise Mid-Sagittal Plane Location in 3D MR Images of the Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergo, Felipe P. G.; Falcão, Alexandre X.; Yasuda, Clarissa L.; Ruppert, Guilherme C. S.

    Extraction of the mid-sagittal plane (MSP) is a key step for brain image registration and asymmetry analysis. We present a fast MSP extraction method for 3D MR images, based on automatic segmentation of the brain and on heuristic maximization of the cerebro-spinal fluid within the MSP. The method is robust to severe anatomical asymmetries between the hemispheres, caused by surgical procedures and lesions. The method is also accurate with respect to MSP delineations done by a specialist. The method was evaluated on 64 MR images (36 pathological, 20 healthy, 8 synthetic), and it found a precise and accurate approximation of the MSP in all of them with a mean time of 60.0 seconds per image, mean angular variation within a same image (precision) of 1.26o and mean angular difference from specialist delineations (accuracy) of 1.64o.

  4. Accurate inference of shoot biomass from high-throughput images of cereal plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    With the establishment of advanced technology facilities for high throughput plant phenotyping, the problem of estimating plant biomass of individual plants from their two dimensional images is becoming increasingly important. The approach predominantly cited in literature is to estimate the biomass of a plant as a linear function of the projected shoot area of plants in the images. However, the estimation error from this model, which is solely a function of projected shoot area, is large, prohibiting accurate estimation of the biomass of plants, particularly for the salt-stressed plants. In this paper, we propose a method based on plant specific weight for improving the accuracy of the linear model and reducing the estimation bias (the difference between actual shoot dry weight and the value of the shoot dry weight estimated with a predictive model). For the proposed method in this study, we modeled the plant shoot dry weight as a function of plant area and plant age. The data used for developing our model and comparing the results with the linear model were collected from a completely randomized block design experiment. A total of 320 plants from two bread wheat varieties were grown in a supported hydroponics system in a greenhouse. The plants were exposed to two levels of hydroponic salt treatments (NaCl at 0 and 100 mM) for 6 weeks. Five harvests were carried out. Each time 64 randomly selected plants were imaged and then harvested to measure the shoot fresh weight and shoot dry weight. The results of statistical analysis showed that with our proposed method, most of the observed variance can be explained, and moreover only a small difference between actual and estimated shoot dry weight was obtained. The low estimation bias indicates that our proposed method can be used to estimate biomass of individual plants regardless of what variety the plant is and what salt treatment has been applied. We validated this model on an independent set of barley data. The

  5. Wall Painting Investigation by Means of Non-invasive Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI): Inspection of Subsurface Structures Buried in Historical Plasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandolo, Corinna Ludovica Koch; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2016-02-01

    Characterization of subsurface features of wall paintings is important in conservation and technical art history as well as in building archaeology and architecture fields. In this study, an area of the apsidal wall painting of Nebbelunde Church (Rødby, Denmark) has been investigated by means of terahertz time-domain imaging (THz-TDI). Subsurface structures have been detected at different depths inside the lime-based plaster of the wall painting until approximately 1 cm from the surface. The surface morphology of the buried structures has been 3D imaged in detail, providing a substantial contribution in their characterization.

  6. Obtaining More Accurate Signals: Spatiotemporal Imaging of Cancer Sites Enabled by a Photoactivatable Aptamer-Based Strategy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Heng; Chen, Yuqi; Yuan, Erfeng; Li, Wei; Jiang, Zhuoran; Wei, Lai; Su, Haomiao; Zeng, Weiwu; Gan, Yunjiu; Wang, Zijing; Yuan, Bifeng; Qin, Shanshan; Leng, Xiaohua; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Songmei; Zhou, Xiang

    2016-09-14

    Early cancer diagnosis is of great significance to relative cancer prevention and clinical therapy, and it is crucial to efficiently recognize cancerous tumor sites at the molecular level. Herein, we proposed a versatile and efficient strategy based on aptamer recognition and photoactivation imaging for cancer diagnosis. This is the first time that a visible light-controlled photoactivatable aptamer-based platform has been applied for cancer diagnosis. The photoactivatable aptamer-based strategy can accurately detect nucleolin-overexpressed tumor cells and can be used for highly selective cancer cell screening and tissue imaging. This strategy is available for both formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens and frozen sections. Moreover, the photoactivation techniques showed great progress in more accurate and persistent imaging to the use of traditional fluorophores. Significantly, the application of this strategy can produce the same accurate results in tissue specimen analysis as with classical hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemical technology.

  7. Obtaining More Accurate Signals: Spatiotemporal Imaging of Cancer Sites Enabled by a Photoactivatable Aptamer-Based Strategy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Heng; Chen, Yuqi; Yuan, Erfeng; Li, Wei; Jiang, Zhuoran; Wei, Lai; Su, Haomiao; Zeng, Weiwu; Gan, Yunjiu; Wang, Zijing; Yuan, Bifeng; Qin, Shanshan; Leng, Xiaohua; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Songmei; Zhou, Xiang

    2016-09-14

    Early cancer diagnosis is of great significance to relative cancer prevention and clinical therapy, and it is crucial to efficiently recognize cancerous tumor sites at the molecular level. Herein, we proposed a versatile and efficient strategy based on aptamer recognition and photoactivation imaging for cancer diagnosis. This is the first time that a visible light-controlled photoactivatable aptamer-based platform has been applied for cancer diagnosis. The photoactivatable aptamer-based strategy can accurately detect nucleolin-overexpressed tumor cells and can be used for highly selective cancer cell screening and tissue imaging. This strategy is available for both formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens and frozen sections. Moreover, the photoactivation techniques showed great progress in more accurate and persistent imaging to the use of traditional fluorophores. Significantly, the application of this strategy can produce the same accurate results in tissue specimen analysis as with classical hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemical technology. PMID:27550088

  8. A Method for Partitioning Surface and Subsurface Flow Using Rainfall Simulaton and Two-Dimensional Surface Electrical Resistivity Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, A. M.; Paige, G. B.; Miller, S. N.; Carr, B. J.; Holbrook, W. S.

    2014-12-01

    In semi-arid rangeland environments understanding how surface and subsurface flow processes and their interactions are influenced by watershed and rainfall characteristics is critical. However, it is difficult to resolve the temporal variations between mechanisms controlling these processes and challenging to obtain field measurements that document their interactions. Better insight into how these complex systems respond hydrologically is necessary in order to refine hydrologic models and decision support tools. We are conducting field studies integrating high resolution, two-dimensional surface electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) with variable intensity rainfall simulation, to quantify real-time partitioning of rainfall into surface and subsurface response. These studies are being conducted at the hillslope scale on long-term runoff plots on four different ecological sites in the Upper Crow Creek Watershed in southeastern Wyoming. Variable intensity rainfall rates were applied using the Walnut Gulch Rainfall Simulator in which intensities were increased incrementally from 49 to 180 mm hr-1 and steady-state runoff rates for each intensity were measured. Two 13.5 m electrode arrays at 0.5 m spacing were positioned on the surface perpendicular to each plot and potentials were measured at given time intervals prior to, during and following simulations using a dipole-dipole array configuration. The configuration allows for a 2.47 m depth of investigation in which magnitude and direction of subsurface flux can be determined. We used the calculated steady state infiltration rates to quantify the variability in the partial area runoff response on the ecological sites. Coupling this information with time-lapse difference inversions of ERI data, we are able to track areas of increasing and decreasing resistivity in the subsurface related to localized areas of infiltration during and following rainfall events. We anticipate implementing this method across a variety of

  9. Analytic calculations and numerical simulations of box-car thermal wave images of planar subsurface scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, D. J.; Favro, L. D.; Kuo, P. K.; Thomas, R. L.

    Due to sample heat diffusion effects, thermal wave images are often blurred; such blurring is especially pronounced for deep defects or long imaging times. An effort is presently made to improve the quality of thermal-wave IR imaging by inverting the blurring mechanism, on the basis of a model of the physical process in which a space description of the defect is parametrically defined. The image inversion is then undertaken on the basis of the model. The resolution improvement anticipated should make thermal techniques competitive with other NDE imaging methods.

  10. Automatic lung segmentation in CT images with accurate handling of the hilar region.

    PubMed

    De Nunzio, Giorgio; Tommasi, Eleonora; Agrusti, Antonella; Cataldo, Rosella; De Mitri, Ivan; Favetta, Marco; Maglio, Silvio; Massafra, Andrea; Quarta, Maurizio; Torsello, Massimo; Zecca, Ilaria; Bellotti, Roberto; Tangaro, Sabina; Calvini, Piero; Camarlinghi, Niccolò; Falaschi, Fabio; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Oliva, Piernicola

    2011-02-01

    A fully automated and three-dimensional (3D) segmentation method for the identification of the pulmonary parenchyma in thorax X-ray computed tomography (CT) datasets is proposed. It is meant to be used as pre-processing step in the computer-assisted detection (CAD) system for malignant lung nodule detection that is being developed by the Medical Applications in a Grid Infrastructure Connection (MAGIC-5) Project. In this new approach the segmentation of the external airways (trachea and bronchi), is obtained by 3D region growing with wavefront simulation and suitable stop conditions, thus allowing an accurate handling of the hilar region, notoriously difficult to be segmented. Particular attention was also devoted to checking and solving the problem of the apparent 'fusion' between the lungs, caused by partial-volume effects, while 3D morphology operations ensure the accurate inclusion of all the nodules (internal, pleural, and vascular) in the segmented volume. The new algorithm was initially developed and tested on a dataset of 130 CT scans from the Italung-CT trial, and was then applied to the ANODE09-competition images (55 scans) and to the LIDC database (84 scans), giving very satisfactory results. In particular, the lung contour was adequately located in 96% of the CT scans, with incorrect segmentation of the external airways in the remaining cases. Segmentation metrics were calculated that quantitatively express the consistency between automatic and manual segmentations: the mean overlap degree of the segmentation masks is 0.96 ± 0.02, and the mean and the maximum distance between the mask borders (averaged on the whole dataset) are 0.74 ± 0.05 and 4.5 ± 1.5, respectively, which confirms that the automatic segmentations quite correctly reproduce the borders traced by the radiologist. Moreover, no tissue containing internal and pleural nodules was removed in the segmentation process, so that this method proved to be fit for the use in the

  11. Imaging the Antarctic Ice Sheet Subsurface with the HF GPR TAPIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gall, A.; Ciarletti, V.; Berthelier, J.; Reineix, A.; Ney, R.; Bonaimé, S.; Corbel, C.

    2006-12-01

    An HF impulse polarimetric Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) operating at very low frequencies (ranging from ~2 to 8MHz) has been developed in the frame of the NetLander mission. This instrument, named TAPIR (Terrestrial And Planetary Investigation by Radar), was designed to probe the Martian subsurface down to kilometric depth and search for potential water reservoirs. Although the NetLander mission was cancelled in 2003, the interest on the exploration of Martian subsurface was recently enhanced by the promising observations of the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) on board of the ESA Mars Express orbiter. In particular, MARSIS detected the base of the North Polar Layered Deposits, penetrating up to ~1.8km the ice-rich upper layer of the underground. Such results suggest that TAPIR, which operates in the same frequency range as MARSIS and can performed a higher number of coherent integrations, is able to reach deeper structures. Yet, in contrast with classical GPRs, TAPIR can not move onto the surface and thus won't provide 2D or 3D scan of the subsurface. To retrieve, in spite of this NetLander restraint, the 3D distribution of the reflecting facets of the underground, the instrument was equipped with two electrical dipoles and a rotating magnetic sensor. These antennas allow to derive, from the measured values of 5 components of the wave field, the direction of arrival of the reflected waves hence the inclination of the buried reflectors. The first validation of this innovative concept was carried out during the RANETA (RAdar of NEtlander in Terre Adélie) campaign organized by the Institute Paul-Emile Victor in January-February 2004. This campaign took place on the Antarctic ice sheet close to the French-Italian Cap Prudhomme station. 8 soundings of the ice shelf were performed on various sites corresponding to different altitudes above the sea level (ranging from ~285m to ~1100m). We shall provide a detailed description of the

  12. Multimodal Quantitative Phase Imaging with Digital Holographic Microscopy Accurately Assesses Intestinal Inflammation and Epithelial Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Philipp; Brückner, Markus; Ketelhut, Steffi; Heidemann, Jan; Kemper, Björn; Bettenworth, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease, i.e., Crohn's disease and Ulcerative colitis, has significantly increased over the last decade. The etiology of IBD remains unknown and current therapeutic strategies are based on the unspecific suppression of the immune system. The development of treatments that specifically target intestinal inflammation and epithelial wound healing could significantly improve management of IBD, however this requires accurate detection of inflammatory changes. Currently, potential drug candidates are usually evaluated using animal models in vivo or with cell culture based techniques in vitro. Histological examination usually requires the cells or tissues of interest to be stained, which may alter the sample characteristics and furthermore, the interpretation of findings can vary by investigator expertise. Digital holographic microscopy (DHM), based on the detection of optical path length delay, allows stain-free quantitative phase contrast imaging. This allows the results to be directly correlated with absolute biophysical parameters. We demonstrate how measurement of changes in tissue density with DHM, based on refractive index measurement, can quantify inflammatory alterations, without staining, in different layers of colonic tissue specimens from mice and humans with colitis. Additionally, we demonstrate continuous multimodal label-free monitoring of epithelial wound healing in vitro, possible using DHM through the simple automated determination of the wounded area and simultaneous determination of morphological parameters such as dry mass and layer thickness of migrating cells. In conclusion, DHM represents a valuable, novel and quantitative tool for the assessment of intestinal inflammation with absolute values for parameters possible, simplified quantification of epithelial wound healing in vitro and therefore has high potential for translational diagnostic use. PMID:27685659

  13. The level of detail required in a deformable phantom to accurately perform quality assurance of deformable image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz, Daniel L.; Kim, Hojin; Chen, Josephine; Stathakis, Sotirios; Kirby, Neil

    2016-09-01

    The primary purpose of the study was to determine how detailed deformable image registration (DIR) phantoms need to adequately simulate human anatomy and accurately assess the quality of DIR algorithms. In particular, how many distinct tissues are required in a phantom to simulate complex human anatomy? Pelvis and head-and-neck patient CT images were used for this study as virtual phantoms. Two data sets from each site were analyzed. The virtual phantoms were warped to create two pairs consisting of undeformed and deformed images. Otsu’s method was employed to create additional segmented image pairs of n distinct soft tissue CT number ranges (fat, muscle, etc). A realistic noise image was added to each image. Deformations were applied in MIM Software (MIM) and Velocity deformable multi-pass (DMP) and compared with the known warping. Images with more simulated tissue levels exhibit more contrast, enabling more accurate results. Deformation error (magnitude of the vector difference between known and predicted deformation) was used as a metric to evaluate how many CT number gray levels are needed for a phantom to serve as a realistic patient proxy. Stabilization of the mean deformation error was reached by three soft tissue levels for Velocity DMP and MIM, though MIM exhibited a persisting difference in accuracy between the discrete images and the unprocessed image pair. A minimum detail of three levels allows a realistic patient proxy for use with Velocity and MIM deformation algorithms.

  14. The level of detail required in a deformable phantom to accurately perform quality assurance of deformable image registration.

    PubMed

    Saenz, Daniel L; Kim, Hojin; Chen, Josephine; Stathakis, Sotirios; Kirby, Neil

    2016-09-01

    The primary purpose of the study was to determine how detailed deformable image registration (DIR) phantoms need to adequately simulate human anatomy and accurately assess the quality of DIR algorithms. In particular, how many distinct tissues are required in a phantom to simulate complex human anatomy? Pelvis and head-and-neck patient CT images were used for this study as virtual phantoms. Two data sets from each site were analyzed. The virtual phantoms were warped to create two pairs consisting of undeformed and deformed images. Otsu's method was employed to create additional segmented image pairs of n distinct soft tissue CT number ranges (fat, muscle, etc). A realistic noise image was added to each image. Deformations were applied in MIM Software (MIM) and Velocity deformable multi-pass (DMP) and compared with the known warping. Images with more simulated tissue levels exhibit more contrast, enabling more accurate results. Deformation error (magnitude of the vector difference between known and predicted deformation) was used as a metric to evaluate how many CT number gray levels are needed for a phantom to serve as a realistic patient proxy. Stabilization of the mean deformation error was reached by three soft tissue levels for Velocity DMP and MIM, though MIM exhibited a persisting difference in accuracy between the discrete images and the unprocessed image pair. A minimum detail of three levels allows a realistic patient proxy for use with Velocity and MIM deformation algorithms. PMID:27494827

  15. Scalable subsurface inverse modeling of huge data sets with an application to tracer concentration breakthrough data from magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jonghyun; Yoon, Hongkyu; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Werth, Charles J.; Valocchi, Albert J.

    2016-07-01

    Characterizing subsurface properties is crucial for reliable and cost-effective groundwater supply management and contaminant remediation. With recent advances in sensor technology, large volumes of hydrogeophysical and geochemical data can be obtained to achieve high-resolution images of subsurface properties. However, characterization with such a large amount of information requires prohibitive computational costs associated with "big data" processing and numerous large-scale numerical simulations. To tackle such difficulties, the principal component geostatistical approach (PCGA) has been proposed as a "Jacobian-free" inversion method that requires much smaller forward simulation runs for each iteration than the number of unknown parameters and measurements needed in the traditional inversion methods. PCGA can be conveniently linked to any multiphysics simulation software with independent parallel executions. In this paper, we extend PCGA to handle a large number of measurements (e.g., 106 or more) by constructing a fast preconditioner whose computational cost scales linearly with the data size. For illustration, we characterize the heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity (K) distribution in a laboratory-scale 3-D sand box using about 6 million transient tracer concentration measurements obtained using magnetic resonance imaging. Since each individual observation has little information on the K distribution, the data were compressed by the zeroth temporal moment of breakthrough curves, which is equivalent to the mean travel time under the experimental setting. Only about 2000 forward simulations in total were required to obtain the best estimate with corresponding estimation uncertainty, and the estimated K field captured key patterns of the original packing design, showing the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  16. Scalable subsurface inverse modeling of huge data sets with an application to tracer concentration breakthrough data from magnetic resonance imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Jonghyun; Yoon, Hongkyu; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Werth, Charles J.; Valocchi, Albert J.

    2016-06-09

    When characterizing subsurface properties is crucial for reliable and cost-effective groundwater supply management and contaminant remediation. With recent advances in sensor technology, large volumes of hydro-geophysical and geochemical data can be obtained to achieve high-resolution images of subsurface properties. However, characterization with such a large amount of information requires prohibitive computational costs associated with “big data” processing and numerous large-scale numerical simulations. To tackle such difficulties, the Principal Component Geostatistical Approach (PCGA) has been proposed as a “Jacobian-free” inversion method that requires much smaller forward simulation runs for each iteration than the number of unknown parameters and measurements needed inmore » the traditional inversion methods. PCGA can be conveniently linked to any multi-physics simulation software with independent parallel executions. In our paper, we extend PCGA to handle a large number of measurements (e.g. 106 or more) by constructing a fast preconditioner whose computational cost scales linearly with the data size. For illustration, we characterize the heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity (K) distribution in a laboratory-scale 3-D sand box using about 6 million transient tracer concentration measurements obtained using magnetic resonance imaging. Since each individual observation has little information on the K distribution, the data was compressed by the zero-th temporal moment of breakthrough curves, which is equivalent to the mean travel time under the experimental setting. Moreover, only about 2,000 forward simulations in total were required to obtain the best estimate with corresponding estimation uncertainty, and the estimated K field captured key patterns of the original packing design, showing the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed method. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.« less

  17. Structured-illumination reflectance imaging for enhanced detection of subsurface tissue bruising in apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this research, a novel method of fresh bruise detection was developed using a structured illumination reflectance imaging (SIRI) system. The SIRI system projects sinusoidal patterns of illumination onto samples, and image demodulation is then used to recover depth-specific information through var...

  18. Thermal Imaging of Subsurface Coal Fires by means of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) in the Autonomous Province Xinjiang, PRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasterling, Margarete; Schloemer, Stefan; Fischer, Christian; Ehrler, Christoph

    2010-05-01

    Spontaneous combustion of coal and resulting coal fires lead to very high temperatures in the subsurface. To a large amount the heat is transferred to the surface by convective and conductive transport inducing a more or less pronounced thermal anomaly. During the past decade satellite-based infrared-imaging (ASTER, MODIS) was the method of choice for coal fire detection on a local and regional scale. However, the resolution is by far too low for a detailed analysis of single coal fires which is essential prerequisite for corrective measures (i.e. fire fighting) and calculation of carbon dioxide emission based on a complex correlation between energy release and CO2 generation. Consequently, within the framework of the Sino-German research project "Innovative Technologies for Exploration, Extinction and Monitoring of Coal Fires in Northern China", a new concept was developed and successfully tested. An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) was equipped with a lightweight camera for thermografic (resolution 160 by 120 pixel, dynamic range -20 to 250°C) and for visual imaging. The UAV designed as an octocopter is able to hover at GPS controlled waypoints during predefined flight missions. The application of a UAV has several advantages. Compared to point measurements on the ground the thermal imagery quickly provides the spatial distribution of the temperature anomaly with a much better resolution. Areas otherwise not accessible (due to topography, fire induced cracks, etc.) can easily be investigated. The results of areal surveys on two coal fires in Xinjiang are presented. Georeferenced thermal and visual images were mosaicked together and analyzed. UAV-born data do well compared to temperatures measured directly on the ground and cover large areas in detail. However, measuring surface temperature alone is not sufficient. Simultaneous measurements made at the surface and in roughly 15cm depth proved substantial temperature gradients in the upper soil. Thus the temperature

  19. Layered Subsurface Structure at the Chang'e-3 Landing Site Derived from Imaging Data: Awaiting Ground Truth from Chang'e-3 Radar Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, L.; Xiao, Z.; Xiao, L.; Zhao, J.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying the subsurface stratigraphic and tectonic features of the Moon, with a depth from a few to thousands of meters, can provide significant information for solving scientific mysteries concerning regional and global evolution history. In December 2013, the Chinese Chang'e-3 (CE-3) spacecraft, carrying the Yutu (Jade Rabbit) rover, successfully landed on the northern Mare Imbrium, the Moon. The surface in-situ radar experiments by CE-3 mission provide an unprecedented opportunity to study the shallow subsurface geology of the Moon. While the processing and interpretation of radar observations usually depend on certain geophysical models and should consider regional geological settings. In this work, we quantified the subsurface structure at the CE-3 landing site using imaging data and illustrated a multi-layer subsurface structure model including three layers of regolith, two layers of basalt deposits and one layer of ejecta. Our result can provide essential references for CE-3 radar data processing and interpretation. The CE-3 radar observations can in turn validate previous technique for quantifying subsurface geology using imaging data, thus further deepening our understanding of lunar geoscience and exploration.

  20. Massively parallel electrical conductivity imaging of the subsurface: Applications to hydrocarbon exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, G.A.; Commer, M.

    2009-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) geophysical imaging is now receiving considerable attention for electrical conductivity mapping of potential offshore oil and gas reservoirs. The imaging technology employs controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) and magnetotelluric (MT) fields and treats geological media exhibiting transverse anisotropy. Moreover when combined with established seismic methods, direct imaging of reservoir fluids is possible. Because of the size of the 3D conductivity imaging problem, strategies are required exploiting computational parallelism and optimal meshing. The algorithm thus developed has been shown to scale to tens of thousands of processors. In one imaging experiment, 32,768 tasks/processors on the IBM Watson Research Blue Gene/L supercomputer were successfully utilized. Over a 24 hour period we were able to image a large scale field data set that previously required over four months of processing time on distributed clusters based on Intel or AMD processors utilizing 1024 tasks on an InfiniBand fabric. Electrical conductivity imaging using massively parallel computational resources produces results that cannot be obtained otherwise and are consistent with timeframes required for practical exploration problems.

  1. MRI-aided tissues interface characterization: An accurate signal propagation time calculation method for UWB breast tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Xiao, Xia; Kikkawa, Takamaro

    2016-12-01

    Radar-based ultrawideband (UWB) microwave imaging is expected to be a safe, low-cost tool for breast cancer detection. However, since radar wave travels at different speeds in different tissues, propagation time is hard to be estimated in heterogeneous breast. Wrongly estimated propagation time leads to error of tumor location in resulting image, aka imaging error. In this paper, we develop a magnetic resonance imaging-aided (MRI-aided) propagation time calculation technique which is independent from radar imaging system but can help decrease the imaging error. The technique can eliminate the influence of the rough interface between fat layer and gland layer in breast and get relative accurate thicknesses of two layers. The propagation time in each layer is calculated and summed. The summed propagation time is used in Confocal imaging algorithm to increase the accuracy of resulting image. 25 patients' breast models with glands of varying size are classified into four categories for imaging simulation tests. Imaging accuracy in terms of tumor location along x-direction has been improved for 21 among 25 cases, as a result, overall around 50% improvement compared to conventional UWB imaging.

  2. Wavelength-modulated differential photoacoustic radar imager (WM-DPARI): accurate monitoring of absolute hemoglobin oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung Soo Sean; Lashkari, Bahman; Dovlo, Edem; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Accurate monitoring of blood oxy-saturation level (SO2 ) in human breast tissues is clinically important for predicting and evaluating possible tumor growth at the site. In this work, four different non-invasive frequency-domain photoacoustic (PA) imaging modalities were compared for their absolute SO2 characterization capability using an in-vitro sheep blood circulation system. Among different PA modes, a new WM-DPAR imaging modality could estimate the SO2 with great accuracy when compared to a commercial blood gas analyzer. The developed WM-DPARI theory was further validated by constructing SO2 tomographic images of a blood-containing plastisol phantom.

  3. Wavelength-modulated differential photoacoustic radar imager (WM-DPARI): accurate monitoring of absolute hemoglobin oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung Soo Sean; Lashkari, Bahman; Dovlo, Edem; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Accurate monitoring of blood oxy-saturation level (SO2 ) in human breast tissues is clinically important for predicting and evaluating possible tumor growth at the site. In this work, four different non-invasive frequency-domain photoacoustic (PA) imaging modalities were compared for their absolute SO2 characterization capability using an in-vitro sheep blood circulation system. Among different PA modes, a new WM-DPAR imaging modality could estimate the SO2 with great accuracy when compared to a commercial blood gas analyzer. The developed WM-DPARI theory was further validated by constructing SO2 tomographic images of a blood-containing plastisol phantom. PMID:27446691

  4. Wavelength-modulated differential photoacoustic radar imager (WM-DPARI): accurate monitoring of absolute hemoglobin oxygen saturation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung Soo Sean; Lashkari, Bahman; Dovlo, Edem; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Accurate monitoring of blood oxy-saturation level (SO2) in human breast tissues is clinically important for predicting and evaluating possible tumor growth at the site. In this work, four different non-invasive frequency-domain photoacoustic (PA) imaging modalities were compared for their absolute SO2 characterization capability using an in-vitro sheep blood circulation system. Among different PA modes, a new WM-DPAR imaging modality could estimate the SO2 with great accuracy when compared to a commercial blood gas analyzer. The developed WM-DPARI theory was further validated by constructing SO2 tomographic images of a blood-containing plastisol phantom. PMID:27446691

  5. Delineation of subsurface hydrocarbon contamination at a former hydrogenation plant using spectral induced polarization imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores Orozco, Adrián; Kemna, Andreas; Oberdörster, Christoph; Zschornack, Ludwig; Leven, Carsten; Dietrich, Peter; Weiss, Holger

    2012-08-01

    Broadband spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements were conducted at a former hydrogenation plant in Zeitz (NE Germany) to investigate the potential of SIP imaging to delineate areas with different BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene) concentrations. Conductivity images reveal a poor correlation with the distribution of contaminants; whereas phase images exhibit two main anomalies: low phase shift values (< 5 mrad) for locations with high BTEX concentrations, including the occurrence of free-phase product (BTEX concentrations > 1.7 g/l), and higher phase values for lower BTEX concentrations. Moreover, the spectral response of the areas with high BTEX concentration and free-phase products reveals a flattened spectrum in the low frequencies (< 40 Hz), while areas with lower BTEX concentrations exhibit a response characterized by a frequency peak. The SIP response was modelled using a Debye decomposition to compute images of the median relaxation-time. Consistent with laboratory studies, we observed an increase in the relaxation-time associated with an increase in BTEX concentrations. Measurements were also collected in the time domain (TDIP), revealing imaging results consistent with those obtained for frequency domain (SIP) measurements. Results presented here demonstrate the potential of the SIP imaging method to discriminate source and plume of dissolved contaminants at BTEX contaminated sites.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of subsurface water content. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickx, J.M.H.

    1997-01-01

    'During the period from October 1997 to January 1998 the author has further developed the understanding of NMR physics, improved software for forward and inverse modeling of the NMR signal, and conducted field tests on sites in Colorado and New Mexico. One important result from the forward modeling was that the field strength of the signals is concentrated under the loop. This indicates that little lateral dissipation occurs. The author received the NUMIS/NMR system (manufactured by IRIS Instruments, France) in late July, 1997. In July and early August, 1997, potential test sites were visited, and several test sites were selected and permitted. The first NMR test measurements were made in mid-August, 1997. The instrument malfunctioned during mid-September, 1997, and was returned to IRIS for repairs. Time lost due to malfunction, repairs, and shipping was about one month. Many NMR measurements have been made at sites in Colorado and New Mexico. Parks often have been selected as test sites due to ease of permitting, the relatively large open space, and general lack of powerlines. Noise from power lines severely degrades the NMR data quality. The NMR data acquired at the first three sites in Colorado (Bear Creek, Clear Creek, and Prospect) was either severely distorted by powerline noise or did not indicate significant groundwater occurrences. The NMR data taken at Cherry Creek were of good quality and also indicated significant groundwater. The NMR data acquired at three sites with relatively shallow ground water levels around Socorro, New Mexico, did not detect any ground water due to severe signal distortion by magnetite, a magnetic mineral. Measurements in a compact sand stone near Santa Rosa and in a limestone near Artesia, New Mexico, gave excellent results. Overall, the NMR technique proves capable of detecting subsurface ground water under the right conditions: little noise from power lines and absence of magnetite.'

  7. Airborne imaging lidar, detection and classification of surface and subsurface objects in a marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cianciotto, F.T.P.

    1996-11-01

    The current problem of imaging objects located within a body of water is overcome by the use of a Gated Imaging Lidar System. Due to variation of suspended particulate matter within a body of water, normal visible video reconnaissance has proven to be highly unreliable. By using nanosecond short pulsed, low repetition rate blue-green laser signals that are exclusively tuned for specific water conditions, Lidar systems are capable of reproducing clear images from oceanic surface to significant depths. One of the major advantages of gated Lidar is that back scatter from layers above and below the region to be searched is basically reduced to zero. This discrimination in layer searching greatly increase the signal to noise ratio of the system, substantially increasing the likelihood of target recognition. Imaging Lidar systems have been successfully used for numerous military applications, studying of marine life forms, and oil spill detection and classification. Gated imaging Lidar systems are light weight with low power consumption and can be operated by personnel with minimal instruction. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Imaging of subsurface lineaments in the southwestern part of the Thrace Basin from gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogan, D.; Pinar, A.; Elmas, A.; Bal, O. Tarhan; Yuksel, S.

    2013-04-01

    Linear anomalies, as an indicator of the structural features of some geological bodies, are very important for the interpretation of gravity and magnetic data. In this study, an image processing technique known as the Hough transform (HT) algorithm is described for determining invisible boundaries and extensions in gravity anomaly maps. The Hough function implements the Hough transform used to extract straight lines or circles within two-dimensional potential field images. It is defined as image and Hough space. In the Hough domain, this function transforms each nonzero point in the parameter domain to a sinusoid. In the image space, each point in the Hough space is transformed to a straight line or circle. Lineaments are depicted from these straight lines which are transformed in the image domain. An application of the Hough transform to the Bouguer anomaly map of the southwestern part of the Thrace Basin, NW Turkey, shows the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Based on geological data and gravity data, the structural features in the southwestern part of the Thrace Basin are investigated by applying the proposed approach and the Blakely and Simpson method. Lineaments identified by these approaches are generally in good accordance with previously-mapped surface faults.

  9. A non-linear iterative method for multi-layer DOT sub-surface imaging system.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hsiang-Wen; Wu, Shih-Yang; Sun, Hao-Jan; Fang, Wai-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) has become an emerging non-invasive technology, and has been widely used in clinical diagnosis. Functional near-infrared (FNIR) is one of the important applications of DOT. However, FNIR is used to reconstruct two-dimensional (2D) images for the sake of good spatial and temporal resolution. In this paper we propose a multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) based data extraction algorithm method in order to increase the spatial and temporal resolution. The non-linear iterative method is used to reconstruct better resolution images layer by layer. In terms of theory, the simulation results and original images are nearly identical. The proposed reconstruction method performs good spatial resolution, and has a depth resolutions capacity of three layers.

  10. Subsurface structure of epitaxial rare-earth silicides imaged by STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogero, C.; Martín-Gago, J. A.; Cerdá, J. I.

    2006-09-01

    We combine scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images, density functional theory total energy calculations, and STM simulations to conclusively determine the surface structure of the Y3Si5(0001) silicide epitaxially grown on Si(111) . We observe, for the same sample, two different types of atomic resolution images exhibiting either p3m or p6 symmetry, in analogy with previous works on similar rare-earth silicide surfaces. We elucidate the long-standing controversy regarding the interpretation of these images by showing that they are mainly related to the registry of the surfacemost Si bilayer with respect to the Si vacancy network located two layers below the surface and, therefore, to the existence of two different buried structural domains. Our results demonstrate an unsual STM depth sensitivity—up to 5Å —for metallic systems.

  11. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of subsurface tissue structures with a volume holographic spatial-spectral imaging system.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuan; Gelsinger-Austin, Paul J; Watson, Jonathan M; Barbastathis, George; Barton, Jennifer K; Kostuk, Raymond K

    2008-09-15

    A three-dimensional imaging system incorporating multiplexed holographic gratings to visualize fluorescence tissue structures is presented. Holographic gratings formed in volume recording materials such as a phenanthrenquinone poly(methyl methacrylate) photopolymer have narrowband angular and spectral transmittance filtering properties that enable obtaining spatial-spectral information within an object. We demonstrate this imaging system's ability to obtain multiple depth-resolved fluorescence images simultaneously.

  12. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of subsurface tissue structures with a volume holographic spatial-spectral imaging system.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuan; Gelsinger-Austin, Paul J; Watson, Jonathan M; Barbastathis, George; Barton, Jennifer K; Kostuk, Raymond K

    2008-09-15

    A three-dimensional imaging system incorporating multiplexed holographic gratings to visualize fluorescence tissue structures is presented. Holographic gratings formed in volume recording materials such as a phenanthrenquinone poly(methyl methacrylate) photopolymer have narrowband angular and spectral transmittance filtering properties that enable obtaining spatial-spectral information within an object. We demonstrate this imaging system's ability to obtain multiple depth-resolved fluorescence images simultaneously. PMID:18794943

  13. Downhole images: Electrical scanning reveals the nature of subsurface oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezard, Philippe; Lovell, Mike

    High-resolution electrical images of oceanic sediments exposed by drilling are permitting scientists to make detailed evaluation of the record preserved in the rocks, particularly in intervals where little core was recovered. The images are generated from measurements taken with a slimhole Formation Micro-Scanner (FMS), developed by Schlumberger specifically for the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP). The new measurement technique was used in May 1989 on ODP Leg 126 in two holes drilled in the Izu-Bonin intra-oceanic volcanic arc (Figure 1), which extends south of Honshu to Iwo Jima, Japan.

  14. Detection of Subsurface Material Separation in Shuttle Orbiter Slip-Side Joggle Region of the Wing Leading Edge using Infrared Imaging Data from Arc Jet Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Walker, Sandra P.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine whether infrared imaging (IR) surface temperature data obtained during arc-jet tests of Space Shuttle Orbiter s reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) wing leading edge panel slip-side joggle region could be used to detect presence of subsurface material separation, and if so, to determine when separation occurs during the simulated entry profile. Recent thermostructural studies have indicated thermally induced interlaminar normal stress concentrations at the substrate/coating interface in the curved joggle region can result in local subsurface material separation, with the separation predicted to occur during approach to peak heating during reentry. The present study was an attempt to determine experimentally when subsurface material separations occur. A simplified thermal model of a flat RCC panel with subsurface material separation was developed and used to infer general surface temperature trends due to the presence of subsurface material separation. IR data from previously conducted arc-jet tests on three test specimens were analyzed: one without subsurface material separation either pre or post test, one with pre test separation, and one with separation developing during test. The simplified thermal model trend predictions along with comparison of experimental IR data of the three test specimens were used to successfully infer material separation from the arc-jet test data. Furthermore, for the test specimen that had developed subsurface material separation during the arc-jet tests, the initiation of separation appeared to occur during the ramp up to the peak heating condition, where test specimen temperature went from 2500 to 2800 F.

  15. Process for guidance, containment, treatment, and imaging in a subsurface environment utilizing ferro-fluids

    DOEpatents

    Moridis, George J.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed are processes for monitoring and control of underground contamination, which involve the application of ferrofluids. Two broad uses of ferrofluids are described: (1) to control liquid movement by the application of strong external magnetic fields; and (2) to image liquids by standard geophysical methods.

  16. Delineation of subsurface hydrocarbon contamination at a former hydrogenation plant using spectral induced polarization imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores Orozco, A.; Kemna, A.; Oberdoerster, C.; Zschornack, L.; Leven, C.; Dietrich, P.; Weiss, H.

    2011-12-01

    In the framework of the EU FP7 project ModelPROBE, broadband spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements were conducted at a former hydrogenation plant in Zeitz for the characterization of a hydrocarbon contaminant plume. In the source area total concentrations of BTEX contaminants partly exceed 1.5 g/l. Previous studies at the laboratory scale have demonstrated the sensitivity of SIP measurements to different concentrations of organic minerals; however, only few studies have been conducted at the field scale. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of SIP imaging to delineate areas with different BTEX concentrations. SIP measurements were performed in the frequency range from 60 mHz to 1 kHz along a 120 m profile across the area of the former hydrogenation plant. At a later stage, a trench was excavated along the location of the profile in order to remove pipes, foundations and different sources of anthropogenic noise associated with the hydrogenation plant. Thereafter, SIP measurements were repeated inside the trench to study the effect of anthropogenic noise on the SIP images. Computed images for the data collected before and after the excavation of the trench show similar results validating the proposed approach even in the presence of anthropogenic noise. SIP images, for frequencies below 100 Hz, exhibit two main anomalies: low phase shift values (~ 5 mrad) for locations with free phase product (BTEX concentrations > 1.7 g/l); whereas relatively high polarization values (> 10 mrad) were observed for lower BTEX concentrations (1 - 1.7 g/l). Moreover, the spectral response of the areas where free phase product was detected reveals a flattened spectrum; while the areas with lower concentrations exhibit a typical Cole-Cole response. Based on these results, SIP imaging appears to be a suitable tool to delineate source-zones at highly contaminated sites.

  17. Factors affecting the accurate determination of cerebrovascular blood flow using high-speed droplet imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudin, Stephen; Divani, Afshin; Wakhloo, Ajay K.; Lieber, Baruch B.; Granger, William; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Yang, Chang-Ying J.

    1998-07-01

    Detailed cerebrovascular blood flow can be more accurately determined radiographically from the new droplet tracking method previously introduced by the authors than from standard soluble contrast techniques. For example, arteriovenous malformation (AVM) transit times which are crucial for proper glue embolization treatments, were shown to be about half when using droplets compared to those measured using soluble contrast techniques. In this work, factors such as x-ray pulse duration, frame rate, system spatial resolution (focal spot size), droplet size, droplet and system contrast parameters, and system noise are considered in relation to their affect on the accurate determination of droplet location and velocity.

  18. Imaging latex-carbon nanotube composites by subsurface electrostatic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sajan; Petty, Clayton W; Krafcik, Karen; Loyola, Bryan; O'Bryan, Greg; Friddle, Raymond W

    2016-10-14

    Electrostatic modes of atomic force microscopy have shown to be non-destructive and relatively simple methods for imaging conductors embedded in insulating polymers. Here we use electrostatic force microscopy to image the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a latex-based conductive composite, which brings forth features not observed in previously studied systems employing linear polymer films. A fixed-potential model of the probe-nanotube electrostatics is presented which in principle gives access to the conductive nanoparticle's depth and radius, and the polymer film dielectric constant. Comparing this model to the data results in nanotube depths that appear to be slightly above the film-air interface. This result suggests that water-mediated charge build-up at the film-air interface may be the source of electrostatic phase contrast in ambient conditions. PMID:27607079

  19. Imaging latex-carbon nanotube composites by subsurface electrostatic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sajan; Petty, Clayton W; Krafcik, Karen; Loyola, Bryan; O'Bryan, Greg; Friddle, Raymond W

    2016-10-14

    Electrostatic modes of atomic force microscopy have shown to be non-destructive and relatively simple methods for imaging conductors embedded in insulating polymers. Here we use electrostatic force microscopy to image the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a latex-based conductive composite, which brings forth features not observed in previously studied systems employing linear polymer films. A fixed-potential model of the probe-nanotube electrostatics is presented which in principle gives access to the conductive nanoparticle's depth and radius, and the polymer film dielectric constant. Comparing this model to the data results in nanotube depths that appear to be slightly above the film-air interface. This result suggests that water-mediated charge build-up at the film-air interface may be the source of electrostatic phase contrast in ambient conditions.

  20. Imaging latex-carbon nanotube composites by subsurface electrostatic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Sajan; Petty, Clayton W.; Krafcik, Karen; Loyola, Bryan; O'Bryan, Greg; Friddle, Raymond W.

    2016-10-01

    Electrostatic modes of atomic force microscopy have shown to be non-destructive and relatively simple methods for imaging conductors embedded in insulating polymers. Here we use electrostatic force microscopy to image the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a latex-based conductive composite, which brings forth features not observed in previously studied systems employing linear polymer films. A fixed-potential model of the probe-nanotube electrostatics is presented which in principle gives access to the conductive nanoparticle’s depth and radius, and the polymer film dielectric constant. Comparing this model to the data results in nanotube depths that appear to be slightly above the film-air interface. This result suggests that water-mediated charge build-up at the film-air interface may be the source of electrostatic phase contrast in ambient conditions.

  1. The Application of Optical Coherence Tomography to Image Subsurface Tissue Structure of Antarctic Krill Euphausia superba

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Nicola; Cox, Martin J.; Harper, Danielle J.; Stott, Sebastian R.; Ashok, Praveen C.; Dholakia, Kishan; Kawaguchi, So; King, Robert; Horton, Tammy; Brown, Christian T. A.

    2014-01-01

    Many small open ocean animals, such as Antarctic krill, are an important part of marine ecosystems. To discover what will happen to animals such as krill in a changing ocean, experiments are run in aquaria where conditions can be controlled to simulate water characteristics predicted to occur in the future. The response of individual animals to changing water conditions can be hard to observe, and with current observation techniques it is very difficult to follow the progress of an individual animal through its life. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an optical imaging technique that allows images at high resolution to be obtained from depths up to a few millimeters inside biological specimens. It is compatible with in vivo imaging and can be used repeatedly on the same specimens. In this work, we show how OCT may be applied to post mortem krill samples and how important physiological data such as shell thickness and estimates of organ volume can be obtained. Using OCT we find an average value for the thickness of krill exoskeleton to be (30±4) µm along a 1 cm length of the animal body. We also show that the technique may be used to provide detailed imagery of the internal structure of a pleopod joint and provide an estimate for the heart volume of (0.73±0.03) mm3. PMID:25310589

  2. Modern Ultrasound Imaging: AN Exciting Window Into the Sub-Surface World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonetti, F.

    2009-03-01

    Progress in solid state electronics and micromachining has led to the rapid development of ultrasound array technology. It is now possible to measure spatial maps of ultrasonic fields almost instantaneously, with high sensitivity and under various insonification conditions. The technology has become central to imaging in combination with beamforming techniques for applications in medical diagnostics and now in NDE for defect characterization. However, the resolution of current beamforming technology is limited. Indeed, it is not possible to observe the sub-wavelength structure of an object due to diffraction as demonstrated by Lord Rayleigh more than a century ago. This paper introduces the notion that ultrasonic measurements encode more information about the object's structure than beamforming can extract. The key to unlock this information is provided by the knowledge of the scattering mechanism that has caused the encoding in the first instance. This leads to a modern imaging strategy that goes beyond beamforming, can achieve subwavelength resolution and shares some of the underpinning physics with near field microscopy—known to break the Rayleigh criterion. These arguments are supported by experimental images showing unprecedented subwavelength resolution and tomographic reconstructions of a complex 3-D breast phantom that exhibit striking similarities with X-ray CT.

  3. An efficient method for accurate segmentation of LV in contrast-enhanced cardiac MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanarayana K., Venkata; Mitra, Abhishek; Srikrishnan, V.; Jo, Hyun Hee; Bidesi, Anup

    2016-03-01

    Segmentation of left ventricle (LV) in contrast-enhanced cardiac MR images is a challenging task because of high variability in the image intensity. This is due to a) wash-in and wash-out of the contrast agent over time and b) poor contrast around the epicardium (outer wall) region. Current approaches for segmentation of the endocardium (inner wall) usually involve application of a threshold within the region of interest, followed by refinement techniques like active contours. A limitation of this method is under-segmentation of the inner wall because of gradual loss of contrast at the wall boundary. On the other hand, the challenge in outer wall segmentation is the lack of reliable boundaries because of poor contrast. There are four main contributions in this paper to address the aforementioned issues. First, a seed image is selected using variance based approach on 4D time-frame images over which initial endocardium and epicardium is segmented. Secondly, we propose a patch based feature which overcomes the problem of gradual contrast loss for LV endocardium segmentation. Third, we propose a novel Iterative-Edge-Refinement (IER) technique for epicardium segmentation. Fourth, we propose a greedy search algorithm for propagating the initial contour segmented on seed-image across other time frame images. We have experimented our technique on five contrast-enhanced cardiac MR Datasets (4D) having a total of 1097 images. The segmentation results for all 1097 images have been visually inspected by a clinical expert and have shown good accuracy.

  4. Accurate permittivity measurements for microwave imaging via ultra-wideband removal of spurious reflectors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of microwave imaging is becoming more prevalent for detection of interior hidden defects in manufactured and packaged materials. In applications for detection of hidden moisture, microwave tomography can be used to image the material and then perform an inverse calculation to derive an estim...

  5. Detection of surface and subsurface conditions in permafrost area after wildfire by using satellite images, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, K.; Narita, K.; Saito, K.; Iwahana, G.; Sawada, Y.; Fukuda, M.

    2013-12-01

    In 1971 and 2002, large tundra fires burned a wide area that is underlain by discontinuous permafrost near the Kougarok River on the Seward Peninsula in western Alaska. Both fires destroyed the vegetation and altered the ground surface thermal conditions. The objective of this study is to understand the characteristics of the post-fire variations in the distribution and condition of the permafrost and of the changes attributed to the wildfire in the thermal and water conditions in the active layer. Especially, we tried to detect thaw depth, surface and subsurface conditions by using satellite images. Summer field observations were conducted at both burned and unburned sites in the area beginning in 2005. The average thaw depth at the burned sites in 2012 was 30% deeper than the depths at the unburned sites. The differences in thaw depth have decreased over time. Boring surveys up to a depth of 2 m conducted in 2012 confirm the presence of massive ice at both sites, which implies the possibility of thermokarst development caused by the thawing of the permafrost after wildfires. The visible satellite image for the burned site detected white-colored areas, corresponding to Clamagrostis canadensis growing areas, surrounded by green-colored areas. The thaw depth at the white-colored areas was deeper by 60% than at the surrounding burned areas. The surface roughness values were also high at these white-colored areas. There was a significant difference in the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) between the white-colored areas and the other areas. Thus, satellite images of areas after wildfires may help detect low NDVI areas that have a deeper thaw depth with the possibility of thermokarst development.

  6. Accurate localization of supernumerary mediastinal parathyroid adenomas by a combination of structural and functional imaging.

    PubMed

    Mackie, G C; Schlicht, S M

    2004-09-01

    Reoperation for refractory or recurrent hyperparathyroidism following parathyroidectomy carries the potential for increased morbidity and the possibility of failure to localize and remove the lesion intraoperatively. Reported herein are three cases demonstrating the combined use of sestamibi scintigraphy, CT and MR for accurate localization of mediastinal parathyroid adenomas.

  7. Nanoscale Subsurface Imaging via Resonant Difference-Frequency Atomic Force Ultrasonic Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, Sean A.; Cantrell, John H.; Lilehei, Peter T.

    2007-01-01

    A novel scanning probe microscope methodology has been developed that employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope, driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by the fundamental resonance frequency of the cantilever, engages the sample top surface. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave in the region defined by the cantilever tip-sample surface interaction force generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever fundamental resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create images of embedded nanoscale features.

  8. A study of P-band synthetic aperture radar applicability and performance for Mars exploration: Imaging subsurface geology and detecting shallow moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paillou, Philippe; Lasne, Yannick; Heggy, Essam; Malézieux, Jean-Marie; Ruffié, Gilles

    2006-04-01

    Over the past decade, orbital images of the Martian surface revealed key evidence about the history of the planet environment (craters, faults, paleo-lakes, and rivers), partially hidden under a widespread layer of aeolian deposits. Furthermore, several recent observations and studies support the hypothesis that water could be found in the shallow subsurface of Mars. Low-frequency synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has demonstrated its subsurface imaging capabilities on Earth, especially in arid regions. While SAR potentials for Mars exploration have already been widely discussed, we present here results of a theoretical and parametric study, based on the experience we gained from terrestrial surveys on Mars analog test sites, which evaluates the capabilities of a P-band (430 MHz) SAR for Mars exploration for both shallow subsurface geology mapping and moisture detection. We suggest that a P-band polarimetric SAR can probe the first meters of the Martian subsurface to reveal the dust-covered geology and to monitor moisture changes over large scales.

  9. A new fast accurate nonlinear medical image registration program including surface preserving regularization.

    PubMed

    Gruslys, Audrunas; Acosta-Cabronero, Julio; Nestor, Peter J; Williams, Guy B; Ansorge, Richard E

    2014-11-01

    Recently inexpensive graphical processing units (GPUs) have become established as a viable alternative to traditional CPUs for many medical image processing applications. GPUs offer the potential of very significant improvements in performance at low cost and with low power consumption. One way in which GPU programs differ from traditional CPU programs is that increasingly elaborate calculations per voxel may not impact of the overall processing time because memory accesses can dominate execution time. This paper presents a new GPU based elastic image registration program named Ezys. The Ezys image registration algorithm belongs to the wide class of diffeomorphic demons but uses surface preserving image smoothing and regularization filters designed for a GPU that would be computationally expensive on a CPU. We describe the methods used in Ezys and present results from two important neuroscience applications. Firstly inter-subject registration for transfer of anatomical labels and secondly longitudinal intra-subject registration to quantify atrophy in individual subjects. Both experiments showed that Ezys registration compares favorably with other popular elastic image registration programs. We believe Ezys is a useful tool for neuroscience and other applications, and also demonstrates the value of developing of novel image processing filters specifically designed for GPUs. PMID:24968094

  10. X-ray imaging of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials at the Diamond Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Eakins, D. E. Chapman, D. J.

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, we describe a new approach enabling study of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials using the unique combination of high-energy synchrotron X-rays, a hybrid bunch structure, and a new dynamic loading platform. We detail the design and operation of the purpose-built, portable small bore gas-gun, which was installed on the I12 high-energy beamline at the Diamond Light Source and used to drive compression waves into solid and porous metal targets. Using a hybrid bunch structure and broadband X-ray pulses of up to 300 keV, radiographic snapshots were captured during various dynamic deformation processes in cm-scale specimens, thereby contributing to a more complete understanding of the evolution of mesoscale damage. Importantly, we highlight strategies for overcoming the challenges associated with using high-energy X-rays, and suggest areas for improvement needed to advance dynamic imaging through large-scale samples of relevance to engineering scenarios. These preliminary measurements demonstrate the feasibility of probing highly transient phenomena using the presented methodology.

  11. X-ray imaging of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials at the Diamond Light Source.

    PubMed

    Eakins, D E; Chapman, D J

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a new approach enabling study of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials using the unique combination of high-energy synchrotron X-rays, a hybrid bunch structure, and a new dynamic loading platform. We detail the design and operation of the purpose-built, portable small bore gas-gun, which was installed on the I12 high-energy beamline at the Diamond Light Source and used to drive compression waves into solid and porous metal targets. Using a hybrid bunch structure and broadband X-ray pulses of up to 300 keV, radiographic snapshots were captured during various dynamic deformation processes in cm-scale specimens, thereby contributing to a more complete understanding of the evolution of mesoscale damage. Importantly, we highlight strategies for overcoming the challenges associated with using high-energy X-rays, and suggest areas for improvement needed to advance dynamic imaging through large-scale samples of relevance to engineering scenarios. These preliminary measurements demonstrate the feasibility of probing highly transient phenomena using the presented methodology.

  12. A hybrid reconstruction algorithm for fast and accurate 4D cone-beam CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Hao; Folkerts, Michael; Jiang, Steve B. E-mail: steve.jiang@UTSouthwestern.edu; Jia, Xun E-mail: steve.jiang@UTSouthwestern.edu; Zhen, Xin; Li, Yongbao; Pan, Tinsu; Cervino, Laura

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: 4D cone beam CT (4D-CBCT) has been utilized in radiation therapy to provide 4D image guidance in lung and upper abdomen area. However, clinical application of 4D-CBCT is currently limited due to the long scan time and low image quality. The purpose of this paper is to develop a new 4D-CBCT reconstruction method that restores volumetric images based on the 1-min scan data acquired with a standard 3D-CBCT protocol. Methods: The model optimizes a deformation vector field that deforms a patient-specific planning CT (p-CT), so that the calculated 4D-CBCT projections match measurements. A forward-backward splitting (FBS) method is invented to solve the optimization problem. It splits the original problem into two well-studied subproblems, i.e., image reconstruction and deformable image registration. By iteratively solving the two subproblems, FBS gradually yields correct deformation information, while maintaining high image quality. The whole workflow is implemented on a graphic-processing-unit to improve efficiency. Comprehensive evaluations have been conducted on a moving phantom and three real patient cases regarding the accuracy and quality of the reconstructed images, as well as the algorithm robustness and efficiency. Results: The proposed algorithm reconstructs 4D-CBCT images from highly under-sampled projection data acquired with 1-min scans. Regarding the anatomical structure location accuracy, 0.204 mm average differences and 0.484 mm maximum difference are found for the phantom case, and the maximum differences of 0.3–0.5 mm for patients 1–3 are observed. As for the image quality, intensity errors below 5 and 20 HU compared to the planning CT are achieved for the phantom and the patient cases, respectively. Signal-noise-ratio values are improved by 12.74 and 5.12 times compared to results from FDK algorithm using the 1-min data and 4-min data, respectively. The computation time of the algorithm on a NVIDIA GTX590 card is 1–1.5 min per phase

  13. Exploiting sparsity and field conditioning in subsurface microwave imaging of nonweak buried targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevacqua, Martina; Crocco, Lorenzo; Donato, Loreto Di; Isernia, Tommaso; Palmeri, Roberta

    2016-04-01

    An efficient inverse scattering strategy is proposed to achieve dielectric characterization of buried objects in lossy soils. The approach takes advantage of Virtual Experiments and Compressive Sensing to obtain quantitative reconstructions of nonweak targets which are nonsparse in the pixel representation basis, commonly adopted in microwave imaging. In addition, an original strategy is adopted to overcome the relevant information lack arising when data are gathered under aspect-limited configurations, such as in ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys. The proposed strategy significantly outperforms the results achievable with the "state of the art" standard approaches since it allows to achieve nearly optimal reconstructions within a linear framework and without increasing the overall computational burden. Numerical examples with simulated data are given to show the feasibility of the proposed strategy.

  14. Improved image quality in pinhole SPECT by accurate modeling of the point spread function in low magnification systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pino, Francisco; Roé, Nuria; Aguiar, Pablo; Falcon, Carles; Ros, Domènec; Pavía, Javier

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has become an important noninvasive imaging technique in small-animal research. Due to the high resolution required in small-animal SPECT systems, the spatially variant system response needs to be included in the reconstruction algorithm. Accurate modeling of the system response should result in a major improvement in the quality of reconstructed images. The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess the impact that an accurate modeling of spatially variant collimator/detector response has on image-quality parameters, using a low magnification SPECT system equipped with a pinhole collimator and a small gamma camera. Methods: Three methods were used to model the point spread function (PSF). For the first, only the geometrical pinhole aperture was included in the PSF. For the second, the septal penetration through the pinhole collimator was added. In the third method, the measured intrinsic detector response was incorporated. Tomographic spatial resolution was evaluated and contrast, recovery coefficients, contrast-to-noise ratio, and noise were quantified using a custom-built NEMA NU 4–2008 image-quality phantom. Results: A high correlation was found between the experimental data corresponding to intrinsic detector response and the fitted values obtained by means of an asymmetric Gaussian distribution. For all PSF models, resolution improved as the distance from the point source to the center of the field of view increased and when the acquisition radius diminished. An improvement of resolution was observed after a minimum of five iterations when the PSF modeling included more corrections. Contrast, recovery coefficients, and contrast-to-noise ratio were better for the same level of noise in the image when more accurate models were included. Ring-type artifacts were observed when the number of iterations exceeded 12. Conclusions: Accurate modeling of the PSF improves resolution, contrast, and recovery

  15. How Accurate Are the Fusion of Cone-Beam CT and 3-D Stereophotographic Images?

    PubMed Central

    Jayaratne, Yasas S. N.; McGrath, Colman P. J.; Zwahlen, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cone-beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and stereophotography are two of the latest imaging modalities available for three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of craniofacial structures. However, CBCT provides only limited information on surface texture. This can be overcome by combining the bone images derived from CBCT with 3-D photographs. The objectives of this study were 1) to evaluate the feasibility of integrating 3-D Photos and CBCT images 2) to assess degree of error that may occur during the above processes and 3) to identify facial regions that would be most appropriate for 3-D image registration. Methodology CBCT scans and stereophotographic images from 29 patients were used for this study. Two 3-D images corresponding to the skin and bone were extracted from the CBCT data. The 3-D photo was superimposed on the CBCT skin image using relatively immobile areas of the face as a reference. 3-D colour maps were used to assess the accuracy of superimposition were distance differences between the CBCT and 3-D photo were recorded as the signed average and the Root Mean Square (RMS) error. Principal Findings: The signed average and RMS of the distance differences between the registered surfaces were −0.018 (±0.129) mm and 0.739 (±0.239) mm respectively. The most errors were found in areas surrounding the lips and the eyes, while minimal errors were noted in the forehead, root of the nose and zygoma. Conclusions CBCT and 3-D photographic data can be successfully fused with minimal errors. When compared to RMS, the signed average was found to under-represent the registration error. The virtual 3-D composite craniofacial models permit concurrent assessment of bone and soft tissues during diagnosis and treatment planning. PMID:23185372

  16. Combining left and right palmprint images for more accurate personal identification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong; Fei, Lunke; Zhang, David

    2015-02-01

    Multibiometrics can provide higher identification accuracy than single biometrics, so it is more suitable for some real-world personal identification applications that need high-standard security. Among various biometrics technologies, palmprint identification has received much attention because of its good performance. Combining the left and right palmprint images to perform multibiometrics is easy to implement and can obtain better results. However, previous studies did not explore this issue in depth. In this paper, we proposed a novel framework to perform multibiometrics by comprehensively combining the left and right palmprint images. This framework integrated three kinds of scores generated from the left and right palmprint images to perform matching score-level fusion. The first two kinds of scores were, respectively, generated from the left and right palmprint images and can be obtained by any palmprint identification method, whereas the third kind of score was obtained using a specialized algorithm proposed in this paper. As the proposed algorithm carefully takes the nature of the left and right palmprint images into account, it can properly exploit the similarity of the left and right palmprints of the same subject. Moreover, the proposed weighted fusion scheme allowed perfect identification performance to be obtained in comparison with previous palmprint identification methods. PMID:25532174

  17. Thermal Imaging of Earth for Accurate Pointing of Deep-Space Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Gerardo; Lee, Shinhak

    2005-01-01

    A report discusses a proposal to use thermal (long-wavelength infrared) images of the Earth, as seen from spacecraft at interplanetary distances, for pointing antennas and telescopes toward the Earth for Ka-band and optical communications. The purpose is to overcome two limitations of using visible images: (1) at large Earth phase angles, the light from the Earth is too faint; and (2) performance is degraded by large albedo variations associated with weather changes. In particular, it is proposed to use images in the wavelength band of 8 to 13 m, wherein the appearance of the Earth is substantially independent of the Earth phase angle and emissivity variations are small. The report addresses tracking requirements for optical and Ka-band communications, selection of the wavelength band, available signal level versus phase angle, background noise, and signal-to-noise ratio. Tracking errors are estimated for several conceptual systems employing currently available infrared image sensors. It is found that at Mars range, it should be possible to locate the centroid of the Earth image within a noise equivalent angle (a random angular error) between 10 and 150 nanoradians at a bias error of no more than 80 nanoradians

  18. Diagnostic medicine: A comprehensive ABCDE algorithm for accurate interpretation of radiology and pathology images and data.

    PubMed

    Zioga, Christina A; Destouni, Chariklia T

    2015-01-01

    A pathway to the procedure of interpreting radiology images or pathology slides is presented. This simplified mnemonic can be used as a memory aid determining the order in which diagnosis should be approached. First, before we place the radiology image in front of the lightbox or the slide under the microscope we have to be sure that it is adequately labelled and prepared (Correct). It is also necessary to have or gather all available information concerning the patient and if possible his full medical history (A, Available Information). Once we come across the image, two fundamental questions should be answered: which part of the body does the image concern and-where applicable-if the image is adequate (B, Body). Next, we proceed to answer if we have a neoplastic tissue or not (C, Cancer). We then either form a differential diagnosis list or we reach to a final diagnosis (D, Diagnosis), which is followed by the writing of the report (E, Exhibit). These series of steps followed as an ad hoc procedure by most specialists, are important in order to achieve a complete and clear diagnosis and report, which is intended to support optimal clinical practice. This ABCDE concept is a generic standard approach which is not limited to specific specimens and can lead to faster diagnosis with less mistakes. PMID:26665217

  19. SU-E-J-23: An Accurate Algorithm to Match Imperfectly Matched Images for Lung Tumor Detection Without Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Rozario, T; Bereg, S; Chiu, T; Liu, H; Kearney, V; Jiang, L; Mao, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In order to locate lung tumors on projection images without internal markers, digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) is created and compared with projection images. Since lung tumors always move and their locations change on projection images while they are static on DRRs, a special DRR (background DRR) is generated based on modified anatomy from which lung tumors are removed. In addition, global discrepancies exist between DRRs and projections due to their different image originations, scattering, and noises. This adversely affects comparison accuracy. A simple but efficient comparison algorithm is reported. Methods: This method divides global images into a matrix of small tiles and similarities will be evaluated by calculating normalized cross correlation (NCC) between corresponding tiles on projections and DRRs. The tile configuration (tile locations) will be automatically optimized to keep the tumor within a single tile which has bad matching with the corresponding DRR tile. A pixel based linear transformation will be determined by linear interpolations of tile transformation results obtained during tile matching. The DRR will be transformed to the projection image level and subtracted from it. The resulting subtracted image now contains only the tumor. A DRR of the tumor is registered to the subtracted image to locate the tumor. Results: This method has been successfully applied to kV fluoro images (about 1000 images) acquired on a Vero (Brainlab) for dynamic tumor tracking on phantom studies. Radiation opaque markers are implanted and used as ground truth for tumor positions. Although, other organs and bony structures introduce strong signals superimposed on tumors at some angles, this method accurately locates tumors on every projection over 12 gantry angles. The maximum error is less than 2.6 mm while the total average error is 1.0 mm. Conclusion: This algorithm is capable of detecting tumor without markers despite strong background signals.

  20. Fast and accurate image recognition algorithms for fresh produce food safety sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun-Chieh; Kim, Moon S.; Chao, Kuanglin; Kang, Sukwon; Lefcourt, Alan M.

    2011-06-01

    This research developed and evaluated the multispectral algorithms derived from hyperspectral line-scan fluorescence imaging under violet LED excitation for detection of fecal contamination on Golden Delicious apples. The algorithms utilized the fluorescence intensities at four wavebands, 680 nm, 684 nm, 720 nm, and 780 nm, for computation of simple functions for effective detection of contamination spots created on the apple surfaces using four concentrations of aqueous fecal dilutions. The algorithms detected more than 99% of the fecal spots. The effective detection of feces showed that a simple multispectral fluorescence imaging algorithm based on violet LED excitation may be appropriate to detect fecal contamination on fast-speed apple processing lines.

  1. Determination of subsurface tumor localization in animal models with near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Blessington, Dana M.; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Qian; Zhou, Lanlan; Mu, Chenpeng; Intes, Xavier; Achilefu, Samuel I.; Li, Hui; Zhang, Min Z.; Zheng, Gang; Chance, Britton

    2003-07-01

    We have developed a novel imaging system for determining the localization of tumors labeled by fluorescent contrast agents and embedded several centimeters inside the highly scattered medium. This frequency-domain system utilizes the phased cancellation configuration with a goniometric probe. The instrumentation performance on the phantom test can detect 3 mm diameter sphere filled with 1 nM fluorescent dye, Indocyanine Green (ICG), and 3 cm deep inside the scattering medium with similar optical properties as human breast tissue within a 1 mm localization confidence. Mouse tumor model immersed in appropriate scattering/absorbing medium is used for animal test. Intra-tumor injection of ICG demonstrates the localization of the tumor (5 mm in diameter) submerged 3 cm deep inside the highly scattered medium with 2 mm position error. Results with NIR804-D-Glucosamide on the AR42J tumor bearing nude mouse are also presented with 3 mm localization error. The accuracy of the localization suggest that this system would be helpful to guide the clinical fine-needle biopsy for early breast cancer detection.

  2. Ground penetrating radar: 2-D and 3-D subsurface imaging of a coastal barrier spit, Long Beach, WA, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jol, Harry M.; Lawton, Don C.; Smith, Derald G.

    2003-07-01

    The ability to effectively interpret and reconstruct geomorphic environments has been significantly aided by the subsurface imaging capabilities of ground penetrating radar (GPR). The GPR method, which is based on the propagation and reflection of pulsed high frequency electromagnetic energy, provides high resolution (cm to m scale) and shallow subsurface (0-60 m), near continuous profiles of many coarser-grained deposits (sediments of low electrical conductivity). This paper presents 2-D and 3-D GPR results from an experiment on a regressive modern barrier spit at Willapa Bay, WA, USA. The medium-grained sand spit is 38 km long, up to 2-3.5 km wide, and is influenced by a 3.7-m tidal range (spring) as well as high energy longshore transport and high wave energy depositional processes. The spit has a freshwater aquifer recharged by rainfall. The GPR acquisition system used for the test was a portable, digital pulseEKKO™ system with antennae frequency ranging from 25 to 200 MHz and transmitter voltages ranging from 400 to 1000 V. Step sizes and antennae separation varied depending on the test requirements. In addition, 100-MHz antennae were used for conducting antennae orientation tests and collecting a detailed grid of data (50×50 m sampled every meter). The 2-D digital profiles were processed and plotted using pulseEKKO™ software. The 3-D datasets, after initial processing, were entered into a LANDMARK™ workstation that allowed for unique 3-D perspectives of the subsurface. To provide depth, near-surface velocity measurements were calculated from common midpoint (CMP) surveys. Results from the present study demonstrate higher resolution from the 200-MHz antennae for the top 5-6 m, whereas the 25- and 50-MHz antennae show deeper penetration to >10 m. For the study site, 100-MHz antennae provided acceptable resolution, continuity of reflections, and penetration. The dip profiles show a shingle-like accretionary depositional pattern, whereas strike profiles

  3. Accurate Enumeration of Aspergillus brasiliensis in Hair Color and Mascara by Time-Lapse Shadow Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Matsuoka, Hideaki; Saito, Mikako

    2015-01-01

    The growth of black mold (Aspergillus brasiliensis) in black-colored samples such as hair color and mascara was measured with an automatic count system based on time-lapse shadow image analysis (TSIA). A. brasiliensis suspended in a lecithin and polysorbate (LP) solution of each sample (hair color or mascara) was spread on a potato dextrose agar medium plate containing LP. The background image darkness of the agar plate could be adjusted to attain accurate colony counts. 95 colonies in hair color and 22 colonies in mascara could be automatically determined at 48 h. The accuracy of the colony counts could be confirmed from the timelapse image data. In contrast, conventional visual counting at a specified time could not determine the number of colonies or led to false colony counts.

  4. Skin surface and sub-surface strain and deformation imaging using optical coherence tomography and digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Maiti, R.; Liu, X.; Gerhardt, L. C.; Lee, Z. S.; Byers, R.; Franklin, S. E.; Lewis, R.; Matcher, S. J.; Carré, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Bio-mechanical properties of the human skin deformed by external forces at difference skin/material interfaces attract much attention in medical research. For instance, such properties are important design factors when one designs a healthcare device, i.e., the device might be applied directly at skin/device interfaces. In this paper, we investigated the bio-mechanical properties, i.e., surface strain, morphological changes of the skin layers, etc., of the human finger-pad and forearm skin as a function of applied pressure by utilizing two non-invasive techniques, i.e., optical coherence tomography (OCT) and digital image correlation (DIC). Skin deformation results of the human finger-pad and forearm skin were obtained while pressed against a transparent optical glass plate under the action of 0.5-24 N force and stretching naturally from 90° flexion to 180° full extension respectively. The obtained OCT images showed the deformation results beneath the skin surface, however, DIC images gave overall information of strain at the surface.

  5. Many Is Better Than One: An Integration of Multiple Simple Strategies for Accurate Lung Segmentation in CT Images.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhenghao; Ma, Jiejue; Zhao, Minghua; Liu, Yonghong; Feng, Yaning; Zhang, Ming; He, Lifeng; Suzuki, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Accurate lung segmentation is an essential step in developing a computer-aided lung disease diagnosis system. However, because of the high variability of computerized tomography (CT) images, it remains a difficult task to accurately segment lung tissue in CT slices using a simple strategy. Motived by the aforementioned, a novel CT lung segmentation method based on the integration of multiple strategies was proposed in this paper. Firstly, in order to avoid noise, the input CT slice was smoothed using the guided filter. Then, the smoothed slice was transformed into a binary image using an optimized threshold. Next, a region growing strategy was employed to extract thorax regions. Then, lung regions were segmented from the thorax regions using a seed-based random walk algorithm. The segmented lung contour was then smoothed and corrected with a curvature-based correction method on each axis slice. Finally, with the lung masks, the lung region was automatically segmented from a CT slice. The proposed method was validated on a CT database consisting of 23 scans, including a number of 883 2D slices (the number of slices per scan is 38 slices), by comparing it to the commonly used lung segmentation method. Experimental results show that the proposed method accurately segmented lung regions in CT slices. PMID:27635395

  6. Many Is Better Than One: An Integration of Multiple Simple Strategies for Accurate Lung Segmentation in CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Minghua; Liu, Yonghong; Feng, Yaning; Zhang, Ming; He, Lifeng; Suzuki, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Accurate lung segmentation is an essential step in developing a computer-aided lung disease diagnosis system. However, because of the high variability of computerized tomography (CT) images, it remains a difficult task to accurately segment lung tissue in CT slices using a simple strategy. Motived by the aforementioned, a novel CT lung segmentation method based on the integration of multiple strategies was proposed in this paper. Firstly, in order to avoid noise, the input CT slice was smoothed using the guided filter. Then, the smoothed slice was transformed into a binary image using an optimized threshold. Next, a region growing strategy was employed to extract thorax regions. Then, lung regions were segmented from the thorax regions using a seed-based random walk algorithm. The segmented lung contour was then smoothed and corrected with a curvature-based correction method on each axis slice. Finally, with the lung masks, the lung region was automatically segmented from a CT slice. The proposed method was validated on a CT database consisting of 23 scans, including a number of 883 2D slices (the number of slices per scan is 38 slices), by comparing it to the commonly used lung segmentation method. Experimental results show that the proposed method accurately segmented lung regions in CT slices. PMID:27635395

  7. Geo-accurate model extraction from three-dimensional image-derived point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilosek, David; Sun, Shaohui; Salvaggio, Carl

    2012-06-01

    A methodology is proposed for automatically extracting primitive models of buildings in a scene from a three-dimensional point cloud derived from multi-view depth extraction techniques. By exploring the information provided by the two-dimensional images and the three-dimensional point cloud and the relationship between the two, automated methods for extraction are presented. Using the inertial measurement unit (IMU) and global positioning system (GPS) data that accompanies the aerial imagery, the geometry is derived in a world-coordinate system so the model can be used with GIS software. This work uses imagery collected by the Rochester Institute of Technology's Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Laboratory's WASP sensor platform. The data used was collected over downtown Rochester, New York. Multiple target buildings have their primitive three-dimensional model geometry extracted using modern point-cloud processing techniques.

  8. Possibilistic-clustering-based MR brain image segmentation with accurate initialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Qingmin; Deng, Yingying; Dou, Weibei; Ruan, Su; Bloyet, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance image analysis by computer is useful to aid diagnosis of malady. We present in this paper a automatic segmentation method for principal brain tissues. It is based on the possibilistic clustering approach, which is an improved fuzzy c-means clustering method. In order to improve the efficiency of clustering process, the initial value problem is discussed and solved by combining with a histogram analysis method. Our method can automatically determine number of classes to cluster and the initial values for each class. It has been tested on a set of forty MR brain images with or without the presence of tumor. The experimental results showed that it is simple, rapid and robust to segment the principal brain tissues.

  9. Rapid and accurate developmental stage recognition of C. elegans from high-throughput image data.

    PubMed

    White, Amelia G; Cipriani, Patricia G; Kao, Huey-Ling; Lees, Brandon; Geiger, Davi; Sontag, Eduardo; Gunsalus, Kristin C; Piano, Fabio

    2010-08-01

    We present a hierarchical principle for object recognition and its application to automatically classify developmental stages of C. elegans animals from a population of mixed stages. The object recognition machine consists of four hierarchical layers, each composed of units upon which evaluation functions output a label score, followed by a grouping mechanism that resolves ambiguities in the score by imposing local consistency constraints. Each layer then outputs groups of units, from which the units of the next layer are derived. Using this hierarchical principle, the machine builds up successively more sophisticated representations of the objects to be classified. The algorithm segments large and small objects, decomposes objects into parts, extracts features from these parts, and classifies them by SVM. We are using this system to analyze phenotypic data from C. elegans high-throughput genetic screens, and our system overcomes a previous bottleneck in image analysis by achieving near real-time scoring of image data. The system is in current use in a functioning C. elegans laboratory and has processed over two hundred thousand images for lab users.

  10. Accurate micro-computed tomography imaging of pore spaces in collagen-based scaffold.

    PubMed

    Zidek, Jan; Vojtova, Lucy; Abdel-Mohsen, A M; Chmelik, Jiri; Zikmund, Tomas; Brtnikova, Jana; Jakubicek, Roman; Zubal, Lukas; Jan, Jiri; Kaiser, Jozef

    2016-06-01

    In this work we have used X-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT) as a method to observe the morphology of 3D porous pure collagen and collagen-composite scaffolds useful in tissue engineering. Two aspects of visualizations were taken into consideration: improvement of the scan and investigation of its sensitivity to the scan parameters. Due to the low material density some parts of collagen scaffolds are invisible in a μCT scan. Therefore, here we present different contrast agents, which increase the contrast of the scanned biopolymeric sample for μCT visualization. The increase of contrast of collagenous scaffolds was performed with ceramic hydroxyapatite microparticles (HAp), silver ions (Ag(+)) and silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs). Since a relatively small change in imaging parameters (e.g. in 3D volume rendering, threshold value and μCT acquisition conditions) leads to a completely different visualized pattern, we have optimized these parameters to obtain the most realistic picture for visual and qualitative evaluation of the biopolymeric scaffold. Moreover, scaffold images were stereoscopically visualized in order to better see the 3D biopolymer composite scaffold morphology. However, the optimized visualization has some discontinuities in zoomed view, which can be problematic for further analysis of interconnected pores by commonly used numerical methods. Therefore, we applied the locally adaptive method to solve discontinuities issue. The combination of contrast agent and imaging techniques presented in this paper help us to better understand the structure and morphology of the biopolymeric scaffold that is crucial in the design of new biomaterials useful in tissue engineering. PMID:27153826

  11. Image reconstruction and subsurface detection by the application of Tikhonov regularization to inverse problems in hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiminez-Rodriguez, Luis O.; Rodriguez-Diaz, Eladio; Velez-Reyes, Miguel; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2003-05-01

    Hyperspectral Remote Sensing has the potential to be used as an effective coral monitoring system from space. The problems to be addressed in hyperspectral imagery of coastal waters are related to the medium, clutter, and the object to be detected. In coastal waters the variability due to the interaction between the coast and the sea can bring significant disparity in the optical properties of the water column and the sea bottom. In terms of the medium, there is high scattering and absorption. Related to clutter we have the ocean floor, dissolved salt and gases, and dissolved organic matter. The object to be detected, in this case the coral reefs, has a weak signal, with temporal and spatial variation. In real scenarios the absorption and backscattering coefficients have spatial variation due to different sources of variability (river discharge, different depths of shallow waters, water currents) and temporal fluctuations. The retrieval of information about an object beneath some medium with high scattering and absorption properties requires the development of mathematical models and processing tools in the area of inversion, image reconstruction and detection. This paper presents the development of algorithms for retrieving information and its application to the recognition and classification of coral reefs under water with particles that provide high absorption and scattering. The data was gathered using a high resolution imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) sensor. A mathematical model that simplifies the radiative transfer equation was used to quantify the interaction between the object of interest, the medium and the sensor. Tikhonov method of regularization was used in the inversion process to estimate the bottom albedo, ρ, of the ocean floor using a priori information. The a priori information is in the form of measured spectral signatures of objects of interest, such as sand, corals, and sea grass.

  12. Three-dimensional subsurface imaging synthetic aperture radar (3D SISAR). Final report, September 22, 1993--September 22, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The concept developed under this applied research and development contract is a novel Ground Penetrating Radar system capable of remotely detecting, analyzing, and mapping buried waste containers from a mobile platform. From the testing and analysis performed to date, the 3-D SISAR has achieved the detection, accurate location, and three-dimensional imaging of buried test objects from a stand-off geometry. Tests have demonstrated that underground objects have been located to within 0.1 meter of their actual position. This work validates that the key elements of the approach are performing as anticipated. The stand-off synthetic aperture radar (SAR) methodology has been demonstrated to be a feasible approach as a remote sensing technique. The radar sensor constructed under this project is providing adequate quality data for imaging, and the matched filters have been demonstrated to provide enhanced target detection. Additional work is on-going in the area of underground propagation and scattering phenomena to provide enhanced depth performance, as the current imaging results have been limited to a few feet of depth underground.

  13. Transrectal high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation of prostate cancer: effective treatment requiring accurate imaging.

    PubMed

    Rouvière, Olivier; Souchon, Rémi; Salomir, Rarès; Gelet, Albert; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lyonnet, Denis

    2007-09-01

    Transrectal HIFU ablation has become a reasonable option for the treatment of localized prostate cancer in non-surgical patients, with 5-year disease-free survival similar to that of radiation therapy. It is also a promising salvage therapy of local recurrence after radiation therapy. These favourable results are partly due to recent improvements in prostate cancer imaging. However, further improvements are needed in patient selection, pre-operative localization of the tumor foci, assessment of the volume treated and early detection of recurrence. A better knowledge of the factors influencing the HIFU-induced tissue destruction and a better pre-operative assessment of them by imaging techniques should improve treatment outcome. Whereas prostate HIFU ablation is currently performed under transrectal ultrasound guidance, MR guidance with real-time operative monitoring of temperature will be available in the near future. If this technique will give better targeting and more uniform tissue destruction, its cost-effectiveness will have to be carefully evaluated. Finally, a recently reported synergistic effect between HIFU ablation and chemotherapy opens possibilities for treatment in high-risk or clinically advanced tumors.

  14. SU-E-J-134: An Augmented-Reality Optical Imaging System for Accurate Breast Positioning During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nazareth, D; Malhotra, H; French, S; Hoffmann, K; Merrow, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Breast radiotherapy, particularly electronic compensation, may involve large dose gradients and difficult patient positioning problems. We have developed a simple self-calibrating augmented-reality system, which assists in accurately and reproducibly positioning the patient, by displaying her live image from a single camera superimposed on the correct perspective projection of her 3D CT data. Our method requires only a standard digital camera capable of live-view mode, installed in the treatment suite at an approximately-known orientation and position (rotation R; translation T). Methods: A 10-sphere calibration jig was constructed and CT imaged to provide a 3D model. The (R,T) relating the camera to the CT coordinate system were determined by acquiring a photograph of the jig and optimizing an objective function, which compares the true image points to points calculated with a given candidate R and T geometry. Using this geometric information, 3D CT patient data, viewed from the camera's perspective, is plotted using a Matlab routine. This image data is superimposed onto the real-time patient image, acquired by the camera, and displayed using standard live-view software. This enables the therapists to view both the patient's current and desired positions, and guide the patient into assuming the correct position. The method was evaluated using an in-house developed bolus-like breast phantom, mounted on a supporting platform, which could be tilted at various angles to simulate treatment-like geometries. Results: Our system allowed breast phantom alignment, with an accuracy of about 0.5 cm and 1 ± 0.5 degree. Better resolution could be possible using a camera with higher-zoom capabilities. Conclusion: We have developed an augmented-reality system, which combines a perspective projection of a CT image with a patient's real-time optical image. This system has the potential to improve patient setup accuracy during breast radiotherapy, and could possibly be

  15. Improved highly accurate localized motion imaging for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Xiaolei; Azuma, Takashi; Sugiyama, Ryusuke; Kanazawa, Kengo; Seki, Mika; Sasaki, Akira; Takeuchi, Hideki; Fujiwara, Keisuke; Itani, Kazunori; Tamano, Satoshi; Takagi, Shu; Sakuma, Ichiro; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-07-01

    Visualizing an area subjected to high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is necessary for controlling the amount of HIFU exposure. One of the promising monitoring methods is localized motion imaging (LMI), which estimates coagulation length by detecting the change in stiffness. In this study, we improved the accuracy of our previous LMI by dynamic cross-correlation window (DCCW) and maximum vibration amount (MVA) methods. The DCCW method was used to increase the accuracy of estimating vibration amplitude, and the MVA method was employed to increase signal-noise ratio of the decrease ratio at the coagulated area. The qualitative comparison of results indicated that the two proposed methods could suppress the effect of noise. Regarding the results of the quantitative comparison, coagulation length was estimated with higher accuracy by the improved LMI method, and the root-mean-square error (RMSE) was reduced from 2.51 to 1.69 mm.

  16. A very accurate filter wheel for a large field IR imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizon, J. L.

    2010-07-01

    HAWK-I is a near-infrared imager with a relatively large field of view. Two filter wheels with 6 positions each offer a choice of 10 filters. The filters are directly in front of the detector, a mosaic of 2 × 2HAWAII 2RG 2048×2048 pixels detectors. A rather high positioning reproducibility (< 6 arc sec) is required in order to avoid any disagreement caused by subtraction of eventual fix pattern on the filters. The document describes various drive systems which have been tested in order to reach the specified positioning reproducibility. This includes an interesting dissipation free locking system combining electro magnet and permanent magnet. Every solution is discussed and the performances measured in the laboratory during a long campaign of test are exposed. We also address the choice of other critical components like the ball bearings, mounting of the filters and cooling of the wheels.

  17. Improved highly accurate localized motion imaging for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Xiaolei; Azuma, Takashi; Sugiyama, Ryusuke; Kanazawa, Kengo; Seki, Mika; Sasaki, Akira; Takeuchi, Hideki; Fujiwara, Keisuke; Itani, Kazunori; Tamano, Satoshi; Takagi, Shu; Sakuma, Ichiro; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-07-01

    Visualizing an area subjected to high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is necessary for controlling the amount of HIFU exposure. One of the promising monitoring methods is localized motion imaging (LMI), which estimates coagulation length by detecting the change in stiffness. In this study, we improved the accuracy of our previous LMI by dynamic cross-correlation window (DCCW) and maximum vibration amount (MVA) methods. The DCCW method was used to increase the accuracy of estimating vibration amplitude, and the MVA method was employed to increase signal–noise ratio of the decrease ratio at the coagulated area. The qualitative comparison of results indicated that the two proposed methods could suppress the effect of noise. Regarding the results of the quantitative comparison, coagulation length was estimated with higher accuracy by the improved LMI method, and the root-mean-square error (RMSE) was reduced from 2.51 to 1.69 mm.

  18. Narrow-band imaging with magnifying endoscopy is accurate for detecting gastric intestinal metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Savarino, Edoardo; Corbo, Marina; Dulbecco, Pietro; Gemignani, Lorenzo; Giambruno, Elisa; Mastracci, Luca; Grillo, Federica; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the predictive value of narrow-band imaging with magnifying endoscopy (NBI-ME) for identifying gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM) in unselected patients. METHODS: We prospectively evaluated consecutive patients undergoing upper endoscopy for various indications, such as epigastric discomfort/pain, anaemia, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, suspicion of peptic ulcer disease, or chronic liver diseases. Patients underwent NBI-ME, which was performed by three blinded, experienced endoscopists. In addition, five biopsies (2 antrum, 1 angulus, and 2 corpus) were taken and examined by two pathologists unaware of the endoscopic findings to determine the presence or absence of GIM. The correlation between light blue crest (LBC) appearance and histology was measured. Moreover, we quantified the degree of LBC appearance as less than 20% (+), 20%-80% (++) and more than 80% (+++) of an image field, and the semiquantitative evaluation of LBC appearance was correlated with IM percentage from the histological findings. RESULTS: We enrolled 100 (58 F/42 M) patients who were mainly referred for gastro-esophageal reflux disease/dyspepsia (46%), cancer screening/anaemia (34%), chronic liver disease (9%), and suspected celiac disease (6%); the remaining patients were referred for other indications. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection detected from the biopsies was 31%, while 67% of the patients used proton pump inhibitors. LBCs were found in the antrum of 33 patients (33%); 20 of the cases were classified as LBC+, 9 as LBC++, and 4 as LBC+++. LBCs were found in the gastric body of 6 patients (6%), with 5 of them also having LBCs in the antrum. The correlation between the appearance of LBCs and histological GIM was good, with a sensitivity of 80% (95%CI: 67-92), a specificity of 96% (95%CI: 93-99), a positive predictive value of 84% (95%CI: 73-96), a negative predictive value of 95% (95%CI: 92-98), and an accuracy of 93% (95%CI: 90-97). The

  19. Study of inspection on metal sheet with subsurface defects using linear frequency modulated ultrasound excitation thermal-wave imaging (LFM-UTWI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junyan; Gong, Jinlong; Qin, Lei; Wang, Huiming; Wang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The linear frequency modulated ultrasound excitation thermal wave imaging (LFM-UTWI) was investigated on detection of subsurface defects of metal sheet. A numerical finite element analysis is carried out to calculate thermal wave signal dependence of time by linear frequency modulated ultrasonic wave excitation. Cross-correlation operation in time domain and frequency domain are used to extract the main peak value and the corresponding delay time, respectively. Fourier transform (FT) is applied to calculate the amplitude and phase angle of harmonic component of thermal wave. Experimental results show that various deep subsurface defects are readily detected using LFM-UTWI with once excitation, and LFM-UTWI has an advantage of better defect detectability compared to ultrasound lock-in thermography (ULIT).

  20. Resonant seismic emission of subsurface objects

    SciTech Connect

    Korneev, Valeri A.

    2009-04-15

    Numerical modeling results and field data indicate that some contrasting subsurface objects (such as tunnels, caves, pipes, filled pits, and fluid-filled fractures) are capable of generating durable resonant oscillations after trapping seismic energy. These oscillations consist of surface types of circumferential waves that repeatedly propagate around the object. The resonant emission of such trapped energy occurs primarily in the form of shear body waves that can be detected by remotely placed receivers. Resonant emission reveals itself in the form of sharp resonant peaks for the late parts of the records, when all strong direct and primary reflected waves are gone. These peaks were observed in field data for a buried barrel filled with water, in 2D finite-difference modeling results, and in the exact canonical solution for a fluid-filled sphere. A computed animation for the diffraction of a plane wave upon a low-velocity elastic sphere confirms the generation of resonances by durable surface waves. Resonant emission has characteristic quasi-hyperbolic traveltime patterns on shot gathers. The inversion of these patterns can be performed in the frequency domain after muting the strong direct and primary scattered waves. Subsurface objects can be detected and imaged at a single resonance frequency without an accurate knowledge of source trigger time. The imaging of subsurface objects requires information about the shear velocity distribution in an embedding medium, which can be done interactively during inversion.

  1. Subsurface sounders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Airborne or spaceborne electromagnetic systems used to detect subsurface features are discussed. Data are given as a function of resistivity of ground material, magnetic permeability of free space, and angular frequency. It was noted that resistivities vary with the water content and temperature.

  2. Efficient and physically accurate modeling and simulation of anisoplanatic imaging through the atmosphere: a space-variant volumetric image blur method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Colin N.; Ritcey, James A.

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel method for efficient and physically-accurate modeling & simulation of anisoplanatic imaging through the atmosphere; in particular we present a new space-variant volumetric image blur algorithm. The method is based on the use of physical atmospheric meteorology models, such as vertical turbulence profiles and aerosol/molecular profiles which can be in general fully spatially-varying in 3 dimensions and also evolving in time. The space-variant modeling method relies on the metadata provided by 3D computer graphics modeling and rendering systems to decompose the image into a set of slices which can be treated in an independent but physically consistent manner to achieve simulated image blur effects which are more accurate and realistic than the homogeneous and stationary blurring methods which are commonly used today. We also present a simple illustrative example of the application of our algorithm, and show its results and performance are in agreement with the expected relative trends and behavior of the prescribed turbulence profile physical model used to define the initial spatially-varying environmental scenario conditions. We present the details of an efficient Fourier-transform-domain formulation of the SV volumetric blur algorithm and detailed algorithm pseudocode description of the method implementation and clarification of some nonobvious technical details.

  3. A fast experimental beam hardening correction method for accurate bone mineral measurements in 3D μCT imaging system.

    PubMed

    Koubar, Khodor; Bekaert, Virgile; Brasse, David; Laquerriere, Patrice

    2015-06-01

    Bone mineral density plays an important role in the determination of bone strength and fracture risks. Consequently, it is very important to obtain accurate bone mineral density measurements. The microcomputerized tomography system provides 3D information about the architectural properties of bone. Quantitative analysis accuracy is decreased by the presence of artefacts in the reconstructed images, mainly due to beam hardening artefacts (such as cupping artefacts). In this paper, we introduced a new beam hardening correction method based on a postreconstruction technique performed with the use of off-line water and bone linearization curves experimentally calculated aiming to take into account the nonhomogeneity in the scanned animal. In order to evaluate the mass correction rate, calibration line has been carried out to convert the reconstructed linear attenuation coefficient into bone masses. The presented correction method was then applied on a multimaterial cylindrical phantom and on mouse skeleton images. Mass correction rate up to 18% between uncorrected and corrected images were obtained as well as a remarkable improvement of a calculated mouse femur mass has been noticed. Results were also compared to those obtained when using the simple water linearization technique which does not take into account the nonhomogeneity in the object.

  4. Integration of multi-modality imaging for accurate 3D reconstruction of human coronary arteries in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannoglou, George D.; Chatzizisis, Yiannis S.; Sianos, George; Tsikaderis, Dimitrios; Matakos, Antonis; Koutkias, Vassilios; Diamantopoulos, Panagiotis; Maglaveras, Nicos; Parcharidis, George E.; Louridas, George E.

    2006-12-01

    In conventional intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-based three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of human coronary arteries, IVUS images are arranged linearly generating a straight vessel volume. However, with this approach real vessel curvature is neglected. To overcome this limitation an imaging method was developed based on integration of IVUS and biplane coronary angiography (BCA). In 17 coronary arteries from nine patients, IVUS and BCA were performed. From each angiographic projection, a single end-diastolic frame was selected and in each frame the IVUS catheter was interactively detected for the extraction of 3D catheter path. Ultrasound data was obtained with a sheath-based catheter and recorded on S-VHS videotape. S-VHS data was digitized and lumen and media-adventitia contours were semi-automatically detected in end-diastolic IVUS images. Each pair of contours was aligned perpendicularly to the catheter path and rotated in space by implementing an algorithm based on Frenet-Serret rules. Lumen and media-adventitia contours were interpolated through generation of intermediate contours creating a real 3D lumen and vessel volume, respectively. The absolute orientation of the reconstructed lumen was determined by back-projecting it onto both angiographic planes and comparing the projected lumen with the actual angiographic lumen. In conclusion, our method is capable of performing rapid and accurate 3D reconstruction of human coronary arteries in vivo. This technique can be utilized for reliable plaque morphometric, geometrical and hemodynamic analyses.

  5. Accurate three-dimensional virtual reconstruction of surgical field using calibrated trajectories of an image-guided medical robot

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yuanzheng; Hu, Danying; Hannaford, Blake; Seibel, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Brain tumor margin removal is challenging because diseased tissue is often visually indistinguishable from healthy tissue. Leaving residual tumor leads to decreased survival, and removing normal tissue causes life-long neurological deficits. Thus, a surgical robotics system with a high degree of dexterity, accurate navigation, and highly precise resection is an ideal candidate for image-guided removal of fluorescently labeled brain tumor cells. To image, we developed a scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) which acquires concurrent reflectance and fluorescence wide-field images at a high resolution. This miniature flexible endoscope was affixed to the arm of a RAVEN II surgical robot providing programmable motion with feedback control using stereo-pair surveillance cameras. To verify the accuracy of the three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructed surgical field, a multimodal physical-sized model of debulked brain tumor was used to obtain the 3-D locations of residual tumor for robotic path planning to remove fluorescent cells. Such reconstruction is repeated intraoperatively during margin clean-up so the algorithm efficiency and accuracy are important to the robotically assisted surgery. Experimental results indicate that the time for creating this 3-D surface can be reduced to one-third by using known trajectories of a robot arm, and the error from the reconstructed phantom is within 0.67 mm in average compared to the model design. PMID:26158071

  6. Accurate segmentation of leukocyte in blood cell images using Atanassov's intuitionistic fuzzy and interval Type II fuzzy set theory.

    PubMed

    Chaira, Tamalika

    2014-06-01

    In this paper automatic leukocyte segmentation in pathological blood cell images is proposed using intuitionistic fuzzy and interval Type II fuzzy set theory. This is done to count different types of leukocytes for disease detection. Also, the segmentation should be accurate so that the shape of the leukocytes is preserved. So, intuitionistic fuzzy set and interval Type II fuzzy set that consider either more number of uncertainties or a different type of uncertainty as compared to fuzzy set theory are used in this work. As the images are considered fuzzy due to imprecise gray levels, advanced fuzzy set theories may be expected to give better result. A modified Cauchy distribution is used to find the membership function. In intuitionistic fuzzy method, non-membership values are obtained using Yager's intuitionistic fuzzy generator. Optimal threshold is obtained by minimizing intuitionistic fuzzy divergence. In interval type II fuzzy set, a new membership function is generated that takes into account the two levels in Type II fuzzy set using probabilistic T co norm. Optimal threshold is selected by minimizing a proposed Type II fuzzy divergence. Though fuzzy techniques were applied earlier but these methods failed to threshold multiple leukocytes in images. Experimental results show that both interval Type II fuzzy and intuitionistic fuzzy methods perform better than the existing non-fuzzy/fuzzy methods but interval Type II fuzzy thresholding method performs little bit better than intuitionistic fuzzy method. Segmented leukocytes in the proposed interval Type II fuzzy method are observed to be distinct and clear.

  7. Accurate three-dimensional virtual reconstruction of surgical field using calibrated trajectories of an image-guided medical robot.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yuanzheng; Hu, Danying; Hannaford, Blake; Seibel, Eric J

    2014-10-01

    Brain tumor margin removal is challenging because diseased tissue is often visually indistinguishable from healthy tissue. Leaving residual tumor leads to decreased survival, and removing normal tissue causes life-long neurological deficits. Thus, a surgical robotics system with a high degree of dexterity, accurate navigation, and highly precise resection is an ideal candidate for image-guided removal of fluorescently labeled brain tumor cells. To image, we developed a scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) which acquires concurrent reflectance and fluorescence wide-field images at a high resolution. This miniature flexible endoscope was affixed to the arm of a RAVEN II surgical robot providing programmable motion with feedback control using stereo-pair surveillance cameras. To verify the accuracy of the three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructed surgical field, a multimodal physical-sized model of debulked brain tumor was used to obtain the 3-D locations of residual tumor for robotic path planning to remove fluorescent cells. Such reconstruction is repeated intraoperatively during margin clean-up so the algorithm efficiency and accuracy are important to the robotically assisted surgery. Experimental results indicate that the time for creating this 3-D surface can be reduced to one-third by using known trajectories of a robot arm, and the error from the reconstructed phantom is within 0.67 mm in average compared to the model design.

  8. Development of a new, robust and accurate, spectroscopic metric for scatterer size estimation in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassinopoulos, Michalis; Pitris, Costas

    2016-03-01

    The modulations appearing on the backscattering spectrum originating from a scatterer are related to its diameter as described by Mie theory for spherical particles. Many metrics for Spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography (SOCT) take advantage of this observation in order to enhance the contrast of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) images. However, none of these metrics has achieved high accuracy when calculating the scatterer size. In this work, Mie theory was used to further investigate the relationship between the degree of modulation in the spectrum and the scatterer size. From this study, a new spectroscopic metric, the bandwidth of the Correlation of the Derivative (COD) was developed which is more robust and accurate, compared to previously reported techniques, in the estimation of scatterer size. The self-normalizing nature of the derivative and the robustness of the first minimum of the correlation as a measure of its width, offer significant advantages over other spectral analysis approaches especially for scatterer sizes above 3 μm. The feasibility of this technique was demonstrated using phantom samples containing 6, 10 and 16 μm diameter microspheres as well as images of normal and cancerous human colon. The results are very promising, suggesting that the proposed metric could be implemented in OCT spectral analysis for measuring nuclear size distribution in biological tissues. A technique providing such information would be of great clinical significance since it would allow the detection of nuclear enlargement at the earliest stages of precancerous development.

  9. Is Accurate Perception of Body Image Associated with Appropriate Weight-Control Behavior among Adolescents of the Seychelles

    PubMed Central

    Alwan, Heba; Viswanathan, Bharathi; Paccaud, Fred; Bovet, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    Background. We examined body image perception and its association with reported weight-control behavior among adolescents in the Seychelles. Methods. We conducted a school-based survey of 1432 students aging 11–17 years in the Seychelles. Perception of body image was assessed using both a closed-ended question (CEQ) and Stunkard's pictorial silhouettes (SPS). Voluntary attempts to change weight were also assessed. Results. A substantial proportion of the overweight students did not consider themselves as overweight (SPS: 24%, CEQ: 34%), and a substantial proportion of the normal-weight students considered themselves as too thin (SPS: 29%, CEQ: 15%). Logistic regression analysis showed that students with an accurate weight perception were more likely to have appropriate weight-control behavior. Conclusions. We found that substantial proportions of students had an inaccurate perception of their weight and that weight perception was associated with weight-control behavior. These findings point to forces that can drive the upwards overweight trends. PMID:21603277

  10. Hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique for accurate measurement of the optical properties of horticultural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Haiyan

    Hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique is promising for determining the optical properties and quality attributes of horticultural and food products. However, considerable challenges still exist for accurate determination of spectral absorption and scattering properties from intact horticultural products. The objective of this research was, therefore, to develop and optimize hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique for accurate measurement of the optical properties of horticultural products. Monte Carlo simulations and experiments for model samples of known optical properties were performed to optimize the inverse algorithm of a single-layer diffusion model and the optical designs, for extracting the absorption (micro a) and reduced scattering (micros') coefficients from spatially-resolved reflectance profiles. The logarithm and integral data transformation and the relative weighting methods were found to greatly improve the parameter estimation accuracy with the relative errors of 10.4%, 10.7%, and 11.4% for micro a, and 6.6%, 7.0%, and 7.1% for micros', respectively. More accurate measurements of optical properties were obtained when the light beam was of Gaussian type with the diameter of less than 1 mm, and the minimum and maximum source-detector distances were 1.5 mm and 10--20 transport mean free paths, respectively. An optical property measuring prototype was built, based on the optimization results, and evaluated for automatic measurement of absorption and reduced scattering coefficients for the wavelengths of 500--1,000 nm. The instrument was used to measure the optical properties, and assess quality/maturity, of 500 'Redstar' peaches and 1039 'Golden Delicious' (GD) and 1040 'Delicious' (RD) apples. A separate study was also conducted on confocal laser scanning and scanning electron microscopic image analysis and compression test of fruit tissue specimens to measure the structural and mechanical properties of 'Golden

  11. Geophysical imaging of near subsurface layers to detect fault and fractured zones in the Tournemire Experimental Platform, France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nhu Ba, Elise, Vi; Noble, Mark; Gélis, Céline; Gesret, Alexandrine; Cabrera, Justo

    2013-04-01

    could either be detected in the upper limestone formation because of the acquisition geometry. In order to better image the clay-rock and upper limestone layers, IRSN, Mines ParisTech and UPPA conducted large-scale 2D and 3D very high-resolution seismic surveys in 2010 and 2011 from the surface in the framework of the GNR TRASSE. We analyze this new dataset with the first arrival traveltime tomography method in order to assess its potential to detect fault and fracture zones in near subsurface layers. For this purpose, we develop a new fast inversion algorithm that allows introducing a priori information and choosing a specific model parameterization. We validate our approach based on the Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique with synthetic data and present the first results of the new real dataset processing. We finally compare these results to a 2D high-resolution electrical resistivity profile acquired at the same location. These electrical resistivity data could also be considered as some a priori information in our inversion scheme.

  12. A finite rate of innovation algorithm for fast and accurate spike detection from two-photon calcium imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oñativia, Jon; Schultz, Simon R.; Dragotti, Pier Luigi

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Inferring the times of sequences of action potentials (APs) (spike trains) from neurophysiological data is a key problem in computational neuroscience. The detection of APs from two-photon imaging of calcium signals offers certain advantages over traditional electrophysiological approaches, as up to thousands of spatially and immunohistochemically defined neurons can be recorded simultaneously. However, due to noise, dye buffering and the limited sampling rates in common microscopy configurations, accurate detection of APs from calcium time series has proved to be a difficult problem. Approach. Here we introduce a novel approach to the problem making use of finite rate of innovation (FRI) theory (Vetterli et al 2002 IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 50 1417-28). For calcium transients well fit by a single exponential, the problem is reduced to reconstructing a stream of decaying exponentials. Signals made of a combination of exponentially decaying functions with different onset times are a subclass of FRI signals, for which much theory has recently been developed by the signal processing community. Main results. We demonstrate for the first time the use of FRI theory to retrieve the timing of APs from calcium transient time series. The final algorithm is fast, non-iterative and parallelizable. Spike inference can be performed in real-time for a population of neurons and does not require any training phase or learning to initialize parameters. Significance. The algorithm has been tested with both real data (obtained by simultaneous electrophysiology and multiphoton imaging of calcium signals in cerebellar Purkinje cell dendrites), and surrogate data, and outperforms several recently proposed methods for spike train inference from calcium imaging data.

  13. A finite rate of innovation algorithm for fast and accurate spike detection from two-photon calcium imaging

    PubMed Central

    Oñativia, Jon; Schultz, Simon R; Dragotti, Pier Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Objective Inferring the times of sequences of action potentials (APs) (spike trains) from neurophysiological data is a key problem in computational neuroscience. The detection of APs from two-photon imaging of calcium signals offers certain advantages over traditional electrophysiological approaches, as up to thousands of spatially and immunohistochemically defined neurons can be recorded simultaneously. However, due to noise, dye buffering and the limited sampling rates in common microscopy configurations, accurate detection of APs from calcium time series has proved to be a difficult problem. Approach Here we introduce a novel approach to the problem making use of finite rate of innovation (FRI) theory (Vetterli et al 2002 IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 50 1417–28). For calcium transients well fit by a single exponential, the problem is reduced to reconstructing a stream of decaying exponentials. Signals made of a combination of exponentially decaying functions with different onset times are a subclass of FRI signals, for which much theory has recently been developed by the signal processing community. Main results We demonstrate for the first time the use of FRI theory to retrieve the timing of APs from calcium transient time series. The final algorithm is fast, non-iterative and parallelizable. Spike inference can be performed in real-time for a population of neurons and does not require any training phase or learning to initialize parameters. Significance The algorithm has been tested with both real data (obtained by simultaneous electrophysiology and multiphoton imaging of calcium signals in cerebellar Purkinje cell dendrites), and surrogate data, and outperforms several recently proposed methods for spike train inference from calcium imaging data. PMID:23860257

  14. Deciphering the mechanisms of cellular uptake of engineered nanoparticles by accurate evaluation of internalization using imaging flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The uptake of nanoparticles (NPs) by cells remains to be better characterized in order to understand the mechanisms of potential NP toxicity as well as for a reliable risk assessment. Real NP uptake is still difficult to evaluate because of the adsorption of NPs on the cellular surface. Results Here we used two approaches to distinguish adsorbed fluorescently labeled NPs from the internalized ones. The extracellular fluorescence was either quenched by Trypan Blue or the uptake was analyzed using imaging flow cytometry. We used this novel technique to define the inside of the cell to accurately study the uptake of fluorescently labeled (SiO2) and even non fluorescent but light diffracting NPs (TiO2). Time course, dose-dependence as well as the influence of surface charges on the uptake were shown in the pulmonary epithelial cell line NCI-H292. By setting up an integrative approach combining these flow cytometric analyses with confocal microscopy we deciphered the endocytic pathway involved in SiO2 NP uptake. Functional studies using energy depletion, pharmacological inhibitors, siRNA-clathrin heavy chain induced gene silencing and colocalization of NPs with proteins specific for different endocytic vesicles allowed us to determine macropinocytosis as the internalization pathway for SiO2 NPs in NCI-H292 cells. Conclusion The integrative approach we propose here using the innovative imaging flow cytometry combined with confocal microscopy could be used to identify the physico-chemical characteristics of NPs involved in their uptake in view to redesign safe NPs. PMID:23388071

  15. Representation and Modeling of Structural Uncertainty in Subsurface Systems by Means of Image Operations in Depositional Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, O.; Caers, J.

    2014-12-01

    Structural uncertainty is an aspect of uncertainty quantification that is receiving increasing attention due to its zero-th order impact in forecasting flow in subsurface formations. Imperfect data and lack of geological understanding poses both challenges of conceptual uncertainty at the fault hierarchy level and parameter uncertainty at single fault level. Therefore structural uncertainty is often underrepresented in subsurface modeling. Unlike property uncertainty, such as for hydraulic conductivity & porosity few methods to address structural uncertainty in an integrated manner exist. A first bottleneck with modeling structural uncertainty is due to constraints posed by fault hierarchy, fault-horizon consistency, and structural-depositional environment consistency. A second bottleneck associated with structural uncertainty lies in the difficulty to construct grids compatible for flow & transport simulations, often requiring manual intervention. In this presentation, we propose to use approximate geological representations of faults in a simple Cartesian domain and to select appropriate structural models using flow proxies in the same Cartesian domain . Faults are first mapped into a Cartesian (depositional) space using an unfolding-unfaulting operation. Fault uncertainty is then modeled implicitly by increasing or decreasing the size of fault blocks in depositional space or by simple removing fault without affecting hierarchical/age relationships. Utilizing simple flow diagnostics in the Cartesian domain we select a small amount (10s) of structural models to represent flow & transport uncertainty. A case study illustrates how this approximate method compares well with the full method of modeling 100s of structural models.

  16. 3-D GPR data analysis for high-resolution imaging of shallow subsurface faults: the Mt Vettore case study (Central Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercoli, Maurizio; Pauselli, Cristina; Frigeri, Alessandro; Forte, Emanuele; Federico, Costanzo

    2014-07-01

    The activation of Late Quaternary faults in the Central Apennines (Italy) could generate earthquakes with magnitude of about 6.5, and the Monte Vettore fault system probably belongs to the same category of seismogenetic faults. Such structure has been defined `silent', because of its geological and geomorphological evidences of past activation, but the absence of historical records in the seismic catalogues to be associated with its activation. The `Piano di Castelluccio' intramountain basin, resulting from the Quaternary activity of normal faults, is characterized by a secondary fault strand highlighted by a NW-SE fault scarp: it has been already studied through palaeoseismological trenches, which highlighted evidences of Quaternary shallow faulting due to strong earthquakes, and through a 2-D ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey, showing the first geophysical signature of faulting for this site. Within the same place, a 3-D GPR volume over a 20 × 20 m area has been collected. The collection of radar echoes in three dimensions allows to map both the vertical and lateral continuity of shallow geometries of the fault zone (Fz), imaging features with high resolution, ranging from few metres to centimetres and therefore imaging also local variations at the microscale. Several geophysical markers of faulting, already highlighted on this site, have been taken as reference to plan the 3-D survey. In this paper, we provide the first 3-D subsurface imaging of an active shallow fault belonging to the Umbria-Marche Apennine highlighting the subsurface fault geometry and the stratigraphic sequence up to a depth of about 5 m. From our data, geophysical faulting signatures are clearly visible in three dimensions: diffraction hyperbolas, truncations of layers, local attenuated zones and varying dip of the layers have been detected within the Fz. The interpretation of the 3-D data set provided qualitative and quantitative geological information in addition to the fault location

  17. Co-registered Frequency-Domain Photoacoustic Radar and Ultrasound System for Subsurface Imaging in Turbid Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovlo, Edem; Lashkari, Bahman; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Frequency-domain photoacoustic radar (FD-PAR) imaging of absorbers in turbid media and their comparison and/or validation as well as co-registration with their corresponding ultrasound (US) images are demonstrated in this paper. Also presented are the FD-PAR tomography and the effects of reducing the number of scan lines (or angles) on image quality, resolution, and contrast. The FD-PAR modality uses intensity-modulated (coded) continuous wave laser sources driven by frequency-swept (chirp) waveforms. The spatial cross-correlation function between the PA response and the reference signal used for laser source modulation produces the reconstructed image. Live animal testing is demonstrated, and images of comparable signal-to-noise ratio, contrast, and spatial resolution were obtained. Various image improvement techniques to further reduce absorber spread and artifacts in the images such as normalization, filtering, and amplification were also investigated. The co-registered image produced from the combined US and PA images provides more information than both images independently. The significance of this work lies in the fact that achieving PA imaging functionality on a commercial ultrasound instrument could accelerate its clinical acceptance and use. This work is aimed at functional PA imaging of small animals in vivo.

  18. OpenHVSR: imaging the subsurface 2D/3D elastic properties through multiple HVSR modeling and inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bignardi, S.; Mantovani, A.; Abu Zeid, N.

    2016-08-01

    OpenHVSR is a computer program developed in the Matlab environment, designed for the simultaneous modeling and inversion of large Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR or H/V) datasets in order to construct 2D/3D subsurface models (topography included). The program is designed to provide a high level of interactive experience to the user and still to be of intuitive use. It implements several effective and established tools already present in the code ModelHVSR by Herak (2008), and many novel features such as: -confidence evaluation on lateral heterogeneity -evaluation of frequency dependent single parameter impact on the misfit function -relaxation of Vp/Vs bounds to allow for water table inclusion -a new cost function formulation which include a slope dependent term for fast matching of peaks, which greatly enhances convergence in case of low quality HVSR curves inversion -capability for the user of editing the subsurface model at any time during the inversion and capability to test the changes before acceptance. In what follows, we shall present many features of the program and we shall show its capabilities on both simulated and real data. We aim to supply a powerful tool to the scientific and professional community capable of handling large sets of HSVR curves, to retrieve the most from their microtremor data within a reduced amount of time and allowing the experienced scientist the necessary flexibility to integrate into the model their own geological knowledge of the sites under investigation. This is especially desirable now that microtremor testing has become routinely used. After testing the code over different datasets, both simulated and real, we finally decided to make it available in an open source format. The program is available by contacting the authors.

  19. Fast, accurate, and robust automatic marker detection for motion correction based on oblique kV or MV projection image pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Slagmolen, Pieter; Hermans, Jeroen; Maes, Frederik; Budiharto, Tom; Haustermans, Karin; Heuvel, Frank van den

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: A robust and accurate method that allows the automatic detection of fiducial markers in MV and kV projection image pairs is proposed. The method allows to automatically correct for inter or intrafraction motion. Methods: Intratreatment MV projection images are acquired during each of five treatment beams of prostate cancer patients with four implanted fiducial markers. The projection images are first preprocessed using a series of marker enhancing filters. 2D candidate marker locations are generated for each of the filtered projection images and 3D candidate marker locations are reconstructed by pairing candidates in subsequent projection images. The correct marker positions are retrieved in 3D by the minimization of a cost function that combines 2D image intensity and 3D geometric or shape information for the entire marker configuration simultaneously. This optimization problem is solved using dynamic programming such that the globally optimal configuration for all markers is always found. Translational interfraction and intrafraction prostate motion and the required patient repositioning is assessed from the position of the centroid of the detected markers in different MV image pairs. The method was validated on a phantom using CT as ground-truth and on clinical data sets of 16 patients using manual marker annotations as ground-truth. Results: The entire setup was confirmed to be accurate to around 1 mm by the phantom measurements. The reproducibility of the manual marker selection was less than 3.5 pixels in the MV images. In patient images, markers were correctly identified in at least 99% of the cases for anterior projection images and 96% of the cases for oblique projection images. The average marker detection accuracy was 1.4{+-}1.8 pixels in the projection images. The centroid of all four reconstructed marker positions in 3D was positioned within 2 mm of the ground-truth position in 99.73% of all cases. Detecting four markers in a pair of MV images

  20. Accurate modeling and inversion of electrical resistivity data in the presence of metallic infrastructure with known location and dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2015-06-26

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has been widely used in environmental applications to study processes associated with subsurface contaminants and contaminant remediation. Anthropogenic alterations in subsurface electrical conductivity associated with contamination often originate from highly industrialized areas with significant amounts of buried metallic infrastructure. The deleterious influence of such infrastructure on imaging results generally limits the utility of ERT where it might otherwise prove useful for subsurface investigation and monitoring. In this manuscript we present a method of accurately modeling the effects of buried conductive infrastructure within the forward modeling algorithm, thereby removing them from the inversion results. The method is implemented in parallel using immersed interface boundary conditions, whereby the global solution is reconstructed from a series of well-conditioned partial solutions. Forward modeling accuracy is demonstrated by comparison with analytic solutions. Synthetic imaging examples are used to investigate imaging capabilities within a subsurface containing electrically conductive buried tanks, transfer piping, and well casing, using both well casings and vertical electrode arrays as current sources and potential measurement electrodes. Results show that, although accurate infrastructure modeling removes the dominating influence of buried metallic features, the presence of metallic infrastructure degrades imaging resolution compared to standard ERT imaging. However, accurate imaging results may be obtained if electrodes are appropriately located.

  1. Looking deeper: multimodal and contrast-enhanced photoacoustic imaging offer a clearer view within tissues for more accurate diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Manojit; Kim, Chulhong

    2015-01-01

    Optical imaging modalities such as fluorescence (FL) microscopy, multiphoton microscopy, and optical coherence tomography (OCT) have been well established for high optical contrast and high spatial resolution imaging of biological tissues. However, as they are dependent on ballistic photons, these methods fail to image beyond ~1 mm or so inside biological tissue. In contrast, diffuse optical imaging (DOI), which uses multiple scattered photons for imaging, can image much deeper (up to a several centimeters) into the tissue. Unfortunately, due to strong light scattering in tissues, it fails to maintain the high resolution at the deeper imaging depth. Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) bridges this gap of imaging deeper with high resolution and contrast by combining optical excitation with acoustic detection [1]. PMID:25974914

  2. Mid-infrared thermal imaging for an effective mapping of surface materials and sub-surface detachments in mural paintings: integration of thermography and thermal quasi-reflectography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daffara, C.; Parisotto, S.; Mariotti, P. I.

    2015-06-01

    Cultural Heritage is discovering how precious is thermal analysis as a tool to improve the restoration, thanks to its ability to inspect hidden details. In this work a novel dual mode imaging approach, based on the integration of thermography and thermal quasi-reflectography (TQR) in the mid-IR is demonstrated for an effective mapping of surface materials and of sub-surface detachments in mural painting. The tool was validated through a unique application: the "Monocromo" by Leonardo da Vinci in Italy. The dual mode acquisition provided two spatially aligned dataset: the TQR image and the thermal sequence. Main steps of the workflow included: 1) TQR analysis to map surface features and 2) to estimate the emissivity; 3) projection of the TQR frame on reference orthophoto and TQR mosaicking; 4) thermography analysis to map detachments; 5) use TQR to solve spatial referencing and mosaicking for the thermal-processed frames. Referencing of thermal images in the visible is a difficult aspect of the thermography technique that the dual mode approach allows to solve in effective way. We finally obtained the TQR and the thermal maps spatially referenced to the mural painting, thus providing the restorer a valuable tool for the restoration of the detachments.

  3. An accurate scatter measurement and correction technique for cone beam breast CT imaging using scanning sampled measurement (SSM)technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinming; Shaw, Chris C.; Wang, Tianpeng; Chen, Lingyun; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Kappadath, S. Cheenu

    2006-03-01

    We developed and investigated a scanning sampled measurement (SSM) technique for scatter measurement and correction in cone beam breast CT imaging. A cylindrical polypropylene phantom (water equivalent) was mounted on a rotating table in a stationary gantry experimental cone beam breast CT imaging system. A 2-D array of lead beads, with the beads set apart about ~1 cm from each other and slightly tilted vertically, was placed between the object and x-ray source. A series of projection images were acquired as the phantom is rotated 1 degree per projection view and the lead beads array shifted vertically from one projection view to the next. A series of lead bars were also placed at the phantom edge to produce better scatter estimation across the phantom edges. Image signals in the lead beads/bars shadow were used to obtain sampled scatter measurements which were then interpolated to form an estimated scatter distribution across the projection images. The image data behind the lead bead/bar shadows were restored by interpolating image data from two adjacent projection views to form beam-block free projection images. The estimated scatter distribution was then subtracted from the corresponding restored projection image to obtain the scatter removed projection images. Our preliminary experiment has demonstrated that it is feasible to implement SSM technique for scatter estimation and correction for cone beam breast CT imaging. Scatter correction was successfully performed on all projection images using scatter distribution interpolated from SSM and restored projection image data. The resultant scatter corrected projection image data resulted in elevated CT number and largely reduced the cupping effects.

  4. Three-dimensional imaging of subsurface structural patterns using quantitative large-scale multiconfiguration electromagnetic induction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hebel, Christian; Rudolph, Sebastian; Mester, Achim; Huisman, Johan A.; Kumbhar, Pramod; Vereecken, Harry; van der Kruk, Jan

    2014-03-01

    Electromagnetic induction (EMI) systems measure the soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa), which is related to the soil water content, texture, and salinity changes. Large-scale EMI measurements often show relevant areal ECa patterns, but only few researchers have attempted to resolve vertical changes in electrical conductivity that in principle can be obtained using multiconfiguration EMI devices. In this work, we show that EMI measurements can be used to determine the lateral and vertical distribution of the electrical conductivity at the field scale and beyond. Processed ECa data for six coil configurations measured at the Selhausen (Germany) test site were calibrated using inverted electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data from a short transect with a high ECa range, and regridded using a nearest neighbor interpolation. The quantitative ECa data at each grid node were inverted using a novel three-layer inversion that uses the shuffled complex evolution (SCE) optimization and a Maxwell-based electromagnetic forward model. The obtained 1-D results were stitched together to form a 3-D subsurface electrical conductivity model that showed smoothly varying electrical conductivities and layer thicknesses, indicating the stability of the inversion. The obtained electrical conductivity distributions were validated with low-resolution grain size distribution maps and two 120 m long ERT transects that confirmed the obtained lateral and vertical large-scale electrical conductivity patterns. Observed differences in the EMI and ERT inversion results were attributed to differences in soil water content between acquisition days. These findings indicate that EMI inversions can be used to infer hydrologically active layers.

  5. Applications of seismic pattern recognition and gravity inversion techniques to obtain enhanced subsurface images of the Earth's crust under the Central Metasedimentary Belt, Grenville Province, Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Baishali; Mereu, R. F.

    2000-12-01

    Project Lithoprobe's Abitibi-Grenville transect seismic reflection lines 32 and 33 traverse the exposed Central Metasedimentary Belt (CMB) located in the Grenville province of the Precambrian Shield of Canada in southern Ontario. These seismic lines image a zone with a protracted deformational history spanning more than 300Myr. Detailed examination of the commercially processed stacked sections reveals a number of significant deficiencies in some important areas. The image quality in these zones of reduced coherency needs to be enhanced to examine specific features and their relation to the surface geology. Examination of near-vertical seismic data from Lines 32 and 33 revealed that the signal-to-noise ratio was not improved by stacking, due to misalignment of signals even after static, normal moveout corrections and residual static corrections. The presumed reason is that reflected seismic energy following long ray paths in heterogeneous media suffers from relative advances and delays in its propagation, and hence arrives at slightly different times at the receivers, tending to be poorly aligned relative to its theoretical traveltime curves. A pattern recognition (PR) method for signal enhancement followed by energy stacking in moving time windows was used in this study to improve the images in spite of misalignments. Reprocessing has refined the geometry of the reflection profiles. The objective of this paper is to use enhanced images of the seismic reflection data obtained by using a PR approach together with gravity data, using 2.5-D forward and 3-D inversion routines, to give an improved model of subsurface structure in the vicinity of lines 32 and 33. Line 32 is dominated by southeast-dipping reflectors soling into the lower crust. The listric geometry of the strong reflection packages of the CMB boundary thrust zone is interpreted to represent a crustal-scale ramp-flat geometry that accommodated northwest-directed tectonic transport of the CMB. This

  6. Analysis of polarimetric terahertz imaging for non-destructive detection of subsurface defects in wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Robert Warren

    During the manufacture of wind turbine blades, internal defects can form which negatively affect their structural integrity and can lead to premature failure. These defects are often not detected before the final installation of the blades onto wind turbines in the field. The purpose of this research was to investigate the advantages of using fully-polarimetric inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) terahertz imaging techniques for scanning the interior structure of the wind turbine blades in order to detect and identify any defects in the blade's internal structure before the blade leaves the manufacturer. Additionally, the research has investigated the use of the Euler parameter polarimetric transformation in improving defect detection, and increasing understanding of the scattering properties of such defects. Use of an image compositing algorithm and of the Euler parameters was found to enhance defect detection.

  7. Shallow subsurface imaging of the Piano di Pezza active normal fault (central Italy) by high-resolution refraction and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time domain electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, Fabio; Tulliani, Valerio; Fierro, Elisa; Sapia, Vincenzo; Civico, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    The Piano di Pezza fault is the north-westernmost segment of the >20 km long Ovindoli-Pezza active normal fault-system (central Italy). Although existing paleoseismic data document high vertical Holocene slip rates (~1 mm/yr) and a remarkable seismogenic potential of this fault, its subsurface setting and Pleistocene cumulative displacement are still poorly known. We investigated for the first time by means of high-resolution seismic and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) measurements the shallow subsurface of a key section of the Piano di Pezza fault. Our surveys cross a ~5 m-high fault scarp that was generated by repeated surface-rupturing earthquakes displacing some Late Holocene alluvial fans. We provide 2-D Vp and resistivity images which clearly show significant details of the fault structure and the geometry of the shallow basin infill material down to 50 m depth. We can estimate the dip (~50°) and the Holocene vertical displacement of the master fault (~10 m). We also recognize in the hangingwall some low-velocity/low-resistivity regions that we relate to packages of colluvial wedges derived from scarp degradation, which may represent the record of several paleo-earthquakes older than the Late Holocene events previously recognized by paleoseismic trenching. Conversely, due to the limited investigation depth of seismic and electrical tomography, the estimation of the cumulative amount of Pleistocene throw is hampered. Therefore, to increase the depth of investigation, we performed 7 TDEM measurements along the electrical profile using a 50 m loop size both in central and offset configuration. The recovered 1-D resistivity models show a good match with 2-D resistivity images in the near surface. Moreover, TDEM inversion results indicate that in the hangingwall, ~200 m away from the surface fault trace, the carbonate pre-Quaternary basement may be found at ~90-100 m depth. The combined approach of electrical and

  8. Color calibration and fusion of lens-free and mobile-phone microscopy images for high-resolution and accurate color reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yibo; Wu, Yichen; Zhang, Yun; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-01-01

    Lens-free holographic microscopy can achieve wide-field imaging in a cost-effective and field-portable setup, making it a promising technique for point-of-care and telepathology applications. However, due to relatively narrow-band sources used in holographic microscopy, conventional colorization methods that use images reconstructed at discrete wavelengths, corresponding to e.g., red (R), green (G) and blue (B) channels, are subject to color artifacts. Furthermore, these existing RGB colorization methods do not match the chromatic perception of human vision. Here we present a high-color-fidelity and high-resolution imaging method, termed “digital color fusion microscopy” (DCFM), which fuses a holographic image acquired at a single wavelength with a color-calibrated image taken by a low-magnification lens-based microscope using a wavelet transform-based colorization method. We demonstrate accurate color reproduction of DCFM by imaging stained tissue sections. In particular we show that a lens-free holographic microscope in combination with a cost-effective mobile-phone-based microscope can generate color images of specimens, performing very close to a high numerical-aperture (NA) benchtop microscope that is corrected for color distortions and chromatic aberrations, also matching the chromatic response of human vision. This method can be useful for wide-field imaging needs in telepathology applications and in resource-limited settings, where whole-slide scanning microscopy systems are not available. PMID:27283459

  9. Color calibration and fusion of lens-free and mobile-phone microscopy images for high-resolution and accurate color reproduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yibo; Wu, Yichen; Zhang, Yun; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-01-01

    Lens-free holographic microscopy can achieve wide-field imaging in a cost-effective and field-portable setup, making it a promising technique for point-of-care and telepathology applications. However, due to relatively narrow-band sources used in holographic microscopy, conventional colorization methods that use images reconstructed at discrete wavelengths, corresponding to e.g., red (R), green (G) and blue (B) channels, are subject to color artifacts. Furthermore, these existing RGB colorization methods do not match the chromatic perception of human vision. Here we present a high-color-fidelity and high-resolution imaging method, termed "digital color fusion microscopy" (DCFM), which fuses a holographic image acquired at a single wavelength with a color-calibrated image taken by a low-magnification lens-based microscope using a wavelet transform-based colorization method. We demonstrate accurate color reproduction of DCFM by imaging stained tissue sections. In particular we show that a lens-free holographic microscope in combination with a cost-effective mobile-phone-based microscope can generate color images of specimens, performing very close to a high numerical-aperture (NA) benchtop microscope that is corrected for color distortions and chromatic aberrations, also matching the chromatic response of human vision. This method can be useful for wide-field imaging needs in telepathology applications and in resource-limited settings, where whole-slide scanning microscopy systems are not available. PMID:27283459

  10. Color calibration and fusion of lens-free and mobile-phone microscopy images for high-resolution and accurate color reproduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yibo; Wu, Yichen; Zhang, Yun; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-01-01

    Lens-free holographic microscopy can achieve wide-field imaging in a cost-effective and field-portable setup, making it a promising technique for point-of-care and telepathology applications. However, due to relatively narrow-band sources used in holographic microscopy, conventional colorization methods that use images reconstructed at discrete wavelengths, corresponding to e.g., red (R), green (G) and blue (B) channels, are subject to color artifacts. Furthermore, these existing RGB colorization methods do not match the chromatic perception of human vision. Here we present a high-color-fidelity and high-resolution imaging method, termed "digital color fusion microscopy" (DCFM), which fuses a holographic image acquired at a single wavelength with a color-calibrated image taken by a low-magnification lens-based microscope using a wavelet transform-based colorization method. We demonstrate accurate color reproduction of DCFM by imaging stained tissue sections. In particular we show that a lens-free holographic microscope in combination with a cost-effective mobile-phone-based microscope can generate color images of specimens, performing very close to a high numerical-aperture (NA) benchtop microscope that is corrected for color distortions and chromatic aberrations, also matching the chromatic response of human vision. This method can be useful for wide-field imaging needs in telepathology applications and in resource-limited settings, where whole-slide scanning microscopy systems are not available.

  11. Experimental study on the application of a compressed-sensing (CS) algorithm to dental cone-beam CT (CBCT) for accurate, low-dose image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jieun; Cho, Hyosung; Je, Uikyu; Lee, Minsik; Kim, Hyojeong; Hong, Daeki; Park, Yeonok; Lee, Seonhwa; Cho, Heemoon; Choi, Sungil; Koo, Yangseo

    2013-03-01

    In practical applications of three-dimensional (3D) tomographic imaging, there are often challenges for image reconstruction from insufficient data. In computed tomography (CT); for example, image reconstruction from few views would enable fast scanning with reduced doses to the patient. In this study, we investigated and implemented an efficient reconstruction method based on a compressed-sensing (CS) algorithm, which exploits the sparseness of the gradient image with substantially high accuracy, for accurate, low-dose dental cone-beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction. We applied the algorithm to a commercially-available dental CBCT system (Expert7™, Vatech Co., Korea) and performed experimental works to demonstrate the algorithm for image reconstruction in insufficient sampling problems. We successfully reconstructed CBCT images from several undersampled data and evaluated the reconstruction quality in terms of the universal-quality index (UQI). Experimental demonstrations of the CS-based reconstruction algorithm appear to show that it can be applied to current dental CBCT systems for reducing imaging doses and improving the image quality.

  12. Color calibration and fusion of lens-free and mobile-phone microscopy images for high-resolution and accurate color reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yibo; Wu, Yichen; Zhang, Yun; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-06-01

    Lens-free holographic microscopy can achieve wide-field imaging in a cost-effective and field-portable setup, making it a promising technique for point-of-care and telepathology applications. However, due to relatively narrow-band sources used in holographic microscopy, conventional colorization methods that use images reconstructed at discrete wavelengths, corresponding to e.g., red (R), green (G) and blue (B) channels, are subject to color artifacts. Furthermore, these existing RGB colorization methods do not match the chromatic perception of human vision. Here we present a high-color-fidelity and high-resolution imaging method, termed “digital color fusion microscopy” (DCFM), which fuses a holographic image acquired at a single wavelength with a color-calibrated image taken by a low-magnification lens-based microscope using a wavelet transform-based colorization method. We demonstrate accurate color reproduction of DCFM by imaging stained tissue sections. In particular we show that a lens-free holographic microscope in combination with a cost-effective mobile-phone-based microscope can generate color images of specimens, performing very close to a high numerical-aperture (NA) benchtop microscope that is corrected for color distortions and chromatic aberrations, also matching the chromatic response of human vision. This method can be useful for wide-field imaging needs in telepathology applications and in resource-limited settings, where whole-slide scanning microscopy systems are not available.

  13. Large-format imaging plate and weissenberg camera for accurate protein crystallographic data collection using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Sakabe, K; Sasaki, K; Watanabe, N; Suzuki, M; Wang, Z G; Miyahara, J; Sakabe, N

    1997-05-01

    Off-line and on-line protein data-collection systems using an imaging plate as a detector are described and their components reported. The off-line scanner IPR4080 was developed for a large-format imaging plate ;BASIII' of dimensions 400 x 400 mm and 400 x 800 mm. The characteristics of this scanner are a dynamic range of 10(5) photons pixel(-1), low background noise and high sensitivity. A means of reducing electronic noise and a method for finding the origin of the noise are discussed in detail. A dedicated screenless Weissenberg camera matching IPR4080 with synchrotron radiation was developed and installed on beamline BL6B at the Photon Factory. This camera can attach one or two sheets of 400 x 800 mm large-format imaging plate inside the film cassette by evacuation. The positional reproducibility of the imaging plate on the cassette is so good that the data can be processed by batch job. Data of 93% completeness up to 1.6 A resolution were collected on a single axis rotation and the value of R(merge) becomes 4% from a tetragonal lysozyme crystal using a set of two imaging-plate sheets. Comparing two types of imaging plates, the signal-to-noise ratio of the ST-VIP-type imaging plate is 25% better than that of the BASIII-type imaging plate for protein data collection using 1.0 and 0.7 A X-rays. A new on-line protein data-collection system with imaging plates is specially designed to use synchrotron radiation X-rays at maximum efficiency.

  14. Accurate quantification of local changes for carotid arteries in 3D ultrasound images using convex optimization-based deformable registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jieyu; Qiu, Wu; Yuan, Jing; Fenster, Aaron; Chiu, Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Registration of longitudinally acquired 3D ultrasound (US) images plays an important role in monitoring and quantifying progression/regression of carotid atherosclerosis. We introduce an image-based non-rigid registration algorithm to align the baseline 3D carotid US with longitudinal images acquired over several follow-up time points. This algorithm minimizes the sum of absolute intensity differences (SAD) under a variational optical-flow perspective within a multi-scale optimization framework to capture local and global deformations. Outer wall and lumen were segmented manually on each image, and the performance of the registration algorithm was quantified by Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and mean absolute distance (MAD) of the outer wall and lumen surfaces after registration. In this study, images for 5 subjects were registered initially by rigid registration, followed by the proposed algorithm. Mean DSC generated by the proposed algorithm was 79:3+/-3:8% for lumen and 85:9+/-4:0% for outer wall, compared to 73:9+/-3:4% and 84:7+/-3:2% generated by rigid registration. Mean MAD of 0:46+/-0:08mm and 0:52+/-0:13mm were generated for lumen and outer wall respectively by the proposed algorithm, compared to 0:55+/-0:08mm and 0:54+/-0:11mm generated by rigid registration. The mean registration time of our method per image pair was 143+/-23s.

  15. Accurate and automated image segmentation of 3D optical coherence tomography data suffering from low signal-to-noise levels.

    PubMed

    Su, Rong; Ekberg, Peter; Leitner, Michael; Mattsson, Lars

    2014-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has proven to be a useful tool for investigating internal structures in ceramic tapes, and the technique is expected to be important for roll-to-roll manufacturing. However, because of high scattering in ceramic materials, noise and speckles deteriorate the image quality, which makes automated quantitative measurements of internal interfaces difficult. To overcome this difficulty we present in this paper an innovative image analysis approach based on volumetric OCT data. The engine in the analysis is a 3D image processing and analysis algorithm. It is dedicated to boundary segmentation and dimensional measurement in volumetric OCT images, and offers high accuracy, efficiency, robustness, subpixel resolution, and a fully automated operation. The method relies on the correlation property of a physical interface and effectively eliminates pixels caused by noise and speckles. The remaining pixels being stored are the ones confirmed to be related to the target interfaces. Segmentation of tilted and curved internal interfaces separated by ∼10  μm in the Z direction is demonstrated. The algorithm also extracts full-field top-view intensity maps of the target interfaces for high-accuracy measurements in the X and Y directions. The methodology developed here may also be adopted in other similar 3D imaging and measurement technologies, e.g., ultrasound imaging, and for various materials. PMID:25606743

  16. Solar subsurface flows from local helioseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junwei; Chen, Ruizhu

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we review recent progresses in subsurface flows obtained from two local helioseismology methods: time-distance helioseismology and ring-diagram analysis. We review results in the following four topics: flows beneath sunspots and active regions, supergranular subsurface flows, shallow meridional flow and its variations with solar cycles, and meridional circulation in the deep solar interior. Despite recent advancements in methodology, modeling, and observations, many questions are still to be answered and a few topics remain controversial. More efforts, especially in numerical modeling and accurate interpretation of acoustic wave travel-time measurements, are needed to improve the derivations of subsurface flows.

  17. Feasibility study for application of the compressed-sensing framework to interior computed tomography (ICT) for low-dose, high-accurate dental x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Je, U. K.; Cho, H. M.; Cho, H. S.; Park, Y. O.; Park, C. K.; Lim, H. W.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, G. A.; Park, S. Y.; Woo, T. H.; Choi, S. I.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a new/next-generation type of CT examinations, the so-called Interior Computed Tomography (ICT), which may presumably lead to dose reduction to the patient outside the target region-of-interest (ROI), in dental x-ray imaging. Here an x-ray beam from each projection position covers only a relatively small ROI containing a target of diagnosis from the examined structure, leading to imaging benefits such as decreasing scatters and system cost as well as reducing imaging dose. We considered the compressed-sensing (CS) framework, rather than common filtered-backprojection (FBP)-based algorithms, for more accurate ICT reconstruction. We implemented a CS-based ICT algorithm and performed a systematic simulation to investigate the imaging characteristics. Simulation conditions of two ROI ratios of 0.28 and 0.14 between the target and the whole phantom sizes and four projection numbers of 360, 180, 90, and 45 were tested. We successfully reconstructed ICT images of substantially high image quality by using the CS framework even with few-view projection data, still preserving sharp edges in the images.

  18. Imaging subsurface migration of dissolved CO2 in a shallow aquifer using 3-D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auken, Esben; Doetsch, Joseph; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Christiansen, Anders Vest; Gazoty, Aurélie; Cahill, Aaron Graham; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2014-02-01

    Contamination of groundwater by leaking CO2 is a potential risk of carbon sequestration. With the help of a field experiment in western Denmark, we investigate to what extent surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can detect and image dissolved CO2 in a shallow aquifer. For this purpose, we injected CO2 at a depth of 5 and 10 m and monitored its migration using 320 electrodes on a 126 m × 25 m surface grid. A fully automated acquisition system continuously collected data and uploaded it into an online database. The large amount of data allows for time-series analysis using geostatistical techniques for noise estimation and data interpolation to compensate for intermittent instrument failure. We estimate a time-dependent noise level for each ERT configuration, taking data variation and measurement frequency into account.

  19. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: An Accurate Image Simulation Method for High-Order Laue Zone Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Can-Ying; Zeng, Song-Jun; Liu, Hong-Rong; Yang, Qi-Bin

    2008-05-01

    A completely different formulation for simulation of the high order Laue zone (HOLZ) diffractions is derived. It refers to the new method, i.e. the Taylor series (TS) method. To check the validity and accuracy of the TS method, we take polyvinglidene fluoride (PVDF) crystal as an example to calculate the exit wavefunction by the conventional multi-slice (CMS) method and the TS method. The calculated results show that the TS method is much more accurate than the CMS method and is independent of the slice thicknesses. Moreover, the pure first order Laue zone wavefunction by the TS method can reflect the major potential distribution of the first reciprocal plane.

  20. Earthquake Risk Analysis and Science for Peace in Western/ Kashmir Himalayas - A Road Map for Transnational Subsurface Earth Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandon, K.

    2006-12-01

    In light of immense human tragedy caused by the Kashmir earthquake of October 8, 2005, there is a need for transnational science for the assessment of future earthquake risks and understanding continental dynamics within the Western and Kashmir Himalayas. One can approach such a test to our society through understanding what causes these earthquakes in Kashmir in the first place in a rigorous manner and also try to determine how often do they happen in Western/ Kashmir Himalayas. Geophysical measurements (passive source, active source seismology, magnetotelluric measurements, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR)) are imaging techniques for earth's deeper as well as shallow structure. When such imaging techniques are used on scales of earth's crust and beyond (~30 km to 100 km) and also on near the surface (~10 to100 meters) of the earth, it helps us understand both the processes for the origin and frequency of the earthquakes. Here, I will only concentrate on a road map for planning regional reflection seismology (active source seismology) surveys within the context of National Science Foundation (NSF) led Science for Peace Initiative primarily involving USA, India, and Pakistan. The proposal here is to initiate shallow and deep active source surveys in mega-population cities in Punjab and adjoining areas in Western Himalayas on either side of the political boundaries of India and Pakistan as separate ventures for first few years but a start for future collaboration. Once the core scientific teams are formed involving Indian, Pakistani, American, and scientists from other nations too, then the Indus Kohistan Seismic Zone in the Kashmir Himalayas should be the target for detailed geophysical and geological investigations. The idea presented here was first formed for the NSF sponsored International Karakoram-Kashmir Workshop that was supposed to be held in Islamabad (Pakistan), May 2006 with around 100 invitees from 10 nations for forming joint scientific initiatives

  1. Fast and accurate calibration of an X-ray imager to an electromagnetic tracking system for interventional cardiac procedures.

    PubMed

    Lang, Andrew; Stanton, Douglas; Parthasarathy, Vijay; Jain, Ameet

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease affects millions of Americans each year. Interventional guidance systems are being developed as treatment options for some of the more delicate procedures, including targeted stem cell therapy. As advanced systems for such types of interventional guidance are being developed, electromagnetic (EM) tracking is coming in demand to perform navigation. To use this EM tracking technology, a calibration is necessary to register the tracker to the imaging system. In this paper we investigate the calibration of an X-ray imaging system to EM tracking. Two specially designed calibration phantoms have been designed for this purpose, each having a rigidly attached EM sensor. From a clinical usability point-of-view, we propose to divide this calibration problem into two steps: i) in initial calibration of the EM sensor to the phantom design using an EM tracked needle to trace out grooves in the phantom surface and ii) segmentation from X-ray images and 3D reconstruction of beads embedded in the phantom in a known geometric pattern. Combining these two steps yields and X-ray-to-EM calibration accuracy of less than 1 mm when overlaying an EM tracked needle on X-ray images.

  2. Topology representing network enables highly accurate classification of protein images taken by cryo electron-microscope without masking.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Toshihiko; Iwasaki, Kenji; Sato, Chikara

    2003-09-01

    In single-particle analysis, a three-dimensional (3-D) structure of a protein is constructed using electron microscopy (EM). As these images are very noisy in general, the primary process of this 3-D reconstruction is the classification of images according to their Euler angles, the images in each classified group then being averaged to reduce the noise level. In our newly developed strategy of classification, we introduce a topology representing network (TRN) method. It is a modified method of a growing neural gas network (GNG). In this system, a network structure is automatically determined in response to the images input through a growing process. After learning without a masking procedure, the GNG creates clear averages of the inputs as unit coordinates in multi-dimensional space, which are then utilized for classification. In the process, connections are automatically created between highly related units and their positions are shifted where the inputs are distributed in multi-dimensional space. Consequently, several separated groups of connected units are formed. Although the interrelationship of units in this space are not easily understood, we succeeded in solving this problem by converting the unit positions into two-dimensional (2-D) space, and by further optimizing the unit positions with the simulated annealing (SA) method. In the optimized 2-D map, visualization of the connections of units provided rich information about clustering. As demonstrated here, this method is clearly superior to both the multi-variate statistical analysis (MSA) and the self-organizing map (SOM) as a classification method and provides a first reliable classification method which can be used without masking for very noisy images. PMID:14572474

  3. A methodology to accurately quantify patellofemoral cartilage contact kinematics by combining 3D image shape registration and cine-PC MRI velocity data.

    PubMed

    Borotikar, Bhushan S; Sipprell, William H; Wible, Emily E; Sheehan, Frances T

    2012-04-01

    Patellofemoral osteoarthritis and its potential precursor patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) are common, costly, and debilitating diseases. PFPS has been shown to be associated with altered patellofemoral joint mechanics; however, an actual variation in joint contact stresses has not been established due to challenges in accurately quantifying in vivo contact kinematics (area and location). This study developed and validated a method for tracking dynamic, in vivo cartilage contact kinematics by combining three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, cine-phase contrast (CPC), multi-plane cine (MPC), and 3D high-resolution static imaging. CPC and MPC data were acquired from 12 healthy volunteers while they actively extended/flexed their knee within the MRI scanner. Since no gold standard exists for the quantification of in vivo dynamic cartilage contact kinematics, the accuracy of tracking a single point (patellar origin relative to the femur) represented the accuracy of tracking the kinematics of an entire surface. The accuracy was determined by the average absolute error between the PF kinematics derived through registration of MPC images to a static model and those derived through integration of the CPC velocity data. The accuracy ranged from 0.47 mm to 0.77 mm for the patella and femur and from 0.68 mm to 0.86 mm for the patellofemoral joint. For purely quantifying joint kinematics, CPC remains an analytically simpler and more accurate (accuracy <0.33 mm) technique. However, for application requiring the tracking of an entire surface, such as quantifying cartilage contact kinematics, this combined imaging approach produces accurate results with minimal operator intervention.

  4. A methodology to accurately quantify patellofemoral cartilage contact kinematics by combining 3D image shape registration and cine-PC MRI velocity data

    PubMed Central

    Borotikar, Bhushan S.; Sipprell, William H.; Wible, Emily E.; Sheehan, Frances T.

    2012-01-01

    Patellofemoral osteoarthritis and its potential precursor patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) are common, costly, and debilitating diseases. PFPS has been shown to be associated with altered patellofemoral joint mechanics; however, an actual variation in joint contact stresses has not been established due to challenges in accurately quantifying in vivo contact kinematics (area and location). This study developed and validated a method for tracking dynamic, in vivo cartilage contact kinematics by combining three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, cine-phase contrast (CPC), multi-plane cine (MPC), and 3D high-resolution static imaging. CPC and MPC data were acquired from 12 healthy volunteers while they actively extended/flexed their knee within the MRI scanner. Since no gold standard exists for the quantification of in vivo dynamic cartilage contact kinematics, the accuracy of tracking a single point (patellar origin relative to the femur) represented the accuracy of tracking the kinematics of an entire surface. The accuracy was determined by the average absolute error between the PF kinematics derived through registration of MPC images to a static model and those derived through integration of the CPC velocity data. The accuracy ranged from 0.47mm–0.77mm for the patella and femur and 0.68mm–0.86 mm for the patellofemoral joint. For purely quantifying joint kinematics, CPC remains an analytically simpler and more accurate (accuracy < 0.33mm) technique. However, for application requiring the tracking of an entire surface, such as quantifying cartilage contact kinematics, this combined imaging approach produces accurate results with minimal operator intervention. PMID:22284428

  5. A binary image reconstruction technique for accurate determination of the shape and location of metal objects in x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Xing, Lei

    2010-01-01

    The presence of metals in patients causes streaking artifacts in X-ray CT and has been recognized as a problem that limits various applications of CT imaging. Accurate localization of metals in CT images is a critical step for metal artifacts reduction in CT imaging and many practical applications of CT images. The purpose of this work is to develop a method of auto-determination of the shape and location of metallic object(s) in the image space. The proposed method is based on the fact that when a metal object is present in a patient, a CT image can be divided into two prominent components: high density metal and low density normal tissues. This prior knowledge is incorporated into an objective function as the regularization term whose role is to encourage the solution to take a form of two intensity levels. A computer simulation study and four experimental studies are performed to evaluate the proposed approach. Both simulation and experimental studies show that the presented algorithm works well even in the presence of complicated shaped metal objects. For a hexagonally shaped metal embedded in a water phantom, for example, it is found that the accuracy of metal reconstruction is within sub-millimeter.

  6. Accurate kinematic measurement at interfaces between dissimilar materials using conforming finite-element-based digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Ran; Moussawi, Ali; Lubineau, Gilles; Pan, Bing

    2016-06-01

    Digital image correlation (DIC) is now an extensively applied full-field measurement technique with subpixel accuracy. A systematic drawback of this technique, however, is the smoothening of the kinematic field (e.g., displacement and strains) across interfaces between dissimilar materials, where the deformation gradient is known to be large. This can become an issue when a high level of accuracy is needed, for example, in the interfacial region of composites or joints. In this work, we described the application of global conforming finite-element-based DIC technique to obtain precise kinematic fields at interfaces between dissimilar materials. Speckle images from both numerical and actual experiments processed by the described global DIC technique better captured sharp strain gradient at the interface than local subset-based DIC.

  7. Analysis of algebraic reconstruction technique for accurate imaging of gas temperature and concentration based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui-Hui, Xia; Rui-Feng, Kan; Jian-Guo, Liu; Zhen-Yu, Xu; Ya-Bai, He

    2016-06-01

    An improved algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) combined with tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy(TDLAS) is presented in this paper for determining two-dimensional (2D) distribution of H2O concentration and temperature in a simulated combustion flame. This work aims to simulate the reconstruction of spectroscopic measurements by a multi-view parallel-beam scanning geometry and analyze the effects of projection rays on reconstruction accuracy. It finally proves that reconstruction quality dramatically increases with the number of projection rays increasing until more than 180 for 20 × 20 grid, and after that point, the number of projection rays has little influence on reconstruction accuracy. It is clear that the temperature reconstruction results are more accurate than the water vapor concentration obtained by the traditional concentration calculation method. In the present study an innovative way to reduce the error of concentration reconstruction and improve the reconstruction quality greatly is also proposed, and the capability of this new method is evaluated by using appropriate assessment parameters. By using this new approach, not only the concentration reconstruction accuracy is greatly improved, but also a suitable parallel-beam arrangement is put forward for high reconstruction accuracy and simplicity of experimental validation. Finally, a bimodal structure of the combustion region is assumed to demonstrate the robustness and universality of the proposed method. Numerical investigation indicates that the proposed TDLAS tomographic algorithm is capable of detecting accurate temperature and concentration profiles. This feasible formula for reconstruction research is expected to resolve several key issues in practical combustion devices. Project supported by the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61205151), the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Project of China (Grant

  8. Analysis of algebraic reconstruction technique for accurate imaging of gas temperature and concentration based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui-Hui, Xia; Rui-Feng, Kan; Jian-Guo, Liu; Zhen-Yu, Xu; Ya-Bai, He

    2016-06-01

    An improved algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) combined with tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy(TDLAS) is presented in this paper for determining two-dimensional (2D) distribution of H2O concentration and temperature in a simulated combustion flame. This work aims to simulate the reconstruction of spectroscopic measurements by a multi-view parallel-beam scanning geometry and analyze the effects of projection rays on reconstruction accuracy. It finally proves that reconstruction quality dramatically increases with the number of projection rays increasing until more than 180 for 20 × 20 grid, and after that point, the number of projection rays has little influence on reconstruction accuracy. It is clear that the temperature reconstruction results are more accurate than the water vapor concentration obtained by the traditional concentration calculation method. In the present study an innovative way to reduce the error of concentration reconstruction and improve the reconstruction quality greatly is also proposed, and the capability of this new method is evaluated by using appropriate assessment parameters. By using this new approach, not only the concentration reconstruction accuracy is greatly improved, but also a suitable parallel-beam arrangement is put forward for high reconstruction accuracy and simplicity of experimental validation. Finally, a bimodal structure of the combustion region is assumed to demonstrate the robustness and universality of the proposed method. Numerical investigation indicates that the proposed TDLAS tomographic algorithm is capable of detecting accurate temperature and concentration profiles. This feasible formula for reconstruction research is expected to resolve several key issues in practical combustion devices. Project supported by the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61205151), the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Project of China (Grant

  9. SU-E-J-08: A Hybrid Three Dimensional Registration Framework for Image-Guided Accurate Radiotherapy System ARTS-IGRT

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q; Pei, X; Cao, R; Hu, L; Wu, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to develop a registration framework and method based on the software platform of ARTS-IGRT and implement in C++ based on ITK libraries to register CT images and CBCT images. ARTS-IGRT was a part of our self-developed accurate radiation planning system ARTS. Methods: Mutual information (MI) registration treated each voxel equally. Actually, different voxels even having same intensity should be treated differently in the registration procedure. According to their importance values calculated from self-information, a similarity measure was proposed which combined the spatial importance of a voxel with MI (S-MI). For lung registration, Firstly, a global alignment method was adopted to minimize the margin error and achieve the alignment of these two images on the whole. The result obtained at the low resolution level was then interpolated to become the initial conditions for the higher resolution computation. Secondly, a new similarity measurement S-MI was established to quantify how close the two input image volumes were to each other. Finally, Demons model was applied to compute the deformable map. Results: Registration tools were tested for head-neck and lung images and the average region was 128*128*49. The rigid registration took approximately 2 min and converged 10% faster than traditional MI algorithm, the accuracy reached 1mm for head-neck images. For lung images, the improved symmetric Demons registration process was completed in an average of 5 min using a 2.4GHz dual core CPU. Conclusion: A registration framework was developed to correct patient's setup according to register the planning CT volume data and the daily reconstructed 3D CBCT data. The experiments showed that the spatial MI algorithm can be adopted for head-neck images. The improved Demons deformable registration was more suitable to lung images, and rigid alignment should be applied before deformable registration to get more accurate result. Supported by

  10. Magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging is more accurate for determination of horizontal extent of early gastric cancers than chromoendoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Asada-Hirayama, Itsuko; Kodashima, Shinya; Sakaguchi, Yoshiki; Ono, Satoshi; Niimi, Keiko; Mochizuki, Satoshi; Tsuji, Yosuke; Minatsuki, Chihiro; Shichijo, Satoki; Matsuzaka, Keisuke; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Fukayama, Masashi; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Although magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging (ME-NBI) is reported to be useful for delineating the horizontal extent of early gastric cancers (EGCs), there are few reports which have objectively demonstrated the superiority of ME-NBI over chromoendoscopy with indigo carmine for this purpose. We conducted an exploratory comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of both modalities for the delineation of EGCs using prospectively collected data, and clarified the clinicopathological features related to inaccurate evaluation of the horizontal extent of EGCs. Patients and methods: EGCs were assigned to the oral narrow-band imaging (O-NBI) group or the oral chromoendoscopy (O-CE) group before endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). The oral border was observed according to assignment, and the anal border with the other modality. The horizontal extent of the tumor was evaluated by each modality and a marking dot was placed on the visible delineation line. After ESD, the marking dots were identified pathologically and defined as “accurate evaluation” if they were located within 1 mm of the pathological tumor border. We compared the rate of accurate evaluation of ME-NBI and chromoendoscopy, and analyzed the clinicopathological features related to inaccurate evaluation. Results: A total of 113 marking dots evaluated by ME-NBI and 116 evaluated by chromoendoscopy were analyzed. The rate of accurate evaluation by ME-NBI was significantly higher than that by chromoendoscopy (89.4 % vs 75.9 %, P = 0.0071). The EGCs with flat borders and large EGCs were significantly related to inaccurate evaluation using ME-NBI. There were no significant factors related to inaccurate evaluation with chromoendoscopy. Conclusions: The accurate evaluation rate of the horizontal extent of EGCs by ME-NBI is significantly higher than that by chromoendoscopy. Study registration: UMIN000007641 PMID:27556080

  11. High-throughput image analysis of tumor spheroids: a user-friendly software application to measure the size of spheroids automatically and accurately.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjin; Wong, Chung; Vosburgh, Evan; Levine, Arnold J; Foran, David J; Xu, Eugenia Y

    2014-07-08

    The increasing number of applications of three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroids as an in vitro model for drug discovery requires their adaptation to large-scale screening formats in every step of a drug screen, including large-scale image analysis. Currently there is no ready-to-use and free image analysis software to meet this large-scale format. Most existing methods involve manually drawing the length and width of the imaged 3D spheroids, which is a tedious and time-consuming process. This study presents a high-throughput image analysis software application - SpheroidSizer, which measures the major and minor axial length of the imaged 3D tumor spheroids automatically and accurately; calculates the volume of each individual 3D tumor spheroid; then outputs the results in two different forms in spreadsheets for easy manipulations in the subsequent data analysis. The main advantage of this software is its powerful image analysis application that is adapted for large numbers of images. It provides high-throughput computation and quality-control workflow. The estimated time to process 1,000 images is about 15 min on a minimally configured laptop, or around 1 min on a multi-core performance workstation. The graphical user interface (GUI) is also designed for easy quality control, and users can manually override the computer results. The key method used in this software is adapted from the active contour algorithm, also known as Snakes, which is especially suitable for images with uneven illumination and noisy background that often plagues automated imaging processing in high-throughput screens. The complimentary "Manual Initialize" and "Hand Draw" tools provide the flexibility to SpheroidSizer in dealing with various types of spheroids and diverse quality images. This high-throughput image analysis software remarkably reduces labor and speeds up the analysis process. Implementing this software is beneficial for 3D tumor spheroids to become a routine in vitro model

  12. An Improved Approach for Accurate and Efficient Measurement of Common Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness in Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Zhang, Wei; Guan, Xin; Bai, Yu; Jia, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The intima-media thickness (IMT) of common carotid artery (CCA) can serve as an important indicator for the assessment of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). In this paper an improved approach for automatic IMT measurement with low complexity and high accuracy is presented. 100 ultrasound images from 100 patients were tested with the proposed approach. The ground truth (GT) of the IMT was manually measured for six times and averaged, while the automatic segmented (AS) IMT was computed by the algorithm proposed in this paper. The mean difference ± standard deviation between AS and GT IMT is 0.0231 ± 0.0348 mm, and the correlation coefficient between them is 0.9629. The computational time is 0.3223 s per image with MATLAB under Windows XP on an Intel Core 2 Duo CPU E7500 @2.93 GHz. The proposed algorithm has the potential to achieve real-time measurement under Visual Studio. PMID:25215292

  13. Accurate D-bar Reconstructions of Conductivity Images Based on a Method of Moment with Sinc Basis

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    Planar D-bar integral equation is one of the inverse scattering solution methods for complex problems including inverse conductivity considered in applications such as Electrical impedance tomography (EIT). Recently two different methodologies are considered for the numerical solution of D-bar integrals equation, namely product integrals and multigrid. The first one involves high computational burden and the other one suffers from low convergence rate (CR). In this paper, a novel high speed moment method based using the sinc basis is introduced to solve the two-dimensional D-bar integral equation. In this method, all functions within D-bar integral equation are first expanded using the sinc basis functions. Then, the orthogonal properties of their products dissolve the integral operator of the D-bar equation and results a discrete convolution equation. That is, the new moment method leads to the equation solution without direct computation of the D-bar integral. The resulted discrete convolution equation maybe adapted to a suitable structure to be solved using fast Fourier transform. This allows us to reduce the order of computational complexity to as low as O (N2log N). Simulation results on solving D-bar equations arising in EIT problem show that the proposed method is accurate with an ultra-linear CR. PMID:24696808

  14. Accurate D-bar Reconstructions of Conductivity Images Based on a Method of Moment with Sinc Basis.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    Planar D-bar integral equation is one of the inverse scattering solution methods for complex problems including inverse conductivity considered in applications such as Electrical impedance tomography (EIT). Recently two different methodologies are considered for the numerical solution of D-bar integrals equation, namely product integrals and multigrid. The first one involves high computational burden and the other one suffers from low convergence rate (CR). In this paper, a novel high speed moment method based using the sinc basis is introduced to solve the two-dimensional D-bar integral equation. In this method, all functions within D-bar integral equation are first expanded using the sinc basis functions. Then, the orthogonal properties of their products dissolve the integral operator of the D-bar equation and results a discrete convolution equation. That is, the new moment method leads to the equation solution without direct computation of the D-bar integral. The resulted discrete convolution equation maybe adapted to a suitable structure to be solved using fast Fourier transform. This allows us to reduce the order of computational complexity to as low as O (N (2)log N). Simulation results on solving D-bar equations arising in EIT problem show that the proposed method is accurate with an ultra-linear CR.

  15. Fully integrated surface-subsurface flow modelling of groundwater-lake interaction in an esker aquifer: Model verification with stable isotopes and airborne thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala-aho, Pertti; Rossi, Pekka M.; Isokangas, Elina; Kløve, Bjørn

    2015-03-01

    Water resources management is moving towards integration, where groundwater (GW), surface water (SW) and related aquatic ecosystems are considered one management unit. Because of this paradigm shift, more information and new tools are needed to understand the ecologically relevant fluxes (water, heat, solutes) at the GW-SW interface. This study estimated the magnitude, temporal variability and spatial distribution of water fluxes at the GW-SW interface using a fully integrated hydrological modelling code (HydroGeoSphere). The model domain comprised a hydrologically complex esker aquifer in Northern Finland with interconnected lakes, streams and wetlands. The model was calibrated in steady state for soil hydraulic conductivity and anisotropy and it reproduced the hydraulic head and stream baseflow distribution throughout the aquifer in both transient and steady state modes. In a novel analysis, model outputs were compared with the locations and magnitude of GW discharge to lakes estimated using field techniques. Spatial occurrence of GW-lake interaction was interpreted from airborne thermal infrared imaging. The observed GW inflow locations coincided well with model nodes showing positive exchange flux between surface and subsurface domains. Order of magnitude of simulated GW inflow to lakes showed good agreement with flux values calculated with a stable water isotope technique. Finally, time series of GW inflow, extracted as model output, showed moderate annual variability and demonstrated different interannual inflow changes in seepage and drainage lakes of the aquifer. Overall, this study demonstrated the ability of a fully integrated numerical model to reproduce observed GW-SW exchange processes in a complex unconfined aquifer system. The model-based estimates obtained for GW influx magnitude and spatial distribution, along with information on GW quality can be used to estimate ecologically relevant fluxes in future water resources management.

  16. Self-referenced, accurate and sensitive optical frequency comb spectroscopy with a virtually imaged phased array spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Kowzan, Grzegorz; Lee, Kevin F; Paradowska, Magdalena; Borkowski, Mateusz; Ablewski, Piotr; Wójtewicz, Szymon; Stec, Kamila; Lisak, Daniel; Fermann, Martin E; Trawiński, Ryszard S; Masłowski, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    We present a cavity-enhanced direct optical frequency comb spectroscopy system with a virtually imaged phased array (VIPA) spectrometer and either a dither or a Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) locking scheme used for stable transmission of the comb through the cavity. A self-referenced scheme for frequency axis calibration is shown along with an analysis of its accuracy. A careful comparison between both locking schemes is performed based on near-IR measurements of the carbon monoxide ν=3←0 band P branch transitions in a gas sample with known composition. The noise-equivalent absorptions (NEA) for the PDH and dither schemes are 9.9×10(-10) cm(-1) and 5.3×10(-9) cm(-1), respectively.

  17. MR diffusion-weighted imaging-based subcutaneous tumour volumetry in a xenografted nude mouse model using 3D Slicer: an accurate and repeatable method

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zelan; Chen, Xin; Huang, Yanqi; He, Lan; Liang, Cuishan; Liang, Changhong; Liu, Zaiyi

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and repeatable measurement of the gross tumour volume(GTV) of subcutaneous xenografts is crucial in the evaluation of anti-tumour therapy. Formula and image-based manual segmentation methods are commonly used for GTV measurement but are hindered by low accuracy and reproducibility. 3D Slicer is open-source software that provides semiautomatic segmentation for GTV measurements. In our study, subcutaneous GTVs from nude mouse xenografts were measured by semiautomatic segmentation with 3D Slicer based on morphological magnetic resonance imaging(mMRI) or diffusion-weighted imaging(DWI)(b = 0,20,800 s/mm2) . These GTVs were then compared with those obtained via the formula and image-based manual segmentation methods with ITK software using the true tumour volume as the standard reference. The effects of tumour size and shape on GTVs measurements were also investigated. Our results showed that, when compared with the true tumour volume, segmentation for DWI(P = 0.060–0.671) resulted in better accuracy than that mMRI(P < 0.001) and the formula method(P < 0.001). Furthermore, semiautomatic segmentation for DWI(intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC = 0.9999) resulted in higher reliability than manual segmentation(ICC = 0.9996–0.9998). Tumour size and shape had no effects on GTV measurement across all methods. Therefore, DWI-based semiautomatic segmentation, which is accurate and reproducible and also provides biological information, is the optimal GTV measurement method in the assessment of anti-tumour treatments. PMID:26489359

  18. A robust and accurate center-frequency estimation (RACE) algorithm for improving motion estimation performance of SinMod on tagged cardiac MR images without known tagging parameters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Wang, Jie; Xu, Xiangyang; Song, Enmin; Wang, Qian; Jin, Renchao; Hung, Chih-Cheng; Fei, Baowei

    2014-11-01

    A robust and accurate center-frequency (CF) estimation (RACE) algorithm for improving the performance of the local sine-wave modeling (SinMod) method, which is a good motion estimation method for tagged cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) images, is proposed in this study. The RACE algorithm can automatically, effectively and efficiently produce a very appropriate CF estimate for the SinMod method, under the circumstance that the specified tagging parameters are unknown, on account of the following two key techniques: (1) the well-known mean-shift algorithm, which can provide accurate and rapid CF estimation; and (2) an original two-direction-combination strategy, which can further enhance the accuracy and robustness of CF estimation. Some other available CF estimation algorithms are brought out for comparison. Several validation approaches that can work on the real data without ground truths are specially designed. Experimental results on human body in vivo cardiac data demonstrate the significance of accurate CF estimation for SinMod, and validate the effectiveness of RACE in facilitating the motion estimation performance of SinMod.

  19. Conceptual design and algorithm evaluation for a very accurate imaging star tracker for deep- space optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Donald E.; Boone, Bradley G.

    2002-12-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is planning high data rate optical communications for future deep space missions. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) is responding by developing concepts for implementing optical communications terminals that are more compact and lightweight than heretofore. An essential requirement for these long-range optical links is a high-precision pointing and tracking system. Focal plane array (FPA)-based star trackers that enable open-loop pointing and tracking are necessary. Spacecraft attitude instabilities, emphemeris errors, tracking sensor noise, clock errors, and mechanical misalignments are among the error sources that must be minimized and compensated for. To achieve this JHU/APL has developed an imaging star tracker concept using redundant multi-aperture FPA's symmetrically disposed about the laser downlink. Centroid estimation and pattern matching techniques account for aberration and motion errors. Robustness, sensitivity to detection thresholds, field-of-view sizing, number of stars per frame, missed detections, false alarms, and position biases, as well as stellar catalog size and star selection, will be described. Finally the conceptual design of a frame-to-frame integration method and sensor fusion algorithm (such as a Kalman filter) will be considered. The goal is to achieve a system pointing and tracking error significantly less than 1 μrad.

  20. Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Borns, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier.

  1. A Protein-Corona-Free T(1)-T(2) Dual-Modal Contrast Agent for Accurate Imaging of Lymphatic Tumor Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zijian; Liu, Hanyu; Chi, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jiahe; Wang, Lirong; Sun, Chengjie; Chen, Zhong; Gao, Jinhao

    2015-12-30

    Precise nodal staging is particularly important to guide the treatments and determine the prognosis for cancer patients. However, it is still challenging to noninvasively and precisely detect in-depth tumor metastasis in lymph nodes (LNs) because of the small size and high potential of obtaining pseudopositive results. Herein, we report the rational design of a T1-T2 dual-modal MRI contrast agent for accurate imaging of tumor metastasis in LNs using gadolinium-embedded iron oxide nanoplates (GdIOP). The GdIOP were modulated with suitable size in vivo through surface functionalization by zwitterionic dopamine sulfonate (ZDS) molecules. The efficient uptake of GdIOP@ZDS nanoparticles through drainage effect because of the presence of large amount of macrophages and dendritic cells generates both T1 and T2 contrasts in LNs. In contrast, the low uptake of protein-corona-free GdIOP@ZDS nanoparticles by melanoma B16 tumor cells promises pseudocontrast imaging of potential tumor metastasis in LNs. The combination of T1 and T2 imaging modalities allows self-confirmed detection of a metastatic tumor with about 1.2 mm in the minimal dimension in LNs, which is close to the detection limit of submilimeter level of MRI scans. This study provides an efficient and noninvasive strategy to detect tumor metastasis in LNs with greatly enhanced diagnostic accuracy. PMID:26645884

  2. Integrated well log and 2-D seismic data interpretation to image the subsurface stratigraphy and structure in north-eastern Bornu (Chad) basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isyaku, Aminu A.; Rust, Derek; Teeuw, Richard; Whitworth, Malcolm

    2016-09-01

    Structural and stratigraphic mapping within the Bornu Basin in north east Nigeria was commonly carried out using traditional field geological methods. However, such traditional approaches remain inadequate in the semi-arid region characterised by topographically flat areas and lack of continuous bedrock outcrops that are mostly concealed beneath sand cover. Previous studies in the north-eastern part of the basin carried out using ditch cuttings from few wells and disconnected seismic data were largely inadequate and the resulting stratigraphic analyses were more often generalised. This paper presents an integrated structural and stratigraphic study of the basin using combined subsurface geophysical datasets. A Combined Log Pattern (CLP) method is a well log analysis, which utilises various well log data including gamma ray, resistivity, bulk density and sonic logs to identify lithology and stratigraphic boundaries of subsurface formations. This method is applied to constrain the subsurface stratigraphy of the north-eastern part of the Bornu Basin bordering the Lake Chad. In addition to qualitative combined well log analysis, the time-depth relationship of the sonic log and seismic data was quantitatively determined by tying a well with an intersecting seismic section to validate the stratigraphic facies horizons identified. Four well log facies and their environments of deposition were characterised from the combined well log analysis of the different log types. It is discovered that the Cretaceous basement structural features controlled the deposition of overlying formations in the basin. Without intact core data, the shallower wells were discovered to have bottomed over subsurface horst features while deeper wells penetrated into the basal facies contained mainly within the grabens. Main subsurface structural lineaments in the area include NW-SE, NE-SW and NNW-SSE trending faults, which mainly formed the horst and graben features. Some stratigraphic formations

  3. EIAGRID: In-field optimization of seismic data acquisition by real-time subsurface imaging using a remote GRID computing environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilmann, B. Z.; Vallenilla Ferrara, A. M.

    2009-04-01

    The constant growth of contaminated sites, the unsustainable use of natural resources, and, last but not least, the hydrological risk related to extreme meteorological events and increased climate variability are major environmental issues of today. Finding solutions for these complex problems requires an integrated cross-disciplinary approach, providing a unified basis for environmental science and engineering. In computer science, grid computing is emerging worldwide as a formidable tool allowing distributed computation and data management with administratively-distant resources. Utilizing these modern High Performance Computing (HPC) technologies, the GRIDA3 project bundles several applications from different fields of geoscience aiming to support decision making for reasonable and responsible land use and resource management. In this abstract we present a geophysical application called EIAGRID that uses grid computing facilities to perform real-time subsurface imaging by on-the-fly processing of seismic field data and fast optimization of the processing workflow. Even though, seismic reflection profiling has a broad application range spanning from shallow targets in a few meters depth to targets in a depth of several kilometers, it is primarily used by the hydrocarbon industry and hardly for environmental purposes. The complexity of data acquisition and processing poses severe problems for environmental and geotechnical engineering: Professional seismic processing software is expensive to buy and demands large experience from the user. In-field processing equipment needed for real-time data Quality Control (QC) and immediate optimization of the acquisition parameters is often not available for this kind of studies. As a result, the data quality will be suboptimal. In the worst case, a crucial parameter such as receiver spacing, maximum offset, or recording time turns out later to be inappropriate and the complete acquisition campaign has to be repeated. The

  4. Robust and accurate transient light transport decomposition via convolutional sparse coding.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xuemei; Deng, Yue; Lin, Xing; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai; Barsi, Christopher; Raskar, Ramesh

    2014-06-01

    Ultrafast sources and detectors have been used to record the time-resolved scattering of light propagating through macroscopic scenes. In the context of computational imaging, decomposition of this transient light transport (TLT) is useful for applications, such as characterizing materials, imaging through diffuser layers, and relighting scenes dynamically. Here, we demonstrate a method of convolutional sparse coding to decompose TLT into direct reflections, inter-reflections, and subsurface scattering. The method relies on the sparsity composition of the time-resolved kernel. We show that it is robust and accurate to noise during the acquisition process.

  5. Wave-Based Subsurface Guide Star

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K

    2011-07-26

    Astronomical or optical guide stars are either natural or artificial point sources located above the Earth's atmosphere. When imaged from ground-based telescopes, they are distorted by atmospheric effects. Knowing the guide star is a point source, the atmospheric distortions may be estimated and, deconvolved or mitigated in subsequent imagery. Extending the guide star concept to wave-based measurement systems to include acoustic, seismo-acoustic, ultrasonic, and radar, a strong artificial scatterer (either acoustic or electromagnetic) may be buried or inserted, or a pre-existing or natural sub-surface point scatterer may be identified, imaged, and used as a guide star to determine properties of the sub-surface volume. That is, a data collection is performed on the guide star and the sub-surface environment reconstructed or imaged using an optimizer assuming the guide star is a point scatterer. The optimization parameters are the transceiver height and bulk sub-surface background refractive index. Once identified, the refractive index may be used in subsequent reconstructions of sub-surface measurements. The wave-base guide star description presented in this document is for a multimonostatic ground penetrating radar (GPR) but is applicable to acoustic, seismo-acoustic, and ultrasonic measurement systems operating in multimonostatic, multistatic, multibistatic, etc., modes.

  6. Imaging beneath the skin of large tropical rivers: System morphodynamics of the Fly and Beni Rivers revealed by novel sub-surface sonar, deep coring, and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, R. E.; Grenfell, M.; Lauer, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Tropical rivers dominate Earth's fluvial fluxes for water, carbon, and mineral sediment. They are characterized by large channels and floodplains, old system histories, prolonged periods of flooding, and a clay-dominated sediment flux. However, the underlying bed & floodplain strata are poorly understood. Available data commonly stem from skin-deep approaches such as GIS analysis of imagery, shallow sampling & topographic profiling during lower river stages. Given the large temporal & spatial scales, new approaches are needed to see below lag deposits on mobile sandy beds & deep into expansive floodbasins. Furthermore, such data are needed to test whether we can interpret large tropical river morphology using analogies to small temperate systems. Systems in a dynamic state of response to sea level rise or an increase/contrast in sediment load would provide especially valuable insight. Last August we conducted a field campaign along the Fly and Strickland Rivers in Papua New Guinea (discharge ~5,350 CMS) and this September we investigated the Beni River in Northern Bolivia (discharge ~3,500 CMS). Results were obtained using a novel measurement method: a high-power (>4kW) dual-frequency SyQwest sub-bottom profiler customized to best image 10-20m below the river/lake bed in shallow water. We were able to distinguish sandy deposits from harder clay and silt lenses and also collected bed grab samples to verify our sonar results. Deep borehole samples (5-15m), bank samples, and push cores confirmed observations from the sonar profiling. We simultaneously collected side-scan sonar imagery plus DGPS records of water/bed elevations that could be used to parameterize numerical models. We have now analyzed these results in some detail. Findings for the Fly River include: 1) The prevalence of hard clay beneath the bed of the Lower Fly River and many locations along the Strickland River, retarding migration; 2) Unusual bed morphology along the lower Middle Fly River, where the

  7. Recommendations for accurate CT diagnosis of suspected acute aortic syndrome (AAS)—on behalf of the British Society of Cardiovascular Imaging (BSCI)/British Society of Cardiovascular CT (BSCCT)

    PubMed Central

    Nicol, Edward; Morgan-Hughes, Gareth; Roobottom, Carl A; Roditi, Giles; Hamilton, Mark C K; Bull, Russell K; Pugliese, Franchesca; Williams, Michelle C; Stirrup, James; Padley, Simon; Taylor, Andrew; Davies, L Ceri; Bury, Roger; Harden, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and timely assessment of suspected acute aortic syndrome is crucial in this life-threatening condition. Imaging with CT plays a central role in the diagnosis to allow expedited management. Diagnosis can be made using locally available expertise with optimized scanning parameters, making full use of recent advances in CT technology. Each imaging centre must optimize their protocols to allow accurate diagnosis, to optimize radiation dose and in particular to reduce the risk of false-positive diagnosis that may simulate disease. This document outlines the principles for the acquisition of motion-free imaging of the aorta in this context. PMID:26916280

  8. Ceramic subsurface marker prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, C.E.

    1985-05-02

    The client submitted 5 sets of porcelain and stoneware subsurface (radioactive site) marker prototypes (31 markers each set). The following were determined: compressive strength, thermal shock resistance, thermal crazing resistance, alkali resistance, color retention, and chemical resistance.

  9. Subsurface Microbiology and Biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, Jim K.; Fletcher, Madilyn

    2001-05-01

    Jim contributed a chapter to this book, in addition to co-editing it with Madilyn Fletcher. Fredrickson, J. K., and M. Fletcher. (eds.) 2001 Subsurface Microbiology and Biogeochemistry. Wiley-Liss, Inc., New York.

  10. Electrical Subsurface Grounding Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Calle

    2000-11-01

    The purpose and objective of this analysis is to determine the present grounding requirements of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) subsurface electrical system and to verify that the actual grounding system and devices satisfy the requirements.

  11. Deep subsurface microbial processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1995-01-01

    Information on the microbiology of the deep subsurface is necessary in order to understand the factors controlling the rate and extent of the microbially catalyzed redox reactions that influence the geophysical properties of these environments. Furthermore, there is an increasing threat that deep aquifers, an important drinking water resource, may be contaminated by man's activities, and there is a need to predict the extent to which microbial activity may remediate such contamination. Metabolically active microorganisms can be recovered from a diversity of deep subsurface environments. The available evidence suggests that these microorganisms are responsible for catalyzing the oxidation of organic matter coupled to a variety of electron acceptors just as microorganisms do in surface sediments, but at much slower rates. The technical difficulties in aseptically sampling deep subsurface sediments and the fact that microbial processes in laboratory incubations of deep subsurface material often do not mimic in situ processes frequently necessitate that microbial activity in the deep subsurface be inferred through nonmicrobiological analyses of ground water. These approaches include measurements of dissolved H2, which can predict the predominant microbially catalyzed redox reactions in aquifers, as well as geochemical and groundwater flow modeling, which can be used to estimate the rates of microbial processes. Microorganisms recovered from the deep subsurface have the potential to affect the fate of toxic organics and inorganic contaminants in groundwater. Microbial activity also greatly influences 1 the chemistry of many pristine groundwaters and contributes to such phenomena as porosity development in carbonate aquifers, accumulation of undesirably high concentrations of dissolved iron, and production of methane and hydrogen sulfide. Although the last decade has seen a dramatic increase in interest in deep subsurface microbiology, in comparison with the study of

  12. Site Recommendation Subsurface Layout

    SciTech Connect

    C.L. Linden

    2000-06-28

    The purpose of this analysis is to develop a Subsurface Facility layout that is capable of accommodating the statutory capacity of 70,000 metric tons of uranium (MTU), as well as an option to expand the inventory capacity, if authorized, to 97,000 MTU. The layout configuration also requires a degree of flexibility to accommodate potential changes in site conditions or program requirements. The objective of this analysis is to provide a conceptual design of the Subsurface Facility sufficient to support the development of the Subsurface Facility System Description Document (CRWMS M&O 2000e) and the ''Emplacement Drift System Description Document'' (CRWMS M&O 2000i). As well, this analysis provides input to the Site Recommendation Consideration Report. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Evaluation of the existing facilities and their integration into the Subsurface Facility design. (2) Identification and incorporation of factors influencing Subsurface Facility design, such as geological constraints, thermal loading, constructibility, subsurface ventilation, drainage control, radiological considerations, and the Test and Evaluation Facilities. (3) Development of a layout showing an available area in the primary area sufficient to support both the waste inventories and individual layouts showing the emplacement area required for 70,000 MTU and, if authorized, 97,000 MTU.

  13. Subsurface Contamination Control

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Yuan

    2001-12-12

    There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a

  14. Subsurface Contamination Control

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Yuan

    2001-11-16

    There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a

  15. Radar Soundings of the Subsurface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picardi, Giovanni; Plaut, Jeffrey J.; Biccari, Daniela; Bombaci, Ornella; Calabrese, Diego; Cartacci, Marco; Cicchetti, Andrea; Clifford, Stephen M.; Edenhofer, Peter; Farrell, William M.; Federico, Costanzo; Frigeri, Alessandro; Gurnett, Donald A.; Hagfors, Tor; Heggy, Essam; Herique, Alain; Huff, Richard L.; Ivanov, Anton B.; Johnson, William T. K.; Jordan, Rolando L.; Kirchner, Donald L.; Kofman, Wlodek; Leuschen, Carlton J.; Nielsen, Erling; Orosei, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    The martian subsurface has been probed to kilometer depths by the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding instrument aboard the Mars Express orbiter. Signals penetrate the polar layered deposits, probably imaging the base of the deposits. Data from the northern lowlands of Chryse Planitia have revealed a shallowly buried quasi-circular structure about 250 kilometers in diameter that is interpreted to be an impact basin. In addition, a planar reflector associated with the basin structure may indicate the presence of a low-loss deposit that is more than 1 kilometer thick.

  16. Best Practice -- Subsurface Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Clark Scott

    2010-03-01

    These best practices for Subsurface Survey processes were developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and later shared and formalized by a sub-committee, under the Electrical Safety Committee of EFCOG. The developed best practice is best characterized as a Tier II (enhanced) survey process for subsurface investigations. A result of this process has been an increase in the safety and lowering of overall cost, when utility hits and their related costs are factored in. The process involves improving the methodology and thoroughness of the survey and reporting processes; or improvement in tool use rather than in the tools themselves. It is hoped that the process described here can be implemented at other sites seeking to improve their Subsurface Investigation results with little upheaval to their existing system.

  17. A high frequency electromagnetic impedance imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Hung-Wen; Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex

    2003-01-15

    Non-invasive, high resolution geophysical mapping of the shallow subsurface is necessary for delineation of buried hazardous wastes, detecting unexploded ordinance, verifying and monitoring of containment or moisture contents, and other environmental applications. Electromagnetic (EM) techniques can be used for this purpose since electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity are representative of the subsurface media. Measurements in the EM frequency band between 1 and 100 MHz are very important for such applications, because the induction number of many targets is small and the ability to determine the subsurface distribution of both electrical properties is required. Earlier workers were successful in developing systems for detecting anomalous areas, but quantitative interpretation of the data was difficult. Accurate measurements are necessary, but difficult to achieve for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface. We are developing a broadband non-invasive method for accurately mapping the electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of the shallow subsurface using an EM impedance approach similar to the MT exploration technique. Electric and magnetic sensors were tested to ensure that stray EM scattering is minimized and the quality of the data collected with the high-frequency impedance (HFI) system is good enough to allow high-resolution, multi-dimensional imaging of hidden targets. Additional efforts are being made to modify and further develop existing sensors and transmitters to improve the imaging capability and data acquisition efficiency.

  18. The Serpentinite Subsurface Microbiome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrenk, M. O.; Nelson, B. Y.; Brazelton, W. J.

    2011-12-01

    Microbial habitats hosted in ultramafic rocks constitute substantial, globally-distributed portions of the subsurface biosphere, occurring both on the continents and beneath the seafloor. The aqueous alteration of ultramafics, in a process known as serpentinization, creates energy rich, high pH conditions, with low concentrations of inorganic carbon which place fundamental constraints upon microbial metabolism and physiology. Despite their importance, very few studies have attempted to directly access and quantify microbial activities and distributions in the serpentinite subsurface microbiome. We have initiated microbiological studies of subsurface seeps and rocks at three separate continental sites of serpentinization in Newfoundland, Italy, and California and compared these results to previous analyses of the Lost City field, near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In all cases, microbial cell densities in seep fluids are extremely low, ranging from approximately 100,000 to less than 1,000 cells per milliliter. Culture-independent analyses of 16S rRNA genes revealed low-diversity microbial communities related to Gram-positive Firmicutes and hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria. Interestingly, unlike Lost City, there has been little evidence for significant archaeal populations in the continental subsurface to date. Culturing studies at the sites yielded numerous alkaliphilic isolates on nutrient-rich agar and putative iron-reducing bacteria in anaerobic incubations, many of which are related to known alkaliphilic and subsurface isolates. Finally, metagenomic data reinforce the culturing results, indicating the presence of genes associated with organotrophy, hydrogen oxidation, and iron reduction in seep fluid samples. Our data provide insight into the lifestyles of serpentinite subsurface microbial populations and targets for future quantitative exploration using both biochemical and geochemical approaches.

  19. Terrestrial Subsurface Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2015-10-15

    The Earth’s crust is a solid cool layer that overlays the mantle, with a varying thickness of between 30-50 km on continental plates, and 5-10 km on oceanic plates. Continental crust is composed of a variety of igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks that weather and re-form over geologic cycles lasting millions to billions of years. At the crust surface, these weathered minerals and organic material combine to produce a variety of soils types that provide suitable habitats and niches for abundant microbial diversity (see Chapter 4). Beneath this soil zone is the subsurface. Once thought to be relatively free of microorganisms, recent estimates have calculated that between 1016-1017 g C biomass (2-19% of Earth’s total biomass) may be present in this environment (Whitman et al., 1998;McMahon and Parnell, 2014). Microbial life in the subsurface exists across a wide range of habitats: in pores associated with relatively shallow unconsolidated aquifer sediments to fractures in bedrock formations that are more than a kilometer deep, where extreme lithostatic pressures and temperatures are encountered. While these different environments contain varying physical and chemical conditions, the absence of light is a constant. Despite this, diverse physiologies and metabolisms enable microorganisms to harness energy and carbon for growth in water-filled pore spaces and fractures. Carbon and other element cycles are driven by microbial activity, which has implications for both natural processes and human activities in the subsurface, e.g., bacteria play key roles in both hydrocarbon formation and degradation. Hydrocarbons are a major focus for human utilization of the subsurface, via oil and gas extraction and potential geologic CO2 sequestration. The subsurface is also utilized or being considered for sequestered storage of high-level radioactive waste from nuclear power generation and residual waste from past production of weapons grade nuclear materials. While our

  20. Autonomous microexplosives subsurface tracing system final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Engler, Bruce Phillip; Nogan, John; Melof, Brian Matthew; Uhl, James Eugene; Dulleck, George R., Jr.; Ingram, Brian V.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Rivas, Raul R.; Cooper, Paul W.; Warpinski, Norman Raymond; Kravitz, Stanley H.

    2004-04-01

    The objective of the autonomous micro-explosive subsurface tracing system is to image the location and geometry of hydraulically induced fractures in subsurface petroleum reservoirs. This system is based on the insertion of a swarm of autonomous micro-explosive packages during the fracturing process, with subsequent triggering of the energetic material to create an array of micro-seismic sources that can be detected and analyzed using existing seismic receiver arrays and analysis software. The project included investigations of energetic mixtures, triggering systems, package size and shape, and seismic output. Given the current absence of any technology capable of such high resolution mapping of subsurface structures, this technology has the potential for major impact on petroleum industry, which spends approximately $1 billion dollar per year on hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States alone.

  1. Subsurface connection methods for subsurface heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Bass, Ronald Marshall; Kim, Dong Sub; Mason, Stanley Leroy; Stegemeier, George Leo; Keltner, Thomas Joseph; Carl, Jr., Frederick Gordon

    2010-12-28

    A system for heating a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a first elongated heater in a first opening in the formation. The first elongated heater includes an exposed metal section in a portion of the first opening. The portion is below a layer of the formation to be heated. The exposed metal section is exposed to the formation. A second elongated heater is in a second opening in the formation. The second opening connects to the first opening at or near the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated. At least a portion of an exposed metal section of the second elongated heater is electrically coupled to at least a portion of the exposed metal section of the first elongated heater in the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated.

  2. SUBSURFACE EMPLACEMENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    T. Wilson; R. Novotny

    1999-11-22

    The objective of this analysis is to identify issues and criteria that apply to the design of the Subsurface Emplacement Transportation System (SET). The SET consists of the track used by the waste package handling equipment, the conductors and related equipment used to supply electrical power to that equipment, and the instrumentation and controls used to monitor and operate those track and power supply systems. Major considerations of this analysis include: (1) Operational life of the SET; (2) Geometric constraints on the track layout; (3) Operating loads on the track; (4) Environmentally induced loads on the track; (5) Power supply (electrification) requirements; and (6) Instrumentation and control requirements. This analysis will provide the basis for development of the system description document (SDD) for the SET. This analysis also defines the interfaces that need to be considered in the design of the SET. These interfaces include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Waste handling building; (2) Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) surface site layout; (3) Waste Emplacement System (WES); (4) Waste Retrieval System (WRS); (5) Ground Control System (GCS); (6) Ex-Container System (XCS); (7) Subsurface Electrical Distribution System (SED); (8) MGR Operations Monitoring and Control System (OMC); (9) Subsurface Facility System (SFS); (10) Subsurface Fire Protection System (SFR); (11) Performance Confirmation Emplacement Drift Monitoring System (PCM); and (12) Backfill Emplacement System (BES).

  3. Mars penetrator: Subsurface science mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumpkin, C. K.

    1974-01-01

    A penetrator system to emplace subsurface science on the planet Mars is described. The need for subsurface science is discussed, and the technologies for achieving successful atmospheric entry, Mars penetration, and data retrieval are presented.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and GeneXpert: A Rapid and Accurate Diagnostic Tool for the Management of Tuberculosis of the Spine

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Harvinder Singh; Mahajan, Rajat; Chabra, Tarun; Batra, Sahil

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose The aim of this study was to analyze various diagnostic tools, including GeneXpert, for the management of tuberculosis of the spine. Overview of Literature Traditional diagnostic methods of microscopy, histology, and culture have low sensitivity and specificity for the management of tuberculosis of the spine. Methods Of the 262 treated cases of spinal tuberculosis, data on 1 year follow-up was available for 217 cases. Of these, only 145 cases with a confirmed diagnosis were selected for retrospective analysis. Results In 145 of the 217 patients (66.80%), diagnosis was confirmed on the basis of a culture. Of the 145 patients with a confirmed diagnosis, 98 (66.20%) patients were diagnosed on the basis of clinical presentation, whereas 123 (84.8%) exhibited a typical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) picture. In 99 surgically treated patients, the diagnosis was confirmed on the basis of an intraoperative tissue biopsy. Among the 46 patients treated conservatively, 35 underwent a transpedicular biopsy, 4 patients underwent computed tomography-guided biopsy, 6 patients were diagnosed on the basis of material obtained from a cold abscess, and 1 patient underwent an open biopsy. The sensitivity of the culture for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was 66.80% (145/217) in our patients. Among the cases in which GeneXpert was used, the sensitivity for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was 93.4% (43/46). Moreover, the sensitivity of GeneXpert to detect rifampicin resistance was 100% (7/7) in our study. Conclusions Majority of the patients with tuberculosis of the spine can be diagnosed on the basis of a typical radiological presentation via MRI. In our study, 84.8% cases exhibited typical MRI findings. For patients presenting with atypical MRI features, a rapid and accurate diagnosis is possible by combining GeneXpert with MRI. The combined use of MRI and GeneXpert is a rapid and highly sensitive tool to diagnose

  5. Widefield subsurface microscopy of integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Köklü, Fatih Hakan; Quesnel, Justin I; Vamivakas, Anthony N; Ippolito, Stephen B; Goldberg, Bennett B; Unlü, M Selim

    2008-06-23

    We apply the numerical aperture increasing lens technique to widefield subsurface imaging of silicon integrated circuits. We demonstrate lateral and longitudinal resolutions well beyond the limits of conventional backside imaging. With a simple infrared widefield microscope (lambda(0) = 1.2 microm), we demonstrate a lateral spatial resolution of 0.26 microm (0.22 lambda(0)) and a longitudinal resolution of 1.24 microm (1.03 lambda(0)) for backside imaging through the silicon substrate of an integrated circuit. We present a spatial resolution comparison between widefield and confocal microscopy, which are essential in integrated circuit analysis for emission and excitation microscopy, respectively.

  6. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  7. Developing Ocean Subsurface Data Record from CALIPSO Depolarization Ratio Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Rodier, S. D.; Zhai, P.; Josset, D. B.; Omar, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    CALIOP, the dual wavelength, polarization sensitive lidar flying aboard the CALIPSO satellite, has been operating since June 2006 and is expected to continue for several more years. CALIOP's depolarization ratio is one of the best calibrated measurements made by the A-Train sensors. Over the life of the CALIPSO mission, the stability of the CALIOP depolarization ratio calibration has remained within 1%. CALIOP's depolarization ratio measurements can be used for studying changes in the backscatter of ocean subsurface particulates. The ocean surface/subsurface depolarization ratio measurements from CALIOP together with collocated A-train instruments can be used for estimating the subsurface particulate backscatter coefficient (bbp) and the cross polarization component of the column integrated ocean subsurface backscatter signal. To derive the cross component of inte¬grated ocean subsurface backscatter signal from the depolarization ratio of CALIOP integrated ocean surface/subsurface range bins, we need theoretical estimates of the ocean surface back¬scatter cross section, which can be derived accurately from CloudSat ocean surface backscatter measurements or from AMSR-E wind speeds. Using the CALIOP cross component of the integrated ocean subsurface backscatter together with diffuse attenuation coefficient derived from MODIS, bbp can be estimated. Preliminary CALIOP data analysis shows that in the Southern Oceans, ocean subsurface backscatter has increased by about 5% since the beginning of the CALIPSO mission in June 2006. This study will: (1) introduce the CALIPSO ocean subsurface backscatter data products; (2) assess the uncertainties in the data products and comparing with in situ optics measurements, radiative transfer modeling and aircraft lidar measurements; and (3) summarize the global and regional (e.g., Gulf of Mexico region) statistics and temporal variations of the ocean subsurface backscatter from CALIPSO measurements.

  8. Quantifying nonisothermal subsurface soil water evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deol, Pukhraj; Heitman, Josh; Amoozegar, Aziz; Ren, Tusheng; Horton, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Accurate quantification of energy and mass transfer during soil water evaporation is critical for improving understanding of the hydrologic cycle and for many environmental, agricultural, and engineering applications. Drying of soil under radiation boundary conditions results in formation of a dry surface layer (DSL), which is accompanied by a shift in the position of the latent heat sink from the surface to the subsurface. Detailed investigation of evaporative dynamics within this active near-surface zone has mostly been limited to modeling, with few measurements available to test models. Soil column studies were conducted to quantify nonisothermal subsurface evaporation profiles using a sensible heat balance (SHB) approach. Eleven-needle heat pulse probes were used to measure soil temperature and thermal property distributions at the millimeter scale in the near-surface soil. Depth-integrated SHB evaporation rates were compared with mass balance evaporation estimates under controlled laboratory conditions. The results show that the SHB method effectively measured total subsurface evaporation rates with only 0.01-0.03 mm h-1difference from mass balance estimates. The SHB approach also quantified millimeter-scale nonisothermal subsurface evaporation profiles over a drying event, which has not been previously possible. Thickness of the DSL was also examined using measured soil thermal conductivity distributions near the drying surface. Estimates of the DSL thickness were consistent with observed evaporation profile distributions from SHB. Estimated thickness of the DSL was further used to compute diffusive vapor flux. The diffusive vapor flux also closely matched both mass balance evaporation rates and subsurface evaporation rates estimated from SHB.

  9. Shallow subsurface imaging of the Piano di Pezza active normal fault (central Italy) by high-resolution refraction and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time-domain electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, Fabio; Tulliani, Valerio; Sapia, Vincenzo; Fierro, Elisa; Civico, Riccardo; Pantosti, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The Piano di Pezza fault is the central section of the 35 km long L'Aquila-Celano active normal fault-system in the central Apennines of Italy. Although palaeoseismic data document high Holocene vertical slip rates (˜1 mm yr-1) and a remarkable seismogenic potential of this fault, its subsurface setting and Pleistocene cumulative displacement are still poorly known. We investigated for the first time the shallow subsurface of a key section of the main Piano di Pezza fault splay by means of high-resolution seismic and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time-domain electromagnetic soundings (TDEM). Our surveys cross a ˜5-m-high fault scarp that was generated by repeated surface-rupturing earthquakes displacing Holocene alluvial fans. We provide 2-D Vp and resistivity images, which show significant details of the fault structure and the geometry of the shallow basin infill material down to 50 m depth. Our data indicate that the upper fault termination has a sub-vertical attitude, in agreement with palaeoseismological trench evidence, whereas it dips ˜50° to the southwest in the deeper part. We recognize some low-velocity/low-resistivity regions in the fault hangingwall that we relate to packages of colluvial wedges derived from scarp degradation, which may represent the record of some Holocene palaeo-earthquakes. We estimate a ˜13-15 m throw of this fault splay since the end of the Last Glacial Maximum (˜18 ka), leading to a 0.7-0.8 mm yr-1 throw rate that is quite in accordance with previous palaeoseismic estimation of Holocene vertical slip rates. The 1-D resistivity models from TDEM soundings collected along the trace of the electrical profile significantly match with 2-D resistivity images. Moreover, they indicate that in the fault hangingwall, ˜200 m away from the surface fault trace, the pre-Quaternary carbonate basement is at ˜90-100 m depth. We therefore provide a minimal ˜150-160 m estimate of the cumulative throw of the Piano di Pezza

  10. Scaling up the Single Transducer Thickness-Independent Ultrasonic Imaging Method for Accurate Characterization of Microstructural Gradients in Monolithic and Composite Tubular Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Carney, Dorothy V.; Baaklini, George Y.; Bodis, James R.; Rauser, Richard W.

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasonic velocity/time-of-flight imaging that uses back surface reflections to gauge volumetric material quality is highly suited for quantitative characterization of microstructural gradients including those due to pore fraction, density, fiber fraction, and chemical composition variations. However, a weakness of conventional pulse-echo ultrasonic velocity/time-of-flight imaging is that the image shows the effects of thickness as well as microstructural variations unless the part is uniformly thick. This limits this imaging method's usefulness in practical applications. Prior studies have described a pulse-echo time-of-flight-based ultrasonic imaging method that requires using a single transducer in combination with a reflector plate placed behind samples that eliminates the effect of thickness variation in the image. In those studies, this method was successful at isolating ultrasonic variations due to material microstructure in plate-like samples of silicon nitride, metal matrix composite, and polymer matrix composite. In this study, the method is engineered for inspection of more complex-shaped structures-those having (hollow) tubular/curved geometry. The experimental inspection technique and results are described as applied to (1) monolithic mullite ceramic and polymer matrix composite 'proof-of-concept' tubular structures that contain machined patches of various depths and (2) as-manufactured monolithic silicon nitride ceramic and silicon carbide/silicon carbide composite tubular structures that might be used in 'real world' applications.

  11. Subsurface fracture spacing

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C. ); Hill, R.E. )

    1991-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to document and analyze the unique set of data on subsurface fracture characteristics, especially spacing, provided by the US Department of Energy's Slant Hole Completion Test well (SHCT-1) in the Piceance Basin, Colorado. Two hundred thirty-six (236) ft (71.9 m) of slant core and 115 ft (35.1 m) of horizontal core show irregular, but remarkably close, spacings for 72 natural fractures cored in sandstone reservoirs of the Mesaverde Group. Over 4200 ft (1280 m) of vertical core (containing 275 fractures) from the vertical Multiwell Experiment wells at the same location provide valuable information on fracture orientation, termination, and height, but only data from the SHCT-1 core allow calculations of relative fracture spacing. Within the 162-ft (49-m) thick zone of overlapping core from the vertical and deviated wellbores, only one fracture is present in vertical core whereas 52 fractures occur in the equivalent SHCT-1 core. The irregular distribution of regional-type fractures in these heterogeneous reservoirs suggests that measurements of average fracture spacing'' are of questionable value as direct input parameters into reservoir engineering models. Rather, deviated core provides data on the relative degree of fracturing, and confirms that cross fractures can be rare in the subsurface. 13 refs., 11 figs.

  12. Enabling computational technologies for subsurface simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Falgout, R D

    1999-02-22

    We collaborated with Environmental Programs to develop and apply advanced computational methodologies for simulating multiphase flow through heterogeneous porous media. The primary focus was on developing a fast accurate advection scheme using a new temporal subcycling technique and on the scalable and efficient solution of the nonlinear Richards' equation used to model two-phase (variably saturated) flow. The resulting algorithms can be orders-of-magnitude faster than existing methods. Our computational technologies were applied to the simulation of subsurface fluid flow and chemical transport in the context of two important applications: water resource management and groundwater remediation.

  13. Muographic imaging with a multi-layered telescope and its application to the study of the subsurface structure of a volcano.

    PubMed

    Kusagaya, Taro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki K M

    2015-01-01

    In conventional muography observations using two detectors for muon tracking, the accidental coincidence of vertical electromagnetic showers generates identical trajectories to the muon tracks. Although muography has favorable properties, which allow direct density measurements inside a volcano, the measured density is lower than the actual value due to these fortuitous trajectories. We performed muography of Usu volcano, and confirmed that, in comparison with a use of two detectors, background noise levels were reduced by more than one order of magnitude using seven detectors for selecting linear trajectories. The resultant muographic image showed a high-density region underneath the central region of Usu volcano. This picture is consistent with the magma intrusion model proposed in previous studies. To clarify the three-dimensional location and actual size of the detected high-density body, multidirectional muographic measurements are necessary. PMID:26560837

  14. Muographic imaging with a multi-layered telescope and its application to the study of the subsurface structure of a volcano

    PubMed Central

    KUSAGAYA, Taro; TANAKA, Hiroyuki K. M.

    2015-01-01

    In conventional muography observations using two detectors for muon tracking, the accidental coincidence of vertical electromagnetic showers generates identical trajectories to the muon tracks. Although muography has favorable properties, which allow direct density measurements inside a volcano, the measured density is lower than the actual value due to these fortuitous trajectories. We performed muography of Usu volcano, and confirmed that, in comparison with a use of two detectors, background noise levels were reduced by more than one order of magnitude using seven detectors for selecting linear trajectories. The resultant muographic image showed a high-density region underneath the central region of Usu volcano. This picture is consistent with the magma intrusion model proposed in previous studies. To clarify the three-dimensional location and actual size of the detected high-density body, multidirectional muographic measurements are necessary. PMID:26560837

  15. Muographic imaging with a multi-layered telescope and its application to the study of the subsurface structure of a volcano.

    PubMed

    Kusagaya, Taro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki K M

    2015-01-01

    In conventional muography observations using two detectors for muon tracking, the accidental coincidence of vertical electromagnetic showers generates identical trajectories to the muon tracks. Although muography has favorable properties, which allow direct density measurements inside a volcano, the measured density is lower than the actual value due to these fortuitous trajectories. We performed muography of Usu volcano, and confirmed that, in comparison with a use of two detectors, background noise levels were reduced by more than one order of magnitude using seven detectors for selecting linear trajectories. The resultant muographic image showed a high-density region underneath the central region of Usu volcano. This picture is consistent with the magma intrusion model proposed in previous studies. To clarify the three-dimensional location and actual size of the detected high-density body, multidirectional muographic measurements are necessary.

  16. RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AT U.S. GOVERNMENT AGENCIES IN SUBSURFACE REACTIVE TRANSPORT MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate of contaminants in the environment is controlled by both chemical reactions and transport phenomena in the subsurface. Our ability to understand the significance of these processes over time requires an accurate conceptual model that incorporates the various mechanisms ...

  17. Containment of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Corey, J.C.

    1994-09-06

    A barrier is disclosed for reducing the spread of a plume of subsurface contaminants. The apparatus includes a well system for injecting a fluid, such as air, just outside and below the periphery of the plume. The fluid is injected at a pressure sufficient to lower the hydraulic conductivity of the soil from the point of injection to the surface thus establishing a curtain-like barrier to groundwater movement. The barrier is established upgradient of the plume to divert groundwater away, or preferably completely around the plume to reduce the flow of groundwater into or out of the plume. The barrier enables the remediation of the confined contamination and then, when the injection of the fluid is halted, the barrier quickly dissipates. 5 figs.

  18. Nonintrusive subsurface surveying capability

    SciTech Connect

    Tunnell, T.W.; Cave, S.P.

    1994-06-01

    This presentation describes the capabilities of a ground-pentrating radar (GPR) system developed by EG&G Energy Measurements (EM), a prime contractor to the Department of Energy (DOE). The focus of the presentation will be on the subsurface survey of DOE site TA-21 in Los Alamos, New Mexico. EG&G EM developed the system for the Department of Defense. The system is owned by the Department of the Army and currently resides at KO in Albuquerque. EM is pursuing efforts to transfer this technology to environmental applications such as waste-site characterization with DOE encouragement. The Army has already granted permission to use the system for the waste-site characterization activities.

  19. Containment of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John C.

    1994-01-01

    A barrier for reducing the spread of a plume of subsurface contaminants. The apparatus includes a well system for injecting a fluid, such as air, just outside and below the periphery of the plume. The fluid is injected at a pressure sufficient to lower the hydraulic conductivity of the soil from the point of injection to the surface thus establishing a curtain-like barrier to groundwater movement. The barrier is established upgradient of the plume to divert groundwater away, or preferably completely around the plume to reduce the flow of groundwater into or out of the plume. The barrier enables the remediation of the confined contamination and then, when the injection of the fluid is halted, the barrier quickly dissipates.

  20. Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    2000-10-12

    The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

  1. Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Loros

    2001-07-25

    The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

  2. Continuous nanoflow-scanning electrochemical microscopy: voltammetric characterization and application for accurate and reproducible imaging of enzyme-labeled protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Kai, Tianhan; Chen, Shu; Monterroso, Estuardo; Zhou, Feimeng

    2015-04-21

    The coupling of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) to a continuous nanoflow (CNF) system is accomplished with the use of a microconcentric ring electrode/injector probe. The gold microring electrode encapsulated by a glass sheath is robust and can be beveled and polished. The CNF system, comprising a precision gas displacement pump and a rotary valve, is capable of delivering solution to the center of the SECM probe in the range of 1-150 nL/min. Major advantages of the CNF-SECM imaging mode over the conventional SECM generation/collection (G/C) mode include higher imaging resolution, immunity from interferences by species in the bulk solution or at other sites of the substrate, elimination of the feedback current that could interfere with the G/C data interpretation, and versatility of initiating surface reactions/processes via introducing different reactants into the flowing stream. Parameters such as flow rates, probe/substrate separations, and collection efficiencies are examined and optimized. Higher resolution, reproducibility, and accuracy are demonstrated through the application of CNF-SECM to horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-amplified imaging of protein microarrays. By flowing H2O2 and ferrocenemethanol through the injector and detecting the surface-generated ferriceniummethanol, human IgG spots covered with HPR-labeled antihuman IgG can be detected in the range of 13 nM-1.333 μM with a detection limit of 3.0 nM. In addition, consistent images of microarray spots for selective and high-density detection of analytes can be attained. PMID:25831146

  3. Subsurface Facility System Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Loros

    2001-07-31

    The Subsurface Facility System encompasses the location, arrangement, size, and spacing of the underground openings. This subsurface system includes accesses, alcoves, and drifts. This system provides access to the underground, provides for the emplacement of waste packages, provides openings to allow safe and secure work conditions, and interfaces with the natural barrier. This system includes what is now the Exploratory Studies Facility. The Subsurface Facility System physical location and general arrangement help support the long-term waste isolation objectives of the repository. The Subsurface Facility System locates the repository openings away from main traces of major faults, away from exposure to erosion, above the probable maximum flood elevation, and above the water table. The general arrangement, size, and spacing of the emplacement drifts support disposal of the entire inventory of waste packages based on the emplacement strategy. The Subsurface Facility System provides access ramps to safely facilitate development and emplacement operations. The Subsurface Facility System supports the development and emplacement operations by providing subsurface space for such systems as ventilation, utilities, safety, monitoring, and transportation.

  4. Optimal joule heating of the subsurface

    DOEpatents

    Berryman, J.G.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-07-05

    A method for simultaneously heating the subsurface and imaging the effects of the heating is disclosed. This method combines the use of tomographic imaging (electrical resistance tomography or ERT) to image electrical resistivity distribution underground, with joule heating by electrical currents injected in the ground. A potential distribution is established on a series of buried electrodes resulting in energy deposition underground which is a function of the resistivity and injection current density. Measurement of the voltages and currents also permits a tomographic reconstruction of the resistivity distribution. Using this tomographic information, the current injection pattern on the driving electrodes can be adjusted to change the current density distribution and thus optimize the heating. As the heating changes conditions, the applied current pattern can be repeatedly adjusted (based on updated resistivity tomographs) to affect real time control of the heating.

  5. Optimal joule heating of the subsurface

    DOEpatents

    Berryman, James G.; Daily, William D.

    1994-01-01

    A method for simultaneously heating the subsurface and imaging the effects of the heating. This method combines the use of tomographic imaging (electrical resistance tomography or ERT) to image electrical resistivity distribution underground, with joule heating by electrical currents injected in the ground. A potential distribution is established on a series of buried electrodes resulting in energy deposition underground which is a function of the resistivity and injection current density. Measurement of the voltages and currents also permits a tomographic reconstruction of the resistivity distribution. Using this tomographic information, the current injection pattern on the driving electrodes can be adjusted to change the current density distribution and thus optimize the heating. As the heating changes conditions, the applied current pattern can be repeatedly adjusted (based on updated resistivity tomographs) to affect real time control of the heating.

  6. Subsurface helicity of active regions 12192 and 10486

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komm, Rudolf; Tripathy, Sushant; Howe, Rachel; Hill, Frank

    2015-04-01

    The active region 10486 that produced the Halloween flares in 2003 initiated our interest in the kinetic helicity of subsurface flows associated with active regions. This lead to the realization that the helicity of subsurface flows is related to the flare activity of active regions. Eleven years later, a similarly enormous active region (12192) appeared on the solar surface. We plan to study the kinetic helicity of the subsurface flows associated with region 12192 and compare it to that of region 10486. For 10486, we have analyzed Dopplergrams obtained with the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) with a dense-pack ring-diagram analysis. For 12192, we have analyzed Dopplergrams from GONG and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We will present the latest results.

  7. Microbial Transport in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, Timothy R.; Camesano, Terri; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Nelson, Kirk B.; Clement, T. P.; Wood, Brian D.

    2005-12-01

    In this article we focus on the physical, chemical, and biological processes involved in the transport of bacteria in the saturated subsurface. We will first review conceptual models of bacterial phases in the subsurface, and then the processes controlling fate and transport on short (e.g., bioremediation) time scales. Finally we briefly review field bacterial transport experiments and discuss a number of issues that impact the application of current process descriptions and models at the field scale.

  8. Truncated-correlation photothermal coherence tomography for deep subsurface analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiplavil, Sreekumar; Mandelis, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Photothermal diffusion-wave imaging is a promising technique for the analysis of a range of media. However, traditional diffusion-wave techniques are limited by the physics of parabolic diffusion and can only produce depth-integrated planar images. Here, we report a depth-resolved photothermal imaging modality, henceforth termed truncated-correlation photothermal coherence tomography (TC-PCT). This enables three-dimensional visualization of subsurface features, which is not possible with known optical or photothermal imaging techniques. Examples include imaging of solids with intricate subsurface structures and discontinuities, such as holes in steel, burn depth profiles in tissues, and the structure of bone. It is compatible with regulations concerning maximum permissible exposure and is the photothermal analogue of optical coherence tomography. Axial and lateral resolutions in bone are measured to be ~25 and 100 µm, respectively, with a depth range of ~3.2 mm (approximately four thermal diffusion lengths).

  9. The Value of Accurate Magnetic Resonance Characterization of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Tears in the Setting of Multiligament Knee Injury: Imaging Features Predictive of Early Repair vs Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Goiney, Christoper C; Porrino, Jack; Twaddle, Bruce; Richardson, Michael L; Mulcahy, Hyojeong; Chew, Felix S

    2016-01-01

    Multiligament knee injury (MLKI) represents a complex set of pathologies treated with a wide variety of surgical approaches. If early surgical intervention is performed, the disrupted posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) can be treated with primary repair or reconstruction. The purpose of our study was to retrospectively identify a critical length of the distal component of the torn PCL on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that may predict the ability to perform early proximal femoral repair of the ligament, as opposed to reconstruction. A total of 50 MLKIs were managed at Harborview Medical Center from May 1, 2013, through July 15, 2014, by an orthopedic surgeon. Following exclusions, there were 27 knees with complete disruption of the PCL that underwent either early reattachment to the femoral insertion or reconstruction and were evaluated using preoperative MRI. In a consensus fashion, 2 radiologists measured the proximal and distal fragments of each disrupted PCL using preoperative MRI in multiple planes, as needed. MRI findings were correlated with what was performed at surgery. Those knees with a distal fragment PCL length of ≥41mm were capable of, and underwent, early proximal femoral repair. With repair, the distal stump was attached to the distal femur. Alternatively, those with a distal PCL length of ≤32mm could not undergo repair because of insufficient length and as such, were reconstructed. If early surgical intervention for an MLKI involving disruption of the PCL is considered, attention should be given to the length of the distal PCL fragment on MRI to plan appropriately for proximal femoral reattachment vs reconstruction. If the distal PCL fragment measures ≥41mm, surgical repair is achievable and can be considered as a surgical option.

  10. Reactive transport benchmarks for subsurface environmental simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Steefel, Carl I.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Mayer, K. U.

    2015-06-01

    -resolution X-ray spectroscopy, have created new lines of research that can be used to inform the conceptualization of reactions and rate laws and validate mechanistic models. For example, spectroscopy has identified the oxidation states of key components and elemental distributions at increasingly smaller scales and lower concentrations; molecular biology has progressed from identifying the presence of microbes to characterization of which microbial communities are active and what they are doing (i.e., microbial function), which has led in turn to the identification of active processes under conditions beyond what analytical chemistry can discern; isotope ratios in pore water and solid phases that can be used to distinguish between biotic from abiotic processes, sorption from precipitation, and origin and age of groundwater. The other noteworthy development that is expanding the role of RTM in subsurface environmental modeling is he advance in computational technology that is enabling the simulation of more coupled processes with increasing mechanistic detail. In some cases, this involves the inclusion of more reactive species and/or microbial populations in the simulations; in other cases, the impact is through the ability to achieve high resolution of property distributions over longer simulated times. To achieve these ambitious objectives for subsurface reactive transport simulation, the subsurface science and engineering community is being driven to provide accurate assessments of engineering performance and risk for important issues with far-reaching consequences. As a result, the complexity and detail of subsurface processes, properties, and conditions that can be simulated have significantly expanded. This expansion was enabled, in part, by advances in measurement technology, computing technology, and numerical techniques.

  11. Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report

    SciTech Connect

    D. Rigby; M. Mrugala; G. Shideler; T. Davidsavor; J. Leem; D. Buesch; Y. Sun; D. Potyondy; M. Christianson

    2003-12-17

    The Yucca Mountain Project is entering a the license application (LA) stage in its mission to develop the nation's first underground nuclear waste repository. After a number of years of gathering data related to site characterization, including activities ranging from laboratory and site investigations, to numerical modeling of processes associated with conditions to be encountered in the future repository, the Project is realigning its activities towards the License Application preparation. At the current stage, the major efforts are directed at translating the results of scientific investigations into sets of data needed to support the design, and to fulfill the licensing requirements and the repository design activities. This document addresses the program need to address specific technical questions so that an assessment can be made about the suitability and adequacy of data to license and construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain Site. In July 2002, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published an Integrated Issue Resolution Status Report (NRC 2002). Included in this report were the Repository Design and Thermal-Mechanical Effects (RDTME) Key Technical Issues (KTI). Geotechnical agreements were formulated to resolve a number of KTI subissues, in particular, RDTME KTIs 3.04, 3.05, 3.07, and 3.19 relate to the physical, thermal and mechanical properties of the host rock (NRC 2002, pp. 2.1.1-28, 2.1.7-10 to 2.1.7-21, A-17, A-18, and A-20). The purpose of the Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report is to present an accounting of current geotechnical information that will help resolve KTI subissues and some other project needs. The report analyzes and summarizes available qualified geotechnical data. It evaluates the sufficiency and quality of existing data to support engineering design and performance assessment. In addition, the corroborative data obtained from tests performed by a number of research organizations is presented to reinforce

  12. SU-E-J-100: The Combination of Deformable Image Registration and Regions-Of-Interest Mapping Technique to Accomplish Accurate Dose Calculation On Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, B-T; Lu, J-Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We introduce a new method combined with the deformable image registration (DIR) and regions-of-interest mapping (ROIM) technique to accurately calculate dose on daily CBCT for esophageal cancer. Methods: Patients suffered from esophageal cancer were enrolled in the study. Prescription was set to 66 Gy/30 F and 54 Gy/30 F to the primary tumor (PTV66) and subclinical disease (PTV54) . Planning CT (pCT) were segmented into 8 substructures in terms of their differences in physical density, such as gross target volume (GTV), venae cava superior (SVC), aorta, heart, spinal cord, lung, muscle and bones. The pCT and its substructures were transferred to the MIM software to readout their mean HU values. Afterwards, a deformable planning CT to daily KV-CBCT image registration method was then utilized to acquire a new structure set on CBCT. The newly generated structures on CBCT were then transferred back to the treatment planning system (TPS) and its HU information were overridden manually with mean HU values obtained from pCT. Finally, the treatment plan was projected onto the CBCT images with the same beam arrangements and monitor units (MUs) to accomplish dose calculation. Planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) from both of the pCT and CBCT were compared to evaluate the dose calculation accuracy. Results: It was found that the dose distribution in the CBCT showed little differences compared to the pCT, regardless of whether PTV or OARs were concerned. Specifically, dose variation in GTV, PTV54, PTV66, SVC, lung and heart were within 0.1%. The maximum dose variation was presented in the spinal cord, which was up to 2.7% dose difference. Conclusion: The proposed method combined with DIR and ROIM technique to accurately calculate dose distribution on CBCT for esophageal cancer is feasible.

  13. Determining Engineering Properties of the Shallow Lunar Subsurface using Seismic Surface Wave Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeluru, P. M.; Baker, G. S.

    2008-12-01

    astronaut. Initial results indicate that robust dispersion curves (and thus subsurface models of engineering properties) can be obtained from the random array geometry. This random geometry will also be evaluated (a) for potential improvements in the resolution of the dispersion image and (b) as more accurate method for assessing azimuthal variations in the subsurface geology. Based on the extreme logistics imposed by lunar exploration and the anticipated engineering needs of lunar exploration, information obtained on the moon using this technique should prove to be a critical component of data acquisition.

  14. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Cameron J.; Slattery, Ashley D.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Gibson, Christopher T.

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  15. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Cameron J; Slattery, Ashley D; Stapleton, Andrew J; Shapter, Joseph G; Gibson, Christopher T

    2016-03-29

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  16. Delineate subsurface structures with ground penetrating radar

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, D.E.; Hu, L.Z.; Ramaswamy, M.; Sexton, B.G.

    1992-10-01

    High resolution ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys were conducted at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina in late 1991 to demonstrate the radar techniques in imaging shallow utility and soil structures. Targets of interest at two selected sites, designated as H- and D-areas, were a buried backfilled trench, buried drums, geologic stratas, and water table. Multiple offset 2-D and single offset 3-D survey methods were used to acquire high resolution radar data. This digital data was processed using standard seismic processing software to enhance signal quality and improve resolution. Finally, using a graphics workstation, the 3D data was interpreted. In addition, a small 3D survey was acquired in The Woodlands, Texas, with very dense spatial sampling. This data set adequately demonstrated the potential of this technology in imaging subsurface features.

  17. Delineate subsurface structures with ground penetrating radar

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, D.E. ); Hu, L.Z. ); Ramaswamy, M. ); Sexton, B.G. )

    1992-01-01

    High resolution ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys were conducted at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina in late 1991 to demonstrate the radar techniques in imaging shallow utility and soil structures. Targets of interest at two selected sites, designated as H- and D-areas, were a buried backfilled trench, buried drums, geologic stratas, and water table. Multiple offset 2-D and single offset 3-D survey methods were used to acquire high resolution radar data. This digital data was processed using standard seismic processing software to enhance signal quality and improve resolution. Finally, using a graphics workstation, the 3D data was interpreted. In addition, a small 3D survey was acquired in The Woodlands, Texas, with very dense spatial sampling. This data set adequately demonstrated the potential of this technology in imaging subsurface features.

  18. Subsurface microbial habitats on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boston, P. J.; Mckay, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    We developed scenarios for shallow and deep subsurface cryptic niches for microbial life on Mars. Such habitats could have considerably prolonged the persistence of life on Mars as surface conditions became increasingly inhospitable. The scenarios rely on geothermal hot spots existing below the near or deep subsurface of Mars. Recent advances in the comparatively new field of deep subsurface microbiology have revealed previously unsuspected rich aerobic and anaerobic microbal communities far below the surface of the Earth. Such habitats, protected from the grim surface conditions on Mars, could receive warmth from below and maintain water in its liquid state. In addition, geothermally or volcanically reduced gases percolating from below through a microbiologically active zone could provide the reducing power needed for a closed or semi-closed microbial ecosystem to thrive.

  19. Towed Subsurface Optical Communications Buoy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirbl, Robert C.; Farr, William H.

    2013-01-01

    The innovation allows critical, high-bandwidth submarine communications at speed and depth. This reported innovation is a subsurface optical communications buoy, with active neutral buoyancy and streamlined flow surface veins for depth control. This novel subsurface positioning for the towed communications buoy enables substantial reduction in water-absorption and increased optical transmission by eliminating the intervening water absorption and dispersion, as well as by reducing or eliminating the beam spread and the pulse spreading that is associated with submarine-launched optical beams.

  20. LRS data processing methods for detection of lunar subsurface echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshigami, Shoko; Mochizuki, Kengo; Watanabe, Shiho; Watanabe, Toshiki; Yamaguchi, Yasushi; Yamaji, Atsushi; Ono, Takayuki; Kumamoto, Atsushi; Nakagawa, Hiromu; Kobayashi, Takao; Kasahara, Yoshiya

    Lunar Radar Sounder (LRS) is an instrument for one of fifteen science missions of SE- LENE (KAGUYA). LRS is a ground-penetrating FM-CW radar system of HF-band. LRS detects echoes reflected from subsurface discontinuities where dielectric constants of the rocks change. The range resolution of LRS is 75 m in free space, whereas the sampling interval in the flight direction is about 75 m when the spacecraft altitude is 100 km. The primary objective of LRS is to investigate lunar subsurface structures. We plan to perform global soundings by LRS to contribute to studying the evolution of the Moon. In this presentation, we introduce the techniques to process LRS data to produce data products and to detect subsurface echoes. We have two standard data products of LRS under consideration. The time series data of ‘A-scope' which is a plot of signal power spectrum as a function of range derived from of the waveform data are called ‘B-scan'. Because LRS instruments change timing of data recording (measurement delay time) according to the predicted distance between KAGUYA spacecraft and lunar surface, observation range with respect to the spacecraft varies from pulse to pulse. In addition, flight altitude of KAGUYA changes in the range of several tens of kilometers. Therefore a trace of surface nadir echoes in unprocessed B-scan images does not correspond to actual lunar topography. We corrected variations of the measurement delay time and flight altitude of KAGUYA to produce a B-scan data product with the original spatial resolution (BScan high) and a reduced spatial resolution product (BScan low) both in the PDS format. The echo signals in A-scope data might be classified in the following categories; (1) a surface nadir echo, (2) surface off-nadir backscattering echoes, and (3) subsurface echoes. The most intense signal usually comes from the nadir point, when KAGUYA is flying over a level surface. The A-scope data also include various noises resulted from, for example

  1. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  2. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  3. A subsurface add-on for standard atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Verbiest, G J; van der Zalm, D J; Oosterkamp, T H; Rost, M J

    2015-03-01

    The application of ultrasound in an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) gives access to subsurface information. However, no commercially AFM exists that is equipped with this technique. The main problems are the electronic crosstalk in the AFM setup and the insufficiently strong excitation of the cantilever at ultrasonic (MHz) frequencies. In this paper, we describe the development of an add-on that provides a solution to these problems by using a special piezo element with a lowest resonance frequency of 2.5 MHz and by separating the electronic connection for this high frequency piezo element from all other connections. In this sense, we support researches with the possibility to perform subsurface measurements with their existing AFMs and hopefully pave also the way for the development of a commercial AFM that is capable of imaging subsurface features with nanometer resolution.

  4. An Improved ERT Approach for the Investigation of Subsurface Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, De-Bao; Wang, Feng; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Ou, Jian; Wang, Hui

    2016-08-01

    The joint use of multiple geophysical data types has been proven to be a powerful tool to both improve subsurface imaging and help in the interpretation process. The main goal of this paper is to develop a multi-geophysical approach for subsurface experimental investigations in which seismic data are used to improve electrical resistivity tomography quality. The basic philosophy of the method is that seismic travel time data will be used to construct the prior model for the resistivity inversion. Synthetic data were employed to demonstrate the improvements enabled by the use of this strategy. Afterwards, the scheme was applied successfully on field data from northwestern China. The outcomes reveal that the multi-geophysical approach improves the interpretation of the subsurface over a single source.

  5. A subsurface add-on for standard atomic force microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Verbiest, G. J.; Zalm, D. J. van der; Oosterkamp, T. H.; Rost, M. J.

    2015-03-15

    The application of ultrasound in an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) gives access to subsurface information. However, no commercially AFM exists that is equipped with this technique. The main problems are the electronic crosstalk in the AFM setup and the insufficiently strong excitation of the cantilever at ultrasonic (MHz) frequencies. In this paper, we describe the development of an add-on that provides a solution to these problems by using a special piezo element with a lowest resonance frequency of 2.5 MHz and by separating the electronic connection for this high frequency piezo element from all other connections. In this sense, we support researches with the possibility to perform subsurface measurements with their existing AFMs and hopefully pave also the way for the development of a commercial AFM that is capable of imaging subsurface features with nanometer resolution.

  6. Localization of subsurface fluorescent lesions using surface spectral measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolste, Kolbein

    Localization of Subsurface Fluorescent Lesions using Surface Spectral Measurements Sponsored by the National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland Kolbein Kolste, Ph.D. Keith Paulsen In neurosurgical tumor resection, maximizing extent of resection plays a major role in the care of cancer patients. To date, ALA is being researched as a technique to guide tumor resection by inducing the accumulation of the endogenous fluorophore PpIX. Most research has focused on the use of blue light excitation of PpIX to visual the tumor. However, due to the high attenuation of blue light by in vivo chromophores, such as oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin, the source of collected fluorescence emissions is confined to the top layer of cells, and the signal is subject to masking by blood on the surface of the surgical field of view. This issue is particularly a problem at the end of the resection, when the surgeon is evaluating the margin for remaining tumor, but the blue-signal is insensitive to residual tumor that may be located several millimeters beneath the surface. PpIX has an absorption band in the near infrared (NIR), where the absorption due to blood is orders of magnitude lower, enabling the excitation of a fluorophore at depth. In this work, we created a hyperspectral imaging system that attaches to a neurosurgical microscope and is capable of detecting PpIX fluorescence that has been excited at 635 nm. We utilize a dual-waveband technique from the hyperspectral to estimate depth of fluorescence origin and characterize the inherent limitations of the estimated depth. One of the major benefits of this technique is that the estimation is independent of the concentration and size of the fluorophore. This is first demonstrated in phantom studies, where the depths of multiple separate inclusions at various depths are accurately estimated. The technique is verified in animal tumor models and translated into the clinical theater, with pilot data showing the first estimation of depth of

  7. SUBSURFACE VISUAL ALARM SYSTEM ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    D.W. Markman

    2001-08-06

    The ''Subsurface Fire Hazard Analysis'' (CRWMS M&O 1998, page 61), and the document, ''Title III Evaluation Report for the Surface and Subsurface Communication System'', (CRWMS M&O 1999a, pages 21 and 23), both indicate the installed communication system is adequate to support Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) activities with the exception of the mine phone system for emergency notification purposes. They recommend the installation of a visual alarm system to supplement the page/party phone system The purpose of this analysis is to identify data communication highway design approaches, and provide justification for the selected or recommended alternatives for the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system. This analysis is being prepared to document a basis for the design selection of the data communication method. This analysis will briefly describe existing data or voice communication or monitoring systems within the ESF, and look at how these may be revised or adapted to support the needed data highway of the subsurface visual alarm. system. The existing PLC communication system installed in subsurface is providing data communication for alcove No.5 ventilation fans, south portal ventilation fans, bulkhead doors and generator monitoring system. It is given that the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system will be a digital based system. It is also given that it is most feasible to take advantage of existing systems and equipment and not consider an entirely new data communication system design and installation. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Briefly review and describe existing available data communication highways or systems within the ESF. (2) Examine technical characteristics of an existing system to disqualify a design alternative is paramount in minimizing the number of and depth of a system review. (3) Apply general engineering design practices or criteria such as relative cost, and degree of

  8. Airborne Electromagnetic Mapping of Subsurface Permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, J. D.; Minsley, B. J.; Cannia, J. C.; Smith, B. D.; Walvoord, M. A.; Voss, C. I.; Jorgenson, T. T.; Wylie, B. K.; Anderson, L.

    2011-12-01

    Concerns over the impacts of climate change have recently energized research on the potential impacts thawing permafrost may have on groundwater flow, infrastructure, forest health, ecosystems, energy production, CO2 release, and contaminant transport. There is typically little knowledge about subsurface permafrost distributions, such as thickness and where groundwater-surface-water connections may occur through taliks. In June of 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey undertook an airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey in the area of Fort Yukon, Alaska in order to map the 3-D distribution of permafrost and provide information for the development of groundwater models within the Yukon River Basin. Prior to the development of these models, information on areas of groundwater-surface water interaction was extremely limited. Lithology determined from a borehole drilled in Fort Yukon in 1994 agrees well with the resistivity depth sections inferred from the airborne survey. In addition to lithology, there a thermal imprint appears on the subsurface resistivity values. In the upper 20-50 m, the sections show continuous areas of high electrical resistivity, consistent with alluvial gravel deposits that are likely frozen. At depth, unfrozen gravel deposits have intermediate-to-high resistivity; frozen silts have intermediate resistivity; and unfrozen silts have low resistivity. Under the Yukon River and lakes where the subsurface is not frozen, zones of moderate resistivity intermix with areas of low resistivity. The areas of loess hills on the margins of the Yukon Flats have very-high electrical resistivity, indicating higher ice content, and are associated with the some of the greatest thickness of permafrost in the survey area. This work provides the first look into the 3-D distribution of permafrost in the areas around Fort Yukon and is a demonstration of the application of AEM to permafrost mapping. The AEM survey provides unprecedented 3-D images of subsurface electrical

  9. Subsurface Tectonics and Pingos of Northern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skirvin, S.; Casavant, R.; Burr, D.

    2008-12-01

    We describe preliminary results of a two-phase study that investigated links between subsurface structural and stratigraphic controls, and distribution of hydrostatic pingos on the central coastal plain of Arctic Alaska. Our 2300 km2 study area is underlain by a complete petroleum system that supports gas, oil and water production from 3 of the largest oil fields in North America. In addition, gas hydrate deposits exist in this area within and just below the permafrost interval at depths of 600 to 1800 feet below sea level. Phase 1 of the study compared locations of subsurface faults and pingos for evidence of linkages between faulting and pingo genesis and distribution. Several hundred discrete fault features were digitized from published data and georeferenced in a GIS database. Fault types were determined by geometry and sense of slip derived from well log and seismic maps. More than 200 pingos and surface sediment type associated with their locations were digitized from regional surficial geology maps within an area that included wire line and seismic data coverage. Beneath the pingos lies an assemblage of high-angle normal and transtensional faults that trend NNE and NW; subsidiary trends are EW and NNW. Quaternary fault reactivation is evidenced by faults that displaced strata at depths exceeding 3000 meters below sea level and intersect near-surface units. Unpublished seismic images and cross-section analysis support this interpretation. Kinematics and distribution of reactivated faults are linked to polyphase deformational history of the region that includes Mesozoic rift events, succeeded by crustal shortening and uplift of the Brooks Range to the south, and differential subsidence and segmentation of a related foreland basin margin beneath the study area. Upward fluid migration, a normal process in basin formation and fault reactivation, may play yet unrecognized roles in the genesis (e.g. fluid charging) of pingos and groundwater hydrology. Preliminary

  10. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  11. Dielectric properties of Jovian satellite ice analogs for subsurface radar exploration: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettinelli, Elena; Cosciotti, Barbara; Di Paolo, Federico; Lauro, Sebastian Emanuel; Mattei, Elisabetta; Orosei, Roberto; Vannaroni, Giuliano

    2015-09-01

    The first European mission dedicated to the exploration of Jupiter and its icy moons (JUpiter ICy moons Explorer—JUICE) will be launched in 2022 and will reach its final destination in 2030. The main goals of this mission are to understand the internal structure of the icy crusts of three Galilean satellites (Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto) and, ultimately, to detect Europa's subsurface ocean, which is believed to be the closest to the surface among those hypothesized to exist on these moons. JUICE will be equipped with the 9 MHz subsurface-penetrating radar RIME (Radar for Icy Moon Exploration), which is designed to image the ice down to a depth of 9 km. Moreover, a parallel mission to Europa, which will host onboard REASON (Radar for Europa Assessment and Sounding: Ocean to Near-surface) equipped with 9MHz and 60MHz antennas, has been recently approved by NASA. The success of these experiments strongly relies on the accurate prediction of the radar performance and on the optimal processing and interpretation of radar echoes that, in turn, depend on the dielectric properties of the materials composing the icy satellite crusts. In the present review we report a complete range of potential ice types that may occur on these icy satellites to understand how they may affect the results of the proposed missions. First, we discuss the experimental results on pure and doped water ice in the framework of the Jaccard theory, highlighting the critical aspects in terms of a lack of standard laboratory procedures and inconsistency in data interpretation. We then describe the dielectric behavior of extraterrestrial ice analogs like hydrates and icy mixtures, carbon dioxide ice and ammonia ice. Building on this review, we have selected the most suitable data to compute dielectric attenuation, velocity, vertical resolution, and reflection coefficients for such icy moon environments, with the final goal being to estimate the potential capabilities of the radar missions as a

  12. Method of installing subsurface barrier

    DOEpatents

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2007-10-09

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  13. INL Subsurface Wireless Sensor Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis C. Kunerth; John M. Svoboda; James T. Johnson

    2005-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory is developing a versatile micro-power sensor interface platform for periodic subsurface sensing of environmental variables important to waste disposal sites such as volumetric moisture, water potential, and temperature. The key characteristics of the platform architecture are that the platform is passive until externally energized --no internal power source is required -- and that it communicates with a "reader" via short-range telemetry - no wires penetrate the subsurface. Other significant attributes include the potential for a long service life and a compact size that makes it well suited for retrofitting existing landfill structures. Functionally, the sensor package is "read" by a short-range induction coil that activates and powers the sensor platform as well as detects the sensor output via a radio frequency signal generated by the onboard programmable interface controller microchip. As a result, the platform has a functional subsurface communication range of approximately 10 to 12 ft. and can only accept sensors that require low power to operate.

  14. Target-oriented Marchenko imaging of a North Sea field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravasi, Matteo; Vasconcelos, Ivan; Kritski, Alexander; Curtis, Andrew; Filho, Carlos Alberto da Costa; Meles, Giovanni Angelo

    2016-04-01

    Seismic imaging provides much of our information about the Earth's crustal structure. The principal source of imaging errors derives from simplicistically modeled predictions of the complex, scattered wavefields that interact with each subsurface point to be imaged. A new method of wavefield extrapolation based on inverse scattering theory produces accurate estimates of these subsurface scattered wavefields, while still using relatively little information about the Earth's properties. We use it for the first time to create real target-oriented seismic images of a North Sea field. We synthesize underside illumination from surface reflection data, and use it to reveal subsurface features that are not present in an image from conventional migration of surface data. To reconstruct underside reflections, we rely on the so-called downgoing focusing function, whose coda consists entirely of transmission-born multiple scattering. As such, we provide the first field data example of reconstructing underside reflections with contributions from transmitted multiples, without the need to first locate or image any reflectors in order to reconstruct multiple scattering effects.

  15. Evidence for a subsurface ocean on Europa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.; Belton, M.J.S.; Chapman, C.R.; Davies, M.E.; Geissler, P.; Greenberg, R.; McEwen, A.S.; Tufts, B.R.; Greeley, R.; Sullivan, R.; Head, J.W.; Pappalardo, R.T.; Klaasen, K.P.; Johnson, T.V.; Kaufman, J.; Senske, D.; Moore, J.; Neukum, G.; Schubert, G.; Burns, J.A.; Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.

    1998-01-01

    Ground-based spectroscopy of Jupiter's moon Europa, combined with gravity data, suggests that the satellite has an icy crust roughly 150 km thick and a rocky interior. In addition, images obtained by the Voyager spacecraft revealed that Europa's surface is crossed by numerous intersecting ridges and dark bands (called lineae) and is sparsely cratered, indicating that the terrain is probably significantly younger than that of Ganymede and Callisto. It has been suggested that Europa's thin outer ice shell might be separated from the moon's silicate interior by a liquid water layer, delayed or prevented from freezing by tidal heating; in this model, the lineae could be explained by repetitive tidal deformation of the outer ice shell. However, observational confirmation of a subsurface ocean was largely frustrated by the low resolution (>2 km per pixel) of the Voyager images. Here we present high-resolution (54 m per pixel) Galileo spacecraft images of Europa, in which we find evidence for mobile 'icebergs'. The detailed morphology of the terrain strongly supports the presence of liquid water at shallow depths below the surface, either today or at some time in the past. Moreover, lower- resolution observations of much larger regions suggest that the phenomena reported here are widespread.

  16. Subsurface Stress Fields in FCC Single Crystal Anisotropic Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakere, Nagaraj K.; Knudsen, Erik; Swanson, Gregory R.; Duke, Gregory; Ham-Battista, Gilda

    2004-01-01

    Single crystal superalloy turbine blades used in high pressure turbomachinery are subject to conditions of high temperature, triaxial steady and alternating stresses, fretting stresses in the blade attachment and damper contact locations, and exposure to high-pressure hydrogen. The blades are also subjected to extreme variations in temperature during start-up and shutdown transients. The most prevalent high cycle fatigue (HCF) failure modes observed in these blades during operation include crystallographic crack initiation/propagation on octahedral planes, and non-crystallographic initiation with crystallographic growth. Numerous cases of crack initiation and crack propagation at the blade leading edge tip, blade attachment regions, and damper contact locations have been documented. Understanding crack initiation/propagation under mixed-mode loading conditions is critical for establishing a systematic procedure for evaluating HCF life of single crystal turbine blades. This paper presents analytical and numerical techniques for evaluating two and three dimensional subsurface stress fields in anisotropic contacts. The subsurface stress results are required for evaluating contact fatigue life at damper contacts and dovetail attachment regions in single crystal nickel-base superalloy turbine blades. An analytical procedure is presented for evaluating the subsurface stresses in the elastic half-space, based on the adaptation of a stress function method outlined by Lekhnitskii. Numerical results are presented for cylindrical and spherical anisotropic contacts, using finite element analysis (FEA). Effects of crystal orientation on stress response and fatigue life are examined. Obtaining accurate subsurface stress results for anisotropic single crystal contact problems require extremely refined three-dimensional (3-D) finite element grids, especially in the edge of contact region. Obtaining resolved shear stresses (RSS) on the principal slip planes also involves

  17. Link between Surface and Subsurface Urban Heat Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Susanne; Bayer, Peter; Olesen, Folke; Goettsche, Frank; Blum, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    Urban heat islands exist in all diverse layers of modern cities, such as surface and subsurface. While both layers are typically investigated separately, the coupling of surface and subsurface urban heat islands is insufficiently understood. Hence, this study focuses on the interrelation of both zones and the influence of additional underground heat sources, such as heated basements, on this interaction. Using satellite derived land surface temperatures and interpolated groundwater temperature measurements the spatial properties of both heat islands are compared. Significant correlations of 0.5 up to more than 0.8 are found between surface and subsurface urban heat islands. If groundwater flow is considered this correlation increases by approximately 10%. Next we analyzed the dissimilarities between both heat islands in order to understand the interaction between the urban surface and subsurface. We find that local groundwater hotspots under the city center and industrial areas are not revealed in satellite derived land surface temperatures. Overall groundwater temperatures are higher than land surface temperatures in 95% of the analyzed area due to the influence of below ground anthropogenic heat sources such as sewage systems, district heating systems, and especially elevated basement temperatures. Thus, an estimation method is proposed that relates groundwater temperatures to mean annual land surface temperatures, building density, and elevated basement temperatures. Using this method regional groundwater temperatures can be accurately estimated with a mean absolute error of 0.9 K. Since land surface temperatures and building densities are available from remote sensing, this method has the potential for a large scale estimations of urban groundwater temperatures. Thus, it is feasible to detect subsurface urban heat islands on a global level and to investigate sustainable geothermal potentials using satellite derived data.

  18. Accurate Optical Reference Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, N.

    2006-08-01

    Current and near future all-sky astrometric catalogs on the ICRF are reviewed with the emphasis on reference star data at optical wavelengths for user applications. The standard error of a Hipparcos Catalogue star position is now about 15 mas per coordinate. For the Tycho-2 data it is typically 20 to 100 mas, depending on magnitude. The USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC) observing program was completed in 2004 and reductions toward the final UCAC3 release are in progress. This all-sky reference catalogue will have positional errors of 15 to 70 mas for stars in the 10 to 16 mag range, with a high degree of completeness. Proper motions for the about 60 million UCAC stars will be derived by combining UCAC astrometry with available early epoch data, including yet unpublished scans of the complete set of AGK2, Hamburg Zone astrograph and USNO Black Birch programs. Accurate positional and proper motion data are combined in the Naval Observatory Merged Astrometric Dataset (NOMAD) which includes Hipparcos, Tycho-2, UCAC2, USNO-B1, NPM+SPM plate scan data for astrometry, and is supplemented by multi-band optical photometry as well as 2MASS near infrared photometry. The Milli-Arcsecond Pathfinder Survey (MAPS) mission is currently being planned at USNO. This is a micro-satellite to obtain 1 mas positions, parallaxes, and 1 mas/yr proper motions for all bright stars down to about 15th magnitude. This program will be supplemented by a ground-based program to reach 18th magnitude on the 5 mas level.

  19. The Mojave Subsurface Bio-Geochemistry Explorer (MOSBE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerrero, J.; Beegle, L.; Abbey, W.; Bhartia, R.; Kounaves, S.; Russell, M.; Towles, D.

    2012-01-01

    The MOSBE Team has developed a terrestrial field campaign to explore two subsurface biological habitats under the Mojave Desert. This field campaign will not only help us understand terrestrial desert biology, but also will develop methodologies and strategies for potential future Mars missions that would seek to explore the Martian subsurface. We have proposed to the ASTEP program to integrate a suite of field demonstrated instruments with a 20 m subsurface drill as a coherent unit, the Mojave Subsurface Bio-geochemistry Explorer. The ATK Space Modular Planetary Drill System (MPDS) requires no drilling fluid, which allows aseptic sampling, can penetrate lithic ground up to 20 meters of depth, and utilizes less than 100 Watts throughout the entire depth. The drill has been developed and demonstrated in field testing to a depth of 10 meters in Arizona, December 2002. In addition to caching a continuous core throughout the drilling depth, it also generates and caches cuttings and fines that are strata-graphically correlated with the core. As a core segment is brought to the surface, it will be analyzed for texture and structure by a color microscopic imager and for relevant chemistry and mineralogy with a UV fluorescence/Raman spectrometer. Organic and soluble ionic species will be identified through two instruments -- a microcapillary electrophoresis, and an ion trap mass spectrometer that have been developed under PIDDP, ASTID and MIDP funding.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging after Completion of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Can Accurately Discriminate between No Residual Carcinoma and Residual Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Patients with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seho; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Sohn, Joohyuk; Park, Hyung Seok; Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Seung Il; Park, Byeong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background The accurate evaluation of favorable response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) is critical to determine the extent of surgery. We investigated independent clinicopathological and radiological predictors to discriminate no residual carcinoma (ypT0) from residual ductal carcinoma in situ (ypTis) in breast cancer patients who received NCT. Patients and Methods Parameters of 117 patients attaining pathological complete response (CR) in the breast after NCT between January 2010 and December 2013 were retrospectively evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. All patients underwent mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after NCT. Results There were 67 (57.3%) patients with ypT0. These patients were associated with hormone receptor-negative status, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-negative tumors, and a higher likelihood of breast-conservation surgery. Baseline mammographic and MRI presentation of the main lesion, absence of associated microcalcifications, shape, posterior features, and absence of calcifications on ultrasound were significantly associated with ypT0. CR in mammography, ultrasound, or MRI after NCT was also related to ypT0. By multivariate analysis, independent predictors of ypT0 were the triple-negative subtype [Odds ratio (OR), 4.23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11–16.09] and CR in MRI after NCT (OR, 5.23; 95% CI, 1.53–17.85). Stratified analysis by breast cancer subtype demonstrated that MRI well predicted ypT0 in all subtypes except the HER2-positive subtype. In particular, of 40 triple-negative subtypes, 22 showed CR in MRI and 21 (95.5%) were ypT0 after NCT. Conclusion Among imaging modalities, breast MRI can potentially distinguish between ypT0 and ypTis after NCT, especially in patients with triple-negative breast cancer. This information can help clinicians evaluate tumor response to NCT and plan surgery for breast cancer patients of all subtypes except for those with HER2

  1. Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Reactive Transport Modeling of Subsurface Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molins, S.; Day, M.; Trebotich, D.; Graves, D. T.

    2015-12-01

    Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is a numerical technique for locally adjusting the resolution of computational grids. AMR makes it possible to superimpose levels of finer grids on the global computational grid in an adaptive manner allowing for more accurate calculations locally. AMR codes rely on the fundamental concept that the solution can be computed in different regions of the domain with different spatial resolutions. AMR codes have been applied to a wide range of problem including (but not limited to): fully compressible hydrodynamics, astrophysical flows, cosmological applications, combustion, blood flow, heat transfer in nuclear reactors, and land ice and atmospheric models for climate. In subsurface applications, in particular, reactive transport modeling, AMR may be particularly useful in accurately capturing concentration gradients (hence, reaction rates) that develop in localized areas of the simulation domain. Accurate evaluation of reaction rates is critical in many subsurface applications. In this contribution, we will discuss recent applications that bring to bear AMR capabilities on reactive transport problems from the pore scale to the flood plain scale.

  2. Controlling Subsurface Fractures and Fluid Flow: A Basic Research Agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J; DePaolo, Donald J.; Pietraß, Tanja

    2015-05-22

    . In response, the Office of Science, through its Office of Basic Energy Science (BES), convened a roundtable consisting of 15 national lab, university and industry geoscience experts to brainstorm basic research areas that underpin the SubTER goals but are currently underrepresented in the BES research portfolio. Held in Germantown, Maryland on May 22, 2015, the round-table participants developed a basic research agenda that is detailed in this report. Highlights include the following: -A grand challenge calling for advanced imaging of stress and geological processes to help understand how stresses and chemical substances are distributed in the subsurface—knowledge that is critical to all aspects of subsurface engineering; -A priority research direction aimed at achieving control of fluid flow through fractured media; -A priority research direction aimed at better understanding how mechanical and geochemical perturbations to subsurface rock systems are coupled through fluid and mineral interactions; -A priority research direction aimed at studying the structure, permeability, reactivity and other properties of nanoporous rocks, like shale, which have become critical energy materials and exhibit important hallmarks of mesoscale materials; -A cross-cutting theme that would accelerate development of advanced computational methods to describe heterogeneous time-dependent geologic systems that could, among other potential benefits, provide new and vastly improved models of hydraulic fracturing and its environmental impacts; -A cross-cutting theme that would lead to the creation of “geo-architected materials” with controlled repeatable heterogeneity and structure that can be tested under a variety of thermal, hydraulic, chemical and mechanical conditions relevant to subsurface systems; -A cross-cutting theme calling for new laboratory studies on both natural and geo-architected subsurface materials that deploy advanced high-resolution 3D imaging and chemical analysis

  3. Phononic subsurface: Flow stabilization by crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Mahmoud I.; Biringen, Sedat; Bilal, Osama R.; Kucala, Alec

    2015-11-01

    Flow control is a century-old problem where the goal is to alter a flow's natural state to achieve improved performance, such as delay of laminar-to-turbulent transition or reduction of drag in a fully developed turbulent flow. Meeting this goal promises to significantly reduce the dependence on fossil fuels for global transport. In this work, we show that phonon motion underneath a surface interacting with a flow may be tuned to cause the flow to stabilize, or destabilize, as desired. This concept is demonstrated by simulating a fully developed plane Poiseuille (channel) flow whereby a small portion of an otherwise rigid wall is replaced with a one-dimensional phononic crystal. A Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) wave is introduced to the flow as an evolving disturbance. Upon tuning the frequency-dependent phase and amplitude relations of the surface of the phononic crystal that interfaces with the flow, the TS wave is shown to stabilize, or destabilize, as needed. A theory of subsurface phonons is presented that provides an accurate prediction of this behavior without the need for a flow simulation. This represents an unprecedented capability to passively synchronize wave propagation across a fluid-structure interface and achieve favorable, and predictable, alterations to the flow properties. National Science Foundation, Grant No. 1131802.

  4. From surface to subsurface and back again: the contribution of subsurface particle motion to surface armoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdowsi, B.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Ortiz, C. P.; Houssais, M.

    2015-12-01

    Armoring is the development of a coarse surface layer of sediments on a river bed, which overlies a smaller and typically more heterogeneous substrate. All existing models for this phenomenon are predicated on the idea that armoring develops due to size-selective transport and kinetic sieving at the surface of the granular bed. Here examine the development of armoring in the absence of size-selective surface transport, and demonstrate that subsurface particle movement can create an armored surface layer. We first conduct experiments in a laminar and annular flume, over a range of Shields stresses, with bimodal and refractive index-matched spherical sediments; this allows us to image the internal motion of the granular bed that is sheared from above by a viscous oil. Fluid-driven particle motion of the surface layer results in granular shear, that drives motion deep into the bed. This subsurface motion causes an upward migration of coarser particles, at a rate that is proportional to the granular shear rate. Comparison of experimental results to an existing continuum-granular flow model suggest that armoring in our bed-load exeriments is entirely consistent with shear-induced segregation in dry avalanches - but is slower. There is no size-selective transport at the surface in the experiments, as the annular flume is mass conserving and all particles move as bed load; this was confirmed by observation. To probe the granular physics of armor development further, we perform numerical simulations using a discrete element model (DEM) of granular flow, with and without damping. Simulations reproduce salient features of the experiments, and indicate that armoring is robust but that the rate of segregation is related to the degree of viscous damping. We posit that subsurface granular flow is an important and perhaps dominant contributor to surface armoring in rivers. More generally, this work shows how information is transferred from the surface to the subsurface and back

  5. Introduction: energy and the subsurface.

    PubMed

    Christov, Ivan C; Viswanathan, Hari S

    2016-10-13

    This theme issue covers topics at the forefront of scientific research on energy and the subsurface, ranging from carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration to the recovery of unconventional shale oil and gas resources through hydraulic fracturing. As such, the goal of this theme issue is to have an impact on the scientific community, broadly, by providing a self-contained collection of articles contributing to and reviewing the state-of-the-art of the field. This collection of articles could be used, for example, to set the next generation of research directions, while also being useful as a self-study guide for those interested in entering the field. Review articles are included on the topics of hydraulic fracturing as a multiscale problem, numerical modelling of hydraulic fracture propagation, the role of computational sciences in the upstream oil and gas industry and chemohydrodynamic patterns in porous media. Complementing the reviews is a set of original research papers covering growth models for branched hydraulic crack systems, fluid-driven crack propagation in elastic matrices, elastic and inelastic deformation of fluid-saturated rock, reaction front propagation in fracture matrices, the effects of rock mineralogy and pore structure on stress-dependent permeability of shales, topographic viscous fingering and plume dynamics in porous media convection.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy and the subsurface'. PMID:27597784

  6. Introduction: energy and the subsurface.

    PubMed

    Christov, Ivan C; Viswanathan, Hari S

    2016-10-13

    This theme issue covers topics at the forefront of scientific research on energy and the subsurface, ranging from carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration to the recovery of unconventional shale oil and gas resources through hydraulic fracturing. As such, the goal of this theme issue is to have an impact on the scientific community, broadly, by providing a self-contained collection of articles contributing to and reviewing the state-of-the-art of the field. This collection of articles could be used, for example, to set the next generation of research directions, while also being useful as a self-study guide for those interested in entering the field. Review articles are included on the topics of hydraulic fracturing as a multiscale problem, numerical modelling of hydraulic fracture propagation, the role of computational sciences in the upstream oil and gas industry and chemohydrodynamic patterns in porous media. Complementing the reviews is a set of original research papers covering growth models for branched hydraulic crack systems, fluid-driven crack propagation in elastic matrices, elastic and inelastic deformation of fluid-saturated rock, reaction front propagation in fracture matrices, the effects of rock mineralogy and pore structure on stress-dependent permeability of shales, topographic viscous fingering and plume dynamics in porous media convection.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy and the subsurface'.

  7. Phylogenetic relationships among subsurface microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nierzwicki-Bauer, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    This project involves the development of group specific 16S ribosomal RNA-targeted oligonucleotide hybridization probes for the rapid detection of specific types of subsurface organisms (e.g., groups of microbes that share certain physiological traits). Major accomplishments for the period of 6/91 to 12/1/91 are described. Nine new probes have been synthesized on the basis of published 16S rRNA sequence data from the Ribosomal Database Project. We have initiated rapid screening of many of the subsurface microbial isolates obtained from the P24 borehole at the Savannah River Site. To date, we have screened approximately 50% of the isolates from P24. We have optimized our {und in situ} hybridization technique, and have developed a cell blot hybridization technique to screen 96 samples on a single blot. This is much faster than reading 96 individual slides. Preliminary experiments have been carried out which indicate specific nutrients can be used to amplify rRNA only in those organisms capable of metabolizing those nutrients. 1 tab., 2 figs.

  8. Calculation notes that support accident scenario and consequence development for the subsurface leak remaining subsurface accident

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-12

    This document supports the development and presentation of the following accident scenario in the TWRS Final Safety Analysis Report: Subsurface Leak Remaining Subsurface. The calculations needed to quantify the risk associated with this accident scenario are included within.

  9. Improving Ground Penetrating Radar Imaging in High Loss Environments by Coordinated System Development, Data Processing, Numerical Modeling, and Visualization methods with Applications to Site Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    David Wright; Michael Powers Charles Oden; Craig Moulton

    2006-10-07

    The Department of Energy has identified the location and characterization of subsurface contaminants and the charcterization of the subsurface as a priority need. Many DOE facilities are in need of subsurface imaging in the vadose and saturated zones.

  10. Surface and subsurface inspection of food safety and quality using a line-scan Raman system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents a line-scan Raman platform for food safety and quality research, which can be configured for Raman chemical imaging (RCI) mode for surface inspection and spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) mode for subsurface inspection. In the RCI mode, macro-scale imaging was achieved u...

  11. Applications of electrical resistance tomography to subsurface environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.L.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-11-15

    We are developing a new imaging technique, Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT), to map subsurface liquids as flow occurs during natural or clean-up processes and to map geologic structure. Natural processes (such as surface water infiltrating the vadose zone) and man-induced processes (such as tank leaks and clean-up processes such as steam injection), can create changes in a soil`s electrical properties that are readily measured. We have conducted laboratory and a variety of field experiments to investigate the capabilities and limitations of ERT for imaging underground structures and processes. In the last four years we have used ERT to successfully monitor several field processes including: a subsurface steam injection process (for VOC removal), an air injection process (below the water table) for VOC removal, water infiltration through the vadose zone, radio-frequency heating, ohmic heating, and tank and pond leaks. The information derived from ERT can be used by remediation projects to: detect and locate leaks, determine the effectiveness of clean-up processes, select appropriate clean-up alternatives, and to verify the installation and performance of subsurface barriers.

  12. Identification of subsurface structures using electromagnetic data and shape priors

    SciTech Connect

    Tveit, Svenn; Bakr, Shaaban A.; Lien, Martha; Mannseth, Trond

    2015-03-01

    We consider the inverse problem of identifying large-scale subsurface structures using the controlled source electromagnetic method. To identify structures in the subsurface where the contrast in electric conductivity can be small, regularization is needed to bias the solution towards preserving structural information. We propose to combine two approaches for regularization of the inverse problem. In the first approach we utilize a model-based, reduced, composite representation of the electric conductivity that is highly flexible, even for a moderate number of degrees of freedom. With a low number of parameters, the inverse problem is efficiently solved using a standard, second-order gradient-based optimization algorithm. Further regularization is obtained using structural prior information, available, e.g., from interpreted seismic data. The reduced conductivity representation is suitable for incorporation of structural prior information. Such prior information cannot, however, be accurately modeled with a gaussian distribution. To alleviate this, we incorporate the structural information using shape priors. The shape prior technique requires the choice of kernel function, which is application dependent. We argue for using the conditionally positive definite kernel which is shown to have computational advantages over the commonly applied gaussian kernel for our problem. Numerical experiments on various test cases show that the methodology is able to identify fairly complex subsurface electric conductivity distributions while preserving structural prior information during the inversion.

  13. Improving surface-subsurface water budgeting for Brownfield study sites using high resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujardin, J.; Boel, S.; Anibas, C.; Batelaan, O.; Canters, F.

    2009-04-01

    Countries around the world have problems with contaminated brownfield sites as resulting from a relatively anarchic economical and industrial development during the 19th and 20th centuries. Since a few decades policy makers and stakeholders have become more aware of the risk posed by these sites because some of these sites present direct public hazards. Water is often the main vector of the mobility of contaminants. In order to propose remediation measures for the contaminated sites, it is required to describe and to quantify as accurately as possible the surface and subsurface water fluxes in the polluted site. In this research a modelling approach with integrated remote sensing analysis has been developed for accurately calculating water and contaminant fluxes on the polluted sites. Groundwater pollution in urban environments is linked to patterns of land use, so to identify the sources of contamination with great accuracy in urban environments it is essential to characterize the land cover in a detailed way. The use of high resolution spatial information is required because of the complexity of the urban land use. An object-oriented classification approach applied on high resolution satellite data has been adopted. Cluster separability analysis and visual interpretation of the image objects belonging to each cluster resulted in the selection of 8 land-cover categories (water, bare soil, meadow, mixed forest, grey urban surfaces, red roofs, bright roofs and shadow).To assign the image objects to one of the 8 selected classes a multiple layer perceptron (MLP) approach was adopted, using the NeuralWorks Predict software. After a post-classification shadow removal and a rule-based classification enhancement a kappa-value of 0.86 was obtained. Once the land cover was characterized, the groundwater recharge has been simulated using the spatially distributed WetSpass model and the subsurface water flow was simulated with GMS 6.0 in order to identify and budget the

  14. Accurate maser positions for MALT-45

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Christopher; Bains, Indra; Voronkov, Maxim; Lo, Nadia; Jones, Paul; Muller, Erik; Cunningham, Maria; Burton, Michael; Brooks, Kate; Green, James; Fuller, Gary; Barnes, Peter; Ellingsen, Simon; Urquhart, James; Morgan, Larry; Rowell, Gavin; Walsh, Andrew; Loenen, Edo; Baan, Willem; Hill, Tracey; Purcell, Cormac; Breen, Shari; Peretto, Nicolas; Jackson, James; Lowe, Vicki; Longmore, Steven

    2013-10-01

    MALT-45 is an untargeted survey, mapping the Galactic plane in CS (1-0), Class I methanol masers, SiO masers and thermal emission, and high frequency continuum emission. After obtaining images from the survey, a number of masers were detected, but without accurate positions. This project seeks to resolve each maser and its environment, with the ultimate goal of placing the Class I methanol maser into a timeline of high mass star formation.

  15. Accurate maser positions for MALT-45

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Christopher; Bains, Indra; Voronkov, Maxim; Lo, Nadia; Jones, Paul; Muller, Erik; Cunningham, Maria; Burton, Michael; Brooks, Kate; Green, James; Fuller, Gary; Barnes, Peter; Ellingsen, Simon; Urquhart, James; Morgan, Larry; Rowell, Gavin; Walsh, Andrew; Loenen, Edo; Baan, Willem; Hill, Tracey; Purcell, Cormac; Breen, Shari; Peretto, Nicolas; Jackson, James; Lowe, Vicki; Longmore, Steven

    2013-04-01

    MALT-45 is an untargeted survey, mapping the Galactic plane in CS (1-0), Class I methanol masers, SiO masers and thermal emission, and high frequency continuum emission. After obtaining images from the survey, a number of masers were detected, but without accurate positions. This project seeks to resolve each maser and its environment, with the ultimate goal of placing the Class I methanol maser into a timeline of high mass star formation.

  16. Surface expressions of subsurface structures in parts of the Michigan and Illinois basins

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, J.D. )

    1991-08-01

    Study of glacial geology, stream drainage, bedrock topography, and subsurface structure maps in Isabella, Midland, Arenac, Gladwin, Clare, Ogemaw, Iosco, Mecosta, and Montcalm counties in Michigan revealed distinct correlations between patterns and types of glacial deposits and subsurface structures. Anticlinal structures associated with the Mt. Pleasant, North Buckeye, and South Buckeye, Hamilton, Deep River, Clayton, Logan, Six Lakes, and West Branch oil and gas fields occur along areas where northeast-trending glacial moraines and truncated, attenuated, or deviated. Furthermore, these anticlinal structures are associated with lacustrine sands and gravels and glacial outwash deposits nearly surrounded by glacial tills or lacustrine sands and clays. All of the anticlinal structures are associated with bedrock topography highs and alignment of streams parallel to the trends of the structures. Comparison of images of subsurface structure and surface elevation data covering the northern part of the illinois basin showed distinct correlations between glacial moraine patterns and subsurface structural trends. The Pesotum and Arcola end moraines bracket the major anticlinal structure at the Hayes oil field. The Westfield, Nevins, and Paris moraines are truncated or attenuated where they intersect the surface projections of the subsurface LaSalle anticlinal belt and the anticlinal structure associated with the Mattoon oil field. These correlations among subsurface structure, bedrock topography, and surface glacial features indicate that the subsurface structural configuration influenced glacial depositional patterns in detectable and predictable ways, even in areas blanketed by over 100 ft of Wisconsin glacial drift.

  17. Microbial processes and subsurface contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molz, Fred J.

    A Chapman Conference entitled “Microbial Processes in the Transport, Fate, and In Situ Treatment of Subsurface Contaminants” was held in Snowbird, Utah, October 1-3, 1986. Members of the program committee and session chairmen were Lenore Clesceri (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N.Y.), David Gibson (University of Texas, Austin), James Mercer (GeoTrans, Inc., Herndon , Va.), Donald Michelsen (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg), Fred Molz (Auburn University, Auburn, Ala.), Bruce Rittman (University of Illinois, Urbana), Gary Sayler (University of Tennessee, Knoxville), and John T. Wilson (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Ada, Okla.). The following report attempts to highlight the six sessions that constituted the conference. For additional information, including a bound summary and abstracts, contact Fred J. Molz, Civil Engineering Department, Auburn University, AL 36849 (telephone: 205-826-4321).

  18. Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport

    2000-09-19

    FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code for simulating isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably and/or fully saturated subsurface porous media. Both single and dual-domain transport formulations are available. Transport mechanisms considered include advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, linear adsorption, mobile/immobile mass transfer and first-order degradation. A wide range of acquifier conditions and remediation systems commonly encountered in the field can be simulated. Notable boundary condition (BC) options include, a combined rechargemore » and drain BC for simulating recirculation wells, and a head dependent well BC that computes flow based on specified drawdown. The code is designed to handle highly heterogenous, multi-layer, acquifer systems in a numerically efficient manner. Subsurface structure is represented with vertically distorted rectangular brick elements in a Cartesian system. The groundwater flow equation is approximated using the Bubnov-Galerkin finite element method in conjunction with an efficient symmetric Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) ICCG matrix solver. The solute transport equation is approximated using an upstream weighted residual finite element method designed to alleviate numerical oscillation. An efficient asymmetric PCG (ORTHOMIN) matrix solver is employed for transport. For both the flow and transport equations, element matrices are computed from either influence coefficient formulas for speed, or two point Gauss-Legendre quadrature for accuracy. Non-linear flow problems can be solved using either Newton-Ralphson linearization or Picard iteration, with under-relaxation formulas to further enhance convergence. Dynamic memory allocation is implemented using Fortran 90 constructs. FACT coding is clean and modular.« less

  19. Enhanced internal reflection microscopy for subsurface damage inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Longbo; Ni, Kaizao; Zhu, Rihong; Liu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Shijie; Zhang, Bo; Shao, Jianda

    2016-07-01

    A new method is proposed to inspect the subsurface damage (SSD) that plays a key role on improving the laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) of optics applied in high power laser system. This method is based on total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM) and digital image processing technique. Because of relatively small depth of focus of a microscope at large magnification, a series of TIRM images can be obtained while the microscope focuses into different depths of sample by micro-focusing control. Definition of each image is calculated through wavelet transform. The relation between definition of TIRM images and the depth of SSD is established. According to the definition curve, the position and size along the depth direction can be acquired simultaneously. The measurement accuracy is dependent on the depth of field of microscope. This proposed method has been applied to measure the SSD information of finished K9 glass, fused silica glass and Nd-doped glass.

  20. Optical method and apparatus for detection of surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Ellingson, William A.; Brada, Mark P.

    1995-01-01

    A laser is used in a non-destructive manner to detect surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics and particularly in ceramic bodies with complex shapes such as ceramic bearings, turbine blades, races, and the like. The laser's wavelength is selected based upon the composition of the ceramic sample and the laser can be directed on the sample while the sample is static or in dynamic rotate or translate motion. Light is scattered off surface and subsurface defects using a preselected polarization. The change in polarization angle is used to select the depth and characteristics of surface/subsurface defects. The scattered light is detected by an optical train consisting of a charge coupled device (CCD), or vidicon, television camera which, in turn, is coupled to a video monitor and a computer for digitizing the image. An analyzing polarizer in the optical train allows scattered light at a given polarization angle to be observed for enhancing sensitivity to either surface or near-subsurface defects. Application of digital image processing allows subtraction of digitized images in near real-time providing enhanced sensitivity to subsurface defects. Storing known "feature masks" of identified defects in the computer and comparing the detected scatter pattern (Fourier images) with the stored feature masks allows for automatic classification of detected defects.

  1. Optical method and apparatus for detection of surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Ellingson, W.A.; Brada, M.P.

    1995-06-20

    A laser is used in a non-destructive manner to detect surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics and particularly in ceramic bodies with complex shapes such as ceramic bearings, turbine blades, races, and the like. The laser`s wavelength is selected based upon the composition of the ceramic sample and the laser can be directed on the sample while the sample is static or in dynamic rotate or translate motion. Light is scattered off surface and subsurface defects using a preselected polarization. The change in polarization angle is used to select the depth and characteristics of surface/subsurface defects. The scattered light is detected by an optical train consisting of a charge coupled device (CCD), or vidicon, television camera which, in turn, is coupled to a video monitor and a computer for digitizing the image. An analyzing polarizer in the optical train allows scattered light at a given polarization angle to be observed for enhancing sensitivity to either surface or near-subsurface defects. Application of digital image processing allows subtraction of digitized images in near real-time providing enhanced sensitivity to subsurface defects. Storing known ``feature masks`` of identified defects in the computer and comparing the detected scatter pattern (Fourier images) with the stored feature masks allows for automatic classification of detected defects. 29 figs.

  2. Using electrokinetic phenomena and electrical resistance tomography to characterize the movement of subsurface fluids

    DOEpatents

    Ramirez, A.L.; Cooper, J.F.; Daily, W.D.

    1996-02-27

    This invention relates generally to the remote detections of subsurface liquid contaminants using in combination a geophysical technique known as ERT and an EKS. Electrokinetic transport is used to enhance the ability of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to detect position and movement of subsurface contaminant liquids, particles or ions. ERT images alone are difficult to interpret because of natural inhomogeneities in soil composition and electrical properties. By subtracting two or more ERT images obtained before and after field induced movement, a high contrast image of a plume of distinct electrokinetic properties can be seen. The invention is applicable to important subsurface characterization problems including, as examples, (1) detection of liquid-saturated plumes of contaminants such as those associated with leaks from underground storage tanks containing hazardous concentrated electrolytes, (2) detection and characterization of soils contaminated with organic pollutants such as droplets of gasoline; and (3) monitoring the progress of electrokinetic containment or clean up of underground contamination. 1 fig.

  3. Using electrokinetic phenomena and electrical resistance tomography to characterize the movement of subsurface fluids

    DOEpatents

    Ramirez, Abelardo L.; Cooper, John F.; Daily, William D.

    1996-01-01

    This invention relates generally to the remote detections of subsurface liquid contaminants using in combination a geophysical technique known as ERT and an EKS. Electrokinetic transport is used to enhance the ability of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to detect position and movement of subsurface contaminant liquids, particles or ions. ERT images alone are difficult to interpret because of natural inhomogeneities in soil composition and electrical properties. By subtracting two or more ERT images obtained before and after field induced movement, a high contrast image of a plume of distinct electrokinetic properties can be seen. The invention is applicable to important subsurface characterization problems including, as examples, (1) detection of liquid-saturated plumes of contaminants such as those associated with leaks from underground storage tanks containing hazardous concentrated electrolytes, (2) detection and characterization of soils contaminated with organic pollutants such as droplets of gasoline; and (3) monitoring the progress of electrokinetic containment or clean up of underground contamination.

  4. Optical probe for surface and subsurface defects induced by ion bombardment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, L D; Hohage, M; Zeppenfeld, P

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that reflectance difference spectroscopy (RDS) is sensitive to defects induced by ion bombardment, located either in the topmost layer or in the subsurface region. Most importantly, these two kinds of defects can be spectrally discriminated, since the corresponding signatures in the RD spectrum arise from perturbations of different types of electronic states: The defects in the topmost surface layer mainly lead to a quenching of the optical anisotropy related to surface states, whereas the subsurface defects strongly affect the optical anisotropy originating from transitions between surface-modified bulk electronic states. Consequently, RDS can be used to simultaneously monitor the defects in the topmost surface layer and in the subsurface region in-situ during ion bombardment and thermal annealing. Characteristic RD spectra and the corresponding STM images for a Cu(110) substrate before and after healing of the subsurface defects. PMID:26089989

  5. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  6. NNLOPS accurate associated HW production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astill, William; Bizon, Wojciech; Re, Emanuele; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2016-06-01

    We present a next-to-next-to-leading order accurate description of associated HW production consistently matched to a parton shower. The method is based on reweighting events obtained with the HW plus one jet NLO accurate calculation implemented in POWHEG, extended with the MiNLO procedure, to reproduce NNLO accurate Born distributions. Since the Born kinematics is more complex than the cases treated before, we use a parametrization of the Collins-Soper angles to reduce the number of variables required for the reweighting. We present phenomenological results at 13 TeV, with cuts suggested by the Higgs Cross section Working Group.

  7. Introduction: energy and the subsurface

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2016-01-01

    This theme issue covers topics at the forefront of scientific research on energy and the subsurface, ranging from carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration to the recovery of unconventional shale oil and gas resources through hydraulic fracturing. As such, the goal of this theme issue is to have an impact on the scientific community, broadly, by providing a self-contained collection of articles contributing to and reviewing the state-of-the-art of the field. This collection of articles could be used, for example, to set the next generation of research directions, while also being useful as a self-study guide for those interested in entering the field. Review articles are included on the topics of hydraulic fracturing as a multiscale problem, numerical modelling of hydraulic fracture propagation, the role of computational sciences in the upstream oil and gas industry and chemohydrodynamic patterns in porous media. Complementing the reviews is a set of original research papers covering growth models for branched hydraulic crack systems, fluid-driven crack propagation in elastic matrices, elastic and inelastic deformation of fluid-saturated rock, reaction front propagation in fracture matrices, the effects of rock mineralogy and pore structure on stress-dependent permeability of shales, topographic viscous fingering and plume dynamics in porous media convection. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Energy and the subsurface’. PMID:27597784

  8. Subsurface Explosions in Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Shuyue; Houim, Ryan; Oran, Elaine

    2015-11-01

    Numerical simulations of coupled gas-granular flows are used to study properties of shock formation and propagation in media, such as sand or regolith on the moon, asteroids, or comets. The simulations were performed with a multidimensional fully compressible model, GRAF, which solves two sets of coupled Navier-Stokes equations, one for the gas and one for the granular medium. The specific case discussed here is for a subsurface explosion in a granular medium initiated by an equivalent of 200g of TNT in depths ranging from 0.1m to 3m. The background conditions of 100K, 10 Pa and loose initial particle volume fraction of 25% are consistent with an event on a comet. The initial blast creates a cavity as a granular shock expands outwards. Since the gas-phase shock propagates faster than the granular shock in loose, granular material, some gas and particles are ejected before the granular shock arrives. When the granular shock reaches the surface, a cap-like structure forms. This cap breaks and may fall back on the surface and in this process, relatively dense particle clusters form. At lower temperatures, the explosion timescales are increased and entrained particles are more densely packed.

  9. Vensis: Venus Advanced Radar For Subsurface And Ionosphere Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biccari, D.; Gurnett, D.; Jordan, R.; Huff, R.; Marinangeli, L.; Nielsen, E.; Ori, G. G.; Picardi, G.; Plaut, J.; Provvedi, F.; Seu, R.; Zampolini, E.

    Due to optically opaque atmosphere of Venus radar is the best way to observe the surface of the planet from orbit. Magellan has obtained global SAR imaging, as well as altimetry and emissivity. As a subsurface sounder, working at low frequency and preferably in the night time, VENSIS would obtain fundamentally different kinds of geologic information than Magellan, mapping of interfaces of geologic units (e.g. tessera, plains, lava flows, impact debris) could in fact be extended into the third di- mension. A subsurface investigation of the first 1-2 Km will show the internal defor- mations of the Venusian surface and will depict the structural styles of old crust which are essential to define the crust dynamics, an improved understanding of the evolu- tion of complex Venusian features is a key to define the geological evolution of the planet. Furthermore in standard subsurface sounding mode VENSIS will be able to transmit four different bandwidth, so the possibility of multi frequency observations will allow the estimate of the material attenuation in the crust and will give significant indications on the dielectric properties of the detected interfaces. Thus the Primary Scientific Objectives of VENSIS are the following: 1-Characterize surface roughness, composition and electrical properties at long wavelengths (orders of magnitude longer than Magellan) 2-Probe the subsurface of Venus (to few km depth) to detect and map geologic materials and large scale structures at planetary level VENSIS sounder, using active sounding in a frequency range of 100 kHz to 7 MHz, would also allow detailed characterization of the Venus ionosphere while in passive mode it can be used to detect lightning, the presence of which remains both controversial and critical to understand the behavior of the atmosphere and the possibility of present day volcanism. Therefore a secondary objective is to Probe the ionosphere to characterize interactions between the solar wind and the Venusian

  10. Planetary subsurface investigation by 3D visualization model .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seu, R.; Catallo, C.; Tragni, M.; Abbattista, C.; Cinquepalmi, L.

    Subsurface data analysis and visualization represents one of the main aspect in Planetary Observation (i.e. search for water or geological characterization). The data are collected by subsurface sounding radars as instruments on-board of deep space missions. These data are generally represented as 2D radargrams in the perspective of space track and z axes (perpendicular to the subsurface) but without direct correlation to other data acquisition or knowledge on the planet . In many case there are plenty of data from other sensors of the same mission, or other ones, with high continuity in time and in space and specially around the scientific sites of interest (i.e. candidate landing areas or particular scientific interesting sites). The 2D perspective is good to analyse single acquisitions and to perform detailed analysis on the returned echo but are quite useless to compare very large dataset as now are available on many planets and moons of solar system. The best way is to approach the analysis on 3D visualization model generated from the entire stack of data. First of all this approach allows to navigate the subsurface in all directions and analyses different sections and slices or moreover navigate the iso-surfaces respect to a value (or interval). The last one allows to isolate one or more iso-surfaces and remove, in the visualization mode, other data not interesting for the analysis; finally it helps to individuate the underground 3D bodies. Other aspect is the needs to link the on-ground data, as imaging, to the underground one by geographical and context field of view.

  11. Component-Based Framework for Subsurface Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Bruce J.; Fang, Yilin; Hammond, Glenn E.; Gurumoorthi, Vidhya

    2007-08-01

    Simulations in the subsurface environment represent a broad range of phenomena covering an equally broad range of scales. Developing modelling capabilities that can integrate models representing different phenomena acting at different scales present formidable challenges both from the algorithmic and computer science perspective. This paper will describe the development of an integrated framework that will be used to combine different models into a single simulation. Initial work has focused on creating two frameworks, one for performing smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of fluid systems, the other for performing grid-based continuum simulations of reactive subsurface flow. The SPH framework is based on a parallel code developed for doing pore scale simulations, the continuum grid-based framework is based on the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) code developed at PNNL. Future work will focus on combining the frameworks together to perform multiscale, multiphysics simulations of reactive subsurface flow.

  12. Complete Subsurface Elemental Composition Measurements with PING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, A. M.

    2012-06-01

    The Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument will measure the complete bulk elemental composition of the subsurface of Mars down to ~ 1 m depth without the need for contacting the surface or extracting samples.

  13. SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    D.C. Randle

    2000-01-07

    The primary purpose of this document is to develop a preliminary high-level functional and physical control system architecture for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain. This document outlines an overall control system concept that encompasses and integrates the many diverse process and communication systems being developed for the subsurface repository design. This document presents integrated design concepts for monitoring and controlling the diverse set of subsurface operations. The Subsurface Repository Integrated Control System design will be composed of a series of diverse process systems and communication networks. The subsurface repository design contains many systems related to instrumentation and control (I&C) for both repository development and waste emplacement operations. These systems include waste emplacement, waste retrieval, ventilation, radiological and air monitoring, rail transportation, construction development, utility systems (electrical, lighting, water, compressed air, etc.), fire protection, backfill emplacement, and performance confirmation. Each of these systems involves some level of I&C and will typically be integrated over a data communications network throughout the subsurface facility. The subsurface I&C systems will also interface with multiple surface-based systems such as site operations, rail transportation, security and safeguards, and electrical/piped utilities. In addition to the I&C systems, the subsurface repository design also contains systems related to voice and video communications. The components for each of these systems will be distributed and linked over voice and video communication networks throughout the subsurface facility. The scope and primary objectives of this design analysis are to: (1) Identify preliminary system-level functions and interfaces (Section 6.2). (2) Examine the overall system complexity and determine how and on what levels the engineered process systems will be monitored, controlled, and

  14. DOE UST interim subsurface barrier technologies workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1992-09-01

    This document contains information which was presented at a workshop regarding interim subsurface barrier technologies that could be used for underground storage tanks, particularly the tank 241-C-106 at the Hanford Reservation.

  15. MODELING CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT THROUGH SUBSURFACE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling of contaminant transport through soil to groundwater to a receptor requires that consideration be given to the many processes which control the transport and fate of chemical constituents in the subsurface environment. These processes include volatilization, degradation,...

  16. Photothermal microscopic studies of surface and subsurface defects on fused silica at 355nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Dong, Jingtao; Zhang, Qi; Wu, Zhouling

    2014-10-01

    It is believed that surface and subsurface defects formed during standard grinding and polishing processes are mainly responsible for laser induced damage in fused silica. The correlation between the laser damage susceptibility and absorption property of these defects has not been totally understood. In this paper, we present the characterization of surface and subsurface defects of fused silica by measuring their absorption properties based on a photothermal technique at 355 nm. The photothermal microscopic imaging reveals that the surface/subsurface absorption defects in fused silica can be identified. In addition, a 3D photothermal imaging of a laser damage site on the silica is also obtained. Our results demonstrate that photothermal microscopy is a powerful tool for defect characterization of optical materials for high power laser applications.

  17. Modeling the influence of subsurface topography on spatial and temporal variability of subsurface stormflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Verseveld, W. J.; Tromp-van Meerveld, H. J.; Weiler, M.; McDonnell, J. J.

    2003-12-01

    Recent investigations of spatial patterns of soil depth, water table and subsurface flow response at the hillslope scale suggest that the variability in depth to bedrock (or to any other low permeable layer) may be a primary control on the space-time variability of subsurface stormflow. However, simulating or even predicting subsurface flow variability is still a challenge. Even more problematic is the fact that spatially explicit soil depth information is generally lacking at hillslope and catchment scales. We investigate how soil depth variability affects the spatial and temporal response of subsurface stormflow and propose a new way forward to defining these controls on sites without soil depth data. We used long-term data of spatially explicit subsurface flow measurements from a trenched hillslope at the Panola Mountain Research Watershed, as well as soil depth and soil property information, to calibrate and verify the HillVi hillslope model. Then we generated numerous realizations of the subsurface topography using geo-statistical information of the observed soil depth in the watershed. Subsurface flow variability was simulated based on these subsurface topography realizations. The spatial-temporal properties of the modeled flow were compared with the spatial and temporal variability of the observed flow. HillVi is a quasi 3D spatially explicit saturated and unsaturated water balance model and is well suited for this approach as it captures all major subsurface runoff generation processes (matrix and macropore flow and infiltration, lateral subsurface flow and pipe flow). We discuss the potentials and drawbacks of this approach to simulate spatially variable outflow from hillslopes and the general role of subsurface topography on the spatial and temporal patterns of subsurface flow.

  18. Microbial life in the deep terrestrial subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Balkwill, D.L.; Beeman, R.E.

    1988-12-31

    The distribution and function of microorganisms is a vital issue in microbial ecology. The US Department of Energy`s Program, ``Microbiology of the Deep Subsurface,`` concentrates on establishing fundamental scientific information about organisms at depth, and the use of these organisms for remediation of contaminants in deep vadose zone and groundwater environments. This investigation effectively extends the Biosphere hundreds of meters into the Geosphere and has implications to a variety of subsurface activities.

  19. Floating insulated conductors for heating subsurface formations

    DOEpatents

    Burns, David; Goodwin, Charles R.

    2014-07-29

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in a first opening in the subsurface formation. Three electrical conductors are located in the conduit. A return conductor is located inside the conduit. The return conductor is electrically coupled to the ends of the electrical conductors distal from the surface of the formation. Insulation is located inside the conduit. The insulation electrically insulates the three electrical conductors, the return conductor, and the conduit from each other.

  20. Phylogenetic relationships among subsurface microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nierzwicki-Bauer, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress made from 6/90--3/91 toward completion of our project, Phylogenetic Relationships among subsurface microorganisms. 16S rRNA was sequenced, and based on the sequence the SMCC isolates were assigned to preliminary groups. Microorganisms were obtained at various depths at the Savannah River Site, including the Surface (0 m), Congaree (91 m), and Middendorf (244 m, 259 m, 265 m). Sequence data from four isolates from the Congaree formation indicate these microorganisms can be divided into Pseudomonas spp. or Acinetobacter spp. Three 16S rRNA probes were synthesized based on sequence data. The synthesized probes were tested through in situ hybridization. Optimal conditions for in situ hybridization were determined. Because stability of RNA-DNA hybrids is dependent on hybridization stringency, related organisms can be differentiated using a single probe under different strigencies. The results of these hybridizations agree with results obtained by Balkwill and Reeves using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The RNA content of a cell reflects its metabolic state. Cells which are starved for four days are not detectable with the homologous 16S rRNA probe. However, within 15 minutes of refeeding, detectable rRNA appeared. This suggests that organisms which are undetectable in environmental samples due to starvation may be detectable after addition of nutrients. Stepwise addition of specific nutrients could indicate which nutrients are rate limiting for growth. Preliminary experiments with soil samples from the Hanford Site indicate indigenous microorganisms can be detected by oligionucleotide probes. Further, using multiple probes based on universal sequences increases the number of organisms detected. Double label experiments, using a rhodamine-labelled oligionucleotide probe with free coumarin succinimidyl ester will allow simultaneous detection of total bacteria and specific 16S rRNA containing bacteria. 4 tabs. (MHB)

  1. High resolution seismic imaging of complex structures: a case study of the South China Sea data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Wang, Jun; Fu, Geping

    2016-03-01

    Seismic imaging is an effective way for marine geophysical investigation. Different types of imaging schemes, such as pre-stack time migration (PSTM) and pre-stack depth migration (PSDM), are often used to reveal subsurface structures. Theoretically, the PSDM method, which better honors the wave field propagation, can produce more accurate subsurface images compared with PSTM. However, it is challenging for PSDM to obtain a proper velocity model. In the South China Sea basin, the presence of complex structures such as carbonate pinnacles makes velocity model building more difficult due to the complex geometry and strong velocity variation. We have developed a seismic processing work flow which aims to circumvent these difficulties and can improve the PSDM velocity model via iterative updating. In order to improve the data quality and obtain optimal results, a proper pre-processing is required. In this workflow, we use the full waveform inversion to update the velocity model, followed by the application of the tomography inversion. In this way, a geologically plausible velocity model for PSDM is obtained. Afterwards, we use the Q-tomography approach to estimate the Earth quality factor (Q), which numerically quantifies the earth absorption and attenuation effect. Finally we use a de-absorption pre-stack depth migration scheme to compensate for the Earth absorption and attenuation effect in the process of imaging. The amplitudes are balanced and a high quality subsurface image is obtained.

  2. System and method for investigating sub-surface features and 3D imaging of non-linear property, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-06-02

    A system and a method for generating a three-dimensional image of a rock formation, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation are provided. A first acoustic signal includes a first plurality of pulses. A second acoustic signal from a second source includes a second plurality of pulses. A detected signal returning to the borehole includes a signal generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first and second acoustic signals in a non-linear mixing zone within an intersection volume. The received signal is processed to extract the signal over noise and/or signals resulting from linear interaction and the three dimensional image of is generated.

  3. Spatial resolution and the geologic interpretation of Martian morphology - implications for subsurface volatiles

    SciTech Connect

    Zimbelman, J.R.

    1987-08-01

    Viking Orbiter images of the Acheron Fossae on Mars are presented and analyzed, with an emphasis on the impact of image resolution on the interpretation. High-resolution (less than 10 m/pixel) images reveal small mounds which can be interpreted as aeolian dunes, but these features are not evident on images with resolution of 50 m/pixel or greater. Also reported are the results of a visual inspection of 527 usable high-resolution images: it is found that all of the morphological features identified can arise in the absence of subsurface volatiles. 21 references.

  4. Shallow subsurface morpho-tectonics at the Northern offshore Sumatra subduction system using high resolution reflection and refraction seismics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, D.; Dibakar Ghosal*, S. C. Singh, A. P. S. Chauhan, H. Carton, N. D. Hananto

    2011-12-01

    The oblique subduction of Indo-Australian plate below the Eurosian plate regulates the subsurface geology of the Sumatra subduction system from south to north. Although many geological, geophysical and geodetic studies have been carried over since several decades nevertheless a high resolution subsurface image describing the detailed structural features over the Northern Sumatra is still missing. To scrutinize the northern part of this subduction system we had carried out a multi channel seismic (MCS) and OBS survey using a 12 km long streamer and 56 ocean bottom seismometers in 2006 and procured a high resolution deep seismic reflection and refraction data over a 500 km long profile mapping the whole subduction setting from the subduction front, forearc high and basin, Sumatra platform, Sumatra fault and volcanic arc. The acoustic basement along the profile is very complex because of its extremities lies in a range of 300 m to 5000 m. In order to overcome the imaging-intricacies caused due to the abrupt changes of water depth, we have downward continued the 12 km streamer data to the seafloor, which provides refraction arrivals from near zero offsets to 12 km, and subsequently a high-resolution travel time tomography keeping node spacing of 50m x 50m has accomplished to procure a detail velocity structure along the profile. We have conducted our analysis in two important areas at northern offshore Sumatra: (1) subduction front and accretionary settings and (2) forearc high and West Anadman Fault. Our main goal lies to observe the nature of shallow subsurface velocity distribution over these regions. Tomographic result of the subduction front demonstrates the changes in velocity gradient along up-dip. The 1D velocity gradients become shallower toward the subduction trench inferring the fact of lithification of accreted sediments around the accretionary wedge. At the forearc high adjacent to the Aceh basin a pile of 1 km thick low velocity sediments is underlain by

  5. Autonomous robot for detecting subsurface voids and tunnels using microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Stacy S.; Crawford, Nicholas C.; Croft, Leigh Ann; Howard, Michael; Miller, Stephen; Rippy, Thomas

    2006-05-01

    Tunnels have been used to evade security of defensive positions both during times of war and peace for hundreds of years. Tunnels are presently being built under the Mexican Border by drug smugglers and possibly terrorists. Several have been discovered at the border crossing at Nogales near Tucson, Arizona, along with others at other border towns. During this war on terror, tunnels under the Mexican Border pose a significant threat for the security of the United States. It is also possible that terrorists will attempt to tunnel under strategic buildings and possibly discharge explosives. The Center for Cave and Karst Study (CCKS) at Western Kentucky University has a long and successful history of determining the location of caves and subsurface voids using microgravity technology. Currently, the CCKS is developing a remotely controlled robot which will be used to locate voids underground. The robot will be a remotely controlled vehicle that will use microgravity and GPS to accurately detect and measure voids below the surface. It is hoped that this robot will also be used in military applications to locate other types of voids underground such as tunnels and bunkers. It is anticipated that the robot will be able to function up to a mile from the operator. This paper will describe the construction of the robot and the use of microgravity technology to locate subsurface voids with the robot.

  6. Microbial Metagenomics Reveals Climate-Relevant Subsurface Biogeochemical Processes.

    PubMed

    Long, Philip E; Williams, Kenneth H; Hubbard, Susan S; Banfield, Jillian F

    2016-08-01

    Microorganisms play key roles in terrestrial system processes, including the turnover of natural organic carbon, such as leaf litter and woody debris that accumulate in soils and subsurface sediments. What has emerged from a series of recent DNA sequencing-based studies is recognition of the enormous variety of little known and previously unknown microorganisms that mediate recycling of these vast stores of buried carbon in subsoil compartments of the terrestrial system. More importantly, the genome resolution achieved in these studies has enabled association of specific members of these microbial communities with carbon compound transformations and other linked biogeochemical processes-such as the nitrogen cycle-that can impact the quality of groundwater, surface water, and atmospheric trace gas concentrations. The emerging view also emphasizes the importance of organism interactions through exchange of metabolic byproducts (e.g., within the carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur cycles) and via symbioses since many novel organisms exhibit restricted metabolic capabilities and an associated extremely small cell size. New, genome-resolved information reshapes our view of subsurface microbial communities and provides critical new inputs for advanced reactive transport models. These inputs are needed for accurate prediction of feedbacks in watershed biogeochemical functioning and their influence on the climate via the fluxes of greenhouse gases, CO2, CH4, and N2O.

  7. Microbial Metagenomics Reveals Climate-Relevant Subsurface Biogeochemical Processes.

    PubMed

    Long, Philip E; Williams, Kenneth H; Hubbard, Susan S; Banfield, Jillian F

    2016-08-01

    Microorganisms play key roles in terrestrial system processes, including the turnover of natural organic carbon, such as leaf litter and woody debris that accumulate in soils and subsurface sediments. What has emerged from a series of recent DNA sequencing-based studies is recognition of the enormous variety of little known and previously unknown microorganisms that mediate recycling of these vast stores of buried carbon in subsoil compartments of the terrestrial system. More importantly, the genome resolution achieved in these studies has enabled association of specific members of these microbial communities with carbon compound transformations and other linked biogeochemical processes-such as the nitrogen cycle-that can impact the quality of groundwater, surface water, and atmospheric trace gas concentrations. The emerging view also emphasizes the importance of organism interactions through exchange of metabolic byproducts (e.g., within the carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur cycles) and via symbioses since many novel organisms exhibit restricted metabolic capabilities and an associated extremely small cell size. New, genome-resolved information reshapes our view of subsurface microbial communities and provides critical new inputs for advanced reactive transport models. These inputs are needed for accurate prediction of feedbacks in watershed biogeochemical functioning and their influence on the climate via the fluxes of greenhouse gases, CO2, CH4, and N2O. PMID:27156744

  8. Phase shift reflectometry for sub-surface defect detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asundi, Anand; Lei, Huang; Eden, Teoh Kang Min; Sreemathy, Parthasarathy; May, Watt Sook

    2012-11-01

    Phase Shift Reflectometry has recently been seen as a novel alternative to interferometry since it can provide warpage measurement over large areas with no need for large optical components. To confirm its capability and to explore the use of this method for sub-surface defect detection, a Chinese magic mirror is used. This bronze mirror which dates back to the Chinese Han Dynasty appears at first sight to be an ordinary convex mirror. However, unlike a normal mirror, when illuminated by a beam of light, an image is formed onto a screen. It has been hypothesized that there are indentations inside the mirror which alter the path of reflected light rays and hence the reflected image. This paper explores various methods to measure these indentations. Of the methods test Phase Shift Reflectometry (PSR) was found suitable to be the most suitable both in terms of the sensitivity and the field of view.

  9. SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    C.J. Fernado

    1998-09-17

    The purpose of this document is to develop preliminary high-level functional and physical control system architectures for the proposed subsurface repository at Yucca Mountain. This document outlines overall control system concepts that encompass and integrate the many diverse systems being considered for use within the subsurface repository. This document presents integrated design concepts for monitoring and controlling the diverse set of subsurface operations. The subsurface repository design will be composed of a series of diverse systems that will be integrated to accomplish a set of overall functions and objectives. The subsurface repository contains several Instrumentation and Control (I&C) related systems including: waste emplacement systems, ventilation systems, communication systems, radiation monitoring systems, rail transportation systems, ground control monitoring systems, utility monitoring systems (electrical, lighting, water, compressed air, etc.), fire detection and protection systems, retrieval systems, and performance confirmation systems. Each of these systems involve some level of I&C and will typically be integrated over a data communication network. The subsurface I&C systems will also integrate with multiple surface-based site-wide systems such as emergency response, health physics, security and safeguards, communications, utilities and others. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Identify preliminary system level functions and interface needs (Presented in the functional diagrams in Section 7.2). (2) Examine the overall system complexity and determine how and on what levels these control systems will be controlled and integrated (Presented in Section 7.2). (3) Develop a preliminary subsurface facility-wide design for an overall control system architecture, and depict this design by a series of control system functional block diagrams (Presented in Section 7.2). (4) Develop a series of physical architectures that

  10. Subsurface photodisruption in scattering biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacks, Zachary S.; Spooner, Greg J. R.; Kurtz, Ron M.; Juhasz, Tibor; Mourou, Gerard A.

    2000-11-01

    Approximately five million people worldwide are blind due to complications from glaucoma. Current surgical techniques often fail due to infection and scarring. Both failure routes are associated with damaging surface tissues. Femtosecond lasers allow a method to create a highly precise incision beneath the surface of the tissue without damaging any of the overlying layers. However, subsurface surgery can only be performed where the beam can be focused tightly enough to cause optical breakdown. Under normal conditions, subsurface surgery is not possible since sclera is highly scattering. Using two independent methods, we show completely subsurface surgery in human sclera using a femtosecond laser. The first method is to make the sclera transparent by injecting a dehydrating agent. The second method is to choose a wavelength that is highly focusable in the sclera. Both methods may be applied in other tissues, such as skin. We show highly precise incisions in in vitro tissues. Subsurface femtosecond photodisruption may be useful for in vivo surgical technique to perform a completely subsurface surgery.

  11. Marine subsurface eukaryotes: the fungal majority.

    PubMed

    Edgcomb, Virginia P; Beaudoin, David; Gast, Rebecca; Biddle, Jennifer F; Teske, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Studies on the microbial communities of deep subsurface sediments have indicated the presence of Bacteria and Archaea throughout the sediment column. Microbial eukaryotes could also be present in deep-sea subsurface sediments; either bacterivorous protists or eukaryotes capable of assimilating buried organic carbon. DNA- and RNA-based clone library analyses are used here to examine the microbial eukaryotic diversity and identify the potentially active members in deep-sea sediment cores of the Peru Margin and the Peru Trench. We compared surface communities with those much deeper in the same cores, and compared cores from different sites. Fungal sequences were most often recovered from both DNA- and RNA-based clone libraries, with variable overall abundances of different sequence types and different dominant clone types in the RNA-based and the DNA-based libraries. Surficial sediment communities were different from each other and from the deep subsurface samples. Some fungal sequences represented potentially novel organisms as well as ones with a cosmopolitan distribution in terrestrial, fresh and salt water environments. Our results indicate that fungi are the most consistently detected eukaryotes in the marine sedimentary subsurface; further, some species may be specifically adapted to the deep subsurface and may play important roles in the utilization and recycling of nutrients.

  12. Subsurface Shielding Source Term Specification Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    S.Su

    2001-04-12

    The purpose of this calculation is to establish appropriate and defensible waste-package radiation source terms for use in repository subsurface shielding design. This calculation supports the shielding design for the waste emplacement and retrieval system, and subsurface facility system. The objective is to identify the limiting waste package and specify its associated source terms including source strengths and energy spectra. Consistent with the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M&O 2001, p. 15), the scope of work includes the following: (1) Review source terms generated by the Waste Package Department (WPD) for various waste forms and waste package types, and compile them for shielding-specific applications. (2) Determine acceptable waste package specific source terms for use in subsurface shielding design, using a reasonable and defensible methodology that is not unduly conservative. This calculation is associated with the engineering and design activity for the waste emplacement and retrieval system, and subsurface facility system. The technical work plan for this calculation is provided in CRWMS M&O 2001. Development and performance of this calculation conforms to the procedure, AP-3.12Q, Calculations.

  13. Subsurface cation vacancy stabilization of the magnetite (001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliem, R.; McDermott, E.; Ferstl, P.; Setvin, M.; Gamba, O.; Pavelec, J.; Schneider, M. A.; Schmid, M.; Diebold, U.; Blaha, P.; Hammer, L.; Parkinson, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    Iron oxides play an increasingly prominent role in heterogeneous catalysis, hydrogen production, spintronics, and drug delivery. The surface or material interface can be performance-limiting in these applications, so it is vital to determine accurate atomic-scale structures for iron oxides and understand why they form. Using a combination of quantitative low-energy electron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, and density functional theory calculations, we show that an ordered array of subsurface iron vacancies and interstitials underlies the well-known (2×2)R45° reconstruction of Fe3O4(001). This hitherto unobserved stabilization mechanism occurs because the iron oxides prefer to redistribute cations in the lattice in response to oxidizing or reducing environments. Many other metal oxides also achieve stoichiometry variation in this way, so such surface structures are likely commonplace.

  14. Modeling stray light from rough surfaces and subsurface scatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, James E.; Goshy, John J.; Pfisterer, Richard N.

    2014-09-01

    Over the years we have developed an adequate theory and understanding of surface scatter from smooth optical surfaces (Rayleigh-Rice), moderately rough surfaces with paraxial incident and scattered angles (Beckmann- Kirchhoff) and even for moderately rough surfaces with arbitrary incident and scattered angles where a linear systems formulation requiring a two-parameter family of surface transfer functions is required to characterize the surface scatter process (generalized Harvey-Shack). However, there is always some new material or surface manufacturing process that provides non-intuitive scatter behavior. The linear systems formulation of surface scatter is potentially useful even for these situations. In this paper we will present empirical models of several classes of rough surfaces or materials (subsurface scatter) that allow us to accurately model the scattering behavior at any incident angle from limited measured scatter data. In particular, scattered radiance appears to continue being the natural quantity that exhibits simple, elegant behavior only in direction cosine space.

  15. Integration of geological remote-sensing techniques in subsurface analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taranik, James V.; Trautwein, Charles M.

    1976-01-01

    Geological remote sensing is defined as the study of the Earth utilizing electromagnetic radiation which is either reflected or emitted from its surface in wavelengths ranging from 0.3 micrometre to 3 metres. The natural surface of the Earth is composed of a diversified combination of surface cover types, and geologists must understand the characteristics of surface cover types to successfully evaluate remotely-sensed data. In some areas landscape surface cover changes throughout the year, and analysis of imagery acquired at different times of year can yield additional geological information. Integration of different scales of analysis allows landscape features to be effectively interpreted. Interpretation of the static elements displayed on imagery is referred to as an image interpretation. Image interpretation is dependent upon: (1) the geologist's understanding of the fundamental aspects of image formation, and (2.) his ability to detect, delineate, and classify image radiometric data; recognize radiometric patterns; and identify landscape surface characteristics as expressed on imagery. A geologic interpretation integrates surface characteristics of the landscape with subsurface geologic relationships. Development of a geologic interpretation from imagery is dependent upon: (1) the geologist's ability to interpret geomorphic processes from their static surface expression as landscape characteristics on imagery, (2) his ability to conceptualize the dynamic processes responsible for the evolution 6f interpreted geologic relationships (his ability to develop geologic models). The integration of geologic remote-sensing techniques in subsurface analysis is illustrated by development of an exploration model for ground water in the Tucson area of Arizona, and by the development of an exploration model for mineralization in southwest Idaho.

  16. Profitable capitation requires accurate costing.

    PubMed

    West, D A; Hicks, L L; Balas, E A; West, T D

    1996-01-01

    In the name of costing accuracy, nurses are asked to track inventory use on per treatment basis when more significant costs, such as general overhead and nursing salaries, are usually allocated to patients or treatments on an average cost basis. Accurate treatment costing and financial viability require analysis of all resources actually consumed in treatment delivery, including nursing services and inventory. More precise costing information enables more profitable decisions as is demonstrated by comparing the ratio-of-cost-to-treatment method (aggregate costing) with alternative activity-based costing methods (ABC). Nurses must participate in this costing process to assure that capitation bids are based upon accurate costs rather than simple averages. PMID:8788799

  17. Tidal response of Europa's subsurface ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatekin, Özgür; Comblen, Richard; Toubeau, Jonathan; Deleersnijder, Eric; van Hoolst, Tim; Dehant, Veronique

    2010-05-01

    Observations of Cassini and Galileo spacecrafts suggest the presence of subsurface global water oceans under the icy shells of several satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. Previous studies have shown that in the presence of subsurface oceans, time-variable tides cause large periodic surface displacements and that tidal dissipation in the icy shell becomes a major energy source that can affect long-term orbital evolution. However, in most studies so far, the dynamics of these satellite oceans have been neglected. In the present study, we investigate the tidal response of the subsurface ocean of Europa to a time-varying potential. Two-dimensional nonlinear shallow water equations are solved on a sphere by means of a finite element code. The resulting ocean tidal flow velocities and surface displacements will be presented.

  18. Complete Subsurface Elemental Composition Measurements With PING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    The Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument will measure the complete bulk elemental composition of the subsurface of Mars as well as any other solid planetary body. PING can thus be a highly effective tool for both detailed local geochemistry science investigations and precision measurements of Mars subsurface reSOurces in preparation for future human exploration. As such, PING is thus fully capable of meeting a majority of both ncar and far term elements in Challenge #1 presented for this conference. Measuring the ncar subsurface composition of Mars will enable many of the MEPAG science goals and will be key to filling an important Strategic Knowledge Gap with regard to In situ Resources Utilization (ISRU) needs for human exploration. [1, 2] PING will thus fill an important niche in the Mars Exploration Program.

  19. Improving the biodegradative capacity of subsurface bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Romine, M.F.; Brockman, F.J.

    1993-04-01

    The continual release of large volumes of synthetic materials into the environment by agricultural and industrial sources over the last few decades has resulted in pollution of the subsurface environment. Cleanup has been difficult because of the relative inaccessibility of the contaminants caused by their wide dispersal in the deep subsurface, often at low concentrations and in large volumes. As a possible solution for these problems, interest in the introduction of biodegradative bacteria for in situ remediation of these sites has increased greatly in recent years (Timmis et al. 1988). Selection of biodegradative microbes to apply in such cleanup is limited to those strains that can survive among the native bacterial and predator community members at the particular pH, temperature, and moisture status of the site (Alexander, 1984). The use of microorganisms isolated from subsurface environments would be advantageous because the organisms are already adapted to the subsurface conditions. The options are further narrowed to strains that are able to degrade the contaminant rapidly, even in the presence of highly recalcitrant anthropogenic waste mixtures, and in conditions that do not require addition of further toxic compounds for the expression of the biodegradative capacity (Sayler et al. 1990). These obstacles can be overcome by placing the genes of well-characterized biodegradative enzymes under the control of promoters that can be regulated by inexpensive and nontoxic external factors and then moving the new genetic constructs into diverse groups of subsurface microbes. ne objective of this research is to test this hypothesis by comparing expression of two different toluene biodegradative enzymatic pathways from two different regulatable promoters in a variety of subsurface isolates.

  20. MSTS - Multiphase Subsurface Transport Simulator theory manual

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.D.; Nichols, W.E.

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy, through the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office, has designated the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada for detailed study as the candidate US geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Site characterization will determine the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for the potential waste repository. If the site is determined suitable, subsequent studies and characterization will be conducted to obtain authorization from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to construct the potential waste repository. A principal component of the characterization and licensing processes involves numerically predicting the thermal and hydrologic response of the subsurface environment of the Yucca Mountain site to the potential repository over a 10,000-year period. The thermal and hydrologic response of the subsurface environment to the repository is anticipated to include complex processes of countercurrent vapor and liquid migration, multiple-phase heat transfer, multiple-phase transport, and geochemical reactions. Numerical simulators based on mathematical descriptions of these subsurface phenomena are required to make numerical predictions of the thermal and hydrologic response of the Yucca Mountain subsurface environment The engineering simulator called the Multiphase Subsurface Transport Simulator (MSTS) was developed at the request of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office to produce numerical predictions of subsurface flow and transport phenomena at the potential Yucca Mountain site. This document delineates the design architecture and describes the specific computational algorithms that compose MSTS. Details for using MSTS and sample problems are given in the {open_quotes}User`s Guide and Reference{close_quotes} companion document.

  1. Accurate reservoir evaluation from borehole imaging techniques and thin bed log analysis: Case studies in shaly sands and complex lithologies in Lower Eocene Sands, Block III, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Coll, C.; Rondon, L.

    1996-08-01

    Computer-aided signal processing in combination with different types of quantitative log evaluation techniques is very useful for predicting reservoir quality in complex lithologies and will help to increase the confidence level to complete and produce a reservoir. The Lower Eocene Sands in Block III are one of the largest reservoirs in Block III and it has produced light oil since 1960. Analysis of Borehole Images shows the reservoir heterogeneity by the presence of massive sands with very few shale laminations and thinnly bedded sands with a lot of laminations. The effect of these shales is a low resistivity that has been interpreted in most of the cases as water bearing sands. A reduction of the porosity due to diagenetic processes has produced a high-resistivity behaviour. The presence of bed boundaries and shales is detected by the microconductivity curves of the Borehole Imaging Tools allowing the estimation of the percentage of shale on these sands. Interactive computer-aided analysis and various image processing techniques are used to aid in log interpretation for estimating formation properties. Integration between these results, core information and production data was used for evaluating producibility of the reservoirs and to predict reservoir quality. A new estimation of the net pay thickness using this new technique is presented with the consequent improvement on the expectation of additional recovery. This methodology was successfully applied in a case by case study showing consistency in the area.

  2. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Pemberton, Bradley E.; May, Christopher P.; Rossabi, Joseph

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus is provided which passively removes contaminated gases from a subsurface. The apparatus includes a riser pipe extending into a subsurface which has an exterior end in fluid communication with a valve. When well pressure is greater than atmospheric pressure, the valve opens to release contaminants into the atmosphere, and when well pressure is less than atmospheric pressure, the valve closes to prevent flow of air into the well. The valve assembly of the invention comprises a lightweight ball which is lifted from its valve seat with a slight pressure drop between the well and the atmosphere.

  3. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh; Vinegar, Harold J.

    2011-04-26

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  4. Subsurface Microbes Expanding the Tree of Life

    SciTech Connect

    Banfield, Jillian

    2015-05-11

    Jillian Banfield, Ph.D., UC Berkeley Professor and Berkeley Lab Earth Sciences Division staff scientist and long-time user of the DOE Joint Genome Institute’s resources shares her perspective on how the DOE JGI helps advance her research addressing knowledge gaps related to the roles of subsurface microbial communities in biogeochemical cycling. The video was filmed near the town of Rifle, Colorado at the primary field site for Phase I of the Subsurface Systems Scientific Focus Area 2.0 sponsored by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

  5. Induction heaters used to heat subsurface formations

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh; Bass, Ronald M.

    2012-04-24

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes an elongated electrical conductor located in the subsurface formation. The electrical conductor extends between at least a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact. A ferromagnetic conductor at least partially surrounds and at least partially extends lengthwise around the electrical conductor. The electrical conductor, when energized with time-varying electrical current, induces sufficient electrical current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor such that the ferromagnetic conductor resistively heats to a temperature of at least about 300.degree. C.

  6. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Pemberton, B.E.; May, C.P.; Rossabi, J.

    1997-06-24

    An apparatus is provided which passively removes contaminated gases from a subsurface. The apparatus includes a riser pipe extending into a subsurface which has an exterior end in fluid communication with a valve. When well pressure is greater than atmospheric pressure, the valve opens to release contaminants into the atmosphere, and when well pressure is less than atmospheric pressure, the valve closes to prevent flow of air into the well. The valve assembly of the invention comprises a lightweight ball which is lifted from its valve seat with a slight pressure drop between the well and the atmosphere. 7 figs.

  7. Image Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peay, Christopher S.; Palacios, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Calibrate_Image calibrates images obtained from focal plane arrays so that the output image more accurately represents the observed scene. The function takes as input a degraded image along with a flat field image and a dark frame image produced by the focal plane array and outputs a corrected image. The three most prominent sources of image degradation are corrected for: dark current accumulation, gain non-uniformity across the focal plane array, and hot and/or dead pixels in the array. In the corrected output image the dark current is subtracted, the gain variation is equalized, and values for hot and dead pixels are estimated, using bicubic interpolation techniques.

  8. Using lunar sounder imagery to distinguish surface from subsurface reflectors in lunar highlands areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Bonnie L.; Carter, James L.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a method using the Apollo 17 Lunar Sounder imagery data which appears capable of filtering out off-nadir surface noise from highland area profiles, so that subsurface features may now be detected in highland areas as well as mare areas. Previously, this had been impossible because the rough topography in the highland areas created noise in the profiles which could not be distinguished from subsurface echoes. The new method is an image processing procedure involving the computerized selection of pixels which represent intermediate echo intensity values, then manually removing those pixels from the profile. Using this technique, a subsurface feature with a horizontal extent of about 150 km, at a calculated depth of approximately 3 km, has been detected beneath the crater Riccioli in the highlands near Oceanus Procellarum. This result shows that the ALSE data contain much useful information that remains to be extracted and used.

  9. Seismic Techniques for Subsurface Voids Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritto, Roland; Korneev, Valeri; Elobaid Elnaiem, Ali; Mohamed, Fathelrahman; Sadooni, Fadhil

    2016-04-01

    A major hazards in Qatar is the presence of karst, which is ubiquitous throughout the country including depressions, sinkholes, and caves. Causes for the development of karst include faulting and fracturing where fluids find pathways through limestone and dissolve the host rock to form caverns. Of particular concern in rapidly growing metropolitan areas that expand in heretofore unexplored regions are the collapse of such caverns. Because Qatar has seen a recent boom in construction, including the planning and development of complete new sub-sections of metropolitan areas, the development areas need to be investigated for the presence of karst to determine their suitability for the planned project. In this paper, we present the results of a study to demonstrate a variety of seismic techniques to detect the presence of a karst analog in form of a vertical water-collection shaft located on the campus of Qatar University, Doha, Qatar. Seismic waves are well suited for karst detection and characterization. Voids represent high-contrast seismic objects that exhibit strong responses due to incident seismic waves. However, the complex geometry of karst, including shape and size, makes their imaging nontrivial. While karst detection can be reduced to the simple problem of detecting an anomaly, karst characterization can be complicated by the 3D nature of the problem of unknown scale, where irregular surfaces can generate diffracted waves of different kind. In our presentation we employ a variety of seismic techniques to demonstrate the detection and characterization of a vertical water collection shaft analyzing the phase, amplitude and spectral information of seismic waves that have been scattered by the object. We used the reduction in seismic wave amplitudes and the delay in phase arrival times in the geometrical shadow of the vertical shaft to independently detect and locate the object in space. Additionally, we use narrow band-pass filtered data combining two

  10. Real-time, Three-dimensional Aquifer Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, A.; Jones, J. W.; Mongrain, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    Commonly-employed subsurface investigation techniques such as drilling and soil sampling, aquifer testing, tracer testing, groundwater sampling and analytical test work yield valuable subsurface information, yet they provide little direct information about the migration pathways followed by contaminants. Meaningful site assessment and remediation work require an accurate assessment of these migration pathways. Since these pathways generally represent a small proportion of the subsurface, accurate characterization data are key to the design of effective remediation programs on a contaminated site. Methods capable of interrogating volumetric properties of the subsurface are necessary to define migration pathways followed by contaminants, develop an accurate conceptualization of the subsurface, and to support a better understanding of contaminant conditions. Of course, to be of practical use at ‘typical’ sites, the methods must be cost-effective and work in existing conventionally-completed monitoring wells. This paper presents the results of real-time geophysical measurements in the context of a tracer test that used de-ionized water and a fluorescent tracer. The purpose of these field activities was to conduct detailed characterization of the aquifer properties to support the design of a groundwater remediation program. The geophysical approach provided real-time, 3 D measurement and images of the evolving changes in the electric conductivity (resistivity) and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) in the aquifer. The de-ionized water provided strong electrochemical changes and allowed both parameters to be rapidly and cost-effectively measured in-situ. Our approach provided continuous monitoring of these diagnostic parameters using readily-deployed down-hole electrode arrays to generate detailed profiles in multiple wells and cross-hole resistivity images of groundwater conditions, prior to, during and after the tracer injection. The geophysical data clearly

  11. Composition and structure of the shallow subsurface of Ceres revealed by crater morphology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bland, Michael; Carol A. Raymond,; Paul Schenk,; Roger R. Fu,; Thomas Kneisl,; Jan Hendrick Pasckert,; Harold Hiesinger,; Frank Preusker,; Ryan S. Park,; Simone Marchi,; Scott King,; Julie C. Castillo-Rogez,; Christopher T. Russell,

    2016-01-01

    Before NASA’s Dawn mission, the dwarf planet Ceres was widely believed to contain a substantial ice-rich layer below its rocky surface. The existence of such a layer has significant implications for Ceres’s formation, evolution, and astrobiological potential. Ceres is warmer than icy worlds in the outer Solar System and, if its shallow subsurface is ice-rich, large impact craters are expected to be erased by viscous flow on short geologic timescales. Here we use digital terrain models derived from Dawn Framing Camera images to show that most of Ceres’s largest craters are several kilometres deep, and are therefore inconsistent with the existence of an ice-rich subsurface. We further show from numerical simulations that the absence of viscous relaxation over billion-year timescales implies a subsurface viscosity that is at least one thousand times greater than that of pure water ice. We conclude that Ceres’s shallow subsurface is no more than 30% to 40% ice by volume, with a mixture of rock, salts and/or clathrates accounting for the other 60% to 70%. However, several anomalously shallow craters are consistent with limited viscous relaxation and may indicate spatial variations in subsurface ice content.

  12. Composition and structure of the shallow subsurface of Ceres revealed by crater morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland, Michael T.; Raymond, Carol A.; Schenk, Paul M.; Fu, Roger R.; Kneissl, Thomas; Pasckert, Jan Hendrik; Hiesinger, Harry; Preusker, Frank; Park, Ryan S.; Marchi, Simone; King, Scott D.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-07-01

    Before NASA’s Dawn mission, the dwarf planet Ceres was widely believed to contain a substantial ice-rich layer below its rocky surface. The existence of such a layer has significant implications for Ceres’s formation, evolution, and astrobiological potential. Ceres is warmer than icy worlds in the outer Solar System and, if its shallow subsurface is ice-rich, large impact craters are expected to be erased by viscous flow on short geologic timescales. Here we use digital terrain models derived from Dawn Framing Camera images to show that most of Ceres’s largest craters are several kilometres deep, and are therefore inconsistent with the existence of an ice-rich subsurface. We further show from numerical simulations that the absence of viscous relaxation over billion-year timescales implies a subsurface viscosity that is at least one thousand times greater than that of pure water ice. We conclude that Ceres’s shallow subsurface is no more than 30% to 40% ice by volume, with a mixture of rock, salts and/or clathrates accounting for the other 60% to 70%. However, several anomalously shallow craters are consistent with limited viscous relaxation and may indicate spatial variations in subsurface ice content.

  13. Geometric reconstruction using tracked ultrasound strain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Simpson, Amber L.; Ondrake, Janet E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2013-03-01

    The accurate identification of tumor margins during neurosurgery is a primary concern for the surgeon in order to maximize resection of malignant tissue while preserving normal function. The use of preoperative imaging for guidance is standard of care, but tumor margins are not always clear even when contrast agents are used, and so margins are often determined intraoperatively by visual and tactile feedback. Ultrasound strain imaging creates a quantitative representation of tissue stiffness which can be used in real-time. The information offered by strain imaging can be placed within a conventional image-guidance workflow by tracking the ultrasound probe and calibrating the image plane, which facilitates interpretation of the data by placing it within a common coordinate space with preoperative imaging. Tumor geometry in strain imaging is then directly comparable to the geometry in preoperative imaging. This paper presents a tracked ultrasound strain imaging system capable of co-registering with preoperative tomograms and also of reconstructing a 3D surface using the border of the strain lesion. In a preliminary study using four phantoms with subsurface tumors, tracked strain imaging was registered to preoperative image volumes and then tumor surfaces were reconstructed using contours extracted from strain image slices. The volumes of the phantom tumors reconstructed from tracked strain imaging were approximately between 1.5 to 2.4 cm3, which was similar to the CT volumes of 1.0 to 2.3 cm3. Future work will be done to robustly characterize the reconstruction accuracy of the system.

  14. Accurate documentation and wound measurement.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Sylvie

    This article, part 4 in a series on wound management, addresses the sometimes routine yet crucial task of documentation. Clear and accurate records of a wound enable its progress to be determined so the appropriate treatment can be applied. Thorough records mean any practitioner picking up a patient's notes will know when the wound was last checked, how it looked and what dressing and/or treatment was applied, ensuring continuity of care. Documenting every assessment also has legal implications, demonstrating due consideration and care of the patient and the rationale for any treatment carried out. Part 5 in the series discusses wound dressing characteristics and selection.

  15. Image

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Amber; Harsch, Tim; Pitt, Julie; Firpo, Mike; Lekin, April; Pardes, Elizabeth

    2007-08-31

    The computer side of the IMAGE project consists of a collection of Perl scripts that perform a variety of tasks; scripts are available to insert, update and delete data from the underlying Oracle database, download data from NCBI's Genbank and other sources, and generate data files for download by interested parties. Web scripts make up the tracking interface, and various tools available on the project web-site (image.llnl.gov) that provide a search interface to the database.

  16. BIODEGRADATION OF ATRAZINE IN SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pesticide atrazine is frequently detected in ground water, including ground water used as drinking water. Little information is available on the fate of atrazine in the subsurface, including its biodegradability. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the biodegradabil...

  17. Is Europa's Subsurface Water Ocean Warm?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, H. J.; Ekholm, A. G.; Showman, A. P.; Lorenz, R. D.

    2002-01-01

    Europa's subsurface water ocean may be warm: that is, at the temperature of water's maximum density. This provides a natural explanation of chaos melt-through events and leads to a correct estimate of the age of its surface. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Methods for forming long subsurface heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong Sub

    2013-09-17

    A method for forming a longitudinal subsurface heater includes longitudinally welding an electrically conductive sheath of an insulated conductor heater along at least one longitudinal strip of metal. The longitudinal strip is formed into a tubular around the insulated conductor heater with the insulated conductor heater welded along the inside surface of the tubular.

  19. Subsurface manure application to reduce ammonia emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Incorporation into soil is generally recommended to reduce ammonia volatilization and nutrient runoff following land application of manures. A range of subsurface applicators are available for manure incorporation with minimal soil disturbance in reduced tillage systems, but none have been widely a...

  20. Lateral gene transfer in the subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Barkay, Tamar; Sobecky, Patricia

    2007-08-27

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) is an important adaptive mechanism among prokaryotic organisms. This mechanism is particularly important for the response of microorganisms to changing environmental conditions because it facilitates the transfer of a large number of genes and their rapid expression. Together the transferred genes promote rapid genetic and metabolic changes that may enhance survival to newly established and sometimes hostile environmental conditions. The goal of our project was to examine if and how LGT enhances microbial adaptation to toxic heavy metals in subsurface environments that had been contaminated by mixed wastes due to activities associated with the production of nuclear energy and weapons. This task has been accomplished by dividing the project to several sub-tasks. Thus, we: (1) Determined the level of resistance of subsurface bacterial isolates to several toxic metals, all identified as pollutants of concern in subsurface environments; (2) Designed, tested, and applied, a molecular approach that determined whether metal resistance genes had evolved by LGT among subsurface bacteria; and (3) Developed a DNA hybridization array for the identification of broad host range plasmids and of metal resistance plasmids. The results are briefly summarized below with references to published papers and manuscripts in preparation where details about our research can be found. Additional information may be found in copies of our published manuscripts and conference proceedings, and our yearly reports that were submitted through the RIMS system.

  1. Biomarker Preservation Potential of Subsurface Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onstott, T. C.; Harris, R. L.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Pedersen, K. A.; Colwell, F. S.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Phelps, T. J.; Kieft, T. L.; Bakermans, C.

    2016-05-01

    If surface life emerged on Mars it may have succumbed to a Gaian bottleneck, whereas subsurface life would have continued to grow and evolve sheltered in rocks with sub-freezing saline pore water and their remains preserved in excavated rock.

  2. Irrigation strategies using subsurface drip irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) is practiced on approximately 60,000 ha in the Texas High Plains region of the USA. Adoption of SDI continues to increase in the region. This has been attributed to record drought in Texas and the US Southwest in recent years, declining irrigation well yields, and ev...

  3. Liquid cryobrines in the subsurface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möhlmann, Diedrich

    Liquid cryobrines in the subsurface of Mars D. Mühlmann, DLR Institut für Planetenforschung, Berlin (dirk.moehlmann@dlr.de) Thermodynamics shows that undercooled liquid interfacial water must necessarily exist in the upper surface of Mars, at least temporarily. In case of a given presence of soluble salt grains in the soil with attached interfacial water (of atmospheric-or ice-origin) there must evolve liquid brines ("cryobrines"). The eutectic temperature of cryobrines can be far below 0 C and numerous known brines will remain liquid at martian temperatures. Liquid cryobrines are therefore expected to exist at appropriate sites in the subsurface of Mars, at least temporarily but also at present. Properties like eutectic phase diagrams, related water activity and stability of "Mars-relevant" salts and brines under current martian atmospheric conditions are presented and discussed. It is described that the presence of at least temporarily liquid cryobrines in the subsurface soil can be related to rheological phenomena of viscous liquid brines, and that liquid cryobrines are a current challenge in view of their possible support to a habitability of the subsurface of Mars.

  4. Surface and subsurface oxygen on Pd(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisenberger, F. P.; Koller, G.; Sock, M.; Surnev, S.; Ramsey, M. G.; Netzer, F. P.; Klötzer, B.; Hayek, K.

    2000-01-01

    The interaction of O2 with Pd(111) in the temperature range from 300 K to 1000 K was studied by molecular beam adsorption, thermal desorption (TDS), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). Using a capillary array doser and high effective oxygen pressures, evidence was found for the formation of a densely packed chemisorbed oxygen adlayer saturating at ΘO close to 1 and separately for subsurface migration of oxygen at elevated temperatures, but not at room temperature and below. Up to completion of a p(2×2) oxygen adlayer at 0.25 ML surface coverage, the dissociative sticking probability of oxygen into the chemisorbed state is high and masks the much slower diffusion into the bulk. Beyond 0.25 ML surface coverage, the adsorption rate into the chemisorbed state becomes small and the influence of bulk migration detectable. Exposure of the sample to high oxygen dosages at 1000 K fills up the subsurface reservoir and subsequent sticking measurements are no longer influenced by oxygen loss to the bulk. The subsurface oxygen could be distinguished in both XPS and off-specular HREELS. These latter techniques revealed that considerable concentrations of oxygen in the near-surface region can build up, even at lower temperatures (523 K) and oxygen exposures (40 L). In contrast to chemisorbed oxygen atoms on Pd(111), the subsurface species cannot be removed by reaction with CO.

  5. Full-field IR measurement of subsurface grinding temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakagami, Takahide; Madhavan, Viswanathan; Harish, G.; Krishnamurthy, K.; Ju, Yongqing; Farris, Thomas N.; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    1998-03-01

    A multiple-element, forward looking IR system is used to measure the subsurface temperature field produced by dry grinding of steel with both aluminum oxide and cubic boron nitride (CBN) grinding wheels. The technique is base don imaging the IR radiation obtained from the side of the specimen. A recent theoretical analysis of heat partition and surface temperatures in grinding is reviewed. The analysis partitions heat on the two length scales pertinent to grinding between the workpiece, wheel, coolant and chips. Spectral analysis is combined with FFT techniques to calculate subsurface temperature contours from the predicted heat partition. The numerical predictions of the model are shown to agree wit the experimental results taken for a range of grinding conditions. It is found that heat partition varies over a wide range depending on grinding conditions. Also, heat partition is a strong function of position inside the grinding zone. The presence of the fluid inside the grinding zone can reduce the heat flux into the workpiece and the workpiece temperature significantly. For typical grinding of steel with CBN, or creep feed grinding of steel with aluminum oxide or CBN, it is possible to keep the fluid active and therefore to reduce thermal damage. However, the analysis suggests that the fluid may not be effective inside the grinding zone, in the conventional grinding of steel with aluminum oxide, due to boiling. It is also found that a moderate ratio of the workpiece velocity to wheel velocity gives high temperatures and therefore should be avoided.

  6. Mapping the Upper Subsurface of MARS Using Radar Polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, L. M.; Rincon, R.; Berkoski, L.

    2012-01-01

    Future human exploration of Mars will require detailed knowledge of the surface and upper several meters of the subsurface in potential landing sites. Likewise, many of the Planetary Science Decadal Survey science goals, such as understanding the history of Mars climate change, determining how the surface was altered through processes like volcanism and fluvial activity, and locating regions that may have been hospitable to life in the past, would be significantly advanced through mapping of the upper meters of the surface. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is the only remote sensing technique capable of penetrating through meters of material and imaging buried surfaces at high (meters to tens-of-meters) spatial resolution. SAR is capable of mapping the boundaries of buried units and radar polarimetry can provide quantitative information about the roughness of surface and subsurface units, depth of burial of stratigraphic units, and density of materials. Orbital SAR systems can obtain broad coverage at a spatial scale relevant to human and robotic surface operations. A polarimetric SAR system would greatly increase the safety and utility of future landed systems including sample caching.

  7. Imaging beneath the skin of large tropical rivers: Clay controls on system morphodynamics revealed by novel CHIRP sub-surface sonar and deep coring along the Fly and Strickland Rivers, Papua New Guinea (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, R. E.; Grenfell, M.; Lauer, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Tropical rivers dominate Earth’s fluvial fluxes for water, carbon, and mineral sediment. They are characterized by large channels and floodplains, old system histories (in comparison to many temperate rivers), frequent and prolonged periods of flooding, and a clay-dominated sediment flux transported above a sandy bed. However, limited insight is available regarding the underlying bed & floodplain strata -- material that underpins system mobility and morphodynamics. Available data commonly stems from “skin-deep” approaches such as GIS analysis of imagery, shallow sampling of a surface veneer, & topographic profiling during lower river stages. Given the large temporal & spatial scales of such systems, new approaches are needed to see below lag deposits on mobile sandy beds & deep into expansive floodbasins. Furthermore, such data are needed to test whether we can usefully interpret large tropical river morphology using direct analogies to observations from small temperate sytems. Systems responding to sea level rise, pending avulsions, or an increase/contrast in sediment load would provide especially valuable insight. We conducted a field campaign along the Fly and Strickland Rivers in Papua New Guinea (discharge ~ 5,400 CMS). Immediate results were obtained using a dual-frequency CHIRP sub-bottom profiler optimized for fluvial environments, with which we were able to image 10-20m below the river/lake bed. We were able to distinguish sandy deposits from harder clay and silt lenses and also collected bed grab samples to verify our sonar results. Deep borehole samples (5-15m), push cores, and cutbank profiles of material strength confirmed observations from the sonar profiling. We simultaneously collected side-scan sonar imagery plus DGPS water/bed elevations. Findings include: 1) The prevalence of hard clay beneath the bed at many locations along the Lower Fly and Strickland Rivers, retarding migration; 2) Unusual bed morphology along the lower Middle Fly River

  8. Accurate Telescope Mount Positioning with MEMS Accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, L.; Jaskó, A.; Pál, A.; Csépány, G.

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes the advantages and challenges of applying microelectromechanical accelerometer systems (MEMS accelerometers) in order to attain precise, accurate, and stateless positioning of telescope mounts. This provides a completely independent method from other forms of electronic, optical, mechanical or magnetic feedback or real-time astrometry. Our goal is to reach the subarcminute range which is considerably smaller than the field-of-view of conventional imaging telescope systems. Here we present how this subarcminute accuracy can be achieved with very cheap MEMS sensors and we also detail how our procedures can be extended in order to attain even finer measurements. In addition, our paper discusses how can a complete system design be implemented in order to be a part of a telescope control system.

  9. SU-C-BRB-06: Utilizing 3D Scanner and Printer for Dummy Eye-Shield: Artifact-Free CT Images of Tungsten Eye-Shield for Accurate Dose Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J; Lee, J; Kim, H; Kim, I; Ye, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of a tungsten eye-shield on the dose distribution of a patient. Methods: A 3D scanner was used to extract the dimension and shape of a tungsten eye-shield in the STL format. Scanned data was transferred into a 3D printer. A dummy eye shield was then produced using bio-resin (3D systems, VisiJet M3 Proplast). For a patient with mucinous carcinoma, the planning CT was obtained with the dummy eye-shield placed on the patient’s right eye. Field shaping of 6 MeV was performed using a patient-specific cerrobend block on the 15 x 15 cm{sup 2} applicator. The gantry angle was 330° to cover the planning target volume near by the lens. EGS4/BEAMnrc was commissioned from our measurement data from a Varian 21EX. For the CT-based dose calculation using EGS4/DOSXYZnrc, the CT images were converted to a phantom file through the ctcreate program. The phantom file had the same resolution as the planning CT images. By assigning the CT numbers of the dummy eye-shield region to 17000, the real dose distributions below the tungsten eye-shield were calculated in EGS4/DOSXYZnrc. In the TPS, the CT number of the dummy eye-shield region was assigned to the maximum allowable CT number (3000). Results: As compared to the maximum dose, the MC dose on the right lens or below the eye shield area was less than 2%, while the corresponding RTP calculated dose was an unrealistic value of approximately 50%. Conclusion: Utilizing a 3D scanner and a 3D printer, a dummy eye-shield for electron treatment can be easily produced. The artifact-free CT images were successfully incorporated into the CT-based Monte Carlo simulations. The developed method was useful in predicting the realistic dose distributions around the lens blocked with the tungsten shield.

  10. Accurately Mapping M31's Microlensing Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, Arlin

    2004-07-01

    We propose to augment an existing microlensing survey of M31 with source identifications provided by a modest amount of ACS {and WFPC2 parallel} observations to yield an accurate measurement of the masses responsible for microlensing in M31, and presumably much of its dark matter. The main benefit of these data is the determination of the physical {or "einstein"} timescale of each microlensing event, rather than an effective {"FWHM"} timescale, allowing masses to be determined more than twice as accurately as without HST data. The einstein timescale is the ratio of the lensing cross-sectional radius and relative velocities. Velocities are known from kinematics, and the cross-section is directly proportional to the {unknown} lensing mass. We cannot easily measure these quantities without knowing the amplification, hence the baseline magnitude, which requires the resolution of HST to find the source star. This makes a crucial difference because M31 lens m ass determinations can be more accurate than those towards the Magellanic Clouds through our Galaxy's halo {for the same number of microlensing events} due to the better constrained geometry in the M31 microlensing situation. Furthermore, our larger survey, just completed, should yield at least 100 M31 microlensing events, more than any Magellanic survey. A small amount of ACS+WFPC2 imaging will deliver the potential of this large database {about 350 nights}. For the whole survey {and a delta-function mass distribution} the mass error should approach only about 15%, or about 6% error in slope for a power-law distribution. These results will better allow us to pinpoint the lens halo fraction, and the shape of the halo lens spatial distribution, and allow generalization/comparison of the nature of halo dark matter in spiral galaxies. In addition, we will be able to establish the baseline magnitude for about 50, 000 variable stars, as well as measure an unprecedentedly deta iled color-magnitude diagram and luminosity

  11. Visualization of subsurface nanoparticles in a polymer matrix using resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kuniko; Kobayashi, Kei; Yao, Atsushi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2016-10-14

    A visualization technique of subsurface features with a nanometer-scale spatial resolution is strongly demanded. Some research groups have demonstrated the visualization of subsurface features using various techniques based on atomic force microscopy. However, the imaging mechanisms have not yet been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated the visualization of subsurface Au nanoparticles buried in a polymer matrix 900 nm from the surface using two techniques; i.e., resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy. It was clarified that the subsurface features were visualized by the two techniques as the area with a higher contact resonance frequency and a higher Q-factor than those in the surrounding area, which suggests that the visualization is realized by the variation of the contact stiffness and damping of the polymer matrix due to the existence of the buried nanoparticles. PMID:27607548

  12. Visualization of subsurface nanoparticles in a polymer matrix using resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kuniko; Kobayashi, Kei; Yao, Atsushi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2016-10-14

    A visualization technique of subsurface features with a nanometer-scale spatial resolution is strongly demanded. Some research groups have demonstrated the visualization of subsurface features using various techniques based on atomic force microscopy. However, the imaging mechanisms have not yet been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated the visualization of subsurface Au nanoparticles buried in a polymer matrix 900 nm from the surface using two techniques; i.e., resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy. It was clarified that the subsurface features were visualized by the two techniques as the area with a higher contact resonance frequency and a higher Q-factor than those in the surrounding area, which suggests that the visualization is realized by the variation of the contact stiffness and damping of the polymer matrix due to the existence of the buried nanoparticles.

  13. Visualization of subsurface nanoparticles in a polymer matrix using resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Kuniko; Kobayashi, Kei; Yao, Atsushi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2016-10-01

    A visualization technique of subsurface features with a nanometer-scale spatial resolution is strongly demanded. Some research groups have demonstrated the visualization of subsurface features using various techniques based on atomic force microscopy. However, the imaging mechanisms have not yet been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated the visualization of subsurface Au nanoparticles buried in a polymer matrix 900 nm from the surface using two techniques; i.e., resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy. It was clarified that the subsurface features were visualized by the two techniques as the area with a higher contact resonance frequency and a higher Q-factor than those in the surrounding area, which suggests that the visualization is realized by the variation of the contact stiffness and damping of the polymer matrix due to the existence of the buried nanoparticles.

  14. Global optimization for multisensor fusion in seismic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Barhen, J.; Protopopescu, V.; Reister, D.

    1997-06-01

    The accurate imaging of subsurface structures requires the fusion of data collected from large arrays of seismic sensors. The fusion process is formulated as an optimization problem and yields an extremely complex energy surface. Due to the very large number of local minima to be explored and escaped from, the seismic imaging problem has typically been tackled with stochastic optimization methods based on Monte Carlo techniques. Unfortunately, these algorithms are very cumbersome and computationally intensive. Here, the authors present TRUST--a novel deterministic algorithm for global optimization that they apply to seismic imaging. The excellent results demonstrate that TRUST may provide the necessary breakthrough to address major scientific and technological challenges in fields as diverse as seismic modeling, process optimization, and protein engineering.

  15. The importance of accurate atmospheric modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Dylan; Schroeder, John; Liang, Pang

    2014-11-01

    This paper will focus on the effect of atmospheric conditions on EO sensor performance using computer models. We have shown the importance of accurately modeling atmospheric effects for predicting the performance of an EO sensor. A simple example will demonstrated how real conditions for several sites in China will significantly impact on image correction, hyperspectral imaging, and remote sensing. The current state-of-the-art model for computing atmospheric transmission and radiance is, MODTRAN® 5, developed by the US Air Force Research Laboratory and Spectral Science, Inc. Research by the US Air Force, Navy and Army resulted in the public release of LOWTRAN 2 in the early 1970's. Subsequent releases of LOWTRAN and MODTRAN® have continued until the present. Please verify that (1) all pages are present, (2) all figures are correct, (3) all fonts and special characters are correct, and (4) all text and figures fit within the red margin lines shown on this review document. Complete formatting information is available at http://SPIE.org/manuscripts Return to the Manage Active Submissions page at http://spie.org/submissions/tasks.aspx and approve or disapprove this submission. Your manuscript will not be published without this approval. Please contact author_help@spie.org with any questions or concerns. The paper will demonstrate the importance of using validated models and local measured meteorological, atmospheric and aerosol conditions to accurately simulate the atmospheric transmission and radiance. Frequently default conditions are used which can produce errors of as much as 75% in these values. This can have significant impact on remote sensing applications.

  16. Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Microorganisms Under Hot Deep Subsurface Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruper, S.; Sharma, A.; Scott, J. H.

    2010-04-01

    In subsurface environments the availability of terminal electron acceptors will be the major biogeochemical constraint, before temperature or pressure begin plays a role. Data is presented to show the impact of deep hot subsurface conditions on dissimilatory iron reduction.

  17. Groundtruth approach to accurate quantitation of fluorescence microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Mascio-Kegelmeyer, L; Tomascik-Cheeseman, L; Burnett, M S; van Hummelen, P; Wyrobek, A J

    2000-12-01

    To more accurately measure fluorescent signals from microarrays, we calibrated our acquisition and analysis systems by using groundtruth samples comprised of known quantities of red and green gene-specific DNA probes hybridized to cDNA targets. We imaged the slides with a full-field, white light CCD imager and analyzed them with our custom analysis software. Here we compare, for multiple genes, results obtained with and without preprocessing (alignment, color crosstalk compensation, dark field subtraction, and integration time). We also evaluate the accuracy of various image processing and analysis techniques (background subtraction, segmentation, quantitation and normalization). This methodology calibrates and validates our system for accurate quantitative measurement of microarrays. Specifically, we show that preprocessing the images produces results significantly closer to the known ground-truth for these samples.

  18. Clinical cross-polarization optical coherence tomography assessment of subsurface enamel below dental resin composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Lenton, Patricia; Rudney, Joel; Fok, Alex; Jones, Robert S

    2014-04-01

    A newly designed intraoral swept source cross-polarization optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) imaging system was used to examine the integrity of the subsurface enamel below resin composite restorations placed in primary teeth. CP-OCT analysis was performed using images obtained from resin composite restoration in 62 ([Formula: see text]) pediatric subjects. Clinical examination was performed by a single examiner prior to CP-OCT imaging and analysis. CP-OCT images are presented using a unique combined intensity image, where a false color scale is overlaid on the grayscale intensity image. There was a clear difference in the distribution of the mean-backscattered intensity (mR) between restorations recently placed and those possessing frank cavitation (Student's t-test, [Formula: see text]). For mR above 15.49 dB, the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 86%. The Youden index J was 0.8 above 12.3 dB where sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 80%. CP-OCT imaging may be used to confirm the subsurface marginal integrity below resin composite restorations but with careful consideration of limitations of the imaging modality. CP-OCT imaging may be a useful adjunct to clinical visual investigation to confirm that a composite margin has a sound and well-adapted interface.

  19. SPLASH: Accurate OH maser positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Andrew; Gomez, Jose F.; Jones, Paul; Cunningham, Maria; Green, James; Dawson, Joanne; Ellingsen, Simon; Breen, Shari; Imai, Hiroshi; Lowe, Vicki; Jones, Courtney

    2013-10-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) 18 cm lines are powerful and versatile probes of diffuse molecular gas, that may trace a largely unstudied component of the Galactic ISM. SPLASH (the Southern Parkes Large Area Survey in Hydroxyl) is a large, unbiased and fully-sampled survey of OH emission, absorption and masers in the Galactic Plane that will achieve sensitivities an order of magnitude better than previous work. In this proposal, we request ATCA time to follow up OH maser candidates. This will give us accurate (~10") positions of the masers, which can be compared to other maser positions from HOPS, MMB and MALT-45 and will provide full polarisation measurements towards a sample of OH masers that have not been observed in MAGMO.

  20. Subsurface detection and characterization of Hertzian cracks in advanced ceramic materials using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkansky, Mark; Reintjes, John F.

    2002-06-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an active optical imaging technique that is capable of three-dimensional resolution better than 10 microns in all dimensions. OCT was originally developed as a non-invasive technique in biomedical field. It also found uses in the NDE of various materials including ceramics, plastics and composites. In various ceramics OCT can be used to detect microscopic, subsurface defects at depths approaching hundreds of microns. The depth of penetration depends on the material and on the wavelength of light. Here we demonstrate an application of OCT to the subsurface imaging in various materials and, in particular, to the detection of a surface-penetrating Hertzian crack in a Si3N4 ceramic ball. We present measured subsurface trajectory of the crack and compare it to theoretical predictions. These cracks represent one of the most important failure mechanisms in advanced ceramic materials. The ability to map subsurface trajectories of cracks is a valuable tool in the evaluation of different existing theories. Better theoretical understanding of various properties of crack initiation and propagation can lead to engineering of improved ceramic materials.

  1. An innovative approach for locating and evaluating subsurface pathways for nitrogen loss.

    PubMed

    Walthall, C L; Gish, T J; Daughtry, C S; Dulaney, W P; Kung, K J; McCarty, G; Timlin, D; Angier, J T; Buss, P; Houser, P R

    2001-12-04

    Fundamental watershed-scale processes governing chemical flux to neighboring ecosystems are so poorly understood that effective strategies for mitigating chemical contamination cannot be formulated. Characterization of evapotranspiration, surface runoff, plant uptake, subsurface preferential flow, behavior of the chemicals in neighboring ecosystems, and an understanding of how crop management practices influence these processes are needed. Adequate characterization of subsurface flow has been especially difficult because conventional sampling methods are ineffective for measuring preferential flow of water and solutes. A sampling strategy based on ground-penetrating radar (GPR) mapping of subsurface structures coupled with near real-time soil moisture data, surface topography, remotely sensed imagery, and a geographic information system (GIS) appears to offer a means of accurately identifying subsurface preferential flow pathways. Four small adjacent watersheds draining into a riparian wetland and first-order stream at the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, Beltsville, MD are being studied with this protocol. The spatial location of some preferential flow pathways for chemicals exiting these agricultural watersheds to the neighboring ecosystems have been identified. Confirmation of the pathways is via examination of patterns in yield monitor data and remote sensing imagery.

  2. MEMS accelerometers in accurate mount positioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, László; Pál, András.; Jaskó, Attila

    2014-07-01

    In order to attain precise, accurate and stateless positioning of telescope mounts we apply microelectromechanical accelerometer systems (also known as MEMS accelerometers). In common practice, feedback from the mount position is provided by electronic, optical or magneto-mechanical systems or via real-time astrometric solution based on the acquired images. Hence, MEMS-based systems are completely independent from these mechanisms. Our goal is to investigate the advantages and challenges of applying such devices and to reach the sub-arcminute range { that is well smaller than the field-of-view of conventional imaging telescope systems. We present how this sub-arcminute accuracy can be achieved with very cheap MEMS sensors. Basically, these sensors yield raw output within an accuracy of a few degrees. We show what kind of calibration procedures could exploit spherical and cylindrical constraints between accelerometer output channels in order to achieve the previously mentioned accuracy level. We also demonstrate how can our implementation be inserted in a telescope control system. Although this attainable precision is less than both the resolution of telescope mount drive mechanics and the accuracy of astrometric solutions, the independent nature of attitude determination could significantly increase the reliability of autonomous or remotely operated astronomical observations.

  3. Spreadsheet log analysis in subsurface geology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doveton, J.H.

    2000-01-01

    Most of the direct knowledge of the geology of the subsurface is gained from the examination of core and drill-cuttings recovered from boreholes drilled by the petroleum and water industries. Wireline logs run in these same boreholes generally have been restricted to tasks of lithostratigraphic correlation and thee location of hydrocarbon pay zones. However, the range of petrophysical measurements has expanded markedly in recent years, so that log traces now can be transformed to estimates of rock composition. Increasingly, logs are available in a digital format that can be read easily by a desktop computer and processed by simple spreadsheet software methods. Taken together, these developments offer accessible tools for new insights into subsurface geology that complement the traditional, but limited, sources of core and cutting observations.

  4. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR SUBSURFACE EXCAVATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    R. Garrett

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface excavation system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  5. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR SUBSURFACE VENTILATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Garrett

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface ventilation system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P7 ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  6. Drill Embedded Nanosensors For Planetary Subsurface Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a carbon nanotube (CNT) sensor for water vapor detection under Martian Conditions and the miniaturized electronics can be embedded in the drill bit for collecting sensor data and transmit it to a computer wirelessly.This capability will enable the real time measurement of ice during drilling. With this real time and in-situ measurement, subsurface ice detection can be easy, fast, precise and low cost.

  7. Surface Signature of Subsurface-Intensified Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciani, D.; Carton, X. J.; Chapron, B.; Bashmachnikov, I.

    2014-12-01

    The ocean at mesoscale (20-200 km) and submesoscale (0.5-20km) is highly populated by vortices. These recirculating structures are more energetic than the mean flow, they trap water masses from their origin areas and advect them across the ocean, with consequent impact on the 3D distribution of heat and tracers. Mesoscale and submesoscale structures characterize the ocean dynamics both at the sea surface and at intrathermocline depths (0-1500m), and are presently investigated by means of model outputs, in-situ and satellite (surface) data, the latest being the only way to get high resolution and synoptic observations at planetary scale (e.g., thermal-band observations, future altimetric observations given by the SWOT satellite mission). The scientific question arising from this context is related to the role of the ocean surface for inferring informations on mesoscale and submesoscale vortices at depth. This study has also been motivated by the recent detection of subsurface eddies east of the Arabian Peninsula (PHYSINDIEN experiment - 2011).Using analytical models in the frame of the QG theory, we could describe the theoretical altimetric signature of non-drifting and of drifting subsurface eddies. Numerical experiments, using both coupled QG-SQG and primitive equations models, allowed us to investigate the surface expression of intrathermocline eddies interacting with baroclinic currents or evolving under planetary beta-effect. The eddy characteristics (radius, depth, thickness, velocity) were varied, to represent various oceanic examples (Meddies, Swoddies, Reddies, Peddies, Leddies). Idealized simulations with the ROMS model, confirming theoretical estimates, showed that drifting subsurface-intensified vortices can induce dipolar sea level anomalies, up to 3 cm. This result, compatibly with future SWOT measurement accuracies (about 2 cm), is a first step towards systematic and synoptic detection of subsurface vortices.

  8. Metalliferous Biosignatures for Deep Subsurface Microbial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnell, John; Brolly, Connor; Spinks, Sam; Bowden, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    The interaction of microbes and metals is widely assumed to have occurred in surface or very shallow subsurface environments. However new evidence suggests that much microbial activity occurs in the deep subsurface. Fluvial, lacustrine and aeolian `red beds' contain widespread centimetre-scale reduction spheroids in which a pale reduced spheroid in otherwise red rocks contains a metalliferous core. Most of the reduction of Fe (III) in sediments is caused by Fe (III) reducing bacteria. They have the potential to reduce a range of metals and metalloids, including V, Cu, Mo, U and Se, by substituting them for Fe (III) as electron acceptors, which are all elements common in reduction spheroids. The spheroidal morphology indicates that they were formed at depth, after compaction, which is consistent with a microbial formation. Given that the consequences of Fe (III) reduction have a visual expression, they are potential biosignatures during exploration of the terrestrial and extraterrestrial geological record. There is debate about the energy available from Fe (III) reduction on Mars, but the abundance of iron in Martian soils makes it one of the most valuable prospects for life there. Entrapment of the microbes themselves as fossils is possible, but a more realistic target during the exploration of Mars would be the colour contrasts reflecting selective reduction or oxidation. This can be achieved by analysing quartz grains across a reduction spheroid using Raman spectroscopy, which demonstrates its suitability for life detection in subsurface environments. Microbial action is the most suitable explanation for the formation of reduction spheroids and may act as metalliferous biosignatures for deep subsurface microbial activity.

  9. Subsurface materials management and containment system

    DOEpatents

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kosteinik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2004-07-06

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  10. Subsurface materials management and containment system

    DOEpatents

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2006-10-17

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

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