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Sample records for accurate target delineation

  1. [Radiotherapy for cervix carcinomas: clinical target volume delineation].

    PubMed

    Gnep, K; Mazeron, R

    2013-10-01

    Concurrent chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy is currently the standard treatment for locally advanced cervix carcinomas. Modern radiation techniques require planning based on 3D images, and therefore an accurate delineation of target volumes. The clinical target volume (CTV) used for the different phases of treatment are now well defined, but are not always easy to delineate on a CT scan which is currently the standard examination for simulation in radiotherapy. MRI and PET-CT are routinely performed at diagnosis, and can be used to improve the accuracy of the delineation. The objective of this review is to describe the definitions and recommendations of CTV in the treatment of cervical cancer.

  2. Comparison of three image segmentation techniques for target volume delineation in positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Drever, Laura A; Roa, Wilson; McEwan, Alexander; Robinson, Don

    2007-03-09

    Incorporation of positron emission tomography (PET) data into radiotherapy planning is currently under investigation for numerous sites including lung, brain, head and neck, breast, and prostate. Accurate tumor-volume quantification is essential to the proper utilization of the unique information provided by PET. Unfortunately,target delineation within PET currently remains a largely unaddressed problem. We therefore examined the ability of three segmentation methods-thresholding, Sobel edge detection, and the watershed approach-to yield accurate delineation of PET target cross-sections. A phantom study employing well-defined cylindrical and spherical volumes and activity distributions provided an opportunity to assess the relative efficacy with which the three approaches could yield accurate target delineation in PET. Results revealed that threshold segmentation can accurately delineate target cross-sections, but that the Sobel and watershed techniques both consistently fail to correctly identify the size of experimental volumes. The usefulness of threshold-based segmentation is limited, however, by the dependence of the correct threshold (that which returns the correct area at each image slice) on target size.

  3. Guidelines for delineation of lymphatic clinical target volumes for high conformal radiotherapy: head and neck region

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The success of radiotherapy depends on the accurate delineation of the clinical target volume. The delineation of the lymph node regions has most impact, especially for tumors in the head and neck region. The purpose of this article was the development an atlas for the delineation of the clinical target volume for patients, who should receive radiotherapy for a tumor of the head and neck region. Literature was reviewed for localisations of the adjacent lymph node regions and their lymph drain in dependence of the tumor entity. On this basis the lymph node regions were contoured on transversal CT slices. The probability for involvement was reviewed and a recommendation for the delineation of the CTV was generated. PMID:21854585

  4. Accurate Automatic Delineation of Heterogeneous Functional Volumes in Positron Emission Tomography for Oncology Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hatt, Mathieu; Cheze le Rest, Catherine; Descourt, Patrice; Dekker, Andre; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Oellers, Michel; Lambin, Philippe; Pradier, Olivier; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Accurate contouring of positron emission tomography (PET) functional volumes is now considered crucial in image-guided radiotherapy and other oncology applications because the use of functional imaging allows for biological target definition. In addition, the definition of variable uptake regions within the tumor itself may facilitate dose painting for dosimetry optimization. Methods and Materials: Current state-of-the-art algorithms for functional volume segmentation use adaptive thresholding. We developed an approach called fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian (FLAB), validated on homogeneous objects, and then improved it by allowing the use of up to three tumor classes for the delineation of inhomogeneous tumors (3-FLAB). Simulated and real tumors with histology data containing homogeneous and heterogeneous activity distributions were used to assess the algorithm's accuracy. Results: The new 3-FLAB algorithm is able to extract the overall tumor from the background tissues and delineate variable uptake regions within the tumors, with higher accuracy and robustness compared with adaptive threshold (T{sub bckg}) and fuzzy C-means (FCM). 3-FLAB performed with a mean classification error of less than 9% +- 8% on the simulated tumors, whereas binary-only implementation led to errors of 15% +- 11%. T{sub bckg} and FCM led to mean errors of 20% +- 12% and 17% +- 14%, respectively. 3-FLAB also led to more robust estimation of the maximum diameters of tumors with histology measurements, with <6% standard deviation, whereas binary FLAB, T{sub bckg} and FCM lead to 10%, 12%, and 13%, respectively. Conclusion: These encouraging results warrant further investigation in future studies that will investigate the impact of 3-FLAB in radiotherapy treatment planning, diagnosis, and therapy response evaluation.

  5. Interobserver Variation of Clinical Target Volume Delineation in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Edwin; Verheij, Marcel

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate interobserver variability in clinical target volume (CTV) delineation in gastric cancer performed with the help of a delineation guide. Patients and Methods: Ten radiotherapy centers that participate in the CRITICS Phase III trial were provided with a delineation atlas, preoperative CT scans, a postoperative planning CT scan, and clinical information for a gastric cancer case and were asked to construct a CTV and create a dosimetric plan according to departmental policy. Results: The volumes of the CTVs and planning target volumes (PTVs) differed greatly, with a mean (SD) CTV volume of 392 (176) cm{sup 3} (range, 240-821cm{sup 3}) and PTV volume of 915 (312) cm{sup 3} (range, 634-1677cm{sup 3}). The overlapping volume was 376cm{sup 3} for the CTV and 890cm{sup 3} for the PTV. The greatest differences in the CTV were seen at the cranial and caudal parts. After planning, dose coverage of the overlapping PTV volume showed less variability than the CTV. Conclusion: In this series of 10 plans, variability of the CTV in postoperative chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer is large. Strict and clear delineation guidelines should be provided, especially in Phase III multicenter studies. Adaptations of these guidelines should be evaluated in clinical studies.

  6. Clinical target volume delineation including elective nodal irradiation in preoperative and definitive radiotherapy of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy (RT) is widely used in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Currently, recommendation has been given for the delineation of the clinical target volume (CTV) in adjuvant RT. Based on recently reviewed pathologic data, the aim of this study is to propose criteria for the CTV definition and delineation including elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in the preoperative and definitive treatment of pancreatic cancer. Methods The anatomical structures of interest, as well as the abdominal vasculature were identified on intravenous contrast-enhanced CT scans of two different patients with pancreatic cancer of the head and the body. To delineate the lymph node area, a margin of 10 mm was added to the arteries. Results We proposed a set of guidelines for elective treatment of high-risk nodal areas and CTV delineation. Reference CT images were provided. Conclusions The proposed guidelines could be used for preoperative or definitive RT for carcinoma of the head and body of the pancreas. Further clinical investigations are needed to validate the defined CTVs. PMID:22691275

  7. Photo-acoustic imaging of blue nanoparticle targeted brain tumor for intra-operative glioma delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Wang, Xueding; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Hah, HoeJin; Kim, Gwangseong; Chen, Thomas; Orrienger, Daniel; Sagher, Oren; Kopelman, Raoul

    2011-07-01

    Distinguishing the tumor from the background neo-plastic tissue is challenging for cancer surgery such as surgical resection of glioma. Attempts have been made to use visible or fluorescent markers to delineate the tumors during surgery. However, the systemic injection of the dyes requires high dose, resulting in negative side effects. A novel method to delineate rat brain tumors intra-operatively, as well as post-operatively, using a highly sensitive photoacoustic imaging technique enhanced by tumor targeting blue nanoparticle as contrast agent is demonstrated. The nanoparticles are made of polyacrylamide (PAA) matrix with covalently linked Coomassie-Blue dye. They contain 7.0% dye and the average size is 80nm. Their surface was conjugated with F3 peptide for active tumor targeting. These nanoparticles are nontoxic, chemically inert and have long plasma circulation lifetime, making them suitable as nanodevices for imaging using photoacoustics. Experiments on phantoms and rat brains tumors ex-vivo demonstrate the high sensitivity of photoacoustic imaging in delineating the tumor, containing contrast agent at concentrations too low to be visualized by eye. The control tumors without nanoparticles did not show any enhanced signal. This study shows that photoacoustic imaging facilitated with the nanoparticle contrast agent could contribute to future surgical procedures for glioma.

  8. Evaluation of Peritumoral Edema in the Delineation of Radiotherapy Clinical Target Volumes for Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Eric L. . E-mail: echang@mdanderson.org; Akyurek, Serap; Avalos, Tedde C; Rebueno, Neal C; Spicer, Chris C; Garcia, John C; Famiglietti, Robin; Allen, Pamela K.; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y.; Maor, Moshe H.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the spatial relationship between peritumoral edema and recurrence pattern in patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Forty-eight primary GBM patients received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy that did not intentionally include peritumoral edema within the clinical target volume between July 2000 and June 2001. All 48 patients have subsequently recurred, and their original treatment planning parameters were used for this study. New theoretical radiation treatment plans were created for the same 48 patients, based on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) target delineation guidelines that specify inclusion of peritumoral edema. Target volume and recurrent tumor coverage, as well as percent volume of normal brain irradiated, were assessed for both methods of target delineation using dose-volume histograms. Results: A comparison between the location of recurrent tumor and peritumoral edema volumes from all 48 cases failed to show correlation by linear regression modeling (r {sup 2} 0.0007; p = 0.3). For patients with edema >75 cm{sup 3}, the percent volume of brain irradiated to 46 Gy was significantly greater in treatment plans that intentionally included peritumoral edema compared with those that did not (38% vs. 31%; p = 0.003). The pattern of failure was identical between the two sets of plans (40 central, 3 in-field, 3 marginal, and 2 distant recurrence). Conclusion: Clinical target volume delineation based on a 2-cm margin rather than on peritumoral edema did not seem to alter the central pattern of failure for patients with GBM. For patients with peritumoral edema >75 cm{sup 3}, using a constant 2-cm margin resulted in a smaller median percent volume of brain being irradiated to 30 Gy, 46 Gy, and 50 Gy compared with corresponding theoretical RTOG plans that deliberately included peritumoral edema.

  9. SU-E-J-231: Comparison of 3D Angiogram and MRI in Delineating the AVM Target for Frameless Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Avkshtol, V; Tanny, S; Reddy, K; Chen, C; Parsai, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) provides an excellent alternative to embolization and surgical excision for the management of appropriately selected cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The currently accepted standard for delineating AVMs is planar digital subtraction angiography (DSA). DSA can be used to acquire a 3D data set that preserves osseous structures (3D-DA) at the time of the angiography for SRT planning. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an alternative noninvasive method of visualizing the AVM nidus with comparable spatial resolution. We utilized 3D-DA and T1 post-contrast MRI data to evaluate the differences in SRT target volumes. Methods: Four patients underwent 3D-DA and high-resolution MRI. 3D T1 post-contrast images were obtained in all three reconstruction planes. A planning CT was fused with MRI and 3D-DA data sets. The AVMs were contoured utilizing one of the image sets at a time. Target volume, centroid, and maximum and minimum dimensions were analyzed for each patient. Results: Targets delineated using post-contrast MRI demonstrated a larger mean volume. AVMs >2 cc were found to have a larger difference between MRI and 3D-DA volumes. Larger AVMs also demonstrated a smaller relative uncertainty in contour centroid position (1 mm). AVM targets <2 cc had smaller absolute differences in volume, but larger differences in contour centroid position (2.5 mm). MRI targets demonstrated a more irregular shape compared to 3D-DA targets. Conclusions: Our preliminary data supports the use of MRI alone to delineate AVM targets >2 cc. The greater centroid stability for AVMs >2 cc ensures accurate target localization during image fusion. The larger MRI target volumes did not result in prohibitively greater volumes of normal brain tissue receiving the prescription dose. The larger centroid instability for AVMs <2 cc precludes the use of MRI alone for target delineation. We recommend incorporating a 3D-DA for these patients.

  10. Postoperative radiation in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and target volume delineation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yingming; Li, Minghuan; Kong, Li; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer death worldwide, and patients who are treated with surgery alone, without neoadjuvant therapies, experience frequent relapses. Whether postoperative therapies could reduce the recurrence or improve overall survival is still controversial for these patients. The purpose of our review is to figure out the value of postoperative adjuvant therapy and address the disputes about target volume delineation according to published data. Based on the evidence of increased morbidity and disadvantages on patient survival caused by postoperative chemotherapy or radiotherapy (RT) alone provided by studies in the early 1990s, the use of postoperative adjuvant therapies in cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma has diminished substantially and has been replaced gradually by neoadjuvant chemoradiation. With advances in surgery and RT, accumulating evidence has recently rekindled interest in the delivery of postoperative RT or chemoradiotherapy in patients with stage T3/T4 or N1 (lymph node positive) carcinomas after radical surgery. However, due to complications with the standard radiation field, a nonconforming modified field has been adopted in most studies. Therefore, we analyze different field applications and provide suggestions on the optimization of the radiation field based on the major sites of relapse and the surgical non-clearance area. For upper and middle thoracic esophageal carcinomas, the bilateral supraclavicular and superior mediastinal areas remain common sites of recurrence and should be encompassed within the clinical target volume. In contrast, a consensus has yet to be reached regarding lower thoracic esophageal carcinomas; the “standard” clinical target volume is still recommended. Further studies of larger sample sizes should focus on different recurrence patterns, categorized by tumor locations, refined classifications, and differing molecular biology, to provide more information on the

  11. Improving superficial target delineation in radiation therapy with endoscopic tracking and registration

    SciTech Connect

    Weersink, R. A.; Qiu, J.; Hope, A. J.; Daly, M. J.; Cho, B. C. J.; DaCosta, R. S.; Sharpe, M. B.; Breen, S. L.; Chan, H.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: Target delineation within volumetric imaging is a critical step in the planning process of intensity modulated radiation therapy. In endoluminal cancers, endoscopy often reveals superficial areas of visible disease beyond what is seen on volumetric imaging. Quantitatively relating these findings to the volumetric imaging is prone to human error during the recall and contouring of the target. We have developed a method to improve target delineation in the radiation therapy planning process by quantitatively registering endoscopic findings contours traced on endoscopic images to volumetric imaging. Methods: Using electromagnetic sensors embedded in an endoscope, 2D endoscopic images were registered to computed tomography (CT) volumetric images by tracking the position and orientation of the endoscope relative to a CT image set. Regions-of-interest (ROI) in the 2D endoscopic view were delineated. A mesh created within the boundary of the ROI was projected onto the 3D image data, registering the ROI with the volumetric image. This 3D ROI was exported to clinical radiation treatment planning software. The precision and accuracy of the procedure was tested on two solid phantoms with superficial markings visible on both endoscopy and CT images. The first phantom was T-shaped tube with X-marks etched on the interior. The second phantom was an anatomically correct skull phantom with a phantom superficial lesion placed on the pharyngeal surface. Markings were contoured on the endoscope images and compared with contours delineated in the treatment planning system based on the CT images. Clinical feasibility was tested on three patients with early stage glottic cancer. Image-based rendering using manually identified landmarks was used to improve the registration. Results: Using the T-shaped phantom with X-markings, the 2D to 3D registration accuracy was 1.5-3.5 mm, depending on the endoscope position relative to the markings. Intraobserver standard variation was 0

  12. A multimodality segmentation framework for automatic target delineation in head and neck radiotherapy a)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinzhong; Beadle, Beth M.; Garden, Adam S.; Schwartz, David L.; Aristophanous, Michalis

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an automatic segmentation algorithm integrating imaging information from computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to delineate target volume in head and neck cancer radiotherapy. Methods: Eleven patients with unresectable disease at the tonsil or base of tongue who underwent MRI, CT, and PET/CT within two months before the start of radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy were recruited for the study. For each patient, PET/CT and T1-weighted contrast MRI scans were first registered to the planning CT using deformable and rigid registration, respectively, to resample the PET and magnetic resonance (MR) images to the planning CT space. A binary mask was manually defined to identify the tumor area. The resampled PET and MR images, the planning CT image, and the binary mask were fed into the automatic segmentation algorithm for target delineation. The algorithm was based on a multichannel Gaussian mixture model and solved using an expectation–maximization algorithm with Markov random fields. To evaluate the algorithm, we compared the multichannel autosegmentation with an autosegmentation method using only PET images. The physician-defined gross tumor volume (GTV) was used as the “ground truth” for quantitative evaluation. Results: The median multichannel segmented GTV of the primary tumor was 15.7 cm3 (range, 6.6–44.3 cm3), while the PET segmented GTV was 10.2 cm3 (range, 2.8–45.1 cm3). The median physician-defined GTV was 22.1 cm3 (range, 4.2–38.4 cm3). The median difference between the multichannel segmented and physician-defined GTVs was −10.7%, not showing a statistically significant difference (p-value = 0.43). However, the median difference between the PET segmented and physician-defined GTVs was −19.2%, showing a statistically significant difference (p-value =0.0037). The median Dice similarity coefficient between the multichannel segmented and physician-defined GTVs was 0

  13. Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy for the Definitive Treatment of Cervix Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Karen; Portelance, Lorraine; Creutzberg, Carien; Juergenliemk-Schulz, Ina M.; Mundt, Arno; Mell, Loren K.; Mayr, Nina; Viswanathan, Akila; Jhingran, Anuja; Erickson, Beth; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Gaffney, David; Yashar, Catheryn; Beriwal, Sushil; Wolfson, Aaron

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Accurate target definition is vitally important for definitive treatment of cervix cancer with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), yet a definition of clinical target volume (CTV) remains variable within the literature. The aim of this study was to develop a consensus CTV definition in preparation for a Phase 2 clinical trial being planned by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Methods and Materials: A guidelines consensus working group meeting was convened in June 2008 for the purposes of developing target definition guidelines for IMRT for the intact cervix. A draft document of recommendations for CTV definition was created and used to aid in contouring a clinical case. The clinical case was then analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with kappa statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. Results: Nineteen experts in gynecological radiation oncology generated contours on axial magnetic resonance images of the pelvis. Substantial STAPLE agreement sensitivity and specificity values were seen for gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation (0.84 and 0.96, respectively) with a kappa statistic of 0.68 (p < 0.0001). Agreement for delineation of cervix, uterus, vagina, and parametria was moderate. Conclusions: This report provides guidelines for CTV definition in the definitive cervix cancer setting for the purposes of IMRT, building on previously published guidelines for IMRT in the postoperative setting.

  14. Uncertainties in target volume delineation in radiotherapy – are they relevant and what can we do about them?

    PubMed Central

    Segedin, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Modern radiotherapy techniques enable delivery of high doses to the target volume without escalating dose to organs at risk, offering the possibility of better local control while preserving good quality of life. Uncertainties in target volume delineation have been demonstrated for most tumour sites, and various studies indicate that inconsistencies in target volume delineation may be larger than errors in all other steps of the treatment planning and delivery process. The aim of this paper is to summarize the degree of delineation uncertainties for different tumour sites reported in the literature and review the effect of strategies to minimize them. Conclusions Our review confirmed that interobserver variability in target volume contouring represents the largest uncertainty in the process for most tumour sites, potentially resulting in a systematic error in dose delivery, which could influence local control in individual patients. For most tumour sites the optimal combination of imaging modalities for target delineation still needs to be determined. Strict use of delineation guidelines and protocols is advisable both in every day clinical practice and in clinical studies to diminish interobserver variability. Continuing medical education of radiation oncologists cannot be overemphasized, intensive formal training on interpretation of sectional imaging should be included in the program for radiation oncology residents. PMID:27679540

  15. Retroperitoneal Sarcoma Target Volume and Organ at Risk Contour Delineation Agreement Among NRG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists

    SciTech Connect

    Baldini, Elizabeth H.; Abrams, Ross A.; Bosch, Walter; Roberge, David; Haas, Rick L.M.; Catton, Charles N.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Olsen, Jeffrey R.; Deville, Curtiland; Chen, Yen-Lin; Finkelstein, Steven E.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Wang, Dian

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the variability in target volume and organ at risk (OAR) contour delineation for retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) among 12 sarcoma radiation oncologists. Methods and Materials: Radiation planning computed tomography (CT) scans for 2 cases of RPS were distributed among 12 sarcoma radiation oncologists with instructions for contouring gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), high-risk CTV (HR CTV: area judged to be at high risk of resulting in positive margins after resection), and OARs: bowel bag, small bowel, colon, stomach, and duodenum. Analysis of contour agreement was performed using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm and kappa statistics. Results: Ten radiation oncologists contoured both RPS cases, 1 contoured only RPS1, and 1 contoured only RPS2 such that each case was contoured by 11 radiation oncologists. The first case (RPS 1) was a patient with a de-differentiated (DD) liposarcoma (LPS) with a predominant well-differentiated (WD) component, and the second case (RPS 2) was a patient with DD LPS made up almost entirely of a DD component. Contouring agreement for GTV and CTV contours was high. However, the agreement for HR CTVs was only moderate. For OARs, agreement for stomach, bowel bag, small bowel, and colon was high, but agreement for duodenum (distorted by tumor in one of these cases) was fair to moderate. Conclusions: For preoperative treatment of RPS, sarcoma radiation oncologists contoured GTV, CTV, and most OARs with a high level of agreement. HR CTV contours were more variable. Further clarification of this volume with the help of sarcoma surgical oncologists is necessary to reach consensus. More attention to delineation of the duodenum is also needed.

  16. SU-E-J-34: Clinical Evaluation of Targeting Accuracy and Tractogrphy Delineation of Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Juh, R; Suh, T; Kim, Y; Han, J; Kim, C; Oh, C; Kim, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Focal radiosurgery is a common treatment modality for trigeminal neuralgia (TN), a neuropathic facial pain condition. Assessment of treatment effectiveness is primarily clinical, given the paucity of investigational tools to assess trigeminal nerve changes. The efficiency of radiosurgery is related to its highly precise targeting. We assessed clinically the targeting accuracy of radiosurgery with Gamma knife. We hypothesized that trigeminal tractography provides more information than 2D-MR imaging, allowing detection of unique, focal changes in the target area after radiosurgery. Methods: Sixteen TN patients (2 females, 4 male, average age 65.3 years) treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, 40 Gy/50% isodose line underwent 1.5Tesla MR trigeminal nerve . Target accuracy was assessed from deviation of the coordinates of the target compared with the center of enhancement on post MRI. Radiation dose delivered at the borders of contrast enhancement was evaluated Results: The median deviation of the coordinates between the intended target and the center of contrast enhancement was within 1mm. The radiation doses fitting within the borders of the contrast enhancement the target ranged from 37.5 to 40 Gy. Trigeminal tractography accurately detected the radiosurgical target. Radiosurgery resulted in 47% drop in FA values at the target with no significant change in FA outside the target, suggesting that radiosurgery primarily affects myelin. Tractography was more sensitive, since FA changes were detected regardless of trigeminal nerve enhancement Conclusion: The median deviation found in clinical assessment of gamma knife treatment for TN Is low and compatible with its high rate of efficiency. DTI parameters accurately detect the effects of focal radiosurgery on the trigeminal nerve, serving as an in vivo imaging tool to study TN. This study is a proof of principle for further assessment of DTI parameters to understand the pathophysiology of TN and treatment effects.

  17. SU-D-16A-02: A Novel Methodology for Accurate, Semi-Automated Delineation of Oral Mucosa for Radiation Therapy Dose-Response Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, J; Welsh, L; Gulliford, S; Harrington, K; Nutting, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The significant morbidity caused by radiation-induced acute oral mucositis means that studies aiming to elucidate dose-response relationships in this tissue are a high priority. However, there is currently no standardized method for delineating the mucosal structures within the oral cavity. This report describes the development of a methodology to delineate the oral mucosa accurately on CT scans in a semi-automated manner. Methods: An oral mucosa atlas for automated segmentation was constructed using the RayStation Atlas-Based Segmentation (ABS) module. A radiation oncologist manually delineated the full surface of the oral mucosa on a planning CT scan of a patient receiving radiotherapy (RT) to the head and neck region. A 3mm fixed annulus was added to incorporate the mucosal wall thickness. This structure was saved as an atlas template. ABS followed by model-based segmentation was performed on four further patients sequentially, adding each patient to the atlas. Manual editing of the automatically segmented structure was performed. A dose comparison between these contours and previously used oral cavity volume contours was performed. Results: The new approach was successful in delineating the mucosa, as assessed by an experienced radiation oncologist, when applied to a new series of patients receiving head and neck RT. Reductions in the mean doses obtained when using the new delineation approach, compared with the previously used technique, were demonstrated for all patients (median: 36.0%, range: 25.6% – 39.6%) and were of a magnitude that might be expected to be clinically significant. Differences in the maximum dose that might reasonably be expected to be clinically significant were observed for two patients. Conclusion: The method developed provides a means of obtaining the dose distribution delivered to the oral mucosa more accurately than has previously been achieved. This will enable the acquisition of high quality dosimetric data for use in

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging- Versus Computed Tomography-Based Target Volume Delineation of the Glandular Breast Tissue (Clinical Target Volume Breast) in Breast-Conserving Therapy: An Exploratory Study

    SciTech Connect

    Giezen, Marina; Kouwenhoven, Erik; Scholten, Astrid N.; Coerkamp, Emile G.; Heijenbrok, Mark; Jansen, Wim P.A.; Mast, Mirjam E.; Petoukhova, Anna L.; Struikmans, Henk

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To examine MRI and CT for glandular breast tissue (GBT) volume delineation and to assess interobserver variability. Methods and Materials: Fifteen breast cancer patients underwent a planning CT and MRI, consecutively, in the treatment position. Four observers (two radiation oncologists and two radiologists) delineated the GBT according to the CT and separately to the MR images. Volumes, centers of mass, maximum extensions with standard deviations (SD), and interobserver variability were quantified. Observers viewed delineation differences between MRI and CT and delineation differences among observers. Results: In cranio-lateral and cranio-medial directions, GBT volumes were delineated larger using MRI when compared with those delineated with CT. Center of mass on MRI shifted a mean (SD) 17% (4%) into the cranial direction and a mean 3% (4%) into the dorsal direction when compared with that on the planning CT. Only small variations between observers were noted. The GBT volumes were approximately 4% larger on MRI (mean [SD] ratio MRI to CT GBT volumes, 1.04 [0.06]). Findings were concordant with viewed MRI and CT images and contours. Conformity indices were only slightly different; mean conformity index was 77% (3%) for MRI and 79% (4%) for CT. Delineation differences arising from personal preferences remained recognizable irrespective of the imaging modality used. Conclusions: Contoured GBT extends substantially further into the cranio-lateral and cranio-medial directions on MRI when compared with CT. Interobserver variability is comparable for both imaging modalities. Observers should be aware of existing personal delineation preferences. Institutions are recommended to review and discuss target volume delineations and to design supplementary guidelines if necessary.

  19. Head-and-Neck Target Delineation Among Radiation Oncology Residents After a Teaching Intervention: A Prospective, Blinded Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bekelman, Justin E. Wolden, Suzanne; Lee, Nancy

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: We conducted this study to determine the feasibility of incorporating a teaching intervention on target delineation into the educational curriculum of a radiation oncology residency program and to assess the short-term effects on resident skills. Methods and Materials: The study schema consisted of a baseline evaluation, the teaching intervention, and a follow-up evaluation. At the baseline evaluation, the participants contoured three clinical tumor volumes (CTVs) (70 Gy, 59.4 Gy, and 54 Gy) on six contrast-enhanced axial computed tomography images of a de-identified patient with Stage T2N2bM0 squamous cell carcinoma of the right base of the tongue. The participants attended a series of head-and-neck oncology and anatomy seminars. The teaching intervention consisted of a didactic lecture and an interactive hands-on practical session designed to improve the knowledge and skills for target delineation in the head and neck. At the follow-up evaluation, the residents again contoured the CTVs. Results: Of the 14 eligible residents, 11 (79%) actually participated in the study. For all participants, but especially for those who had not had previous experience with head-and-neck target delineation, the teaching intervention was associated with improvement in the delineation of the node-negative neck (CTV 54 Gy contour). Regardless of clinical experience, participants had difficulty determining what should be included in the CTV 59.4 Gy contour to ensure adequate coverage of potential microscopic disease. Conclusion: Incorporating a teaching intervention into the education curriculum of a radiation oncology residency program is feasible and was associated with short-term improvements in target delineation skills. Subsequent interventions will require content refinement, additional validation, longer term follow-up, and multi-institutional collaboration.

  20. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H.; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-02-01

    crucial model input. We conclude that the tumor growth model provides a method to account for anisotropic growth patterns of glioma, and may therefore provide a tool to make target delineation more objective and automated.

  1. SU-E-J-136: Multimodality-Image-Based Target Delineation for Dose Painting of Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dalah, E; Paulson, E; Erickson, B; Li, X

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dose escalated RT may provide improved disease local-control for selected unresectable pancreatic cancer. Accurate delineation of the gross tumor volume (GTV) inside pancreatic head or body would allow safe dose escalation considering the tolerances of adjacent organs at risk (OAR). Here we explore the potential of multi-modality imaging (DCE-MRI, ADC-MRI, and FDG-PET) to define the GTV for dose painting of pancreatic cancer. Volumetric variations of DCE-MRI, ADC-MRI and FDG-PET defined GTVs were assessed in comparison to the findings on CT, and to pathology specimens for resectable and borderline reseactable cases of pancreatic cancer. Methods: A total of 19 representative patients with DCE-MRI, ADC-MRI and FDG-PET data were analyzed. Of these, 8 patients had pathological specimens. GTV, inside pancreatic head/neck, or body, were delineated on MRI (denoted GTVDCE, and GTVADC), on FDG-PET using SUV of 2.5, 40% SUVmax, and 50% SUVmax (denoted GTV2.5, GTV40%, and GTV50%). A Kruskal-Wallis test was used to determine whether significant differences existed between GTV volumes. Results: Significant statistical differences were found between the GTVs defined by DCE-MRI, ADC-MRI, and FDG-PET, with a mean and range of 4.73 (1.00–9.79), 14.52 (3.21–25.49), 22.04 (1.00–45.69), 19.10 (4.84–45.59), and 9.80 (0.32–35.21) cm3 (p<0.0001) for GTVDCE, GTVADC, GTV2.5, GTV40%, and GTV50%, respectively. The mean difference and range in the measurements of maximum dimension of GTVs based on DCE-MRI, ADC-MRI, SUV2.5, 40% SUVmax, and 50% SUVmax compared with pathologic specimens were −0.84 (−2.24 to 0.9), 0.41 (−0.15 to 2.3), 0.58 (−1.41 to 3.69), 0.66 (−0.67 to 1.32), and 0.15 (−1.53 to 2.38) cm, respectively. Conclusion: Differences exists between DCE, ADC, and PET defined target volumes for RT of pancreatic cancer. Further studies combined with pathological specimens are required to identify the optimal imaging modality and/or acquisition method to

  2. Variability of Target and Normal Structure Delineation Using Multimodality Imaging for Radiation Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dalah, Entesar; Moraru, Ion; Paulson, Eric; Erickson, Beth; Li, X. Allen

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To explore the potential of multimodality imaging (dynamic contrast–enhanced magnetic resonance imaging [DCE-MRI], apparent diffusion-coefficient diffusion-weighted imaging [ADC-DWI], fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography [FDG-PET], and computed tomography) to define the gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk in radiation therapy planning for pancreatic cancer. Delineated volumetric changes of DCE-MRI, ADC-DWI, and FDG-PET were assessed in comparison with the finding on 3-dimensional/4-dimensional CT with and without intravenous contrast, and with pathology specimens for resectable and borderline resectable cases of pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: We studied a total of 19 representative patients, whose DCE-MRI, ADC-DWI, and FDG-PET data were reviewed. Gross tumor volume and tumor burden/active region inside pancreatic head/neck or body were delineated on MRI (denoted GTV{sub DCE}, and GTV{sub ADC}), a standardized uptake value (SUV) of 2.5, 40%SUVmax, and 50%SUVmax on FDG-PET (GTV2.5, GTV{sub 40%}, and GTV{sub 50%}). Volumes of the pancreas, duodenum, stomach, liver, and kidneys were contoured according to CT (V{sub CT}), T1-weighted MRI (V{sub T1}), and T2-weighted MRI (V{sub T2}) for 7 patients. Results: Significant statistical differences were found between the GTVs from DCE-MRI, ADC-DW, and FDG-PET, with a mean and range of 4.73 (1.00-9.79), 14.52 (3.21-25.49), 22.04 (1.00-45.69), 19.10 (4.84-45.59), and 9.80 (0.32-35.21) cm{sup 3} for GTV{sub DCE}, GTV{sub ADC}, GTV2.5, GTV{sub 40%}, and GTV{sub 50%}, respectively. The mean difference and range in the measurements of maximum dimension of tumor on DCE-MRI, ADC-DW, SUV2.5, 40%SUVmax, and 50%SUVmax compared with pathologic specimens were −0.84 (−2.24 to 0.9), 0.41 (−0.15 to 2.3), 0.58 (−1.41 to 3.69), 0.66 (−0.67 to 1.32), and 0.15 (−1.53 to 2.38) cm, respectively. The T1- and T2-based volumes for pancreas, duodenum, stomach, and liver were generally smaller

  3. {sup 11}C-methionine PET improves the target volume delineation of meningiomas treated with stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grosu, Anca-Ligia . E-mail: anca-ligia.grosu@lrz.tum.de; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Astner, Sabrina T.; Adam, Markus; Krause, Bernd J.; Schwaiger, Markus; Molls, Michael; Nieder, Carsten

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of {sup 11}C-methionine positron emission tomography (MET-PET) in target volume delineation for meningiomas and to determine the interobserver variability. Methods and Materials: Two independent observers performed treatment planning in 10 patients according to a prospective written protocol. In the first step, they used coregistered computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the second step, MET-PET was added to CT/MRI (image fusion based on mutual information). Results: The correlation between gross tumor volume (GTVs) delineated by the two observers based on CT/MRI was r = 0.855 (Spearman's correlation coefficient, p = 0.002) and r = 0.988 (p = 0.000) when MET-PET/CT/MRI were used. The number of patients with agreement in more then 80% of the outlined volume increased with the availability of MET-PET from 1 in 10 to 5 in 10. The median volume of intersection between the regions delineated by two observers increased significantly from 69% (from the composite volume) to 79%, by the addition of MET-PET (p = 0.005). The information of MET-PET was useful to delineate GTV in the area of cavernous sinus, orbit, and base of the skull. Conclusions: The hypothesis-generating findings of potential normal tissue sparing and reduced interobserver variability provide arguments for invasive studies of the correlation between MET-PET images and histologic tumor extension and for prospective trials of target volume delineation with CT/MRI/MET-PET image fusion.

  4. Biopsy validation of 18F-DOPA PET and biodistribution in gliomas for neurosurgical planning and radiotherapy target delineation: results of a prospective pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Pafundi, Deanna H.; Laack, Nadia N.; Youland, Ryan S.; Parney, Ian F.; Lowe, Val J.; Giannini, Caterina; Kemp, Brad J.; Grams, Michael P.; Morris, Jonathan M.; Hoover, Jason M.; Hu, Leland S.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Brinkmann, Debra H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Delineation of glioma extent for surgical or radiotherapy planning is routinely based on MRI. There is increasing awareness that contrast enhancement on T1-weighted images (T1-CE) may not reflect the entire extent of disease. The amino acid tracer 18F-DOPA (3,4-dihydroxy-6-[18F] fluoro-l-phenylalanine) has a high tumor-to-background signal and high sensitivity for glioma imaging. This study compares 18F-DOPA PET against conventional MRI for neurosurgical biopsy targeting, resection planning, and radiotherapy target volume delineation. Methods Conventional MR and 18F-DOPA PET/CT images were acquired in 10 patients with suspected malignant brain tumors. One to 3 biopsy locations per patient were chosen in regions of concordant and discordant 18F-DOPA uptake and MR contrast enhancement. Histopathology was reviewed on 23 biopsies. 18F-DOPA PET was quantified using standardized uptake values (SUV) and tumor-to-normal hemispheric tissue (T/N) ratios. Results Pathologic review confirmed glioma in 22 of 23 biopsy specimens. Thirteen of 16 high-grade biopsy specimens were obtained from regions of elevated 18F-DOPA uptake, while T1-CE was present in only 6 of those 16 samples. Optimal 18F-DOPA PET thresholds corresponding to high-grade disease based on histopathology were calculated as T/N > 2.0. In every patient, 18F-DOPA uptake regions with T/N > 2.0 extended beyond T1-CE up to a maximum of 3.5 cm. SUV was found to correlate with grade and cellularity. Conclusions 18F-DOPA PET SUVmax may more accurately identify regions of higher-grade/higher-density disease in patients with astrocytomas and will have utility in guiding stereotactic biopsy selection. Using SUV-based thresholds to define high-grade portions of disease may be valuable in delineating radiotherapy boost volumes. PMID:23460322

  5. Detection and delineation of oral cancer with a PARP1 targeted optical imaging agent

    PubMed Central

    Kossatz, Susanne; Brand, Christian; Gutiontov, Stanley; Liu, Jonathan T. C.; Lee, Nancy Y.; Gönen, Mithat; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Reiner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Earlier and more accurate detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is essential to improve the prognosis of patients and to reduce the morbidity of surgical therapy. Here, we demonstrate that the nuclear enzyme Poly(ADP-ribose)Polymerase 1 (PARP1) is a promising target for optical imaging of OSCC with the fluorescent dye PARPi-FL. In patient-derived OSCC specimens, PARP1 expression was increased 7.8 ± 2.6-fold when compared to normal tissue. Intravenous injection of PARPi-FL allowed for high contrast in vivo imaging of human OSCC models in mice with a surgical fluorescence stereoscope and high-resolution imaging systems. The emitted signal was specific for PARP1 expression and, most importantly, PARPi-FL can be used as a topical imaging agent, spatially resolving the orthotopic tongue tumors in vivo. Collectively, our results suggest that PARP1 imaging with PARPi-FL can enhance the detection of oral cancer, serve as a screening tool and help to guide surgical resections. PMID:26900125

  6. Target Volume Delineation in Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography Based on Time Activity Curve Differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teymurazyan, Artur

    Tumor volume delineation plays a critical role in radiation treatment planning and simulation, since inaccurately defined treatment volumes may lead to the overdosing of normal surrounding structures and potentially missing the cancerous tissue. However, the imaging modality almost exclusively used to determine tumor volumes, X-ray Computed Tomography (CT), does not readily exhibit a distinction between cancerous and normal tissue. It has been shown that CT data augmented with PET can improve radiation treatment plans by providing functional information not available otherwise. Presently, static PET scans account for the majority of procedures performed in clinical practice. In the radiation therapy (RT) setting, these scans are visually inspected by a radiation oncologist for the purpose of tumor volume delineation. This approach, however, often results in significant interobserver variability when comparing contours drawn by different experts on the same PET/CT data sets. For this reason, a search for more objective contouring approaches is underway. The major drawback of conventional tumor delineation in static PET images is the fact that two neighboring voxels of the same intensity can exhibit markedly different overall dynamics. Therefore, equal intensity voxels in a static analysis of a PET image may be falsely classified as belonging to the same tissue. Dynamic PET allows the evaluation of image data in the temporal domain, which often describes specific biochemical properties of the imaged tissues. Analysis of dynamic PET data can be used to improve classification of the imaged volume into cancerous and normal tissue. In this thesis we present a novel tumor volume delineation approach (Single Seed Region Growing algorithm in 4D (dynamic) PET or SSRG/4D-PET) in dynamic PET based on TAC (Time Activity Curve) differences. A partially-supervised approach is pursued in order to allow an expert reader to utilize the information available from other imaging

  7. Evaluation of atlas based auto-segmentation for head and neck target volume delineation in adaptive/replan IMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speight, R.; Karakaya, E.; Prestwich, R.; Sen, M.; Lindsay, R.; Harding, R.; Sykes, J.

    2014-03-01

    IMRT for head and neck patients requires clinicians to delineate clinical target volumes (CTV) on a planning-CT (>2hrs/patient). When patients require a replan-CT, CTVs must be re-delineated. This work assesses the performance of atlas-based autosegmentation (ABAS), which uses deformable image registration between planning and replan-CTs to auto-segment CTVs on the replan-CT, based on the planning contours. Fifteen patients with planning-CT and replan-CTs were selected. One clinician delineated CTVs on the planning-CTs and up to three clinicians delineated CTVs on the replan-CTs. Replan-CT volumes were auto-segmented using ABAS using the manual CTVs from the planning-CT as an atlas. ABAS CTVs were edited manually to make them clinically acceptable. Clinicians were timed to estimate savings using ABAS. CTVs were compared using dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and mean distance to agreement (MDA). Mean inter-observer variability (DSC>0.79 and MDA<2.1mm) was found to be greater than intra-observer variability (DSC>0.91 and MDA<1.5mm). Comparing ABAS to manual CTVs gave DSC=0.86 and MDA=2.07mm. Once edited, ABAS volumes agreed more closely with the manual CTVs (DSC=0.87 and MDA=1.87mm). The mean clinician time required to produce CTVs reduced from 169min to 57min when using ABAS. ABAS segments volumes with accuracy close to inter-observer variability however the volumes require some editing before clinical use. Using ABAS reduces contouring time by a factor of three.

  8. Variability in target delineation of cervical carcinoma: A Korean radiation oncology group study (KROG 15-06)

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Ji Hyeon; Cho, Byung Chul; Jeong, Chi Young; Park, Won; Kim, Hak Jae; Yoon, Won Sup; Yoon, Mee Sun; Kim, Ji-Yoon; Choi, Jin Hwa; Choi, Youngmin; Kim, Joo-Young

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine inter-observer variability in target volume definition of cervical cancer in radical and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) settings. Methods Eight physicians contoured CTVs of 2 patients underwent definitive and postoperative RT. Each volume was analyzed using the individual/median volume ratio and generalized conformity index (CIgen). And center of mass (COM) of each contour was calculated. Expert agreement was quantified using an expectation maximization algorithm for Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE). Results For definitive RT, the individual/median volume ratio ranged from 0.51 to 1.41, and CIgen was 0.531. Mean 3-dimensional distances of average to each COM were 7.8 mm. For postoperative RT setting, corresponding values were 0.65–1.38, 0.563, and 5.3 mm. Kappa value of expert agreement was 0.65 and 0.67, respectively. STAPLE estimates of the sensitivity, specificity, and kappa measures of inter-physician agreement were 0.73, 0.98, and 0.65 for the definitive and 0.75, 0.98, and 0.67 for the adjuvant radiotherapy setting. The largest difference was observed in the superior-inferior direction, particularly in the upper vagina and the common iliac area. Conclusion As there was still some variability in target delineation, more detailed guidelines for target volume delineation and continuing education would help to reduce this uncertainty. PMID:28301492

  9. Planning Evaluation of C-Arm Cone Beam CT Angiography for Target Delineation in Stereotactic Radiation Surgery of Brain Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Jun; Huang, Judy; Gailloud, Philippe; Rigamonti, Daniele; Lim, Michael; Bernard, Vincent; Ehtiati, Tina; Ford, Eric C.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) is one of the therapeutic modalities currently available to treat cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM). Conventionally, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR angiography (MRA) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) are used in combination to identify the target volume for SRS treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of C-arm cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the treatment planning of SRS for cerebral AVMs. Methods and Materials: Sixteen consecutive patients treated for brain AVMs at our institution were included in this retrospective study. Prior to treatment, all patients underwent MRA, DSA, and C-arm CBCT. All images were coregistered using the GammaPlan planning system. AVM regions were delineated independently by 2 physicians using either C-arm CBCT or MRA, resulting in 2 volumes: a CBCT volume (VCBCT) and an MRA volume (V{sub MRA}). SRS plans were generated based on the delineated regions. Results: The average volume of treatment targets delineated using C-arm CBCT and MRA were similar, 6.40 cm{sup 3} and 6.98 cm{sup 3}, respectively (P=.82). However, significant regions of nonoverlap existed. On average, the overlap of the MRA with the C-arm CBCT was only 52.8% of the total volume. In most cases, radiation plans based on V{sub MRA} did not provide adequate dose to the region identified on C-arm CBCT; the mean minimum dose to V{sub CBCT} was 29.5%, whereas the intended goal was 45% (P<.001). The mean volume of normal brain receiving 12 Gy or more in C-arm CBCT-based plans was not greater than in the MRA-based plans. Conclusions: Use of C-arm CBCT images significantly alters the delineated regions of AVMs for SRS planning, compared to that of MRA/MRI images. CT-based planning can be accomplished without increasing the dose to normal brain and may represent a more accurate definition of the nidus, increasing the chances for successful obliteration.

  10. Target Volume Delineation in Oropharyngeal Cancer: Impact of PET, MRI, and Physical Examination

    SciTech Connect

    Thiagarajan, Anuradha; Caria, Nicola; Schoeder, Heiko; Iyer, N. Gopalakrishna; Wolden, Suzanne; Wong, Richard J.; Sherman, Eric; Fury, Matthew G.; Lee, Nancy

    2012-05-01

    Introduction: Sole utilization of computed tomography (CT) scans in gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation for head-and-neck cancers is subject to inaccuracies. This study aims to evaluate contributions of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and physical examination (PE) to GTV delineation in oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods: Forty-one patients with OPC were studied. All underwent contrast-enhanced CT simulation scans (CECTs) that were registered with pretreatment PETs and MRIs. For each patient, three sets of primary and nodal GTV were contoured. First, reference GTVs (GTVref) were contoured by the treating radiation oncologist (RO) using CT, MRI, PET, and PE findings. Additional GTVs were created using fused CT/PET scans (GTVctpet) and CT/MRI scans (GTVctmr) by two other ROs blinded to GTVref. To compare GTVs, concordance indices (CI) were calculated by dividing the respective overlap volumes by overall volumes. To evaluate the contribution of PE, composite GTVs derived from CT, MRI, and PET (GTVctpetmr) were compared with GTVref. Results: For primary tumors, GTVref was significantly larger than GTVctpet and GTVctmr (p < 0.001). Although no significant difference in size was noted between GTVctpet and GTVctmr (p = 0.39), there was poor concordance between them (CI = 0.62). In addition, although CI (ctpetmr vs. ref) was low, it was significantly higher than CI (ctpet vs. ref) and CI (ctmr vs. ref) (p < 0.001), suggesting that neither modality should be used alone. Qualitative analyses to explain the low CI (ctpetmr vs. ref) revealed underestimation of mucosal disease when GTV was contoured without knowledge of PE findings. Similar trends were observed for nodal GTVs. However, CI (ctpet vs. ref), CI (ctmr vs. ref), and CI (ctpetmr vs. ref) were high (>0.75), indicating that although the modalities were complementary, the added benefit was small in the context of CECTs. In addition, PE did not aid greatly in nodal GTV delineation

  11. Cranial location of level II lymph nodes in laryngeal cancer: Implications for elective nodal target volume delineation

    SciTech Connect

    Braam, Petra M. . E-mail: P.M.Braam@umcutrecht.nl; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.; Terhaard, Chris

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the cranial distribution of level II lymph nodes in patients with laryngeal cancer to optimize the elective radiation nodal target volume delineation. Methods and Materials: The most cranially located metastatic lymph node was delineated in 67 diagnostic CT data sets. The minimum distance from the base of the skull (BOS) to the lymph node was determined. Results: A total of 98 lymph nodes were delineated including 62 ipsilateral and 36 contralateral lymph nodes. The mean ipsilateral and contralateral distance from the top of the most cranial metastatic lymph node to the BOS was 36 mm (range, -9-120; standard deviation [SD], 17.9) and 35 mm (range, 14-78; SD 15.0), respectively. Only 5% and 12% of the ipsilateral and 3% and 9% of the contralateral metastatic lymph nodes were located within 15 mm and 20 mm below the BOS, respectively. No significant differences were found between patients with only ipsilateral metastatic lymph nodes and patients with bilateral metastatic lymph nodes. Between tumors that do cross the midline and those that do not, no significant difference was found in the distance of the most cranial lymph node to the BOS and the occurrence ipsilateral or contralateral. Conclusions: Setting the cranial border of the nodal target volume 1.5 cm below the base of the skull covers 95% of the lymph nodes and should be considered in elective nodal irradiation for laryngeal cancer. Bilateral neck irradiation is mandatory, including patients with unilateral laryngeal cancer, when elective irradiation is advised.

  12. SU-C-BRA-02: Gradient Based Method of Target Delineation On PET/MR Image of Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Dance, M; Chera, B; Falchook, A; Das, S; Lian, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Validate the consistency of a gradient-based segmentation tool to facilitate accurate delineation of PET/CT-based GTVs in head and neck cancers by comparing against hybrid PET/MR-derived GTV contours. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 head and neck target volumes (10 primary and 8 nodal) were retrospectively contoured using a gradient-based segmentation tool by two observers. Each observer independently contoured each target five times. Inter-observer variability was evaluated via absolute percent differences. Intra-observer variability was examined by percentage uncertainty. All target volumes were also contoured using the SUV percent threshold method. The thresholds were explored case by case so its derived volume matched with the gradient-based volume. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) were calculated to determine overlap of PET/CT GTVs and PET/MR GTVs. Results: The Levene’s test showed there was no statistically significant difference of the variances between the observer’s gradient-derived contours. However, the absolute difference between the observer’s volumes was 10.83%, with a range from 0.39% up to 42.89%. PET-avid regions with qualitatively non-uniform shapes and intensity levels had a higher absolute percent difference near 25%, while regions with uniform shapes and intensity levels had an absolute percent difference of 2% between observers. The average percentage uncertainty between observers was 4.83% and 7%. As the volume of the gradient-derived contours increased, the SUV threshold percent needed to match the volume decreased. Dice coefficients showed good agreement of the PET/CT and PET/MR GTVs with an average DSC value across all volumes at 0.69. Conclusion: Gradient-based segmentation of PET volume showed good consistency in general but can vary considerably for non-uniform target shapes and intensity levels. PET/CT-derived GTV contours stemming from the gradient-based tool show good agreement with the anatomically and

  13. A method for simultaneously delineating multiple targets in 3D-FISH using limited channels, lasers, and fluorochromes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, F Y; Yang, X; Chen, D Y; Ma, W Y; Zheng, J G; Zhang, X M

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have suggested a link between the spatial organization of genomes and fundamental biological processes such as genome reprogramming, gene expression, and differentiation. Multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization on three-dimensionally preserved nuclei (3D-FISH), in combination with confocal microscopy, has become an effective technique for analyzing 3D genome structure and spatial patterns of defined nucleus targets including entire chromosome territories and single gene loci. This technique usually requires the simultaneous visualization of numerous targets labeled with different colored fluorochromes. Thus, the number of channels and lasers must be sufficient for the commonly used labeling scheme of 3D-FISH, "one probe-one target". However, these channels and lasers are usually restricted by a given microscope system. This paper presents a method for simultaneously delineating multiple targets in 3D-FISH using limited channels, lasers, and fluorochromes. In contrast to other labeling schemes, this method is convenient and simple for multicolor 3D-FISH studies, which may result in widespread adoption of the technique. Lastly, as an application of the method, the nucleus locations of chromosome territory 18/21 and centromere 18/21/13 in normal human lymphocytes were analyzed, which might present evidence of a radial higher order chromatin arrangement.

  14. Efficacy of salvage stereotactic radiotherapy for recurrent glioma: impact of tumor morphology and method of target delineation on local control

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Kengo; Mizowaki, Takashi; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Miyamoto, Susumu; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the efficacy of salvage stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for recurrent glioma. From August 2008 to December 2012, 30 patients with recurrent glioma underwent salvage SRT. The initial histological diagnoses were World Health Organization (WHO) grades II, III, and IV in 6, 9, and 15 patients, respectively. Morphologically, the type of recurrence was classified as diffuse or other. Two methods of clinical target delineation were used: A, a contrast-enhancing tumor; or B, a contrast-enhancing tumor with a 3–10-mm margin and/or surrounding fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) high-intensity areas. The prescribed dose was 22.5–35 Gy delivered in five fractions at an isocenter using a dynamic conformal arc technique. The overall survival (OS) and local control probability (LCP) after SRT were calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method. A univariate analysis was used to test the effect of clinical variables on OS/LCP. The median follow-up period was 272 days after SRT. The OS and LCP were 83% and 56% at 6 months after SRT, respectively. Morphologically, the tumor type correlated significantly with both OS and LCP (P = 0.006 and <0.001, respectively). The method of target delineation also had a significant influence on LCP (P = 0.016). Grade 3 radiation necrosis was observed in two patients according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. Salvage SRT was safe and effective for recurrent glioma, especially non-diffuse recurrences. Improved local control might be obtained by adding a margin to contrast-enhancing tumors or including increased FLAIR high-intensity areas. PMID:24403268

  15. Cone-Beam CT-Based Delineation of Stereotactic Lung Targets: The Influence of Image Modality and Target Size on Interobserver Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Altorjai, Gabriela

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: It is generally agreed that the safe implementation of stereotactic body radiotherapy requires image guidance. The aim of this work was to assess interobserver variability in the delineation of lung lesions on cone-beam CT (CBCT) images compared with CT-based contouring for adaptive stereotactic body radiotherapy. The influence of target size was also evaluated. Methods and Materials: Eight radiation oncologists delineated gross tumor volumes in 12 patient cases (non-small cell lung cancer I-II or solitary metastasis) on planning CTs and on CBCTs. Cases were divided into two groups with tumor diameters of less than (Group A) or more than 2 cm (Group B). Comparison of mean volumes delineated by all observers and range and coefficient of variation were reported for each case and image modality. Interobserver variability was assessed by means of standard error of measurement, conformity index (CI), and its generalized observer-independent approach. The variance between single observers on CT and CBCT images was measured via interobserver reliability coefficient. Results: Interobserver variability on CT images was 17% with 0.79 reliability, compared with 21% variability on CBCT and 0.76 reliability. On both image modalities, values of the intraobserver reliability coefficient (0.99 for CT and 0.97 for CBCT) indicated high reproducibility of results. In general, lower interobserver agreement was observed for small lesions (CI{sub genA} = 0.62 {+-} 0.06 vs. CI{sub genB} = 0.70 {+-} 0.03, p < 0.05). The analysis of single patient cases revealed that presence of spicules, diffuse infiltrations, proximity of the tumors to the vessels and thoracic wall, and respiration motion artifacts presented the main sources of the variability. Conclusion: Interobserver variability for Stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer and lung metastasis was slightly higher on CBCT compared with CT. Absence of significant differences in interobserver variability suggests that CBCT imaging

  16. Validation of a 4D-PET Maximum Intensity Projection for Delineation of an Internal Target Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, Jason; Kron, Tomas; Schneider-Kolsky, Michal; Dunn, Leon; Thompson, Mick; Siva, Shankar; Aarons, Yolanda; Binns, David; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: The delineation of internal target volumes (ITVs) in radiation therapy of lung tumors is currently performed by use of either free-breathing (FB) {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) or 4-dimensional (4D)-CT maximum intensity projection (MIP). In this report we validate the use of 4D-PET-MIP for the delineation of target volumes in both a phantom and in patients. Methods and Materials: A phantom with 3 hollow spheres was prepared surrounded by air then water. The spheres and water background were filled with a mixture of {sup 18}F and radiographic contrast medium. A 4D-PET/CT scan was performed of the phantom while moving in 4 different breathing patterns using a programmable motion device. Nine patients with an FDG-avid lung tumor who underwent FB and 4D-PET/CT and >5 mm of tumor motion were included for analysis. The 3 spheres and patient lesions were contoured by 2 contouring methods (40% of maximum and PET edge) on the FB-PET, FB-CT, 4D-PET, 4D-PET-MIP, and 4D-CT-MIP. The concordance between the different contoured volumes was calculated using a Dice coefficient (DC). The difference in lung tumor volumes between FB-PET and 4D-PET volumes was also measured. Results: The average DC in the phantom using 40% and PET edge, respectively, was lowest for FB-PET/CT (DCAir = 0.72/0.67, DCBackground 0.63/0.62) and highest for 4D-PET/CT-MIP (DCAir = 0.84/0.83, DCBackground = 0.78/0.73). The average DC in the 9 patients using 40% and PET edge, respectively, was also lowest for FB-PET/CT (DC = 0.45/0.44) and highest for 4D-PET/CT-MIP (DC = 0.72/0.73). In the 9 lesions, the target volumes of the FB-PET using 40% and PET edge, respectively, were on average 40% and 45% smaller than the 4D-PET-MIP. Conclusion: A 4D-PET-MIP produces volumes with the highest concordance with 4D-CT-MIP across multiple breathing patterns and lesion sizes in both a phantom and among patients. Freebreathing PET/CT consistently

  17. RNA-Mediated Virus Resistance: Role of Repeated Transgenes and Delineation of Targeted Regions.

    PubMed Central

    Sijen, T.; Wellink, J.; Hiriart, J. B.; Van Kammen, A.

    1996-01-01

    Resistance to cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants is RNA mediated. In resistant CPMV movement protein (MP) gene-transformed lines, transgene steady state mRNA levels were low, whereas nuclear transcription rates were high, implying that a post-transcriptional gene-silencing mechanism is at the base of the resistance. The silencing mechanism can also affect potato virus X (PVX) RNAs when they contain CPMV MP gene sequences. In particular, sequences situated in the 3[prime] part of the transcribed region of the MP transgene direct elimination of recombinant PVX genomes. Remarkably, successive portions of this 3[prime] part, which can be as small as 60 nucleotides, all tag PVX genomes for degradation. These observations suggest that the entire 3[prime] part of the MP transgene mRNA is the initial target of the silencing mechanism. The arrangement of transgenes in the plant genome plays an important role in establishing resistance because the frequency of resistant lines increased from 20 to 60% when transformed with a transgene containing a direct repeat of MP sequences rather than a single MP transgene. Interestingly, we detected strong methylation in all of the plants containing directly repeated MP sequences. In sensitive lines, only the promoter region was found to be heavily methylated, whereas in resistant lines, only the transcribed region was strongly methylated. PMID:12239378

  18. SU-E-J-78: Internal Target Volume Delineation for Lung Tumors in Patients Treated with Robotic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Descovich, M; Pinnaduwage, D; Kirby, N; Gottschalk, A; Yom, S; Pouliot, J; Braunstein, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare different approaches for Internal Target Volume (ITV) delineation for patients treated with fiducial-free robotic radiosurgery for primary and metastatic lung tumors. Methods: Ten patients undergoing Lung-Optimized Treatment (LOT) for robotic radiosurgery were imaged with inhale and exhale breath-hold CT scans and 8-phase 4DCT scan. We evaluated the differences in internal target volume (ITV) delineated using three approaches: 1) maximum intensity projection (MIP) images reconstructed from 4DCT scan (ITV-MIP); 2) linear interpolation of Gross Tumor Volumes (GTV) segmented on inhale and exhale breath-hold scans (ITV-BH); 3) linear interpolation of GTV segmented on inhale and exhale phases of 4DCT scan (ITV-2Phase). All contours were independently generated by the same radiation oncologist using lung window settings. Patients had ITV-MIP volumes ranging from 1.5 to 146.9 cc (mean 36.8 cc) located in various parts of the lung. Volume overlap and matching index (MI) were calculated and compared. The MI between two volumes was defined as the ratio of their intersection to their union. MI of 1 indicates the volumes are identical; MI of 0 indicates that there is no overlap. Results: The three approaches generated very different results. The average (SD) MI for ITV-MIP and ITV-BH was 0.52 (0.24); for ITV-MIP and ITV-2Phase it was 0.69 (0.13); and for ITV-BH and ITV-2Phase was 0.57 (0.21), (ANOVA, p=0.16). Relative to the ITV-MIP, the percentage of volume overlap was 72% (26%) and 90% (7%) for ITV-BH and ITV-2Phase, respectively (t-test, p=0.05). Conclusion: Differences between ITV-BH and ITV-MIP are due to inconsistent lung filling at breath-hold and nonlinear tumor motion. Therefore, methods to check breath-hold scanning against regular patient breathing patterns should be developed. Whenever possible, ITV-BH generated by the LOT workflow should be verified by 4DCT data.

  19. Human-computer interaction in radiotherapy target volume delineation: a prospective, multi-institutional comparison of user input devices.

    PubMed

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was the prospective comparison of objective and subjective effects of target volume region of interest (ROI) delineation using mouse-keyboard and pen-tablet user input devices (UIDs). The study was designed as a prospective test/retest sequence, with Wilcoxon signed rank test for matched-pair comparison. Twenty-one physician-observers contoured target volume ROIs on four standardized cases (representative of brain, prostate, lung, and head and neck malignancies) twice: once using QWERTY keyboard/scroll-wheel mouse UID and once with pen-tablet UID (DTX2100, Wacom Technology Corporation, Vancouver, WA, USA). Active task time, ROI manipulation task data, and subjective survey data were collected. One hundred twenty-nine target volume ROI sets were collected, with 62 paired pen-tablet/mouse-keyboard sessions. Active contouring time was reduced using the pen-tablet UID, with mean ± SD active contouring time of 26 ± 23 min, compared with 32 ± 25 with the mouse (p ≤ 0.01). Subjective estimation of time spent was also reduced from 31 ± 26 with mouse to 27 ± 22 min with the pen (p = 0.02). Task analysis showed ROI correction task reduction (p = 0.045) and decreased panning and scrolling tasks (p < 0.01) with the pen-tablet; drawing, window/level changes, and zoom commands were unchanged (p = n.s.) Volumetric analysis demonstrated no detectable differences in ROI volume nor intra- or inter-observer volumetric coverage. Fifty-two of 62 (84%) users preferred the tablet for each contouring task; 5 of 62 (8%) denoted no preference, and 5 of 62 (8%) chose the mouse interface. The pen-tablet UID reduced active contouring time and reduced correction of ROIs, without substantially altering ROI volume/coverage.

  20. A method to obtain correct standard uptake values in Pinnacle treatment planning system for target volume delineation

    PubMed Central

    Salehzahi, Farshid; Tse, Jason; Lee, Jonathan; Selvaraj, Jothybasu

    2016-01-01

    Standardized uptake value (SUV) is an advanced tool for quantitative tumor identification and metabolic target volume delineation (TVD) in diagnostic and therapeutic settings. It is thus important to establish a quality assured process to maintain the traceability of data correctly by positron emission tomography (PET) systems. Patient administration of 18fluoro-deoxy-glucose is increasingly delivered by automated infusion systems (AISs). Whenever AIS is used, its accuracy and traceability measurement need verification. In addition, it was observed that the unreproducible SUV displayed in PET and the treatment planning system (TPS) may cause grave concerns for radiation oncologists for TVD. This concern may complicate the correlation of TVD on PET and TPS and their clinical reporting. The SUV traceability was established from the PET system to AIS. Its accuracy was verified by cross-referencing to the reference dose calibrator traceable to a primary standard. The SUV values were converted in TPS using the in-house “clinical tool” to be identical as in PET, to allow radiation oncologists to use SUV confidently. The outcome of this study enables the clinical groups to rely on the correct SUV values displayed on the TPS and to improve the quality of care for patients in clinical procedures. PMID:28144116

  1. Impact of Node Negative Target Volume Delineation on Contralateral Parotid Gland Dose Sparing Using IMRT in Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, William J; Urban, Erich; Bayliss, R Adam; Harari, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    There is considerable practice variation in treatment of the node negative (N0) contralateral neck in patients with head and neck cancer. In this study, we examined the impact of N0 neck target delineation volume on radiation dose to the contralateral parotid gland. Following institutional review board approval, 12 patients with head and neck cancer were studied. All had indications for treatment of the N0 neck, such as midline base of tongue or soft palate extension or advanced ipsilateral nodal disease. The N0 neck volumes were created using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group head and neck contouring atlas. The physician-drawn N0 neck clinical target volume (CTV) was expanded by 25% to 200% to generate volume variation, followed by a 3-mm planning target volume (PTV) expansion. Surrounding organs at risk were contoured and complete intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans were generated for each N0 volume expansion. The median N0 target volume drawn by the radiation oncologist measured 93 cm(3) (range 71-145). Volumetric expansion of the N0 CTV by 25% to 200% increased the resultant mean dose to the contralateral parotid gland by 1.4 to 8.5 Gray (Gy). For example, a 4.1-mm increase in the N0 neck CTV translated to a 2.0-Gy dose increase to the parotid, 7.4 mm to a 4.5 Gy dose increase, and 12.5 mm to an 8.5 Gy dose increase, respectively. The treatment volume designated for the N0 neck has profound impact on resultant dose to the contralateral parotid gland. Variations of up to 15 mm are routine across physicians in target contouring, reflecting individual preference and training expertise. Depending on the availability of immobilization and image guidance techniques, experts commonly recommend 3 to 10 mm margin expansions to generate the PTV. Careful attention to the original volume of the N0 neck CTV, as well as expansion margins, is important in achieving effective contralateral gland sparing to reduce the resultant xerostomia and dysguesia that may ensue

  2. Simulation of tissue activity curves of 64Cu-ATSM for sub-target volume delineation in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalah, E.; Bradley, D.; Nisbet, A.

    2010-02-01

    There is much interest in positron emission tomography (PET) for measurements of regional tracer concentration in hypoxic tumour-bearing tissue, focusing on the need for accurate radiotherapy treatment planning. Generally, relevant data are taken over multiple time frames in the form of tissue activity curves (TACs), thus providing an indication of vasculature structure and geometry. This is a potential key in providing information on cellular perfusion and limited diffusion. A number of theoretical studies have attempted to describe tracer uptake in tissue cells in an effort to understand such complicated behaviour of cellular uptake and the mechanism of washout. More recently, a novel computerized reaction diffusion equation method was developed by Kelly and Brady (2006 A model to simulate tumour oxygenation and dynamic [18F]-FMISO PET data Phys. Med. Biol. 51 5859-73), where they managed to simulate the realistic dynamic TACs of 18F-FMISO. The model was developed over a multi-step process. Here we present a refinement to the work of Kelly and Brady, such that the model allows simulation of a realistic tissue activity curve (TAC) of any hypoxia selective PET tracer, in a single step process. In this work we show particular interest in simulating the TAC of perhaps the most promising hypoxia selective tracer, 64Cu-ATSM. In addition, we demonstrate its potential role in tumour sub-volume delineation for radiotherapy treatment planning. Simulation results have demonstrated the significant high contrast of imaging using ATSM, with a tumour to blood ratio ranging from 2.24 to 4.1.

  3. A New Brain Positron Emission Tomography Scanner With Semiconductor Detectors for Target Volume Delineation and Radiotherapy Treatment Planning in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Norio; Yasuda, Koichi; Shiga, Tohru; Hasegawa, Masakazu; Onimaru, Rikiya; Shimizu, Shinichi; Bengua, Gerard; Ishikawa, Masayori; Tamaki, Nagara; Shirato, Hiroki

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We compared two treatment planning methods for stereotactic boost for treating nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC): the use of conventional whole-body bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillator positron emission tomography (PET{sub CONV}WB) versus the new brain (BR) PET system using semiconductor detectors (PET{sub NEW}BR). Methods and Materials: Twelve patients with NPC were enrolled in this study. [{sup 18}F]Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET images were acquired using both the PET{sub NEW}BR and the PET{sub CONV}WB system on the same day. Computed tomography (CT) and two PET data sets were transferred to a treatment planning system, and the PET{sub CONV}WB and PET{sub NEW}BR images were coregistered with the same set of CT images. Window width and level values for all PET images were fixed at 3000 and 300, respectively. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was visually delineated on PET images by using either PET{sub CONV}WB (GTV{sub CONV}) images or PET{sub NEW}BR (GTV{sub NEW}) images. Assuming a stereotactic radiotherapy boost of 7 ports, the prescribed dose delivered to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) was set to 2000 cGy in 4 fractions. Results: The average absolute volume ({+-}standard deviation [SD]) of GTV{sub NEW} was 15.7 ml ({+-}9.9) ml, and that of GTV{sub CONV} was 34.0 ({+-}20.5) ml. The average GTV{sub NEW} was significantly smaller than that of GTV{sub CONV} (p = 0.0006). There was no statistically significant difference between the maximum dose (p = 0.0585) and the mean dose (p = 0.2748) of PTV. The radiotherapy treatment plan based on the new gross tumor volume (PLAN{sub NEW}) significantly reduced maximum doses to the cerebrum and cerebellum (p = 0.0418) and to brain stem (p = 0.0041). Conclusion: Results of the present study suggest that the new brain PET system using semiconductor detectors can provide more accurate tumor delineation than the conventional whole-body BGO PET system and may be an important tool for functional and molecular radiotherapy

  4. Pre-clinical evaluation of a novel CEA-targeting near-infrared fluorescent tracer delineating colorectal and pancreatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Martin C.; Tolner, Berend; Schaafsma, Boudewijn E.; Boogerd, Leonora S.F.; Prevoo, Hendrica A.J.M; Bhavsar, Guarav; Kuppen, Peter J.K.; Sier, Cornelis F.M.; Bonsing, Bert A.; Frangioni, John V.; van de Velde, Cornelis J.H.; Chester, Kerry A.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2016-01-01

    Surgery is the cornerstone of oncologic therapy with curative intent. However, identification of tumor cells in the resection margins is difficult, resulting in non-radical resections, increased cancer recurrence and subsequent decreased patient survival. Novel imaging techniques that aid in demarcating tumor margins during surgery are needed. Overexpression of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is found in the majority of gastro-intestinal carcinomas, including colorectal and pancreas. We developed ssSM3E/800CW, a novel CEA-targeted near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) tracer, based on a disulphide stabilized single-chain antibody fragment (ssScFv), to visualize colorectal and pancreatic tumors in a clinically translatable setting. The applicability of the tracer was tested for cell and tissue binding characteristics and dosing using immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, cell-based plate assays and orthotopic colorectal (HT-29, well differentiated) and pancreatic (BXPC-3, poorly differentiated) xenogeneic human-mouse models. NIRF signals were visualized using the clinically compatible FLARE™ imaging system. Calculated clinically relevant doses of ssSM3E/800CW selectively accumulated in colorectal and pancreatic tumors/cells, with highest tumor-to-background ratios of 5.1±0.6 at 72 h post-injection, which proved suitable for intra-operative detection and delineation of tumor boarders and small (residual) tumor-nodules in mice, between 8 h and 96 h post-injection. Ex vivo fluorescence imaging and pathologic examination confirmed tumor-specificity and the distribution of the tracer. Our results indicate that ssSM3E/800CW shows promise as a diagnostic tool to recognize colorectal and pancreatic cancers for fluorescent-guided surgery applications. If successful translated clinically, this tracer could help improve the completeness of surgery and thus survival. PMID:25895046

  5. Accurate Target Identification Using Multi-look Fusion of Low Quality Target Signatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    qualité, ce qui pourrait avoir des conséquences importantes pour les applications pratiques. D’une part, l’apparition de technologies de capteurs et...identification performance and this is not adequate for many target identification applications . Furthermore, in order for the single-look procedure to...obtenues qu’avec un un seul capteur . Toutefois, force est de constater que le rendement de l’identification correcte d’objectifs par l’approche

  6. [Definition of accurate planning target volume margins for esophageal cancer radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Lesueur, P; Servagi-Vernat, S

    2016-10-01

    More than 4000 cases of esophagus neoplasms are diagnosed every year in France. Radiotherapy, which can be delivered in preoperative or exclusive with a concomitant chemotherapy, plays a central role in treatment of esophagus cancer. Even if efficacy of radiotherapy no longer has to be proved, the prognosis of esophagus cancer remains unfortunately poor with a high recurrence rate. Toxicity of esophageal radiotherapy is correlated with the irradiation volume, and limits dose escalation and local control. Esophagus is a deep thoracic organ, which undergoes cardiac and respiratory motion, making the radiotherapy delivery more difficult and increasing the planning target volume margins. Definition of accurate planning target volume margins, taking into account the esophagus' intrafraction motion and set up margins is very important to be sure to cover the clinical target volume and restrains acute and late radiotoxicity. In this article, based on a review of the literature, we propose planning target volume margins adapted to esophageal radiotherapy.

  7. Cas9-chromatin binding information enables more accurate CRISPR off-target prediction

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ritambhara; Kuscu, Cem; Quinlan, Aaron; Qi, Yanjun; Adli, Mazhar

    2015-01-01

    The CRISPR system has become a powerful biological tool with a wide range of applications. However, improving targeting specificity and accurately predicting potential off-targets remains a significant goal. Here, we introduce a web-based CRISPR/Cas9 Off-target Prediction and Identification Tool (CROP-IT) that performs improved off-target binding and cleavage site predictions. Unlike existing prediction programs that solely use DNA sequence information; CROP-IT integrates whole genome level biological information from existing Cas9 binding and cleavage data sets. Utilizing whole-genome chromatin state information from 125 human cell types further enhances its computational prediction power. Comparative analyses on experimentally validated datasets show that CROP-IT outperforms existing computational algorithms in predicting both Cas9 binding as well as cleavage sites. With a user-friendly web-interface, CROP-IT outputs scored and ranked list of potential off-targets that enables improved guide RNA design and more accurate prediction of Cas9 binding or cleavage sites. PMID:26032770

  8. Optimal target VOI size for accurate 4D coregistration of DCE-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Brian; Mikheev, Artem; Zaim Wadghiri, Youssef; Bertrand, Anne; Novikov, Dmitry; Chandarana, Hersh; Rusinek, Henry

    2016-03-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI has emerged as a reliable and diagnostically useful functional imaging technique. DCE protocol typically lasts 3-15 minutes and results in a time series of N volumes. For automated analysis, it is important that volumes acquired at different times be spatially coregistered. We have recently introduced a novel 4D, or volume time series, coregistration tool based on a user-specified target volume of interest (VOI). However, the relationship between coregistration accuracy and target VOI size has not been investigated. In this study, coregistration accuracy was quantitatively measured using various sized target VOIs. Coregistration of 10 DCE-MRI mouse head image sets were performed with various sized VOIs targeting the mouse brain. Accuracy was quantified by measures based on the union and standard deviation of the coregistered volume time series. Coregistration accuracy was determined to improve rapidly as the size of the VOI increased and approached the approximate volume of the target (mouse brain). Further inflation of the VOI beyond the volume of the target (mouse brain) only marginally improved coregistration accuracy. The CPU time needed to accomplish coregistration is a linear function of N that varied gradually with VOI size. From the results of this study, we recommend the optimal size of the VOI to be slightly overinclusive, approximately by 5 voxels, of the target for computationally efficient and accurate coregistration.

  9. SU-E-J-221: A Novel Expansion Method for MRI Based Target Delineation in Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, B; Feng, Y; Shores, R; Fung, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare a novel bladder/rectum carveout expansion method on MRI delineated prostate to standard CT and expansion based methods for maintaining prostate coverage while providing superior bladder and rectal sparing. Methods: Ten prostate cases were planned to include four trials: MRI vs CT delineated prostate/proximal seminal vesicles, and each image modality compared to both standard expansions (8mm 3D expansion and 5mm posterior, i.e. ∼8mm) and carveout method expansions (5mm 3D expansion, 4mm posterior for GTV-CTV excluding expansion into bladder/rectum followed by additional 5mm 3D expansion to PTV, i.e. ∼1cm). All trials were planned to total dose 7920 cGy via IMRT. Evaluation and comparison was made using the following criteria: QUANTEC constraints for bladder/rectum including analysis of low dose regions, changes in PTV volume, total control points, and maximum hot spot. Results: ∼8mm MRI expansion consistently produced the most optimal plan with lowest total control points and best bladder/rectum sparing. However, this scheme had the smallest prostate (average 22.9% reduction) and subsequent PTV volume, consistent with prior literature. ∼1cm MRI had an average PTV volume comparable to ∼8mm CT at 3.79% difference. Bladder QUANTEC constraints were on average less for the ∼1cm MRI as compared to the ∼8mm CT and observed as statistically significant with 2.64% reduction in V65. Rectal constraints appeared to follow the same trend. Case-by-case analysis showed variation in rectal V30 with MRI delineated prostate being most favorable regardless of expansion type. ∼1cm MRI and ∼8mm CT had comparable plan quality. Conclusion: MRI delineated prostate with standard expansions had the smallest PTV leading to margins that may be too tight. Bladder/rectum carveout expansion method on MRI delineated prostate was found to be superior to standard CT based methods in terms of bladder and rectal sparing while maintaining prostate coverage

  10. An Accurate Non-Cooperative Method for Measuring Textureless Spherical Target Based on Calibrated Lasers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Dong, Hang; Chen, Yanan; Zheng, Nanning

    2016-01-01

    Strong demands for accurate non-cooperative target measurement have been arising recently for the tasks of assembling and capturing. Spherical objects are one of the most common targets in these applications. However, the performance of the traditional vision-based reconstruction method was limited for practical use when handling poorly-textured targets. In this paper, we propose a novel multi-sensor fusion system for measuring and reconstructing textureless non-cooperative spherical targets. Our system consists of four simple lasers and a visual camera. This paper presents a complete framework of estimating the geometric parameters of textureless spherical targets: (1) an approach to calibrate the extrinsic parameters between a camera and simple lasers; and (2) a method to reconstruct the 3D position of the laser spots on the target surface and achieve the refined results via an optimized scheme. The experiment results show that our proposed calibration method can obtain a fine calibration result, which is comparable to the state-of-the-art LRF-based methods, and our calibrated system can estimate the geometric parameters with high accuracy in real time. PMID:27941705

  11. An Accurate Non-Cooperative Method for Measuring Textureless Spherical Target Based on Calibrated Lasers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Dong, Hang; Chen, Yanan; Zheng, Nanning

    2016-12-09

    Strong demands for accurate non-cooperative target measurement have been arising recently for the tasks of assembling and capturing. Spherical objects are one of the most common targets in these applications. However, the performance of the traditional vision-based reconstruction method was limited for practical use when handling poorly-textured targets. In this paper, we propose a novel multi-sensor fusion system for measuring and reconstructing textureless non-cooperative spherical targets. Our system consists of four simple lasers and a visual camera. This paper presents a complete framework of estimating the geometric parameters of textureless spherical targets: (1) an approach to calibrate the extrinsic parameters between a camera and simple lasers; and (2) a method to reconstruct the 3D position of the laser spots on the target surface and achieve the refined results via an optimized scheme. The experiment results show that our proposed calibration method can obtain a fine calibration result, which is comparable to the state-of-the-art LRF-based methods, and our calibrated system can estimate the geometric parameters with high accuracy in real time.

  12. Threshold segmentation for PET target volume delineation in radiation treatment planning: the role of target-to-background ratio and target size.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, M; Matheoud, R; Secco, C; Loi, G; Krengli, M; Inglese, E

    2008-04-01

    A multivariable approach was adopted to study the dependence of the percentage threshold [TH(%)] used to define the boundaries of 18F-FDG positive tissue on emission scan duration (ESD) and activity at the start of acquisition (Aacq) for different target sizes and target-to-background (T/B) ratios. An anthropomorphic model, at least for counting rate characteristics, was used to study this dependence in conditions resembling the ones that can be encountered in the clinical studies. An annular ring of water bags of 3 cm thickness was fitted over an International Electro-technical Commission (IEC) phantom in order to obtain counting rates similar to those found in average patients. The scatter fraction of the modified IEC phantom was similar to the mean scatter fraction measured on patients, with a similar scanner. A supplemental set of microhollow spheres was positioned inside the phantom. The NEMA NU 2-2001 scatter phantom was positioned at the end of the IEC phantom to approximate the clinical situation of having activity that extends beyond the scanner field of view. The phantoms were filled with a solution of water and 18F (12 kBq/mL) and the spheres with various T/B ratios of 22.5, 10.3, and 3.6. Sequential imaging was performed to acquire PET images with varying background activity concentrations of about 12, 9, 6.4, 5.3, and 3.1 kBq/mL. The ESD was set to 60, 120, 180, and 240 s/bed. Data were fitted using two distinct multiple linear regression models for sphere ID < or = 10 mm and sphere ID > 10 mm. The fittings of both models were good with an R2 of 0.86 in both cases. Neither ESD nor Aacq resulted as significant predictors of the TH(%). For sphere ID < or =10 mm the target size was the most significant predictor of the TH(%), followed by the T/B ratio, while for sphere ID > 10 mm the explanatory power of the target size and T/B ratio were reversed, the T/B ratio being now the most important predictor of the TH(%). Both the target size and T/B ratio play a

  13. Application of the Geo-Anomaly Unit Concept in Quantitative Delineation and Assessment of Gold Ore Targets in Western Shandong Uplift Terrain, Eastern China

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yongqing Zhao Pengda; Chen Jianguo; Liu Jiping

    2001-03-15

    A number of large and giant ore deposits have been discovered within the relatively small areas of lithospheric structure anomalies, including various boundary zones of tectonic plates. The regions have become the well-known intercontinental ore-forming belts, such as the circum-Pacific gold-copper, copper-molybdenum, and tungsten-tin metallogenic belts. These belts are typical geological anomalous areas. An investigation into the hydrothermal ore deposits in different regions in the former Soviet Union illustrated that the geologic structures of ore fields of almost all major commercial deposits have distinct features compared with the neighboring areas. These areas with distinct features are defined as geo-anomalies. A geo-anomaly refers to such a geologic body or a combination of bodies that their composition, texture-structure, and genesis are significantly different from those of their surroundings. A geo-anomaly unit (GU) is an area containing distinct features that can be delineated with integrated ore-forming information using computer techniques on the basis of the geo-anomaly concept. Herein, the GU concept is illustrated by a case study of delineating the gold ore targets in the western Shandong uplift terrain, eastern China. It includes: (1) analyses of gold ore-forming factors; (2) compilation of normalized regional geochemical map and extraction of geochemical anomalies; (3) compilation of gravitational and aeromagnetic tectonic skeleton map and extraction of gravitational and aeromagnetic anomalies; (4) extraction of circular and linear anomalies from remote-sensing Landsat TM images; (5) establishment of a geo-anomaly conceptual model associated with known gold mineralization; (6) establishment of gold ore-forming favorability by computing techniques; and (7) delineation and assessment of ore-forming units. The units with high favorability are suggested as ore targets.

  14. Prospective Randomized Double-Blind Pilot Study of Site-Specific Consensus Atlas Implementation for Rectal Cancer Target Volume Delineation in the Cooperative Group Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Clifton D.; Nijkamp, Jasper; Duppen, Joop C.; Rasch, Coen R.N.; Thomas, Charles R.; Wang, Samuel J.; Okunieff, Paul; Jones, William E.; Baseman, Daniel; Patel, Shilpen; Demandante, Carlo G.N.; Harris, Anna M.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Katz, Alan W.; McGann, Camille

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Variations in target volume delineation represent a significant hurdle in clinical trials involving conformal radiotherapy. We sought to determine the effect of a consensus guideline-based visual atlas on contouring the target volumes. Methods and Materials: A representative case was contoured (Scan 1) by 14 physician observers and a reference expert with and without target volume delineation instructions derived from a proposed rectal cancer clinical trial involving conformal radiotherapy. The gross tumor volume (GTV), and two clinical target volumes (CTVA, including the internal iliac, presacral, and perirectal nodes, and CTVB, which included the external iliac nodes) were contoured. The observers were randomly assigned to receipt (Group A) or nonreceipt (Group B) of a consensus guideline and atlas for anorectal cancers and then instructed to recontour the same case/images (Scan 2). Observer variation was analyzed volumetrically using the conformation number (CN, where CN = 1 equals total agreement). Results: Of 14 evaluable contour sets (1 expert and 7 Group A and 6 Group B observers), greater agreement was found for the GTV (mean CN, 0.75) than for the CTVs (mean CN, 0.46-0.65). Atlas exposure for Group A led to significantly increased interobserver agreement for CTVA (mean initial CN, 0.68, after atlas use, 0.76; p = .03) and increased agreement with the expert reference (initial mean CN, 0.58; after atlas use, 0.69; p = .02). For the GTV and CTVB, neither the interobserver nor the expert agreement was altered after atlas exposure. Conclusion: Consensus guideline atlas implementation resulted in a detectable difference in interobserver agreement and a greater approximation of expert volumes for the CTVA but not for the GTV or CTVB in the specified case. Visual atlas inclusion should be considered as a feature in future clinical trials incorporating conformal RT.

  15. Usefulness of target delineation based on the two extreme phases of a four-dimensional computed tomography scan in stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Seong Soon; Huh, Gil Ja; Park, Suk Young; Yang, Po Song; Cho, EunYoun

    2015-01-01

    Background An evaluation of the usefulness of target delineation based only on the two extreme phases of a four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) scan in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods Seventeen patients treated with SBRT via 4D CT scans for lung cancer were retrospectively enrolled. Volumetric and geometric analyses were performed for the internal target volumes (ITVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) generated using different respiratory phases (all phases and 2 extreme phases) and setup margins (3 mm and 5 mm). Results As the setup margins were added to the ITVs, the overlap percentage between the PTVs based on all phases and the two extreme phases increased (85.1% for ITVs, 89.8% for PTVs_3 mm, and 91.3% for PTVs_5 mm), and there were no differences according to the tumor parameters, such as the gross tumor volume and 3D mobility. The missing-volume differences for ITVs derived from cone-beam CT images also decreased, with values of 5.3% between ITVs, 0.5% between PTVs_3 mm, and 0.2% between PTVs_5 mm. Compared with the plan based on all phases and a 3 mm margin, the average lung-dose differences found for the PTV based on the two extreme phases and a 5 mm margin were 0.41 Gy for the mean lung dose and 0.93% for V20. Conclusions Regardless of tumor characteristics, PTV construction based only on the two extreme phases and a 5 mm setup margin may be a useful tool for reducing the clinical workload involved in target delineation in SBRT for lung cancer. PMID:26273368

  16. Multiple selection filters ensure accurate tail-anchored membrane protein targeting

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Meera; Okreglak, Voytek; Chio, Un Seng; Cho, Hyunju; Walter, Peter; Shan, Shu-ou

    2016-01-01

    Accurate protein localization is crucial to generate and maintain organization in all cells. Achieving accuracy is challenging, as the molecular signals that dictate a protein’s cellular destination are often promiscuous. A salient example is the targeting of an essential class of tail-anchored (TA) proteins, whose sole defining feature is a transmembrane domain near their C-terminus. Here we show that the Guided Entry of Tail-anchored protein (GET) pathway selects TA proteins destined to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) utilizing distinct molecular steps, including differential binding by the co-chaperone Sgt2 and kinetic proofreading after ATP hydrolysis by the targeting factor Get3. Further, the different steps select for distinct physicochemical features of the TA substrate. The use of multiple selection filters may be general to protein biogenesis pathways that must distinguish correct and incorrect substrates based on minor differences. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21301.001 PMID:27925580

  17. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Guidelines for the Delineation of the Clinical Target Volume in the Postoperative Treatment of Pancreatic Head Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Karyn A.; Regine, William F.; Dawson, Laura A.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Haustermans, Karin; Bosch, Walter R.; Turian, Julius; Abrams, Ross A.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To develop contouring guidelines to be used in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0848, a Phase III randomized trial evaluating the benefit of adjuvant chemoradiation in patients with resected head of pancreas cancer. Methods and Materials: A consensus committee of six radiation oncologists with expertise in gastrointestinal radiotherapy developed stepwise contouring guidelines and an atlas for the delineation of the clinical target volume (CTV) in the postoperative treatment of pancreas cancer, based on identifiable regions of interest and margin expansions. Areas at risk for subclinical disease to be included in the CTV were defined, including nodal regions, anastomoses, and the preoperative primary tumor location. Regions of interest that could be reproducibly contoured on postoperative imaging after a pancreaticoduodenectomy were identified. Standardized expansion margins to encompass areas at risk were developed after multiple iterations to determine the optimal margin expansions. Results: New contouring recommendations based on CT anatomy were established. Written guidelines for the delineation of the postoperative CTV and normal tissues, as well as a Web-based atlas, were developed. Conclusions: The postoperative abdomen has been a difficult area for effective radiotherapy. These new guidelines will help physicians create fields that better encompass areas at risk and minimize dose to normal tissues.

  18. Systematic evaluation of MRI findings in different stages of treatment of cervical cancer: Potential of MRI on delineation of target, pathoanatomic structures, and organs at risk

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Johannes . E-mail: johannes.dimopoulos@akhwien.at; Schard, Gerdi; Berger, Daniel; Lang, Stefan; Goldner, Gregor; Helbich, Thomas; Poetter, Richard

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings at different stages of cervix cancer treatment and to define the potential of MRI to delineate the gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), pathoanatomic structures, and organs at risk (OAR) in brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Forty-nine patients underwent MRI at diagnosis and at brachytherapy. The ability to discriminate anatomic structures on MRI was assessed (quality factor: 0 = inability to discriminate; 1 = fair discrimination; 2 = good discrimination; 3 = excellent discrimination). The overall ability to visualize (percentage of patients with quality factors greater than 0) and the overall discrimination quality score (mean quality factors of all patients) were estimated for the applicator, GTV at diagnosis (GTV{sub D}), GTV at brachytherapy (GTV{sub BT})/'gray zones,' cervix rim/uterine corpus, OAR, vaginal wall, and parametria. Results: The overall ability to visualize the applicator on MRI at brachytherapy was 100%; for the GTV{sub BT}/'gray zones,' cervix rim/uterine corpus, OAR, and vaginal wall, visualization was 98% (overall discrimination quality factors: 1.2, 2.9, 2.1, 1.9, 1.7, and 2.6). Three of 4 borders of parametrial space were defined in more than 98% (discrimination quality factors: 2.9, 2.1, and 1.2). Conclusion: Magnetic resonance imaging provides appropriate information for definition of the applicator, GTV, CTV, pathoanatomic structures, and OAR that enables precise delineation for cervix cancer brachytherapy.

  19. Selective pressures for accurate altruism targeting: evidence from digital evolution for difficult-to-test aspects of inclusive fitness theory.

    PubMed

    Clune, Jeff; Goldsby, Heather J; Ofria, Charles; Pennock, Robert T

    2011-03-07

    Inclusive fitness theory predicts that natural selection will favour altruist genes that are more accurate in targeting altruism only to copies of themselves. In this paper, we provide evidence from digital evolution in support of this prediction by competing multiple altruist-targeting mechanisms that vary in their accuracy in determining whether a potential target for altruism carries a copy of the altruist gene. We compete altruism-targeting mechanisms based on (i) kinship (kin targeting), (ii) genetic similarity at a level greater than that expected of kin (similarity targeting), and (iii) perfect knowledge of the presence of an altruist gene (green beard targeting). Natural selection always favoured the most accurate targeting mechanism available. Our investigations also revealed that evolution did not increase the altruism level when all green beard altruists used the same phenotypic marker. The green beard altruism levels stably increased only when mutations that changed the altruism level also changed the marker (e.g. beard colour), such that beard colour reliably indicated the altruism level. For kin- and similarity-targeting mechanisms, we found that evolution was able to stably adjust altruism levels. Our results confirm that natural selection favours altruist genes that are increasingly accurate in targeting altruism to only their copies. Our work also emphasizes that the concept of targeting accuracy must include both the presence of an altruist gene and the level of altruism it produces.

  20. Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the External Auditory Canal and Middle Ear: Treatment Outcomes, Marginal Misses, and Perspective on Target Delineation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wan-Yu; Kuo, Sung-Hsin; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Lu, Szu-Huai; Tsai, Chiao-Ling; Chia-Hsien Cheng, Jason; Hong, Ruey-Long; Chen, Ya-Fang; Hsu, Chuan-Jen; Lin, Kai-Nan; Ko, Jenq-Yuh; Lou, Pei-Jen; Wang, Cheng-Ping; Chong, Fok-Ching; Wang, Chun-Wei

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To report outcomes of the rare disease of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the external auditory canal (EAC) and middle ear treated with surgery and postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Failure patterns related to spatial dose distribution were also analyzed to provide insight into target delineation. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of the records of 11 consecutive patients with SCC of the EAC and middle ear who were treated with curative surgery and postoperative IMRT at one institution between January 2007 and February 2010. The prescribed IMRT dose was 60 to 66 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Three patients also received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy, and 1 patient received concurrent oral tegafur/uracil. The median follow-up time was 19 months (range, 6-33 months). Results: Four patients had locoregional recurrence, yielding an estimated 2-year locoregional control rate of 70.7%. Among them, 1 patient had persistent disease after treatment, and 3 had marginal recurrence. Distant metastasis occurred in 1 patient after extensive locoregional recurrence, yielding an estimated 2-year distant control rate of 85.7%. The estimated 2-year overall survival was 67.5%. The three cases of marginal recurrence were near the preauricular space and glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint, adjacent to the apex of the ear canal and glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint, and in the postauricular subcutaneous area and ipsilateral parotid nodes, respectively. Conclusions: Marginal misses should be recognized to improve target delineation. When treating SCC of the EAC and middle ear, care should be taken to cover the glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint and periauricular soft tissue. Elective ipsilateral parotid irradiation should be considered. The treatment planning procedure should also be refined to balance subcutaneous soft-tissue dosimetry and toxicity.

  1. Treatment Optimization Using Computed Tomography-Delineated Targets Should be Used for Supraclavicular Irradiation for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liengsawangwong, Raweewan; Yu, T.-K.; Sun, T.-L.; Erasmus, Jeremy J.; Perkins, George H.; Tereffe, Welela; Oh, Julia L.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Strom, Eric A.; Salephour, Mohammad; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2007-11-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of optimized CT treatment planning offered better coverage of axillary level III (LIII)/supraclavicular (SC) targets than the empirically derived dose prescription that are commonly used. Materials/Methods: Thirty-two consecutive breast cancer patients who underwent CT treatment planning of a SC field were evaluated. Each patient was categorized according to body mass index (BMI) classes: normal, overweight, or obese. The SC and LIII nodal beds were contoured, and four treatment plans for each patient were generated. Three of the plans used empiric dose prescriptions, and these were compared with a CT-optimized plan. Each plan was evaluated by two criteria: whether 98% of target volume receive >90% of prescribed dose and whether < 5% of the irradiated volume received 105% of prescribed dose. Results: The mean depth of SC and LIII were 3.2 cm (range, 1.4-6.7 cm) and 3.1 (range, 1.7-5.8 cm). The depth of these targets varied according across BMI classes (p = 0.01). Among the four sets of plans, the CT-optimized plans were the most successful at achieving both of the dosimetry objectives for every BMI class (normal BMI, p = .003; overweight BMI, p < .0001; obese BMI, p < .001). Conclusions: Across all BMI classes, routine radiation prescriptions did not optimally cover intended targets for every patient. Optimized CT-based treatment planning generated the most successful plans; therefore, we recommend the use of routine CT simulation and treatment planning of SC fields in breast cancer.

  2. L-[METHYL-{sup 11}C] Methionine Positron Emission Tomography for Target Delineation in Malignant Gliomas: Impact on Results of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mahasittiwat, Pawinee; Mizoe, Jun-etsu Hasegawa, Azusa; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Kyosan; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Yanagi, Takeshi; Takagi, Ryou D.D.S.; Pattaranutaporn, Pittayapoom; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the importance of {sup 11}C-methionine (MET)-positron emission tomography (PET) for clinical target volume (CTV) delineation. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed 16 patients with malignant glioma (4 patients, anaplastic astrocytoma; 12 patients, glioblastoma multiforme) treated with surgery and carbon ion radiotherapy from April 2002 to Nov 2005. The MET-PET target volume was compared with gross tumor volume and CTV, defined by using computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Correlations with treatment results were evaluated between positive and negative extended volumes (EVs) of the MET-PET target for CTV. Results: Mean volumes of the MET-PET targets, CTV1 (defined by means of high-intensity volume on T2-weighted MRI), and CTV2 (defined by means of contrast-enhancement volume on T1-weighted MRI) were 6.35, 264.7, and 117.7 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Mean EVs of MET-PET targets for CTV1 and CTV2 were 0.6 and 2.2 cm{sup 3}, respectively. The MET-PET target volumes were included in CTV1 and CTV2 in 13 (81.3%) and 11 patients (68.8%), respectively. Patients with a negative EV for CTV1 had significantly greater survival rate (p = 0.0069), regional control (p = 0.0047), and distant control time (p = 0.0267) than those with a positive EV. Distant control time also was better in patients with a negative EV for CTV2 than those with a positive EV (p = 0.0401). Conclusions: For patients with malignant gliomas, MET-PET has a possibility to be a predictor of outcome in carbon ion radiotherapy. Direct use of MET-PET fused to planning computed tomography will be useful and yield favorable results for the therapy.

  3. Gene Network Inference and Biochemical Assessment Delineates GPCR Pathways and CREB Targets in Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Drozdov, Ignat; Svejda, Bernhard; Gustafsson, Bjorn I.; Mane, Shrikant; Pfragner, Roswitha; Kidd, Mark; Modlin, Irvin M.

    2011-01-01

    Small intestinal (SI) neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are increasing in incidence, however little is known about their biology. High throughput techniques such as inference of gene regulatory networks from microarray experiments can objectively define signaling machinery in this disease. Genome-wide co-expression analysis was used to infer gene relevance network in SI-NETs. The network was confirmed to be non-random, scale-free, and highly modular. Functional analysis of gene co-expression modules revealed processes including ‘Nervous system development’, ‘Immune response’, and ‘Cell-cycle’. Importantly, gene network topology and differential expression analysis identified over-expression of the GPCR signaling regulators, the cAMP synthetase, ADCY2, and the protein kinase A, PRKAR1A. Seven CREB response element (CRE) transcripts associated with proliferation and secretion: BEX1, BICD1, CHGB, CPE, GABRB3, SCG2 and SCG3 as well as ADCY2 and PRKAR1A were measured in an independent SI dataset (n = 10 NETs; n = 8 normal preparations). All were up-regulated (p<0.035) with the exception of SCG3 which was not differently expressed. Forskolin (a direct cAMP activator, 10−5 M) significantly stimulated transcription of pCREB and 3/7 CREB targets, isoproterenol (a selective ß-adrenergic receptor agonist and cAMP activator, 10−5 M) stimulated pCREB and 4/7 targets while BIM-53061 (a dopamine D2 and Serotonin [5-HT2] receptor agonist, 10−6 M) stimulated 100% of targets as well as pCREB; CRE transcription correlated with the levels of cAMP accumulation and PKA activity; BIM-53061 stimulated the highest levels of cAMP and PKA (2.8-fold and 2.5-fold vs. 1.8–2-fold for isoproterenol and forskolin). Gene network inference and graph topology analysis in SI NETs suggests that SI NETs express neural GPCRs that activate different CRE targets associated with proliferation and secretion. In vitro studies, in a model NET cell system, confirmed that transcriptional

  4. Contribution of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT to Target Volume Delineation of Skull Base Meningiomas Treated With Stereotactic Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Reinhold; Nyuyki, Fonyuy; Steffen, Ingo G.; Michel, Roger; Fahdt, Daniel; Wust, Peter; Brenner, Winfried; Budach, Volker; Wurm, Reinhard; Plotkin, Michail

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential impact of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC positron emission tomography ({sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET) in addition to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) for retrospectively assessing the gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation of meningiomas of the skull base in patients treated with fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT). Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 48 patients with 54 skull base meningiomas, previously treated with FSRT. After scans were coregistered, the GTVs were first delineated with MRI and CT data (GTV{sub MRI/CT}) and then by PET (GTV{sub PET}) data. The overlapping regions of both datasets resulted in the GTV{sub common}, which was enlarged to the GTV{sub final} by adding volumes defined by only one of the complementary modalities (GTV{sub MRI/CT-added} or GTV{sub PET-added}). We then evaluated the contribution of conventional imaging modalities (MRI, CT) and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET to the GTV{sub final}, which was used for planning purposes. Results: Forty-eight of the 54 skull base lesions in 45 patients showed increased {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC uptake and were further analyzed. The mean GTV{sub MRI/CT} and GTV{sub PET} were approximately 21 cm{sup 3} and 25 cm{sup 3}, with a common volume of approximately 15 cm{sup 3}. PET contributed a mean additional GTV of approximately 1.5 cm{sup 3} to the common volume (16% {+-} 34% of the GTV{sub common}). Approximately 4.5 cm{sup 3} of the GTV{sub MRI/CT} was excluded from the contribution to the common volume. The resulting mean GTV{sub final} was significantly smaller than both the GTV{sub MRI/CT} and the GTV{sub PET}. Compared with the initial GTV{sub MRI/CT}, the addition of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET resulted in more than 10% modification of the size of the GTV{sub final} in 32 (67%) meningiomas Conclusions: {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT seems to improve the target volume delineation in skull base meningiomas, often leading to a reduction of

  5. A mathematical approach towards simulating a realistic tissue activity curve of 64Cu-ATSM for the purpose of sub-target volume delineation in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalah, E.; Bradley, D.; Nisbet, A.

    2010-07-01

    One unique feature of positron emission tomography (PET) is that it allows measurements of regional tracer concentration in hypoxic tumour-bearing tissue, supporting the need for accurate radiotherapy treatment planning. Generally the data are taken over multiple time frames, in the form of tissue activity curves (TACs), providing an indication of the presence of hypoxia, the degree of oxygen perfusion, vascular geometry and hypoxia fraction. In order to understand such a complicated phenomenon a number of theoretical studies have attempted to describe tracer uptake in tissue cells. More recently, a novel computerized reaction diffusion equation method developed by Kelly and Brady has allowed simulation of the realistic TACs of 18F-FMISO, with representation of physiological oxygen heterogeneity and tracer kinetics. We present a refinement to the work of Kelly and Brady, with a particular interest in simulating TACs of the most promising hypoxia selective tracer, 64Cu-ATSM, demonstrating its potential role in tumour sub-volume delineation for radiotherapy treatment planning. Simulation results have demonstrated the high contrast of imaging using ATSM, with a tumour to blood ratio ranging 2.24-4.1. Similarly, results of tumour sub-volumes generated using three different thresholding methods were all well correlated.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour

    SciTech Connect

    Aslian, Hossein; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Mahdavi, Seied Rabie; Babapour Mofrad, Farshid; Astarakee, Mahdi; Khaledi, Navid; Fadavi, Pedram

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists’ contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (±SD) of 12.33 ± 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 ± 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 ± 0.02, 2.05 ± 0.66 cm, and 0.78 ± 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 ± 0.03, 1.91 ± 0.65 cm, and 0.7 ± 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer.

  7. Metrology target design simulations for accurate and robust scatterometry overlay measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Dov, Guy; Tarshish-Shapir, Inna; Gready, David; Ghinovker, Mark; Adel, Mike; Herzel, Eitan; Oh, Soonho; Choi, DongSub; Han, Sang Hyun; El Kodadi, Mohamed; Hwang, Chan; Lee, Jeongjin; Lee, Seung Yoon; Lee, Kuntack

    2016-03-01

    Overlay metrology target design is an essential step prior to performing overlay measurements. This step is done through the optimization of target parameters for a given process stack. A simulation tool is therefore used to improve measurement performances. This work shows how our Metrology Target Design (MTD) simulator helps significantly in the target design process. We show the role of film and Optical CD measurements in improving significantly the fidelity of the simulations. We demonstrate that for various target design parameters we are capable of predicting measured performance metrics by simulations and correctly rank various designs performances.

  8. Comparison and Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for CT- and MR-Based Brachytherapy in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Erickson, Beth; Gaffney, David K.; Bosch, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective To create and compare consensus clinical target volume (CTV) contours for computed tomography (CT) and 3 Tesla (3T) magnetic resonance (MR) image-based cervical-cancer brachytherapy Materials/Methods Twenty-three gynecologic radiation oncology experts contoured the same 3 cervical-cancer brachytherapy cases: one Stage IIB near-complete response (CR) case with a tandem and ovoid, one Stage IIB partial response (PR) case with ovoid with needles and one Stage IB2 CR case with a ring applicator. CT contours were completed before MRI contours. These were analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with kappa statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. The conformity index (CI) was calculated for each of the six data sets. Dice coefficients were generated to compare CT and MR contours of the same case. Results For all 3 cases, the mean tumor volume was smaller on MR than on CT (p<0.001). Kappa and CI estimates were slightly higher for CT, indicating a higher level of agreement on CT. DICE coefficients were 89% for the Stage IB2 case with a CR, 74% for the Stage IIB case with a PR, and 57% for the Stage IIB case with a CR. Conclusion When comparing MR- to CT-contoured CTV volumes, the higher level of agreement on CT may be due to the more distinct contrast visible on the images at the time of brachytherapy. The largest difference at the time of brachytherapy was in the case with parametrial extension at diagnosis that had a near-complete response, due to the appearance of the parametria on CT but not on MR. Based on these results, a 95% consensus volume was generated for CT and for MR. Online contouring atlases are available for instruction at http://www.nrgoncology.org/Resources/ContouringAtlases.aspx. PMID:25304792

  9. Accurate State Estimation and Tracking of a Non-Cooperative Target Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thienel, Julie K.; Sanner, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    Autonomous space rendezvous scenarios require knowledge of the target vehicle state in order to safely dock with the chaser vehicle. Ideally, the target vehicle state information is derived from telemetered data, or with the use of known tracking points on the target vehicle. However, if the target vehicle is non-cooperative and does not have the ability to maintain attitude control, or transmit attitude knowledge, the docking becomes more challenging. This work presents a nonlinear approach for estimating the body rates of a non-cooperative target vehicle, and coupling this estimation to a tracking control scheme. The approach is tested with the robotic servicing mission concept for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Such a mission would not only require estimates of the HST attitude and rates, but also precision control to achieve the desired rate and maintain the orientation to successfully dock with HST.

  10. Automated Crater Delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, J. S.; Pina, P.

    2015-05-01

    An algorithm to delineate impact craters based on Edge Maps and Dynamic Programming is presented. The global performance obtained on 1045 craters from Mars (5 m to about 200 km in diameter), achieved 96% of correct contour delineations.

  11. Precision Pointing Control to and Accurate Target Estimation of a Non-Cooperative Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanEepoel, John; Thienel, Julie; Sanner, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    In 2004, NASA began investigating a robotic servicing mission for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Such a mission would not only require estimates of the HST attitude and rates in order to achieve capture by the proposed Hubble Robotic Vehicle (HRV), but also precision control to achieve the desired rate and maintain the orientation to successfully dock with HST. To generalize the situation, HST is the target vehicle and HRV is the chaser. This work presents a nonlinear approach for estimating the body rates of a non-cooperative target vehicle, and coupling this estimation to a control scheme. Non-cooperative in this context relates to the target vehicle no longer having the ability to maintain attitude control or transmit attitude knowledge.

  12. Accurate imaging of moving targets via random sensor arrays and Kerdock codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmer, Thomas; Wang, Haichao

    2013-08-01

    The detection and parameter estimation of moving targets is one of the most important tasks in radar. Arrays of randomly distributed antennas have been popular for this purpose for about half a century. Yet, surprisingly little rigorous mathematical theory exists for random arrays that addresses fundamental questions such as how many targets can be recovered, at what resolution, at which noise level, and with which algorithm. In a different line of research in radar, mathematicians and engineers have invested significant effort into the design of radar transmission waveforms which satisfy various desirable properties. In this paper we bring these two seemingly unrelated areas together. Using tools from compressive sensing we derive a theoretical framework for the imaging of targets in the azimuth-range-Doppler domain via random antenna arrays. In one manifestation of our theory we use Kerdock codes as transmission waveforms and exploit some of their peculiar properties in our analysis. Our paper provides two main contributions. (i) We derive the first rigorous mathematical theory for the detection of moving targets using random sensor arrays. (ii) The transmitted waveforms satisfy a variety of properties that are very desirable and important from a practical viewpoint. Thus our approach does not just lead to useful theoretical insights, but is also of practical importance. Various extensions of our results are derived and numerical simulations confirming our theory are presented.

  13. Non-targeted screening of house dust samples using accurate mass TOFMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    House dust exists as an environmental repository of chemicals to which we are exposed in our homes. A growing number of studies have targeted select persistent organic and inorganic pollutants found in house dust. Many have concluded that dust exists as an important human expos...

  14. Oral hapsis guides accurate hand preshaping for grasping food targets in the mouth.

    PubMed

    Karl, Jenni M; Sacrey, Lori-Ann R; Doan, Jon B; Whishaw, Ian Q

    2012-08-01

    Preshaping the digits and orienting the hand when reaching to grasp a distal target is proposed to be optimal when guided by vision. A reach-to-grasp movement to an object in one's own mouth is a natural and commonly used movement, but there has been no previous description of how it is performed. The movement requires accuracy but likely depends upon haptic rather than visual guidance, leading to the question of whether the kinematics of this movement are similar to those with vision or whether the movement depends upon an alternate strategy. The present study used frame-by-frame video analysis and linear kinematics to analyze hand movements as participants reached for ethologically relevant food targets placed either at a distal location or in the mouth. When reaching for small and medium-sized food items (blueberries and donut balls) that had maximal lip-to-target contact, hand preshaping was equivalent to that used for visually guided reaching. When reaching for a large food item (orange slice) that extended beyond the edges of the mouth, hand preshaping was suboptimal compared to vision. Nevertheless, hapsis from the reaching hand was used to reshape and reorient the hand after first contact with the large target. The equally precise guidance of hand preshaping under oral hapsis is discussed in relation to the idea that hand preshaping, and its requisite neural circuitry, may have originated under somatosensory control, with secondary access by vision.

  15. Comparison and Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for CT- and MR-Based Brachytherapy in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Gaffney, David K.; Beriwal, Sushil; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Lee Burnett, Omer; D'Souza, David P.; Patil, Nikhilesh; Haddock, Michael G.; Jhingran, Anuja; Jones, Ellen L.; Kunos, Charles A.; Lee, Larissa J.; Mayr, Nina A.; Petersen, Ivy; Petric, Primoz; Portelance, Lorraine; Small, William; Strauss, Jonathan B.; and others

    2014-10-01

    Objective: To create and compare consensus clinical target volume (CTV) contours for computed tomography (CT) and 3-Tesla (3-T) magnetic resonance (MR) image-based cervical-cancer brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three experts in gynecologic radiation oncology contoured the same 3 cervical cancer brachytherapy cases: 1 stage IIB near-complete response (CR) case with a tandem and ovoid, 1 stage IIB partial response (PR) case with tandem and ovoid with needles, and 1 stage IB2 CR case with a tandem and ring applicator. The CT contours were completed before the MRI contours. These were analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with κ statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. The conformity index was calculated for each of the 6 data sets. Dice coefficients were generated to compare the CT and MR contours of the same case. Results: For all 3 cases, the mean tumor volume was smaller on MR than on CT (P<.001). The κ and conformity index estimates were slightly higher for CT, indicating a higher level of agreement on CT. The Dice coefficients were 89% for the stage IB2 case with a CR, 74% for the stage IIB case with a PR, and 57% for the stage IIB case with a CR. Conclusion: In a comparison of MR-contoured with CT-contoured CTV volumes, the higher level of agreement on CT may be due to the more distinct contrast medium visible on the images at the time of brachytherapy. MR at the time of brachytherapy may be of greatest benefit in patients with large tumors with parametrial extension that have a partial or complete response to external beam. On the basis of these results, a 95% consensus volume was generated for CT and for MR. Online contouring atlases are available for instruction at (http://www.nrgoncology.org/Resources/ContouringAtlases/GYNCervicalBrachytherapy.aspx)

  16. Improved targeting device and computer navigation for accurate placement of brachytherapy needles

    SciTech Connect

    Pappas, Ion P.I.; Ryan, Paul; Cossmann, Peter; Kowal, Jens; Borgeson, Blake; Caversaccio, Marco

    2005-06-15

    Successful treatment of skull base tumors with interstitial brachytherapy requires high targeting accuracy for the brachytherapy needles to avoid harming vital anatomical structures. To enable safe placement of the needles in this area, we developed an image-based planning and navigation system for brachytherapy, which includes a custom-made mechanical positioning arm that allows rough and fine adjustment of the needle position. The fine-adjustment mechanism consists of an XYZ microstage at the base of the arm and a needle holder with two fine-adjustable inclinations. The rotation axes of the inclinations cross at the tip of the needle so that the inclinational adjustments do not interfere with the translational adjustments. A vacuum cushion and a noninvasive fixation frame are used for the head immobilization. To avoid mechanical bending of the needles due to the weight of attached tracking markers, which would be detrimental for targeting accuracy, only a single LED marker on the tail of the needle is used. An experimental phantom-based targeting study with this setup demonstrated that a positioning accuracy of 1.4 mm (rms) can be achieved. The study showed that the proposed setup allows brachytherapy needles to be easily aligned and inserted with high targeting accuracy according to a preliminary plan. The achievable accuracy is higher than if the needles are inserted manually. The proposed system can be linked to a standard afterloader and standard dosimetry planning module. The associated additional effort is reasonable for the clinical practice and therefore the proposed procedure provides a promising tool for the safe treatment of tumors in the skull base area.

  17. SU-E-J-76: Incorporation of Ultrasound Elastography in Target Volume Delineation for Partial Breast Radiotherapy Planning: A Comparative Study

    SciTech Connect

    Juneja, P; Harris, E; Bamber, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is substantial observer variability in the delineation of target volumes for post-surgical partial breast radiotherapy because the tumour bed has poor x-ray contrast. This variability may result in substantial variations in planned dose distribution. Ultrasound elastography (USE) has an ability to detect mechanical discontinuities and therefore, the potential to image the scar and distortion in breast tissue architecture. The goal of this study was to compare USE techniques: strain elastography (SE), shear wave elastography (SWE) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging using phantoms that simulate features of the tumour bed, for the purpose of incorporating USE in breast radiotherapy planning. Methods: Three gelatine-based phantoms (10% w/v) containing: a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with adhered boundaries, a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with mobile boundaries and fluid cavity inclusion (to mimic seroma), were constructed and used to investigate the USE techniques. The accuracy of the elastography techniques was quantified by comparing the imaged inclusion with the modelled ground-truth using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). For two regions of interest (ROI), the DSC measures their spatial overlap. Ground-truth ROIs were modelled using geometrical measurements from B-mode images. Results: The phantoms simulating stiff scar tissue with adhered and mobile boundaries and seroma were successfully developed and imaged using SE and SWE. The edges of the stiff inclusions were more clearly visible in SE than in SWE. Subsequently, for all these phantoms the measured DSCs were found to be higher for SE (DSCs: 0.91–0.97) than SWE (DSCs: 0.68–0.79) with an average relative difference of 23%. In the case of seroma phantom, DSC values for SE and SWE were similar. Conclusion: This study presents a first attempt to identify the most suitable elastography technique for use in breast radiotherapy planning. Further analysis will

  18. DCP-collected absolute target reflectance signatures assist accurate interpretation of ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, F. P.

    1973-01-01

    Data collection platforms (DCP's) are being used at a Black Hills, South Dakota, test site (MMC 226A) to record radiometric measurements needed to determine solar and atmospheric parameters that affect ERTS-1 multispectral scanner radiance measurements. A total of 72 channels of analog data transmitted from an unattended ground truth site via three DCP's at least six times a day. The system has operated with only minor problems since September, sending forth daily measurements of biophysical responses and atmospheric conditions. Comparisons of scene radiance data calculated from ERTS images with that measured on the ground show the image-measured values to be 35 percent higher for the green channel and 20 percent higher for the red channel for the same scene targets. Radiance values for channels 6 and 7 are nearly the same from the ground data and from the imagery.

  19. Rapid and accurate tumor-target bio-imaging through specific in vivo biosynthesis of a fluorescent europium complex.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jing; Wang, Jianling; Li, Qiwei; Dong, Xiawei; Ge, Wei; Chen, Yun; Jiang, Xuerui; Liu, Hongde; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Xuemei

    2016-04-01

    A new and facile method for rapidly and accurately achieving tumor targeting fluorescent images has been explored using a specifically biosynthesized europium (Eu) complex in vivo and in vitro. It demonstrated that a fluorescent Eu complex could be bio-synthesized through a spontaneous molecular process in cancerous cells and tumors, but not prepared in normal cells and tissues. In addition, the proteomics analyses show that some biological pathways of metabolism, especially for NADPH production and glutamine metabolism, are remarkably affected during the relevant biosynthesis process, where molecular precursors of europium ions are reduced to fluorescent europium complexes inside cancerous cells or tumor tissues. These results proved that the specific self-biosynthesis of a fluorescent Eu complex by cancer cells or tumor tissues can provide a new strategy for accurate diagnosis and treatment strategies in the early stages of cancers and thus is beneficial for realizing precise surgical intervention based on the relevant cheap and readily available agents.

  20. Automated individual tree crown delineation from LIDAR data using morphological techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, L.; Hu, B.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Noland, T.

    2014-03-01

    In current tree crown delineation from LiDAR data, treetops and 3D geometric shapes of tree crowns are frequently extracted from LiDAR-derived Crown Height Model (CHM) and used as references to localize and delineate crowns. However, it is difficult to detect deciduous treetops and delineate deciduous tree crowns. The 3D shape of a crown, which can be derived from CHM, may be taken as a half ellipsoid, and any horizontal slice of the ellipsoid contains the treetop and indicates not only the location but also the spatial extent of the crown. Based on such slices, a novel multi-scale method for individual tree crown delineation from CHM was proposed in this study. This method consists mainly of two steps: (1) morphologically open the CHM over the scale range of target tree crowns; and (2) take local maxima within each resulting opened CHM as the horizontal slices of target crowns at the corresponding scale level and integrate all the slices within the scale range together to represent the spatial distribution of target crowns. In an experiment on CHMs over two natural closed canopy forests in Ontario, Canada, the proposed method accurately delineated the majority of the tree crowns from closed canopy forests.

  1. Delineating CD4 dependency of HIV-1: Adaptation to infect low level CD4 expressing target cells widens cellular tropism but severely impacts on envelope functionality

    PubMed Central

    Beauparlant, David; Rusert, Peter; Magnus, Carsten; Weber, Jacqueline; Uhr, Therese; Clapham, Paul R.; Metzner, Karin J.

    2017-01-01

    A hallmark of HIV-1 infection is the continuously declining number of the virus’ predominant target cells, activated CD4+ T cells. With diminishing CD4+ T cell levels, the capacity to utilize alternate cell types and receptors, including cells that express low CD4 receptor levels such as macrophages, thus becomes crucial. To explore evolutionary paths that allow HIV-1 to acquire a wider host cell range by infecting cells with lower CD4 levels, we dissected the evolution of the envelope-CD4 interaction under in vitro culture conditions that mimicked the decline of CD4high target cells, using a prototypic subtype B, R5-tropic strain. Adaptation to CD4low targets proved to severely alter envelope functions including trimer opening as indicated by a higher affinity to CD4 and loss in shielding against neutralizing antibodies. We observed a strikingly decreased infectivity on CD4high target cells, but sustained infectivity on CD4low targets, including macrophages. Intriguingly, the adaptation to CD4low targets altered the kinetic of the entry process, leading to rapid CD4 engagement and an extended transition time between CD4 and CCR5 binding during entry. This phenotype was also observed for certain central nervous system (CNS) derived macrophage-tropic viruses, highlighting that the functional perturbation we defined upon in vitro adaptation to CD4low targets occurs in vivo. Collectively, our findings suggest that CD4low adapted envelopes may exhibit severe deficiencies in entry fitness and shielding early in their evolution. Considering this, adaptation to CD4low targets may preferentially occur in a sheltered and immune-privileged environment such as the CNS to allow fitness restoring compensatory mutations to occur. PMID:28264054

  2. Automated basin delineation from digital terrain data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marks, D.; Dozier, J.; Frew, J.

    1983-01-01

    While digital terrain grids are now in wide use, accurate delineation of drainage basins from these data is difficult to efficiently automate. A recursive order N solution to this problem is presented. The algorithm is fast because no point in the basin is checked more than once, and no points outside the basin are considered. Two applications for terrain analysis and one for remote sensing are given to illustrate the method, on a basin with high relief in the Sierra Nevada. This technique for automated basin delineation will enhance the utility of digital terrain analysis for hydrologic modeling and remote sensing.

  3. SPARSE: Seed Point Auto-Generation for Random Walks Segmentation Enhancement in medical inhomogeneous targets delineation of morphological MR and CT images.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haibin; Zhen, Xin; Gu, Xuejun; Yan, Hao; Cervino, Laura; Xiao, Yang; Zhou, Linghong

    2015-03-08

    In medical image processing, robust segmentation of inhomogeneous targets is a challenging problem. Because of the complexity and diversity in medical images, the commonly used semiautomatic segmentation algorithms usually fail in the segmentation of inhomogeneous objects. In this study, we propose a novel algorithm imbedded with a seed point autogeneration for random walks segmentation enhancement, namely SPARSE, for better segmentation of inhomogeneous objects. With a few user-labeled points, SPARSE is able to generate extended seed points by estimating the probability of each voxel with respect to the labels. The random walks algorithm is then applied upon the extended seed points to achieve improved segmentation result. SPARSE is implemented under the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) programming environment on graphic processing unit (GPU) hardware platform. Quantitative evaluations are performed using clinical homogeneous and inhomogeneous cases. It is found that the SPARSE can greatly decrease the sensitiveness to initial seed points in terms of location and quantity, as well as the freedom of selecting parameters in edge weighting function. The evaluation results of SPARSE also demonstrate substantial improvements in accuracy and robustness to inhomogeneous target segmentation over the original random walks algorithm.

  4. Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy in Postoperative Treatment of Endometrial and Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Small, William Mell, Loren K.; Anderson, Penny; Creutzberg, Carien; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Gaffney, David; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Schefter, Tracey; Iyer, Revathy; Varia, Mahesh; Winter, Kathryn M.S.; Mundt, Arno J.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an atlas of the clinical target volume (CTV) definitions for postoperative radiotherapy of endometrial and cervical cancer to be used for planning pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group led an international collaberation of cooperative groups in the development of the atlas. The groups included the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Gynecologic Oncology Group, National Cancer Institute of Canada, European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and American College of Radiology Imaging Network. The members of the group were asked by questionnaire to define the areas that were to be included in the CTV and to outline theses areas on individual computed tomography images. The initial formulation of the group began in late 2004 and culminated with a formal consensus conference in June 2005. Results: The committee achieved a consensus CTV definition for postoperative therapy for endometrial and cervical cancer. The CTV should include the common, external, and internal iliac lymph node regions. The upper 3.0 cm of the vagina and paravaginal soft tissue lateral to the vagina should also be included. For patients with cervical cancer, or endometrial cancer with cervical stromal invasion, it is also recommended that the CTV include the presacral lymph node region. Conclusion: This report serves as an international template for the definition of the CTV for postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy for endometrial and cervical cancer.

  5. Audio-Visual Biofeedback Does Not Improve the Reliability of Target Delineation Using Maximum Intensity Projection in 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Radiation Therapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei; Neuner, Geoffrey A.; George, Rohini; Wang, Zhendong; Sasor, Sarah; Huang, Xuan; Regine, William F.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; D'Souza, Warren D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether coaching patients' breathing would improve the match between ITV{sub MIP} (internal target volume generated by contouring in the maximum intensity projection scan) and ITV{sub 10} (generated by combining the gross tumor volumes contoured in 10 phases of a 4-dimensional CT [4DCT] scan). Methods and Materials: Eight patients with a thoracic tumor and 5 patients with an abdominal tumor were included in an institutional review board-approved prospective study. Patients underwent 3 4DCT scans with: (1) free breathing (FB); (2) coaching using audio-visual (AV) biofeedback via the Real-Time Position Management system; and (3) coaching via a spirometer system (Active Breathing Coordinator or ABC). One physician contoured all scans to generate the ITV{sub 10} and ITV{sub MIP}. The match between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10} was quantitatively assessed with volume ratio, centroid distance, root mean squared distance, and overlap/Dice coefficient. We investigated whether coaching (AV or ABC) or uniform expansions (1, 2, 3, or 5 mm) of ITV{sub MIP} improved the match. Results: Although both AV and ABC coaching techniques improved frequency reproducibility and ABC improved displacement regularity, neither improved the match between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10} over FB. On average, ITV{sub MIP} underestimated ITV{sub 10} by 19%, 19%, and 21%, with centroid distance of 1.9, 2.3, and 1.7 mm and Dice coefficient of 0.87, 0.86, and 0.88 for FB, AV, and ABC, respectively. Separate analyses indicated a better match for lung cancers or tumors not adjacent to high-intensity tissues. Uniform expansions of ITV{sub MIP} did not correct for the mismatch between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10}. Conclusions: In this pilot study, audio-visual biofeedback did not improve the match between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10}. In general, ITV{sub MIP} should be limited to lung cancers, and modification of ITV{sub MIP} in each phase of the 4DCT data set is recommended.

  6. Polyallelic structural variants can provide accurate, highly informative genetic markers focused on diagnosis and therapeutic targets: Accuracy vs. Precision.

    PubMed

    Roses, A D

    2016-02-01

    Structural variants (SVs) include all insertions, deletions, and rearrangements in the genome, with several common types of nucleotide repeats including single sequence repeats, short tandem repeats, and insertion-deletion length variants. Polyallelic SVs provide highly informative markers for association studies with well-phenotyped cohorts. SVs can influence gene regulation by affecting epigenetics, transcription, splicing, and/or translation. Accurate assays of polyallelic SV loci are required to define the range and allele frequency of variable length alleles.

  7. Transcription factor regulation can be accurately predicted from the presence of target gene signatures in microarray gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Essaghir, Ahmed; Toffalini, Federica; Knoops, Laurent; Kallin, Anders; van Helden, Jacques; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste

    2010-01-01

    Deciphering transcription factor networks from microarray data remains difficult. This study presents a simple method to infer the regulation of transcription factors from microarray data based on well-characterized target genes. We generated a catalog containing transcription factors associated with 2720 target genes and 6401 experimentally validated regulations. When it was available, a distinction between transcriptional activation and inhibition was included for each regulation. Next, we built a tool (www.tfacts.org) that compares submitted gene lists with target genes in the catalog to detect regulated transcription factors. TFactS was validated with published lists of regulated genes in various models and compared to tools based on in silico promoter analysis. We next analyzed the NCI60 cancer microarray data set and showed the regulation of SOX10, MITF and JUN in melanomas. We then performed microarray experiments comparing gene expression response of human fibroblasts stimulated by different growth factors. TFactS predicted the specific activation of Signal transducer and activator of transcription factors by PDGF-BB, which was confirmed experimentally. Our results show that the expression levels of transcription factor target genes constitute a robust signature for transcription factor regulation, and can be efficiently used for microarray data mining. PMID:20215436

  8. Large-Scale Off-Target Identification Using Fast and Accurate Dual Regularized One-Class Collaborative Filtering and Its Application to Drug Repurposing

    PubMed Central

    Poleksic, Aleksandar; Yao, Yuan; Tong, Hanghang; Meng, Patrick; Xie, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Target-based screening is one of the major approaches in drug discovery. Besides the intended target, unexpected drug off-target interactions often occur, and many of them have not been recognized and characterized. The off-target interactions can be responsible for either therapeutic or side effects. Thus, identifying the genome-wide off-targets of lead compounds or existing drugs will be critical for designing effective and safe drugs, and providing new opportunities for drug repurposing. Although many computational methods have been developed to predict drug-target interactions, they are either less accurate than the one that we are proposing here or computationally too intensive, thereby limiting their capability for large-scale off-target identification. In addition, the performances of most machine learning based algorithms have been mainly evaluated to predict off-target interactions in the same gene family for hundreds of chemicals. It is not clear how these algorithms perform in terms of detecting off-targets across gene families on a proteome scale. Here, we are presenting a fast and accurate off-target prediction method, REMAP, which is based on a dual regularized one-class collaborative filtering algorithm, to explore continuous chemical space, protein space, and their interactome on a large scale. When tested in a reliable, extensive, and cross-gene family benchmark, REMAP outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. Furthermore, REMAP is highly scalable. It can screen a dataset of 200 thousands chemicals against 20 thousands proteins within 2 hours. Using the reconstructed genome-wide target profile as the fingerprint of a chemical compound, we predicted that seven FDA-approved drugs can be repurposed as novel anti-cancer therapies. The anti-cancer activity of six of them is supported by experimental evidences. Thus, REMAP is a valuable addition to the existing in silico toolbox for drug target identification, drug repurposing, phenotypic screening, and

  9. A Tumor-specific MicroRNA Recognition System Facilitates the Accurate Targeting to Tumor Cells by Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yingting; Yao, Yi; Yan, Hao; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Zhenming; Sun, Xiaodan; Zhao, Lingyun; Ao, Xiang; Xie, Zhen; Wu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapy for cancer is a research area of great interest, and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) show great potential as targeted carriers for therapeutics. One important class of cancer biomarkers is microRNAs (miRNAs), which play a significant role in tumor initiation and progression. In this study, a cascade recognition system containing multiple plasmids, including a Tet activator, a lacI repressor gene driven by the TetOn promoter, and a reporter gene repressed by the lacI repressor and influenced by multiple endogenous miRNAs, was used to recognize cells that display miRNA signals that are characteristic of cancer. For this purpose, three types of signal miRNAs with high proliferation and metastasis abilities were chosen (miR-21, miR-145, and miR-9). The response of this system to the human breast cancer MCF-7 cell line was 3.2-fold higher than that to the human breast epithelial HBL100 cell line and almost 7.5-fold higher than that to human embryonic kidney HEK293T cells. In combination with polyethyleneimine-modified MNPs, this recognition system targeted the tumor location in situ in an animal model, and an ~42% repression of tumor growth was achieved. Our study provides a new combination of magnetic nanocarrier and gene therapy based on miRNAs that are active in vivo, which has potential for use in future cancer therapies. PMID:27138178

  10. High-Grade Glioma Radiation Therapy Target Volumes and Patterns of Failure Obtained From Magnetic Resonance Imaging and {sup 18}F-FDOPA Positron Emission Tomography Delineations From Multiple Observers

    SciTech Connect

    Kosztyla, Robert; Chan, Elisa K.; Hsu, Fred; Wilson, Don; Ma, Roy; Cheung, Arthur; Zhang, Susan; Moiseenko, Vitali; Benard, Francois; Nichol, Alan

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare recurrent tumor locations after radiation therapy with pretreatment delineations of high-grade gliomas from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 3,4-dihydroxy-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-phenylalanine ({sup 18}F-FDOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) using contours delineated by multiple observers. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients with newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas underwent computed tomography (CT), gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI, and {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT. The image sets (CT, MRI, and PET/CT) were registered, and 5 observers contoured gross tumor volumes (GTVs) using MRI and PET. Consensus contours were obtained by simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE). Interobserver variability was quantified by the percentage of volume overlap. Recurrent tumor locations after radiation therapy were contoured by each observer using CT or MRI. Consensus recurrence contours were obtained with STAPLE. Results: The mean interobserver volume overlap for PET GTVs (42% ± 22%) and MRI GTVs (41% ± 22%) was not significantly different (P=.67). The mean consensus volume was significantly larger for PET GTVs (58.6 ± 52.4 cm{sup 3}) than for MRI GTVs (30.8 ± 26.0 cm{sup 3}, P=.003). More than 95% of the consensus recurrence volume was within the 95% isodose surface for 11 of 12 (92%) cases with recurrent tumor imaging. Ten (91%) of these cases extended beyond the PET GTV, and 9 (82%) were contained within a 2-cm margin on the MRI GTV. One recurrence (8%) was located outside the 95% isodose surface. Conclusions: High-grade glioma contours obtained with {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET had similar interobserver agreement to volumes obtained with MRI. Although PET-based consensus target volumes were larger than MRI-based volumes, treatment planning using PET-based volumes may not have yielded better treatment outcomes, given that all but 1 recurrence extended beyond the PET GTV and most were contained by a 2-cm

  11. A scalable and accurate targeted gene assembly tool (SAT-Assembler) for next-generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Sun, Yanni; Cole, James R

    2014-08-01

    Gene assembly, which recovers gene segments from short reads, is an important step in functional analysis of next-generation sequencing data. Lacking quality reference genomes, de novo assembly is commonly used for RNA-Seq data of non-model organisms and metagenomic data. However, heterogeneous sequence coverage caused by heterogeneous expression or species abundance, similarity between isoforms or homologous genes, and large data size all pose challenges to de novo assembly. As a result, existing assembly tools tend to output fragmented contigs or chimeric contigs, or have high memory footprint. In this work, we introduce a targeted gene assembly program SAT-Assembler, which aims to recover gene families of particular interest to biologists. It addresses the above challenges by conducting family-specific homology search, homology-guided overlap graph construction, and careful graph traversal. It can be applied to both RNA-Seq and metagenomic data. Our experimental results on an Arabidopsis RNA-Seq data set and two metagenomic data sets show that SAT-Assembler has smaller memory usage, comparable or better gene coverage, and lower chimera rate for assembling a set of genes from one or multiple pathways compared with other assembly tools. Moreover, the family-specific design and rapid homology search allow SAT-Assembler to be naturally compatible with parallel computing platforms. The source code of SAT-Assembler is available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/sat-assembler/. The data sets and experimental settings can be found in supplementary material.

  12. [Metabolically active volumes automatic delineation methodologies in PET imaging: review and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Hatt, M; Boussion, N; Cheze-Le Rest, C; Visvikis, D; Pradier, O

    2012-02-01

    PET imaging is now considered a gold standard tool in clinical oncology, especially for diagnosis purposes. More recent applications such as therapy follow-up or tumor targeting in radiotherapy require a fast, accurate and robust metabolically active tumor volumes delineation on emission images, which cannot be obtained through manual contouring. This clinical need has sprung a large number of methodological developments regarding automatic methods to define tumor volumes on PET images. This paper reviews most of the methodologies that have been recently proposed and discusses their framework and methodological and/or clinical validation. Perspectives regarding the future work to be done are also suggested.

  13. [Guidelines for delineation of pelvic lymph nodes in anal cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Vendrely, V; Galland-Girodet, S; Orré, M; Maire, J-P

    2013-10-01

    Squamous cell anal cancer is a rare malignancy, its incidence increases due to higher exposure of the young adults to risk factors. The current management is based on chemoradiotherapy, which is highly effective and achieves locoregional control but causes important morbidity. Improvement of radiation technique such as intensity modulated radiation therapy has led to reduce acute toxicities, but also requires an accurate delineation of the target volumes in order not to underestimate potential and pathological sites resulting in an increase of the locoregional failures. PET scanner has an important place in the pretreatment work-up for staging and targeting the delineation of the volumes, allowing to select patients with localized disease, avoid geographic miss and appropriately boost nodal disease. The study of recurrences sites has not yet provided a real mapping of the recurrences depending on the treatment volumes. Different radiation oncologist cooperative groups have published guidelines and tools for delineation, in order to provide homogeneity but also customize the management of anal carcinoma.

  14. A novel 33-Gene targeted resequencing panel provides accurate, clinical-grade diagnosis and improves patient management for rare inherited anaemias.

    PubMed

    Roy, Noémi B A; Wilson, Edward A; Henderson, Shirley; Wray, Katherine; Babbs, Christian; Okoli, Steven; Atoyebi, Wale; Mixon, Avery; Cahill, Mary R; Carey, Peter; Cullis, Jonathan; Curtin, Julie; Dreau, Helene; Ferguson, David J P; Gibson, Brenda; Hall, Georgina; Mason, Joanne; Morgan, Mary; Proven, Melanie; Qureshi, Amrana; Sanchez Garcia, Joaquin; Sirachainan, Nongnuch; Teo, Juliana; Tedgård, Ulf; Higgs, Doug; Roberts, David; Roberts, Irene; Schuh, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Accurate diagnosis of rare inherited anaemias is challenging, requiring a series of complex and expensive laboratory tests. Targeted next-generation-sequencing (NGS) has been used to investigate these disorders, but the selection of genes on individual panels has been narrow and the validation strategies used have fallen short of the standards required for clinical use. Clinical-grade validation of negative results requires the test to distinguish between lack of adequate sequencing reads at the locations of known mutations and a real absence of mutations. To achieve a clinically-reliable diagnostic test and minimize false-negative results we developed an open-source tool (CoverMi) to accurately determine base-coverage and the 'discoverability' of known mutations for every sample. We validated our 33-gene panel using Sanger sequencing and microarray. Our panel demonstrated 100% specificity and 99·7% sensitivity. We then analysed 57 clinical samples: molecular diagnoses were made in 22/57 (38·6%), corresponding to 32 mutations of which 16 were new. In all cases, accurate molecular diagnosis had a positive impact on clinical management. Using a validated NGS-based platform for routine molecular diagnosis of previously undiagnosed congenital anaemias is feasible in a clinical diagnostic setting, improves precise diagnosis and enhances management and counselling of the patient and their family.

  15. An Integrated Tool to Study MHC Region: Accurate SNV Detection and HLA Genes Typing in Human MHC Region Using Targeted High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Xu, Yinyin; Liang, Dequan; Gao, Peng; Sun, Yepeng; Gifford, Benjamin; D’Ascenzo, Mark; Liu, Xiaomin; Tellier, Laurent C. A. M.; Yang, Fang; Tong, Xin; Chen, Dan; Zheng, Jing; Li, Weiyang; Richmond, Todd; Xu, Xun; Wang, Jun; Li, Yingrui

    2013-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is one of the most variable and gene-dense regions of the human genome. Most studies of the MHC, and associated regions, focus on minor variants and HLA typing, many of which have been demonstrated to be associated with human disease susceptibility and metabolic pathways. However, the detection of variants in the MHC region, and diagnostic HLA typing, still lacks a coherent, standardized, cost effective and high coverage protocol of clinical quality and reliability. In this paper, we presented such a method for the accurate detection of minor variants and HLA types in the human MHC region, using high-throughput, high-coverage sequencing of target regions. A probe set was designed to template upon the 8 annotated human MHC haplotypes, and to encompass the 5 megabases (Mb) of the extended MHC region. We deployed our probes upon three, genetically diverse human samples for probe set evaluation, and sequencing data show that ∼97% of the MHC region, and over 99% of the genes in MHC region, are covered with sufficient depth and good evenness. 98% of genotypes called by this capture sequencing prove consistent with established HapMap genotypes. We have concurrently developed a one-step pipeline for calling any HLA type referenced in the IMGT/HLA database from this target capture sequencing data, which shows over 96% typing accuracy when deployed at 4 digital resolution. This cost-effective and highly accurate approach for variant detection and HLA typing in the MHC region may lend further insight into immune-mediated diseases studies, and may find clinical utility in transplantation medicine research. This one-step pipeline is released for general evaluation and use by the scientific community. PMID:23894464

  16. Rapid and accurate identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and common non-tuberculous mycobacteria by multiplex real-time PCR targeting different housekeeping genes.

    PubMed

    Nasr Esfahani, Bahram; Rezaei Yazdi, Hadi; Moghim, Sharareh; Ghasemian Safaei, Hajieh; Zarkesh Esfahani, Hamid

    2012-11-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of mycobacteria isolates from primary culture is important due to timely and appropriate antibiotic therapy. Conventional methods for identification of Mycobacterium species based on biochemical tests needs several weeks and may remain inconclusive. In this study, a novel multiplex real-time PCR was developed for rapid identification of Mycobacterium genus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) and the most common non-tuberculosis mycobacteria species including M. abscessus, M. fortuitum, M. avium complex, M. kansasii, and the M. gordonae in three reaction tubes but under same PCR condition. Genetic targets for primer designing included the 16S rDNA gene, the dnaJ gene, the gyrB gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS). Multiplex real-time PCR was setup with reference Mycobacterium strains and was subsequently tested with 66 clinical isolates. Results of multiplex real-time PCR were analyzed with melting curves and melting temperature (T (m)) of Mycobacterium genus, MTC, and each of non-tuberculosis Mycobacterium species were determined. Multiplex real-time PCR results were compared with amplification and sequencing of 16S-23S rDNA ITS for identification of Mycobacterium species. Sensitivity and specificity of designed primers were each 100 % for MTC, M. abscessus, M. fortuitum, M. avium complex, M. kansasii, and M. gordonae. Sensitivity and specificity of designed primer for genus Mycobacterium was 96 and 100 %, respectively. According to the obtained results, we conclude that this multiplex real-time PCR with melting curve analysis and these novel primers can be used for rapid and accurate identification of genus Mycobacterium, MTC, and the most common non-tuberculosis Mycobacterium species.

  17. Delineating the "galectin signature" of the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Compagno, Daniel; Laderach, Diego J.; Gentilini, Lucas; Jaworski, Felipe M.; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.

    2013-01-01

    Galectins, a family of glycan-binding proteins, can control tumor progression by promoting transformation, angiogenesis and immune escape. We identified a dynamically regulated ‘galectin signature’, which delineates the progression of prostate cancer, highlighting galectin-1 as an attractive target for anti-angiogenic therapy in advanced stages of the disease. PMID:23734312

  18. Non-targeted screening for contaminants in paper and board food-contact materials using effect-directed analysis and accurate mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bengtström, Linda; Rosenmai, Anna Kjerstine; Trier, Xenia; Jensen, Lisbeth Krüger; Granby, Kit; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Driffield, Malcolm; Højslev Petersen, Jens

    2016-06-01

    Due to large knowledge gaps in chemical composition and toxicological data for substances involved, paper and board food-contact materials (P&B FCM) have been emerging as a FCM type of particular concern for consumer safety. This study describes the development of a step-by-step strategy, including extraction, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractionation, tentative identification of relevant substances and in vitro testing of selected tentatively identified substances. As a case study, we used two fractions from a recycled pizza box sample which exhibited aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activity. These fractions were analysed by gas chromatography (GC) and ultra-HPLC (UHPLC) coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometers (QTOF MS) in order tentatively to identify substances. The elemental composition was determined for peaks above a threshold, and compared with entries in a commercial mass spectral library for GC-MS (GC-EI-QTOF MS) analysis and an in-house built library of accurate masses for substances known to be used in P&B packaging for UHPLC-QTOF analysis. Of 75 tentatively identified substances, 15 were initially selected for further testing in vitro; however, only seven were commercially available and subsequently tested in vitro and quantified. Of these seven, the identities of three pigments found in printing inks were confirmed by UHPLC tandem mass spectrometry (QqQ MS/MS). Two pigments had entries in the database, meaning that a material relevant accurate mass database can provide a fast tentative identification. Pure standards of the seven tentatively identified substances were tested in vitro but could not explain a significant proportion of the AhR-response in the extract. Targeted analyses of dioxins and PCBs, both well-known AhR agonists, was performed. However, the dioxins could explain approximately 3% of the activity observed in the pizza box extract indicating that some very AhR active substance(s) still remain to be

  19. Automated delineation of radiotherapy volumes: are we going in the right direction?

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, G A; Price, P; Price, G J; Moore, C J

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Rapid and accurate delineation of target volumes and multiple organs at risk, within the enduring International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement framework, is now hugely important in radiotherapy, owing to the rapid proliferation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy and the advent of four-dimensional image-guided adaption. Nevertheless, delineation is still generally clinically performed with little if any machine assistance, even though it is both time-consuming and prone to interobserver variation. Currently available segmentation tools include those based on image greyscale interrogation, statistical shape modelling and body atlas-based methods. However, all too often these are not able to match the accuracy of the expert clinician, which remains the universally acknowledged gold standard. In this article we suggest that current methods are fundamentally limited by their lack of ability to incorporate essential human clinical decision-making into the underlying models. Hybrid techniques that utilise prior knowledge, make sophisticated use of greyscale information and allow clinical expertise to be integrated are needed. This may require a change in focus from automated segmentation to machine-assisted delineation. Similarly, new metrics of image quality reflecting fitness for purpose would be extremely valuable. We conclude that methods need to be developed to take account of the clinician's expertise and honed visual processing capabilities as much as the underlying, clinically meaningful information content of the image data being interrogated. We illustrate our observations and suggestions through our own experiences with two software tools developed as part of research council-funded projects. PMID:23239689

  20. Comparative study of methods for WHPA delineation.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Daniel; Martel, Richard; Karanta, Gilbert; Lefebvre, René; Michaud, Yves; Therrien, René; Nastev, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Human activities, whether agricultural, industrial, commercial, or domestic, can contribute to ground water quality deterioration. In order to protect the ground water exploited by a production well, it is essential to develop a good knowledge of the flow system and to adequately delineate the area surrounding the well within which potential contamination sources should be managed. Many methods have been developed to delineate such a wellhead protection area (WHPA). The integration of more information on the geologic and hydrogeologic characteristics of the study area increases the precision of any given WHPA delineation method. From a practical point of view, the WHPA delineation methods allowing the simplest and least expensive integration of the available information should be favored. This paper presents a comparative study in which nine different WHPA delineation methods were applied to a well and a spring in an unconfined granular aquifer and to a well in a confined highly fractured rock aquifer. These methods range from simple approaches to complex computer models. Hydrogeological mapping and numerical modeling with MODFLOW-MODPATH were used as reference methods to respectively compare the delineation of the zone of contribution and the zone of travel obtained from the various WHPA methods. Although applied to simple ground water flow systems, these methods provided a relatively wide range of results. To allow a realistic delineation of the WHPA in aquifers of variable geometry, a WHPA delineation method should ensure a water balance and include observed or calculated regional flow characteristics.

  1. An Accurate and Fault-Tolerant Target Positioning System for Buildings Using Laser Rangefinders and Low-Cost MEMS-Based MARG Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lin; Guan, Dongxue; Landry, René Jr.; Cheng, Jianhua; Sydorenko, Kostyantyn

    2015-01-01

    Target positioning systems based on MEMS gyros and laser rangefinders (LRs) have extensive prospects due to their advantages of low cost, small size and easy realization. The target positioning accuracy is mainly determined by the LR’s attitude derived by the gyros. However, the attitude error is large due to the inherent noises from isolated MEMS gyros. In this paper, both accelerometer/magnetometer and LR attitude aiding systems are introduced to aid MEMS gyros. A no-reset Federated Kalman Filter (FKF) is employed, which consists of two local Kalman Filters (KF) and a Master Filter (MF). The local KFs are designed by using the Direction Cosine Matrix (DCM)-based dynamic equations and the measurements from the two aiding systems. The KFs can estimate the attitude simultaneously to limit the attitude errors resulting from the gyros. Then, the MF fuses the redundant attitude estimates to yield globally optimal estimates. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the FKF-based system can improve the target positioning accuracy effectively and allow for good fault-tolerant capability. PMID:26512672

  2. Key questions for conducting role delineation research.

    PubMed

    Taub, Alyson; Gilmore, Gary D; Olsen, Larry K; Connell, Dave

    2011-06-01

    Role delineation research for the verification of professional competencies is essential in many professions to promote quality assurance and support capacity building and workforce development. In this article, guidance is provided about key aspects of role delineation research. The information contained in this article focuses on 13 key questions within three selected research phases when attempting to identify and verify the roles that are inherent within any given profession. The major sections in the paper include planning the research, collecting and analyzing the data, interpreting findings, and considering the future. Recommendations and examples related to each of the important questions are provided to assist others undertaking role delineation research.

  3. Intensity-modulated salvage radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost for local recurrence of prostate carcinoma: a pilot study on the place of PET-choline for guiding target volume delineation

    PubMed Central

    Wahart, Aurélien; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Vallard, Alexis; Geissler, Benjamin; Ben Mrad, Majed; Falk, Alexander T; Prevot, Nathalie; de Laroche, Guy; Rancoule, Chloé; Chargari, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to report the first cases of salvage radiotherapy (RT) using the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) targeted on choline positron emission tomography (PET) uptake in a local recurrent prostate cancer, after a radical prostatectomy. Methods: Four patients received salvage irradiation for biochemical relapse that occurred after the initial radical prostatectomy. The relapse occurred from 10 months to 6 years with PSA levels ranging from 2.35 to 4.86 ng ml−1. For each patient, an 18F-choline PET-CT showed a focal choline uptake in prostatic fossa, with standardized uptake value calculated on the basis of predicted lean body mass (SUL) max of 3.3–6.8. No involved lymph node or distant metastases were diagnosed. IMRT doses were of 62.7 Gy (1.9 Gy/fraction, 33 fractions), with a SIB of 69.3 Gy (2.1 Gy/fraction, 33 fractions) to a PET-guided target volume. Results: Acute toxicities were limited. We observed no gastrointestinal toxicity ≥grade 2 and only one grade 2 genitourinary toxicity. At 1-month follow-up evaluation, no complication and a decrease in PSA level (6.8–43.8% of the pre-therapeutic level) were reported. After 4 months, a decrease in PSA level was obtained for all the patients, ranging from 30% to 70%. At a median follow-up of 15 months, PSA level was controlled for all the patients, but one of them experienced a distant lymph node recurrence. Conclusion: Salvage irradiation to the prostate bed with SIB guided by PET-CT is feasible, with biological efficacy and no major acute toxicity. Advances in knowledge: IMRT with PET-oriented SIB for salvage treatment of prostate cancer is possible, without major acute toxicity. PMID:26648528

  4. Sequencer-Based Capillary Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Targeting the rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) Regions for Accurate Identification of Clinically Important Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sharon C.-A.; Wang, He; Zhang, Li; Fan, Xin; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Cheng, Jing-Wei; Kong, Fanrong; Zhao, Yu-Pei; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Accurate species identification of Candida, Cryptococcus, Trichosporon and other yeast pathogens is important for clinical management. In the present study, we developed and evaluated a yeast species identification scheme by determining the rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region length types (LTs) using a sequencer-based capillary gel electrophoresis (SCGE) approach. A total of 156 yeast isolates encompassing 32 species were first used to establish a reference SCGE ITS LT database. Evaluation of the ITS LT database was then performed on (i) a separate set of (n = 97) clinical isolates by SCGE, and (ii) 41 isolates of 41 additional yeast species from GenBank by in silico analysis. Of 156 isolates used to build the reference database, 41 ITS LTs were identified, which correctly identified 29 of the 32 (90.6%) species, with the exception of Trichosporon asahii, Trichosporon japonicum and Trichosporon asteroides. In addition, eight of the 32 species revealed different electropherograms and were subtyped into 2–3 different ITS LTs each. Of the 97 test isolates used to evaluate the ITS LT scheme, 96 (99.0%) were correctly identified to species level, with the remaining isolate having a novel ITS LT. Of the additional 41 isolates for in silico analysis, none was misidentified by the ITS LT database except for Trichosporon mucoides whose ITS LT profile was identical to that of Trichosporon dermatis. In conclusion, yeast identification by the present SCGE ITS LT assay is a fast, reproducible and accurate alternative for the identification of clinically important yeasts with the exception of Trichosporon species. PMID:27105313

  5. Variability Among Breast Radiation Oncologists in Delineation of the Postsurgical Lumpectomy Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Landis, Daniel M. . E-mail: Daniel.Landis@swedish.org; Luo Weixiu; Song Jun; Harris, Jay R.

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: Partial breast irradiation (PBI) is becoming more widely used. Accurate determination of the surgical lumpectomy cavity volume is more critical with PBI than with whole breast radiation therapy. We examined the interobserver variability in delineation of the lumpectomy cavity among four academic radiation oncologists who specialize in the treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-four lumpectomy cavities in 33 consecutive patients were evaluated. Each physician contoured the cavity and a 1.5-cm margin was added to define the planning target volume (PTV). A cavity visualization score (CVS) was assigned (1-5). To eliminate bias, the physician of record was eliminated from the analysis in all cases. Three measures of variability of the PTV were developed: average shift of the center of mass (COM), average percent overlap between the PTV of two physicians (PVO), and standard deviation of the PTV. Results: Of variables examined, pathologic resection volume was significantly correlated with CVS, with larger volumes more easily visualized. Shift of the COM decreased and PVO increased significantly as CVS increased. For CVS 4 and 5 cases, the average COM shift was 3 mm and 2 mm, respectively, and PVO was 77% and 87%, respectively. In multiple linear regression, pathologic diameter >4 cm and CVS {>=}3 were significantly associated with smaller COM shift. When CVS was omitted from analysis, PVO was significantly larger with pathologic diameter {>=}5 cm, days to planning <36, and older age. Conclusions: Even among radiation oncologists who specialize in breast radiotherapy, there can be substantial differences in delineation of the postsurgical radiotherapy target volume. Large treatment margins may be prudent if the cavity is not clearly defined.

  6. Delineation of regional arid karstic aquifers: an integrative data approach.

    PubMed

    Wolaver, Brad D; Sharp, John M; Rodriguez, Juan M; Flores, Juan Carlos Ibarra

    2008-01-01

    This research integrates data procedures for the delineation of regional ground water flow systems in arid karstic basins with sparse hydrogeologic data using surface topography data, geologic mapping, permeability data, chloride concentrations of ground water and precipitation, and measured discharge data. This integrative data analysis framework can be applied to evaluate arid karstic aquifer systems globally. The accurate delineation of ground water recharge areas in developing aquifer systems with sparse hydrogeologic data is essential for their effective long-term development and management. We illustrate the use of this approach in the Cuatrociénegas Basin (CCB) of Mexico. Aquifers are characterized using geographic information systems for ground water catchment delineation, an analytical model for interbasin flow evaluation, a chloride balance approach for recharge estimation, and a water budget for mapping contributing catchments over a large region. The test study area includes the CCB of Coahuila, Mexico, a UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve containing more than 500 springs that support ground water-dependent ecosystems with more than 70 endemic organisms and irrigated agriculture. We define recharge areas that contribute local and regional ground water discharge to springs and the regional flow system. Results show that the regional aquifer system follows a topographic gradient that during past pluvial periods may have linked the Río Nazas and the Río Aguanaval of the Sierra Madre Occidental to the Río Grande via the CCB and other large, currently dry, upgradient lakes.

  7. Stratiform/convective rain delineation for TRMM microwave imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Tanvir; Srivastava, Prashant K.; Dai, Qiang; Gupta, Manika; Wan Jaafar, Wan Zurina

    2015-10-01

    This article investigates the potential for using machine learning algorithms to delineate stratiform/convective (S/C) rain regimes for passive microwave imager taking calibrated brightness temperatures as only spectral parameters. The algorithms have been implemented for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) microwave imager (TMI), and calibrated as well as validated taking the Precipitation Radar (PR) S/C information as the target class variables. Two different algorithms are particularly explored for the delineation. The first one is metaheuristic adaptive boosting algorithm that includes the real, gentle, and modest versions of the AdaBoost. The second one is the classical linear discriminant analysis that includes the Fisher's and penalized versions of the linear discriminant analysis. Furthermore, prior to the development of the delineation algorithms, a feature selection analysis has been conducted for a total of 85 features, which contains the combinations of brightness temperatures from 10 GHz to 85 GHz and some derived indexes, such as scattering index, polarization corrected temperature, and polarization difference with the help of mutual information aided minimal redundancy maximal relevance criterion (mRMR). It has been found that the polarization corrected temperature at 85 GHz and the features derived from the "addition" operator associated with the 85 GHz channels have good statistical dependency to the S/C target class variables. Further, it has been shown how the mRMR feature selection technique helps to reduce the number of features without deteriorating the results when applying through the machine learning algorithms. The proposed scheme is able to delineate the S/C rain regimes with reasonable accuracy. Based on the statistical validation experience from the validation period, the Matthews correlation coefficients are in the range of ~0.60-0.70. Since, the proposed method does not rely on any a priori information, this makes it very

  8. 43 CFR 3922.40 - Tract delineation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) OIL SHALE LEASING Application Processing § 3922.40 Tract... the oil shale resource. (b) The BLM may delineate more or less lands than were covered by...

  9. 43 CFR 3922.40 - Tract delineation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE LEASING Application Processing § 3922.40... development of the oil shale resource. (b) The BLM may delineate more or less lands than were covered by...

  10. 43 CFR 3922.40 - Tract delineation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE LEASING Application Processing § 3922.40... development of the oil shale resource. (b) The BLM may delineate more or less lands than were covered by...

  11. 43 CFR 3922.40 - Tract delineation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE LEASING Application Processing § 3922.40... development of the oil shale resource. (b) The BLM may delineate more or less lands than were covered by...

  12. Archived neonatal dried blood spot samples can be used for accurate whole genome and exome-targeted next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hollegaard, Mads Vilhelm; Grauholm, Jonas; Nielsen, Ronni; Grove, Jakob; Mandrup, Susanne; Hougaard, David Michael

    2013-01-01

    Dried blood spot samples (DBSS) have been collected and stored for decades as part of newborn screening programmes worldwide. Representing almost an entire population under a certain age and collected with virtually no bias, the Newborn Screening Biobanks are of immense value in medical studies, for example, to examine the genetics of various disorders. We have previously demonstrated that DNA extracted from a fraction (2×3.2mm discs) of an archived DBSS can be whole genome amplified (wgaDNA) and used for accurate array genotyping. However, until now, it has been uncertain whether wgaDNA from DBSS can be used for accurate whole genome sequencing (WGS) and exome sequencing (WES). This study examined two individuals represented by three different types of samples each: whole-blood (reference samples), 3-year-old DBSS spotted with reference material (refDBSS), and 27- to 29-year-old archived neonatal DBSS (neoDBSS) stored at -20°C in the Danish Newborn Screening Biobank. The reference samples were genotyped using an Illumina Omni2.5M array, and all samples were sequenced on a HighSeq2000 Paired-End flow cell. First, we compared the array single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype data to the single nucleotide variation (SNV) calls from the WGS and WES SNV calls. We also compared the WGS and WES reference sample SNV calls to the DBSS SNV calls. The overall performance of the archived DBSS was similar to the whole blood reference sample. Plotting the error rates relative to coverage revealed that the error rates of DBSS were similar to that of their reference samples. SNVs called with a coverage<×8 had error rates between 1.5 and 35%, whereas the error rates of SNVs called with a coverage≥8 were <1.5%. In conclusion, the wgaDNA amplified from both new and old neonatal DBSS perform as well as their whole-blood reference samples with regards to error rates, strongly indicating that neonatal DBSS collected shortly after birth and stored for decades comprise an

  13. Use of dose-dependent absorption into target tissues to more accurately predict cancer risk at low oral doses of hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Haney, J

    2015-02-01

    The mouse dose at the lowest water concentration used in the National Toxicology Program hexavalent chromium (CrVI) drinking water study (NTP, 2008) is about 74,500 times higher than the approximate human dose corresponding to the 35-city geometric mean reported in EWG (2010) and over 1000 times higher than that based on the highest reported tap water concentration. With experimental and environmental doses differing greatly, it is a regulatory challenge to extrapolate high-dose results to environmental doses orders of magnitude lower in a meaningful and toxicologically predictive manner. This seems particularly true for the low-dose extrapolation of results for oral CrVI-induced carcinogenesis since dose-dependent differences in the dose fraction absorbed by mouse target tissues are apparent (Kirman et al., 2012). These data can be used for a straightforward adjustment of the USEPA (2010) draft oral slope factor (SFo) to be more predictive of risk at environmentally-relevant doses. More specifically, the evaluation of observed and modeled differences in the fraction of dose absorbed by target tissues at the point-of-departure for the draft SFo calculation versus lower doses suggests that the draft SFo be divided by a dose-specific adjustment factor of at least an order of magnitude to be less over-predictive of risk at more environmentally-relevant doses.

  14. FcR epsilon+ lymphocytes and regulation of the IgE antibody system. IV. Delineation of target cells and mechanisms of action of SFA and EFA in inhibiting in vitro induction of FcR epsilon expression.

    PubMed

    Marcelletti, J F; Katz, D H

    1984-12-01

    SFA and EFA are derived from distinct mouse T cell hybridomas secreting one or the other (but not both) factor, and although both are capable of inhibiting FcR epsilon expression by unfractionated spleen cells induced by monomeric IgE, neither was inhibitory for EIRT-induced FcR epsilon expression by T cells in the same cell population. This suggests that the final target cell for the inhibitory effects of SFA and EFA is the FcR epsilon+ B lymphocyte. T cells are required for both SFA- and EFA-mediated FcR epsilon inhibition, and more precisely, as shown in this study, SFA stimulates Lyt-1+ cells in the presence or absence of IgE to produce a suppressive effector molecule (SEM), and EFA together with IgE stimulates Lyt-2+ cells to produce an enhancing effector molecule (EEM), both of which can directly inhibit FcR epsilon expression by B cells. SFA and SEM can inhibit both IgE- and EIRB-induced FcR epsilon expression by B cells, indicating that SFA may act by blocking the EIRB-mediated expansion of the FcR epsilon+ B cell population. EFA and EEM, in contrast, can inhibit IgE-induced but not EIRB-induced FcR epsilon expression, indicating that EFA may act at some point before the release of EIR, perhaps involving those FcR epsilon+ B cells that respond to IgE and produce EIRB. Finally, although neither SFA and EFA display IgE binding properties, both SEM and EEM, in contrast, are IgE binding factors (IgE-BF) and may be homologous to the suppressive IgE binding factor and potentiating IgE binding factor described by other investigators. The possible interrelationships between these various cells and factors are discussed.

  15. Automated design of probes for rRNA-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization reveals the advantages of using dual probes for accurate identification.

    PubMed

    Wright, Erik S; Yilmaz, L Safak; Corcoran, Andrew M; Ökten, Hatice E; Noguera, Daniel R

    2014-08-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a common technique for identifying cells in their natural environment and is often used to complement next-generation sequencing approaches as an integral part of the full-cycle rRNA approach. A major challenge in FISH is the design of oligonucleotide probes with high sensitivity and specificity to their target group. The rapidly expanding number of rRNA sequences has increased awareness of the number of potential nontargets for every FISH probe, making the design of new FISH probes challenging using traditional methods. In this study, we conducted a systematic analysis of published probes that revealed that many have insufficient coverage or specificity for their intended target group. Therefore, we developed an improved thermodynamic model of FISH that can be applied at any taxonomic level, used the model to systematically design probes for all recognized genera of bacteria and archaea, and identified potential cross-hybridizations for the selected probes. This analysis resulted in high-specificity probes for 35.6% of the genera when a single probe was used in the absence of competitor probes and for 60.9% when up to two competitor probes were used. Requiring the hybridization of two independent probes for positive identification further increased specificity. In this case, we could design highly specific probe sets for up to 68.5% of the genera without the use of competitor probes and 87.7% when up to two competitor probes were used. The probes designed in this study, as well as tools for designing new probes, are available online (http://DECIPHER.cee.wisc.edu).

  16. Efficiency of Integrated Geophysical techniques in delineating the extension of Bauxites ore in north Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almutairi, Yasir; Alanazi, Abdulrahman; Almutairi, Muteb; Alsama, Ali; Alhenaki, Bander; Almalki, Awadh

    2014-05-01

    We exploit the integration of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) techniques, magnetic gradiometry, resistivity measurements and seismic tomography for the high-resolution non-invasive study for delineating the subsurface Bauxite layer in Zabira locality, north of Riyadh. Integrated GPR, magnetic gradiometry resistivity and seismic refraction are used in the case of high contrast targets and provide an accurate subsurface reconstruction of foundations in sediments. Resistivity pseudo-sections are in particular useful for the areal identification of contacts between soils and foundations while GPR and magnetic gradiometry provide detailed information about location and depth of the structures. Results obtained by GPR, Magnetics and resistivity shows a very good agreement in mapping the bauxite layer depth at range of 5 m to 10 m while the depth obtained by seismic refraction was 10 m to 15 m due to lack of velocity information.

  17. A rapid, reproducible, on-the-fly orthogonal array optimization method for targeted protein quantification by LC/MS and its application for accurate and sensitive quantification of carbonyl reductases in human liver.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jin; Gonzalez-Covarrubias, Vanessa; Covarrubias, Vanessa M; Straubinger, Robert M; Wang, Hao; Duan, Xiaotao; Yu, Haoying; Qu, Jun; Blanco, Javier G

    2010-04-01

    Liquid chromatography (LC)/mass spectrometry (MS) in selected-reactions-monitoring (SRM) mode provides a powerful tool for targeted protein quantification. However, efficient, high-throughput strategies for proper selection of signature peptides (SP) for protein quantification and accurate optimization of their SRM conditions remain elusive. Here we describe an on-the-fly, orthogonal array optimization (OAO) approach that enables rapid, comprehensive, and reproducible SRM optimization of a large number of candidate peptides in a single nanoflow-LC/MS run. With the optimized conditions, many peptide candidates can be evaluated in biological matrixes for selection of the final SP. The OAO strategy employs a systematic experimental design that strategically varies product ions, declustering energy, and collision energy in a cycle of 25 consecutive SRM trials, which accurately reveals the effects of these factors on the signal-to-noise ratio of a candidate peptide and optimizes each. As proof of concept, we developed a highly sensitive, accurate, and reproducible method for the quantification of carbonyl reductases CBR1 and CBR3 in human liver. Candidate peptides were identified by nano-LC/LTQ/Orbitrap, filtered using a stringent set of criteria, and subjected to OAO. After evaluating both sensitivity and stability of the candidates, two SP were selected for quantification of each protein. As a result of the accurate OAO of assay conditions, sensitivities of 80 and 110 amol were achieved for CBR1 and CBR3, respectively. The method was validated and used to quantify the CBRs in 33 human liver samples. The mean level of CBR1 was 93.4 +/- 49.7 (range: 26.2-241) ppm of total protein, and of CBR3 was 7.69 +/- 4.38 (range: 1.26-17.9) ppm. Key observations of this study: (i) evaluation of peptide stability in the target matrix is essential for final selection of the SP; (ii) utilization of two unique SP contributes to high reliability of target protein quantification; (iii

  18. Delineation of Supraclavicular Target Volumes in Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Lindsay C.; Diehn, Felix E.; Boughey, Judy C.; Childs, Stephanie K.; Park, Sean S.; Yan, Elizabeth S.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Mutter, Robert W.

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: To map the location of gross supraclavicular metastases in patients with breast cancer, in order to determine areas at highest risk of harboring subclinical disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with axial imaging of gross supraclavicular disease were identified from an institutional breast cancer registry. Locations of the metastatic lymph nodes were transferred onto representative axial computed tomography images of the supraclavicular region and compared with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) breast cancer atlas for radiation therapy planning. Results: Sixty-two patients with 161 supraclavicular nodal metastases were eligible for study inclusion. At the time of diagnosis, 117 nodal metastases were present in 44 patients. Forty-four nodal metastases in 18 patients were detected at disease recurrence, 4 of whom had received prior radiation to the supraclavicular fossa. Of the 161 nodal metastases, 95 (59%) were within the RTOG consensus volume, 4 nodal metastases (2%) in 3 patients were marginally within the volume, and 62 nodal metastases (39%) in 30 patients were outside the volume. Supraclavicular disease outside the RTOG consensus volume was located in 3 regions: at the level of the cricoid and thyroid cartilage (superior to the RTOG volume), in the posterolateral supraclavicular fossa (posterolateral to the RTOG volume), and in the lateral low supraclavicular fossa (lateral to the RTOG volume). Only women with multiple supraclavicular metastases had nodal disease that extended superiorly to the level of the thyroid cartilage. Conclusions: For women with risk of harboring subclinical supraclavicular disease warranting the addition of supraclavicular radiation, coverage of the posterior triangle and the lateral low supraclavicular region should be considered. For women with known supraclavicular disease, extension of neck coverage superior to the cricoid cartilage may be warranted.

  19. Plastic and Glass Greenhouses Detection and Delineation from WORLDVIEW-2 Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koc-San, D.; Sonmez, N. K.

    2016-06-01

    Greenhouse detection using remote sensing technologies is an important research area for yield estimation, sustainable development, urban and rural planning and management. An approach was developed in this study for the detection and delineation of greenhouse areas from high resolution satellite imagery. Initially, the candidate greenhouse patches were detected using supervised classification techniques. For this purpose, Maximum Likelihood (ML), Random Forest (RF), and Support Vector Machines (SVM) classification techniques were applied and compared. Then, sieve filter and morphological operations were performed for improving the classification results. Finally, the obtained candidate plastic and glass greenhouse areas were delineated using boundary tracing and Douglas Peucker line simplification algorithms. The proposed approach was implemented in the Kumluca district of Antalya, Turkey utilizing pan-sharpened WorldView-2 satellite imageries. Kumluca is the prominent district of Antalya with greenhouse cultivation and includes both plastic and glass greenhouses intensively. When the greenhouse classification results were analysed, it can be stated that the SVM classification provides most accurate results and RF classification follows this. The SVM classification overall accuracy was obtained as 90.28%. When the greenhouse boundary delineation results were considered, the plastic greenhouses were delineated with 92.11% accuracy, while glass greenhouses were delineated with 80.67% accuracy. The obtained results indicate that, generally plastic and glass greenhouses can be detected and delineated successfully from WorldView-2 satellite imagery.

  20. Using geographic information systems in the delineation of wellhead protection areas

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, J.M. . Earth Sciences and Resources Inst.); Horton, C.A. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1994-03-01

    The 1986 amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act established the nationwide wellhead protection program to be administered by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Although individual states have the responsibility to implement wellhead protection, the US EPA provides technical guidance, and approves each wellhead protection plan prepared by the states. A major aspect of wellhead protection strategies is the delineation of wellhead protection areas. These are zones around municipal water supply wells that receive special land use considerations intended to minimize the threat of contamination of the wells. The US EPA has recommended several technical approaches to delineating wellhead protection areas, ranging in sophistication from simple concentric circles around wells to irregular areas determined from groundwater flow and transport analyses. Regardless of the wellhead protection area delineation technique, the resulting area surrounding the municipal well must be accurately mapped. A geographic information system (GIS) approach to mapping the results of wellhead protection area delineation is demonstrated. Using hypothetical groundwater flow regimes, each EPA recommended approach to wellhead protection area delineation is presented in a GIS format. A visual comparison of delineation techniques in terms of area and configuration of the resulting wellhead protection areas is made. Finally, the advantages of using a GIS for representing wellhead protection areas is provided.

  1. pyLIDEM: A Python-Based Tool to Delineate Coastal Watersheds Using LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Banion, R.; Alameddine, I.; Gronewold, A.; Reckhow, K.

    2008-12-01

    Accurately identifying the boundary of a watershed is one of the most fundamental and important steps in any hydrological assessment. Representative applications include defining a study area, predicting overland flow, estimating groundwater infiltration, modeling pollutant accumulation and wash-off rates, and evaluating effectiveness of pollutant mitigation measures. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program, the most comprehensive water quality management program in the United States (US), is just one example of an application in which accurate and efficient watershed delineation tools play a critical role. For example, many impaired water bodies currently being addressed through the TMDL program drain small coastal watersheds with relatively flat terrain, making watershed delineation particularly challenging. Most of these TMDL studies use 30-meter digital elevation models (DEMs) that rarely capture all of the small elevation changes in coastal watersheds, leading to errors not only in watershed boundary delineation, but in subsequent model predictions (such as watershed runoff flow and pollutant deposition rate predictions) for which watershed attributes are key inputs. Manually delineating these low-relief coastal watersheds through the use of expert knowledge of local water flow patterns, often produces relatively accurate (and often more accurate) watershed boundaries as compared to the boundaries generated by the 30-meter DEMs. Yet, manual delineation is a costly and time consuming procedure that is often not opted for. There is a growing need, therefore, particularly to address the ongoing needs of the TMDL program (and similar environmental management programs), for software tools which can utilize high resolution topography data to more accurately delineate coastal watersheds. Here, we address this need by developing pyLIDEM (python LIdar DEM), a python-based tool which processes bare earth high

  2. 30 CFR 282.22 - Delineation Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Delineation Plan. 282.22 Section 282.22 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR..., minimize, or otherwise mitigate air, land, and water pollution and damage to aquatic and wildlife...

  3. Further delineation of the KBG syndrome.

    PubMed

    Devriendt, K; Holvoet, M; Fryns, J P

    1998-01-01

    Further Delineation of the KBG syndrome: We present a mother and her daughter with clinical features of KBG syndrome, including mild mental retardation, distinct facial features, macrodontia and skeletal anomalies. In the daughter, a heart defect (ventricular septal defect) was present.

  4. Unsupervised boundary delineation of spinal neural foramina using a multi-feature and adaptive spectral segmentation.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Heye; Landis, Mark; Sharma, Manas; Warrington, James; Li, Shuo

    2017-02-01

    As a common disease in the elderly, neural foramina stenosis (NFS) brings a significantly negative impact on the quality of life due to its symptoms including pain, disability, fall risk and depression. Accurate boundary delineation is essential to the clinical diagnosis and treatment of NFS. However, existing clinical routine is extremely tedious and inefficient due to the requirement of physicians' intensively manual delineation. Automated delineation is highly needed but faces big challenges from the complexity and variability in neural foramina images. In this paper, we propose a pure image-driven unsupervised boundary delineation framework for the automated neural foramina boundary delineation. This framework is based on a novel multi-feature and adaptive spectral segmentation (MFASS) algorithm. MFASS firstly utilizes the combination of region and edge features to generate reliable spectral features with a good separation between neural foramina and its surroundings, then estimates an optimal separation threshold for each individual image to separate neural foramina from its surroundings. This self-adjusted optimal separation threshold, estimated from spectral features, successfully overcome the diverse appearance and shape variations. With the robustness from the multi-feature fusion and the flexibility from the adaptively optimal separation threshold estimation, the proposed framework, based on MFASS, provides an automated and accurate boundary delineation. Validation was performed in 280 neural foramina MR images from 56 clinical subjects. Our method was benchmarked with manual boundary obtained by experienced physicians. Results demonstrate that the proposed method enjoys a high and stable consistency with experienced physicians (Dice: 90.58% ± 2.79%; SMAD: 0.5657 ± 0.1544 mm). Therefore, the proposed framework enables an efficient and accurate clinical tool in the diagnosis of neural foramina stenosis.

  5. Delineation of recharge areas for selected wells in the St. Peter-Prairie du Chien-Jordan Aquifer, Rochester, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delin, G.N.; Almendinger, James Edward

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogeologic mapping and numerical modeling were used to delineate zones of contribution to wells, defined as all parts of a ground-water-flow system that could supply water to a well. The zones of contribution delineated by use of numerical modeling have similar orientation (parallel to regional flow directions) but significantly different areas than the zones of contribution delineated by use of hydrogeologic mapping. Differences in computed areas of recharge are attributed to the capability of the numerical model to more accurately represent (1) the three-dimensional flow system, (2) hydrologic boundaries like streams, (3) variable recharge, and (4) the influence of nearby pumped wells, compared to the analytical models.

  6. Delineation of recharge areas for selected wells in the St. Peter-Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer, Rochester, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delin, G.N.; Almendinger, James Edward

    1993-01-01

    Hydrogeologic mapping and numerical modeling were used to delineate zones of contribution to wells, defined as all parts of a ground-water-flow system that could supply water to a well. The zones of contribution delineated by use of numerical modeling have similar orientation (parallel to regional flow directions) but significantly different areas than the zones of contribution delineated by use of hydrogeologic mapping. Differences in computed areas of recharge are attributed to the capability of the numerical model to more accurately represent (1) the three-dimensional flow system, (2) hydrologic boundaries such as streams, (3) variable recharge, and (4) the influence of nearby pumped wells, compared to the analytical models.

  7. An algorithm for microscopic specimen delineation and focus candidate selection.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yilun; Gal, Yaniv; Bradley, Andrew P

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we compare four field-of-view (FOV) metrics that, when applied to a low-resolution image of a microscope slide, are capable of both accurately delineating the specimen and selecting a subset of focus candidate FOVs required for construction of high-resolution focus map. The metrics evaluated are: threshold index (TI) that measures image intensity; normalised auto-correlation index (NACI) that measures spatial image similarity; auto-phase correlation index (APCI) that measures image phase diversity; and entropy index (EI) that measures the predictability of image intensities. Experiments are undertaken on a data set of forty slides including PAP stained Thin-prep cervical cytology and breast fine-needle aspiration slides and haematoxylin and eosin (HE) stained histology slides. These slides were scanned on an automated bright-field microscope and chosen to be indicative of a variety pathology specimens, containing artefacts such as excess coverslip glue and ink markers. Results are presented on the performance of each metric for correct ranking/segmentation of foreground (specimen) from background, and subsequently selecting focus candidate FOVs characteristic of the specimen's focal plane(s). The experimental results demonstrate that while NACI, APCI and EI are all effective at specimen delineation, only APCI is capable of effectively selecting superior focus candidates and ignoring artefacts.

  8. Delineation, characterization, and classification of topographic eminences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Gaurav

    Topographic eminences are defined as upwardly rising, convex shaped topographic landforms that are noticeably distinct in their immediate surroundings. As opposed to everyday objects, the properties of a topographic eminence are dependent not only on how it is conceptualized, but is also intrinsically related to its spatial extent and its relative location in the landscape. In this thesis, a system for automated detection, delineation and characterization of topographic eminences based on an analysis of digital elevation models is proposed. Research has shown that conceptualization of eminences (and other landforms) is linked to the cultural and linguistic backgrounds of people. However, the perception of stimuli from our physical environment is not subject to cultural or linguistic bias. Hence, perceptually salient morphological and spatial properties of the natural landscape can form the basis for generically applicable detection and delineation of topographic eminences. Six principles of cognitive eminence modeling are introduced to develop the philosophical foundation of this research regarding eminence delineation and characterization. The first step in delineating eminences is to automatically detect their presence within digital elevation models. This is achieved by the use of quantitative geomorphometric parameters (e.g., elevation, slope and curvature) and qualitative geomorphometric features (e.g., peaks, passes, pits, ridgelines, and valley lines). The process of eminence delineation follows that of eminence detection. It is posited that eminences may be perceived either as monolithic terrain objects, or as composites of morphological parts (e.g., top, bottom, slope). Individual eminences may also simultaneously be conceived as comprising larger, higher order eminence complexes (e.g., mountain ranges). Multiple algorithms are presented for the delineation of simple and complex eminences, and the morphological parts of eminences. The proposed eminence

  9. Individual object delineation revising cadastral boundaries by means of VHSR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Stefan; Tiede, Dirk; Schumacher, Jens; Hölbling, Daniel

    2007-10-01

    A rapidly increasing demand for accurate and updated geo-spatial information requires advanced techniques for extracting and providing relevant information. The presented work was carried out in a 3654 km2 sized area in the region of Stuttgart/Germany, characterized by high dynamic growth and steady economic development. The project Biotope Information and Management System (BIMS) provides and monitors aggregated spatial units relevant for regional planning tasks. We discuss experiences from the first phase of the project, in which we developed an adaptive per-parcel approach for delineating elementary units using SPOT-5 MS data (5 m GSD). The target geometry was pre-defined by digital cadastre data from 2005, but not all existing boundaries were retained: some were dismissed, others introduced. We followed a threefold strategy: (1) a parcel with internal homogeneity remains the same; (2) neighboring parcels with similar spectral behavior are merged; (3) a single, heterogeneous parcel is split and new boundaries are generated. By this, the initial number of units dropped to one fourth. The majority of the units were merged due to trans-boundary homogeneity, one fourth was subdivided. Assets of this approach are its cost-efficiency, the high matching degree of the produced geometry and the transferability to similar cases because of the standardized character of the data sets involved.

  10. Multimodality Tumor Delineation and Predictive Modelling via Fuzzy-Fusion Deformable Models and Biological Potential Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasserman, Richard Marc

    The radiation therapy treatment planning (RTTP) process may be subdivided into three planning stages: gross tumor delineation, clinical target delineation, and modality dependent target definition. The research presented will focus on the first two planning tasks. A gross tumor target delineation methodology is proposed which focuses on the integration of MRI, CT, and PET imaging data towards the generation of a mathematically optimal tumor boundary. The solution to this problem is formulated within a framework integrating concepts from the fields of deformable modelling, region growing, fuzzy logic, and data fusion. The resulting fuzzy fusion algorithm can integrate both edge and region information from multiple medical modalities to delineate optimal regions of pathological tissue content. The subclinical boundaries of an infiltrating neoplasm cannot be determined explicitly via traditional imaging methods and are often defined to extend a fixed distance from the gross tumor boundary. In order to improve the clinical target definition process an estimation technique is proposed via which tumor growth may be modelled and subclinical growth predicted. An in vivo, macroscopic primary brain tumor growth model is presented, which may be fit to each patient undergoing treatment, allowing for the prediction of future growth and consequently the ability to estimate subclinical local invasion. Additionally, the patient specific in vivo tumor model will be of significant utility in multiple diagnostic clinical applications.

  11. An automatic, stagnation point based algorithm for the delineation of Wellhead Protection Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea; di Molfetta, Antonio

    2008-07-01

    Time-related capture areas are usually delineated using the backward particle tracking method, releasing circles of equally spaced particles around each well. In this way, an accurate delineation often requires both a very high number of particles and a manual capture zone encirclement. The aim of this work was to propose an Automatic Protection Area (APA) delineation algorithm, which can be coupled with any model of flow and particle tracking. The computational time is here reduced, thanks to the use of a limited number of nonequally spaced particles. The particle starting positions are determined coupling forward particle tracking from the stagnation point, and backward particle tracking from the pumping well. The pathlines are postprocessed for a completely automatic delineation of closed perimeters of time-related capture zones. The APA algorithm was tested for a two-dimensional geometry, in homogeneous and nonhomogeneous aquifers, steady state flow conditions, single and multiple wells. Results show that the APA algorithm is robust and able to automatically and accurately reconstruct protection areas with a very small number of particles, also in complex scenarios.

  12. More Accurate Definition of Clinical Target Volume Based on the Measurement of Microscopic Extensions of the Primary Tumor Toward the Uterus Body in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Ib-IIa Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Wen-Jia; Wu, Xiao; Xue, Ren-Liang; Lin, Xiang-Ying; Kidd, Elizabeth A.; Yan, Shu-Mei; Zhang, Yao-Hong; Zhai, Tian-Tian; Lu, Jia-Yang; Wu, Li-Li; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Hai-Hua; Chen, Zhi-Jian; Li, De-Rui; Xie, Liang-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To more accurately define clinical target volume for cervical cancer radiation treatment planning by evaluating tumor microscopic extension toward the uterus body (METU) in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (SCCC). Patients and Methods: In this multicenter study, surgical resection specimens from 318 cases of stage Ib-IIa SCCC that underwent radical hysterectomy were included. Patients who had undergone preoperative chemotherapy, radiation, or both were excluded from this study. Microscopic extension of primary tumor toward the uterus body was measured. The association between other pathologic factors and METU was analyzed. Results: Microscopic extension toward the uterus body was not common, with only 12.3% of patients (39 of 318) demonstrating METU. The mean (±SD) distance of METU was 0.32 ± 1.079 mm (range, 0-10 mm). Lymphovascular space invasion was associated with METU distance and occurrence rate. A margin of 5 mm added to gross tumor would adequately cover 99.4% and 99% of the METU in the whole group and in patients with lymphovascular space invasion, respectively. Conclusion: According to our analysis of 318 SCCC specimens for METU, using a 5-mm gross tumor volume to clinical target volume margin in the direction of the uterus should be adequate for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa SCCC. Considering the discrepancy between imaging and pathologic methods in determining gross tumor volume extent, we recommend a safer 10-mm margin in the uterine direction as the standard for clinical practice when using MRI for contouring tumor volume.

  13. Trisomy 4 mosaicism: Delineation of the phenotype.

    PubMed

    Bouman, Arjan; van der Kevie-Kersemaekers, Anne-Marie; Huijsdens-van Amsterdam, Karin; Dahhan, Nordin; Knegt, Lia; Vansenne, Fleur; Cobben, Jan Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Trisomy 4 mosaicism in liveborns is very rare. We describe a 17-month-old girl with trisomy 4 mosaicism. Clinical findings in this patient are compared to previously reported patients. Based on the few descriptions available in the literature the common phenotype of trisomy 4 mosaicism seems to consist of IUGR, low birth weight/length/OFC, congenital heart defects, characteristic thumb anomalies (aplasia/hypoplasia), skin abnormalities (hypo-/hyperpigmentation), several dysmorphic features, and likely some degree of intellectual disability. When trisomy 4 mosaicism is suspected clinicians should be aware that a normal karyotype in lymphocytes does not exclude mosaicism for trisomy 4. This report contributes to a further delineation of the phenotype associated with trisomy 4 mosaicism.

  14. Harnessing genomics for delineating conservation units

    PubMed Central

    Funk, W. Chris; McKay, John K.; Hohenlohe, Paul A.; Allendorf, Fred W.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic data have the potential to revolutionize the delineation of conservation units (CUs) by allowing the detection of adaptive genetic variation, which is otherwise difficult for rare, endangered species. In contrast to previous recommendations, we propose that the use of neutral versus adaptive markers should not be viewed as alternatives. Rather, neutral and adaptive markers provide different types of information that should be combined to make optimal management decisions. Genetic patterns at neutral markers reflect the interaction of gene flow and genetic drift that affects genome-wide variation within and among populations. This population genetic structure is what natural selection operates on to cause adaptive divergence. Here, we provide a new framework to integrate data on neutral and adaptive markers to protect biodiversity. PMID:22727017

  15. Harnessing genomics for delineating conservation units.

    PubMed

    Funk, W Chris; McKay, John K; Hohenlohe, Paul A; Allendorf, Fred W

    2012-09-01

    Genomic data have the potential to revolutionize the delineation of conservation units (CUs) by allowing the detection of adaptive genetic variation, which is otherwise difficult for rare, endangered species. In contrast to previous recommendations, we propose that the use of neutral versus adaptive markers should not be viewed as alternatives. Rather, neutral and adaptive markers provide different types of information that should be combined to make optimal management decisions. Genetic patterns at neutral markers reflect the interaction of gene flow and genetic drift that affects genome-wide variation within and among populations. This population genetic structure is what natural selection operates on to cause adaptive divergence. Here, we provide a new framework to integrate data on neutral and adaptive markers to protect biodiversity.

  16. Male pseudohermaphroditism: genetics and clinical delineation.

    PubMed

    Simpson, J L

    1978-10-19

    The genetics and clinical delineation of male pseudohermaphroditism are reviewed. These disorders are categorized initially by their genetic etiology--cytogenetic, Mendelian, or teratogenic. It is especially important to distinguish cytogenetic forms, usually associated with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism, from Mendelian (genetic) forms because in the former the prevalence of gonadoblastomas or dysgerminomas is about 15--20%. Genetic forms include (1) those associated with a multiple malformation pattern, (2) those due to an error in adrenal or testicular hormonal biosynthesis, (3) complete testicular feminization, (4) incomplete testicular feminization, (5) Reifenstein syndrome, (6) pseudovaginal perineoscrotal hypospadias, and (7) agondia, and possibly other conditions. Incomplete testicular feminization and the Reifenstein syndrome may or may not represent varied expressivity of the same trait. The designation pseudovaginal perineoscrotal hypospadias is appropriate only if constellations of clinical features are present and if no metabolic abnormalities are demonstrable. Etiology and available genetic data are reviewed for each of these disorders.

  17. Mapping and delineating wetlands of Huntington Wildlife Forest using very high resolution digital color-infrared imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, Mehmet

    The effectiveness of off-site wetland delineation methods using very high resolution digital color-infrared aerial imagery (the color-IR imagery) is compared to the traditional on-site wetland delineation method. The on-site delineation results created using the US Fish and Wildlife Service's National Wetland Inventory (NWI map procedures are compared to the following mapping techniques; heads-up digitizing, hybrid classification, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and unsupervised classifications (ISODATA) using the same image source. Each of the mapping techniques was applied using the seasonal color-IR imagery. Pair-wise significance tests of the closest mean distances indicated that heads-up digitizing was significantly more accurate than other classification techniques for the color-IR imagery. A combination of the heads-up digitizing and the hybrid classification showed that emergent wetland and scrub-shrub wetlands can be delineated without visiting the ground from the color-IR imagery. Applying logarithmic and hyperbolic sine algorithms to enhance the radiometric property of the color-IR imagery increased delineation accuracy 98% in the spring color-IR imagery and 28% in the fall color-IR imagery. Methods for measuring the accuracy of linear features are reviewed and a new method Points-in-Buffer Analysis (PIBA) is proposed. Keywords. Wetland boundary delineation, heads-up digitizing, radiometric enhancement, wetland boundary accuracy, point-in-buffer analysis (PIBA)

  18. Simultaneous multi-modality ROI delineation in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bol, Gijsbert H; Kotte, Alexis N T J; van der Heide, Uulke A; Lagendijk, Jan J W

    2009-11-01

    The delineation of tumors and their surrounding organs at risk is a critical step of the treatment planning for radiation therapy. Besides computer tomography (CT), other imaging modalities are used to improve the quality of the delineations, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). A practical framework is presented for using multiple datasets from different modalities during the delineation phase. The system is based on two basic principles. First, all image datasets of all available modalities are displayed in their original form (in their own coordinate system, with their own spatial resolution and voxel aspect ratio), and second, delineations can take place on all orthogonal views of each dataset and changes made to a delineation are visualized in all image sets, giving direct feedback to the delineator. The major difference between the described approach and other existing delineation tools is that instead of resampling the image sets, the delineations are transformed from one dataset to another. The transformation used for transferring the delineations is obtained by rigid normalized mutual information registration. The crucial components and the benefits of the application are presented and discussed.

  19. Delineation of modular proteins: domain boundary prediction from sequence information.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lesheng; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2004-06-01

    The delineation of domain boundaries of a given sequence in the absence of known 3D structures or detectable sequence homology to known domains benefits many areas in protein science, such as protein engineering, protein 3D structure determination and protein structure prediction. With the exponential growth of newly determined sequences, our ability to predict domain boundaries rapidly and accurately from sequence information alone is both essential and critical from the viewpoint of gene function annotation. Anyone attempting to predict domain boundaries for a single protein sequence is invariably confronted with a plethora of databases that contain boundary information available from the internet and a variety of methods for domain boundary prediction. How are these derived and how well do they work? What definition of 'domain' do they use? We will first clarify the different definitions of protein domains, and then describe the available public databases with domain boundary information. Finally, we will review existing domain boundary prediction methods and discuss their strengths and weaknesses.

  20. DNA Probe Pooling for Rapid Delineation of Chromosomal Breakpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Kwan, Johnson; Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Escudero, Tomas; Munne', Santiago; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2009-01-30

    Structural chromosome aberrations are hallmarks of many human genetic diseases. The precise mapping of translocation breakpoints in tumors is important for identification of genes with altered levels of expression, prediction of tumor progression, therapy response, or length of disease-free survival as well as the preparation of probes for detection of tumor cells in peripheral blood. Similarly, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for carriers of balanced, reciprocal translocations benefit from accurate breakpoint maps in the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes followed by a selection of normal or balanced oocytes or embryos. We expedited the process of breakpoint mapping and preparation of case-specific probes by utilizing physically mapped bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. Historically, breakpoint mapping is based on the definition of the smallest interval between proximal and distal probes. Thus, many of the DNA probes prepared for multi-clone and multi-color mapping experiments do not generate additional information. Our pooling protocol described here with examples from thyroid cancer research and PGD accelerates the delineation of translocation breakpoints without sacrificing resolution. The turnaround time from clone selection to mapping results using tumor or IVF patient samples can be as short as three to four days.

  1. A tree canopy height delineation method based on Morphological Reconstruction—Open Crown Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Jing, L.; Li, Y.; Tang, Y.; Li, H.; Lin, Q.

    2016-04-01

    For the purpose of forest management, high resolution LIDAR and optical remote sensing imageries are used for treetop detection, tree crown delineation, and classification. The purpose of this study is to develop a self-adjusted dominant scales calculation method and a new crown horizontal cutting method of tree canopy height model (CHM) to detect and delineate tree crowns from LIDAR, under the hypothesis that a treetop is radiometric or altitudinal maximum and tree crowns consist of multi-scale branches. The major concept of the method is to develop an automatic selecting strategy of feature scale on CHM, and a multi-scale morphological reconstruction-open crown decomposition (MRCD) to get morphological multi-scale features of CHM by: cutting CHM from treetop to the ground; analysing and refining the dominant multiple scales with differential horizontal profiles to get treetops; segmenting LiDAR CHM using watershed a segmentation approach marked with MRCD treetops. This method has solved the problems of false detection of CHM side-surface extracted by the traditional morphological opening canopy segment (MOCS) method. The novel MRCD delineates more accurate and quantitative multi-scale features of CHM, and enables more accurate detection and segmentation of treetops and crown. Besides, the MRCD method can also be extended to high optical remote sensing tree crown extraction. In an experiment on aerial LiDAR CHM of a forest of multi-scale tree crowns, the proposed method yielded high-quality tree crown maps.

  2. Delineating groundwater and subsurface structures by

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araffa, Sultan Awad Sultan; Helaly, Ahmed S.; Khozium, Ashraf; Lala, Amir M. S.; Soliman, Shokry A.; Hassan, Noha M.

    2015-06-01

    Geophysical tools such as magnetic, gravity and electric resistivity have been used to delineate subsurface structures, groundwater aquifer around Cairo-Belbies Desert road. A dipole-dipole section was measured at the central part of the study area with 2100 m length and electrode spacing 50 m for greater penetration depth. The results of the inverse resistivity data indicate that the study area includes two groundwater aquifers at different depths. The shallow aquifer water is near the surface and the deep aquifer lies at depth of about 115 m and exhibits low resistivity values ranging from 20 to 100 ohm m. One hundred and fifty-two gravity stations were measured using Autograv gravimeter (CG3), different gravity corrections (drift, elevation and latitude corrections) were applied. The corrected data represented by Bouguer anomaly map were filtered into regional and residual gravity anomaly maps. The residual gravity map indicates that the area is dissected by many faults with NW-SE, N-S, E-W and NE-SW trends. One hundred and fifty-three ground magnetic measurements are collected using two Proton magnetometers (Envimag). The corrected magnetic data are represented by total magnetic intensity map that was reduced to the magnetic pole. 3D magnetic modeling was applied to detect the depth of basaltic sheet and basement complex. The results indicated that the elevation of upper surface of basalt is ranging from 148 to -153 m and the elevation of lower surface of basalt is ranging from 148 to 269 m.

  3. Hydrocone groundwater study delineates petroleum contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Prochaska, K.; Hartness, J.; Christenson, K.

    1994-12-31

    Law Environmental, Inc., (LAW), conducted a groundwater survey at Myrtle Beach Air Force Base, South Carolina, to delineate the horizontal and vertical extent of petroleum contamination at the BX Service station. The survey was performed using the In-Situ Technology Hydrocone in conjunction with a field gas chromatograph. The Hydrocone proved to be a reliable, cost-effective method of extracting multi-depth groundwater samples without incurring the expenses associated with the installation and maintenance of monitoring wells. The process generates virtually no investigation-derived waste. The Hydrocone system consists of an elongated cylindrical steel sampler attached to drill rods on a direct push trailer mounted rig. A gas/electronic cable connects to the sampler, and a computer installed on the rig displays pressure on the tool, sampling time, and groundwater volume collected. A total of 18 groundwater samples were collected from 12 locations around the site at sampling depths of approximately 10, 20, and 30 feet below the ground surface. The Hydrocone/gas chromatograph method produced a large volume of groundwater quality data within a relatively short time interval.

  4. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  5. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  6. Delineation of the movement disorders associated with FOXG1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Papandreou, Apostolos; Schneider, Ruth B.; Augustine, Erika F.; Ng, Joanne; Mankad, Kshitij; Meyer, Esther; McTague, Amy; Ngoh, Adeline; Hemingway, Cheryl; Robinson, Robert; Varadkar, Sophia M.; Kinali, Maria; Salpietro, Vincenzo; O'Driscoll, Margaret C.; Basheer, S. Nigel; Webster, Richard I.; Mohammad, Shekeeb S.; Pula, Shpresa; McGowan, Marian; Trump, Natalie; Jenkins, Lucy; Elmslie, Frances; Scott, Richard H.; Hurst, Jane A.; Perez-Duenas, Belen; Paciorkowski, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The primary objective of this research was to characterize the movement disorders associated with FOXG1 mutations. Methods: We identified patients with FOXG1 mutations who were referred to either a tertiary movement disorder clinic or tertiary epilepsy service and retrospectively reviewed medical records, clinical investigations, neuroimaging, and available video footage. We administered a telephone-based questionnaire regarding the functional impact of the movement disorders and perceived efficacy of treatment to the caregivers of one cohort of participants. Results: We identified 28 patients with FOXG1 mutations, of whom 6 had previously unreported mutations. A wide variety of movement disorders were identified, with dystonia, choreoathetosis, and orolingual/facial dyskinesias most commonly present. Ninety-three percent of patients had a mixed movement disorder phenotype. In contrast to the phenotype classically described with FOXG1 mutations, 4 patients with missense mutations had a milder phenotype, with independent ambulation, spoken language, and normocephaly. Hyperkinetic involuntary movements were a major clinical feature in these patients. Of the symptomatic treatments targeted to control abnormal involuntary movements, most did not emerge as clearly beneficial, although 4 patients had a caregiver-reported response to levodopa. Conclusions: Abnormal involuntary movements are a major feature of FOXG1 mutations. Our study delineates the spectrum of movement disorders and confirms an expanding clinical phenotype. Symptomatic treatment may be considered for severe or disabling cases, although further research regarding potential treatment strategies is necessary. PMID:27029630

  7. Optimising delineation accuracy of tumours in PET for radiotherapy planning using blind deconvolution

    PubMed Central

    Guvenis, A.; Koc, A.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been proven to be useful in radiotherapy planning for the determination of the metabolically active regions of tumours. Delineation of tumours, however, is a difficult task in part due to high noise levels and the partial volume effects originating mainly from the low camera resolution. The goal of this work is to study the effect of blind deconvolution on tumour volume estimation accuracy for different computer-aided contouring methods. The blind deconvolution estimates the point spread function (PSF) of the imaging system in an iterative manner in a way that the likelihood of the given image being the convolution output is maximised. In this way, the PSF of the imaging system does not need to be known. Data were obtained from a NEMA NU-2 IQ-based phantom with a GE DSTE-16 PET/CT scanner. The artificial tumour diameters were 13, 17, 22, 28 and 37 mm with a target/background ratio of 4:1. The tumours were delineated before and after blind deconvolution. Student's two-tailed paired t-test showed a significant decrease in volume estimation error (p < 0.001) when blind deconvolution was used in conjunction with computer-aided delineation methods. A manual delineation confirmation demonstrated an improvement from 26 to 16 % for the artificial tumour of size 37 mm while an improvement from 57 to 15 % was noted for the small tumour of 13 mm. Therefore, it can be concluded that blind deconvolution of reconstructed PET images may be used to increase tumour delineation accuracy. PMID:25836686

  8. Flowpath delineation and ground water age, Allequash Basin, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pint, Christine D.; Hunt, Randall J.; Anderson, Mary P.

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of ground water flowpaths to a lake and creek in northern Wisconsin shows the flow system in a geologically simple basin dominated by lakes can be surprisingly complex. Differences in source area, i.e., lakes or terrestrial, combined with the presence of intervening lakes, which may or may not capture underflowing ground water as water moves downgradient from recharge areas, contribute to a complex mix of flowpaths. The result is water of different chemistry and vastly different ages may discharge in close proximity. Flowpaths, travel times, and capture zones in the Allequash Basin in northern Wisconsin were delineated using particle tracking based on a calibrated steady-state ground water flow model. The flowpath analysis supports the conclusions of Walker et al. (2003) who made inferences about flowpath characteristics from isotope and major ion chemistry. Simulated particle tracking agreed with Walker et al.'s measurements of water source (lake or terrestrial recharge) in the stream subsurface and also supported their assertion that ground water with a high calcium concentration in the lower basin of Allequash Lake is derived from long flowpaths. Numerical simulations show that ground water discharging in this area originates more than 5 km away in a source area located upgradient of Big Muskellunge Lake, which is upgradient of Allequash Lake. These results graphically illustrate that in settings with multiple sources of water with different age characteristics and converging flowlines (like the Allequash Basin) it may be difficult to obtain accurate estimates of ground water age by chemical analyses of ground water.

  9. Delineating relative homogeneous G+C domains in DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, W

    2001-10-03

    The concept of homogeneity of G+C content is always relative and subjective. This point is emphasized and quantified in this paper using a simple example of one sequence segmented into two subsequences. Whether the sequence is homogeneous or not can be answered by whether the two-subsequence model describes the DNA sequence better than the one-sequence model. There are at least three equivalent ways of looking at the 1-to-2 segmentation: Jensen-Shannon divergence measure, log likelihood ratio test, and model selection using Bayesian information criterion. Once a criterion is chosen, a DNA sequence can be recursively segmented into multiple domains. We use one subjective criterion called segmentation strength based on the Bayesian information criterion. Whether or not a sequence is homogeneous and how many domains it has depend on this criterion. We compare six different genome sequences (yeast S. cerevisiae chromosome III and IV, bacterium M. pneumoniae, human major histocompatibility complex sequence, longest contigs in human chromosome 21 and 22) by recursive segmentations at different strength criteria. Results by recursive segmentation confirm that yeast chromosome IV is more homogeneous than yeast chromosome III, human chromosome 21 is more homogeneous than human chromosome 22, and bacterial genomes may not be homogeneous due to short segments with distinct base compositions. The recursive segmentation also provides a quantitative criterion for identifying isochores in human sequences. Some features of our recursive segmentation, such as the possibility of delineating domain borders accurately, are superior to those of the moving-window approach commonly used in such analyses.

  10. Glacial Delineation and Ice Retreat on Pico de Orizaba, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colby, A. E.; Weissling, B.; Xie, H.

    2011-12-01

    Pico de Orizaba, a dormant stratovolcano at the eastern end of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt at approximately 19 degrees of latitude and the third largest peak in North America (5636 m), hosts what is likely the last significant tropical zone glacier (Jamapa Glacier) in the Northern Hemisphere. Not since the International Geophysical Year of 1957-58 has Pico's glacial environment been studied with any focused effort, perhaps due to the general innaccessibility, high altitude, and steep slopes. As are most glaciers around the world, the Jamapa Glacier is retreating, with a remarkable loss of ice in the past 2 decades. The rate and pattern of retreat is important to understanding climate change forcing as well as understanding environmental and water supply impacts to a substantial human population who live along the base of the volcano. Through the use of satellite imagery (LandSat, ASTER, IKONOS), legacy hand-drawn maps, aerial photographs, and first-hand accounts from climber's expeditions, a reasonably accurate map of almost 60 years of glacial retreat has been produced. Legacy hand-drawn maps of the ice edge, that pre-date the satellite era, did not fit perfectly with modern images when layered in ArcGIS. Oblique perspectives in Google Earth and various aerial and surface-based photographs of the mountain were used to help fit the ice edge to the actual topography. The disparity of satellite image pixel resolution (from 1 m IKONOS to 60 m LandSat) was addressed using various imagery analysis tools (eg. edge detection convolution filters and pixel unmixing) in order to delineate an approximate ice edge for the respective image date. The final map shows the nature of ice edge retreat on Pico de Orizaba from 1945 up until the present (Feb 2011).

  11. Methodology of delineating wellhead protection zones in crystalline bedrock in Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipfert, G.; Tolman, A.L.; Loiselle, M.C.

    2004-01-01

    Delineation of contributing areas for wellhead protection around supply wells drilled into bedrock in Maine, USA, is currently achieved by assigning a fixed radius circle around the well. This project develops a methodology that incorporates hydrogeologic processes and ground water modeling (MODFLOW) and accounts for variable data availability to estimate the areas that contribute water to 26 bedrock supply wells. Outcrop fracture mapping and lineament analysis are used to characterize the fracture system. Multiple simulations are constructed of each site using ranges of values for recharge, hydraulic conductivity, and anisotropy. Uncertainty in the delineation process is accounted for by portraying the delineated areas as confidence zones that are constructed by overlapping the capture zones from the multiple simulations. The results are variable and depend on the ability to characterize a site in a way that can be easily modeled. Sites with complex hydrogeology tend to have larger contributing areas that reflect the greater uncertainty in the parameters. The majority of the sites, however, produce reasonable results that provide a much more accurate depiction of the area likely to contribute to a bedrock well than the fixed radius circle.

  12. Delinating Thermohaline Double-Diffusive Rayleigh Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, T.; Walther, M.; Kolditz, O.; Liedl, R.

    2013-12-01

    In natural systems, convective flow induced from density differences may occur in near-coastal aquifers, atmospheric boundary layers, oceanic streams or within the earth crust. Whether an initially stable, diffusive regime evolves into a convective (stable or chaotic) regime, or vice versa, depends on the system's framing boundary conditions. A conventional parameter to express the relation between diffusive and convective forces of such a density-driven regime is Rayleigh number (Ra). While most systems are mainly dominated by only a single significant driving force (i.e. only temperature or salinity), some systems need to consider two boundary processes (e.g. deep, thus warm, haline flow in porous media). In that case, a two-dimensional, 'double-diffusive' Rayleigh system can be defined. Nield (1998) postulated a boundary between diffusive and convective regime at RaT + RaC = 4pi^2 in the first quadrant (Q1), with Rayleigh numbers for temperature and concentration respectively. The boundary in the forth quadrant (Q4) could not exactly be determined, yet the approximate position estimated. Simulations with HydroGeoSphere (Therrien, 2010) using a vertical, quadratic, homogeneous, isotropic setup confirmed the existence of the 4pi^2-boundary and revealed additional regimes (diffusive, single-roll, double-roll, chaotic) in Q1. Also, non-chaotic, oscillating patterns could be identified in Q4. More detailed investigations with OpenGeoSys (Kolditz, 2012) confirmed the preceding HGS results, and, using a 1:10-scaled domain (height:length), uncovered even more distinctive regimes (diffusive, minimum ten roles, supposely up to 25 roles, and chaotic?) in Q1, while again, oscillating patterns were found in the transition zone between diffusive and chaotic regimes in Q4. Output of numerical simulations from Q1 and Q4 show the mentioned regimes (diffusive, stable-convective, stable-oscillatory, chaotic) while results are displayed in context of a possible delination between

  13. SU-E-J-07: A Functional MR Protocol for the Pancreatic Tumor Delineation

    SciTech Connect

    Andreychenko, A; Heerkens, H; Meijer, G; Vulpen, M van; Lagendijk, J; Berg, C van den

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Pancreatic cancer is one of the cancers with the poorest survival prognosis. At the time of diagnosis most of pancreatic cancers are unresectable and those patients can be treated by radiotherapy. Radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer is limited due to uncertainties in CT-based delineations. MRI provides an excellent soft tissue contrast. Here, an MR protocol is developed to improve delineations for radiotherapy treatment of pancreatic cancer. In a later stage this protocol can also be used for on-line visualization of the pancreas during MRI guided treatments. Methods: Nine pancreatic cancer patients were included. The MR protocol included T2 weighted(T2w), T1 weighted(T1w), diffusion weighted(DWI) and dynamic contrast enhanced(DCE) techniques. The tumor was delineated on T2w and T1w MRI by an experienced radiation oncologist. Healthy pancreas or pancreatitis (assigned by the oncologist based on T2w) areas were also delineated. Apparent diffusion coefficient(ADC), and area under the curve(AUC)/time to peak(TTP) maps were obtained from DWI and DCE scans, respectively. Results: A clear demarcation of tumor area was visible on b800 DWI images in 5 patients. ADC maps of those patients characterized tumor as an area with restricted water diffusion. Tumor delineations based on solely DCE were possible in 7 patients. In 6 of those patients AUC maps demonstrated tumor heterogeneity: a hypointense area with a hyperintense ring. TTP values clearly discriminated the tumor and the healthy pancreas but could not distinguish tumor and the pancreatitis accurately. Conclusion: MR imaging results in a more pronounced tumor contrast than contrast enhanced CT. The addition of quantitative, functional MRI provides valuable, additional information to the radiation oncologist on the spatial tumor extent by discriminating tumor from the healthy pancreas(TTP, DWI) and characterizing the tumor(ADC). Our findings indicate that tumor delineation in pancreatic cancer can greatly

  14. 2. Photocopy of a measured drawing (original delineated the Royal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of a measured drawing (original delineated the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts (Kunstakademiets), Copenhagen, Denmark, 1961) FRONT (KING STREET) ELEVATION AND PLANS OF FIRST AND SECOND FLOORS - Kongensgade 58 (House), 58 King Street, Christiansted, St. Croix, VI

  15. 22. Photocopy of drawing Delineator unknown, ca. 1931 Wright Studio, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photocopy of drawing Delineator unknown, ca. 1931 Wright Studio, photographer View from Kellogg Blvd. - St. Paul City Hall & Ramsey County Courthouse, 15 West Kellogg Boulevard, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  16. 356. Delineator Unknown March 1946 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    356. Delineator Unknown March 1946 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; GENERAL DATA; PLAT III - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  17. 10. Photocopy of map (from Benicia Historical Society) Delineator unknown ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of map (from Benicia Historical Society) Delineator unknown May 1, 1894, revised to Mar. 27, 1918 'MAP OF BENICIA ARSENAL RESERVATION' - Benicia Arsenal, Benicia Industrial Park, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  18. Photocopy of site plan, Dene Hendrick, delineator, 1977, for the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of site plan, Dene Hendrick, delineator, 1977, for the City of San Jose in cooperative agreement with the California Department of Transportation (from the San Jose Historical Museum) - Stevens Ranch Complex, State Route 101, Coyote, Santa Clara County, CA

  19. 1. PHOTOCOPY OF HISTORIC DRAWING OF SHIP SECTION, UNKNOWN DELINEATOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. PHOTOCOPY OF HISTORIC DRAWING OF SHIP SECTION, UNKNOWN DELINEATOR AND DATE, SOURCE: BISHOP MUSEUM, HONOLULU, HI. - Ship "Falls of Clyde", Hawaii Maritime Center,Pier 7, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  20. 1. Photocopy of delineation, American Architect and Building News, Vol ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of delineation, American Architect and Building News, Vol VI, No. 146, (September 27, 1879). SHOWING FRONT ELEVATION AND FLOOR PLAN - G. B. P. Carpenter House, 100 Block of Polk Streets (Prospect Point), Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  1. Polymer delineation system. [Patent application: traffic lane lines

    DOEpatents

    Woolman, S.; Steinberg, M.

    1975-06-24

    A delineation system (traffic lane lines) for highways is described in which polymerizable substances are applied to existing or newly prepared highway pavements. The substances would contain a suitable pigment and may incorporate reflective elements.

  2. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  3. Applications of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to UXO Delineation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar ( SAR ) to UXO Delineation May 2004 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the...Applications of Synthetic Aperture Radar ( SAR ) to UXO Delineation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report ( SAR ) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 39 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified

  4. Description and application of capture zone delineation for a wellfield at Hilton Head Island, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Ground-water capture zone boundaries for individual pumped wells in a confined aquffer were delineated by using groundwater models. Both analytical and numerical (semi-analytical) models that more accurately represent the $round-water-flow system were used. All models delineated 2-dimensional boundaries (capture zones) that represent the areal extent of groundwater contribution to a pumped well. The resultant capture zones were evaluated on the basis of the ability of each model to realistically rapresent the part of the ground-water-flow system that contributed water to the pumped wells. Analytical models used were based on a fixed radius approach, and induded; an arbitrary radius model, a calculated fixed radius model based on the volumetric-flow equation with a time-of-travel criterion, and a calculated fixed radius model derived from modification of the Theis model with a drawdown criterion. Numerical models used induded the 2-dimensional, finite-difference models RESSQC and MWCAP. The arbitrary radius and Theis analytical models delineated capture zone boundaries that compared least favorably with capture zones delineated using the volumetric-flow analytical model and both numerical models. The numerical models produced more hydrologically reasonable capture zones (that were oriented parallel to the regional flow direction) than the volumetric-flow equation. The RESSQC numerical model computed more hydrologically realistic capture zones than the MWCAP numerical model by accounting for changes in the shape of capture zones caused by multiple-well interference. The capture zone boundaries generated by using both analytical and numerical models indicated that the curnmtly used 100-foot radius of protection around a wellhead in South Carolina is an underestimate of the extent of ground-water capture for pumped wetis in this particular wellfield in the Upper Floridan aquifer. The arbitrary fixed radius of 100 feet was shown to underestimate the upgradient

  5. Coverage-based treatment planning to accommodate delineation uncertainties in prostate cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huijun; Gordon, J. James; Siebers, Jeffrey V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare two coverage-based planning (CP) techniques with fixed margin-based (FM) planning for high-risk prostate cancer treatments, with the exclusive consideration of the dosimetric impact of delineation uncertainties of target structures and normal tissues. Methods: In this work, 19-patient data sets were involved. To estimate structure dose for each delineated contour under the influence of interobserver contour variability and CT image quality limitations, 1000 alternative structures were simulated by an average-surface-of-standard-deviation model, which utilized the patient-specific information of delineated structure and CT image contrast. An IMRT plan with zero planning-target-volume (PTV) margin on the delineated prostate and seminal vesicles [clinical-target-volume (CTVprostate) and CTVSV] was created and dose degradation due to contour variability was quantified by the dosimetric consequences of 1000 alternative structures. When D98 failed to achieve a 95% coverage probability objective D98,95 ≥ 78 Gy (CTVprostate) or D98,95 ≥ 66 Gy (CTVSV), replanning was performed using three planning techniques: (1) FM (PTVprostate margin = 4,5,6 mm and PTVSV margin = 4,5,7 mm for RL, PA, and SI directions, respectively), (2) CPOM which optimized uniform PTV margins for CTVprostate and CTVSV to meet the D98,95 objectives, and (3) CPCOP which directly optimized coverage-based objectives for all the structures. These plans were intercompared by computing percentile dose-volume histograms and tumor-control probability/normal tissue complication probability (TCP/NTCP) distributions. Results: Inherent contour variability resulted in unacceptable CTV coverage for the zero-PTV-margin plans for all patients. For plans designed to accommodate contour variability, 18/19 CP plans were most favored by achieving desirable D98,95 and TCP/NTCP values. The average improvement of probability of complication free control was 9.3% for CPCOP plans and 3.4% for CPOM plans

  6. The Valley Bottom Extraction Tool (V-BET): A GIS tool for delineating valley bottoms across entire drainage networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Jordan T.; Macfarlane, William W.; Wheaton, Joseph M.

    2016-12-01

    The shape, size and extent of a valley bottom dictates the form and function of the associated river or stream. Consequently, accurate, watershed-wide delineation of valley bottoms is increasingly recognized as a necessary component of watershed management. While many valley bottom delineation approaches exist, methods that can be effectively applied across entire drainage networks to produce reasonably accurate results are lacking. Most existing tools are designed to work using high resolution topography data (i.e. > 2 m resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM)) and can only be applied over relatively short reach lengths due to computational or data availability limitations. When these precise mapping approaches are applied throughout drainage networks (i.e. 102-104 km), the computational techniques often either do not scale, or the algorithms perform inconsistently. Other tools that produce outputs at broader scale extents generally utilize coarser input topographic data to produce more poorly resolved valley bottom approximations. To fill this methodology gap and produce relatively accurate valley bottoms over large areas, we developed an algorithm that accepts terrain data from one to 10 m with slope and valley width parameters that scale based on drainage area, allowing for watershed-scale valley bottom delineation. We packaged this algorithm in the Valley Bottom Extraction Tool (V-BET) as an open-source ArcGIS toolbox for ease of use. To illustrate V-BET's scalability and test the tool's robustness across different physiographic settings, we delineated valley bottoms for the entire perennial drainage network of Utah as well as twelve watersheds across the interior Columbia River Basin (totaling 55,400 km) using 10 m DEMs. We found that even when driven with relatively coarse data (10 m DEMs), V-BET produced a relatively accurate approximation of valley bottoms across the entire watersheds of these diverse physiographic regions.

  7. BIOACCESSIBILITY TESTS ACCURATELY ESTIMATE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hazards of soil-borne Pb to wild birds may be more accurately quantified if the bioavailability of that Pb is known. To better understand the bioavailability of Pb to birds, we measured blood Pb concentrations in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) fed diets containing Pb-contaminated soils. Relative bioavailabilities were expressed by comparison with blood Pb concentrations in quail fed a Pb acetate reference diet. Diets containing soil from five Pb-contaminated Superfund sites had relative bioavailabilities from 33%-63%, with a mean of about 50%. Treatment of two of the soils with P significantly reduced the bioavailability of Pb. The bioaccessibility of the Pb in the test soils was then measured in six in vitro tests and regressed on bioavailability. They were: the “Relative Bioavailability Leaching Procedure” (RBALP) at pH 1.5, the same test conducted at pH 2.5, the “Ohio State University In vitro Gastrointestinal” method (OSU IVG), the “Urban Soil Bioaccessible Lead Test”, the modified “Physiologically Based Extraction Test” and the “Waterfowl Physiologically Based Extraction Test.” All regressions had positive slopes. Based on criteria of slope and coefficient of determination, the RBALP pH 2.5 and OSU IVG tests performed very well. Speciation by X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that, on average, most of the Pb in the sampled soils was sorbed to minerals (30%), bound to organic matter 24%, or present as Pb sulfate 18%. Ad

  8. [Propositions for the selection and the delineation of peritumoral microscopic disease volumes in oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers (lymph nodes excluded)].

    PubMed

    Lapeyre, M; Henrot, P; Alfonsi, M; Bardet, E; Bensadoun, R J; Dolivet, G; Favrel, V; Gallocher, O; Giraud, P; Graff, P; Guerif, S; Lagarde, P; Lartigau, E; Marchesi, V; Pommier, P; Rives, M; Tortochaux, J; Toussaint, B; Verrelle, P; Bourhis, J; Calais, G

    2005-06-01

    This article reviews the concept of selectivity in peritumoral microscopic disease to be included in the Clinical Target Volume (CTV) for elective treatment for oral cavity and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, using the local tumoral spread. The objective of the present article is to present a procedure for the delineation of the target volumes, required for an appropriate application of 3-DCRT and IMRT for head and neck cancers. These propositions are for the delineation of microscopic peritumoral target volumes when external beam irradiation is required. CTVs are illustrated on CT sections.

  9. Accurate spectral color measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, Jouni; Jaeaeskelaeinen, Timo; Parkkinen, Jussi P. S.

    1999-08-01

    Surface color measurement is of importance in a very wide range of industrial applications including paint, paper, printing, photography, textiles, plastics and so on. For a demanding color measurements spectral approach is often needed. One can measure a color spectrum with a spectrophotometer using calibrated standard samples as a reference. Because it is impossible to define absolute color values of a sample, we always work with approximations. The human eye can perceive color difference as small as 0.5 CIELAB units and thus distinguish millions of colors. This 0.5 unit difference should be a goal for the precise color measurements. This limit is not a problem if we only want to measure the color difference of two samples, but if we want to know in a same time exact color coordinate values accuracy problems arise. The values of two instruments can be astonishingly different. The accuracy of the instrument used in color measurement may depend on various errors such as photometric non-linearity, wavelength error, integrating sphere dark level error, integrating sphere error in both specular included and specular excluded modes. Thus the correction formulas should be used to get more accurate results. Another question is how many channels i.e. wavelengths we are using to measure a spectrum. It is obvious that the sampling interval should be short to get more precise results. Furthermore, the result we get is always compromise of measuring time, conditions and cost. Sometimes we have to use portable syste or the shape and the size of samples makes it impossible to use sensitive equipment. In this study a small set of calibrated color tiles measured with the Perkin Elmer Lamda 18 and the Minolta CM-2002 spectrophotometers are compared. In the paper we explain the typical error sources of spectral color measurements, and show which are the accuracy demands a good colorimeter should have.

  10. Using satellite radiotelemetry data to delineate and manage wildlife populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, Steven C.; McDonald, T.L.; Durner, G.M.

    2004-01-01

    The greatest promise of radiotelemetry always has been a better understanding of animal movements. Telemetry has helped us know when animals are active, how active they are, how far and how fast they move, the geographic areas they occupy, and whether individuals vary in these traits. Unfortunately, the inability to estimate the error in animals utilization distributions (UDs), has prevented probabilistic linkage of movements data, which are always retrospective, with future management actions. We used the example of the harvested population of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) in the Southern Beaufort Sea to illustrate a method that provides that linkage. We employed a 2-dimensional Gaussian kernel density estimator to smooth and scale frequencies of polar bear radio locations within cells of a grid overlying our study area. True 2-dimensional smoothing allowed us to create accurate descriptions of the UDs of individuals and groups of bears. We used a new method of clustering, based upon the relative use collared bears made of each cell in our grid, to assign individual animals to populations. We applied the fast Fourier transform to make bootstrapped estimates of the error in UDs computationally feasible. Clustering and kernel smoothing identified 3 populations of polar bears in the region between Wrangel Island, Russia, and Banks Island, Canada. The relative probability of occurrence of animals from each population varied significantly among grid cells distributed across the study area. We displayed occurrence probabilities as contour maps wherein each contour line corresponded with a change in relative probability. Only at the edges of our study area and in some offshore regions were bootstrapped estimates of error in occurrence probabilities too high to allow prediction. Error estimates, which also were displayed as contours, allowed us to show that occurrence probabilities did not vary by season. Near Barrow, Alaska, 50% of bears observed are predicted to be from

  11. Further delineation of the SATB2 phenotype.

    PubMed

    Döcker, Dennis; Schubach, Max; Menzel, Moritz; Munz, Marita; Spaich, Christiane; Biskup, Saskia; Bartholdi, Deborah

    2014-08-01

    SATB2 is an evolutionarily highly conserved chromatin remodeling gene located on chromosome 2q33.1. Vertebrate animal models have shown that Satb2 has a crucial role in craniofacial patterning and osteoblast differentiation, as well as in determining the fates of neuronal projections in the developing neocortex. In humans, chromosomal translocations and deletions of 2q33.1 leading to SATB2 haploinsufficiency are associated with cleft palate (CP), facial dysmorphism and intellectual disability (ID). A single patient carrying a nonsense mutation in SATB2 has been described to date. In this study, we performed trio-exome sequencing in a 3-year-old girl with CP and severely delayed speech development, and her unaffected parents. Previously, the girl had undergone conventional and molecular karyotyping (microarray analysis), as well as targeted analysis for different diseases associated with developmental delay, including Angelman syndrome, Rett syndrome and Fragile X syndrome. No diagnosis could be established. Exome sequencing revealed a de novo nonsense mutation in the SATB2 gene (c.715C>T; p.R239*). The identification of a second patient carrying a de novo nonsense mutation in SATB2 confirms that this gene is essential for normal craniofacial patterning and cognitive development. Based on our data and the literature published so far, we propose a new clinically recognizable syndrome - the SATB2-associated syndrome (SAS). SAS is likely to be underdiagnosed and should be considered in children with ID, severe speech delay, cleft or high-arched palate and abnormal dentition with crowded and irregularly shaped teeth.

  12. Further delineation of the SATB2 phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Döcker, Dennis; Schubach, Max; Menzel, Moritz; Munz, Marita; Spaich, Christiane; Biskup, Saskia; Bartholdi, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    SATB2 is an evolutionarily highly conserved chromatin remodeling gene located on chromosome 2q33.1. Vertebrate animal models have shown that Satb2 has a crucial role in craniofacial patterning and osteoblast differentiation, as well as in determining the fates of neuronal projections in the developing neocortex. In humans, chromosomal translocations and deletions of 2q33.1 leading to SATB2 haploinsufficiency are associated with cleft palate (CP), facial dysmorphism and intellectual disability (ID). A single patient carrying a nonsense mutation in SATB2 has been described to date. In this study, we performed trio-exome sequencing in a 3-year-old girl with CP and severely delayed speech development, and her unaffected parents. Previously, the girl had undergone conventional and molecular karyotyping (microarray analysis), as well as targeted analysis for different diseases associated with developmental delay, including Angelman syndrome, Rett syndrome and Fragile X syndrome. No diagnosis could be established. Exome sequencing revealed a de novo nonsense mutation in the SATB2 gene (c.715C>T; p.R239*). The identification of a second patient carrying a de novo nonsense mutation in SATB2 confirms that this gene is essential for normal craniofacial patterning and cognitive development. Based on our data and the literature published so far, we propose a new clinically recognizable syndrome – the SATB2-associated syndrome (SAS). SAS is likely to be underdiagnosed and should be considered in children with ID, severe speech delay, cleft or high-arched palate and abnormal dentition with crowded and irregularly shaped teeth. PMID:24301056

  13. Velocity-depth model estimation for a subsalt target from the Southern Gas Basin of the North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, O.; Rutledge, J.; Sandvin, O.; Godfrey, B. )

    1996-01-01

    The Southern Gas Basin of the North Sea has been subjected to extensional tectonics, primarily in the east-west direction. Subsequent occurrence of the salt diapirism gave rise to the presence of complex structures. By doing a depth-domain analysis of a 3-D seismic survey data from an area in the Southern Gas Basin, we delineated the structural geometry of the top Rotliegendes formation beneath the complex Zechstein diapiric formation. This required an accurate estimate of the velocity-depth model above the Zechstein diapiric formation and removal of its deleterious effect on the underlying Permian sands of Rotliegendes and deeper targets. We conducted a layer-by-layer depth-domain analysis, and used coherency inversion to estimate layer velocities and 3-D poststack depth migration to delineate reflector geometries down to top Zechstein. We verified the accuracy of the velocity-depth model for the overburden above Zechstein by analyzing image gathers from prestack depth migration. We then analyzed constant-half-space image-gather stacks to estimate velocities for the substratum including Zechstein and the underlying Carboniferous sequence. Finally, we performed 3-D prestack depth migration to delineate the base Zechstein - top Rotliegendes geometry. This study demonstrates the need for depth-domain analysis of seismic data to derive accurate structure maps for targets beneath complex structures associated with salt and overthrust tectonics. The final output from depth-domain analysis -- a velocity-depth model, can then be used as a canvas for a reservoir model.

  14. Velocity-depth model estimation for a subsalt target from the Southern Gas Basin of the North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, O.; Rutledge, J.; Sandvin, O.; Godfrey, B.

    1996-12-31

    The Southern Gas Basin of the North Sea has been subjected to extensional tectonics, primarily in the east-west direction. Subsequent occurrence of the salt diapirism gave rise to the presence of complex structures. By doing a depth-domain analysis of a 3-D seismic survey data from an area in the Southern Gas Basin, we delineated the structural geometry of the top Rotliegendes formation beneath the complex Zechstein diapiric formation. This required an accurate estimate of the velocity-depth model above the Zechstein diapiric formation and removal of its deleterious effect on the underlying Permian sands of Rotliegendes and deeper targets. We conducted a layer-by-layer depth-domain analysis, and used coherency inversion to estimate layer velocities and 3-D poststack depth migration to delineate reflector geometries down to top Zechstein. We verified the accuracy of the velocity-depth model for the overburden above Zechstein by analyzing image gathers from prestack depth migration. We then analyzed constant-half-space image-gather stacks to estimate velocities for the substratum including Zechstein and the underlying Carboniferous sequence. Finally, we performed 3-D prestack depth migration to delineate the base Zechstein - top Rotliegendes geometry. This study demonstrates the need for depth-domain analysis of seismic data to derive accurate structure maps for targets beneath complex structures associated with salt and overthrust tectonics. The final output from depth-domain analysis -- a velocity-depth model, can then be used as a canvas for a reservoir model.

  15. Delineation of wellhead protection areas in fractured rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbu, K.R.; Muldoon, M.A.; Zaporozec, A.; Levy, J.

    1991-06-01

    In 1989, the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey prepared the report under an agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency to evaluate methods for wellhead protection area (WHPA) delineation in unconfined fractured-rock aquifers. Two fractured-rock settings were selected for the study: Precambrian crystalline rocks in central Wisconsin and Silurian dolomite in northeastern Wisconsin. The methods tested ranged from simple approaches to complex computer models. Four WHPA delineation approaches are suggested for unconfined fractured-rock aquifers that do not behave as porous media.

  16. Model assessment for delineating wellhead protection areas. Technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Heijde, P.; Beljin, M.S.

    1988-05-01

    This report offers a compilation of ground-water computer flow models potentially applicable to Wellhead Protection Areas (WHPA) delineation. EPA's Office of Ground-Water Protection prepared the document in a continuing effort to provide technical assistance to State and local Wellhead Protection Programs based on requirements of the Safe Drinking Water act (SDWA) as amended in 1986. The criteria used to select and evaluate the applicable analytical and numerical models for WHPA delineation is explained in the document and informative reference material of each of 64 models is listed.

  17. In vivo delineation of subdivisions of the human amygdaloid complex in a high-resolution group template.

    PubMed

    Tyszka, J Michael; Pauli, Wolfgang M

    2016-11-01

    The nuclei of the human amygdala remain difficult to distinguish in individual subject structural magnetic resonance images. However, interpretation of the amygdala's role in whole brain networks requires accurate localization of functional activity to a particular nucleus or subgroup of nuclei. To address this, high spatial resolution, three-dimensional templates, using joint high accuracy diffeomorphic registration of T1- and T2-weighted structural images from 168 typical adults between 22 and 35 years old released by the Human Connectome Project were constructed. Several internuclear boundaries are clearly visible in these templates, which would otherwise be impossible to delineate in individual subject data. A probabilistic atlas of major nuclei and nuclear groups was constructed in this template space and mapped back to individual spaces by inversion of the individual diffeomorphisms. Group level analyses revealed a slight (∼2%) bias toward larger total amygdala and nuclear volumes in the right hemisphere. No substantial sex or age differences were found in amygdala volumes normalized to total intracranial volume, or subdivision volumes normalized to amygdala volume. The current delineation provides a finer parcellation of the amygdala with more accurate external boundary definition than current histology-based atlases when used in conjunction with high accuracy registration methods, such as diffeomorphic warping. These templates and delineation are intended to be an open and evolving resource for future functional and structural imaging studies of the human amygdala. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3979-3998, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The Regionalization of Africa: Delineating Africa's Subregions Using Airline Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Pieter R.; Derudder, Ben; Witlox, Frank J.

    2011-01-01

    Current regionalizations of Africa have limitations in that they are attribute-based and regions are delineated according to national boundaries. Taking the world city network approach as starting point, it is possible to use relational data (i.e., information about the relationships between cities) rather than attribute data, and moreover, it…

  19. 390. Delineator Unknown October 1933 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    390. Delineator Unknown October 1933 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; SUPERSTRUCTURE - EAST BAY CROSSING; SPANS YBI TO El - E9 TO El ; TYPICAL CROSSSECTION; CONTRACT NO. 7; SUP. DRAWING NO. 82 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  20. 375. Delineator Unknown June 1933 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    375. Delineator Unknown June 1933 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; YERBA BUENA CROSSING; ANCHORAGE TUNNELS; CONTRACT NO. 5; DRAWING NO. 10A - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  1. 379. Delineator Unknown December 1932 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    379. Delineator Unknown December 1932 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; CABLES AND ATTACHMENTS - WEST BAY CROSSING; SPLAY CASTINGS; CONTRACT NO. 6A; DRAWING NO. 4 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  2. 385. Delineator Unknown December 1932 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    385. Delineator Unknown December 1932 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; SUPERSTRUCTURE - WEST BAY CROSSING; ROCKER POSTS AND BEARING; CONTRACT NO. 6; DRAWINGS NO. 42 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  3. 380. Delineator Unknown December 1932 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    380. Delineator Unknown December 1932 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; CABLES & ATTACHMENTS WEST BAY CROSSING; CABLE BANDS; CONTRACT NO. 6A; DRAWING NO. 3 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  4. 402. Delineator Unknown May 2, 1933 STUDY FOR SUSPENSION TOWERS; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    402. Delineator Unknown May 2, 1933 STUDY FOR SUSPENSION TOWERS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; TIMOTHY L. PFLUEGER, ARTHUR BROWN JR., JOHN J. DONOVAN; BOARD OF CONSULTING ARCHITECTS; SCHEME 1A - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  5. 404. Delineator Unknown June 1, 1933 STUDY FOR TOP OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    404. Delineator Unknown June 1, 1933 STUDY FOR TOP OF SUSPENSION TOWERS; SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; TIMOTHY L. PFLUEGER, ARTHUR BROWN JR., JOHN J. DONOVAN; BOARD OF CONSULTING ARCHITECTS; SCHEME 7-A - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  6. 407. Delineator Unknown July 11, 1933 PERSPECTIVE STUDY OF SAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    407. Delineator Unknown July 11, 1933 PERSPECTIVE STUDY OF SAN FRANCISCO ANCHORAGE; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; TIMOTHY L. PFLUEGER, ARTHUR BROWN JR., JOHN J. DONOVAN; BOARD OF CONSULTING ARCHITECTS; SHEET 12 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  7. 403. Delineator Unknown May 2, 1933 STUDY FOR SUSPENSION TOWERS; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    403. Delineator Unknown May 2, 1933 STUDY FOR SUSPENSION TOWERS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; TIMOTHY L. PFLUEGER, ARTHUR BROWN JR., JOHN J. DONOVAN; BOARD OF CONSULTING ARCHITECTS; SCHEME 2 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  8. 406. Delineator Unknown April 19, 1933 ELEVATION STUDY FOR SAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    406. Delineator Unknown April 19, 1933 ELEVATION STUDY FOR SAN FRANCISCO ANCHORAGE; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; BOARD OF CONSULTING ARCHITECTS; TIMOTHY L. PFLUEGER, ARTHUR BROWN JR., JOHN J. DONOVAN; SHEET 23 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  9. 408. Delineator Unknown September 19, 1933 SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    408. Delineator Unknown September 19, 1933 SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; STUDY FOR SAN FRANCISCO ANCHORAGE; TIMOTHY L. PFLUEGER, ARTHUR BROWN JR., JOHN J. DONOVAN; BOARD OF CONSULTING ARCHITECTS; SHEET NO. 26 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  10. Delineation of nuclear structures in 3D multicellular systems

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-13

    A pipeline, implemented within the Insight Segmentation and Registration Toolkit (ITK) and The Visualization Toolkit (VTK) framework, to delineate each nucleus and to profile morphometric and colony organization. At an abstract level, our approach is an extension of a previously developed method for monolayer call structure models.

  11. 18 CFR 415.43 - Mapped and unmapped delineations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mapped and unmapped... ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Administration § 415.43 Mapped and unmapped delineations. (a) Whenever an official flood plain map providing the pertinent information is available...

  12. 18 CFR 415.43 - Mapped and unmapped delineations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mapped and unmapped... ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Administration § 415.43 Mapped and unmapped delineations. (a) Whenever an official flood plain map providing the pertinent information is available...

  13. 18 CFR 415.43 - Mapped and unmapped delineations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Mapped and unmapped... ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Administration § 415.43 Mapped and unmapped delineations. (a) Whenever an official flood plain map providing the pertinent information is available...

  14. 18 CFR 415.43 - Mapped and unmapped delineations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mapped and unmapped... ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Administration § 415.43 Mapped and unmapped delineations. (a) Whenever an official flood plain map providing the pertinent information is available...

  15. 18 CFR 415.43 - Mapped and unmapped delineations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mapped and unmapped... ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Administration § 415.43 Mapped and unmapped delineations. (a) Whenever an official flood plain map providing the pertinent information is available...

  16. 1. Photocopy of site plan, Dene Hendrick, delineator, 1977, for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of site plan, Dene Hendrick, delineator, 1977, for the City of San Jose in cooperative agreement with the California Department of Transportation (from the San Jose Historical Museum). - Twin Oaks Dairy, Northwest of Metcalfe Road, off State Route 101 (Monterey Road), Coyote, Santa Clara County, CA

  17. 374. Delineator Unknown June 1933 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    374. Delineator Unknown June 1933 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; YERBA BUENA CROSSING; EYE BAR CHAIN; CONTRACT NO. 5; SUP. DRAWING NO. 12A - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  18. 362. Delineator Unknown June 1933 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    362. Delineator Unknown June 1933 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; SAN FRANCISCO ANCHORAGE; EYE BAR ANCHOR CHAIN; CONTRACT NO. 3; SUP. DRAWING NO. 11-A - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  19. Dynamic Stereochemistry: A Simple Approach to Delineating Relative Configuration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandal, Dipak K.

    2007-01-01

    A simple approach for delineating the stereochemistry of the products relative to that of the reactants in reactions involving stereogenic centers is addressed. The reaction at the tetrahedral center involves the cleavage of a bond to one of the ligands in the reactant and the resulting new ligand in the product is labeled by affixing prime to the…

  20. 1. Photocopy of measured drawing (original delineated by the Royal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of measured drawing (original delineated by the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts (Kunstakademiets), Copenhagen, Denmark, 1961) WEST ELEVATIONS AND PLAN OF UPPER DRONNINGENSGADE - Dronningensgade Area Study, Ninty-nine Steps, 30-31 Queen Street, Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, VI

  1. 359. Delineator Unknown April 1935 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    359. Delineator Unknown April 1935 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; BRIDGE RAILWAY SAN FRANCISCO LOOP; DETAILS OF VIADUCT; FINAL REPORT; DRG. NO. 92 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  2. Comparison of Eh and H2 measurements for delineating redox processes in a contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, Francis H.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Adriaens, Peter; Henry, Mark A.; Bradley, Paul M.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of oxidation−reduction potential (Eh) and concentrations of dissolved hydrogen (H2) were made in a shallow groundwater system contaminated with solvents and jet fuel to delineate the zonation of redox processes. Eh measurements ranged from +69 to −158 mV in a cross section of the contaminated plume and accurately delineated oxic from anoxic groundwater. Plotting measured Eh and pH values on an equilibrium stability diagram indicated that Fe(III) reduction was the predominant redox process in the anoxic zone and did not indicate the presence of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction. In contrast, measurements of H2concentrations indicated that methanogenesis predominated in heavily contaminated sediments near the water table surface (H2 ∼ 7.0 nM) and that the methanogenic zone was surrounded by distinct sulfate-reducing (H2 ∼ 1−4 nM) and Fe(III)-reducing (H2 ∼ 0.1−0.8 nM) zones. The presence of methanogenesis, sulfate reduction, and Fe(III) reduction was confirmed by the distribution of dissolved oxygen, sulfate, Fe(II), and methane in groundwater. These results show that H2 concentrations were more useful for identifying anoxic redox processes than Ehmeasurements in this groundwater system. However, H2-based redox zone delineations are more reliable when H2 concentrations are interpreted in the context of electron-acceptor (oxygen, nitrate, sulfate) availability and the presence of final products [Fe(II), sulfide, methane] of microbial metabolism.

  3. Comparison of Eh and H2 measurements for delineating redox zones in a contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, Francis H.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Adriaens, Peter; Henry, Mark A.; Bradley, Paul M.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of oxidation−reduction potential (Eh) and concentrations of dissolved hydrogen (H2) were made in a shallow groundwater system contaminated with solvents and jet fuel to delineate the zonation of redox processes. Eh measurements ranged from +69 to −158 mV in a cross section of the contaminated plume and accurately delineated oxic from anoxic groundwater. Plotting measured Eh and pH values on an equilibrium stability diagram indicated that Fe(III) reduction was the predominant redox process in the anoxic zone and did not indicate the presence of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction. In contrast, measurements of H2concentrations indicated that methanogenesis predominated in heavily contaminated sediments near the water table surface (H2 ∼ 7.0 nM) and that the methanogenic zone was surrounded by distinct sulfate-reducing (H2 ∼ 1−4 nM) and Fe(III)-reducing (H2 ∼ 0.1−0.8 nM) zones. The presence of methanogenesis, sulfate reduction, and Fe(III) reduction was confirmed by the distribution of dissolved oxygen, sulfate, Fe(II), and methane in groundwater. These results show that H2 concentrations were more useful for identifying anoxic redox processes than Ehmeasurements in this groundwater system. However, H2-based redox zone delineations are more reliable when H2 concentrations are interpreted in the context of electron-acceptor (oxygen, nitrate, sulfate) availability and the presence of final products [Fe(II), sulfide, methane] of microbial metabolism.

  4. Ground truth delineation for medical image segmentation based on Local Consistency and Distribution Map analysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Irene; Sun, Xinyao; Alsufyani, Noura; Xiong, Zhihui; Major, Paul; Basu, Anup

    2015-01-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) systems are being increasingly deployed for medical applications in recent years with the goal to speed up tedious tasks and improve precision. Among others, segmentation is an important component in CAD systems as a preprocessing step to help recognize patterns in medical images. In order to assess the accuracy of a CAD segmentation algorithm, comparison with ground truth data is necessary. To-date, ground truth delineation relies mainly on contours that are either manually defined by clinical experts or automatically generated by software. In this paper, we propose a systematic ground truth delineation method based on a Local Consistency Set Analysis approach, which can be used to establish an accurate ground truth representation, or if ground truth is available, to assess the accuracy of a CAD generated segmentation algorithm. We validate our computational model using medical data. Experimental results demonstrate the robustness of our approach. In contrast to current methods, our model also provides consistency information at distributed boundary pixel level, and thus is invariant to global compensation error.

  5. Delineating complex spatiotemporal distribution of earthquake aftershocks: an improved Source-Scanning Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yen-Che; Kao, Honn; Rosenberger, Andreas; Hsu, Shu-Kun; Huang, Bor-Shouh

    2012-06-01

    Conventional earthquake location methods depend critically on the correct identification of seismic phases and their arrival times from seismograms. Accurate phase picking is particularly difficult for aftershocks that occur closely in time and space, mostly because of the ambiguity of correlating the same phase at different stations. In this study, we introduce an improved Source-Scanning Algorithm (ISSA) for the purpose of delineating the complex distribution of aftershocks without time-consuming and labour-intensive phase-picking procedures. The improvements include the application of a ground motion analyser to separate P and S waves, the automatic adjustment of time windows for 'brightness' calculation based on the scanning resolution and a modified brightness function to combine constraints from multiple phases. Synthetic experiments simulating a challenging scenario are conducted to demonstrate the robustness of the ISSA. The method is applied to a field data set selected from the ocean-bottom-seismograph records of an offshore aftershock sequence southwest of Taiwan. Although visual inspection of the seismograms is ambiguous, our ISSA analysis clearly delineates two events that can best explain the observed waveform pattern.

  6. A role delineation study of health educators in the United States: methodological innovations.

    PubMed

    Taub, Alyson; Olsen, Larry K; Gilmore, Gary D; Connell, David

    2008-12-01

    This paper focuses on methodological innovations used in the National Health Educator Competencies Update Project (CUP) in the United States. The CUP was a six-year research study designed to delineate the role of the health educator in the USA. Individuals who self-identified as health educators were included in the study. To provide context, the background for the research is presented, followed by a brief overview of the research process. Some of the key methodological innovations discussed are: selecting a representative sample when the total population of those working as health educators was not easily identified or readily accessible; assessing response methodology preferences through pilot studies; enhancing the response rate through accurate, up-to-date mailing lists and incentives; and exploring new approaches to large-scale data analyses. Insights gained are included for other researchers who may wish to undertake similar studies or draw from the CUP dataset for secondary analyses.

  7. Accurate vessel segmentation with constrained B-snake.

    PubMed

    Yuanzhi Cheng; Xin Hu; Ji Wang; Yadong Wang; Tamura, Shinichi

    2015-08-01

    We describe an active contour framework with accurate shape and size constraints on the vessel cross-sectional planes to produce the vessel segmentation. It starts with a multiscale vessel axis tracing in a 3D computed tomography (CT) data, followed by vessel boundary delineation on the cross-sectional planes derived from the extracted axis. The vessel boundary surface is deformed under constrained movements on the cross sections and is voxelized to produce the final vascular segmentation. The novelty of this paper lies in the accurate contour point detection of thin vessels based on the CT scanning model, in the efficient implementation of missing contour points in the problematic regions and in the active contour model with accurate shape and size constraints. The main advantage of our framework is that it avoids disconnected and incomplete segmentation of the vessels in the problematic regions that contain touching vessels (vessels in close proximity to each other), diseased portions (pathologic structure attached to a vessel), and thin vessels. It is particularly suitable for accurate segmentation of thin and low contrast vessels. Our method is evaluated and demonstrated on CT data sets from our partner site, and its results are compared with three related methods. Our method is also tested on two publicly available databases and its results are compared with the recently published method. The applicability of the proposed method to some challenging clinical problems, the segmentation of the vessels in the problematic regions, is demonstrated with good results on both quantitative and qualitative experimentations; our segmentation algorithm can delineate vessel boundaries that have level of variability similar to those obtained manually.

  8. Techniques of Fluorescence Cholangiography During Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Better Delineation of the Bile Duct Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Yoshiharu; Ishizawa, Takeaki; Tani, Keigo; Harada, Nobuhiro; Kaneko, Junichi; Saiura, Akio; Bandai, Yasutsugu; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the clinical and technical factors affecting the ability of fluorescence cholangiography (FC) using indocyanine green (ICG) to delineate the bile duct anatomy during laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). Application of FC during LC began after laparoscopic fluorescence imaging systems became commercially available. In 108 patients undergoing LC, FC was performed by preoperative intravenous injection of ICG (2.5 mg) during dissection of Calot's triangle, and clinical factors affecting the ability of FC to delineate the extrahepatic bile ducts were evaluated. Equipment-related factors associated with bile duct detectability were also assessed among 5 laparoscopic systems and 1 open fluorescence imaging system in ex vivo studies. FC delineated the confluence between the cystic duct and common hepatic duct (CyD–CHD) before and after dissection of Calot's triangle in 80 patients (74%) and 99 patients (92%), respectively. The interval between ICG injection and FC before dissection of Calot's triangle was significantly longer in the 80 patients in whom the CyD–CHD confluence was detected by fluorescence imaging before dissection (median, 90 min; range, 15–165 min) than in the remaining 28 patients in whom the confluence was undetectable (median, 47 min; range, 21–205 min; P < 0.01). The signal contrast on the fluorescence images of the bile duct samples was significantly different among the laparoscopic imaging systems and tended to decrease more steeply than those of the open imaging system as the target-laparoscope distance increased and porcine tissues covering the samples became thicker. FC is a simple navigation tool for obtaining a biliary roadmap to reach the “critical view of safety” during LC. Key factors for better bile duct identification by FC are administration of ICG as far in advance as possible before surgery, sufficient extension of connective tissues around the bile ducts, and placement of the tip of

  9. Delineating biophysical environments of the Sunda Banda Seascape, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingshu; Ahmadia, Gabby N; Chollett, Iliana; Huang, Charles; Fox, Helen; Wijonarno, Anton; Madden, Marguerite

    2015-01-22

    The Sunda Banda Seascape (SBS), located in the center of the Coral Triangle, is a global center of marine biodiversity and a conservation priority. We proposed the first biophysical environmental delineation of the SBS using globally available satellite remote sensing and model-assimilated data to categorize this area into unique and meaningful biophysical classes. Specifically, the SBS was partitioned into eight biophysical classes characterized by similar sea surface temperature, chlorophyll a concentration, currents, and salinity patterns. Areas within each class were expected to have similar habitat types and ecosystem functions. Our work supplemented prevailing global marine management schemes by focusing in on a regional scale with finer spatial resolution. It also provided a baseline for academic research, ecological assessments and will facilitate marine spatial planning and conservation activities in the area. In addition, the framework and methods of delineating biophysical environments we presented can be expanded throughout the whole Coral Triangle to support research and conservation activities in this important region.

  10. A Comparative Review of North American Tundra Delineations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, Kirk C.; Carroll, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Recent profound changes have been observed in the Arctic environment, including record low sea ice extents and high latitude greening. Studying the Arctic and how it is changing is an important element of climate change science. The Tundra, an ecoregion of the Arctic, is directly related to climate change due to its effects on the snow ice feedback mechanism and greenhouse gas cycling. Like all ecoregions, the Tundra border is shifting, yet studies and policies require clear delineation of boundaries. There are many options for ecoregion classification systems, as well as resources for creating custom maps. To help decision makers identify the best classification system possible, we present a review of North American Tundra ecoregion delineations and further explore the methodologies, purposes, limitations, and physical properties of five common ecoregion classification systems. We quantitatively compare the corresponding maps by area using a geographic information system.

  11. Population delineation of polar bears using satellite collar data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bethke, R.; Taylor, M.; Amstrup, S.; Messler, F.

    1996-01-01

    To produce reliable estimates of the size or vital rates of a given population, it is important that the boundaries of the population under study are clearly defined. This is particularly critical for large, migratory animals where levels of sustainable harvest are based on these estimates, and where small errors may have serious long-term consequences for the population. Once populations are delineated, rates of exchange between adjacent populations can be determined and accounted/corrected for when calculating abundance (e.g., based on mark-recapture data). Using satellite radio-collar locations for polar bears in the western Canadian Arctic, we illustrate one approach to delineating wildlife populations that integrates cluster analysis methods for determining group membership with home range plotting procedures to define spatial utilization. This approach is flexible with respect to the specific procedures used and provides an objective and quantitative basis for defining population boundaries.

  12. Delineating high-density areas in spatial Poisson fields from strip-transect sampling using indicator geostatistics: application to unexploded ordnance removal.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hirotaka; McKenna, Sean A

    2007-07-01

    An approach for delineating high anomaly density areas within a mixture of two or more spatial Poisson fields based on limited sample data collected along strip transects was developed. All sampled anomalies were transformed to anomaly count data and indicator kriging was used to estimate the probability of exceeding a threshold value derived from the cdf of the background homogeneous Poisson field. The threshold value was determined so that the delineation of high-density areas was optimized. Additionally, a low-pass filter was applied to the transect data to enhance such segmentation. Example calculations were completed using a controlled military model site, in which accurate delineation of clusters of unexploded ordnance (UXO) was required for site cleanup.

  13. Enhanced delineation of degradation in aortic walls through OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real, Eusebio; Val-Bernal, José Fernando; Revuelta, José M.; Pontón, Alejandro; Calvo Díez, Marta; Mayorga, Marta; López-Higuera, José M.; Conde, Olga M.

    2015-03-01

    Degradation of the wall of human ascending thoracic aorta has been assessed through Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). OCT images of the media layer of the aortic wall exhibit micro-structure degradation in case of diseased aortas from aneurysmal vessels or in aortas prone to aortic dissections. The degeneration in vessel walls appears as low-reflectivity areas due to the invasive appearance of acidic polysaccharides and mucopolysaccharides within a typical ordered microstructure of parallel lamellae of smooth muscle cells, elastin and collagen fibers. An OCT indicator of wall degradation can be generated upon the spatial quantification of the extension of degraded areas in a similar way as conventional histopathology. This proposed OCT marker offers a real-time clinical insight of the vessel status to help cardiovascular surgeons in vessel repair interventions. However, the delineation of degraded areas on the B-scan image from OCT is sometimes difficult due to presence of speckle noise, variable SNR conditions on the measurement process, etc. Degraded areas could be outlined by basic thresholding techniques taking advantage of disorders evidences in B-scan images, but this delineation is not always optimum and requires complex additional processing stages. This work proposes an optimized delineation of degraded spots in vessel walls, robust to noisy environments, based on the analysis of the second order variation of image intensity of backreflection to determine the type of local structure. Results improve the delineation of wall anomalies providing a deeper physiological perception of the vessel wall conditions. Achievements could be also transferred to other clinical scenarios: carotid arteries, aorto-iliac or ilio-femoral sections, intracranial, etc.

  14. Delineation of major soil associations using ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, W. L.; Bodenheimer, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The delineation of a major soil association in the loess region of Obion County has been accomplished using ERTS-1 imagery. Channel 7 provides the clearest differentiation. The separation of other smaller soil associations in an intensive row crop agricultural area is somewhat more difficult. Soil differentiation has been accomplished visually as well as electronically using a scanning microdensitometer. Lower altitude aircraft imagery permits a more refined soil association identification and where imagery is of sufficient scale, even individual soils may be identified.

  15. A locally adaptive kernel regression method for facies delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernàndez-Garcia, D.; Barahona-Palomo, M.; Henri, C. V.; Sanchez-Vila, X.

    2015-12-01

    Facies delineation is defined as the separation of geological units with distinct intrinsic characteristics (grain size, hydraulic conductivity, mineralogical composition). A major challenge in this area stems from the fact that only a few scattered pieces of hydrogeological information are available to delineate geological facies. Several methods to delineate facies are available in the literature, ranging from those based only on existing hard data, to those including secondary data or external knowledge about sedimentological patterns. This paper describes a methodology to use kernel regression methods as an effective tool for facies delineation. The method uses both the spatial and the actual sampled values to produce, for each individual hard data point, a locally adaptive steering kernel function, self-adjusting the principal directions of the local anisotropic kernels to the direction of highest local spatial correlation. The method is shown to outperform the nearest neighbor classification method in a number of synthetic aquifers whenever the available number of hard data is small and randomly distributed in space. In the case of exhaustive sampling, the steering kernel regression method converges to the true solution. Simulations ran in a suite of synthetic examples are used to explore the selection of kernel parameters in typical field settings. It is shown that, in practice, a rule of thumb can be used to obtain suboptimal results. The performance of the method is demonstrated to significantly improve when external information regarding facies proportions is incorporated. Remarkably, the method allows for a reasonable reconstruction of the facies connectivity patterns, shown in terms of breakthrough curves performance.

  16. Delineation of a clinical syndrome caused by mosaic trisomy 15

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, E.M.; Bienz, G.; Straumann, E.; Bosceh, N.

    1996-03-15

    We report on a boy with mosaic trisomy 15. The clinical manifestations are compared with those of the few cases reported up to now. A clinical syndrome is delineated consisting of a characteristic shape of the nose and other minor craniofacial anomalies, as well as typical deformities of the hands and feet. Different degrees of mosaicism may explain the more or less severe manifestations in individual patients. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Methods for Data-based Delineation of Spatial Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, John E.

    2012-10-01

    In data analysis, it is often useful to delineate or segregate areas of interest from the general population of data in order to concentrate further analysis efforts on smaller areas. Three methods are presented here for automatically generating polygons around spatial data of interest. Each method addresses a distinct data type. These methods were developed for and implemented in the sample planning tool called Visual Sample Plan (VSP). Method A is used to delineate areas of elevated values in a rectangular grid of data (raster). The data used for this method are spatially related. Although VSP uses data from a kriging process for this method, it will work for any type of data that is spatially coherent and appears on a regular grid. Method B is used to surround areas of interest characterized by individual data points that are congregated within a certain distance of each other. Areas where data are “clumped” together spatially will be delineated. Method C is used to recreate the original boundary in a raster of data that separated data values from non-values. This is useful when a rectangular raster of data contains non-values (missing data) that indicate they were outside of some original boundary. If the original boundary is not delivered with the raster, this method will approximate the original boundary.

  18. Harmonization of the Volume of Interest Delineation among All Eleven Radiotherapy Centers in the North of France

    PubMed Central

    Pasquier, David; Boutaud de la Combe-Chossiere, Laurence; Carlier, Damien; Darloy, Franck; Degrendel-Courtecuisse, Anne Catherine; Dufour, Chantal; Fares, Mustapha; Gilbeau, Laurent; Liem, Xavier; Martin, Philippe; Meyer, Pascal; Minne, Jean François; Olszyk, Olimpia; Rhliouch, Hassan; Tokarski, Marc; Viot, Chloé; Castelain, Bernard; Lartigau, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background Inter-observer delineation variation has been detailed for many years in almost every tumor location. Inadequate delineation can impair the chance of cure and/or increase toxicity. The aim of our original work was to prospectively improve the homogeneity of delineation among all of the senior radiation oncologists in the Nord-Pas de Calais region, irrespective of the conditions of practice. Methods All 11 centers were involved. The first studied cancer was prostate cancer. Three clinical cases were studied: a low-risk prostate cancer case (case 1), a high-risk prostate cancer case (pelvic nodes, case 2) and a case of post-operative biochemical elevated PSA (case 3). All of the involved physicians delineated characteristically the clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk. The volumes were compared using validated indexes: the volume ratio (VR), common and additional volumes (CV and AV), volume overlap (VO) and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). A second delineation of the same three cases was performed after discussion of the slice results and the choice of shared guidelines to evaluate homogenization. A comparative analysis of the indexes before and after discussion was conducted using the Wilcoxon test for paired samples. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. Results The indexes were not improved in case 1, for which the inter-observer agreement was considered good after the first comparison (DSC = 0.83±0.06). In case 2, the second comparison showed homogenization of the CTV delineation with a significant improvement in CV (81.4±11.7 vs. 88.6±10.26, respectively, p = 0.048), VO (0.41±0.09 vs. 0.47±0.07, respectively; p = 0.009) and DSC (0.58±0.09 vs. 0.63±0.07, respectively; p = 0.0098). In case 3, VR and AV were significantly improved: VR: 1.71(±0.6) vs. 1.34(±0.46), respectively, p = 0.0034; AV: 46.58(±14.50) vs. 38.08(±15.10), respectively, p = 0.0024. DSC was not improved, but it was already

  19. Accurate Evaluation of Quantum Integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, D. C.; Goorvitch, D.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Combining an appropriate finite difference method with Richardson's extrapolation results in a simple, highly accurate numerical method for solving a Schrodinger's equation. Important results are that error estimates are provided, and that one can extrapolate expectation values rather than the wavefunctions to obtain highly accurate expectation values. We discuss the eigenvalues, the error growth in repeated Richardson's extrapolation, and show that the expectation values calculated on a crude mesh can be extrapolated to obtain expectation values of high accuracy.

  20. Enhancing in vivo tumor boundary delineation with structured illumination fluorescence molecular imaging and spatial gradient mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jessica; Miller, Jessica P.; Hathi, Deep; Zhou, Haiying; Achilefu, Samuel; Shokeen, Monica; Akers, Walter J.

    2016-08-01

    Fluorescence imaging, in combination with tumor-avid near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent molecular probes, provides high specificity and sensitivity for cancer detection in preclinical animal models, and more recently, assistance during oncologic surgery. However, conventional camera-based fluorescence imaging techniques are heavily surface-weighted such that surface reflection from skin or other nontumor tissue and nonspecific fluorescence signals dominate, obscuring true cancer-specific signals and blurring tumor boundaries. To address this challenge, we applied structured illumination fluorescence molecular imaging (SIFMI) in live animals for automated subtraction of nonspecific surface signals to better delineate accumulation of an NIR fluorescent probe targeting α4β1 integrin in mice bearing subcutaneous plasma cell xenografts. SIFMI demonstrated a fivefold improvement in tumor-to-background contrast when compared with other full-field fluorescence imaging methods and required significantly reduced scanning time compared with diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging. Furthermore, the spatial gradient mapping enhanced highlighting of tumor boundaries. Through the relatively simple hardware and software modifications described, SIFMI can be integrated with clinical fluorescence imaging systems, enhancing intraoperative tumor boundary delineation from the uninvolved tissue.

  1. MRI to CT prostate registration for improved targeting in cancer external beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Commandeur, Frederic; Simon, Antoine; Mathieu, Romain; Nassef, Mohamed; Ospina, Juan David; Rolland, Yan; Haigron, Pascal; De Crevoisier, Renaud; Acosta, Oscar

    2016-06-16

    External radiotherapy is a major clinical treatment for localized prostate cancer. Currently, computed tomography (CT) is used to delineate the prostate and to plan the radiotherapy treatment. However, CT images suffer from a poor soft tissue contrast and do not allow an accurate organ delineation. On the contrary, Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides rich details and high soft tissue contrast, allowing tumor detection. Thus, the intra-individual propagation of MRI delineations towards the planning CT may improve tumor targeting. In this paper we introduce a new method to propagate MRI prostate delineations to the planning CT. In a first step, a random forest (RF) classification is performed to coarsely detect the prostate in the CT images, yielding a prostate probability membership for each voxel and a prostate hard segmentation. Then the registration is performed using a new similarity metric which maximizes the probability and the collinearity between the normals of the MR existing contour and the contour resulting from the CT classification. A first study on synthetic data was performed to analyze the influence of the metric parameters with different levels of noise. Then, the method was also evaluated on real MR-CT data using manual alignments and intraprostatic fiducial markers and compared to a classically used mutual information (MI) approach. The proposed metric outperformed MI by 7% in terms of Dice score coefficient (DSC), by 3.14 mm the Hausdorff Distance (HD) and 2.13 mm the markers position errors (MPE). Finally, the impact of registration uncertainties on the treatment planning was evaluated, demonstrating the potential advantage of the proposed approach in a clinical setup to define a precise target.

  2. Impact of FDG-PET/CT on Radiotherapy Volume Delineation in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Correlation of Imaging Stage With Pathologic Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Faria, Sergio L. Menard, Sonia; Devic, Slobodan; Sirois, Christian; Souhami, Luis; Lisbona, Robert; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomography (CT) is more accurate than CT in determining the extent of non-small-cell lung cancer. We performed a study to evaluate the impact of FDG-PET/CT on the radiotherapy volume delineation compared with CT without using any mathematical algorithm and to correlate the findings with the pathologic examination findings. Methods and Materials: A total of 32 patients with proven non-small-cell lung cancer, pathologic specimens from the mediastinum and lung primary, and pretreatment chest CT and FDG-PET/CT scans were studied. For each patient, two data sets of theoretical gross tumor volumes were contoured. One set was determined using the chest CT only, and the second, done separately, was based on the co-registered FDG-PET/CT data. The disease stage of each patient was determined using the TNM staging system for three data sets: the CT scan only, FDG-PET/CT scan, and pathologic findings. Results: Pathologic examination altered the CT-determined stage in 22 (69%) of 32 patients and the PET-determined stage in 16 (50%) of 32 patients. The most significant alterations were related to the N stage. PET altered the TNM stage in 15 (44%) of 32 patients compared with CT alone, but only 7 of these 15 alterations were confirmed by the pathologic findings. With respect to contouring the tumor volume for radiotherapy, PET altered the contour in 18 (56%) of 32 cases compared with CT alone. Conclusion: The contour of the tumor volume of non-small-cell lung cancer patients with co-registered FDG-PET/CT resulted in >50% alterations compared with CT targeting, findings similar to those of other publications. However, the significance of this change is unknown. Furthermore, pathologic examination showed that PET is not always accurate and histologic examination should be obtained to confirm the findings of PET whenever possible.

  3. Plume Delineation in the BC Cribs and Trenches Area

    SciTech Connect

    Rucker, Dale F.; Sweeney, Mark D.

    2004-11-30

    HydroGEOPHYSICS, Inc. and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) were contracted by Fluor Hanford Group, Inc. to conduct a geophysical investigation in the area of the BC Cribs and Trenches (subject site) at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The BC Cribs and Trenches are located south of the 200 East Area. This document provides the details of the investigation to identify existing infrastructure from legacy disposal activities and to delineate the edges of a groundwater plume that contains radiological and heavy metal constituents beneath the 216-B-26 and 216-B-52 Trenches, and the 216-B-14 through 216-B-19 Cribs.

  4. 12. J. Fuss, delineator (from Folder 5) 'PLAN ETC. OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. J. Fuss, delineator (from Folder 5) 'PLAN ETC. OF NEW ARSENAL FOR BENICIA DEPOT CAL.' PLAN, ELEVATIONS, SECTIONS, DETAILS (right half of CA-1828-13) 13. (From Folder 5) PLAN, ELEVATION, SECTION (left half of CA-1828-12) 14. (From Folder 2) PLAN, ELEVATION, AND DETAILS OF STONES TO BE CUT 15. (From Folder 4) PLAN AND ELEVATION OF MAIN DOORWAY 16. (From Folder 5) DETAILS OF CANNON EMBRASURES - Benicia Arsenal, Storehouse, Comandant's Lane, Benicia Industrial Park, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  5. Newer Imaging Modalities to Assist With Target Localization in the Radiation Treatment of Prostate Cancer and Possible Lymph Node Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    John, Subhash S. Zietman, Anthony L.; Shipley, William U.; Harisinghani, Mukesh G.

    2008-05-01

    Precise localization of prostate cancer and the drainage lymph nodes is mandatory to define an accurate clinical target volume for conformal radiotherapy. Better target definition and delineation on a daily basis is surely important in quality assurance for fractionated radiation therapy. This article reviews the evidence for major emerging techniques that show promise in better identifying the clinical target volume. Partial prostate boost by brachytherapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, or protons has become possible not only with standard imaging techniques but also with the availability of metabolic images obtained by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Even though fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography has not been found to be useful, novel radiolabeled tracers may eventually prove of value in the diagnosis and treatment planning of prostate cancer. For the metastatic lymph nodes, lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles has greater accuracy as compared with conventional techniques and has been instrumental in delineating the lymphatic drainage of the prostate gland. These novel investigational techniques could further help in optimizing conformal radiotherapy for patients with prostate cancer. The concepts of biologic target volume, real target volume, and multidimensional conformal radiotherapy are being explored.

  6. Newer imaging modalities to assist with target localization in the radiation treatment of prostate cancer and possible lymph node metastases.

    PubMed

    John, Subhash S; Zietman, Anthony L; Shipley, William U; Harisinghani, Mukesh G

    2008-01-01

    Precise localization of prostate cancer and the drainage lymph nodes is mandatory to define an accurate clinical target volume for conformal radiotherapy. Better target definition and delineation on a daily basis is surely important in quality assurance for fractionated radiation therapy. This article reviews the evidence for major emerging techniques that show promise in better identifying the clinical target volume. Partial prostate boost by brachytherapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, or protons has become possible not only with standard imaging techniques but also with the availability of metabolic images obtained by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Even though fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography has not been found to be useful, novel radiolabeled tracers may eventually prove of value in the diagnosis and treatment planning of prostate cancer. For the metastatic lymph nodes, lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles has greater accuracy as compared with conventional techniques and has been instrumental in delineating the lymphatic drainage of the prostate gland. These novel investigational techniques could further help in optimizing conformal radiotherapy for patients with prostate cancer. The concepts of biologic target volume, real target volume, and multidimensional conformal radiotherapy are being explored.

  7. Delineating Rearrangements in Single Yeast Artificial Chromosomes by Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Wu, Jenny; Duell, Thomas

    2009-09-18

    Cloning of large chunks of human genomic DNA in recombinant systems such as yeast or bacterial artificial chromosomes has greatly facilitated the construction of physical maps, the positional cloning of disease genes or the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes for diagnostic purposes. For this process to work efficiently, the DNA cloning process and subsequent clone propagation need to maintain stable inserts that are neither deleted nor otherwise rearranged. Some regions of the human genome; however, appear to have a higher propensity than others to rearrange in any host system. Thus, techniques to detect and accurately characterize such rearrangements need to be developed. We developed a technique termed 'Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping (QDFM)' that allows accurate tagging of sequence elements of interest with near kilobase accuracy and optimized it for delineation of rearrangements in recombinant DNA clones. This paper demonstrates the power of this microscopic approach by investigating YAC rearrangements. In our examples, high-resolution physical maps for regions within the immunoglobulin lambda variant gene cluster were constructed for three different YAC clones carrying deletions of 95 kb and more. Rearrangements within YACs could be demonstrated unambiguously by pairwise mapping of cosmids along YAC DNA molecules. When coverage by YAC clones was not available, distances between cosmid clones were estimated by hybridization of cosmids onto DNA fibers prepared from human genomic DNA. In addition, the QDFM technology provides essential information about clone stability facilitating closure of the maps of the human genome as well as those of model organisms.

  8. Atlas-based segmentation technique incorporating inter-observer delineation uncertainty for whole breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, L. R.; Dowling, J. A.; Pogson, E. M.; Metcalfe, P.; Holloway, L.

    2017-01-01

    Accurate, efficient auto-segmentation methods are essential for the clinical efficacy of adaptive radiotherapy delivered with highly conformal techniques. Current atlas based auto-segmentation techniques are adequate in this respect, however fail to account for inter-observer variation. An atlas-based segmentation method that incorporates inter-observer variation is proposed. This method is validated for a whole breast radiotherapy cohort containing 28 CT datasets with CTVs delineated by eight observers. To optimise atlas accuracy, the cohort was divided into categories by mean body mass index and laterality, with atlas’ generated for each in a leave-one-out approach. Observer CTVs were merged and thresholded to generate an auto-segmentation model representing both inter-observer and inter-patient differences. For each category, the atlas was registered to the left-out dataset to enable propagation of the auto-segmentation from atlas space. Auto-segmentation time was recorded. The segmentation was compared to the gold-standard contour using the dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and mean absolute surface distance (MASD). Comparison with the smallest and largest CTV was also made. This atlas-based auto-segmentation method incorporating inter-observer variation was shown to be efficient (<4min) and accurate for whole breast radiotherapy, with good agreement (DSC>0.7, MASD <9.3mm) between the auto-segmented contours and CTV volumes.

  9. Delineating forested river habitats and riparian floodplain hydrology with LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrasek, Chris

    Rivers and the riparian forest corridor comprise a valuable freshwater ecosystem that has been altered by human activities including timber management, road building, and other land conversions. The habitats of river dependent species in the Pacific Northwest, in particular salmon have often been degraded by these activities. Many salmon runs have become threatened with extinction and have been Endangered Species Act listed. New conservation planning and policies have developed around protecting freshwater habitats and restoring more natural river processes. In WA State, timber landowners, officials from State and Federal agencies, Native tribes, and other stakeholders developed Forest Practice rules and codified a Habitat Conservation Plan with dual goals of providing regulatory surety for timber land owners and helping to recover the threatened salmon runs in forested watersheds. Conserving critical stream ecological functions and potential fish habitats throughout watersheds while managing and regulating timber harvest across the State requires accurate and up-to-date delineation and mapping of channels, tributaries, and off-channel wetlands. Monitoring the effectiveness of protection efforts is necessary but can also be difficult. Agency staff and resources are limited for both day-to-day implementation of Forest Practice rules and adaptive management. The goal of this research has been to develop efficient and accessible methods to delineate wetlands, side-channels, tributaries, and pools and backwaters created by large log jams in forested watersheds. It was also essential to use publicly available LiDAR data and to model these waters at ecologically meaningful flows. I tested a hydraulic model at a 2-year and 50-year flows, and a relative height above river surface model and compared them. I completed two additional remote sensing investigations to correlate channel movement and the locations of off-channel wetlands: an analysis of historical aerial imagery

  10. Rapid 3-D delineation of cell nuclei for high-content screening platforms.

    PubMed

    Gertych, Arkadiusz; Ma, Zhaoxuan; Tajbakhsh, Jian; Velásquez-Vacca, Adriana; Knudsen, Beatrice S

    2016-02-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) microscopy combined with multiplexing of fluorescent labels allows high-content analysis of large numbers of cell nuclei. The full automation of 3-D screening platforms necessitates image processing algorithms that can accurately and robustly delineate nuclei in images with little to no human intervention. Imaging-based high-content screening was originally developed as a powerful tool for drug discovery. However, cell confluency, complexity of nuclear staining as well as poor contrast between nuclei and background result in slow and unreliable 3-D image processing and therefore negatively affect the performance of studying a drug response. Here, we propose a new method, 3D-RSD, to delineate nuclei by means of 3-D radial symmetries and test it on high-resolution image data of human cancer cells treated by drugs. The nuclei detection performance was evaluated by means of manually generated ground truth from 2351 nuclei (27 confocal stacks). When compared to three other nuclei segmentation methods, 3D-RSD possessed a better true positive rate of 83.3% and F-score of 0.895±0.045 (p-value=0.047). Altogether, 3D-RSD is a method with a very good overall segmentation performance. Furthermore, implementation of radial symmetries offers good processing speed, and makes 3D-RSD less sensitive to staining patterns. In particular, the 3D-RSD method performs well in cell lines, which are often used in imaging-based HCS platforms and are afflicted by nuclear crowding and overlaps that hinder feature extraction.

  11. An approach for delineating drinking water wellhead protection areas at the Nile Delta, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Fadlelmawla, Amr A; Dawoud, Mohamed A

    2006-04-01

    In Egypt, production has a high priority. To this end protecting the quality of the groundwater, specifically when used for drinking water, and delineating protection areas around the drinking water wellheads for strict landuse restrictions is essential. The delineation methods are numerous; nonetheless, the uniqueness of the hydrogeological, institutional as well as social conditions in the Nile Delta region dictate a customized approach. The analysis of the hydrological conditions and land ownership at the Nile Delta indicates the need for an accurate methodology. On the other hand, attempting to calculate the wellhead protected areas around each of the drinking wells (more than 1500) requires data, human resources, and time that exceed the capabilities of the groundwater management agency. Accordingly, a combination of two methods (simplified variable shapes and numerical modeling) was adopted. Sensitivity analyses carried out using hypothetical modeling conditions have identified the pumping rate, clay thickness, hydraulic gradient, vertical conductivity of the clay, and the hydraulic conductivity as the most significant parameters in determining the dimensions of the wellhead protection areas (WHPAs). Tables of sets of WHPAs dimensions were calculated using synthetic modeling conditions representing the most common ranges of the significant parameters. Specific WHPA dimensions can be calculated by interpolation, utilizing the produced tables along with the operational and hydrogeological conditions for the well under consideration. In order to simplify the interpolation of the appropriate dimensions of the WHPAs from the calculated tables, an interactive computer program was written. The program accepts the real time data of the significant parameters as its input, and gives the appropriate WHPAs dimensions as its output.

  12. A System for Continual Quality Improvement of Normal Tissue Delineation for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Breunig, Jennifer; Hernandez, Sophy; Lin, Jeffrey; Alsager, Stacy; Dumstorf, Christine; Price, Jennifer; Steber, Jennifer; Garza, Richard; Nagda, Suneel; Melian, Edward; Emami, Bahman; Roeske, John C.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To implement the 'plan-do-check-act' (PDCA) cycle for the continual quality improvement of normal tissue contours used for radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: The CT scans of patients treated for tumors of the brain, head and neck, thorax, pancreas and prostate were selected for this study. For each scan, a radiation oncologist and a diagnostic radiologist, outlined the normal tissues ('gold' contours) using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) guidelines. A total of 30 organs were delineated. Independently, 5 board-certified dosimetrists and 1 trainee then outlined the same organs. Metrics used to compare the agreement between the dosimetrists' contours and the gold contours included the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), and a penalty function using distance to agreement. Based on these scores, dosimetrists were re-trained on those organs in which they did not receive a passing score, and they were subsequently re-tested. Results: Passing scores were achieved on 19 of 30 organs evaluated. These scores were correlated to organ volume. For organ volumes <8 cc, the average DSC was 0.61 vs organ volumes {>=}8 cc, for which the average DSC was 0.91 (P=.005). Normal tissues that had the lowest scores included the lenses, optic nerves, chiasm, cochlea, and esophagus. Of the 11 organs that were considered for re-testing, 10 showed improvement in the average score, and statistically significant improvement was noted in more than half of these organs after education and re-assessment. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate the feasibility of applying the PDCA cycle to assess competence in the delineation of individual organs, and to identify areas for improvement. With testing, guidance, and re-evaluation, contouring consistency can be obtained across multiple dosimetrists. Our expectation is that continual quality improvement using the PDCA approach will ensure more accurate treatments and dose assessment in radiotherapy

  13. Rapid 3-D delineation of cell nuclei for high-content screening platforms

    PubMed Central

    Gertych, Arkadiusz; Ma, Zhaoxuan; Tajbakhsh, Jian; Velásquez-Vacca, Adriana; Knudsen, Beatrice S.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) microscopy combined with multiplexing of fluorescent labels allows high-content analysis of large numbers of cell nuclei. The full automation of 3-D screening platforms necessitates image processing algorithms that can accurately and robustly delineate nuclei in images with little to no human intervention. Imaging-based high-content screening was originally developed as a powerful tool for drug discovery. However, cell confluency, complexity of nuclear staining as well as poor contrast between nuclei and background result in slow and unreliable 3-D image processing and therefore negatively affect the performance of studying a drug response. Here, we propose a new method, 3D-RSD, to delineate nuclei by means of 3-D radial symmetries and test it on high-resolution image data of human cancer cells treated by drugs. The nuclei detection performance was evaluated by means of manually generated ground truth from 2351 nuclei (27 confocal stacks). When compared to three other nuclei segmentation methods, 3D-RSD possessed a better true positive rate of 83.3% and F-score of 0.895+/-0.045 (p- value=0.047). Altogether, 3D-RSD is a method with a very good overall segmentation performance. Furthermore, implementation of radial symmetries offers good processing speed, and makes 3D-RSD less sensitive to staining patterns. In particular the 3D-RSG method performs well in cell lines, which are often used in imaging-based HCS platforms and are afflicted by nuclear crowding and overlaps that hinder feature extraction. PMID:25982066

  14. Delineating Biophysical Environments of the Sunda Banda Seascape, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingshu; Ahmadia, Gabby N.; Chollett, Iliana; Huang, Charles; Fox, Helen; Wijonarno, Anton; Madden, Marguerite

    2015-01-01

    The Sunda Banda Seascape (SBS), located in the center of the Coral Triangle, is a global center of marine biodiversity and a conservation priority. We proposed the first biophysical environmental delineation of the SBS using globally available satellite remote sensing and model-assimilated data to categorize this area into unique and meaningful biophysical classes. Specifically, the SBS was partitioned into eight biophysical classes characterized by similar sea surface temperature, chlorophyll a concentration, currents, and salinity patterns. Areas within each class were expected to have similar habitat types and ecosystem functions. Our work supplemented prevailing global marine management schemes by focusing in on a regional scale with finer spatial resolution. It also provided a baseline for academic research, ecological assessments and will facilitate marine spatial planning and conservation activities in the area. In addition, the framework and methods of delineating biophysical environments we presented can be expanded throughout the whole Coral Triangle to support research and conservation activities in this important region. PMID:25648170

  15. Automated diffraction delineation using an apex-shifted Radon transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimpouli, Sadegh; Malehmir, Alireza; Hassani, Hossein; Khoshdel, Hossein; Nabi-Bidhendi, Majid

    2015-04-01

    Diffraction arrivals are important data that have increasingly been used to delineate the sources of diffractors and to explore subsurface discontinuities. In prestack data, diffractions are both zero- and non-zero offset hyperbolas while reflections are only zero-offset hyperbolas. An iterative algorithm using an apex-shifted Radon transform (ASRT) approach is presented in this paper that uses the diffraction hyperbolic trajectory similar to that of prestack time migration in order to locate diffractors and to estimate their corresponding background velocities. Because diffraction energy is generally weak in seismic data and particularly in prestack data, noise attenuation and edge enhancement methods are applied on the instantaneous phase of the seismic data instead of the amplitude data. This means that the phase data are input to the ASRT algorithm. The method is then tested on two synthetic datasets (a point-diffraction model with randomly distributed diffractors and the 2D BP/SEG salt model) and one real data example. Results show that this method can locate the diffractors reasonably well on the rough surfaces of the salt dome and the discontinuities associated with structures such as paleo-channels and faults. Our analysis of the estimated velocities suggests that they are generally valid for diffraction delineation; however, the accuracy of the estimation decreases as background velocity and depth increase.

  16. Molecular delineation of species in the coral holobiont.

    PubMed

    Stat, Michael; Baker, Andrew C; Bourne, David G; Correa, Adrienne M S; Forsman, Zac; Huggett, Megan J; Pochon, Xavier; Skillings, Derek; Toonen, Robert J; van Oppen, Madeleine J H; Gates, Ruth D

    2012-01-01

    The coral holobiont is a complex assemblage of organisms spanning a diverse taxonomic range including a cnidarian host, as well as various dinoflagellate, prokaryotic and acellular symbionts. With the accumulating information on the molecular diversity of these groups, binomial species classification and a reassessment of species boundaries for the partners in the coral holobiont is a logical extension of this work and will help enhance the capacity for comparative research among studies. To aid in this endeavour, we review the current literature on species diversity for the three best studied partners of the coral holobiont (coral, Symbiodinium, prokaryotes) and provide suggestions for future work on systematics within these taxa. We advocate for an integrative approach to the delineation of species using both molecular genetics in combination with phenetic characters. We also suggest that an a priori set of criteria be developed for each taxonomic group as no one species concept or accompanying set of guidelines is appropriate for delineating all members of the coral holobiont.

  17. Medical staff appointment and delineation of pediatric privileges in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Daniel A

    2012-04-01

    The review and verification of credentials and the granting of clinical privileges are required of every hospital to ensure that members of the medical staff are competent and qualified to provide specified levels of patient care. The credentialing process involves the following: (1) assessment of the professional and personal background of each practitioner seeking privileges; (2) assignment of privileges appropriate for the clinician's training and experience; (3) ongoing monitoring of the professional activities of each staff member; and (4) periodic reappointment to the medical staff on the basis of objectively measured performance. We examine the essential elements of a credentials review for initial and renewed medical staff appointments along with suggested criteria for the delineation of clinical privileges. Sample forms for the delineation of privileges can be found on the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Hospital Care Web site (http://www.aap.org/visit/cmte19.htm). Because of differences among individual hospitals, no 1 method for credentialing is universally applicable. The medical staff of each hospital must, therefore, establish its own process based on the general principles reviewed in this report. The issues of medical staff membership and credentialing have become very complex, and institutions and medical staffs are vulnerable to legal action. Consequently, it is advisable for hospitals and medical staffs to obtain expert legal advice when medical staff bylaws are constructed or revised.

  18. A circumscribing active contour model for delineation of nuclei and membranes of megakaryocytes in bone marrow trephine biopsy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tzu-Hsi; Sanchez, Victor; EIDaly, Hesham; Rajpoot, Nasir M.

    2015-03-01

    The assessment of megakaryocytes (MKs) in bone marrow trephine images is an important step in the classification of different subtypes of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). In general, bone marrow trephine images include several types of cells mixed together, which make it quite difficult to visually identify MKs. In order to aid hematopathologists in the identification and study of MKs, we develop an image processing framework with supervised machine learning approaches and a novel circumscribing active contour model to identify potential MKs and then to accurately delineate the corresponding nucleus and membrane. Specifically, a number of color and texture features are used in a nave Bayesian classifier and an Adaboost classifier to locate the regions with a high probability of depicting MKs. A region-based active contour is used on the candidate MKs to accurately delineate the boundaries of nucleus and membrane. The proposed circumscribing active contour model employs external forces not only based on pixel intensities, but also on the probabilities of depicting MKs as computed by the classifiers. Experimental results suggest that the machine learning approach can detect potential MKs with an accuracy of more than 75%. When our circumscribing active contour model is employed on the candidate MKs, the nucleus and membrane boundaries are segmented with an accuracy of more than 80% as measured by the Dice similarity coefficient. Compared to traditional region-based active contours, the use of additional external forces based on the probability of depicting MKs improves segmentation performance and computational time by an average 5%.

  19. Semi-automated stand delineation in Mediterranean Pinus sylvestris plantations through segmentation of LiDAR data: The influence of pulse density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varo-Martínez, Mª Ángeles; Navarro-Cerrillo, Rafael M.; Hernández-Clemente, Rocío; Duque-Lazo, Joaquín

    2017-04-01

    Traditionally, forest-stand delineation has been assessed based on orthophotography. The application of LiDAR has improved forest management by providing high-spatial-resolution data on the vertical structure of the forest. The aim of this study was to develop and test a semi-automated algorithm for stands delineation in a plantation of Pinus sylvestris L. using LiDAR data. Three specific objectives were evaluated, i) to assess two complementary LiDAR metrics, Assmann dominant height and basal area, for the characterization of the structure of P. sylvestris Mediterranean forests based on object-oriented segmentation, ii) to evaluate the influence of the LiDAR pulse density on forest-stand delineation accuracy, and iii) to investigate the algorithmś effectiveness in the delineation of P. sylvestris stands for map prediction of Assmann dominant height and basal area. Our results show that it is possible to generate accurate P. sylvestris forest-stand segmentations using multiresolution or mean shift segmentation methods, even with low-pulse-density LiDAR - which is an important economic advantage for forest management. However, eCognition multiresolution methods provided better results than the OTB (Orfeo Tool Box) for stand delineation based on dominant height and basal area estimations. Furthermore, the influence of pulse density on the results was not statistically significant in the basal area calculations. However, there was a significant effect of pulse density on Assmann dominant height [F2,9595 = 5.69, p = 0.003].for low pulse density. We propose that the approach shown here should be considered for stand delineation in other large Pinus plantations in Mediterranean regions with similar characteristics.

  20. Evaluation of catchment delineation methods for the medium-resolution National Hydrography Dataset

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, Craig M.; Dewald, Thomas G.; Bondelid, Timothy R.; Worstell, Bruce B.; McKay, Lucinda D.; Rea, Alan; Moore, Richard B.; Goodall, Jonathan L.

    2009-01-01

    Different methods for determining catchments (incremental drainage areas) for stream segments of the medium-resolution (1:100,000-scale) National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) were evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The NHD is a comprehensive set of digital spatial data that contains information about surface-water features (such as lakes, ponds, streams, and rivers) of the United States. The need for NHD catchments was driven primarily by the goal to estimate NHD streamflow and velocity to support water-quality modeling. The application of catchments for this purpose also demonstrates the broader value of NHD catchments for supporting landscape characterization and analysis. Five catchment delineation methods were evaluated. Four of the methods use topographic information for the delineation of the NHD catchments. These methods include the Raster Seeding Method; two variants of a method first used in a USGS New England study-one used the Watershed Boundary Dataset (WBD) and the other did not-termed the 'New England Methods'; and the Outlet Matching Method. For these topographically based methods, the elevation data source was the 30-meter (m) resolution National Elevation Dataset (NED), as this was the highest resolution available for the conterminous United States and Hawaii. The fifth method evaluated, the Thiessen Polygon Method, uses distance to the nearest NHD stream segments to determine catchment boundaries. Catchments were generated using each method for NHD stream segments within six hydrologically and geographically distinct Subbasins to evaluate the applicability of the method across the United States. The five methods were evaluated by comparing the resulting catchments with the boundaries and the computed area measurements available from several verification datasets that were developed independently using manual methods. The results of the evaluation indicated that the two

  1. Computer-aided boundary delineation of agricultural lands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Thomas D.; Angelici, Gary L.; Slye, Robert E.; Ma, Matt

    1989-01-01

    The National Agricultural Statistics Service of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) presently uses labor-intensive aerial photographic interpretation techniques to divide large geographical areas into manageable-sized units for estimating domestic crop and livestock production. Prototype software, the computer-aided stratification (CAS) system, was developed to automate the procedure, and currently runs on a Sun-based image processing system. With a background display of LANDSAT Thematic Mapper and United States Geological Survey Digital Line Graph data, the operator uses a cursor to delineate agricultural areas, called sampling units, which are assigned to strata of land-use and land-cover types. The resultant stratified sampling units are used as input into subsequent USDA sampling procedures. As a test, three counties in Missouri were chosen for application of the CAS procedures. Subsequent analysis indicates that CAS was five times faster in creating sampling units than the manual techniques were.

  2. Case studies in wellhead protection area delineation and monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.A.

    1993-04-01

    Ground-water monitoring is one of many management options for Wellhead Protection Program implementation. Ground-water parameters are monitored (1) to assess source-control measures, (2) to monitor compliance with drinking water standards at sites other than the wellhead, and (3) to provide advance warning of contaminants in ground water. Five case studies are included in the document to exemplify the monitoring methodology for different hydrogeologic and contaminant source settings. The five case study research sites include Stevens Point, Wisconsin; Littleton, MA; Sioux Falls, South Dakota; Dover, New Hampshire; and Springfield, Missouri. The document emphasizes a multi-disciplinary approach for hydrogeologic characterization, wellhead protection area delineation, and flowpath assessment. Hydrogeologic characterization techniques include: well installation, water quality sampling and assessment, geologic and structural-control mapping, aquifer testing, dye tracing, borehole geophysics, analytical solutions, and ground-water flow modeling.

  3. Snow Pattern Delineation Using Ground Observations, Remote Sensing, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiemstra, C. A.; Wagner, A. M.; Sturm, M.; Deeb, E. J.

    2013-12-01

    Regardless of the precipitation received, snow depth patterns tend to repeat on landscapes year after year (Sturm and Wagner, 2010). For example, windswept ridges with sparse vegetation have shallow snow while water tracks and swales are deeper. If snow patterns can be consistently identified, understood, and classified using ground observations, remote sensing, models, or some combination thereof, an untapped potential exists to expand and improve snow assessments and predictions. Pattern detection, repeatability, and efficacy have been demonstrated for images and data from a nested study area located on Alaska's North Slope. As a part of the SnowNet project, well over 200,000 snow depths and hundreds of snow densities have been measured during spring measurement campaigns from 2010-2013. Most of the measurements were collected at the core 1km2 Imnavait Creek watershed (where snow measurements have occurred since the early 1980s), with sparser (but still high volume) data collected from the outer 6km2 and 21km2 areas. Imagery collected for the same areas include snow cover from Landsat (30 m) from 1982-present and fine-resolution commercial imagery (0.5-3 m) from 2002-present. While winter imagery is useful for delineating snow-free ridges and windswept areas, of more value were the 12 mid-melt images which allowed us to identify deeper snowpack areas. We also simulated snow distributions from 2010-2013 using SnowModel, which uses topography, land cover, and meteorological data to realistically simulate snow accumulation and ablation over our domains. The time series of over 200,000 individual observations, over 40 images, and four years of model simulations show striking repeatability in snow depth patterns and among years. The spatial agreements among ground observations, satellite-derived snow cover, and SnowModel are remarkable. Our results show a strong fidelity to patterns appearing in three different snow cover and depth estimate approaches, and suggest the

  4. Electrocardiogram ST-Segment Morphology Delineation Method Using Orthogonal Transformations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation between ischaemic and non-ischaemic transient ST segment events of long term ambulatory electrocardiograms is a persisting weakness in present ischaemia detection systems. Traditional ST segment level measuring is not a sufficiently precise technique due to the single point of measurement and severe noise which is often present. We developed a robust noise resistant orthogonal-transformation based delineation method, which allows tracing the shape of transient ST segment morphology changes from the entire ST segment in terms of diagnostic and morphologic feature-vector time series, and also allows further analysis. For these purposes, we developed a new Legendre Polynomials based Transformation (LPT) of ST segment. Its basis functions have similar shapes to typical transient changes of ST segment morphology categories during myocardial ischaemia (level, slope and scooping), thus providing direct insight into the types of time domain morphology changes through the LPT feature-vector space. We also generated new Karhunen and Lo ève Transformation (KLT) ST segment basis functions using a robust covariance matrix constructed from the ST segment pattern vectors derived from the Long Term ST Database (LTST DB). As for the delineation of significant transient ischaemic and non-ischaemic ST segment episodes, we present a study on the representation of transient ST segment morphology categories, and an evaluation study on the classification power of the KLT- and LPT-based feature vectors to classify between ischaemic and non-ischaemic ST segment episodes of the LTST DB. Classification accuracy using the KLT and LPT feature vectors was 90% and 82%, respectively, when using the k-Nearest Neighbors (k = 3) classifier and 10-fold cross-validation. New sets of feature-vector time series for both transformations were derived for the records of the LTST DB which is freely available on the PhysioNet website and were contributed to the LTST DB. The KLT and LPT

  5. Sparse and accurate high resolution SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Duc; Zhao, Kexin; Rowe, William; Li, Jian

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the usage of an adaptive method, the Iterative Adaptive Approach (IAA), in combination with a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate to reconstruct high resolution SAR images that are both sparse and accurate. IAA is a nonparametric weighted least squares algorithm that is robust and user parameter-free. IAA has been shown to reconstruct SAR images with excellent side lobes suppression and high resolution enhancement. We first reconstruct the SAR images using IAA, and then we enforce sparsity by using MAP with a sparsity inducing prior. By coupling these two methods, we can produce a sparse and accurate high resolution image that are conducive for feature extractions and target classification applications. In addition, we show how IAA can be made computationally efficient without sacrificing accuracies, a desirable property for SAR applications where the size of the problems is quite large. We demonstrate the success of our approach using the Air Force Research Lab's "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set Version 1.0" challenge dataset. Via the widely used FFT, individual vehicles contained in the scene are barely recognizable due to the poor resolution and high side lobe nature of FFT. However with our approach clear edges, boundaries, and textures of the vehicles are obtained.

  6. Semi-automatic delineation using weighted CT-MRI registered images for radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fitton, I.; Cornelissen, S. A. P.; Duppen, J. C.; Rasch, C. R. N.; Herk, M. van; Steenbakkers, R. J. H. M.; Peeters, S. T. H.; Hoebers, F. J. P.; Kaanders, J. H. A. M.; Nowak, P. J. C. M.

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: To develop a delineation tool that refines physician-drawn contours of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in nasopharynx cancer, using combined pixel value information from x-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during delineation. Methods: Operator-guided delineation assisted by a so-called ''snake'' algorithm was applied on weighted CT-MRI registered images. The physician delineates a rough tumor contour that is continuously adjusted by the snake algorithm using the underlying image characteristics. The algorithm was evaluated on five nasopharyngeal cancer patients. Different linear weightings CT and MRI were tested as input for the snake algorithm and compared according to contrast and tumor to noise ratio (TNR). The semi-automatic delineation was compared with manual contouring by seven experienced radiation oncologists. Results: A good compromise for TNR and contrast was obtained by weighing CT twice as strong as MRI. The new algorithm did not notably reduce interobserver variability, it did however, reduce the average delineation time by 6 min per case. Conclusions: The authors developed a user-driven tool for delineation and correction based a snake algorithm and registered weighted CT image and MRI. The algorithm adds morphological information from CT during the delineation on MRI and accelerates the delineation task.

  7. Surface geophysical techniques for aquifer and wellhead protection area delineation. Technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Violette, P.

    1987-12-01

    Surface geophysical techniques developed by the petroleum and minerals industries are applicable to ground-water investigations. This document examines some of these techniques to aid in the delineation of aquifers as part of the delineation of wellhead protection areas. Overviewed are seismic, electrical, electromagnetic induction, VLF resistivity, ground penetrating radar, gravity, and magnetic geophysical techniques, and their applicability to aquifer delineation. The theory and methodology of these are discussed, along with the method costs as of early 1987. Also briefly discussed is the delineation of wellhead protection areas.

  8. ModBack - simplified contaminant source zone delineation using backtracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thielsch, K.; Herold, M.; Ptak, T.

    2012-12-01

    Contaminated groundwater poses a serious threat to drinking water resources all over the world. Even though contaminated water might be detected in observation wells, a proper clean up is often only successful if the source of the contamination is detected and subsequently removed, contained or remediated. The high costs of groundwater remediation could be possibly significantly reduced if, from the outset, a focus is placed on source zone detection. ModBack combines several existing modelling tools in one easy to use GIS-based interface helping to delineate potential contaminant source zones in the subsurface. The software is written in Visual Basic 3.5 and uses the ArcObjects library to implement all required GIS applications. It can run without modification on any Microsoft Windows based PC with sufficient RAM and at least Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5. Using ModBack requires additional installation of the following software: Processing Modflow Pro 7.0, ModPath, CSTREAM (Bayer-Raich et al., 2003), Golden Software Surfer and Microsoft Excel. The graphical user interface of ModBack is separated into four blocks of procedures dealing with: data input, groundwater modelling, backtracking and analyses. Geographical data input includes all georeferenced information pertaining to the study site. Information on subsurface contamination is gathered either by conventional sampling of monitoring wells or by conducting integral pumping tests at control planes with a specific sampling scheme. Hydraulic data from these pumping tests together with all other available information are then used to set up a groundwater flow model of the study site, which provides the flow field for transport simulations within the subsequent contamination backtracking procedures, starting from the defined control planes. The backtracking results are then analysed within ModBack. The potential areas of contamination source presence or absence are determined based on the procedure used by Jarsjö et

  9. A screening tool for delineating subregions of steady recharge within groundwater models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dickinson, Jesse E.; Ferré, T. P. A.; Bakker, Mark; Crompton, Becky

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a screening method for simplifying groundwater models by delineating areas within the domain that can be represented using steady-state groundwater recharge. The screening method is based on an analytical solution for the damping of sinusoidal infiltration variations in homogeneous soils in the vadose zone. The damping depth is defined as the depth at which the flux variation damps to 5% of the variation at the land surface. Groundwater recharge may be considered steady where the damping depth is above the depth of the water table. The analytical solution approximates the vadose zone diffusivity as constant, and we evaluated when this approximation is reasonable. We evaluated the analytical solution through comparison of the damping depth computed by the analytic solution with the damping depth simulated by a numerical model that allows variable diffusivity. This comparison showed that the screening method conservatively identifies areas of steady recharge and is more accurate when water content and diffusivity are nearly constant. Nomograms of the damping factor (the ratio of the flux amplitude at any depth to the amplitude at the land surface) and the damping depth were constructed for clay and sand for periodic variations between 1 and 365 d and flux means and amplitudes from nearly 0 to 1 × 10−3 m d−1. We applied the screening tool to Central Valley, California, to identify areas of steady recharge. A MATLAB script was developed to compute the damping factor for any soil and any sinusoidal flux variation.

  10. Digital panoramic radiography versus cone beam computed tomography in the delineation of maxillomandibular tumors.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Barros, Renata Quirino de; Abilio, Vanessa Maria Freire; Yamamoto, Angela Toshie Araki; Melo, Daniela Pita de; Godoy, Gustavo Pina; Bento, Patricia Meira

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to compare the efficacy of digital panoramic radiography (DPR) with that of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for delineation of odontogenic and nonodontogenic tumors. From November 2009 through March 2011, 23 tumors in the maxillomandibular complex were diagnosed by histopathological examination. All DPRs and CBCTs were obtained and analyzed by a single previously calibrated radiologist, who considered the following radiographic aspects: clarity of the lesion edges, relation with dental elements, involvement of adjacent anatomical structures, cortical bone expansion and disruption, and, if present, type of involved anatomical structures and site of bone expansion and disruption. Of 23 patients, 15 (65.2%) were male and 8 (34.8%) were female. The tumor was classified as odontogenic in 73.9% of patients and nonodontogenic in 26.1% of patients. Analysis revealed that 56.5% of the tumors were located in the mandible, 34.8% in the maxilla, and 8.7% in both arches. For all analyzed variables, CBCTs offered more accurate details than did DPRs. Panoramic radiography should not be the examination of choice to visualize lesions in the maxillomandibular complex.

  11. Use of optical coherence tomography in delineating airways microstructure: comparison of OCT images to histopathological sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Whiteman, Suzanne; Gey van Pittius, Daniel; He, Yonghong; Wang, Ruikang K.; Spiteri, Monica A.

    2004-04-01

    An ideal diagnostic system for the human airways should be able to detect and define early development of premalignant pathological lesions, to facilitate optimal curative treatment and prevent irreversible and/or invasive lung disease. There is great need for exploration of safe, repeatable imaging techniques which can run at real-time and with high spatial resolution. In this study, optical coherence tomography (OCT) was utilized to acquire cross-sectional images of upper and lower airways using fresh pig lung resections as a model system. Obtained OCT images were compared with parallel tissue characterization by conventional histological analysis. Our objective was to determine whether OCT differentiates the composite structural layers and inherent anatomical variations along different airway locations. The data show that OCT can clearly display the multilayered structure of the airways. The subtle architectural differences in three separate anatomical locations including trachea, main bronchus and tertiary bronchus were clearly delineated. Images of the appropriate anatomical profiles, with depth of up to 2 mm and 10 µm spatial resolution were obtained by our current OCT system, which was sufficient for recognition of the epithelium, subepithelial tissues and cartilage. In addition, the relative thickness of individual structural components was accurately reflected and comparable to histological sections. These data support OCT as a highly feasible, optical biopsy tool, which merits further exploration for early diagnosis of human airway epithelial pathology.

  12. Delineating the decadal expansion of Lake Basaka (Ethiopia) using various image interpretation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olumana Dinka, Megersa

    2017-01-01

    Lake Basaka is expanding at a significant rate. Before the establishment of Matahara Sugar Plantation, the lake was like a small surface pond created during rainy season and used as grazing area. The lake expansion has certain negative consequences to the region. Thus, appropriate method of quantification of the Lake expansion is extremely important. In this particular study, the areal expansion of the Lake Basaka and sugarcane plantation was analysed. Four LandSat images (1973, 1986, 2000 and 2008) were taken for the cloud-free period and processed in ERDAS Imagine and ArcGIS softwares. Three techniques were employed in the delineation of the areas of the lake and plantation: visual interpretation of FCC in GIS, enhancements and advanced classification in ERDAS Imagine. The study result shows that Lake Basaka expansion is very significant and the increment is geometric rather than linear. Overall, the finding indicates that visual image interpretation gives a fast and accurate indication of the Lake Basaka expansion compared to image enhancement and classification techniques.

  13. On numerically accurate finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagtegaal, J. C.; Parks, D. M.; Rice, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A general criterion for testing a mesh with topologically similar repeat units is given, and the analysis shows that only a few conventional element types and arrangements are, or can be made suitable for computations in the fully plastic range. Further, a new variational principle, which can easily and simply be incorporated into an existing finite element program, is presented. This allows accurate computations to be made even for element designs that would not normally be suitable. Numerical results are given for three plane strain problems, namely pure bending of a beam, a thick-walled tube under pressure, and a deep double edge cracked tensile specimen. The effects of various element designs and of the new variational procedure are illustrated. Elastic-plastic computation at finite strain are discussed.

  14. Delineating optimal settlement areas of juvenile reef fish in Ngederrak Reef, Koror state, Republic of Palau.

    PubMed

    Ticzon, Victor S; Foster, Greg; David, Laura T; Mumby, Peter J; Samaniego, Badi R; Madrid, Val Randolf

    2015-01-01

    Establishing the effectiveness of habitat features to act as surrogate measures of diversity and abundance of juvenile reef fish provides information that is critical to coral reef management. When accurately set on a broader spatial context, microhabitat information becomes more meaningful and its management application becomes more explicit. The goal of the study is to identify coral reef areas potentially important to juvenile fishes in Ngederrak Reef, Republic of Palau, across different spatial scales. To achieve this, the study requires the accomplishment of the following tasks: (1) structurally differentiate the general microhabitat types using acoustics; (2) quantify microhabitat association with juvenile reef fish community structure; and (3) conduct spatial analysis of the reef-wide data and locate areas optimal for juvenile reef fish settlement. The results strongly suggest the importance of branching structures in determining species count and abundance of juvenile reef fish at the outer reef slope of Ngederrak Reef. In the acoustic map, the accurate delineation of these features allowed us to identify reef areas with the highest potential to harbor a rich aggregation of juvenile reef fish. Using a developed spatial analysis tool that ranks pixel groups based on user-defined parameters, the reef area near the Western channel of Ngederrak is predicted to have the most robust aggregation of juvenile reef fish. The results have important implications not only in management, but also in modeling the impacts of habitat loss on reef fish community. At least for Ngederrak Reef, the results advanced the utility of acoustic systems in predicting spatial distribution of juvenile fish.

  15. SPEQTACLE: An automated generalized fuzzy C-means algorithm for tumor delineation in PET

    SciTech Connect

    Lapuyade-Lahorgue, Jérôme; Visvikis, Dimitris; Hatt, Mathieu; Pradier, Olivier; Cheze Le Rest, Catherine

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Accurate tumor delineation in positron emission tomography (PET) images is crucial in oncology. Although recent methods achieved good results, there is still room for improvement regarding tumors with complex shapes, low signal-to-noise ratio, and high levels of uptake heterogeneity. Methods: The authors developed and evaluated an original clustering-based method called spatial positron emission quantification of tumor—Automatic Lp-norm estimation (SPEQTACLE), based on the fuzzy C-means (FCM) algorithm with a generalization exploiting a Hilbertian norm to more accurately account for the fuzzy and non-Gaussian distributions of PET images. An automatic and reproducible estimation scheme of the norm on an image-by-image basis was developed. Robustness was assessed by studying the consistency of results obtained on multiple acquisitions of the NEMA phantom on three different scanners with varying acquisition parameters. Accuracy was evaluated using classification errors (CEs) on simulated and clinical images. SPEQTACLE was compared to another FCM implementation, fuzzy local information C-means (FLICM) and fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian (FLAB). Results: SPEQTACLE demonstrated a level of robustness similar to FLAB (variability of 14% ± 9% vs 14% ± 7%, p = 0.15) and higher than FLICM (45% ± 18%, p < 0.0001), and improved accuracy with lower CE (14% ± 11%) over both FLICM (29% ± 29%) and FLAB (22% ± 20%) on simulated images. Improvement was significant for the more challenging cases with CE of 17% ± 11% for SPEQTACLE vs 28% ± 22% for FLAB (p = 0.009) and 40% ± 35% for FLICM (p < 0.0001). For the clinical cases, SPEQTACLE outperformed FLAB and FLICM (15% ± 6% vs 37% ± 14% and 30% ± 17%, p < 0.004). Conclusions: SPEQTACLE benefitted from the fully automatic estimation of the norm on a case-by-case basis. This promising approach will be extended to multimodal images and multiclass estimation in future developments.

  16. How Accurate Are Judgments of Intelligence by Strangers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borkenau, Peter

    Whether judgments made by complete strangers as to the intelligence of subjects are accurate or merely illusory was studied in Germany. Target subjects were 50 female and 50 male adults recruited through a newspaper article. Eighteen judges, who did not know the subjects, were recruited from a university community. Videorecordings of the subjects,…

  17. Catchment delineation and morphometric analysis using geographical information system.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Kumar, Rohitashw; Singh, P K; Singh, Manjeet; Yadav, K K; Mittal, H K

    2015-01-01

    The geographical information system (GIS) has emerged as an efficient tool in delineation of drainage patterns of watershed planning and management. The morphometric parameters of basins can address linear, areal and relief aspects. The study deals with the integrated watershed management of Baliya micro-watersheds, located in the Udaipur district of Rajasthan, India. Morphometric analysis in hydrological investigation is an important aspect and it is inevitable in the development and management of drainage basins. The determination of linear, areal and relief parameters indicate fairly good significance. The low value of the bifurcation ratio of 4.19 revealed that the drainage pattern has not been distorted by structural disturbance. The high value of the elongation ratio (0.68) compared to the circulatory ratio (0.27) indicates an elongated shape of the watershed. The high value of drainage density (5.39 km/km(2)) and stream frequency (12.32) shows that the region has impermeable subsoil material under poor vegetative cover with a low relief factor. The morphometric parameters of relief ratio (0.041) and relative relief (0.99%) show that the watershed can be treated using GIS techniques to determine the morphometric presence of dendritic drainage pattern, with a view to selecting the soil and water conservation measures and water harvesting.

  18. Automatic delineation of the diaphragm in computed tomographic images.

    PubMed

    Rangayyan, Rangaraj M; Vu, Randy H; Boag, Graham S

    2008-10-01

    Segmentation of the internal organs in medical images is a difficult task. By incorporating a priori information regarding specific organs of interest, results of segmentation may be improved. Landmarking (i.e., identifying stable structures to aid in gaining more knowledge concerning contiguous structures) is a promising segmentation method. Specifically, segmentation of the diaphragm may help in limiting the scope of segmentation methods to the abdominal cavity; the diaphragm may also serve as a stable landmark for identifying internal organs, such as the liver, the spleen, and the heart. A method to delineate the diaphragm is proposed in the present work. The method is based upon segmentation of the lungs, identification of the lower surface of the lungs as an initial representation of the diaphragm, and the application of least-squares modeling and deformable contour models to obtain the final segmentation of the diaphragm. The proposed procedure was applied to nine X-ray computed tomographic (CT) exams of four pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. The results were evaluated against the boundaries of the diaphragm as identified independently by a radiologist. Good agreement was observed between the results of segmentation and the reference contours drawn by the radiologist, with an average mean distance to the closest point of 5.85 mm over a total of 73 CT slices including the diaphragm.

  19. Directional phytoscreening: contaminant gradients in trees for plume delineation.

    PubMed

    Limmer, Matt A; Shetty, Mikhil K; Markus, Samantha; Kroeker, Ryan; Parker, Beth L; Martinez, Camilo; Burken, Joel G

    2013-08-20

    Tree sampling methods have been used in phytoscreening applications to delineate contaminated soil and groundwater, augmenting traditional investigative methods that are time-consuming, resource-intensive, invasive, and costly. In the past decade, contaminant concentrations in tree tissues have been shown to reflect the extent and intensity of subsurface contamination. This paper investigates a new phytoscreening tool: directional tree coring, a concept originating from field data that indicated azimuthal concentrations in tree trunks reflected the concentration gradients in the groundwater around the tree. To experimentally test this hypothesis, large diameter trees were subjected to subsurface contaminant concentration gradients in a greenhouse study. These trees were then analyzed for azimuthal concentration gradients in aboveground tree tissues, revealing contaminant centroids located on the side of the tree nearest the most contaminated groundwater. Tree coring at three field sites revealed sufficiently steep contaminant gradients in trees reflected nearby groundwater contaminant gradients. In practice, trees possessing steep contaminant gradients are indicators of steep subsurface contaminant gradients, providing compass-like information about the contaminant gradient, pointing investigators toward higher concentration regions of the plume.

  20. Delineating landfill leachate discharge to an arsenic contaminated waterway.

    PubMed

    Ford, Robert G; Acree, Steven D; Lien, Bob K; Scheckel, Kirk G; Luxton, Todd P; Ross, Randall R; Williams, Aaron G; Clark, Patrick

    2011-11-01

    Discharge of contaminated ground water may serve as a primary and on-going source of contamination to surface water. A field investigation was conducted at a Superfund site in Massachusetts, USA to define the locus of contaminant flux and support source identification for arsenic contamination in a pond abutting a closed landfill. Subsurface hydrology and ground-water chemistry were evaluated in the aquifer between the landfill and the pond during the period 2005-2009 employing a network of wells to delineate the spatial and temporal variability in subsurface conditions. These observations were compared with concurrent measures of ground-water seepage and surface water chemistry within a shallow cove that had a historical visual record of hydrous ferric oxide precipitation along with elevated arsenic concentrations in shallow sediments. Barium, presumably derived from materials disposed in the landfill, served as an indicator of leachate-impacted ground water discharging into the cove. Evaluation of the spatial distributions of seepage flux and the concentrations of barium, calcium, and ammonium-nitrogen indicated that the identified plume primarily discharged into the central portion of the cove. Comparison of the spatial distribution of chemical signatures at depth within the water column demonstrated that direct discharge of leachate-impacted ground water was the source of highest arsenic concentrations observed within the cove. These observations demonstrate that restoration of the impacted surface water body will necessitate control of leachate-impacted ground water that continues to discharge into the cove.

  1. Delineation of groundwater potential zone: An AHP/ANP approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Etishree; Agarwal, Rajat; Garg, R. D.; Garg, P. K.

    2013-06-01

    The sustainable development and management of groundwater resource requires precise quantitative assessment based on scientific principle and modern techniques. In the present study, groundwater potential zone are delineated using remote sensing, geographical information system (GIS) and multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) techniques in Unnao district, Uttar Pradesh. The analytical network process (ANP) is a method that makes it possible for one to deal systematically, and includes the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) as a special case. The AHP and ANP are used to determine the weights of various themes and their classes for identifying the groundwater potential zone. These weights are applied in a linear combination to obtain five different groundwater potential zone in the study area, namely `very poor', `poor', `moderate', `good' and `very good'. It has been concluded that about 153.39 km2 area has very good groundwater potential which is only 3.37% of the total study area. However, the area having very poor groundwater potential is about 850 km2 which is about 19.63% of the study area. The area having good, moderate and poor groundwater potential is about 540.25, 1135.5, 1868.6 km2, respectively. The groundwater potential zone map was finally verified using the well yield data of 37 pumping wells, and the result was found satisfactory.

  2. Volcanic calderas delineate biogeographic provinces among Yellowstone thermophiles.

    PubMed

    Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina; Mitchell, Kendra; Jackson-Weaver, Olan; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    2008-07-01

    It has been suggested that the distribution of microorganisms should be cosmopolitan because of their enormous capacity for dispersal. However, recent studies have revealed that geographically isolated microbial populations do exist. Geographic distance as a barrier to dispersal is most often invoked to explain these distributions. Here we show that unique and diverse sequences of the bacterial genus Sulfurihydrogenibium exist in Yellowstone thermal springs, indicating that these sites are geographically isolated. Although there was no correlation with geographic distance or the associated geochemistry of the springs, there was a strong historical signal. We found that the Yellowstone calderas, remnants of prehistoric volcanic eruptions, delineate biogeographical provinces for the Sulfurihydrogenibium within Yellowstone (chi(2): 9.7, P = 0.002). The pattern of distribution that we have detected suggests that major geological events in the past 2 million years explain more of the variation in sequence diversity in this system than do contemporary factors such as habitat or geographic distance. These findings highlight the importance of historical legacies in determining contemporary microbial distributions and suggest that the same factors that determine the biogeography of macroorganisms are also evident among bacteria.

  3. Hornblendite delineates zones of mass transfer through the lower crust

    PubMed Central

    Daczko, Nathan R.; Piazolo, Sandra; Meek, Uvana; Stuart, Catherine A.; Elliott, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Geochemical signatures throughout the layered Earth require significant mass transfer through the lower crust, yet geological pathways are under-recognized. Elongate bodies of basic to ultrabasic rocks are ubiquitous in exposures of the lower crust. Ultrabasic hornblendite bodies hosted within granulite facies gabbroic gneiss of the Pembroke Valley, Fiordland, New Zealand, are typical occurrences usually reported as igneous cumulate hornblendite. Their igneous features contrast with the metamorphic character of their host gabbroic gneiss. Both rock types have a common parent; field relationships are consistent with modification of host gabbroic gneiss into hornblendite. This precludes any interpretation involving cumulate processes in forming the hornblendite; these bodies are imposter cumulates. Instead, replacement of the host gabbroic gneiss formed hornblendite as a result of channeled high melt flux through the lower crust. High melt/rock ratios and disequilibrium between the migrating magma (granodiorite) and its host gabbroic gneiss induced dissolution (grain-scale magmatic assimilation) of gneiss and crystallization of mainly hornblende from the migrating magma. The extent of this reaction-replacement mechanism indicates that such hornblendite bodies delineate significant melt conduits. Accordingly, many of the ubiquitous basic to ultrabasic elongate bodies of the lower crust likely map the ‘missing’ mass transfer zones. PMID:27546342

  4. Hornblendite delineates zones of mass transfer through the lower crust.

    PubMed

    Daczko, Nathan R; Piazolo, Sandra; Meek, Uvana; Stuart, Catherine A; Elliott, Victoria

    2016-08-22

    Geochemical signatures throughout the layered Earth require significant mass transfer through the lower crust, yet geological pathways are under-recognized. Elongate bodies of basic to ultrabasic rocks are ubiquitous in exposures of the lower crust. Ultrabasic hornblendite bodies hosted within granulite facies gabbroic gneiss of the Pembroke Valley, Fiordland, New Zealand, are typical occurrences usually reported as igneous cumulate hornblendite. Their igneous features contrast with the metamorphic character of their host gabbroic gneiss. Both rock types have a common parent; field relationships are consistent with modification of host gabbroic gneiss into hornblendite. This precludes any interpretation involving cumulate processes in forming the hornblendite; these bodies are imposter cumulates. Instead, replacement of the host gabbroic gneiss formed hornblendite as a result of channeled high melt flux through the lower crust. High melt/rock ratios and disequilibrium between the migrating magma (granodiorite) and its host gabbroic gneiss induced dissolution (grain-scale magmatic assimilation) of gneiss and crystallization of mainly hornblende from the migrating magma. The extent of this reaction-replacement mechanism indicates that such hornblendite bodies delineate significant melt conduits. Accordingly, many of the ubiquitous basic to ultrabasic elongate bodies of the lower crust likely map the 'missing' mass transfer zones.

  5. Delineating liver events in trichloroethylene-induced autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kathleen M; Przybyla, Beata; Pumford, Neil R; Han, Tao; Fuscoe, James; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Holland, Ricky D; Doss, Jason C; Macmillan-Crow, Lee Ann; Blossom, Sarah J

    2009-04-01

    Exposure to the environmental pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) has been linked to autoimmune disease development in humans. Chronic (32-week) low-level exposure to TCE has been shown to promote autoimmune hepatitis in association with CD4(+) T cell activation in autoimmune-prone MRL+/+ mice. MRL+/+ mice are usually thought of as a model of systemic lupus rather than an organ-specific disease such as autoimmune hepatitis. Consequently, the present study examined gene expression and metabolites to delineate the liver events that skewed the autoimmune response toward that organ in TCE-treated mice. Female MRL+/+ mice were treated with 0.5 mg/mL TCE in their drinking water. The results showed that TCE-induced autoimmune hepatitis could be detected in as little as 26 weeks. TCE exposure also generated a time-dependent increase in the number of antibodies specific for liver proteins. The gene expression correlated with the metabolite analysis to show that TCE upregulated the methionine/homocysteine pathway in the liver after 26 weeks of exposure. The results also showed that TCE exposure altered the expression of selective hepatic genes associated with immunity and inflammation. On the basis of these results, future mechanistic studies will focus on how alterations in genes associated with immunity and inflammation, in conjunction with protein alterations in the liver, promote liver immunogenicity in TCE-treated MRL+/+ mice.

  6. Delineation of Steroid-Degrading Microorganisms through Comparative Genomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bergstrand, Lee H.; Cardenas, Erick; Holert, Johannes; Van Hamme, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Steroids are ubiquitous in natural environments and are a significant growth substrate for microorganisms. Microbial steroid metabolism is also important for some pathogens and for biotechnical applications. This study delineated the distribution of aerobic steroid catabolism pathways among over 8,000 microorganisms whose genomes are available in the NCBI RefSeq database. Combined analysis of bacterial, archaeal, and fungal genomes with both hidden Markov models and reciprocal BLAST identified 265 putative steroid degraders within only Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, which mainly originated from soil, eukaryotic host, and aquatic environments. These bacteria include members of 17 genera not previously known to contain steroid degraders. A pathway for cholesterol degradation was conserved in many actinobacterial genera, particularly in members of the Corynebacterineae, and a pathway for cholate degradation was conserved in members of the genus Rhodococcus. A pathway for testosterone and, sometimes, cholate degradation had a patchy distribution among Proteobacteria. The steroid degradation genes tended to occur within large gene clusters. Growth experiments confirmed bioinformatic predictions of steroid metabolism capacity in nine bacterial strains. The results indicate there was a single ancestral 9,10-seco-steroid degradation pathway. Gene duplication, likely in a progenitor of Rhodococcus, later gave rise to a cholate degradation pathway. Proteobacteria and additional Actinobacteria subsequently obtained a cholate degradation pathway via horizontal gene transfer, in some cases facilitated by plasmids. Catabolism of steroids appears to be an important component of the ecological niches of broad groups of Actinobacteria and individual species of Proteobacteria. PMID:26956583

  7. Hornblendite delineates zones of mass transfer through the lower crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daczko, Nathan R.; Piazolo, Sandra; Meek, Uvana; Stuart, Catherine A.; Elliott, Victoria

    2016-08-01

    Geochemical signatures throughout the layered Earth require significant mass transfer through the lower crust, yet geological pathways are under-recognized. Elongate bodies of basic to ultrabasic rocks are ubiquitous in exposures of the lower crust. Ultrabasic hornblendite bodies hosted within granulite facies gabbroic gneiss of the Pembroke Valley, Fiordland, New Zealand, are typical occurrences usually reported as igneous cumulate hornblendite. Their igneous features contrast with the metamorphic character of their host gabbroic gneiss. Both rock types have a common parent; field relationships are consistent with modification of host gabbroic gneiss into hornblendite. This precludes any interpretation involving cumulate processes in forming the hornblendite; these bodies are imposter cumulates. Instead, replacement of the host gabbroic gneiss formed hornblendite as a result of channeled high melt flux through the lower crust. High melt/rock ratios and disequilibrium between the migrating magma (granodiorite) and its host gabbroic gneiss induced dissolution (grain-scale magmatic assimilation) of gneiss and crystallization of mainly hornblende from the migrating magma. The extent of this reaction-replacement mechanism indicates that such hornblendite bodies delineate significant melt conduits. Accordingly, many of the ubiquitous basic to ultrabasic elongate bodies of the lower crust likely map the ‘missing’ mass transfer zones.

  8. Probabilistic capture zone delineation based on an analytic solution.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Elizabeth; Andricevic, Roko; Morrice, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    A major tool used in the design of wellhead protection areas is the delineation of a capture zone for a pumping well by use of a simple, steady-state analytic solution. This simple approach has been useful for many small municipalities because of the high costs associated with obtaining the hydrogeologic information needed for detailed numerical modeling. This analytic solution, however, is deterministic, and uncertainty in the mean value estimates of the hydraulic parameters used in this model can be a major source of error in predicting capture zones. To address this problem, a statistical theory was developed for including the uncertainty in the transmissivity and the magnitude and direction of the hydraulic head gradient in the analytic solution for both the ultimate and time-dependent capture zone for an arbitrary reliability level. To demonstrate the method and investigate the effect of varying magnitudes of uncertainty on time-dependent capture zones, the method is applied to three synthetic data sets based on data from the Borden Aquifer in Ontario, Canada. In general, the results show that uncertainty in the length of the time-dependent capture zone at a given reliability level is dependent on the uncertainty in the magnitude of the mean regional flow, which is equal to the transmissivity multiplied by the hydraulic head gradient; uncertainty in the maximum width of the capture zone is dependent primarily on the uncertainty in the mean direction of the regional flow.

  9. Fully Automated Gis-Based Individual Tree Crown Delineation Based on Curvature Values from a LIDAR Derived Canopy Height Model in a Coniferous Plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argamosa, R. J. L.; Paringit, E. C.; Quinton, K. R.; Tandoc, F. A. M.; Faelga, R. A. G.; Ibañez, C. A. G.; Posilero, M. A. V.; Zaragosa, G. P.

    2016-06-01

    The generation of high resolution canopy height model (CHM) from LiDAR makes it possible to delineate individual tree crown by means of a fully-automated method using the CHM's curvature through its slope. The local maxima are obtained by taking the maximum raster value in a 3 m x 3 m cell. These values are assumed as tree tops and therefore considered as individual trees. Based on the assumptions, thiessen polygons were generated to serve as buffers for the canopy extent. The negative profile curvature is then measured from the slope of the CHM. The results show that the aggregated points from a negative profile curvature raster provide the most realistic crown shape. The absence of field data regarding tree crown dimensions require accurate visual assessment after the appended delineated tree crown polygon was superimposed to the hill shaded CHM.

  10. Accurate ab Initio Spin Densities.

    PubMed

    Boguslawski, Katharina; Marti, Konrad H; Legeza, Ors; Reiher, Markus

    2012-06-12

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of α and β electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740].

  11. Quality metric for accurate overlay control in <20nm nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Dana; Amit, Eran; Cohen, Guy; Amir, Nuriel; Har-Zvi, Michael; Huang, Chin-Chou Kevin; Karur-Shanmugam, Ramkumar; Pierson, Bill; Kato, Cindy; Kurita, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    The semiconductor industry is moving toward 20nm nodes and below. As the Overlay (OVL) budget is getting tighter at these advanced nodes, the importance in the accuracy in each nanometer of OVL error is critical. When process owners select OVL targets and methods for their process, they must do it wisely; otherwise the reported OVL could be inaccurate, resulting in yield loss. The same problem can occur when the target sampling map is chosen incorrectly, consisting of asymmetric targets that will cause biased correctable terms and a corrupted wafer. Total measurement uncertainty (TMU) is the main parameter that process owners use when choosing an OVL target per layer. Going towards the 20nm nodes and below, TMU will not be enough for accurate OVL control. KLA-Tencor has introduced a quality score named `Qmerit' for its imaging based OVL (IBO) targets, which is obtained on the-fly for each OVL measurement point in X & Y. This Qmerit score will enable the process owners to select compatible targets which provide accurate OVL values for their process and thereby improve their yield. Together with K-T Analyzer's ability to detect the symmetric targets across the wafer and within the field, the Archer tools will continue to provide an independent, reliable measurement of OVL error into the next advanced nodes, enabling fabs to manufacture devices that meet their tight OVL error budgets.

  12. Towards a High-Resolution Global Inundation Delineation Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluet-Chouinard, E.; Lehner, B.

    2011-12-01

    Although their importance for biodiversity, flow regulation and ecosystem service provision is widely recognized, wetlands and temporarily inundated landscapes remain poorly mapped globally because of their inherent elusive nature. Inventorying of wetland resources has been identified in international agreements as an essential component of appropriate conservation efforts and management initiatives of these threatened ecosystems. However, despite recent advances in remote sensing surface water monitoring, current inventories of surface water variations remain incomplete at the regional-to-global scale due to methodological limitations restricting truly global application. Remote sensing wetland applications such as SAR L-band are particularly constrained by image availability and heterogeneity of acquisition dates, while coarse resolution passive microwave and multi-sensor methods cannot discriminate distinct surface water bodies. As a result, the most popular global wetland dataset remains to this day the Global Lake & Wetland Database (Lehner and Doll, 2004) a spatially inconsistent database assembled from various existing data sources. The approach taken in this project circumvents the limitations of current global wetland monitoring methods by combining globally available topographic and hydrographic data to downscale coarse resolution global inundation data (Prigent et al., 2007) and thus create a superior inundation delineation map product. The developed procedure downscales inundation data from the coarse resolution (~27km) of current passive microwave sensors to the finer spatial resolution (~500m) of the topographic and hydrographic layers of HydroSHEDS' data suite (Lehner et al., 2006), while retaining the high temporal resolution of the multi-sensor inundation dataset. From the downscaling process emerges new information on the specific location of inundation, but also on its frequency and duration. The downscaling algorithm employs a decision tree

  13. Integrated semi-automated landslide delineation, classification and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölbling, Daniel; Eisank, Clemens; Friedl, Barbara; Blaschke, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Landslides constitute a major natural hazard in almost all mountainous regions of the world. Today, the wide range of available Earth Observation (EO) data implies the need for reliable and efficient methods for detecting, analysing and monitoring landslides in order to assist hazard and risk analysis. Hence, it is of high importance to make use of effective techniques in order to gather information about the exact location, extent and type of landslides in a fast and transparent manner. Object-based image analysis (OBIA) provides a great potential for semi-automated landslide detection and classification, since - in comparison to pixel-based approaches - not only spectral, but also spatial, morphometric, textural, as well as contextual properties can be addressed. Through the integration of multiple data sets landslides can be examined in a more efficient way, making use of the most suitable properties of the available information layers. Within the project "iSLIDE - Integrated Semi-automated Landslide Delineation, Classification and Evaluation", funded by the Austrian Science Found (FWF), we address such issues by developing a methodological framework for landslide delineation, classification and evaluation through the integration of optical remote sensing data and digital elevation information, as well as terrain unit layers using innovative OBIA methods. Additionally, the potential of SAR data for object-based landslide mapping will be investigated. The methodology will be developed and tested in Austrian as well as Taiwanese study areas, which are frequently affected by landslides. An important component of the framework is the definition of digital signatures of landslide types that facilitate the transformation of expert knowledge into machine-understandable rules. Such a conceptual foundation will make the approach robust and transferable to other study areas, en route to fully automated landslide analysis. Furthermore, the development of automated object

  14. Classification of building infrastructure and automatic building footprint delineation using airborne laser swath mapping data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caceres, Jhon

    image analysis for obtaining an initial classification, an automatic approach for delineating accurate building footprints is presented. The physical fact that laser pulses that happen to strike building edges can produce very different 1st and last return elevations has been long recognized. However, in older generation ALSM systems (<50 kHz pulse rates) such points were too few and far between to delineate building footprints precisely. Furthermore, without the robust separation of nearby trees and vegetation from the buildings, simply extracting ALSM shots where the elevation of the first return was much higher than the elevation of the last return, was not a reliable means of identifying building footprints. However, with the advent of ALSM systems with pulse rates in excess of 100 kHz, and by using spin-imaged based segmentation, it is now possible to extract building edges from the point cloud. A refined classification resulting from incorporating "on-edge" information is developed for obtaining quadrangular footprints. The footprint fitting process involves line generalization, least squares-based clustering and dominant points finding for segmenting individual building edges. In addition, an algorithm for fitting complex footprints using the segmented edges and data inside footprints is also proposed.

  15. Feasibility study for image guided kidney surgery: assessment of required intraoperative surface for accurate image to physical space registrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benincasa, Anne B.; Clements, Logan W.; Herrell, S. Duke; Chang, Sam S.; Cookson, Michael S.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2006-03-01

    Currently, the removal of kidney tumor masses uses only direct or laparoscopic visualizations, resulting in prolonged procedure and recovery times and reduced clear margin. Applying current image guided surgery (IGS) techniques, as those used in liver cases, to kidney resections (nephrectomies) presents a number of complications. Most notably is the limited field of view of the intraoperative kidney surface, which constrains the ability to obtain a surface delineation that is geometrically descriptive enough to drive a surface-based registration. Two different phantom orientations were used to model the laparoscopic and traditional partial nephrectomy views. For the laparoscopic view, fiducial point sets were compiled from a CT image volume using anatomical features such as the renal artery and vein. For the traditional view, markers attached to the phantom set-up were used for fiducials and targets. The fiducial points were used to perform a point-based registration, which then served as a guide for the surface-based registration. Laser range scanner (LRS) obtained surfaces were registered to each phantom surface using a rigid iterative closest point algorithm. Subsets of each phantom's LRS surface were used in a robustness test to determine the predictability of their registrations to transform the entire surface. Results from both orientations suggest that about half of the kidney's surface needs to be obtained intraoperatively for accurate registrations between the image surface and the LRS surface, suggesting the obtained kidney surfaces were geometrically descriptive enough to perform accurate registrations. This preliminary work paves the way for further development of kidney IGS systems.

  16. Comprehensive multiplexed protein quantitation delineates eosinophilic and neutrophilic experimental asthma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Improvements in asthma diagnosis and management require deeper understanding of the heterogeneity of the complex airway inflammation. We hypothesise that differences in the two major inflammatory phenotypes of asthma; eosinophilic and neutrophilic asthma, will be reflected in the lung protein expression profile of murine asthma models and can be delineated using proteomics of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Methods BAL from mice challenged with ovalbumin (OVA/OVA) alone (standard model of asthma, here considered eosinophilic) or OVA in combination with endotoxin (OVA/LPS, model of neutrophilic asthma) was analysed using liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry, and compared with steroid-treated animals and healthy controls. In addition, conventional inflammatory markers were analysed using multiplexed ELISA (Bio-Plex™ assay). Multivariate statistics was performed on integrative proteomic fingerprints using principal component analysis. Proteomic data were complemented with lung mechanics and BAL cell counts. Results Several of the analysed proteins displayed significant differences between the controls and either or both of the two models reflecting eosinophilic and neutrophilic asthma. Most of the proteins found with mass spectrometry analysis displayed a considerable increase in neutrophilic asthma compared with the other groups. Conversely, the larger number of the inflammatory markers analysed with Bio-Plex™ analysis were found to be increased in the eosinophilic model. In addition, major inflammation markers were correlated to peripheral airway closure, while commonly used asthma biomarkers only reflect central inflammation. Conclusion Our data suggest that the commercial markers we are currently relying on to diagnose asthma subtypes are not giving us comprehensive or specific enough information. The analysed protein profiles allowed to discriminate the two models and may add useful information for characterization of

  17. Delineating and quantifying ground water discharge zones using streambed temperatures.

    PubMed

    Conant, Brewster

    2004-01-01

    Streambed temperature mapping, hydraulic testing using minipiezometers, and geochemical analyses of interstitial water of the streambed were used to delineate the pattern of ground water discharge in a sandy streambed and to develop a flux-based conceptual model for ground water/surface water interactions. A new and simple empirical method was used to relate fluxes obtained from minipiezometer data to streambed temperatures. The relationship allowed flux to be calculated at locations where only streambed temperature measurements were made. Slug testing and potentiomanometer measurements at 34 piezometers indicated ground water discharge ranged from 0.03 to 446 L/m2/day (and possibly as high as 7060 L/m2/day) along a 60 m long by 11 to 14 m wide reach of river. Complex but similar plan-view patterns of flux were calculated for both summer and winter using hundreds of streambed temperatures measured on a 1 by 2 m grid. The reach was dominated by ground water discharge and 5% to 7% of the area accounted for approximately 20% to 24% of the total discharge. < 12% of the total area consisted of recharge zones or no-discharge zones. A conceptual model for ground water/surface water interactions consisting of five different behaviors was developed based on the magnitude and direction of flux across the surface of the streambed. The behaviors include short-circuit discharge (e.g., high-flow springs), high discharge (e.g., preferential flowpaths), low to moderate discharge, no discharge (e.g., horizontal hyporheic or ground water flow), and recharge. Geological variations at depth played a key role in determining which type of flow behavior occurred in the streambed.

  18. Delineation of the calcineurin-interacting region of cyclophilin B.

    PubMed Central

    Carpentier, M.; Allain, F.; Haendler, B.; Slomianny, M. C.; Spik, G.

    2000-01-01

    The immunosuppressant drug cyclosporin A (CsA) inhibits T-cell function by blocking the phosphatase activity of calcineurin. This effect is mediated by formation of a complex between the drug and cyclophilin (CyP), which creates a composite surface able to make high-affinity contacts with calcineurin. In vitro, the CyPB/CsA complex is more effective in inhibiting calcineurin than the CyPA/CsA and CyPC/CsA complexes, pointing to fine structural differences in the calcineurin-binding region. To delineate the calcineurin-binding region of CyPB, we mutated several amino acids, located in two loops corresponding to CyPA regions known to be involved, as follows: R76A, G77H, D155R, and D158R. Compared to wild-type CyPB, the G77H, D155R, and D158R mutants had intact isomerase and CsA-binding activities, indicating that no major conformational changes had taken place. When complexed to CsA, they all displayed only reduced affinity for calcineurin and much decreased inhibition of calcineurin phosphatase activity. These results strongly suggest that the three amino acids G77, D155, and D158 are directly involved in the interaction of CyPB/CsA with calcineurin, in agreement with their exposed position. The G77, D155, and D158 residues are not maintained in CyPA and might therefore account for the higher affinity of the CyPB/CsA complex for calcineurin. PMID:11206060

  19. Wetland delineation with IKONOS high-resolution satellite imagery, Fort Custer Training Center, Battle Creek, Michigan, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, L.M.; Morgan, T.R.; Aichele, S.S.

    2006-01-01

    The Michigan Army National Guard’s Fort Custer Training Center (FCTC) in Battle Creek, Mich., has the responsibility to protect wetland resources on the training grounds while providing training opportunities, and for future development planning at the facility. The National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) data have been the primary wetland-boundary resource, but a check on scale and accuracy of the wetland boundary information for the Fort Custer Training Center was needed. In cooperation with the FCTC, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used an early spring IKONOS pan-sharpened satellite image to delineate the wetlands and create a more accurate wetland map for the FCTC. The USGS tested automated approaches (supervised and unsupervised classifications) to identify the wetland areas from the IKONOS satellite image, but the automated approaches alone did not yield accurate results. To ensure accurate wetland boundaries, the final wetland map was manually digitized on the basis of the automated supervised and unsupervised classifications, in combination with NWI data, field verifications, and visual interpretation of the IKONOS satellite image. The final wetland areas digitized from the IKONOS satellite imagery were similar to those in NWI; however, the wetland boundaries differed in some areas, a few wetlands mapped on the NWI were determined not to be wetlands from the IKONOS image and field verification, and additional previously unmapped wetlands not recognized by the NWI were identified from the IKONOS image.

  20. Fast, Accurate and Precise Mid-Sagittal Plane Location in 3D MR Images of the Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergo, Felipe P. G.; Falcão, Alexandre X.; Yasuda, Clarissa L.; Ruppert, Guilherme C. S.

    Extraction of the mid-sagittal plane (MSP) is a key step for brain image registration and asymmetry analysis. We present a fast MSP extraction method for 3D MR images, based on automatic segmentation of the brain and on heuristic maximization of the cerebro-spinal fluid within the MSP. The method is robust to severe anatomical asymmetries between the hemispheres, caused by surgical procedures and lesions. The method is also accurate with respect to MSP delineations done by a specialist. The method was evaluated on 64 MR images (36 pathological, 20 healthy, 8 synthetic), and it found a precise and accurate approximation of the MSP in all of them with a mean time of 60.0 seconds per image, mean angular variation within a same image (precision) of 1.26o and mean angular difference from specialist delineations (accuracy) of 1.64o.

  1. 4D laser camera for accurate patient positioning, collision avoidance, image fusion and adaptive approaches during diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.

    PubMed

    Brahme, Anders; Nyman, Peter; Skatt, Björn

    2008-05-01

    A four-dimensional (4D) laser camera (LC) has been developed for accurate patient imaging in diagnostic and therapeutic radiology. A complementary metal-oxide semiconductor camera images the intersection of a scanned fan shaped laser beam with the surface of the patient and allows real time recording of movements in a three-dimensional (3D) or four-dimensional (4D) format (3D +time). The LC system was first designed as an accurate patient setup tool during diagnostic and therapeutic applications but was found to be of much wider applicability as a general 4D photon "tag" for the surface of the patient in different clinical procedures. It is presently used as a 3D or 4D optical benchmark or tag for accurate delineation of the patient surface as demonstrated for patient auto setup, breathing and heart motion detection. Furthermore, its future potential applications in gating, adaptive therapy, 3D or 4D image fusion between most imaging modalities and image processing are discussed. It is shown that the LC system has a geometrical resolution of about 0, 1 mm and that the rigid body repositioning accuracy is about 0, 5 mm below 20 mm displacements, 1 mm below 40 mm and better than 2 mm at 70 mm. This indicates a slight need for repeated repositioning when the initial error is larger than about 50 mm. The positioning accuracy with standard patient setup procedures for prostate cancer at Karolinska was found to be about 5-6 mm when independently measured using the LC system. The system was found valuable for positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) in vivo tumor and dose delivery imaging where it potentially may allow effective correction for breathing artifacts in 4D PET-CT and image fusion with lymph node atlases for accurate target volume definition in oncology. With a LC system in all imaging and radiation therapy rooms, auto setup during repeated diagnostic and therapeutic procedures may save around 5 min per session, increase accuracy and allow

  2. Accurate Fission Data for Nuclear Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solders, A.; Gorelov, D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Lantz, M.; Mattera, A.; Penttilä, H.; Pomp, S.; Rakopoulos, V.; Rinta-Antila, S.

    2014-05-01

    The Accurate fission data for nuclear safety (AlFONS) project aims at high precision measurements of fission yields, using the renewed IGISOL mass separator facility in combination with a new high current light ion cyclotron at the University of Jyväskylä. The 30 MeV proton beam will be used to create fast and thermal neutron spectra for the study of neutron induced fission yields. Thanks to a series of mass separating elements, culminating with the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, it is possible to achieve a mass resolving power in the order of a few hundred thousands. In this paper we present the experimental setup and the design of a neutron converter target for IGISOL. The goal is to have a flexible design. For studies of exotic nuclei far from stability a high neutron flux (1012 neutrons/s) at energies 1 - 30 MeV is desired while for reactor applications neutron spectra that resembles those of thermal and fast nuclear reactors are preferred. It is also desirable to be able to produce (semi-)monoenergetic neutrons for benchmarking and to study the energy dependence of fission yields. The scientific program is extensive and is planed to start in 2013 with a measurement of isomeric yield ratios of proton induced fission in uranium. This will be followed by studies of independent yields of thermal and fast neutron induced fission of various actinides.

  3. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  4. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  5. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  6. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  7. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  8. Tumor delineation using PET in head and neck cancers: Threshold contouring and lesion volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric C.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Hanlon, Lorraine; Alessio, Adam; Rajendran, Joseph; Schwartz, David L.; Phillips, Mark

    2006-11-15

    Tumor boundary delineation using positron emission tomography (PET) is a promising tool for radiation therapy applications. In this study we quantify the uncertainties in tumor boundary delineation as a function of the reconstruction method, smoothing, and lesion size in head and neck cancer patients using FDG-PET images and evaluate the dosimetric impact on radiotherapy plans. FDG-PET images were acquired for eight patients with a GE Advance PET scanner. In addition, a 20 cm diameter cylindrical phantom with six FDG-filled spheres with volumes of 1.2 to 26.5 cm{sup 3} was imaged. PET emission scans were reconstructed with the OSEM and FBP algorithms with different smoothing parameters. PET-based tumor regions were delineated using an automatic contouring function set at progressively higher threshold contour levels and the resulting volumes were calculated. CT-based tumor volumes were also contoured by a physician on coregistered PET/CT patient images. The intensity value of the threshold contour level that returns 100% of the actual volume, I{sub V100}, was measured. We generated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for an example head and neck patient, treating 66 Gy to CT-based gross disease and 54 Gy to nodal regions at risk, followed by a boost to the FDG-PET-based tumor. The volumes of PET-based tumors are a sensitive function of threshold contour level for all patients and phantom datasets. A 5% change in threshold contour level can translate into a 200% increase in volume. Phantom data indicate that I{sub V100} can be set as a fraction, f, of the maximum measured uptake. Fractional threshold values in the cylindrical water phantom range from 0.23 to 0.51. Both the fractional threshold and the threshold-volume curve are dependent on lesion size, with lesions smaller than approximately 5 cm{sup 3} displaying a more pronounced sensitivity and larger fractional threshold values. The threshold-volume curves and fractional threshold values also depend

  9. Utilising Physical, Chemical, And Stable Isotope Techniques To Delineate The Flows Within A Coastal Wetlands System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marimuthu, S.; Reynolds, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    The coastal wetlands system under study comprises a series of small lakes and is very unique in the sense that the lakes within the system display different hydrochemistry and stable isotopic composition although they are connected by channels and form as a cluster of inter-connected lakes. The complex flow systems and the transient nature of the interactions between surface water and groundwater present in the wetlands system were delineated using both chemical and stable isotope data to supplement existing classical hydraulic data. The spatial and temporal variations of chemical and isotopic composition of the individual water bodies within the system were measured for an annual cycle, to provide a unique data set for the analysis. A purely hydraulic analysis of the region surrounding the wetlands would indicate that the wetlands are flow-through bodies, however the chemical and isotope information indicates the lakes almost invariably act as discharge points for the surface water flows and the north south regional groundwater flow. Large volumes of groundwater flow were found within an observed northeast-southwest trending paleochannel within the wetlands system, and in this case, the chemical and isotopic evidence are complimentary with the hydraulic study. The isotope and chloride results from the surface water bodies allowed for the accurate determination of the composition of the major creeks in the system, and a simple portioning model indicated that groundwater is the predominant source for the inflowing creeks. Similarly, the deuterium versus Oxygen-18 and deuterium versus chloride relationships observed in the system portray two distinct evaporation trends, one through the hypersaline lakes and the other through less saline lakes which indicates that the isotopic composition of the water bodies are affected to a great extent by high dissolved salts content. The superposition of these data sets provided a unique vision of the flow system and clearly shows

  10. Delineating Discontinuous Permafrost on the Seward Peninsula, Alaska, With Two-Dimensional Resistivity and Electromagnetic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astley, B. N.; Delaney, A. J.; Douglas, T. A.; Engel, C.

    2005-12-01

    Soils at the Stewart River Training Area near Nome, Alaska were investigated in July 2005 to determine suitability for trail relocation. The area contains classic cryogenic features including thermokarst ponds, ice wedge polygons, sorted circles, cobble pavement, and solifluction lobes. The soils range from silty gravel to clayey silt, typical of a glacial depositional environment. Discontinuous permafrost is present in the region. We collected 2D resistivity and EM31 on a study grid 525 m long by 300 m wide that was bisected north to south by a stream valley. We used Wenner, Schlumberger, and Dipole-Dipole arrays with a 5-m electrode spacing and array length of 275 m. Soil pits were excavated to determine the depth to the top of permafrost, to measure soil horizon thicknesses and to collect soil samples for water content measurements. Frost probes were also used to determine permafrost depth. Soil moisture content ranged from 47% by weight in frozen silt to 11% in thawed poorly-sorted silty gravel. The depth to permafrost ranged from 15 to120 cm below the surface. Soil type appeared to be the dominant control on the presence of permafrost in the study area with all permafrost found in silt and no permafrost found in gravels. The presence of willow thickets corresponded with thawed areas. Willows were absent in areas containing massive permafrost, but were present in low numbers where permafrost was degrading. High resistivity anomalies correlated with frozen soil on the east side of the stream. On the west side of the stream, high resistivity associated with a cobble pavement and large gravel clasts had similar resistivity values as permafrost. The EM31 data correlated well with permafrost, and determined the location of a highly conductive area in the schistose bedrock. Our results suggest that a combination of geophysical tools and shallow ground truth explorations using probes and shovels can provide an accurate delineation of horizontal and vertical permafrost

  11. G-protein coupled receptor expression patterns delineate medulloblastoma subgroups

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Genetic profiling has identified four principle tumor subgroups; each subgroup is characterized by different initiating mutations, genetic and clinical profiles, and prognoses. The two most well-defined subgroups are caused by overactive signaling in the WNT and SHH mitogenic pathways; less is understood about Groups 3 and 4 medulloblastoma. Identification of tumor subgroup using molecular classification is set to become an important component of medulloblastoma diagnosis and staging, and will likely guide therapeutic options. However, thus far, few druggable targets have emerged. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) possess characteristics that make them ideal targets for molecular imaging and therapeutics; drugs targeting GPCRs account for 30-40% of all current pharmaceuticals. While expression patterns of many proteins in human medulloblastoma subgroups have been discerned, the expression pattern of GPCRs in medulloblastoma has not been investigated. We hypothesized that analysis of GPCR expression would identify clear subsets of medulloblastoma and suggest distinct GPCRs that might serve as molecular targets for both imaging and therapy. Results Our study found that medulloblastoma tumors fall into distinct clusters based solely on GPCR expression patterns. Normal cerebellum clustered separately from the tumor samples. Further, two of the tumor clusters correspond with high fidelity to the WNT and SHH subgroups of medulloblastoma. Distinct over-expressed GPCRs emerge; for example, LGR5 and GPR64 are significantly and uniquely over-expressed in the WNT subgroup of tumors, while PTGER4 is over-expressed in the SHH subgroup. Uniquely under-expressed GPCRs were also observed. Our key findings were independently validated using a large international dataset. Conclusions Our results identify GPCRs with potential to act as imaging and therapeutic targets. Elucidating tumorigenic pathways

  12. Analyte quantification with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography: assessment of methods for baseline correction, peak delineation, and matrix effect elimination for real samples.

    PubMed

    Samanipour, Saer; Dimitriou-Christidis, Petros; Gros, Jonas; Grange, Aureline; Samuel Arey, J

    2015-01-02

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) is used widely to separate and measure organic chemicals in complex mixtures. However, approaches to quantify analytes in real, complex samples have not been critically assessed. We quantified 7 PAHs in a certified diesel fuel using GC×GC coupled to flame ionization detector (FID), and we quantified 11 target chlorinated hydrocarbons in a lake water extract using GC×GC with electron capture detector (μECD), further confirmed qualitatively by GC×GC with electron capture negative chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ENCI-TOFMS). Target analyte peak volumes were determined using several existing baseline correction algorithms and peak delineation algorithms. Analyte quantifications were conducted using external standards and also using standard additions, enabling us to diagnose matrix effects. We then applied several chemometric tests to these data. We find that the choice of baseline correction algorithm and peak delineation algorithm strongly influence the reproducibility of analyte signal, error of the calibration offset, proportionality of integrated signal response, and accuracy of quantifications. Additionally, the choice of baseline correction and the peak delineation algorithm are essential for correctly discriminating analyte signal from unresolved complex mixture signal, and this is the chief consideration for controlling matrix effects during quantification. The diagnostic approaches presented here provide guidance for analyte quantification using GC×GC.

  13. A Hybrid Clustering Method for ROI Delineation in Small Animal Dynamic PET Images: Application to the Automatic Estimation of FDG Input Functions

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiujuan; Tian, Guangjian; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Feng, Dagan

    2011-01-01

    Tracer kinetic modeling with dynamic Positron Emission Tomography (PET) requires a plasma time-activity curve (PTAC) as an input function. Several image-derived input function (IDIF) methods that rely on drawing the region-of-interest (ROI) in large vascular structures have been proposed to overcome the problems caused by the invasive approach to obtaining the PTAC, especially for small animal studies. However, the manual placement of ROIs for estimating IDIF is subjective and labor-intensive, making it an undesirable and unreliable process. In this paper, we propose a novel hybrid clustering method (HCM) that objectively delineates ROIs in dynamic PET images for the estimation of IDIFs, and demonstrate its application to the mouse PET studies acquired with [18F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-2-D-glucose (FDG). We begin our HCM using K-means clustering for background removal. We then model the time-activity curves using polynomial regression mixture models in curve clustering for heart structure detection. The hierarchical clustering is finally applied for ROI refinements. The HCM achieved accurate ROI delineation in both computer simulations and experimental mouse studies. In the mouse studies the predicted IDIF had a high correlation with the gold standard, the PTAC derived from the invasive blood samples. The results indicate that the proposed HCM has a great potential in ROI delineation for automatic estimation of IDIF in dynamic FDG-PET studies. PMID:20952342

  14. Targeted anti-inflammatory therapeutics in asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Andrew L.; Caramori, Gaetano; Chung, Kian F.; Adcock, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are chronic inflammatory diseases of the airway, although the drivers and site of the inflammation differ between diseases. Asthmatics with a neutrophilic airway inflammation are associated with a poor response to corticosteroids, whereas asthmatics with eosinophilic inflammation respond better to corticosteroids. Biologicals targeting the Th2-eosinophil nexus such as anti–interleukin (IL)-4, anti–IL-5, and anti–IL-13 are ineffective in asthma as a whole but are more effective if patients are selected using cellular (eg, eosinophils) or molecular (eg, periostin) biomarkers. This highlights the key role of individual inflammatory mediators in driving the inflammatory response and for accurate disease phenotyping to allow greater understanding of disease and development of patient-oriented antiasthma therapies. In contrast to asthmatic patients, corticosteroids are relatively ineffective in COPD patients. Despite stratification of COPD patients, the results of targeted therapy have proved disappointing with the exception of recent studies using CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)2 antagonists. Currently, several other novel mediator-targeted drugs are undergoing clinical trials. As with asthma specifically targeted treatments may be of most benefit in specific COPD patient endotypes. The use of novel inflammatory mediator-targeted therapeutic agents in selected patients with asthma or COPD and the detection of markers of responsiveness or nonresponsiveness will allow a link between clinical phenotypes and pathophysiological mechanisms to be delineated reaching the goal of endotyping patients. PMID:26334389

  15. Targeted anti-inflammatory therapeutics in asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Durham, Andrew L; Caramori, Gaetano; Chung, Kian F; Adcock, Ian M

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are chronic inflammatory diseases of the airway, although the drivers and site of the inflammation differ between diseases. Asthmatics with a neutrophilic airway inflammation are associated with a poor response to corticosteroids, whereas asthmatics with eosinophilic inflammation respond better to corticosteroids. Biologicals targeting the Th2-eosinophil nexus such as anti-interleukin (IL)-4, anti-IL-5, and anti-IL-13 are ineffective in asthma as a whole but are more effective if patients are selected using cellular (eg, eosinophils) or molecular (eg, periostin) biomarkers. This highlights the key role of individual inflammatory mediators in driving the inflammatory response and for accurate disease phenotyping to allow greater understanding of disease and development of patient-oriented antiasthma therapies. In contrast to asthmatic patients, corticosteroids are relatively ineffective in COPD patients. Despite stratification of COPD patients, the results of targeted therapy have proved disappointing with the exception of recent studies using CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)2 antagonists. Currently, several other novel mediator-targeted drugs are undergoing clinical trials. As with asthma specifically targeted treatments may be of most benefit in specific COPD patient endotypes. The use of novel inflammatory mediator-targeted therapeutic agents in selected patients with asthma or COPD and the detection of markers of responsiveness or nonresponsiveness will allow a link between clinical phenotypes and pathophysiological mechanisms to be delineated reaching the goal of endotyping patients.

  16. INVESTIGATION OF HYDROLOEGROLOGIC MAPPING TO DELINEATE PROTECTION ZONES AROUND SPRINGS: REPORT OF TWO CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods commonly used to delineate protection zones for water-supply wells are often not directly applicable for springs. This investigation focuses on characterization of the hydrogeologic setting using hydrogeologic mapping methods to identify geologic and hydrologic features ...

  17. Hydrologic Modeling and Flood Frequency Analysis for Ordinary High Water Mark Delineation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    High Water Mark Delineation Co ld R eg io ns R es ea rc h an d En gi ne er in g La bo ra to ry John D. Gartner, Mathew K. Mersel, and...environmental challenges. ERDC develops innovative solutions in civil and military engineering, geospatial sciences, water resources, and environmental...Program (WRAP) ERDC/CRREL TR-16-2 February 2016 Hydrologic Modeling and Flood Frequency Analysis for Ordinary High Water Mark Delineation John

  18. Comparison of [{sup 11}C]choline Positron Emission Tomography With T2- and Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Delineating Malignant Intraprostatic Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joe H.; Lim Joon, Daryl; Davis, Ian D.; Lee, Sze Ting; Hiew, Chee-Yan; Esler, Stephen; Gong, Sylvia J.; Wada, Morikatsu; Clouston, David; O'Sullivan, Richard; Goh, Yin P.; Bolton, Damien; Scott, Andrew M.; Khoo, Vincent

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography (CHOL-PET) with that of the combination of T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted (T2W/DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for delineating malignant intraprostatic lesions (IPLs) for guiding focal therapies and to investigate factors predicting the accuracy of CHOL-PET. Methods and Materials: This study included 21 patients who underwent CHOL-PET and T2W/DW MRI prior to radical prostatectomy. Two observers manually delineated IPL contours for each scan, and automatic IPL contours were generated on CHOL-PET based on varying proportions of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV). IPLs identified on prostatectomy specimens defined reference standard contours. The imaging-based contours were compared with the reference standard contours using Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), and sensitivity and specificity values. Factors that could potentially predict the DSC of the best contouring method were analyzed using linear models. Results: The best automatic contouring method, 60% of the maximum SUV (SUV{sub 60}) , had similar correlations (DSC: 0.59) with the manual PET contours (DSC: 0.52, P=.127) and significantly better correlations than the manual MRI contours (DSC: 0.37, P<.001). The sensitivity and specificity values were 72% and 71% for SUV{sub 60}; 53% and 86% for PET manual contouring; and 28% and 92% for MRI manual contouring. The tumor volume and transition zone pattern could independently predict the accuracy of CHOL-PET. Conclusions: CHOL-PET is superior to the combination of T2W/DW MRI for delineating IPLs. The accuracy of CHOL-PET is insufficient for gland-sparing focal therapies but may be accurate enough for focal boost therapies. The transition zone pattern is a new classification that may predict how well CHOL-PET delineates IPLs.

  19. A modular low-complexity ECG delineation algorithm for real-time embedded systems.

    PubMed

    Bote, Jose Manuel; Recas, Joaquin; Rincon, Francisco; Atienza, David; Hermida, Roman

    2017-02-17

    This work presents a new modular and lowcomplexity algorithm for the delineation of the different ECG waves (QRS, P and T peaks, onsets and end). Involving a reduced number of operations per second and having a small memory footprint, this algorithm is intended to perform realtime delineation on resource-constrained embedded systems. The modular design allows the algorithm to automatically adjust the delineation quality in run time to a wide range of modes and sampling rates, from a Ultra-low power mode when no arrhythmia is detected, in which the ECG is sampled at low frequency, to a complete High-accuracy delineation mode in which the ECG is sampled at high frequency and all the ECG fiducial points are detected, in case of arrhythmia. The delineation algorithm has been adjusted using the QT database, providing very high sensitivity and positive predictivity, and validated with the MIT database. The errors in the delineation of all the fiducial points are below the tolerances given by the Common Standards for Electrocardiography (CSE) committee in the High-accuracy mode, except for the P wave onset, for which the algorithm is above the agreed tolerances by only a fraction of the sample duration. The computational load for the ultra-low-power 8-MHz TI MSP430 series microcontroller ranges from 0.2 to 8.5% according to the mode used.

  20. Uncertainty in wellhead protection area delineation due to uncertainty in aquifer parameter values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Kailash

    1993-08-01

    The importance of modeling in hydrogeologic investigations has been stressed in a number of studies. Since the applicability of any model is dependent on the type of need and availability of hydrogeological information, a parametric analysis is essential to determine its applicability. This paper presents the results of a parametric analysis conducted to evaluate the effect of data uncertainty on wellhead protection area (WHPA) delineation. The precision of aquifer parameter values is the most important factor in a WHPA delineation process in relation to the model itself. To demonstrate the effect of variable values in a wellfield, we tested modified version of time-related analytical groundwater flow concept using a RESSQC model, which is used for capture zone delineation and to delineate contaminant front for injection wells. The RESSQC model is a modified version of the RESSQ code which was initially designed to only delineate contaminant fronts for injection wells. Field measured aquifer parameters for a shallow aquifer were used in the analysis. The results indicate that great caution must be taken when aquifer parameters such as hydraulic gradient, thickness, transmissivity and porosity are being used for WHPA delineation, since over or under-protection of WHPA can jeopardize the public health. An extended aquifer test and installation of various observation wells in or near different lithologic and depth zones may increase reliability of parameter values.

  1. DEM-based Watershed Delineation - Comparison of Different Methods and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, X.; Zhang, J.; Tahmasebi Nasab, M.

    2015-12-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) are commonly used for large-scale watershed hydrologic and water quality modeling. With aid of the latest LiDAR technology, submeter scale DEM data are often available for many areas in the United States. Precise characterization of the detailed variations in surface microtopography using such high-resolution DEMs is crucial to the related watershed modeling. Various methods have been developed to delineate a watershed, including determination of flow directions and accumulations, identification of subbasin boundaries, and calculation of the relevant topographic parameters. The objective of this study is to examine different DEM-based watershed delineation methods by comparing their unique features and the discrepancies in their results. Not only does this study cover the traditional watershed delineation methods, but also a new puddle-based unit (PBU) delineation method. The specific topics and issues to be presented involve flow directions (D8 single flow direction vs. multi-direction methods), segmentation of stream channels, drainage systems (single "depressionless" drainage network vs. hierarchical depression-dominated drainage system), and hydrologic connectivity (static structural connectivity vs. dynamic functional connectivity). A variety of real topographic surfaces are selected and delineated by using the selected methods. Comparisons of their delineation results emphasize the importance of selection of the methods and highlight their applicability and potential impacts on watershed modeling.

  2. WHPA delineation in Rhode Island: Development and statewide application of methodologies. [WellHead Protection Area

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, M.D.; Kaczor-Bobiak, S.M. )

    1992-01-01

    Wellhead Protection Areas (WHPAs) were delineated for all 525 public drinking water wells in Rhode Island by RI Department of Environmental Management hydrogeology staff. WHPA delineation is an element of the EPA-approved Rhode Island Wellhead Protection Program (RIWHPP), which is designed to protect areas contributing groundwater to public drinking water wells. For resource protection to proceed, legally defensible WHPAs were needed which could be quickly delineated. The authors incorporated input and feedback from a technical subcommittee in developing Rhode Island WHPA delineation methodologies. Comprehensive databases were compiled, which included well parameters and associated aquifer characteristics. More complex delineation techniques were applied to large-capacity wells (average discharge greater than 10 gpm) than to smaller wells. WHPAs for the smaller wells were limited to a 1750-foot-radius circle based on average characteristics of small bedrock wells in Rhode Island. For the large wells, WHPAs consisted of a combination of analytical modelling and hydrogeologic mapping. The Theis equation was used to map the downgradient WHPA boundary for large wells finished in bedrock. The uniform flow equation was used to calculate the downgradient portion of the WHPA for large wells finished in stratified drift. The upgradient boundary for all large wells was delineated using hydrogeologic mapping based on a technique modified from a USGS method. These WHPAs are being provided to municipalities and public water suppliers, who will use them to carry out the other elements of the RIWHPP, such as pollution source inventories, contingency planning, and management approaches.

  3. Anatomic Boundaries of the Clinical Target Volume (Prostate Bed) After Radical Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltshire, Kirsty L.; Brock, Kristy K.; Haider, Masoom A.; Zwahlen, Daniel; Kong, Vickie; Chan, Elisa; Moseley, Joanne; Bayley, Andrew; Catton, Charles; Chung, Peter W.M.; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Milosevic, Michael; Kneebone, Andrew; Warde, Padraig; Menard, Cynthia

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: We sought to derive and validate an interdisciplinary consensus definition for the anatomic boundaries of the postoperative clinical target volume (CTV, prostate bed). Methods and Materials: Thirty one patients who had planned for radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy were enrolled and underwent computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) simulation prior to radiotherapy. Through an iterative process of consultation and discussion, an interdisciplinary consensus definition was derived based on a review of published data, patterns of local failure, surgical practice, and radiologic anatomy. In validation, we analyzed the distribution of surgical clips in reference to the consensus CTV and measured spatial uncertainties in delineating the CTV and vesicourethral anastomosis. Clinical radiotherapy plans were retrospectively evaluated against the consensus CTV (prostate bed). Results: Anatomic boundaries of the consensus CTV (prostate bed) are described. Surgical clips (n = 339) were well distributed throughout the CTV. The vesicourethral anastomosis was accurately localized using central sagittal computed tomography reconstruction, with a mean {+-} standard deviation uncertainty of 1.8 {+-} 2.5 mm. Delineation uncertainties were small for both MRI and computed tomography (mean reproducibility, 0-3.8 mm; standard deviation, 1.0-2.3); they were most pronounced in the anteroposterior and superoinferior dimensions and at the superior/posterior-most aspect of the CTV. Retrospectively, the mean {+-} standard deviation CTV (prostate bed) percentage of volume receiving 100% of prescribed dose was only 77% {+-} 26%. Conclusions: We propose anatomic boundaries for the CTV (prostate bed) and present evidence supporting its validity. In the absence of gross recurrence, the role of MRI in delineating the CTV remains to be confirmed. The CTV is larger than historically practiced at our institution and should be encompassed by a microscopic tumoricidal dose.

  4. Dosimetric impact of tumor bed delineation variability based on 4DCT scan for external-beam partial breast irradiation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bing; Li, Jianbin; Wang, Wei; Li, Fengxiang; Guo, Yanluan; Li, Yankang; Liu, Tonghai

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate the dosimetric impact of tumor bed delineation variability (based on clips, seroma or both clips and seroma) during external-beam partial breast irradiation (EB-PBI) planned utilizing four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scans. 4DCT scans of 20 patients with a seroma clarity score (SCS) 3~5 and ≥5 surgical clips were included in this study. The combined volume of the tumor bed formed using clips, seroma, or both clips and seroma on the 10 phases of 4DCT was defined as the internal gross target volume (termed IGTVC, IGTVS and IGTVC+S, respectively). A 1.5-cm margin was added by defining the planning target volume (termed PTVC, PTVS and PTVC+S, respectively). Three treatment plans were established using the 4DCT images (termed EB-PBIC, EB-PBIS, EB-PBIC+S, respectively). The results showed that the volume of IGTVC+S was significantly larger than that of IGTVCand IGTVS. Similarly, the volume of PTVC+S was markedly larger than that of PTVC and PTVS. However, the PTV coverage for EB-PBIC+S was similar to that of EB-PBIC and EB-PBIS, and there were no significant differences in the homogeneity index or conformity index between the three treatment plans (P=0.878, 0.086). The EB-PBIS plan resulted in the lowest ipsilateral normal breast and ipsilateral lung doses compared with the EB-PBIC and EB-PBIC+S plans. To conclude, the volume variability delineated based on clips, seroma or both clips and seroma resulted in dosimetric variability for organs at risk, but did not show a marked influence on the dosimetric distribution.

  5. Targeting of deep-brain structures in nonhuman primates using MR and CT Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Antong; Hines, Catherine; Dogdas, Belma; Bone, Ashleigh; Lodge, Kenneth; O'Malley, Stacey; Connolly, Brett; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Bagchi, Ansuman; Lubbers, Laura S.; Uslaner, Jason M.; Johnson, Colena; Renger, John; Zariwala, Hatim A.

    2015-03-01

    In vivo gene delivery in central nervous systems of nonhuman primates (NHP) is an important approach for gene therapy and animal model development of human disease. To achieve a more accurate delivery of genetic probes, precise stereotactic targeting of brain structures is required. However, even with assistance from multi-modality 3D imaging techniques (e.g. MR and CT), the precision of targeting is often challenging due to difficulties in identification of deep brain structures, e.g. the striatum which consists of multiple substructures, and the nucleus basalis of meynert (NBM), which often lack clear boundaries to supporting anatomical landmarks. Here we demonstrate a 3D-image-based intracranial stereotactic approach applied toward reproducible intracranial targeting of bilateral NBM and striatum of rhesus. For the targeting we discuss the feasibility of an atlas-based automatic approach. Delineated originally on a high resolution 3D histology-MR atlas set, the NBM and the striatum could be located on the MR image of a rhesus subject through affine and nonrigid registrations. The atlas-based targeting of NBM was compared with the targeting conducted manually by an experienced neuroscientist. Based on the targeting, the trajectories and entry points for delivering the genetic probes to the targets could be established on the CT images of the subject after rigid registration. The accuracy of the targeting was assessed quantitatively by comparison between NBM locations obtained automatically and manually, and finally demonstrated qualitatively via post mortem analysis of slices that had been labelled via Evan Blue infusion and immunohistochemistry.

  6. Delineating subsurface zones of natural bioreduction using the complex resistivity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Orozco, A.; Williams, K. H.; Kemna, A.; Campbell, K. M.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Peacock, A.; Long, P. E.

    2009-12-01

    Measurements of complex resistivity (CR) were made in order to spatially delineate zones of natural bioreduction (NBZ’s) within an aquifer underlying a former uranium mill tailings site near Rifle, Colorado. Previous studies at the site have demonstrated the ability to remove aqueous uranium from groundwater by stimulating iron and sulfate reducing bacteria through injection of acetate. Time-lapse CR measurements have proven to be a useful technique for assessing changes in sediment redox status accompanying biostimulation, with laboratory and field CR phase anomalies strongly correlated with the accumulation of metal sulfides and electroactive ions, such as Fe(II). In the present study, we show that CR measurements can also be used to identify zones where natural bioreduction processes have occurred or are ongoing in the absence of exogenous organic carbon. These zones are a critical component of the natural attenuation process and enable the slow but sustained removal of uranium from groundwater. As such, identifying the presence and distribution of NBZ’s is an important aspect of assessing the potential for natural attenuation at a site of interest. Measurements were obtained in both the time and frequency domain along surface transects oriented parallel and perpendicular to groundwater flow direction using an electrode separation of either 1 or 2 m. A modified dipole-dipole configuration was used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio and the depth of investigation; reciprocal measurements were performed in order to estimate the error in resistance and phase. Well-defined phase anomalies along several of the CR transects were used to define drilling targets, and recovery of aquifer materials from these locations revealed sediments enriched in refractory organic carbon, reduced inorganic sulfur, framboidal pyrites, and uranium. Based on these results, the CR method appears to be an exploration technique well suited for characterizing the spatial distribution

  7. Single-cell analysis delineates a trajectory toward the human early otic lineage

    PubMed Central

    Ealy, Megan; Ellwanger, Daniel C.; Kosaric, Nina; Stapper, Andres P.; Heller, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Efficient pluripotent stem cell guidance protocols for the production of human posterior cranial placodes such as the otic placode that gives rise to the inner ear do not exist. Here we use a systematic approach including defined monolayer culture, signaling modulation, and single-cell gene expression analysis to delineate a developmental trajectory for human otic lineage specification in vitro. We found that modulation of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and WNT signaling combined with FGF and retinoic acid treatments over the course of 18 days generates cell populations that develop chronological expression of marker genes of non-neural ectoderm, preplacodal ectoderm, and early otic lineage. Gene expression along this differentiation path is distinct from other lineages such as endoderm, mesendoderm, and neural ectoderm. Single-cell analysis exposed the heterogeneity of differentiating cells and allowed discrimination of non-neural ectoderm and otic lineage cells from off-target populations. Pseudotemporal ordering of human embryonic stem cell and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived single-cell gene expression profiles revealed an initially synchronous guidance toward non-neural ectoderm, followed by comparatively asynchronous occurrences of preplacodal and otic marker genes. Positive correlation of marker gene expression between both cell lines and resemblance to mouse embryonic day 10.5 otocyst cells implied reasonable robustness of the guidance protocol. Single-cell trajectory analysis further revealed that otic progenitor cell types are induced in monolayer cultures, but further development appears impeded, likely because of lack of a lineage-stabilizing microenvironment. Our results provide a framework for future exploration of stabilizing microenvironments for efficient differentiation of stem cell-generated human otic cell types. PMID:27402757

  8. A High Performance Computing Approach to Tree Cover Delineation in 1-m NAIP Imagery using a Probabilistic Learning Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, S.; Ganguly, S.; Michaelis, A.; Votava, P.; Roy, A.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Nemani, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    Tree cover delineation is a useful instrument in deriving Above Ground Biomass (AGB) density estimates from Very High Resolution (VHR) airborne imagery data. Numerous algorithms have been designed to address this problem, but most of them do not scale to these datasets which are of the order of terabytes. In this paper, we present a semi-automated probabilistic framework for the segmentation and classification of 1-m National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) for tree-cover delineation for the whole of Continental United States, using a High Performance Computing Architecture. Classification is performed using a multi-layer Feedforward Backpropagation Neural Network and segmentation is performed using a Statistical Region Merging algorithm. The results from the classification and segmentation algorithms are then consolidated into a structured prediction framework using a discriminative undirected probabilistic graphical model based on Conditional Random Field, which helps in capturing the higher order contextual dependencies between neighboring pixels. Once the final probability maps are generated, the framework is updated and re-trained by relabeling misclassified image patches. This leads to a significant improvement in the true positive rates and reduction in false positive rates. The tree cover maps were generated for the whole state of California, spanning a total of 11,095 NAIP tiles covering a total geographical area of 163,696 sq. miles. The framework produced true positive rates of around 88% for fragmented forests and 74% for urban tree cover areas, with false positive rates lower than 2% for both landscapes. Comparative studies with the National Land Cover Data (NLCD) algorithm and the LiDAR canopy height model (CHM) showed the effectiveness of our framework for generating accurate high-resolution tree-cover maps.

  9. A High Performance Computing Approach to Tree Cover Delineation in 1-m NAIP Imagery Using a Probabilistic Learning Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, Saikat; Ganguly, Sangram; Michaelis, Andrew; Votava, Petr; Roy, Anshuman; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nemani, Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Tree cover delineation is a useful instrument in deriving Above Ground Biomass (AGB) density estimates from Very High Resolution (VHR) airborne imagery data. Numerous algorithms have been designed to address this problem, but most of them do not scale to these datasets, which are of the order of terabytes. In this paper, we present a semi-automated probabilistic framework for the segmentation and classification of 1-m National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) for tree-cover delineation for the whole of Continental United States, using a High Performance Computing Architecture. Classification is performed using a multi-layer Feedforward Backpropagation Neural Network and segmentation is performed using a Statistical Region Merging algorithm. The results from the classification and segmentation algorithms are then consolidated into a structured prediction framework using a discriminative undirected probabilistic graphical model based on Conditional Random Field, which helps in capturing the higher order contextual dependencies between neighboring pixels. Once the final probability maps are generated, the framework is updated and re-trained by relabeling misclassified image patches. This leads to a significant improvement in the true positive rates and reduction in false positive rates. The tree cover maps were generated for the whole state of California, spanning a total of 11,095 NAIP tiles covering a total geographical area of 163,696 sq. miles. The framework produced true positive rates of around 88% for fragmented forests and 74% for urban tree cover areas, with false positive rates lower than 2% for both landscapes. Comparative studies with the National Land Cover Data (NLCD) algorithm and the LiDAR canopy height model (CHM) showed the effectiveness of our framework for generating accurate high-resolution tree-cover maps.

  10. Delineating Spatial Patterns in the Yellowstone Hydrothermal System using Geothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J.; Hurwitz, S.; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Yellowstone National Park is unmatched with regard to its quantity of active hydrothermal features. Origins of thermal waters in its geyser basins have been traced to mixing of a deep parent water with meteoric waters in shallow local reservoirs (Fournier, 1989). A mineral-solution equilibrium model was developed to calculate water-rock chemical re-equilibration temperatures in these shallow reservoirs. We use the GeoT program, which uses water composition data as input to calculate saturation indices of selected minerals; the "best-clustering" minerals are then statistically determined to infer reservoir temperatures (Spycher et al., 2013). We develop the method using water composition data from Heart Lake Geyser Basin (HLGB), for which both chemical and isotopic geothermometers predict a reservoir water temperature of 205°C ± 10°C (Lowenstern et al., 2012), and minerals found in drill cores in Yellowstone's geyser basins. We test the model for sensitivity to major element composition, pH, Total Inorganic Carbon (TIC) and selected minerals to optimize model parameters. Calculated temperatures are most accurate at pH values below 9.0, and closely match the equilibrium saturation indices of quartz, stilbite, microcline, and albite. The model is optimized with a TIC concentration that is consistent with the mass of diffuse CO2 flux in HLGB (Lowenstern et al., 2012). We then use water compositions from other thermal basins in Yellowstone in search of spatial variations in reservoir temperatures. We then compare the calculated temperatures with various SiO2 and cation geothermometers.

  11. A method of dose reconstruction for moving targets compatible with dynamic treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Rugaard Poulsen, Per; Lykkegaard Schmidt, Mai; Keall, Paul; Schjodt Worm, Esben; Fledelius, Walther; Hoffmann, Lone

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To develop a method that allows a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) to perform accurate dose reconstruction for rigidly moving targets and to validate the method in phantom measurements for a range of treatments including intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric arc therapy (VMAT), and dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking. Methods: An in-house computer program was developed to manipulate Dicom treatment plans exported from a TPS (Eclipse, Varian Medical Systems) such that target motion during treatment delivery was incorporated into the plans. For each treatment, a motion including plan was generated by dividing the intratreatment target motion into 1 mm position bins and construct sub-beams that represented the parts of the treatment that were delivered, while the target was located within each position bin. For each sub-beam, the target shift was modeled by a corresponding isocenter shift. The motion incorporating Dicom plans were reimported into the TPS, where dose calculation resulted in motion including target dose distributions. For experimental validation of the dose reconstruction a thorax phantom with a moveable lung equivalent rod with a tumor insert of solid water was first CT scanned. The tumor insert was delineated as a gross tumor volume (GTV), and a planning target volume (PTV) was formed by adding margins. A conformal plan, two IMRT plans (step-and-shoot and sliding windows), and a VMAT plan were generated giving minimum target doses of 95% (GTV) and 67% (PTV) of the prescription dose (3 Gy). Two conformal fields with MLC leaves perpendicular and parallel to the tumor motion, respectively, were generated for DMLC tracking. All treatment plans were delivered to the thorax phantom without tumor motion and with a sinusoidal tumor motion. The two conformal fields were delivered with and without portal image guided DMLC tracking based on an embedded gold marker. The target dose distribution was measured with a

  12. Improving molecular diagnosis of aniridia and WAGR syndrome using customized targeted array-based CGH

    PubMed Central

    Vallespín, Elena; Villaverde, Cristina; Martín-Arenas, Rubén; Vélez-Monsalve, Camilo; Lorda-Sánchez, Isabel; Nevado, Julián; Trujillo-Tiebas, María José; Lapunzina, Pablo; Ayuso, Carmen; Corton, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Chromosomal deletions at 11p13 are a frequent cause of congenital Aniridia, a rare pan-ocular genetic disease, and of WAGR syndrome, accounting up to 30% of cases. First-tier genetic testing for newborn with aniridia, to detect 11p13 rearrangements, includes Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) and karyotyping. However, neither of these approaches allow obtaining a complete picture of the high complexity of chromosomal deletions and breakpoints in aniridia. Here, we report the development and validation of a customized targeted array-based comparative genomic hybridization, so called WAGR-array, for comprehensive high-resolution analysis of CNV in the WAGR locus. Our approach increased the detection rate in a Spanish cohort of 38 patients with aniridia, WAGR syndrome and other related ocular malformations, allowing to characterize four undiagnosed aniridia cases, and to confirm MLPA findings in four additional patients. For all patients, breakpoints were accurately established and a contiguous deletion syndrome, involving a large number of genes, was identified in three patients. Moreover, we identified novel microdeletions affecting 3' PAX6 regulatory regions in three families with isolated aniridia. This tool represents a good strategy for the genetic diagnosis of aniridia and associated syndromes, allowing for a more accurate CNVs detection, as well as a better delineation of breakpoints. Our results underline the clinical importance of performing exhaustive and accurate analysis of chromosomal rearrangements for patients with aniridia, especially newborns and those without defects in PAX6 after diagnostic screening. PMID:28231309

  13. Colorectal Cancer Genetic Heterogeneity Delineated by Multi-Region Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Rui; Xie, Zhen-Rong; Luo, Hua-You; Zeng, Yu-Jian; Xu, Yu; Wang, La-Mei; Kong, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Kun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) leads to an underestimation of the mutational landscape portrayed by a single needle biopsy and consequently affects treatment precision. The extent of colorectal cancer (CRC) genetic ITH is not well understood in Chinese patients. Thus, we conducted deep sequencing by using the OncoGxOne™ Plus panel, targeting 333 cancer-specific genes in multi-region biopsies of primary and liver metastatic tumors from three Chinese CRC patients. We determined that the extent of ITH varied among the three cases. On average, 65% of all the mutations detected were common within individual tumors. KMT2C aberrations and the NCOR1 mutation were the only ubiquitous events. Subsequent phylogenetic analysis showed that the tumors evolved in a branched manner. Comparison of the primary and metastatic tumors revealed that PPP2R1A (E370X), SETD2 (I1608V), SMAD4 (G382T), and AR splicing site mutations may be specific to liver metastatic cancer. These mutations might contribute to the initiation and progression of distant metastasis. Collectively, our analysis identified a substantial level of genetic ITH in CRC, which should be considered for personalized therapeutic strategies. PMID:27023146

  14. Multitracer: a Java-based tool for anatomic delineation of grayscale volumetric images.

    PubMed

    Woods, Roger P

    2003-08-01

    A Java-based tool for delineating anatomic boundaries in 8- and 16- bit grayscale volumetric images is described. Modern features implemented by the tool include the ability to simultaneously view the current cursor position and the previously delineated boundaries on three orthogonal planes, the ability to magnify images during delineation using high-quality interpolation, the ability to encode and save boundaries with subvoxel resolution, and the ability to utilize coregistered images interchangeably during delineation. Additional features facilitate use of the tool in a multiuser, multiplatform environment and provide support for the documentation of anatomic delineation protocols. In addition to providing direct estimates of structure volumes, areas, and lengths, the tool allows contoured boundaries to be exported for more sophisticated analyses. The tool also provides support for manual editing of image volumes to remove confounding structures and for manual correction of image volumes that have been inaccurately edited. In addition to its research utility, the tool also has potential value in education, allowing students to interact with volumetric data and structural boundaries in three dimensions.

  15. Accurate and simple calibration of DLP projector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilm, Jakob; Olesen, Oline V.; Larsen, Rasmus

    2014-03-01

    Much work has been devoted to the calibration of optical cameras, and accurate and simple methods are now available which require only a small number of calibration targets. The problem of obtaining these parameters for light projectors has not been studied as extensively and most current methods require a camera and involve feature extraction from a known projected pattern. In this work we present a novel calibration technique for DLP Projector systems based on phase shifting profilometry projection onto a printed calibration target. In contrast to most current methods, the one presented here does not rely on an initial camera calibration, and so does not carry over the error into projector calibration. A radial interpolation scheme is used to convert features coordinates into projector space, thereby allowing for a very accurate procedure. This allows for highly accurate determination of parameters including lens distortion. Our implementation acquires printed planar calibration scenes in less than 1s. This makes our method both fast and convenient. We evaluate our method in terms of reprojection errors and structured light image reconstruction quality.

  16. USGS aerial resolution targets.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Salamonowicz, P.H.

    1982-01-01

    It is necessary to measure the achievable resolution of any airborne sensor that is to be used for metric purposes. Laboratory calibration facilities may be inadequate or inappropriate for determining the resolution of non-photographic sensors such as optical-mechanical scanners, television imaging tubes, and linear arrays. However, large target arrays imaged in the field can be used in testing such systems. The USGS has constructed an array of resolution targets in order to permit field testing of a variety of airborne sensing systems. The target array permits any interested organization with an airborne sensing system to accurately determine the operational resolution of its system. -from Author

  17. Systems Biomedicine of Rabies Delineates the Affected Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Azimzadeh Jamalkandi, Sadegh; Mozhgani, Sayed-Hamidreza; Gholami Pourbadie, Hamid; Mirzaie, Mehdi; Noorbakhsh, Farshid; Vaziri, Behrouz; Gholami, Alireza; Ansari-Pour, Naser; Jafari, Mohieddin

    2016-01-01

    The prototypical neurotropic virus, rabies, is a member of the Rhabdoviridae family that causes lethal encephalomyelitis. Although there have been a plethora of studies investigating the etiological mechanism of the rabies virus and many precautionary methods have been implemented to avert the disease outbreak over the last century, the disease has surprisingly no definite remedy at its late stages. The psychological symptoms and the underlying etiology, as well as the rare survival rate from rabies encephalitis, has still remained a mystery. We, therefore, undertook a systems biomedicine approach to identify the network of gene products implicated in rabies. This was done by meta-analyzing whole-transcriptome microarray datasets of the CNS infected by strain CVS-11, and integrating them with interactome data using computational and statistical methods. We first determined the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in each study and horizontally integrated the results at the mRNA and microRNA levels separately. A total of 61 seed genes involved in signal propagation system were obtained by means of unifying mRNA and microRNA detected integrated DEGs. We then reconstructed a refined protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) of infected cells to elucidate the rabies-implicated signal transduction network (RISN). To validate our findings, we confirmed differential expression of randomly selected genes in the network using Real-time PCR. In conclusion, the identification of seed genes and their network neighborhood within the refined PPIN can be useful for demonstrating signaling pathways including interferon circumvent, toward proliferation and survival, and neuropathological clue, explaining the intricate underlying molecular neuropathology of rabies infection and thus rendered a molecular framework for predicting potential drug targets.

  18. Delineating ecotypes of marine photosynthetic picoeukaryotes in the wild

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limardo, A. J.; Sudek, S.; Rii, Y. M.; Church, M. J.; Wei, C. L.; Armbrust, E. V.; Worden, A. Z.

    2015-12-01

    Extremely small eukaryotic green algae are abundant primary producers found in diverse marine habitats. Over the last decade several studies have revealed extensive diversity within the "pico-prasinophytes" (≤2 µm diameter) that was previously unrecognized due to a lack of distinguishing morphological features. Using whole genome and marker gene analyses, distinct species have since been recognized within the Micromonas and Ostreococcus genera. Relatively little is known about environmental factors driving distributions of these species, but for Ostreococcus, laboratory studies suggested that differentiation reflects high- and low-light adapted ecotypes. Subsequent field studies indicated that Ostreococcus Clade OI and Clade OII rarely co-occur but partition according to distinct habitats - representing 'mesotrophic' and 'oligotrophic' ecotypes, respectively. Unlike Micromonas and Ostreococcus, Bathycoccus was presumed to be a single cosmopolitan species because identical 18S rRNA gene sequences are observed in cultured isolates and in environmental surveys. However, analysis of a targeted metagenome from a Bathycoccus population in the tropical Atlantic led to the hypothesis that Bathycoccus also harbors distinct ecotypes. Here, we have developed qPCR assays to enumerate the two Bathycoccus types which can be discriminated based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS). Statistical analysis of qPCR and environmental data from >200 North Pacific Ocean samples shows that the two Bathycoccus clades are only somewhat analogous to oligotrophic and mesotrophic Ostreococcus clades. The two Bathycoccus clades co-occurred more than twice as often as the Ostreococcus clades. Additionally, while Bathycoccus BII and oligotrophic Ostreococcus OII were found at warm temperatures up to 26°C, BII extended into colder waters than OII. Similarly, Bathycoccus BI extended into warmer waters than mesotrophic Ostreococcus OI. Currently, we are analyzing metatranscriptomes to

  19. Systems Biomedicine of Rabies Delineates the Affected Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Azimzadeh Jamalkandi, Sadegh; Mozhgani, Sayed-Hamidreza; Gholami Pourbadie, Hamid; Mirzaie, Mehdi; Noorbakhsh, Farshid; Vaziri, Behrouz; Gholami, Alireza; Ansari-Pour, Naser; Jafari, Mohieddin

    2016-01-01

    The prototypical neurotropic virus, rabies, is a member of the Rhabdoviridae family that causes lethal encephalomyelitis. Although there have been a plethora of studies investigating the etiological mechanism of the rabies virus and many precautionary methods have been implemented to avert the disease outbreak over the last century, the disease has surprisingly no definite remedy at its late stages. The psychological symptoms and the underlying etiology, as well as the rare survival rate from rabies encephalitis, has still remained a mystery. We, therefore, undertook a systems biomedicine approach to identify the network of gene products implicated in rabies. This was done by meta-analyzing whole-transcriptome microarray datasets of the CNS infected by strain CVS-11, and integrating them with interactome data using computational and statistical methods. We first determined the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in each study and horizontally integrated the results at the mRNA and microRNA levels separately. A total of 61 seed genes involved in signal propagation system were obtained by means of unifying mRNA and microRNA detected integrated DEGs. We then reconstructed a refined protein–protein interaction network (PPIN) of infected cells to elucidate the rabies-implicated signal transduction network (RISN). To validate our findings, we confirmed differential expression of randomly selected genes in the network using Real-time PCR. In conclusion, the identification of seed genes and their network neighborhood within the refined PPIN can be useful for demonstrating signaling pathways including interferon circumvent, toward proliferation and survival, and neuropathological clue, explaining the intricate underlying molecular neuropathology of rabies infection and thus rendered a molecular framework for predicting potential drug targets. PMID:27872612

  20. Delineation of Tsunami Risk Zones for Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijetunge, J. J.

    2008-12-01

    The coastal belts of several Indian Ocean countries including Indonesia, Sri Lanka, India and Thailand suffered massive loss of life and damage to property due to the tsunami unleashed by the great earthquake of moment magnitude 9.1-9.3 in the Andaman-Sunda subduction zone on December 26, 2004. In Sri Lanka, 13 of the 14 administrative districts lying along the coastal belt were affected: the death toll was over 35,000 with 20,000 injured and about 100,000 dwellings and other buildings either completely or partially damaged leaving half a million people homeless and causing massive disruption to livelihoods. However, it was clear in the immediate aftermath of the tsunami that the degree of damage along the coastal belt of Sri Lanka was not uniform: some areas suffered more damage, some less, and in certain other areas, often not far away, there was no damage at all. This suggests that the level of risk for coastal communities from future events of tsunami exhibits considerable variation even along a short stretch of the shoreline. The high cost and the scarcity of coastal lands in many areas demand an accurate assessment of the tsunami risk rather than arbitrary conservative zonation. Moreover, information relating to the spatial distribution of tsunami risk is essential in formulating post-tsunami coastal land use plans as well as in planning of evacuation of people during tsunami warnings. However, neither comprehensive probabilistic assessments of the tsunami hazard nor detailed information pertaining to the vulnerability of coastal communities are available at present for the coastal zone of Sri Lanka. Consequently, the methodology adopted in the present paper is to use field observations and numerical simulations of the December 2004 tsunami, which may be considered a worst-case scenario, in order to obtain the variation along the coastline of three parameters that quantify the tsunami impact. These three parameters are the tsunami height, the horizontal

  1. Delineation of Spatial Variability in the Temperature–Mortality Relationship on Extremely Hot Days in Greater Vancouver, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Hung Chak; Knudby, Anders; Walker, Blake Byron; Henderson, Sarah B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Climate change has increased the frequency and intensity of extremely hot weather. The health risks associated with extemely hot weather are not uniform across affected areas owing to variability in heat exposure and social vulnerability, but these differences are challenging to map with precision. Objectives: We developed a spatially and temporally stratified case-crossover approach for delineation of areas with higher and lower risks of mortality on extremely hot days and applied this approach in greater Vancouver, Canada. Methods: Records of all deaths with an extremely hot day as a case day or a control day were extracted from an administrative vital statistics database spanning the years of 1998–2014. Three heat exposure and 11 social vulnerability variables were assigned at the residential location of each decedent. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio for a 1°C increase in daily mean temperature at a fixed site with an interaction term for decedents living above and below different values of the spatial variables. Results: The heat exposure and social vulnerability variables with the strongest spatially stratified results were the apparent temperature and the labor nonparticipation rate, respectively. Areas at higher risk had values ≥ 34.4°C for the maximum apparent temperature and ≥ 60% of the population neither employed nor looking for work. These variables were combined in a composite index to quantify their interaction and to enhance visualization of high-risk areas. Conclusions: Our methods provide a data-driven framework for spatial delineation of the temperature-–mortality relationship by heat exposure and social vulnerability. The results can be used to map and target the most vulnerable areas for public health intervention. Citation: Ho HC, Knudby A, Walker BB, Henderson SB. 2017. Delineation of spatial variability in the temperature–mortality relationship on extremely hot days in greater

  2. Accurately Diagnosing and Treating Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Julie P.; Correll, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    The high prevalence of comorbid bipolar and borderline personality disorders and some diagnostic criteria similar to both conditions present both diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. This article delineates certain symptoms which, by careful history taking, may be attributed more closely to one of these two disorders. Making the correct primary diagnosis along with comorbid psychiatric conditions and choosing the appropriate type of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy are critical steps to a patient's recovery. In this article, we will use a case example to illustrate some of the challenges the psychiatrist may face in diagnosing and treating borderline personality disorder. In addition, we will explore treatment strategies, including various types of therapy modalities and medication classes, which may prove effective in stabilizing or reducing a broad range of symptomotology associated with borderline personality disorder. PMID:20508805

  3. Geographic object-based delineation of neighborhoods of Accra, Ghana using QuickBird satellite imagery.

    PubMed

    Stow, Douglas A; Lippitt, Christopher D; Weeks, John R

    2010-08-01

    The objective was to test GEographic Object-based Image Analysis (GEOBIA) techniques for delineating neighborhoods of Accra, Ghana using QuickBird multispectral imagery. Two approaches to aggregating census enumeration areas (EAs) based on image-derived measures of vegetation objects were tested: (1) merging adjacent EAs according to vegetation measures and (2) image segmentation. Both approaches exploit readily available functions within commercial GEOBIA software. Image-derived neighborhood maps were compared to a reference map derived by spatial clustering of slum index values (from census data), to provide a relative assessment of potential map utility. A size-constrained iterative segmentation approach to aggregation was more successful than standard image segmentation or feature merge techniques. The segmentation approaches account for size and shape characteristics, enabling more realistic neighborhood boundaries to be delineated. The percentage of vegetation patches within each EA yielded more realistic delineation of potential neighborhoods than mean vegetation patch size per EA.

  4. Mill profiler machines soft materials accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Mill profiler machines bevels, slots, and grooves in soft materials, such as styrofoam phenolic-filled cores, to any desired thickness. A single operator can accurately control cutting depths in contour or straight line work.

  5. Enhancements to TauDEM to support Rapid Watershed Delineation Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazib, N. S.; Tarboton, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    Watersheds are widely recognized as the basic functional unit for water resources management studies and are important for a variety of problems in hydrology, ecology, and geomorphology. Nevertheless, delineating a watershed spread across a large region is still cumbersome due to the processing burden of working with large Digital Elevation Model. Terrain Analysis Using Digital Elevation Models (TauDEM) software supports the delineation of watersheds and stream networks from within desktop Geographic Information Systems. A rich set of watershed and stream network attributes are computed. However limitations of the TauDEM desktop tools are (1) it supports only one type of raster (tiff format) data (2) requires installation of software for parallel processing, and (3) data have to be in projected coordinate system. This paper presents enhancements to TauDEM that have been developed to extend its generality and support web based watershed delineation services. The enhancements of TauDEM include (1) reading and writing raster data with the open-source geospatial data abstraction library (GDAL) not limited to the tiff data format and (2) support for both geographic and projected coordinates. To support web services for rapid watershed delineation a procedure has been developed for sub setting the domain based on sub-catchments, with preprocessed data prepared for each catchment stored. This allows the watershed delineation to function locally, while extending to the full extent of watersheds using preprocessed information. Additional capabilities of this program includes computation of average watershed properties and geomorphic and channel network variables such as drainage density, shape factor, relief ratio and stream ordering. The updated version of TauDEM increases the practical applicability of it in terms of raster data type, size and coordinate system. The watershed delineation web service functionality is useful for web based software as service deployments

  6. Applicability of VI in arid vegetation delineation using shadow-affected SPOT imagery.

    PubMed

    Gunasekara, N K; Al-Wardy, M M; Al-Rawas, G A; Charabi, Y

    2015-07-01

    GDVI(3), GDVI(2), NDVI, MSAVI and SAVI were evaluated for their dynamic ranges, the class accuracy of the Vegetation Index (VI) classifications, the effects of shadow delineation on the other land use classes and their applicability in vegetation delineation in Al-Qara Mountains, Oman. Supervised classifications of a SPOT scene by Support Vector Machines (SVM) algorithm were employed. GDVI(3) showed the widest dynamic range in all land use types, while GDVI(2) also exhibited evidently wider dynamic ranges for arid to semi-arid Al-Qara than NDVI, MSAVI and SAVI. GDVI(3) reported the highest accuracies in delineating natural vegetation (dense - 74.80%, medium-dense- 43.19%), except for low-dense vegetation (40.51%). It also performs the best in delineating bare soil and dry grass with over 80% and 60% accuracies. The attenuated reflectance created by the shadows results in VI signals in the range of dry grass to bare soil, enabling us to neglect the shadow effect on natural vegetation delineation due to below 9.50% omissions from the shadows class. GDVI(3) also limits shadow delineation better than the other indices, which will enable us to analyze spectral information recovery by the VI with the help of ground truth information under the shadows. For applications such as land degradation assessments, GDVI(3) has better prospects over the other indices explored. Saturation at high-vigor vegetation is an issue in GDVI(3), GDVI(2) and NDVI. Our study also points to a dependency of a VI's capability to weaken shadows on the number of training data pixels to be utilized in a supervised classification.

  7. Using analytic element models to delineate drinking water source protection areas.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Heather A; Bondoc, Michael; McGinnis, John; Metropulos, Kathy; Heider, Pat; Reed, Allison; Saines, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Since 1999, Ohio EPA hydrogeologists have used two analytic element models (AEMs), the proprietary software GFLOW and U.S. EPA's WhAEM, to delineate protection areas for 535 public water systems. Both models now use the GFLOW2001 solution engine, integrate well with Geographic Information System (GIS) technology, have a user-friendly graphical interface, are capable of simulating a variety of complex hydrogeologic settings, and do not rely upon a model grid. These features simplify the modeling process and enable AEMs to bridge the gap between existing simplistic delineation methods and more complex numerical models. Ohio EPA hydrogeologists demonstrated that WhAEM2000 and GFLOW2000 were capable of producing capture zones similar to more widely accepted models by applying the AEMs to eight sites that had been previously delineated using other methods. After the Ohio EPA delineated protection areas using AEMs, more simplistic delineation methods used by other states (volumetric equation and arbitrary fixed radii) were applied to the same water systems to compare the differences between various methods. GIS software and two-tailed paired t-tests were used to quantify the differences in protection areas and analyze the data. The results of this analysis demonstrate that AEMs typically produce significantly different protection areas than the most simplistic delineation methods, in terms of total area and shape. If the volumetric equation had been used instead of AEMs, Ohio would not have protected 265 km2 of critical upgradient area and would have overprotected 269 km2 of primarily downgradient land. Since an increasing number of land-use restrictions are being tied to drinking water protection areas, this analysis has broad policy implications.

  8. Breast ultrasound lesions classification: a performance evaluation between manual delineation and computer segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Moi Hoon; Yap, Chuin Hong

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is a threat to women worldwide. Manual delineation on breast ultrasound lesions is time-consuming and operator dependent. Computer segmentation of ultrasound breast lesions can be a challenging task due to the ill-defined lesions boundaries and issues related to the speckle noise in ultrasound images. The main contribution of this paper is to compare the performance of the computer classifier on the manual delineation and computer segmentation in malignant and benign lesions classification. This paper we implement computer segmentation using multifractal approach on a database consists of 120 images (50 malignant lesions and 70 benign lesions). The computer segmentation result is compared with the manual delineation using Jaccard Similarity Index (JSI). The result shows that the average JSI of 0.5010 (+/-0.2088) for malignant lesions and the average JSI of 0.6787 (+/-0.1290) for benign lesions. These results indicate lower agreement in malignant lesions due to the irregular shape while the higher agreement in benign lesions with regular shape. Further, we extract the shape descriptors for the lesions. By using logistic regression with 10 fold cross validation, the classification rates of manual delineation and computer segmentation are computed. The computer segmentation produced results with sensitivity 0.780 and specificity 0.871. However, the manual delineation produced sensitivity of 0.520 and specificity of 0.800. The results show that there are no clear differences between the delineation in MD and CS in benign lesions but the computer segmentation on malignant lesions shows better accuracy for computer classifier.

  9. Delineating baseflow contribution areas for streams - A model and methods comparison.

    PubMed

    Chow, Reynold; Frind, Michael E; Frind, Emil O; Jones, Jon P; Sousa, Marcelo R; Rudolph, David L; Molson, John W; Nowak, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    This study addresses the delineation of areas that contribute baseflow to a stream reach, also known as stream capture zones. Such areas can be delineated using standard well capture zone delineation methods, with three important differences: (1) natural gradients are smaller compared to those produced by supply wells and are therefore subject to greater numerical errors, (2) stream discharge varies seasonally, and (3) stream discharge varies spatially. This study focuses on model-related uncertainties due to model characteristics, discretization schemes, delineation methods, and particle tracking algorithms. The methodology is applied to the Alder Creek watershed in southwestern Ontario. Four different model codes are compared: HydroGeoSphere, WATFLOW, MODFLOW, and FEFLOW. In addition, two delineation methods are compared: reverse particle tracking and reverse transport, where the latter considers local-scale parameter uncertainty by using a macrodispersion term to produce a capture probability plume. The results from this study indicate that different models can calibrate acceptably well to the same data and produce very similar distributions of hydraulic head, but can produce different capture zones. The stream capture zone is found to be highly sensitive to the particle tracking algorithm. It was also found that particle tracking by itself, if applied to complex systems such as the Alder Creek watershed, would require considerable subjective judgement in the delineation of stream capture zones. Reverse transport is an alternative and more reliable approach that provides probability intervals for the baseflow contribution areas, taking uncertainty into account. The two approaches can be used together to enhance the confidence in the final outcome.

  10. Delineating baseflow contribution areas for streams - A model and methods comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Reynold; Frind, Michael E.; Frind, Emil O.; Jones, Jon P.; Sousa, Marcelo R.; Rudolph, David L.; Molson, John W.; Nowak, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    This study addresses the delineation of areas that contribute baseflow to a stream reach, also known as stream capture zones. Such areas can be delineated using standard well capture zone delineation methods, with three important differences: (1) natural gradients are smaller compared to those produced by supply wells and are therefore subject to greater numerical errors, (2) stream discharge varies seasonally, and (3) stream discharge varies spatially. This study focuses on model-related uncertainties due to model characteristics, discretization schemes, delineation methods, and particle tracking algorithms. The methodology is applied to the Alder Creek watershed in southwestern Ontario. Four different model codes are compared: HydroGeoSphere, WATFLOW, MODFLOW, and FEFLOW. In addition, two delineation methods are compared: reverse particle tracking and reverse transport, where the latter considers local-scale parameter uncertainty by using a macrodispersion term to produce a capture probability plume. The results from this study indicate that different models can calibrate acceptably well to the same data and produce very similar distributions of hydraulic head, but can produce different capture zones. The stream capture zone is found to be highly sensitive to the particle tracking algorithm. It was also found that particle tracking by itself, if applied to complex systems such as the Alder Creek watershed, would require considerable subjective judgement in the delineation of stream capture zones. Reverse transport is an alternative and more reliable approach that provides probability intervals for the baseflow contribution areas, taking uncertainty into account. The two approaches can be used together to enhance the confidence in the final outcome.

  11. Groundtruth approach to accurate quantitation of fluorescence microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Mascio-Kegelmeyer, L; Tomascik-Cheeseman, L; Burnett, M S; van Hummelen, P; Wyrobek, A J

    2000-12-01

    To more accurately measure fluorescent signals from microarrays, we calibrated our acquisition and analysis systems by using groundtruth samples comprised of known quantities of red and green gene-specific DNA probes hybridized to cDNA targets. We imaged the slides with a full-field, white light CCD imager and analyzed them with our custom analysis software. Here we compare, for multiple genes, results obtained with and without preprocessing (alignment, color crosstalk compensation, dark field subtraction, and integration time). We also evaluate the accuracy of various image processing and analysis techniques (background subtraction, segmentation, quantitation and normalization). This methodology calibrates and validates our system for accurate quantitative measurement of microarrays. Specifically, we show that preprocessing the images produces results significantly closer to the known ground-truth for these samples.

  12. The use of remote sensing and natural indicators to delineate floodplains - Preliminary findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sollers, S. C.; Petersen, G. W.; Henninger, D. L.; Borden, F. Y.

    1974-01-01

    Feasibility studies to delineate floodplains using aerial photography have been conducted by the Army Corps of Engineers. The objective of this project is to establish floodplain boundaries using natural indicators such as vegetation types, soil types, moisture differences, and geologic variations. Using aircraft multispectral data, an automated mapping routine should enable the Corps of Engineers to reduce costly field surveys and improve the accuracy of floodplain delineation in pristine areas. The purpose of this paper is to document the methodology utilized in this investigation while using one of a series of available data sets and test sites and to report preliminary findings.

  13. The Benefits and Limitations of Hydraulic Modeling for Ordinary High Water Mark Delineation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    High Water Mark Delineation Co ld R eg io ns R es ea rc h an d En gi ne er in g La bo ra to ry John D. Gartner, Matthew K. Mersel...sciences, water resources, and environmental sciences for the Army, the Department of Defense, civilian agencies, and our nation’s public good. Find out...for Ordinary High Water Mark Delineation John D. Gartner, Matthew K. Mersel, Lindsey E. Lefebvre, and Robert W. Lichvar U.S. Army Engineer Research

  14. Delineation of early attentional control difficulties in fragile X syndrome: focus on neurocomputational changes.

    PubMed

    Scerif, Gaia; Cornish, Kim; Wilding, John; Driver, Jon; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2007-04-09

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is due to the silencing of a single X-linked gene and it is associated with striking attentional difficulties. As FXS is well characterised at the cellular level, the condition provides a unique opportunity to investigate how a genetic dysfunction can impact on the development of neurocomputational properties relevant to attention. Thirteen young boys with FXS and 13 mental-age-matched typically developing controls performed a touch-screen-based search task that manipulated the similarity between targets and distractors and their heterogeneity in size. Search speed, path and errors were recorded as multiple measures of performance. Children did not differ in overall search speed or path when searching amongst distractors, but striking error patterns distinguished children with FXS from controls. Firstly, although clear markers of previously found targets remained on screen, children with FXS perseverated on touching previous hits more than typically developing controls, consistent with the well-documented inhibitory deficits in adults with the disorder. Secondly, they could accurately discriminate single target-distractor pairs, but, when searching a complex display, they touched distractors more often than control children when distractors were similar to targets and especially so when these were infrequent, highlighting difficulties in judging relative size and allocate attentional weight independently of stimulus frequency. Thirdly, their performance was also characterised by inaccuracies in pointing, suggesting additional motor control deficits. Taken together, the findings suggest that fragile X syndrome affects the early development of multiple processes contributing to efficient attentional selection, as would be predicted from an understanding of the neurocomputational changes associated with the disorder.

  15. Digital soil mapping for the support of delineation of Areas Facing Natural Constraints defined by common European biophysical criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pásztor, László; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Laborczi, Annamária; Takács, Katalin; Szatmári, Gábor; Tóth, Tibor; Szabó, József

    2016-04-01

    One of the main objectives of the EU's Common Agricultural Policy is to encourage maintaining agricultural production in Areas Facing Natural Constraints (ANC) in order to sustain agricultural production and use natural resources, in such a way to secure both stable production and income to farmers and to protect the environment. ANC assignment has both ecological and severe economical aspects. Recently the delimitation of ANCs is suggested to be carried out by using common biophysical diagnostic criteria on low soil productivity and poor climate conditions all over Europe. The criterion system was elaborated and has been repeatedly upgraded by JRC. The operational implementation is under member state competence. This process requires application of available soil databases and proper thematic and spatial inference methods. In our paper we present the inferences applied for the latest identification and delineation of areas with low soil productivity in Hungary according to JRC biophysical criteria related to soil: limited soil drainage, texture and stoniness (coarse texture, heavy clay, vertic properties), shallow rooting depth, chemical properties (salinity, sodicity, low pH). The compilation of target specific maps were based on the available legacy and recently collected data. In the present work three different data sources were used. The most relevant available data were queried from the datasets for each mapped criterion for either direct application or for the compilation a suitable, synthetic (non-measured) parameter. In some cases the values of the target variable originated from only one, in other cases from more databases. The reference dataset used in the mapping process was set up after substantial statistical analysis and filtering. It consisted of the values of the target variable attributed to the finally selected georeferenced locations. For spatial inference regression kriging was applied. Accuracy assessment was carried out by Leave One Out

  16. Methods for delineating flood-prone areas in the Great Basin of Nevada and adjacent states

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkham, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Great Basin is a region of about 210,000 square miles having no surface drainage to the ocean; it includes most of Nevada and parts of Utah, California, Oregon, Idaho, and Wyoming. The area is characterized by many parallel mountain ranges and valleys trending north-south. Stream channels usually are well defined and steep within the mountains, but on reaching the alluvial fan at the canyon mouth, they may diverge into numerous distributary channels, be discontinuous near the apex of the fan, or be deeply entrenched in the alluvial deposits. Larger rivers normally have well-defined channels to or across the valley floors, but all terminate at lakes or playas. Major floods occur in most parts of the Great Basin and result from snowmelt, frontal-storm rainfall, and localized convective rainfall. Snowmelt floods typically occur during April-June. Floods resulting from frontal rain and frontal rain on snow generally occur during November-March. Floods resulting from convective-type rainfall during localized thunderstorms occur most commonly during the summer months. Methods for delineating flood-prone areas are grouped into five general categories: Detailed, historical, analytical, physiographic, and reconnaissance. The detailed and historical methods are comprehensive methods; the analytical and physiographic are intermediate; and the reconnaissance method is only approximate. Other than the reconnaissance method, each method requires determination of a T-year discharge (the peak rate of flow during a flood with long-term average recurrence interval of T years) and T-year profile and the development of a flood-boundary map. The procedure is different, however, for each method. Appraisal of the applicability of each method included consideration of its technical soundness, limitations and uncertainties, ease of use, and costs in time and money. Of the five methods, the detailed method is probably the most accurate, though most expensive. It is applicable to

  17. Proteomic Patterns of Colonic Mucosal Tissues Delineate Crohn’s Colitis and Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Seeley, Erin H.; Washington, Mary K.; Caprioli, Richard M.; M’Koma, Amosy E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although Crohn’s colitis (CC) and ulcerative colitis (UC) share several clinical features, they have different causes, mechanisms of tissue damage, and treatment options. Therefore, the accurate diagnosis is of paramount importance in terms of medical care. The distinction between UC/CC is made on the basis of clinical, radiologic, endoscopic, and pathologic interpretations but cannot be differentiated in up to 15% of IBD patients. Correct management of this “indeterminate colitis” (IC) depends on the accuracy of future, and yet not known, destination diagnosis (CC/UC). Experimental design We have developed a proteomic methodology that has the potential to discriminate between UC/CC. The histologic layers of 62 confirmed UC/CC tissues were analyzed using MALDI-MS for proteomic profiling. Results A Support Vector Machine algorithm consisting of 25 peaks was able to differentiate spectra from CC and UC with 76.9% spectral accuracy when using a leave-20%-out cross validation. Application of the model to the entire data set resulted in accurate classification of 19/26 CC patients and 36/36 UC patients when using a 2/3 correct cutoff. A total 114 peaks were found to have Wilcoxin p-values of less than 0.05. Conclusion/Clinical relevance This information may provide new avenues for the development of novel personalized therapeutic targets. PMID:23382084

  18. Ictal onset zone and seizure propagation delineated on ictal F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Madhavi; Tripathi, Manjari; Garg, Ajay; Damle, Nishikant; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    The present case highlights the utility of ictal F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in delineating the seizure onset zone in a child with complex partial seizures. Although F-18 FDG PET has been successfully used to delineate interictal hypometabolism, planned ictal FDG PET, in cases with prolonged seizure activity, can provide better spatial resolution than single-photon emission CT by delineating the seizure onset zone and propagation pathway.

  19. Delineation of inundated area and vegetation along the Amazon floodplain with the SIR-C synthetic aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, L.L.; Melack, J.M.; Filoso, S.; Wang, Y. |

    1995-07-01

    Floodplain inundation and vegetation along the Negro and Amazon rivers near Manaus, Brazil were accurately delineated using multi-frequency, polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data from the April and October 1994 SIR-C missions. A decision-tree model was used to formulate rules for a supervised classification into five categories: water, clearing (pasture), aquatic macrophyte (floating meadow), nonflooded forest, and flooded forest. Classified images were produced and tested within three days of SIR-C data acquisition. Both C-band (5.7 cm) and L-band (24 cm) wavelengths were necessary to distinguish the cover types. HH polarization was most useful for distinguishing flooded from nonflooded vegetation (C-HH for macrophyte versus pasture, and L-HH for flooded versus nonflooded forest), and cross-polarized L-band data provided the best separation between woody and nonwoody vegetation. Between the April and October missions, the Amazon River level fell about 3.6 m and the portion of the study area covered by flooded forest decreased from 23% to 12%. This study demonstrates the ability of multifrequency SAR to quantify in near realtime the extent of inundation on forested floodplains, and its potential application for timely monitoring of flood events.

  20. Inherently Multimodal Nanoparticle-Driven Tracking and Real-Time Delineation of Orthotopic Prostate Tumors and Micrometastases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men and the second cause of male cancer-related deaths. There are currently three critical needs in prostate cancer imaging to personalize cancer treatment: (1) accurate intraprostatic imaging for multiple foci and extra-capsular extent; (2) monitoring local and systemic treatment response and predicting recurrence; and (3) more sensitive imaging of occult prostate cancer bone metastases. Recently, our lab developed porphysomes, inherently multimodal, all-organic nanoparticles with flexible and robust radiochemistry. Herein, we validate the first in vivo application of 64Cu-porphysomes in clinically relevant orthotopic prostate and bony metastatic cancer models. We demonstrate clear multimodal delineation of orthotopic tumors on both the macro- and the microscopic scales (using both PET and fluorescence) and sensitively detected small bony metastases (<2 mm). The unique and multifaceted properties of porphysomes offers a promising all-in-one prostate cancer imaging agent for tumor detection and treatment response/recurrence monitoring using both radionuclide- and photonic-based strategies. PMID:23544841

  1. Inherently multimodal nanoparticle-driven tracking and real-time delineation of orthotopic prostate tumors and micrometastases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tracy W; Macdonald, Thomas D; Jin, Cheng S; Gold, Joseph M; Bristow, Robert G; Wilson, Brian C; Zheng, Gang

    2013-05-28

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men and the second cause of male cancer-related deaths. There are currently three critical needs in prostate cancer imaging to personalize cancer treatment: (1) accurate intraprostatic imaging for multiple foci and extra-capsular extent; (2) monitoring local and systemic treatment response and predicting recurrence; and (3) more sensitive imaging of occult prostate cancer bone metastases. Recently, our lab developed porphysomes, inherently multimodal, all-organic nanoparticles with flexible and robust radiochemistry. Herein, we validate the first in vivo application of (64)Cu-porphysomes in clinically relevant orthotopic prostate and bony metastatic cancer models. We demonstrate clear multimodal delineation of orthotopic tumors on both the macro- and the microscopic scales (using both PET and fluorescence) and sensitively detected small bony metastases (<2 mm). The unique and multifaceted properties of porphysomes offers a promising all-in-one prostate cancer imaging agent for tumor detection and treatment response/recurrence monitoring using both radionuclide- and photonic-based strategies.

  2. Semi-automated extraction and delineation of 3D roads of street scene from mobile laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bisheng; Fang, Lina; Li, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    Accurate 3D road information is important for applications such as road maintenance and virtual 3D modeling. Mobile laser scanning (MLS) is an efficient technique for capturing dense point clouds that can be used to construct detailed road models for large areas. This paper presents a method for extracting and delineating roads from large-scale MLS point clouds. The proposed method partitions MLS point clouds into a set of consecutive "scanning lines", which each consists of a road cross section. A moving window operator is used to filter out non-ground points line by line, and curb points are detected based on curb patterns. The detected curb points are tracked and refined so that they are both globally consistent and locally similar. To evaluate the validity of the proposed method, experiments were conducted using two types of street-scene point clouds captured by Optech's Lynx Mobile Mapper System. The completeness, correctness, and quality of the extracted roads are over 94.42%, 91.13%, and 91.3%, respectively, which proves the proposed method is a promising solution for extracting 3D roads from MLS point clouds.

  3. Delineating transcriptional networks of prognostic gene signatures refines treatment recommendations for lymph node-negative breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lanigan, Fiona; Brien, Gerard L; Fan, Yue; Madden, Stephen F; Jerman, Emilia; Maratha, Ashwini; Aloraifi, Fatima; Hokamp, Karsten; Dunne, Eiseart J; Lohan, Amanda J; Flanagan, Louise; Garbe, James C; Stampfer, Martha R; Fridberg, Marie; Jirstrom, Karin; Quinn, Cecily M; Loftus, Brendan; Gallagher, William M; Geraghty, James; Bracken, Adrian P

    2015-09-01

    The majority of women diagnosed with lymph node-negative breast cancer are unnecessarily treated with damaging chemotherapeutics after surgical resection. This highlights the importance of understanding and more accurately predicting patient prognosis. In the present study, we define the transcriptional networks regulating well-established prognostic gene expression signatures. We find that the same set of transcriptional regulators consistently lie upstream of both 'prognosis' and 'proliferation' gene signatures, suggesting that a central transcriptional network underpins a shared phenotype within these signatures. Strikingly, the master transcriptional regulators within this network predict recurrence risk for lymph node-negative breast cancer better than currently used multigene prognostic assays, particularly in estrogen receptor-positive patients. Simultaneous examination of p16(INK4A) expression, which predicts tumours that have bypassed cellular senescence, revealed that intermediate levels of p16(INK4A) correlate with an intact pRB pathway and improved survival. A combination of these master transcriptional regulators and p16(INK4A), termed the OncoMasTR score, stratifies tumours based on their proliferative and senescence capacity, facilitating a clearer delineation of lymph node-negative breast cancer patients at high risk of recurrence, and thus requiring chemotherapy. Furthermore, OncoMasTR accurately classifies over 60% of patients as 'low risk', an improvement on existing prognostic assays, which has the potential to reduce overtreatment in early-stage patients. Taken together, the present study provides new insights into the transcriptional regulation of cellular proliferation in breast cancer and provides an opportunity to enhance and streamline methods of predicting breast cancer prognosis.

  4. An object-based approach to delineate wetlands across landscapes of varied disturbance with high spatial resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mui, Amy; He, Yuhong; Weng, Qihao

    2015-11-01

    Mapping wetlands across both natural and human-altered landscapes is important for the management of these ecosystems. Though they are considered important landscape elements providing both ecological and socioeconomic benefits, accurate wetland inventories do not exist in many areas. In this study, a multi-scale geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA) approach was employed to segment three high spatial resolution images acquired over landscapes of varying heterogeneity due to human-disturbance to determine the robustness of this method to changing scene variability. Multispectral layers, a digital elevation layer, normalized-difference vegetation index (NDVI) layer, and a first-order texture layer were used to segment images across three segmentation scales with a focus on accurate delineation of wetland boundaries and wetland components. Each ancillary input layer contributed to improving segmentation at different scales. Wetlands were classified using a nearest neighbor approach across a relatively undisturbed park site and an agricultural site using GeoEye1 imagery, and an urban site using WorldView2 data. Successful wetland classification was achieved across all study sites with an accuracy above 80%, though results suggest that overall a higher degree of landscape heterogeneity may negatively affect both segmentation and classification. The agricultural site suffered from the greatest amount of over and under segmentation, and lowest map accuracy (kappa: 0.78) which was partially attributed to confusion among a greater proportion of mixed vegetated classes from both wetlands and uplands. Accuracy of individual wetland classes based on the Canadian Wetland Classification system varied between each site, with kappa values ranging from 0.64 for the swamp class and 0.89 for the marsh class. This research developed a unique approach to mapping wetlands of various degrees of disturbance using GEOBIA, which can be applied to study other wetlands of similar

  5. Respiration effect on wavelet-based ECG T-wave end delineation strategies.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Maikel; Martínez, Juan Pablo; Laguna, Pablo; Bailón, Raquel; Almeida, Rute

    2012-07-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to study the influence of the mechanical effect of respiration over the T-wave end delineation. We compared the performance of an automatic delineation system based on the wavelet transform (WT), considering single lead (SL), global delineation locations obtained from SL annotations (SLR), and multilead (ML) approaches. The linear relation between the variations on T-wave end locations obtained with each of the methods and the mechanical effect of respiration was quantified using spectral coherence and ARARX modeling both in simulated signals and in real data. We also explored the evolution of the vectorcardiographic spatial loop using the projection on the main direction of the WT in the region close to the T-wave end ( T(e)) and its relation with respiration. The dispersion of the additional T-wave end location error due to respiration was reduced by 15% using SLR with respect to SL, while ML allows for a reduction of around 40%. The percentage of that error correlated with respiration was in average 99% using SL while 82% and 72% using SLR and ML, respectively. Thus, results suggest that ML is the most adequate strategy for T-wave delineation, allowing the reduction of the instability of T-wave end location caused by respiration.

  6. Using the Gravity Model to Delineate a Trade Area: A Class Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dzik, Anthony J.

    1992-01-01

    Reports that students who might be bored or intimidated by economic geographic theory become enthusiastic when they can apply it to their own experiences. Describes a class project involving fieldwork and in-class analysis on delineating the retail trade area of a small Ohio city. Includes three maps and mathematical formulae for data analysis.…

  7. 365. J.W., Delineator February 1934 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    365. J.W., Delineator February 1934 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; SAN FRANCISCO ANCHORAGE; PIER NO. 1 - DETAILS; CONTRACT NO. 3; SUP. DRAWING NO. 22A - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  8. 364. J.G.M., Delineator February 1934 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    364. J.G.M., Delineator February 1934 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; CONTRACT NO. 6; SUPERSTRUCTURE - WEST BAY CROSSING; SAN FRANCISCO ANCHORAGE CABLE BENT CASTING; AMERICAN BRIDGE CO.; AMBRIDGE PLANT; ORDER NO. G 4852 C; SHEET NO. 100 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  9. 363. A.C.S., Delineator March 1934 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    363. A.C.S., Delineator March 1934 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; CONTRACT NO. 6A; SUPERSTRUCTURE - WEST BAY CROSSING; SAN FRANCISCO ANCHORAGE; AMERICAN BRIDGE CO.; AMBRIDGE PLANT; ORDER NO. G4866; SHEET NO E3 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  10. 358. E.S.T., Delineator April 1935 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    358. E.S.T., Delineator April 1935 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; SAN FRANCISCO SECTION AND APPROACHES; GIRDER AND FLOOR BEAM DETAILS; SPANS 5 TO 32; CONTRACT NO. 15 & 15A; SUP. DRAWING NO. 8A - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  11. 392. J.R.L., Delineator August 1933 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    392. J.R.L., Delineator August 1933 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; SUPERSTRUCTURE - EAST BAY CROSSING; PIER El; ANCHORAGE STEEL WORK; CONTRACT NO. 7; SUP. DRAWING NO. 72A - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  12. 371. A.J.M. and D.L.S., Delineators April 1934. STATE OF CALIFORNIA; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    371. A.J.M. and D.L.S., Delineators April 1934. STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; SUPERSTRUCTURE - WEST BAY CROSSING; PIER NO. 4; VERTICAL SECTIONS; CONTRACT NO. 2; SUP. DRAWING NO. 17A - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  13. 357. E.S.T., Delineator April 1935 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    357. E.S.T., Delineator April 1935 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; SAN FRANCISCO SECTION AND APPROACHES; GENERAL PLAN AND ELEVATION; CONTRACT NO. 15 AND 15A; SUP. DRAWINGS NO. 1-A - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  14. 388. D.E.M., Delineator December 1932 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    388. D.E.M., Delineator December 1932 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; SUPERSTRUCTURE - WEST BAY CROSSING; SUSPENDED STRUCTURE; SIDE SPAN TRUSSES AT ANCHORAGES; CONTRACT NO. 6; DRAWING NO. 40 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  15. 376. A.J.M. and D.L.S., Delineators February 1934 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    376. A.J.M. and D.L.S., Delineators February 1934 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; YERBA BUENA CROSSING; CROSS-SECTIONS OF CABLE ANCHORAGE; CONTRACT NO. 5; SUP. DRAWING NO. 4A - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  16. 378. A.C.S., Delineator March 1933 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    378. A.C.S., Delineator March 1933 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; CONTRACT NO. 6A; SUPERSTRUCTURE - WEST BAY CROSSING; YERBA BUENA ANCHORAGE & CABLE BENT. AMERICAN BRIDGE CO.; AMBRIDGE PLANT; ORDER NO. G 4866; SHEET NO. E4 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  17. 387. D.E.M., Delineator December 1932 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    387. D.E.M., Delineator December 1932 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; SUPERSTRUCTURE - WEST BAY CROSSING; TOWERS 2, 3, 5 & 6; BRACING DETAILS - LOWER DECK; CONTRACT NO. 6; DRAWING NO. 27 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  18. 367. J.W.G., Delineator August 1933 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    367. J.W.G., Delineator August 1933 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; SUPERSTRUCTURE - WEST BAY CROSSING; PIER NO. 5; GENERAL PLAN & ELEVATION; CONTRACT NO. 2; SUP. DRAWING NO. 10A - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  19. Delineation of Roles and Functions of Respiratory Therapy Personnel. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Respiratory Therapy, Dallas, TX.

    Frequently assigned tasks performed by qualified respiratory therapy personnel are delineated in the document in such a manner that proficiency examinations within the profession can be prepared from them. Four distinct proficiency levels are identified and defined. Due to the fact that proficiency examinations will be assigned for them,…

  20. Instructor Strategic Ambiguity: Delineation of the Construct and Development of a Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klyukovski, Andrei A.; Medlock-Klyukovski, Amanda L.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents research to delineate the construct of instructor strategic ambiguity (ISA) and develop a measure. The first study analyzed instructor uses of ambiguity, identified 18 strategies, and classified them into four categories. The second study developed an Instructor Strategic Ambiguity Measure (ISAM) for the college classroom.…

  1. 355. J.R.L., Delineator Date Unknown STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    355. J.R.L., Delineator Date Unknown STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; PRELIMINARY LAYOUT STUDIES; DRG. NO. 3 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  2. 411. Delineator Unknown November 2, 1933 1/8" SCALE DETAIL STUDY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    411. Delineator Unknown November 2, 1933 1/8" SCALE DETAIL STUDY OF S.F. ANCHORAGE; SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; TIMOTHY L. PFLUEGER, ARTHUR BROWN JR., JOHN J. DONOVAN; BOARD OF CONSULTING ARCHITECTS; SHEET NO. R31 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  3. 75 FR 39052 - 2010 Standards for Delineating Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... BUDGET 2010 Standards for Delineating Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas Correction In... Statistical Areas and New England City and Town Areas, in the last line of paragraph (a), ``75'' should read... column, in paragraph (f), in the first and second lines, ``Metropolitan and Metropolitan Statistical...

  4. Electrochemical method for defect delineation in silicon-on-insulator wafers

    DOEpatents

    Guilinger, Terry R.; Jones, Howland D. T.; Kelly, Michael J.; Medernach, John W.; Stevenson, Joel O.; Tsao, Sylvia S.

    1991-01-01

    An electrochemical method for defect delineation in thin-film SOI or SOS wafers in which a surface of a silicon wafer is electrically connected so as to control the voltage of the surface within a specified range, the silicon wafer is then contacted with an electrolyte, and, after removing the electrolyte, defects and metal contamination in the silicon wafer are identified.

  5. Assessment and Delineation of DNAPL Source Zones at Hazardous Waste Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document provides a framework to assess the presence of DNAPL in the subsurface and for delineating the spatial extent of a DNAPL source zone. Direct and indirect site investigation methods are discussed, as well as their applicability in unconsolidated deposits and fracture...

  6. Role Delineation for the Position of Director of Worksite Health Promotion Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golaszewski, Thomas; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A six-step process defines and validates the role of worksite health promotion directors: developing expert opinion consensus, examining current job descriptions, reviewing literature, reviewing independent role delineations, developing competency statements, and validating statements to reduce the number to 80. The competencies are categorized as…

  7. INVESTIGATION OF HYDROGEOLOGIC MAPPING TO DELINEATE PROTECTION ZONES AROUND SPRINGS: REPORT OF TWO CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods commonly used to delineate protection zones for water-supply wells are often not directly applicable for springs. This investigation focuses on the use of hydrogeologic mapping methods to identify physical and hydrologic features that control ground-water flow to springs...

  8. What Community College Students Value: Delineating a Normative Structure for Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akin, Renea; Park, Toby J.

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript delineates a normative structure for community college students, outlines how this structure varies by student characteristics, and compares this structure to that of a previously established normative structure identified at a 4-year institution. A total of 512 student survey responses on the College Student Behaviors Inventory…

  9. Automatic delineation of tumor volumes by co-segmentation of combined PET/MR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibfarth, S.; Eckert, F.; Welz, S.; Siegel, C.; Schmidt, H.; Schwenzer, N.; Zips, D.; Thorwarth, D.

    2015-07-01

    Combined PET/MRI may be highly beneficial for radiotherapy treatment planning in terms of tumor delineation and characterization. To standardize tumor volume delineation, an automatic algorithm for the co-segmentation of head and neck (HN) tumors based on PET/MR data was developed. Ten HN patient datasets acquired in a combined PET/MR system were available for this study. The proposed algorithm uses both the anatomical T2-weighted MR and FDG-PET data. For both imaging modalities tumor probability maps were derived, assigning each voxel a probability of being cancerous based on its signal intensity. A combination of these maps was subsequently segmented using a threshold level set algorithm. To validate the method, tumor delineations from three radiation oncologists were available. Inter-observer variabilities and variabilities between the algorithm and each observer were quantified by means of the Dice similarity index and a distance measure. Inter-observer variabilities and variabilities between observers and algorithm were found to be comparable, suggesting that the proposed algorithm is adequate for PET/MR co-segmentation. Moreover, taking into account combined PET/MR data resulted in more consistent tumor delineations compared to MR information only.

  10. Resource Documentation and Recharge Area Delineation of a Large Fluvial Karst System: Carroll Cave, Missouri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Located along Wet Glaize Creek in the central Missouri Ozarks, Toronto Spring is a distributary spring system where surface stream flow mixes with flow from the Carroll Cave system. Following recharge area delineations for Thunder River and Confusion Creek in Carroll Cave, flow from these rivers wa...

  11. Differential assessment of designations of wetland status using two delineation methods.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meiyin; Kalma, Dennis; Treadwell-Steitz, Carol

    2014-07-01

    Two different methods are commonly used to delineate and characterize wetlands. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (ACOE) delineation method uses field observation of hydrology, soils, and vegetation. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Wetland Inventory Program (NWI) relies on remote sensing and photointerpretation. This study compared designations of wetland status at selected study sites using both methods. Twenty wetlands from the Wetland Boundaries Map of the Ausable-Boquet River Basin (created using the revised NWI method) in the Ausable River watershed in Essex and Clinton Counties, NY, were selected for this study. Sampling sites within and beyond the NWI wetland boundaries were selected. During the summers of 2008 and 2009, wetland hydrology, soils, and vegetation were examined for wetland indicators following the methods described in the ACOE delineation manual. The study shows that the two methods agree at 78 % of the sampling sites and disagree at 22 % of the sites. Ninety percent of the sampling locations within the wetland boundaries on the NWI maps were categorized as ACOE wetlands with all three ACOE wetland indicators present. A binary linear logistic regression model analyzed the relationship between the designations of the two methods. The outcome of the model indicates that 83 % of the time, the two wetland designation methods agree. When discrepancies are found, it is the presence or absence of wetland hydrology and vegetation that causes the differences in delineation.

  12. Integrating Ensemble Data Assimilation and Indicator Geostatistics to Delineate Hydrofacies Spatial Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, X.; Chen, X.; Ye, M.; Dai, Z.; Hammond, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new framework for delineating spatial distributions of hydrofacies from indirect data by linking ensemble-based data assimilation method (e.g., Ensemble Kalman filter, EnKF) with indicator geostatistics based on transition probability. The nature of ensemble data assimilation makes the framework efficient and flexible to integrate various types of observation data. We leveraged the level set concept to establish transformations between discrete hydrofacies and continuous variables, which is a critical element to implement ensemble data assimilation methods for hydrofacies delineation. T-PROGS is used to generate realizations of hydrofacies fields given conditioning points. An additional quenching step of T-PROGS is taken to preserve spatial structure of updated hydrofacies after each data assimilation step. This new method is illustrated by a two-dimensional (2-D) synthetic study in which transient hydraulic head data resulting from pumping is assimilated to delineate hydrofacies distribution. Our results showed that the proposed framework was able to characterize hydrofacies distribution and their associated permeability with adequate accuracy even with limited direct hydrofacies data. This method may find broader applications in facies delineation using other types of indirect measurements, such as tracer tests and geophysical surveys.

  13. Models of Racial and Ethnic Identity Development: Delineation of Practice Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwan, Kwong-Liem Karl

    2001-01-01

    Summarizes common themes that emerged from the articles in this special issue of "Journal of Mental Health Counseling" on the counseling of racially diverse clients. Discusses variables that need to be addressed when working with members of visible racial and ethnic groups, and delineates some assessment questions for counselors.…

  14. {sup 18}F-FDG PET Definition of Gross Tumor Volume for Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer: Is the Tumor Uptake Value-Based Approach Appropriate for Lymph Node Delineation?

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Nuria; Sanz, Xavier; Trampal, Carlos; Foro, Palmira; Reig, Anna; Lacruz, Marti; Membrive, Ismael; Lozano, Joan; Quera, Jaime; Algara, Manuel

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) with the glucose analogue [18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET) has been used in radiation treatment planning for non-small-cell carcinoma. To date, lymph nodes have been contoured according to the uptake of the tumor. This prospective study was performed to evaluate if nodal volume delineates according to FDG uptake within the primary tumor (PET-GTVnt) is suitable for nodal target volume delineation or if individualized nodal FDG uptake measure (PET-GTVnn) is necessary to better nodal target definition. Methods and Materials: Forty cases, who underwent a diagnostic {sup 18}F-FDG PET/computed tomography (CT) scan, were included. Two PET-based GTVs for each lymph node were contoured and compared. First, we used an isocontour of 40% of the maximum tumor uptake (PET-GTVnt). Second, an isocontour of 40% of the maximum uptake of each node (PET-GTVnn) was employed. To avoid interobserver variability, this was carried out by the same radiation oncologist. Afterwards, the difference between both lymph node volumes was plotted against the ratio of the maximum uptakes (I{sub n}/I{sub t}) in a linear regression analysis. Results: Compared with CT-based lymph node volume (CT-GTVn), the intraclass correlation coefficient of PET-GTVnn was higher than the coefficient of PET-GTVnt (p < 0.001). All cases could be divided into four groups: undetected (17.5%), detected but overestimated (10%), detected but underestimated (35%), and correctly detected (37.5%). Conclusions: If a method of automatic delineation shall be applied, this method must be applied to every lesion separately. However, to facilitate the delineation in daily practice, when I{sub n}/I{sub t} is {<=}25%, lymph nodes could be delineated in accordance with tumor uptake, keeping an absolute difference in radii <5 mm.

  15. A high resolution and high contrast MRI for differentiation of subcortical structures for DBS targeting: the Fast Gray Matter Acquisition T1 Inversion Recovery (FGATIR).

    PubMed

    Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Haq, Ihtsham U; Foote, Kelly D; Okun, Michael S; Bova, Frank J

    2009-08-01

    DBS depends on precise placement of the stimulating electrode into an appropriate target region. Image-based (direct) targeting has been limited by the ability of current technology to visualize DBS targets. We have recently developed and employed a Fast Gray Matter Acquisition T1 Inversion Recovery (FGATIR) 3T MRI sequence to more reliably visualize these structures. The FGATIR provides significantly better high resolution thin (1 mm) slice visualization of DBS targets than does either standard 3T T1 or T2-weighted imaging. The T1 subcortical image revealed relatively poor contrast among the targets for DBS, though the sequence did allow localization of striatum and thalamus. T2 FLAIR scans demonstrated better contrast between the STN, SNr, red nucleus (RN), and pallidum (GPe/GPi). The FGATIR scans allowed for localization of the thalamus, striatum, GPe/GPi, RN, and SNr and displayed sharper delineation of these structures. The FGATIR also revealed features not visible on other scan types: the internal lamina of the GPi, fiber bundles from the internal capsule piercing the striatum, and the boundaries of the STN. We hope that use of the FGATIR to aid initial targeting will translate in future studies to faster and more accurate procedures with consequent improvements in clinical outcomes.

  16. Retroperitoneal Sarcoma (RPS) High Risk Gross Tumor Volume Boost (HR GTV Boost) Contour Delineation Agreement Among NRG Sarcoma Radiation and Surgical Oncologists

    PubMed Central

    Baldini, Elizabeth H.; Bosch, Walter; Kane, John M.; Abrams, Ross A.; Salerno, Kilian E.; Deville, Curtiland; Raut, Chandrajit P.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Chen, Yen-Lin; Mullen, John T.; Millikan, Keith W.; Karakousis, Giorgos; Kendrick, Michael L.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Wang, Dian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Curative intent management of retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) requires gross total resection. Preoperative radiotherapy (RT) often is used as an adjuvant to surgery, but recurrence rates remain high. To enhance RT efficacy with acceptable tolerance, there is interest in delivering “boost doses” of RT to high-risk areas of gross tumor volume (HR GTV) judged to be at risk for positive resection margins. We sought to evaluate variability in HR GTV boost target volume delineation among collaborating sarcoma radiation and surgical oncologist teams. Methods Radiation planning CT scans for three cases of RPS were distributed to seven paired radiation and surgical oncologist teams at six institutions. Teams contoured HR GTV boost volumes for each case. Analysis of contour agreement was performed using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm and kappa statistics. Results HRGTV boost volume contour agreement between the seven teams was “substantial” or “moderate” for all cases. Agreement was best on the torso wall posteriorly (abutting posterior chest abdominal wall) and medially (abutting ipsilateral para-vertebral space and great vessels). Contours varied more significantly abutting visceral organs due to differing surgical opinions regarding planned partial organ resection. Conclusions Agreement of RPS HRGTV boost volumes between sarcoma radiation and surgical oncologist teams was substantial to moderate. Differences were most striking in regions abutting visceral organs, highlighting the importance of collaboration between the radiation and surgical oncologist for “individualized” target delineation on the basis of areas deemed at risk and planned resection. PMID:26018727

  17. Global Biogeography of Reef Fishes: A Hierarchical Quantitative Delineation of Regions

    PubMed Central

    Kulbicki, Michel; Parravicini, Valeriano; Bellwood, David R.; Arias-Gonzàlez, Ernesto; Chabanet, Pascale; Floeter, Sergio R.; Friedlander, Alan; McPherson, Jana; Myers, Robert E.; Vigliola, Laurent; Mouillot, David

    2013-01-01

    Delineating regions is an important first step in understanding the evolution and biogeography of faunas. However, quantitative approaches are often limited at a global scale, particularly in the marine realm. Reef fishes are the most diversified group of marine fishes, and compared to most other phyla, their taxonomy and geographical distributions are relatively well known. Based on 169 checklists spread across all tropical oceans, the present work aims to quantitatively delineate biogeographical entities for reef fishes at a global scale. Four different classifications were used to account for uncertainty related to species identification and the quality of checklists. The four classifications delivered converging results, with biogeographical entities that can be hierarchically delineated into realms, regions and provinces. All classifications indicated that the Indo-Pacific has a weak internal structure, with a high similarity from east to west. In contrast, the Atlantic and the Eastern Tropical Pacific were more strongly structured, which may be related to the higher levels of endemism in these two realms. The “Coral Triangle”, an area of the Indo-Pacific which contains the highest species diversity for reef fishes, was not clearly delineated by its species composition. Our results show a global concordance with recent works based upon endemism, environmental factors, expert knowledge, or their combination. Our quantitative delineation of biogeographical entities, however, tests the robustness of the results and yields easily replicated patterns. The similarity between our results and those from other phyla, such as corals, suggests that our approach may be of broad utility in describing and understanding global marine biodiversity patterns. PMID:24386083

  18. Global biogeography of reef fishes: a hierarchical quantitative delineation of regions.

    PubMed

    Kulbicki, Michel; Parravicini, Valeriano; Bellwood, David R; Arias-Gonzàlez, Ernesto; Chabanet, Pascale; Floeter, Sergio R; Friedlander, Alan; McPherson, Jana; Myers, Robert E; Vigliola, Laurent; Mouillot, David

    2013-01-01

    Delineating regions is an important first step in understanding the evolution and biogeography of faunas. However, quantitative approaches are often limited at a global scale, particularly in the marine realm. Reef fishes are the most diversified group of marine fishes, and compared to most other phyla, their taxonomy and geographical distributions are relatively well known. Based on 169 checklists spread across all tropical oceans, the present work aims to quantitatively delineate biogeographical entities for reef fishes at a global scale. Four different classifications were used to account for uncertainty related to species identification and the quality of checklists. The four classifications delivered converging results, with biogeographical entities that can be hierarchically delineated into realms, regions and provinces. All classifications indicated that the Indo-Pacific has a weak internal structure, with a high similarity from east to west. In contrast, the Atlantic and the Eastern Tropical Pacific were more strongly structured, which may be related to the higher levels of endemism in these two realms. The "Coral Triangle", an area of the Indo-Pacific which contains the highest species diversity for reef fishes, was not clearly delineated by its species composition. Our results show a global concordance with recent works based upon endemism, environmental factors, expert knowledge, or their combination. Our quantitative delineation of biogeographical entities, however, tests the robustness of the results and yields easily replicated patterns. The similarity between our results and those from other phyla, such as corals, suggests that our approach may be of broad utility in describing and understanding global marine biodiversity patterns.

  19. Accurate pointing of tungsten welding electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegelmeier, P.

    1971-01-01

    Thoriated-tungsten is pointed accurately and quickly by using sodium nitrite. Point produced is smooth and no effort is necessary to hold the tungsten rod concentric. The chemically produced point can be used several times longer than ground points. This method reduces time and cost of preparing tungsten electrodes.

  20. DoctorEye: A Clinically Driven Multifunctional Platform, for Accurate Processing of Tumors in Medical Images

    PubMed Central

    Skounakis, Emmanouil; Farmaki, Christina; Sakkalis, Vangelis; Roniotis, Alexandros; Banitsas, Konstantinos; Graf, Norbert; Marias, Konstantinos

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a novel, open access interactive platform for 3D medical image analysis, simulation and visualization, focusing in oncology images. The platform was developed through constant interaction and feedback from expert clinicians integrating a thorough analysis of their requirements while having an ultimate goal of assisting in accurately delineating tumors. It allows clinicians not only to work with a large number of 3D tomographic datasets but also to efficiently annotate multiple regions of interest in the same session. Manual and semi-automatic segmentation techniques combined with integrated correction tools assist in the quick and refined delineation of tumors while different users can add different components related to oncology such as tumor growth and simulation algorithms for improving therapy planning. The platform has been tested by different users and over large number of heterogeneous tomographic datasets to ensure stability, usability, extensibility and robustness with promising results. Availability The platform, a manual and tutorial videos are available at: http://biomodeling.ics.forth.gr. It is free to use under the GNU General Public License. PMID:21603180

  1. Toward Semi-automated Assessment of Target Volume Delineation in Radiotherapy Trials: The SCOPE 1 Pretrial Test Case

    SciTech Connect

    Gwynne, Sarah; Spezi, Emiliano; Wills, Lucy; Nixon, Lisette; Hurt, Chris; Joseph, George; Evans, Mererid; Griffiths, Gareth; Crosby, Tom; Staffurth, John

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate different conformity indices (CIs) for use in the analysis of outlining consistency within the pretrial quality assurance (Radiotherapy Trials Quality Assurance [RTTQA]) program of a multicenter chemoradiation trial of esophageal cancer and to make recommendations for their use in future trials. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Research Institute SCOPE 1 trial is an ongoing Cancer Research UK-funded phase II/III randomized controlled trial of chemoradiation with capecitabine and cisplatin with or without cetuximab for esophageal cancer. The pretrial RTTQA program included a detailed radiotherapy protocol, an educational package, and a single mid-esophageal tumor test case that were sent to each investigator to outline. Investigator gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were received from 50 investigators in 34 UK centers, and CERR (Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research) was used to perform an assessment of each investigator GTV against a predefined gold-standard GTV using different CIs. A new metric, the local conformity index (l-CI), that can localize areas of maximal discordance was developed. Results: The median Jaccard conformity index (JCI) was 0.69 (interquartile range, 0.62-0.70), with 14 of 50 investigators (28%) achieving a JCI of 0.7 or greater. The median geographical miss index was 0.09 (interquartile range, 0.06-0.16), and the mean discordance index was 0.27 (95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.30). The l-CI was highest in the middle section of the volume, where the tumor was bulky and more easily definable, and identified 4 slices where fewer than 20% of investigators achieved an l-CI of 0.7 or greater. Conclusions: The available CIs analyze different aspects of a gold standard-observer variation, with JCI being the most useful as a single metric. Additional information is provided by the l-CI and can focus the efforts of the RTTQA team in these areas, possibly leading to semi-automated outlining assessment.

  2. Molecular Differentiation of Risk for Disease Progression: Delineating Stage-Specific Therapeutic Targets for Disease Management in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    microarrays. Nat. Genet., 21 : 10-14, 1999 4. Oh J. M., Hanash S. M., Teichroew D. Mining protein data from two-dimensional gels: tools for systematic post...PLCIS, 13 LCIS and 21 DCIS. Patient cohort DNA was interrogated for gene loss and gain at 122 gene loci. An interpretation of gene loss or gain was...and 21 (37%) DCIS. An interpretation of gene loss or gain was measured as the number of copies in a range of 0 to more than 2 copies, respectively

  3. Target delineation for radiosurgery of a small brain arteriovenous malformation using high-resolution contrast-enhanced cone beam CT.

    PubMed

    van der Bom, Imramsjah M J; Gounis, Matthew J; Ding, Linda; Kühn, Anna Luisa; Goff, David; Puri, Ajit S; Wakhloo, Ajay K

    2014-06-01

    Three years following endovascular embolization of a 3 mm ruptured arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the left superior colliculus in a 42-year-old man, digital subtraction angiography showed continuous regrowth of the lesion. Thin-slice MRI acquired for treatment planning did not show the AVM nidus. The patient was brought back to the angiography suite for high-resolution contrast-enhanced cone beam CT (VasoCT) acquired using an angiographic c-arm system. The lesion and nidus were visualized with VasoCT. MRI, CT and VasoCT data were transferred to radiation planning software and mutually co-registered. The nidus was annotated for radiation on VasoCT data by an experienced neurointerventional radiologist and a dose/treatment plan was completed. Due to image registration, the treatment area could be directly adopted into the MRI and CT data. The AVM was completely obliterated 10 months following completion of the radiosurgery treatment.

  4. Target delineation for radiosurgery of a small brain arteriovenous malformation using high-resolution contrast-enhanced cone beam CT.

    PubMed

    van der Bom, Imramsjah M J; Gounis, Matthew J; Ding, Linda; Kühn, Anna Luisa; Goff, David; Puri, Ajit S; Wakhloo, Ajay K

    2013-08-14

    Three years following endovascular embolization of a 3 mm ruptured arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the left superior colliculus in a 42-year-old man, digital subtraction angiography showed continuous regrowth of the lesion. Thin-slice MRI acquired for treatment planning did not show the AVM nidus. The patient was brought back to the angiography suite for high-resolution contrast-enhanced cone beam CT (VasoCT) acquired using an angiographic c-arm system. The lesion and nidus were visualized with VasoCT. MRI, CT and VasoCT data were transferred to radiation planning software and mutually co-registered. The nidus was annotated for radiation on VasoCT data by an experienced neurointerventional radiologist and a dose/treatment plan was completed. Due to image registration, the treatment area could be directly adopted into the MRI and CT data. The AVM was completely obliterated 10 months following completion of the radiosurgery treatment.

  5. Comparison of FDG-PET/CT and CT for Delineation of Lumpectomy Cavity for Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric C. Lavely, William C.; Frassica, Deborah A.; Myers, Lee T.; Asrari, Fariba; Wahl, Richard L.; Zellars, Richard C.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: The success of partial breast irradiation critically depends on proper target localization. We examined the use of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomography (CT) for improved lumpectomy cavity (LC) delineation and treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Twelve breast cancer patients underwent FDG-PET/CT on a GE Discovery scanner with a median time from surgery to PET/CT of 49 days. The LC was contoured on the CT scan by a radiation oncologist and, together with a nuclear medicine physician, on the PET/CT scan. The volumes were calculated and compared in each patient. Treatment planning target volumes (PTVs) were calculated by expanding the margin 2 cm beyond the LC, maintaining a 5-mm margin from the skin and chest wall, and the treatment plans were evaluated. In addition, a study with a patient-like phantom was conducted to evaluate the effect that the window/level settings might have on contouring. Results: The margin of the LC was well visualized on all FDG-PET images. The phantom results indicated that the difference between the known volume and the FDG-PET-delineated volume was <10%, regardless of the window/level settings. The PET/CT volumes were larger than the CT volumes in all cases (median volume ratio, 1.68; range, 1.24-2.45; p = 0.004). The PET/CT-based PTVs were also larger than the CT-based PTV (median volume ratio, 1.16; range, 1.08-1.64; p = 0.006). In 9 of 12 patients, a CT-based treatment plan did not provide adequate coverage of the PET/CT-based PTV (99% of the PTV received <95% of the prescribed dose), resulting in substantial cold spots in some plans. In these cases, treatment plans were generated which were specifically designed to cover the larger PET/CT-based PTV. Although these plans showed an increased dose to the normal tissues, the increases were modest: the non-target breast volume receiving {>=}50 Gy, lung volume receiving {>=}30 Gy, and heart volume receiving {>=}5 Gy increased by 5

  6. Feedback about More Accurate versus Less Accurate Trials: Differential Effects on Self-Confidence and Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected by feedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On Day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of…

  7. Target marketing strategies for occupational therapy entrepreneurs.

    PubMed

    Kautzmann, L N; Kautzmann, F N; Navarro, F H

    1989-01-01

    Understanding marketing techniques is one of the skills needed by successful entre renews. Target marketing is an effective method for occupational therapy entrepreneurs to use in determining when and where to enter the marketplace. The two components of target marketing, market segmentation and the development of marketing mix strategies for each identified market segment, are described. The Profife of Attitudes Toward Health Care (PATH) method of psychographic market segmentation of health care consumers is presented. Occupational therapy marketing mix strategies for each PATH consumer group are delineated and compatible groupings of market segments are suggested.

  8. Accurate Guitar Tuning by Cochlear Implant Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  9. New model accurately predicts reformate composition

    SciTech Connect

    Ancheyta-Juarez, J.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. )

    1994-01-31

    Although naphtha reforming is a well-known process, the evolution of catalyst formulation, as well as new trends in gasoline specifications, have led to rapid evolution of the process, including: reactor design, regeneration mode, and operating conditions. Mathematical modeling of the reforming process is an increasingly important tool. It is fundamental to the proper design of new reactors and revamp of existing ones. Modeling can be used to optimize operating conditions, analyze the effects of process variables, and enhance unit performance. Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo has developed a model of the catalytic reforming process that accurately predicts reformate composition at the higher-severity conditions at which new reformers are being designed. The new AA model is more accurate than previous proposals because it takes into account the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate constants of each chemical reaction.

  10. Accurate colorimetric feedback for RGB LED clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Kwong; Ashdown, Ian

    2006-08-01

    We present an empirical model of LED emission spectra that is applicable to both InGaN and AlInGaP high-flux LEDs, and which accurately predicts their relative spectral power distributions over a wide range of LED junction temperatures. We further demonstrate with laboratory measurements that changes in LED spectral power distribution with temperature can be accurately predicted with first- or second-order equations. This provides the basis for a real-time colorimetric feedback system for RGB LED clusters that can maintain the chromaticity of white light at constant intensity to within +/-0.003 Δuv over a range of 45 degrees Celsius, and to within 0.01 Δuv when dimmed over an intensity range of 10:1.

  11. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task.

  12. A Semi-Automated Machine Learning Algorithm for Tree Cover Delineation from 1-m Naip Imagery Using a High Performance Computing Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, S.; Ganguly, S.; Nemani, R. R.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Milesi, C.; Votava, P.; Michaelis, A.; Zhang, G.; Cook, B. D.; Saatchi, S. S.; Boyda, E.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate tree cover delineation is a useful instrument in the derivation of Above Ground Biomass (AGB) density estimates from Very High Resolution (VHR) satellite imagery data. Numerous algorithms have been designed to perform tree cover delineation in high to coarse resolution satellite imagery, but most of them do not scale to terabytes of data, typical in these VHR datasets. In this paper, we present an automated probabilistic framework for the segmentation and classification of 1-m VHR data as obtained from the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) for deriving tree cover estimates for the whole of Continental United States, using a High Performance Computing Architecture. The results from the classification and segmentation algorithms are then consolidated into a structured prediction framework using a discriminative undirected probabilistic graphical model based on Conditional Random Field (CRF), which helps in capturing the higher order contextual dependencies between neighboring pixels. Once the final probability maps are generated, the framework is updated and re-trained by incorporating expert knowledge through the relabeling of misclassified image patches. This leads to a significant improvement in the true positive rates and reduction in false positive rates. The tree cover maps were generated for the state of California, which covers a total of 11,095 NAIP tiles and spans a total geographical area of 163,696 sq. miles. Our framework produced correct detection rates of around 85% for fragmented forests and 70% for urban tree cover areas, with false positive rates lower than 3% for both regions. Comparative studies with the National Land Cover Data (NLCD) algorithm and the LiDAR high-resolution canopy height model shows the effectiveness of our algorithm in generating accurate high-resolution tree cover maps.

  13. An Accurate, Simplified Model Intrabeam Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl LF

    2002-05-23

    Beginning with the general Bjorken-Mtingwa solution for intrabeam scattering (IBS) we derive an accurate, greatly simplified model of IBS, valid for high energy beams in normal storage ring lattices. In addition, we show that, under the same conditions, a modified version of Piwinski's IBS formulation (where {eta}{sub x,y}{sup 2}/{beta}{sub x,y} has been replaced by {Eta}{sub x,y}) asymptotically approaches the result of Bjorken-Mtingwa.

  14. An accurate registration technique for distorted images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delapena, Michele; Shaw, Richard A.; Linde, Peter; Dravins, Dainis

    1990-01-01

    Accurate registration of International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) images is crucial because the variability of the geometrical distortions that are introduced by the SEC-Vidicon cameras ensures that raw science images are never perfectly aligned with the Intensity Transfer Functions (ITFs) (i.e., graded floodlamp exposures that are used to linearize and normalize the camera response). A technique for precisely registering IUE images which uses a cross correlation of the fixed pattern that exists in all raw IUE images is described.

  15. On accurate determination of contact angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.

    1992-01-01

    Methods are proposed that exploit a microgravity environment to obtain highly accurate measurement of contact angle. These methods, which are based on our earlier mathematical results, do not require detailed measurement of a liquid free-surface, as they incorporate discontinuous or nearly-discontinuous behavior of the liquid bulk in certain container geometries. Physical testing is planned in the forthcoming IML-2 space flight and in related preparatory ground-based experiments.

  16. Joint accurate time and stable frequency distribution infrastructure sharing fiber footprint with research network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojtech, Josef; Slapak, Martin; Skoda, Pavel; Radil, Jan; Havlis, Ondrej; Altmann, Michal; Munster, Petr; Smotlacha, Vladimir; Kundrat, Jan; Velc, Radek; Altmannova, Lada; Hula, Miloslav

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present infrastructure for accurate time and stable frequency distribution. It is based on sharing of fibers of research and educational network carrying data traffic. Accurate time and stable frequency transmission uses mainly created dark channels amplified by special bidirectional amplifiers with the same propagation path for both directions. Paper also targets challenges joined with bidirectional transmission, which represents directional non-reciprocities and interaction with parallel data transmissions.

  17. Delineation of Waters of the United States for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R E

    2006-09-25

    This report presents the results of a delineation of waters of the United States, including wetlands, for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300 in Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, California. Jones & Stokes mapped vegetation at Site 300 in August, 2001, using Global Positioning System (GPS) data recorders to collect point locations and to record linear features and map unit polygons. We identified wetlands boundaries in the field on the basis of the plant community present. We returned to collect additional information on wetland soils on July 3, 2002. Forty-six wetlands were identified, with a total area of 3.482 hectares (8.605 acres). The wetlands include vernal pools, freshwater seeps, and seasonal ponds. Wetlands appearing to meet the criteria for federal jurisdictional total 1.776 hectares (4.388 acres). A delineation map is presented and a table is provided with information on the type, size, characteristic plant species of each wetland, and a preliminary jurisdictional assessment.

  18. Integration of sewer system maps in topographically based sub-basin delineation in suburban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankowfsky, Sonja; Branger, Flora; Braud, Isabelle; Rodriguez, Fabrice

    2010-05-01

    Due to the increase of urbanization, suburban areas experience a fast change in land use. The impact of such modifications on the watershed hydrological cycle must be quantified. To achieve this goal, distributed hydrological models offer the possibility to take into account land use change, and more particularly to consider urbanized areas and anthropogenic features such as roads or ditches and their impact on the hydrological cycle. A detailed definition of the hydrographical drainage network and a corresponding delineation of sub-basins is therefore necessary as input to distributed models. Sub-basins in natural catchments are usually delineated using standard GIS based terrain analysis. The drainage network in urbanised watersheds is often modified, due to sewer systems, ditches, retention basins, etc.. Therefore, its delineation is not only determined by topography. The simple application of terrain analysis algorithms to delineate sub-basins in suburban areas can consequently lead to erroneous sub-basin borders. This study presents an improved approach for sub-basin delineation in suburban areas. It applies to small catchments connected to a sewage plant, located outside the catchment boundary. The approach assumes that subsurface flow follows topography. The method requires a digital elevation model (DEM), maps of land use, cadastre, sewer system and the location of measurement stations and retention basins. Firstly, the topographic catchment border must be defined for the concerning flow measurement station. Standard GIS based algorithms, like the d8-flow direction algorithm (O'Callaghan and Mark, 1984) can be applied using a high resolution DEM. Secondly, the artificial catchment outlets have to be determined. Each catchment has one natural outlet - the measurement station on the river- but it can have several artificial outlets towards a sewage station. Once the outlets are determined, a first approximation of the "theoretical maximal contributing area

  19. Body-wide hierarchical fuzzy modeling, recognition, and delineation of anatomy in medical images.

    PubMed

    Udupa, Jayaram K; Odhner, Dewey; Zhao, Liming; Tong, Yubing; Matsumoto, Monica M S; Ciesielski, Krzysztof C; Falcao, Alexandre X; Vaideeswaran, Pavithra; Ciesielski, Victoria; Saboury, Babak; Mohammadianrasanani, Syedmehrdad; Sin, Sanghun; Arens, Raanan; Torigian, Drew A

    2014-07-01

    To make Quantitative Radiology (QR) a reality in radiological practice, computerized body-wide Automatic Anatomy Recognition (AAR) becomes essential. With the goal of building a general AAR system that is not tied to any specific organ system, body region, or image modality, this paper presents an AAR methodology for localizing and delineating all major organs in different body regions based on fuzzy modeling ideas and a tight integration of fuzzy models with an Iterative Relative Fuzzy Connectedness (IRFC) delineation algorithm. The methodology consists of five main steps: (a) gathering image data for both building models and testing the AAR algorithms from patient image sets existing in our health system; (b) formulating precise definitions of each body region and organ and delineating them following these definitions; (c) building hierarchical fuzzy anatomy models of organs for each body region; (d) recognizing and locating organs in given images by employing the hierarchical models; and (e) delineating the organs following the hierarchy. In Step (c), we explicitly encode object size and positional relationships into the hierarchy and subsequently exploit this information in object recognition in Step (d) and delineation in Step (e). Modality-independent and dependent aspects are carefully separated in model encoding. At the model building stage, a learning process is carried out for rehearsing an optimal threshold-based object recognition method. The recognition process in Step (d) starts from large, well-defined objects and proceeds down the hierarchy in a global to local manner. A fuzzy model-based version of the IRFC algorithm is created by naturally integrating the fuzzy model constraints into the delineation algorithm. The AAR system is tested on three body regions - thorax (on CT), abdomen (on CT and MRI), and neck (on MRI and CT) - involving a total of over 35 organs and 130 data sets (the total used for model building and testing). The training and

  20. Geospatial datasets for watershed delineation and characterization used in the Hawaii StreamStats web application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rea, Alan; Skinner, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Hawaii StreamStats application uses an integrated suite of raster and vector geospatial datasets to delineate and characterize watersheds. The geospatial datasets used to delineate and characterize watersheds on the StreamStats website, and the methods used to develop the datasets are described in this report. The datasets for Hawaii were derived primarily from 10 meter resolution National Elevation Dataset (NED) elevation models, and the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD), using a set of procedures designed to enforce the drainage pattern from the NHD into the NED, resulting in an integrated suite of elevation-derived datasets. Additional sources of data used for computing basin characteristics include precipitation, land cover, soil permeability, and elevation-derivative datasets. The report also includes links for metadata and downloads of the geospatial datasets.

  1. Delineation of a refined wellhead protection area for bedrock public supply wells, Charlestown, Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, D.L.

    1995-04-01

    This report describes the refined delineation of the Wellhead Protection Area (WHPA) of a wellfield of five public supply wells installed in granitic bedrock in Charlestown, Rhode Island, approximately 32 miles southwest of Providence, RI. The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (RIDEM) requested technical assistance from the USEPA-New England office to reevaluate the wellfield`s existing WHPA boundary with respect to the Charlestown Municipal Landfill, less than one mile upgradient from the wellfield. The Town of Charlestown, which owns the solid waste facility, was considering an areal expansion of the site. Based on the best available information, the refined wellhead protection area is approximately one-tenth the size of that delineated by the RIDEM. In addition, despite these modified size, a portion of the waste cell of the Charlestown Municipal Landfill apparently still lies within the refined WHPA.

  2. Sputter target

    DOEpatents

    Gates, Willard G.; Hale, Gerald J.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an improved sputter target for use in the deposition of hard coatings. An exemplary target is given wherein titanium diboride is brazed to a tantalum backing plate using a gold-palladium-nickel braze alloy.

  3. Use of LiDAR to Assist in Delineating Waters of the United States, Including Wetlands

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    position in the land- scape. Wetness indices are often calculated using the general formula WI = ln(A/tanβ) where A is the catchment area (m2/m...delineations of an Ordinary High Water Mark (OHWM) boundary, LiDAR data or products may be used to view the OHWM signature across a project area ...view vegeta- tive, topographic, and hydrologic patterns across a project area and to focus the investigation on transitional areas . They cannot

  4. 372. J.W.M., Delineator August 1934 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    372. J.W.M., Delineator August 1934 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; CONTRACT NO. 6; SUPERSTRUCTURE - WEST BAY CROSSING; OUTSIDE ELEVATION OF HOUSING; CENTER ANCHORAGE - PIER NO. 4; AMERICAN BRIDGE CO.; AMBRIDGE PLANT; ORDER NO. G 4854-XI; SHEET NO. E8 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  5. Delineation of Methyl-DNA Binding Protein Interactions in the Prostate Cancer Genome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    Protein Interactions in the Prostate Cancer Genome PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Roderick T Hori, Ph.D...July 2012 – 30 June 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Delineation of Methyl-DNA Binding Protein Interactions in the Prostate Cancer ...such as MeCP2, MBD1, MBD2 and MBD4, in malignant prostate cancer cells and matched normal or benign prostate cells using Chromatin

  6. Electromagnetic Delineation and Confirmation of Areas of Groundwater-Surface Water Interaction in a Large River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, J.; Dawe, M. R.; Butler, K. E.; Macquarrie, K. T.

    2004-05-01

    Riverbank filtration systems are typically located in heterogeneous alluvial river valley deposits. Delineation of riverbed areas where there is downward river water infiltration is important for determining the fluxes, quality, and travel time of water supplied to production wells. Efficient methods of delineation are especially required in large rivers that may also have relatively large water depths. A portion of the City of Fredericton well field recharge zone lies beneath the adjacent Saint John River, where a discontinuity in the clay/silt aquitard may allow hydraulic connection between the esker-like aquifer and the river. In this project we have investigated the potential for using electromagnetic methods to delineate zones of low electrical conductivity. Such zones, in a fresh water environment, suggest the absence of clay/silt materials. During the summers of 2001 and 2002, a total of 120 km of electromagnetic data were acquired using the Geonics EM31 and EM34 ground conductivity meters. The survey was carried out using an outboard-motor-powered canoe and raft with onboard DGPS system. Both electromagnetic instruments were operated in the vertical dipole mode, thereby providing maximum depths of exploration of approximately 30 meters. The water depths in the survey area fall in the range where the EM31 and EM34 results are very sensitive to the conductivity structure. We applied a novel bathymetry correction approach to compensate for water depth effects. Contouring of the apparent conductivity data revealed a conductivity low with an approximate area of 6 hectares. The absence of the clay/silt aquitard was confirmed by high resolution seismic profiling and drilling and sampling of riverbed sediments. Further confirmation of river water infiltration has been provided by hydraulic data from mini-piezometers and temperature time series collected beneath the riverbed. Apparent conductivity mapping proved to be a sensitive and efficient method for delineating

  7. Interim Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Arid West Region

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    alternative sampling techniques are used, they should be described in field notes or in the delineation report. The basic data must include...information on these techniques . Growing season Beginning and ending dates of the growing season are needed to evaluate certain wetland indicators, such...Sediment deposits are thin layers or coatings of fine-grained mineral material (e.g., silt or clay) or organic matter (e.g., pollen ), sometimes mixed

  8. Relationship between Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and Gregorc Style Delineator.

    PubMed

    Harasym, P H; Leong, E J; Juschka, B B; Lucier, G E; Lorscheider, F L

    1996-06-01

    The relationship between the Myers-briggs Type Indicator and Gregorc Style Delineator, and achievement was examined by administering these instruments to 259 first-year nursing students enrolled in an introductory human anatomy and physiology course. A principal component factor analysis using a varimax rotation of the scores from the two psychometric instruments, achievement examinations and an over-all grade point average indicated that each learning style from the Gregorc Style Delineator corresponds to certain traits on the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. An individual who had a preference for the learning style of Concrete Sequential tended to have the traits of sensing and judging on the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, while an individual who used the learning style of Concrete Random tended to have the traits of intuition and perceiving on the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. One who had a preference for the learning style of Abstract Sequential tended to use the trait of thinking while another who used the learning style of Abstract Random tended to have the trait of feeling. The factor analysis also indicates no relationship of any scores of the traits on the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator or learning styles of the Gregorc Style Delineator with the examination scores achieved in the human anatomy and physiology course or to the students' over-all grade point average. However, factor analysis indicates that the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator traits of Judging vs Perceiving collapsed into the Sensing vs Intuition scale, and that the Gregorc Style Delineator consists of two bipolar scales that are different from those proposed by Gregorc.

  9. Iterative Otsu's method for OCT improved delineation in the aorta wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Daniel; Real, Eusebio; Val-Bernal, José F.; Revuelta, José M.; Pontón, Alejandro; Calvo Díez, Marta; Mayorga, Marta; López-Higuera, José M.; Conde, Olga M.

    2015-07-01

    Degradation of human ascending thoracic aorta has been visualized with Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). OCT images of the vessel wall exhibit structural degradation in the media layer of the artery, being this disorder the final trigger of the pathology. The degeneration in the vessel wall appears as low-reflectivity areas due to different optical properties of acidic polysaccharides and mucopolysaccharides in contrast with typical ordered structure of smooth muscle cells, elastin and collagen fibers. An OCT dimension indicator of wall degradation can be generated upon the spatial quantification of the extension of degraded areas in a similar way as conventional histopathology. This proposed OCT marker can offer in the future a real-time clinical perception of the vessel status to help cardiovascular surgeons in vessel repair interventions. However, the delineation of degraded areas on the B-scan image from OCT is sometimes difficult due to presence of speckle noise, variable signal to noise ratio (SNR) conditions on the measurement process, etc. Degraded areas can be delimited by basic thresholding techniques taking advantage of disorders evidences in B-scan images, but this delineation is not optimum in the aorta samples and requires complex additional processing stages. This work proposes an optimized delineation of degraded areas within the aorta wall, robust to noisy environments, based on the iterative application of Otsu's thresholding method. Results improve the delineation of wall anomalies compared with the simple application of the algorithm. Achievements could be also transferred to other clinical scenarios: carotid arteries, aorto-iliac or ilio-femoral sections, intracranial, etc.

  10. Delineating Floodplain in North Korea using Remote Sensing and Geographic Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, J.; Lee, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    Korea has been divided into two countries after World War II. So environmental studies about North Korean are not easy and very limited. There were several flood damages every summer in North Korea since 1995, which induces lots of economic loss and agricultural production decrease. Delineating floodplain is indispensable to estimate the magnitude of flood damage and restore the flooded paddy field after unification. Remote Sensing (RS) can provide opportunity to study inaccessible area. In addition, flooding detection is possible. Several research groups study about flooding disaster using RS. Optical images and microwave images have been used in that field. Also, Digital topographic data have been used for flooding detection. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the land characteristics of floodplain by delineating floodplain in inaccessible North Korea using Landsat and digital topographic data. Landsat TM 5 images were used in this study. North Korea had severe flooding disaster since 1995. Among them 1995, 2007 and 2012 flooding are known for serious damages. Two Landsat images before and after flooding of each year were used to delineate floodplain. Study areas are Pyongyang City, Nampo City, North and South Hwanghae Province and South Pyongan Province. Floodplain are derived from overlaid classification image and flood-depth map. 1:25,000 scale digital topographic data were used to make flood-depth map. For land cover classification image enhancement and supervised classification with maximum likelihood classifier were used. Training areas were selected by visual interpretation using Daum-map which provides high resolution image of whole North Korea. The spatial characteristics of the floodplain were discussed based on floodplain map delineated in this study.

  11. Growing Season Definition and Use in Wetland Delineation: A Literature Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    also indicate that the alpine tundra microbial community has a high resistance to freeze–thaw and dry–rewet events, in contrast to studies in other...Lacking direct information on soil temperatures, minimum air temperature thresholds are used as indicators of the beginning and ending dates for the...basis of careful scientific study of natural wetland communities and processes.” Currently, there are ten USACE regional wetland delineation

  12. Interim Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Great Plans Region

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    limited to unvegetated playa lakes , mud and salt flats, and perennial, intermittent, and ephemeral stream channels. Delineation of these waters in non...drifts; glacial lake sediments; wind-deposited loess and sands; residuum from the weathering of shales, sandstones, and limestones; mountain out- washes...fens, seeps, fringe wetlands surrounding lakes and reservoirs, prairie potholes, playa lakes , and other fresh and saline depressional systems (Comer

  13. Using SAR Interferograms and Coherence Images for Object-Based Delineation of Unstable Slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, Barbara; Holbling, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    This study uses synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometric products for the semi-automated identification and delineation of unstable slopes and active landslides. Single-pair interferograms and coherence images are therefore segmented and classified in an object-based image analysis (OBIA) framework. The rule-based classification approach has been applied to landslide-prone areas located in Taiwan and Southern Germany. The semi-automatically obtained results were validated against landslide polygons derived from manual interpretation.

  14. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  15. Delineating Species with DNA Barcodes: A Case of Taxon Dependent Method Performance in Moths

    PubMed Central

    Kekkonen, Mari; Mutanen, Marko; Kaila, Lauri; Nieminen, Marko; Hebert, Paul D. N.

    2015-01-01

    The accelerating loss of biodiversity has created a need for more effective ways to discover species. Novel algorithmic approaches for analyzing sequence data combined with rapidly expanding DNA barcode libraries provide a potential solution. While several analytical methods are available for the delineation of operational taxonomic units (OTUs), few studies have compared their performance. This study compares the performance of one morphology-based and four DNA-based (BIN, parsimony networks, ABGD, GMYC) methods on two groups of gelechioid moths. It examines 92 species of Finnish Gelechiinae and 103 species of Australian Elachistinae which were delineated by traditional taxonomy. The results reveal a striking difference in performance between the two taxa with all four DNA-based methods. OTU counts in the Elachistinae showed a wider range and a relatively low (ca. 65%) OTU match with reference species while OTU counts were more congruent and performance was higher (ca. 90%) in the Gelechiinae. Performance rose when only monophyletic species were compared, but the taxon-dependence remained. None of the DNA-based methods produced a correct match with non-monophyletic species, but singletons were handled well. A simulated test of morphospecies-grouping performed very poorly in revealing taxon diversity in these small, dull-colored moths. Despite the strong performance of analyses based on DNA barcodes, species delineated using single-locus mtDNA data are best viewed as OTUs that require validation by subsequent integrative taxonomic work. PMID:25849083

  16. An efficient approach to 3D single tree-crown delineation in LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongus, Domen; Žalik, Borut

    2015-10-01

    This paper proposes a new method for 3D delineation of single tree-crowns in LiDAR data by exploiting the complementaries of treetop and tree trunk detections. A unified mathematical framework is provided based on the graph theory, allowing for all the segmentations to be achieved using marker-controlled watersheds. Treetops are defined by detecting concave neighbourhoods within the canopy height model using locally fitted surfaces. These serve as markers for watershed segmentation of the canopy layer where possible oversegmentation is reduced by merging the regions based on their heights, areas, and shapes. Additional tree crowns are delineated from mid- and under-storey layers based on tree trunk detection. A new approach for estimating the verticalities of the points' distributions is proposed for this purpose. The watershed segmentation is then applied on a density function within the voxel space, while boundaries of delineated trees from the canopy layer are used to prevent the overspreading of regions. The experiments show an approximately 6% increase in the efficiency of the proposed treetop definition based on locally fitted surfaces in comparison with the traditionally used local maxima of the smoothed canopy height model. In addition, 4% increase in the efficiency is achieved by the proposed tree trunk detection. Although the tree trunk detection alone is dependent on the data density, supplementing it with the treetop detection the proposed approach is efficient even when dealing with low density point-clouds.

  17. Frameless neuronavigation using the ISG-system in practice: from craniotomy to delineation of lesion.

    PubMed

    Kleinpeter, G; Lothaller, C

    2003-10-01

    The overall performance of a "pointer" neuronavigation system (the ISG ALLEGRO Viewing Wand) in everyday surgical use was evaluated by investigating the practical utility of the technical set-up for one particular surgical task. The basis of the analysis was the numerical evaluation of four areas of fundamental importance for most brain surgery: site and size of craniotomy, localisation of lesion, the trajectory through the brain, and the delineation of the lesion. In a protocol of 65 patients we based our examination on a subjective 4-point rating scale ranging from 0 (= no help) to 3 (= very helpful) for each of the four above categories. We investigated the potential influence of three factors: the lesions histology (4 groups), its size (3 categories) and the depth from the cortical surface (3 levels). Our experience is that the histology of the lesions has significant influence on the relative usefulness of neuronavigation for craniotomy (P < 0.017) and for delineation of the lesion (P < 0.003). We found neuronavigation most helpful for removing gliomas. Second, this system was found to be very helpful in locating small, hitherto hard-to-find, lesions (P < 0.01). Lesion's depth had no effect on the ratings (P > 0.2). Overall, the use of this system led to more precise skin incisions, better site and size of craniotomies tailored to the pathology, the trajectory through the brain, and to more precise delineation of the lesion.

  18. Modeling fire susceptibility to delineate wildland-urban interface for municipal-scale fire risk management.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Ellen; Rapaport, Eric; Sherren, Kate

    2013-12-01

    The wildland-urban interface (WUI) is the region where development meets and intermingles with wildlands. The WUI has an elevated fire risk due to the proximity of development and residents to wildlands with natural wildfire regimes. Existing methods of delineating WUI are typically applied over a large region, use proxies for risk, and do not consider site-specific fire hazard drivers. While these models are appropriate for federal and provincial risk management, municipal managers require models intended for smaller regions. The model developed here uses the Burn-P3 fire behavior model to model WUI from local fire susceptibility (FS) in two study communities. Forest fuel code (FFC) maps for the study communities were modified using remote sensing data to produce detailed forest edges, including ladder fuels, update data currency, and add buildings and roads. The modified FFC maps used in Burn-P3 produced bimodal FS distributions for each community. The WUI in these communities was delineated as areas within community bounds where FS was greater than or equal to -1 SD from the mean FS value ([Formula: see text]), which fell in the trough of the bimodal distribution. The WUI so delineated conformed to the definition of WUI. This model extends WUI modeling for broader risk management initiatives for municipal management of risk, as it (a) considers site-specific drivers of fire behavior; (b) models risk, represented by WUI, specific to a community; and, (c) does not use proxies for risk.

  19. Delineating spring recharge areas in a fractured sandstone aquifer (Luxembourg) based on pesticide mass balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farlin, J.; Drouet, L.; Gallé, T.; Pittois, D.; Bayerle, M.; Braun, C.; Maloszewski, P.; Vanderborght, J.; Elsner, M.; Kies, A.

    2013-06-01

    A simple method to delineate the recharge areas of a series of springs draining a fractured aquifer is presented. Instead of solving the flow and transport equations, the delineation is reformulated as a mass balance problem assigning arable land in proportion to the pesticide mass discharged annually in a spring at minimum total transport cost. The approach was applied to the Luxembourg Sandstone, a fractured-rock aquifer supplying half of the drinking water for Luxembourg, using the herbicide atrazine. Predictions of the recharge areas were most robust in situations of strong competition by neighbouring springs while the catchment boundaries for isolated springs were extremely sensitive to the parameter controlling flow direction. Validation using a different pesticide showed the best agreement with the simplest model used, whereas using historical crop-rotation data and spatially distributed soil-leaching data did not improve predictions. The whole approach presents the advantage of integrating objectively information on land use and pesticide concentration in spring water into the delineation of groundwater recharge zones in a fractured-rock aquifer.

  20. Fast automatic delineation of cardiac volume of interest in MSCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Lessick, Jonathan; Lavi, Guy; Bulow, Thomas; Renisch, Steffen

    2004-05-01

    Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) is an emerging modality for assessing cardiac anatomy. The delineation of the cardiac volume of interest (VOI) is a pre-processing step for subsequent visualization or image processing. It serves the suppression of anatomic structures being not in the primary focus of the cardiac application, such as sternum, ribs, spinal column, descending aorta and pulmonary vasculature. These structures obliterate standard visualizations such as direct volume renderings or maximum intensity projections. In addition, outcome and performance of post-processing steps such as ventricle suppression, coronary artery segmentation or the detection of short and long axes of the heart can be improved. The structures being part of the cardiac VOI (coronary arteries and veins, myocardium, ventricles and atria) differ tremendously in appearance. In addition, there is no clear image feature associated with the contour (or better cut-surface) distinguishing between cardiac VOI and surrounding tissue making the automatic delineation of the cardiac VOI a difficult task. The presented approach locates in a first step chest wall and descending aorta in all image slices giving a rough estimate of the location of the heart. In a second step, a Fourier based active contour approach delineates slice-wise the border of the cardiac VOI. The algorithm has been evaluated on 41 multi-slice CT data-sets including cases with coronary stents and venous and arterial bypasses. The typical processing time amounts to 5-10s on a 1GHz P3 PC.

  1. Delineation of creosote-based DNAPLs using CPT-deployed laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggery, D.A. Jr.; Misquitta, N.J; Coll, F.R..

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents a case study of the first commercial use of cone penetrometer testing (CPT)/deployed laser induced fluorescence (LIF) to address the following objectives at a creosote DNAPL site. The objectives of the investigation using CPT/LIF were to: quickly and cost effectively delineate the horizontal and vertical extent of creosote DNAPL in soil/groundwater; delineate/differentiate creosote DNAPL constituents within the extent of DNAPL; delineate dissolved-phase versus free phase DNAPL compounds in the subsurface. The complexity of investigating the extent of creosote DNAPL magnifies the time and cost of the application of conventional investigative techniques. The application of CPT/LIF at the subject site allowed a comparison between CPT/LIF and more conventional investigative techniques. If the objectives were achieved in a shorter time-frame, and at a lesser cost than traditional methods, then the CPT/LIF method would be confirmed as a viable, field-scale technology for investigating appropriate wood-treating sites.

  2. A pilot study for delineation of areas contributing water to wellfields at Jackson, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broshears, R.E.; Connell, J.F.; Short, N.C.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment, Division of Groundwater Protection, and the Jackson Utility Division, conducted a pilot study to determine data needs and the applicability of four methods for the delineation of wellhead protection areas. Jackson Utility Division in Jackson, Madison County, Tennessee, pumps about 9 million gallons of ground water daily from two municipal wellfields that tap an unconfined sand aquifer. Under natural hydraulic gradients, ground waterflows southward toward the South Wellfield at approximately 2 to 3 feet per day; natural flow toward the North Wellfield from the east at 1 to 2 feet per day. Water quality generally is suitable for most uses. Concentrations of dissolved solids are low, and excessive iron is the only significant naturally occurring water-quality problem. However, trace concentrations of volatile organic compounds have been detected in water pumps from the South Wellfield; the highest concentration of a single compound has been 23 micrograms per liter of tetrachloroethylene. Potential sources of ground-water contamination in the Jackson area include a hazardous-waste site, municipal and industrial landfill, and underground-storage tanks. Some of the four method for delineating wellhead protection areas did not adequately describe zones contributing flow to the wellfields. Calculations based on a uniform flow equation provided a preliminary delineation of zones of contribution for the wellfields and ground-water time-of-travel contours. Limitations of the applied methods motivated the design of a more rigorous hydrogeologic investigation.

  3. Delineating incised stream sediment sources within a San Francisco Bay tributary basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Paul; Benda, Lee; Pearce, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    Erosion and sedimentation pose ubiquitous problems for land and watershed managers, requiring delineation of sediment sources and sinks across landscapes. However, the technical complexity of many spatially explicit erosion models precludes their use by practitioners. To address this critical gap, we demonstrate a contemporary use of applied geomorphometry through a straightforward GIS analysis of sediment sources in the San Francisco Bay Area in California, USA, designed to support erosion reduction strategies. Using 2 m lidar digital elevation models, we delineated the entire river network in the Arroyo Mocho watershed (573 km2) at the scale of ˜ 30 m segments and identified incised landforms using a combination of hillslope gradient and planform curvature. Chronic erosion to the channel network was estimated based on these topographic attributes and the size of vegetation, and calibrated to sediment gage data, providing a spatially explicit estimate of sediment yield from incised channels across the basin. Rates of erosion were summarized downstream through the channel network, revealing patterns of sediment supply at the reach scale. Erosion and sediment supply were also aggregated to subbasins, allowing comparative analyses at the scale of tributaries. The erosion patterns delineated using this approach provide land use planners with a robust framework to design erosion reduction strategies. More broadly, the study demonstrates a modern analysis of important geomorphic processes affected by land use that is easily applied by agencies to solve common problems in watersheds, improving the integration between science and environmental management.

  4. Maritime Route Delineation using AIS Data from the Atlantic Coast of the US

    SciTech Connect

    Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Copping, Andrea; Tagestad, Jerry; Whiting, Jonathan

    2016-09-28

    This study examines maritime routes between ports along the Atlantic coast of the US, utilising Automated Identification System (AIS) data for the years 2010 through 2012. The delineation of vessel routes conducted in this study was motivated by development planned for offshore Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) along the Atlantic coast of the US and the need to evaluate the effect of these development areas on commercial shipping. To this end, available AIS data were processed to generate commercial vessel tracks for individual vessels, though cargo vessels are the focus in this study. The individual vessel tracks were sampled at transects placed along the Atlantic coast. The transect samples were analysed and partitioned by voyages between Atlantic ports to facilitate computation of vessel routes between ports. The route boundary analysis utilised a definition from UK guidance in which routes' boundaries encompassed 95% of the vessel traffic between ports. In addition to delineating route boundaries, we found multi-modal transverse distributions of vessels for well-travelled routes, which indicated preference for lanes of travel within the delineated routes.

  5. Geographic delineations of yeast communities and populations associated with vines and wines in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Gayevskiy, Velimir; Goddard, Matthew R

    2012-01-01

    Yeasts are a diverse seemingly ubiquitous group of eukaryotic microbes, and many are naturally associated with fruits. Humans have harnessed yeasts since the dawn of civilisation to make wine, and thus it is surprising that we know little of the distribution of yeast communities naturally associated with fruits. Previous reports of yeast community diversity have been descriptive only. Here we present, we believe, the first robust test for the geographic delineation of yeast communities. Humans have relatively recently employed Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model research organism, and have long harnessed its ancient adaption to ferment even in the presence of oxygen. However, as far as we are aware, there has not been a rigorous test for the presence of regional differences in natural S. cerevisiae populations before. We combined these community- and population-level questions and surveyed replicate vineyards and corresponding spontaneous ferments from different regions on New Zealand's (NZ's) North Island and analysed the resulting data with community ecology and population genetic tests. We show that there are distinct regional delineations of yeast communities, but the picture for S. cerevisiae is more complex: there is evidence for region-specific sub-populations but there are also reasonable levels of gene flow among these regions in NZ. We believe this is the first demonstration of regional delineations of yeast populations and communities worldwide. PMID:22189497

  6. Residual Tumor After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Outside the Radiation Therapy Target Volume: A New Prognostic Factor for Survival in Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Muijs, Christina; Smit, Justin; Karrenbeld, Arend; Beukema, Jannet; Mul, Veronique; Dam, Go van; Hospers, Geke; Kluin, Phillip; Langendijk, Johannes; Plukker, John

    2014-03-15

    Purpose/Objective(s): The aim of this study was to analyze the accuracy of gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation and clinical target volume (CTV) margins for neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (neo-CRT) in esophageal carcinoma at pathologic examination and to determine the impact on survival. Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 63 esophageal cancer patients treated with neo-CRT. GTV and CTV borders were demarcated in situ during surgery on the esophagus, using anatomical reference points to provide accurate information regarding tumor location at pathologic evaluation. To identify prognostic factors for disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS), a Cox regression analysis was performed. Results: After resection, macroscopic residual tumor was found outside the GTV in 7 patients (11%). Microscopic residual tumor was located outside the CTV in 9 patients (14%). The median follow-up was 15.6 months. With multivariate analysis, only microscopic tumor outside the CTV (hazard ratio [HR], 4.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-15.36), and perineural growth (HR, 5.77; 95% CI, 1.27-26.13) were identified as independent prognostic factors for OS. The 1-year OS was 20% for patients with tumor outside the CTV and 86% for those without (P<.01). For DFS, microscopic tumor outside the CTV (HR, 5.92; 95% CI, 1.89-18.54) and ypN+ (HR, 3.36; 95% CI, 1.33-8.48) were identified as independent adverse prognostic factors. The 1-year DFS was 23% versus 77% for patients with or without tumor outside the CTV (P<.01). Conclusions: Microscopic tumor outside the CTV is associated with markedly worse OS after neo-CRT. This may either stress the importance of accurate tumor delineation or reflect aggressive tumor behavior requiring new adjuvant treatment modalities.

  7. Auto-segmentation of normal and target structures in head and neck CT images: A feature-driven model-based approach

    SciTech Connect

    Qazi, Arish A.; Pekar, Vladimir; Kim, John; Xie, Jason; Breen, Stephen L.; Jaffray, David A.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) allows greater control over dose distribution, which leads to a decrease in radiation related toxicity. IMRT, however, requires precise and accurate delineation of the organs at risk and target volumes. Manual delineation is tedious and suffers from both interobserver and intraobserver variability. State of the art auto-segmentation methods are either atlas-based, model-based or hybrid however, robust fully automated segmentation is often difficult due to the insufficient discriminative information provided by standard medical imaging modalities for certain tissue types. In this paper, the authors present a fully automated hybrid approach which combines deformable registration with the model-based approach to accurately segment normal and target tissues from head and neck CT images. Methods: The segmentation process starts by using an average atlas to reliably identify salient landmarks in the patient image. The relationship between these landmarks and the reference dataset serves to guide a deformable registration algorithm, which allows for a close initialization of a set of organ-specific deformable models in the patient image, ensuring their robust adaptation to the boundaries of the structures. Finally, the models are automatically fine adjusted by our boundary refinement approach which attempts to model the uncertainty in model adaptation using a probabilistic mask. This uncertainty is subsequently resolved by voxel classification based on local low-level organ-specific features. Results: To quantitatively evaluate the method, they auto-segment several organs at risk and target tissues from 10 head and neck CT images. They compare the segmentations to the manual delineations outlined by the expert. The evaluation is carried out by estimating two common quantitative measures on 10 datasets: volume overlap fraction or the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), and a geometrical metric, the median symmetric

  8. A new method to synthesize competitor RNAs for accurate analyses by competitive RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, O

    1997-12-03

    A method to synthesize competitor RNAs as internal standards for competitive RT-PCR is improved by using the long accurate PCR (LA-PCR) technique. Competitor templates synthesized by the new method are almost the same in length, and possibly in secondary structure, as target mRNAs to be quantified except that they include the short deletion within the segments to be amplified. This allows the reverse transcription to be achieved with almost the same efficiency from both target mRNAs and competitor RNAs. Therefore, more accurate quantification can be accomplished by using such competitor RNAs.

  9. Muon-catalyzed fusion experiment target and detector system. Preliminary design report

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.E.; Watts, K.D.; Caffrey, A.J.; Walter, J.B.

    1982-03-01

    We present detailed plans for the target and particle detector systems for the muon-catalyzed fusion experiment. Requirements imposed on the target vessel by experimental conditions and safety considerations are delineated. Preliminary designs for the target vessel capsule and secondary containment vessel have been developed which meet these requirements. In addition, the particle detection system is outlined, including associated fast electronics and on-line data acquisition. Computer programs developed to study the target and detector system designs are described.

  10. Using aquatic invertebrates to delineate seasonal and temporary wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region of North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Euliss, Ned H.; Mushet, David M.; Johnson, Douglas H.

    2002-01-01

    Tillage can destroy or greatly disturb indicators of hydric soils and hydrophytic vegetation, making delineation of tilled wetlands difficult. The remains of aquatic invertebrates (e.g., shells, drought-resistant eggs, and trichopteran cases) are easily identifiable and persist in wetland substrates even when wetlands are dry. Additionally, these remains are not easily destroyed by mechanical tillage. To test the feasibility of using invertebrate remains to delineate wetlands, we used two methods to identify the wetland edge of ten seasonal and ten temporary wetlands, evenly divided between grassland and cropland landscapes. First, we identified the wetland edge using hydric soil and vegetation indicators along six evenly spaced transects in each wetland (our “standard” delineation). We then identified the wetland edge along the same transects using aquatic invertebrate remains as our indicator. In grassland landscapes, delineations of the wetland edge made using invertebrate remains were consistently at the same location or closer to the wetland center as the standard delineations for both seasonal and temporary wetlands. In cropland landscapes, however, many of our invertebrate delineations of seasonal and temporary wetlands were on the upland side of our standard delineations. We attribute the differences to movement of remains during tillage, increased maximum pool levels in cropland wetlands, and disturbance of hydric soils and plants. We found that the elevations of the wetland edge indicated by invertebrate remains were more consistent within a wetland than elevations determined by standard delineations. Aquatic invertebrate remains can be useful in delineating wetlands when other indicators have been destroyed or severely disturbed by tillage.

  11. Lymphatic atlas-based target volume definition for intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qatarneh, S. M.; Kiricuta, I. C.; Brahme, A.; Noz, M. E.; Ferreira, B.; Kim, W. C.; Lind, B. K.

    2007-10-01

    Despite the improvements in current imaging modalities such as CT and MRI, the detection of normal or malignant lymph nodes remains a challenge due to the large variability in lymph node characteristics and the variation in imaging quality and the limited imaging resolution. A computerized lymph node atlas could be the ideal tool for target volume definition based on the distribution of normal lymph nodes surrounding the verified malignant nodes to improve the accuracy of intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning. The standard lymph node topography in the newly constructed 3D lymph node atlas offers a detailed topographical distribution of discrete nodal locations in relation to surrounding organs at risk. In the present paper, the recently developed lymph node atlas is used for selection and delineation of target volumes in the head and neck, thorax and pelvic region. Image registration techniques were implemented to integrate the topography of the lymph node atlas into the patient's data set. By combining the knowledge-based lymph node distribution with the patient's data set, more detailed definitions of the target volumes were obtained to facilitate biologically based treatment plan optimization. The response values of the biologically optimized treatment plans were used to derive the probability of tumor control and the probability of complications in organs at risk. The treatment outcome of the lung reference plan showed a lower probability of recurrence in comparison to planning without the lymph node atlas. The lymph node atlas can improve and standardize the target volume definition by including more accurate anatomical knowledge for target volume definition and biologically optimized radiation therapy planning.

  12. Investigation of SRTM Data for Delineation of Process Relevant Response Units in Different Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, M.; Pfennig, B.

    2007-12-01

    The concept of this research is justified to the integration of landscape components for hydrological modelling within distributed models. Distributed models are based on homogenous entities which are delineated using landscape parameters such as topography, land use, soil, and geology. In ungauged basins most of these required data are only available on a coarse spatial resolution. In order to by-pass this gap the globally and freely available data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) were used to obtain model entities on a finer resolution because this data have an adequate resolution of 30m and 90m. The method relies on the assumption of a strong, process-driven feedback between the topography and further landscape components as well as runoff dynamics. It is expected that the water balance of catchments with insufficient data availability can be estimated using SRTM-based delineations of process-oriented model entities. A main goal is the investigation of the SRTM-data for delineation of process relevant response units (RU) over various scales. In order to correct geometric and radiometric errors the SRTM-data were optimized using several GIS procedures and new algorithms for void filling, vegetation reduction, hydrological oriented filter combinations and stream burning. A new developed sink fill method was implemented with the name LaSA (Landscape based Sink Algorithm). Elimination of sinks should be realized by a landscape-based optimum between filling sinks and carving of flow paths in flow barriers. In result of DEM preparation, hydrological corrected elevation data were available to establish a ruled-based framework for RU-delineation. Numerous topographic indices were applied whereas the index selection was oriented on different relief driven processes. The resulting datasets were analysed by the Cluster Analysis IVHG. Finally, different patterns of process driven RU, combing various topographic indices were delineated for three mesoscale

  13. Accurate upwind methods for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1993-01-01

    A new class of piecewise linear methods for the numerical solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations of gas dynamics is presented. These methods are uniformly second-order accurate, and can be considered as extensions of Godunov's scheme. With an appropriate definition of monotonicity preservation for the case of linear convection, it can be shown that they preserve monotonicity. Similar to Van Leer's MUSCL scheme, they consist of two key steps: a reconstruction step followed by an upwind step. For the reconstruction step, a monotonicity constraint that preserves uniform second-order accuracy is introduced. Computational efficiency is enhanced by devising a criterion that detects the 'smooth' part of the data where the constraint is redundant. The concept and coding of the constraint are simplified by the use of the median function. A slope steepening technique, which has no effect at smooth regions and can resolve a contact discontinuity in four cells, is described. As for the upwind step, existing and new methods are applied in a manner slightly different from those in the literature. These methods are derived by approximating the Euler equations via linearization and diagonalization. At a 'smooth' interface, Harten, Lax, and Van Leer's one intermediate state model is employed. A modification for this model that can resolve contact discontinuities is presented. Near a discontinuity, either this modified model or a more accurate one, namely, Roe's flux-difference splitting. is used. The current presentation of Roe's method, via the conceptually simple flux-vector splitting, not only establishes a connection between the two splittings, but also leads to an admissibility correction with no conditional statement, and an efficient approximation to Osher's approximate Riemann solver. These reconstruction and upwind steps result in schemes that are uniformly second-order accurate and economical at smooth regions, and yield high resolution at discontinuities.

  14. Accurate measurement of unsteady state fluid temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, two accurate methods for determining the transient fluid temperature were presented. Measurements were conducted for boiling water since its temperature is known. At the beginning the thermometers are at the ambient temperature and next they are immediately immersed into saturated water. The measurements were carried out with two thermometers of different construction but with the same housing outer diameter equal to 15 mm. One of them is a K-type industrial thermometer widely available commercially. The temperature indicated by the thermometer was corrected considering the thermometers as the first or second order inertia devices. The new design of a thermometer was proposed and also used to measure the temperature of boiling water. Its characteristic feature is a cylinder-shaped housing with the sheath thermocouple located in its center. The temperature of the fluid was determined based on measurements taken in the axis of the solid cylindrical element (housing) using the inverse space marching method. Measurements of the transient temperature of the air flowing through the wind tunnel using the same thermometers were also carried out. The proposed measurement technique provides more accurate results compared with measurements using industrial thermometers in conjunction with simple temperature correction using the inertial thermometer model of the first or second order. By comparing the results, it was demonstrated that the new thermometer allows obtaining the fluid temperature much faster and with higher accuracy in comparison to the industrial thermometer. Accurate measurements of the fast changing fluid temperature are possible due to the low inertia thermometer and fast space marching method applied for solving the inverse heat conduction problem.

  15. The first accurate description of an aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    2006-12-01

    As technology has advanced, the scientific study of auroral phenomena has increased by leaps and bounds. A look back at the earliest descriptions of aurorae offers an interesting look into how medieval scholars viewed the subjects that we study.Although there are earlier fragmentary references in the literature, the first accurate description of the aurora borealis appears to be that published by the German Catholic scholar Konrad von Megenberg (1309-1374) in his book Das Buch der Natur (The Book of Nature). The book was written between 1349 and 1350.

  16. Determining accurate distances to nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanos, Alceste Zoe

    2005-11-01

    Determining accurate distances to nearby or distant galaxies is a very simple conceptually, yet complicated in practice, task. Presently, distances to nearby galaxies are only known to an accuracy of 10-15%. The current anchor galaxy of the extragalactic distance scale is the Large Magellanic Cloud, which has large (10-15%) systematic uncertainties associated with it, because of its morphology, its non-uniform reddening and the unknown metallicity dependence of the Cepheid period-luminosity relation. This work aims to determine accurate distances to some nearby galaxies, and subsequently help reduce the error in the extragalactic distance scale and the Hubble constant H 0 . In particular, this work presents the first distance determination of the DIRECT Project to M33 with detached eclipsing binaries. DIRECT aims to obtain a new anchor galaxy for the extragalactic distance scale by measuring direct, accurate (to 5%) distances to two Local Group galaxies, M31 and M33, with detached eclipsing binaries. It involves a massive variability survey of these galaxies and subsequent photometric and spectroscopic follow-up of the detached binaries discovered. In this work, I also present a catalog of variable stars discovered in one of the DIRECT fields, M31Y, which includes 41 eclipsing binaries. Additionally, we derive the distance to the Draco Dwarf Spheroidal galaxy, with ~100 RR Lyrae found in our first CCD variability study of this galaxy. A "hybrid" method of discovering Cepheids with ground-based telescopes is described next. It involves applying the image subtraction technique on the images obtained from ground-based telescopes and then following them up with the Hubble Space Telescope to derive Cepheid period-luminosity distances. By re-analyzing ESO Very Large Telescope data on M83 (NGC 5236), we demonstrate that this method is much more powerful for detecting variability, especially in crowded fields. I finally present photometry for the Wolf-Rayet binary WR 20a

  17. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material.

  18. Non-coding-regulatory regions of human brain genes delineated by bacterial artificial chromosome knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The next big challenge in human genetics is understanding the 98% of the genome that comprises non-coding DNA. Hidden in this DNA are sequences critical for gene regulation, and new experimental strategies are needed to understand the functional role of gene-regulation sequences in health and disease. In this study, we build upon our HuGX ('high-throughput human genes on the X chromosome’) strategy to expand our understanding of human gene regulation in vivo. Results In all, ten human genes known to express in therapeutically important brain regions were chosen for study. For eight of these genes, human bacterial artificial chromosome clones were identified, retrofitted with a reporter, knocked single-copy into the Hprt locus in mouse embryonic stem cells, and mouse strains derived. Five of these human genes expressed in mouse, and all expressed in the adult brain region for which they were chosen. This defined the boundaries of the genomic DNA sufficient for brain expression, and refined our knowledge regarding the complexity of gene regulation. We also characterized for the first time the expression of human MAOA and NR2F2, two genes for which the mouse homologs have been extensively studied in the central nervous system (CNS), and AMOTL1 and NOV, for which roles in CNS have been unclear. Conclusions We have demonstrated the use of the HuGX strategy to functionally delineate non-coding-regulatory regions of therapeutically important human brain genes. Our results also show that a careful investigation, using publicly available resources and bioinformatics, can lead to accurate predictions of gene expression. PMID:24124870

  19. Landsat TM image segmentation for delineating geological zone correlated vegetation stratification in the Kruger National Park, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munyati, Christopher; Ratshibvumo, Thihanedzwi; Ogola, Jason

    Image classification approaches are widely used in mapping vegetation on remotely sensed images. Vegetation assemblages are equivalent to habitats. Whereas sub-pixel classification approaches potentially can produce more realistic, homogenous habitat maps, pixel-based hard classifier approaches often result in non-homogenous habitat zones. This salt-and-pepper habitat mapping is particularly a challenge on images of savannas, given the characteristic patchy texture of scattered trees and grass. Image segmentation techniques offer possibilities for homogenous habitat classification. This study aimed at establishing the extent to which established, field surveyed and geology-related vegetation types in South Africa’s Kruger National Park (KNP) can be reproduced using image segmentation. Rain season Landsat TM images were used, selected to coincide with the peak in vegetation productivity, which was deemed the time of year when discrimination between key habitats in KNP is most likely to be successful. The multiresolution segmentation mode in eCognition 5.0 was employed, object classification accomplished using the nearest neighbour (NN) classifier, using object texture and training area mean values in the NN feature space. Compared to delineations of the vegetation types of KNP on a digital map of the vegetation zones that was tested, image segmentation successfully mapped the zones (overall accuracy 85.3%, K^ = 82.7%) despite slight shifts in the location of vegetation zone boundaries. Maximum likelihood classification (MLC) of the same images was only 37% accurate (K^ = 24.2%). Whereas the vegetation zones resulting from MLC were non-homogenous, with considerable spectral confusion among the vegetation zones, image segmentation produced more homogenous vegetation zones, comparably more useful for conservation management, because realistic and meaningful habitat maps are important in biodiversity conservation as input data upon which to base management decisions

  20. Combined reflectance confocal microscopy-optical coherence tomography for delineation of basal cell carcinoma margins: an ex vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Iftimia, Nicusor; Peterson, Gary; Chang, Ernest W.; Maguluri, Gopi; Fox, William; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. We present a combined reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) approach, integrated within a single optical layout, for diagnosis of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and delineation of margins. While RCM imaging detects BCC presence (diagnoses) and its lateral spreading (margins) with measured resolution of ∼1  μm, OCT imaging delineates BCC depth spreading (margins) with resolution of ∼7  μm. When delineating margins in 20 specimens of superficial and nodular BCCs, depth could be reliably determined down to ∼600  μm, and agreement with histology was within about ±50  μm. PMID:26780224

  1. Combined reflectance confocal microscopy-optical coherence tomography for delineation of basal cell carcinoma margins: an ex vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iftimia, Nicusor; Peterson, Gary; Chang, Ernest W.; Maguluri, Gopi; Fox, William; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2016-01-01

    We present a combined reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) approach, integrated within a single optical layout, for diagnosis of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and delineation of margins. While RCM imaging detects BCC presence (diagnoses) and its lateral spreading (margins) with measured resolution of ˜1 μm, OCT imaging delineates BCC depth spreading (margins) with resolution of ˜7 μm. When delineating margins in 20 specimens of superficial and nodular BCCs, depth could be reliably determined down to ˜600 μm, and agreement with histology was within about ±50 μm.

  2. Simple and accurate sum rules for highly relativistic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Scott M.

    2005-03-01

    In this paper, I consider the Bethe and Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rules, which together form the foundation of Bethe's theory of energy loss from fast charged particles to matter. For nonrelativistic target systems, the use of closure leads directly to simple expressions for these quantities. In the case of relativistic systems, on the other hand, the calculation of sum rules is fraught with difficulties. Various perturbative approaches have been used over the years to obtain relativistic corrections, but these methods fail badly when the system in question is very strongly bound. Here, I present an approach that leads to relatively simple expressions yielding accurate sums, even for highly relativistic many-electron systems. I also offer an explanation for the difference between relativistic and nonrelativistic sum rules in terms of the Zitterbewegung of the electrons.

  3. Use of an inertial navigation system for accurate track recovery and coastal oceanographic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, B. M.; Gower, J. F. R.

    1977-01-01

    A data acquisition system using a Litton LTN-51 inertial navigation unit (INU) was tested and used for aircraft track recovery and for location and tracking from the air of targets at sea. The characteristic position drift of the INU is compensated for by sighting landmarks of accurately known position at discrete time intervals using a visual sighting system in the transparent nose of the Beechcraft 18 aircraft used. For an aircraft altitude of about 300 m, theoretical and experimental tests indicate that calculated aircraft and/or target positions obtained from the interpolated INU drift curve will be accurate to within 10 m for landmarks spaced approximately every 15 minutes in time. For applications in coastal oceanography, such as surface current mapping by tracking artificial targets, the system allows a broad area to be covered without use of high altitude photography and its attendant needs for large targets and clear weather.

  4. Accurate taxonomic assignment of short pyrosequencing reads.

    PubMed

    Clemente, José C; Jansson, Jesper; Valiente, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Ambiguities in the taxonomy dependent assignment of pyrosequencing reads are usually resolved by mapping each read to the lowest common ancestor in a reference taxonomy of all those sequences that match the read. This conservative approach has the drawback of mapping a read to a possibly large clade that may also contain many sequences not matching the read. A more accurate taxonomic assignment of short reads can be made by mapping each read to the node in the reference taxonomy that provides the best precision and recall. We show that given a suffix array for the sequences in the reference taxonomy, a short read can be mapped to the node of the reference taxonomy with the best combined value of precision and recall in time linear in the size of the taxonomy subtree rooted at the lowest common ancestor of the matching sequences. An accurate taxonomic assignment of short reads can thus be made with about the same efficiency as when mapping each read to the lowest common ancestor of all matching sequences in a reference taxonomy. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach on several metagenomic datasets of marine and gut microbiota.

  5. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  6. Accurate pose estimation for forensic identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merckx, Gert; Hermans, Jeroen; Vandermeulen, Dirk

    2010-04-01

    In forensic authentication, one aims to identify the perpetrator among a series of suspects or distractors. A fundamental problem in any recognition system that aims for identification of subjects in a natural scene is the lack of constrains on viewing and imaging conditions. In forensic applications, identification proves even more challenging, since most surveillance footage is of abysmal quality. In this context, robust methods for pose estimation are paramount. In this paper we will therefore present a new pose estimation strategy for very low quality footage. Our approach uses 3D-2D registration of a textured 3D face model with the surveillance image to obtain accurate far field pose alignment. Starting from an inaccurate initial estimate, the technique uses novel similarity measures based on the monogenic signal to guide a pose optimization process. We will illustrate the descriptive strength of the introduced similarity measures by using them directly as a recognition metric. Through validation, using both real and synthetic surveillance footage, our pose estimation method is shown to be accurate, and robust to lighting changes and image degradation.

  7. Accurate basis set truncation for wavefunction embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Taylor A.; Goodpaster, Jason D.; Manby, Frederick R.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) provides a formally exact framework for performing embedded subsystem electronic structure calculations, including DFT-in-DFT and wavefunction theory-in-DFT descriptions. In the interest of efficiency, it is desirable to truncate the atomic orbital basis set in which the subsystem calculation is performed, thus avoiding high-order scaling with respect to the size of the MO virtual space. In this study, we extend a recently introduced projection-based embedding method [F. R. Manby, M. Stella, J. D. Goodpaster, and T. F. Miller III, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2564 (2012)], 10.1021/ct300544e to allow for the systematic and accurate truncation of the embedded subsystem basis set. The approach is applied to both covalently and non-covalently bound test cases, including water clusters and polypeptide chains, and it is demonstrated that errors associated with basis set truncation are controllable to well within chemical accuracy. Furthermore, we show that this approach allows for switching between accurate projection-based embedding and DFT embedding with approximate kinetic energy (KE) functionals; in this sense, the approach provides a means of systematically improving upon the use of approximate KE functionals in DFT embedding.

  8. Strategy for accurate liver intervention by an optical tracking system

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qinyong; Yang, Rongqian; Cai, Ken; Guan, Peifeng; Xiao, Weihu; Wu, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided navigation for radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors requires the accurate guidance of needle insertion into a tumor target. The main challenge of image-guided navigation for radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors is the occurrence of liver deformations caused by respiratory motion. This study reports a strategy of real-time automatic registration to track custom fiducial markers glued onto the surface of a patient’s abdomen to find the respiratory phase, in which the static preoperative CT is performed. Custom fiducial markers are designed. Real-time automatic registration method consists of the automatic localization of custom fiducial markers in the patient and image spaces. The fiducial registration error is calculated in real time and indicates if the current respiratory phase corresponds to the phase of the static preoperative CT. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed strategy, a liver simulator is constructed and two volunteers are involved in the preliminary experiments. An ex-vivo porcine liver model is employed to further verify the strategy for liver intervention. Experimental results demonstrate that real-time automatic registration method is rapid, accurate, and feasible for capturing the respiratory phase from which the static preoperative CT anatomical model is generated by tracking the movement of the skin-adhered custom fiducial markers. PMID:26417501

  9. Targeted Nanotechnology for Cancer Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Toy, Randall; Bauer, Lisa; Hoimes, Christopher; Ghaghada, Ketan B.; Karathanasis, Efstathios

    2014-01-01

    Targeted nanoparticle imaging agents provide many benefits and new opportunities to facilitate accurate diagnosis of cancer and significantly impact patient outcome. Due to the highly engineerable nature of nanotechnology, targeted nanoparticles exhibit significant advantages including increased contrast sensitivity, binding avidity and targeting specificity. Considering the various nanoparticle designs and their adjustable ability to target a specific site and generate detectable signals, nanoparticles can be optimally designed in terms of biophysical interactions (i.e., intravascular and interstitial transport) and biochemical interactions (i.e., targeting avidity towards cancer-related biomarkers) for site-specific detection of very distinct microenvironments. This review seeks to illustrate that the design of a nanoparticle dictates its in vivo journey and targeting of hard-to-reach cancer sites, facilitating early and accurate diagnosis and interrogation of the most aggressive forms of cancer. We will report various targeted nanoparticles for cancer imaging using X-ray computed tomography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear imaging and optical imaging. Finally, to realize the full potential of targeted nanotechnology for cancer imaging, we will describe the challenges and opportunities for the clinical translation and widespread adaptation of targeted nanoparticles imaging agents. PMID:25116445

  10. Exploring the Process of Energy Generation in Pathophysiology by Targeted Metabolomics: Performance of a Simple and Quantitative Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera-Borrull, Marta; Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Hernández-Aguilera, Anna; Luciano, Fedra; Ras, Rosa; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Camps, Jordi; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Menendez, Javier A.; Joven, Jorge; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities in mitochondrial metabolism and regulation of energy balance contribute to human diseases. The consequences of high fat and other nutrient intake, and the resulting acquired mitochondrial dysfunction, are essential to fully understand common disorders, including obesity, cancer, and atherosclerosis. To simultaneously and noninvasively measure and quantify indirect markers of mitochondrial function, we have developed a method based on gas chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry and an electron ionization interface, and validated the system using plasma from patients with peripheral artery disease, human cancer cells, and mouse tissues. This approach was used to increase sensibility in the measurement of a wide dynamic range and chemical diversity of multiple intermediate metabolites used in energy metabolism. We demonstrate that our targeted metabolomics method allows for quick and accurate identification and quantification of molecules, including the measurement of small yet significant biological changes in experimental samples. The apparently low process variability required for its performance in plasma, cell lysates, and tissues allowed a rapid identification of correlations between interconnected pathways. Our results suggest that delineating the process of energy generation by targeted metabolomics can be a valid surrogate for predicting mitochondrial dysfunction in biological samples. Importantly, when used in plasma, targeted metabolomics should be viewed as a robust and noninvasive source of biomarkers in specific pathophysiological scenarios.

  11. Delineation of Nested Wetland Catchments and Modeling of Hydrologic Connectivity Using LiDAR Data and Aerial Imagery

    EPA Science Inventory

    In traditional watershed delineation and topographic modelling, surface depressions are generally treated as spurious features and simply removed from a digital elevation model (DEM) to enforce flow continuity of water across the topographic surface to the watershed outlets. In r...

  12. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, D.D.

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperatures in the range of about 1800/sup 0/ to 2700/sup 0/C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  13. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperaes in the range of about 1800.degree. to 2700.degree. C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  14. LSM: perceptually accurate line segment merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Naila; Khan, Nazar

    2016-11-01

    Existing line segment detectors tend to break up perceptually distinct line segments into multiple segments. We propose an algorithm for merging such broken segments to recover the original perceptually accurate line segments. The algorithm proceeds by grouping line segments on the basis of angular and spatial proximity. Then those line segment pairs within each group that satisfy unique, adaptive mergeability criteria are successively merged to form a single line segment. This process is repeated until no more line segments can be merged. We also propose a method for quantitative comparison of line segment detection algorithms. Results on the York Urban dataset show that our merged line segments are closer to human-marked ground-truth line segments compared to state-of-the-art line segment detection algorithms.

  15. Highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-12-30

    Disclosed is a highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine, comprising a revolute joint, comprising a circular encoder wheel, having an axis of rotation; a plurality of marks disposed around at least a portion of the circumference of the encoder wheel; bearing means for supporting the encoder wheel, while permitting free rotation of the encoder wheel about the wheel's axis of rotation; and a sensor, rigidly attached to the bearing means, for detecting the motion of at least some of the marks as the encoder wheel rotates; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the encoder wheel, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the sensor, for converting the output of the sensor into a set of cylindrical coordinates representing the position of the probe tip relative to a reference cylindrical coordinate system.

  16. Practical aspects of spatially high accurate methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Andrew G.; Mitchell, Curtis R.; Walters, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    The computational qualities of high order spatially accurate methods for the finite volume solution of the Euler equations are presented. Two dimensional essentially non-oscillatory (ENO), k-exact, and 'dimension by dimension' ENO reconstruction operators are discussed and compared in terms of reconstruction and solution accuracy, computational cost and oscillatory behavior in supersonic flows with shocks. Inherent steady state convergence difficulties are demonstrated for adaptive stencil algorithms. An exact solution to the heat equation is used to determine reconstruction error, and the computational intensity is reflected in operation counts. Standard MUSCL differencing is included for comparison. Numerical experiments presented include the Ringleb flow for numerical accuracy and a shock reflection problem. A vortex-shock interaction demonstrates the ability of the ENO scheme to excel in simulating unsteady high-frequency flow physics.

  17. Toward Accurate and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S.

    2016-01-01

    Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable accurate comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. PMID:27565341

  18. Obtaining accurate translations from expressed sequence tags.

    PubMed

    Wasmuth, James; Blaxter, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The genomes of an increasing number of species are being investigated through the generation of expressed sequence tags (ESTs). However, ESTs are prone to sequencing errors and typically define incomplete transcripts, making downstream annotation difficult. Annotation would be greatly improved with robust polypeptide translations. Many current solutions for EST translation require a large number of full-length gene sequences for training purposes, a resource that is not available for the majority of EST projects. As part of our ongoing EST programs investigating these "neglected" genomes, we have developed a polypeptide prediction pipeline, prot4EST. It incorporates freely available software to produce final translations that are more accurate than those derived from any single method. We describe how this integrated approach goes a long way to overcoming the deficit in training data.

  19. Micron Accurate Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron accurate measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.

  20. Accurate radio positions with the Tidbinbilla interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batty, M. J.; Gulkis, S.; Jauncey, D. L.; Rayner, P. T.

    1979-01-01

    The Tidbinbilla interferometer (Batty et al., 1977) is designed specifically to provide accurate radio position measurements of compact radio sources in the Southern Hemisphere with high sensitivity. The interferometer uses the 26-m and 64-m antennas of the Deep Space Network at Tidbinbilla, near Canberra. The two antennas are separated by 200 m on a north-south baseline. By utilizing the existing antennas and the low-noise traveling-wave masers at 2.29 GHz, it has been possible to produce a high-sensitivity instrument with a minimum of capital expenditure. The north-south baseline ensures that a good range of UV coverage is obtained, so that sources lying in the declination range between about -80 and +30 deg may be observed with nearly orthogonal projected baselines of no less than about 1000 lambda. The instrument also provides high-accuracy flux density measurements for compact radio sources.

  1. Magnetic ranging tool accurately guides replacement well

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, J.B.; Wesson, J.P. )

    1992-12-21

    This paper reports on magnetic ranging surveys and directional drilling technology which accurately guided a replacement well bore to intersect a leaking gas storage well with casing damage. The second well bore was then used to pump cement into the original leaking casing shoe. The repair well bore kicked off from the surface hole, bypassed casing damage in the middle of the well, and intersected the damaged well near the casing shoe. The repair well was subsequently completed in the gas storage zone near the original well bore, salvaging the valuable bottom hole location in the reservoir. This method would prevent the loss of storage gas, and it would prevent a potential underground blowout that could permanently damage the integrity of the storage field.

  2. The high cost of accurate knowledge.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Kathleen M; Weber, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    Many business thinkers believe it's the role of senior managers to scan the external environment to monitor contingencies and constraints, and to use that precise knowledge to modify the company's strategy and design. As these thinkers see it, managers need accurate and abundant information to carry out that role. According to that logic, it makes sense to invest heavily in systems for collecting and organizing competitive information. Another school of pundits contends that, since today's complex information often isn't precise anyway, it's not worth going overboard with such investments. In other words, it's not the accuracy and abundance of information that should matter most to top executives--rather, it's how that information is interpreted. After all, the role of senior managers isn't just to make decisions; it's to set direction and motivate others in the face of ambiguities and conflicting demands. Top executives must interpret information and communicate those interpretations--they must manage meaning more than they must manage information. So which of these competing views is the right one? Research conducted by academics Sutcliffe and Weber found that how accurate senior executives are about their competitive environments is indeed less important for strategy and corresponding organizational changes than the way in which they interpret information about their environments. Investments in shaping those interpretations, therefore, may create a more durable competitive advantage than investments in obtaining and organizing more information. And what kinds of interpretations are most closely linked with high performance? Their research suggests that high performers respond positively to opportunities, yet they aren't overconfident in their abilities to take advantage of those opportunities.

  3. Ground-Water Capture Zone Delineation of Hypothetical Systems: Methodology Comparison and Real-World Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahern, J. A.; Lilly, M. R.; Hinzman, L. D.

    2003-12-01

    A capture zone is the aquifer volume through which ground-water flows to a pumping well over a given time of travel. Determining a well's capture zone aids in water-supply management by creating an awareness of the water source. This helps ensure sustainable pumping operations and outlines areas where protection from contamination is critical. We are delineating the capture zones of hypothetical conceptual models that resemble the Fairbanks, Alaska floodplain both in aquifer parameters and boundary conditions. We begin with a very simple hydrogeologic system and gradually add complexity such as heterogeneity, anisotropy, multiple wells, and zones of permafrost. Commonly-used delineation methods are applied to each case. These include calculated fixed-radius, analytical and numerical models. The calculated fixed-radius method uses a mathematical equation with several simplifying assumptions. Analytical techniques employ a series of equations that likewise assume simple conditions, although to a lesser degree than the fixed-radius method. Our chosen numerical model is MODFLOW-2000, which offers a particle-tracking package (MODPATH) for delineating recharge areas. The delineations are overlayed for each conceptual model in order to compare the capture zones produced by the different methods. Contrasts between capture zones increase with the complexity of the hydrogeology. Simpler methods are restricted by their underlying assumptions. When methods can no longer account for complexities in the conceptual model, the resulting delineations remain similar to those of simpler models. Meanwhile, the zones generated by more sophisticated methods are able to change with changes to the conceptual model. Hence, the simpler methods now lack accuracy and credibility. We have found that these simpler techniques tend to overestimate the capture zone. Water-supply managers must consider such inaccuracies when evaluating the costs of each method. In addition to comparing delineation

  4. Charting the Visual Space of Insect Eyes - Delineating the Guidance, Navigation and Control of Insect Flight by Their Optical Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2014-0021 Charting the visual space of insect eyes - Delineating the guidance, navigation and control of insect ...the visual space of insect eyes - Delineating the guidance, navigation and control of insect flight by their optical sensor 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Insect visual systems are extremely compact and presumably optimized for optimal

  5. Delineation of the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley groundwater basin, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenelon, Joseph M.; Halford, Keith J.; Moreo, Michael T.

    2016-01-22

    This report delineates the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley (PMOV) groundwater basin, where recharge occurs, moves downgradient, and discharges to Oasis Valley, Nevada. About 5,900 acre-feet of water discharges annually from Oasis Valley, an area of springs and seeps near the town of Beatty in southern Nevada. Radionuclides in groundwater beneath Pahute Mesa, an area of historical underground nuclear testing at the Nevada National Security Site, are believed to be migrating toward Oasis Valley. Delineating the boundary of the PMOV groundwater basin is necessary to adequately assess the potential for transport of radionuclides from Pahute Mesa to Oasis Valley.The PMOV contributing area is defined based on regional water-level contours, geologic controls, and knowledge of adjacent flow systems. The viability of this area as the contributing area to Oasis Valley and the absence of significant interbasin flow between the PMOV groundwater basin and adjacent basins are shown regionally and locally. Regional constraints on the location of the contributing area boundary and on the absence of interbasin groundwater flow are shown by balancing groundwater discharges in the PMOV groundwater basin and adjacent basins against available water from precipitation. Internal consistency for the delineated contributing area is shown by matching measured water levels, groundwater discharges, and transmissivities with simulated results from a single-layer, steady-state, groundwater-flow model. An alternative basin boundary extending farther north than the final boundary was rejected based on a poor chloride mass balance and a large imbalance in the northern area between preferred and simulated recharge.

  6. LNAPL source zone delineation using soil gases in a heterogeneous silty-sand aquifer.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Grégory J V; Jousse, Florie; Luze, Nicolas; Höhener, Patrick; Atteia, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Source delineation of hydrocarbon contaminated sites is of high importance for remediation work. However, traditional methods like soil core extraction and analysis or recent Membrane Interface Probe methods are time consuming and costly. Therefore, the development of an in situ method based on soil gas analysis can be interesting. This includes the direct measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soil gas taken from gas probes using a PID (Photo Ionization Detector) and the analysis of other soil gases related to VOC degradation distribution (CH4, O2, CO2) or related to presence of Light Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (LNAPL) as (222)Rn. However, in widespread heterogeneous formations, delineation by gas measurements becomes more challenging. The objective of this study is twofold: (i) to analyse the potential of several in situ gas measurement techniques in comparison to soil coring for LNAPL source delineation at a heterogeneous contaminated site where the techniques might be limited by a low diffusion potential linked to the presence of fine sands and silts, and (ii) to analyse the effect of vertical sediment heterogeneities on the performance of these gas measurement methods. Thus, five types of gases were analysed: VOCs, their three related degradation products O2, CO2 and CH4 and (222)Rn. Gas measurements were compared to independent LNAPL analysis by coring. This work was conducted at an old industrial site frequently contaminated by a Diesel-Fuel mixture located in a heterogeneous fine-grained aquifer. Results show that in such heterogeneous media migration of reactive gases like VOCs occurs only across small distances and the VOC concentrations sampled with gas probes are mainly related to local conditions rather than the presence of LNAPL below the gas probe. (222)Rn is not well correlated with LNAPL because of sediment heterogeneity. Oxygen, CO2, and especially CH4, have larger lengths of diffusion and give the clearest picture for LNAPL presence at

  7. Accuracy Assessment of Crown Delineation Methods for the Individual Trees Using LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, K. T.; Lin, C.; Lin, Y. C.; Liu, J. K.

    2016-06-01

    Forest canopy density and height are used as variables in a number of environmental applications, including the estimation of biomass, forest extent and condition, and biodiversity. The airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is very useful to estimate forest canopy parameters according to the generated canopy height models (CHMs). The purpose of this work is to introduce an algorithm to delineate crown parameters, e.g. tree height and crown radii based on the generated rasterized CHMs. And accuracy assessment for the extraction of volumetric parameters of a single tree is also performed via manual measurement using corresponding aerial photo pairs. A LiDAR dataset of a golf course acquired by Leica ALS70-HP is used in this study. Two algorithms, i.e. a traditional one with the subtraction of a digital elevation model (DEM) from a digital surface model (DSM), and a pit-free approach are conducted to generate the CHMs firstly. Then two algorithms, a multilevel morphological active-contour (MMAC) and a variable window filter (VWF), are implemented and used in this study for individual tree delineation. Finally, experimental results of two automatic estimation methods for individual trees can be evaluated with manually measured stand-level parameters, i.e. tree height and crown diameter. The resulting CHM generated by a simple subtraction is full of empty pixels (called "pits") that will give vital impact on subsequent analysis for individual tree delineation. The experimental results indicated that if more individual trees can be extracted, tree crown shape will became more completely in the CHM data after the pit-free process.

  8. Inter- and intra-observer variations in the delineation of lesions in mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buelow, Thomas; Heese, Harald S.; Grewer, Ruediger; Kutra, Dominik; Wiemker, Rafael

    2015-03-01

    Many clinical and research tasks require the delineation of lesions in radiological images. There is a variety of methods available for deriving such delineations, ranging from free hand manual contouring and manual positioning of lowparameter graphical objects, to (semi-)automatic computerized segmentation methods. In this paper we investigate the impact of the chosen segmentation method on the inter-observer variability of the resulting contour. Three different methods are compared in this paper, namely (1) manual positioning of an ellipse, (2) an automatic segmentation method, coined live-segmentation, which depends on the current mouse pointer position as input information and is updated in real-time as the user hovers with the mouse over the image and (3) free form segmentation which is realized by allowing the user to pull the result of method (2) to image positions that the contour is required to pass. Each of the three methods was used by three experienced radiologists to delineate a set of 215 round breast lesion images in digital mammograms. Agreement between contours was assessed by computing the Dice coefficient. The median Dice coefficient for the ellipses placed by different readers was 0.85. The intra-reader Dice coefficient comparing ellipses and livesegmentations was 0.84, thus showing that the live-segmentation results agree with ellipse segmentations to the same extent as readers agree on the ellipse placement. Inter-observer agreement when using the live-segmentation was higher than for the ellipses (median Dice = 0.91 vs. 0.85) showing that the live-segmentation is a more reproducible alternative to the ellipse placement.

  9. Spatial and thematic assessment of object-based forest stand delineation using an OFA-matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando, A.; Tiede, D.; Albrecht, F.; Lang, S.

    2012-10-01

    The delineation and classification of forest stands is a crucial aspect of forest management. Object-based image analysis (OBIA) can be used to produce detailed maps of forest stands from either orthophotos or very high resolution satellite imagery. However, measures are then required for evaluating and quantifying both the spatial and thematic accuracy of the OBIA output. In this paper we present an approach for delineating forest stands and a new Object Fate Analysis (OFA) matrix for accuracy assessment. A two-level object-based orthophoto analysis was first carried out to delineate stands on the Dehesa Boyal public land in central Spain (Avila Province). Two structural features were first created for use in class modelling, enabling good differentiation between stands: a relational tree cover cluster feature, and an arithmetic ratio shadow/tree feature. We then extended the OFA comparison approach with an OFA-matrix to enable concurrent validation of thematic and spatial accuracies. Its diagonal shows the proportion of spatial and thematic coincidence between a reference data and the corresponding classification. New parameters for Spatial Thematic Loyalty (STL), Spatial Thematic Loyalty Overall (STLOVERALL) and Maximal Interfering Object (MIO) are introduced to summarise the OFA-matrix accuracy assessment. A stands map generated by OBIA (classification data) was compared with a map of the same area produced from photo interpretation and field data (reference data). In our example the OFA-matrix results indicate good spatial and thematic accuracies (>65%) for all stand classes except for the shrub stands (31.8%), and a good STLOVERALL (69.8%). The OFA-matrix has therefore been shown to be a valid tool for OBIA accuracy assessment.

  10. On using simple time-of-travel capture zone delineation methods.

    PubMed

    Ceric, Admir; Haitjema, Henk

    2005-01-01

    As part of its Wellhead Protection Program, the U.S. EPA mandates the delineation of "time-of-travel capture zones" as the basis for the definition of wellhead protection zones surrounding drinking water production wells. Depending on circumstances the capture zones may be determined using methods that range from simply drawing a circle around the well to sophisticated ground water flow and transport modeling. The simpler methods are attractive when faced with the delineation of hundreds or thousands of capture zones for small public drinking water supply wells. On the other hand, a circular capture zone may not be adequate in the presence of an ambient ground water flow regime. A dimensionless time-of-travel parameter T is used to determine when calculated fixed-radius capture zones can be used for drinking water production wells. The parameter incorporates aquifer properties, the magnitude of the ambient ground water flow field, and the travel time criterion for the time-of-travel capture zone. In the absence of interfering flow features, three different simple capture zones can be used depending on the value of T . A modified calculated fixed-radius capture zone proves protective when T < 0.1, while a more elongated capture zone must be used when T > 1. For values of T between 0.1 and 1, a circular capture zone can be used that is eccentric with respect to the well. Finally, calculating T allows for a quick assessment of the validity of circular capture zones without redoing the delineation with a computer model.

  11. LNAPL source zone delineation using soil gases in a heterogeneous silty-sand aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Grégory J. V.; Jousse, Florie; Luze, Nicolas; Höhener, Patrick; Atteia, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Source delineation of hydrocarbon contaminated sites is of high importance for remediation work. However, traditional methods like soil core extraction and analysis or recent Membrane Interface Probe methods are time consuming and costly. Therefore, the development of an in situ method based on soil gas analysis can be interesting. This includes the direct measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soil gas taken from gas probes using a PID (Photo Ionization Detector) and the analysis of other soil gases related to VOC degradation distribution (CH4, O2, CO2) or related to presence of Light Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (LNAPL) as 222Rn. However, in widespread heterogeneous formations, delineation by gas measurements becomes more challenging. The objective of this study is twofold: (i) to analyse the potential of several in situ gas measurement techniques in comparison to soil coring for LNAPL source delineation at a heterogeneous contaminated site where the techniques might be limited by a low diffusion potential linked to the presence of fine sands and silts, and (ii) to analyse the effect of vertical sediment heterogeneities on the performance of these gas measurement methods. Thus, five types of gases were analysed: VOCs, their three related degradation products O2, CO2 and CH4 and 222Rn. Gas measurements were compared to independent LNAPL analysis by coring. This work was conducted at an old industrial site frequently contaminated by a Diesel-Fuel mixture located in a heterogeneous fine-grained aquifer. Results show that in such heterogeneous media migration of reactive gases like VOCs occurs only across small distances and the VOC concentrations sampled with gas probes are mainly related to local conditions rather than the presence of LNAPL below the gas probe. 222Rn is not well correlated with LNAPL because of sediment heterogeneity. Oxygen, CO2, and especially CH4, have larger lengths of diffusion and give the clearest picture for LNAPL presence at this

  12. Accurate de novo design of hyperstable constrained peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Mulligan, Vikram Khipple; Bahl, Christopher D.; Gilmore, Jason M.; Harvey, Peta J.; Cheneval, Olivier; Buchko, Garry W.; Pulavarti, Surya V. S. R. K.; Kaas, Quentin; Eletsky, Alexander; Huang, Po-Ssu; Johnsen, William A.; Greisen, Per, Jr.; Rocklin, Gabriel J.; Song, Yifan; Linsky, Thomas W.; Watkins, Andrew; Rettie, Stephen A.; Xu, Xianzhong; Carter, Lauren P.; Bonneau, Richard; Olson, James M.; Coutsias, Evangelos; Correnti, Colin E.; Szyperski, Thomas; Craik, David J.; Baker, David

    2016-10-01

    Naturally occurring, pharmacologically active peptides constrained with covalent crosslinks generally have shapes that have evolved to fit precisely into binding pockets on their targets. Such peptides can have excellent pharmaceutical properties, combining the stability and tissue penetration of small-molecule drugs with the specificity of much larger protein therapeutics. The ability to design constrained peptides with precisely specified tertiary structures would enable the design of shape-complementary inhibitors of arbitrary targets. Here we describe the development of computational methods for accurate de novo design of conformationally restricted peptides, and the use of these methods to design 18-47 residue, disulfide-crosslinked peptides, a subset of which are heterochiral and/or N-C backbone-cyclized. Both genetically encodable and non-canonical peptides are exceptionally stable to thermal and chemical denaturation, and 12 experimentally determined X-ray and NMR structures are nearly identical to the computational design models. The computational design methods and stable scaffolds presented here provide the basis for development of a new generation of peptide-based drugs.

  13. Accurate de novo design of hyperstable constrained peptides.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Mulligan, Vikram Khipple; Bahl, Christopher D; Gilmore, Jason M; Harvey, Peta J; Cheneval, Olivier; Buchko, Garry W; Pulavarti, Surya V S R K; Kaas, Quentin; Eletsky, Alexander; Huang, Po-Ssu; Johnsen, William A; Greisen, Per Jr; Rocklin, Gabriel J; Song, Yifan; Linsky, Thomas W; Watkins, Andrew; Rettie, Stephen A; Xu, Xianzhong; Carter, Lauren P; Bonneau, Richard; Olson, James M; Coutsias, Evangelos; Correnti, Colin E; Szyperski, Thomas; Craik, David J; Baker, David

    2016-10-20

    Naturally occurring, pharmacologically active peptides constrained with covalent crosslinks generally have shapes that have evolved to fit precisely into binding pockets on their targets. Such peptides can have excellent pharmaceutical properties, combining the stability and tissue penetration of small-molecule drugs with the specificity of much larger protein therapeutics. The ability to design constrained peptides with precisely specified tertiary structures would enable the design of shape-complementary inhibitors of arbitrary targets. Here we describe the development of computational methods for accurate de novo design of conformationally restricted peptides, and the use of these methods to design 18-47 residue, disulfide-crosslinked peptides, a subset of which are heterochiral and/or N-C backbone-cyclized. Both genetically encodable and non-canonical peptides are exceptionally stable to thermal and chemical denaturation, and 12 experimentally determined X-ray and NMR structures are nearly identical to the computational design models. The computational design methods and stable scaffolds presented here provide the basis for development of a new generation of peptide-based drugs.

  14. Approaching system equilibrium with accurate or not accurate feedback information in a two-route system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-mei; Xie, Dong-fan; Li, Qi

    2015-02-01

    With the development of intelligent transport system, advanced information feedback strategies have been developed to reduce traffic congestion and enhance the capacity. However, previous strategies provide accurate information to travelers and our simulation results show that accurate information brings negative effects, especially in delay case. Because travelers prefer to the best condition route with accurate information, and delayed information cannot reflect current traffic condition but past. Then travelers make wrong routing decisions, causing the decrease of the capacity and the increase of oscillations and the system deviating from the equilibrium. To avoid the negative effect, bounded rationality is taken into account by introducing a boundedly rational threshold BR. When difference between two routes is less than the BR, routes have equal probability to be chosen. The bounded rationality is helpful to improve the efficiency in terms of capacity, oscillation and the gap deviating from the system equilibrium.

  15. 46, XY, del (3) (pter-->p25) syndrome: further delineation of the clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Benini, D; Vino, L; Vecchini, S; Fanos, V

    1999-12-01

    A boy with monosomy for the distal part of the short arm of chromosome 3 is described. The clinical features this patient has in common with the previously reported cases include pre- and post-natal growth delay, microcephaly, craniofacial dysmorphism and mental retardation. In addition, minor abnormalities not previously reported were observed, such as snapping thumbs, dorsiflected big toes, connecting anterior and posterior fontanelles at birth, nasolacrimal duct stenosis and double urethral meatus. Conclusion These five new clinical findings may help in further delineation of the syndrome and allow its early recognition. A complete revision of clinical findings published in literature is reported.

  16. Automated volume of interest delineation and rendering of cone beam CT images in interventional cardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Schäfer, Dirk; Eshuis, Peter; Carroll, John; Grass, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Interventional C-arm systems allow the efficient acquisition of 3D cone beam CT images. They can be used for intervention planning, navigation, and outcome assessment. We present a fast and completely automated volume of interest (VOI) delineation for cardiac interventions, covering the whole visceral cavity including mediastinum and lungs but leaving out rib-cage and spine. The problem is addressed in a model based approach. The procedure has been evaluated on 22 patient cases and achieves an average surface error below 2mm. The method is able to cope with varying image intensities, varying truncations due to the limited reconstruction volume, and partially with heavy metal and motion artifacts.

  17. Simple diagrammatic method to delineate male urethra in prostate cancer radiotherapy: an MRI based approach.

    PubMed

    Kataria, Tejinder; Gupta, Deepak; Goyal, Shikha; Bisht, Shyam S; Chaudhary, Ravi; Narang, Kushal; Banerjee, Susovan; Basu, Trinanjan; Abhishek, Ashu; Sambasivam, Sasikumar; Vishnu, Nisha T

    2016-12-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being increasingly utilized in the treatment of prostate cancer. With the advent of high-precision radiosurgery systems, it is possible to obtain dose distributions akin to high-dose rate brachytherapy with SBRT. However, urethral toxicity has a significant impact on the quality of life in patients with prostate cancer. Contouring the male urethra on a CT scan is difficult in the absence of an indwelling catheter. In this pictorial essay, we have used the MRI obtained for radiotherapy planning to aid in the delineation of the male urethra and have attempted to define guidelines for the same.

  18. Dosimetric Consequences of Interobserver Variability in Delineating the Organs at Risk in Gynecologic Interstitial Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Damato, Antonio L.; Townamchai, Kanopkis; Albert, Michele; Bair, Ryan J.; Cormack, Robert A.; Jang, Joanne; Kovacs, Arpad; Lee, Larissa J.; Mak, Kimberley S.; Mirabeau-Beale, Kristina L.; Mouw, Kent W.; Phillips, John G.; Pretz, Jennifer L.; Russo, Andrea L.; Lewis, John H.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the dosimetric variability associated with interobserver organ-at-risk delineation differences on computed tomography in patients undergoing gynecologic interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials The rectum, bladder and sigmoid of 14 patients treated with gynecologic interstitial brachytherapy were retrospectively contoured by 13 physicians. Geometric variability was calculated using κ statistics, conformity index (CIgen), and coefficient of variation (CV) of volumes contoured across physicians. Dosimetric variability of the single-fraction D0.1cc and D2cc was assessed through CV across physicians, and the standard deviation of the total EQD2 (equivalent dose in 2 Gy per fraction) brachytherapy dose (SDTOT) was calculated. Results The population mean ± 1 standard deviation of κ, CIgen and volume CV were, respectively: 0.77 ± 0.06, 0.70 ± 0.08 and 20% ± 6% for bladder; 0.74 ± 06, 0.67 ± 0.08 and 20% ± 5% for rectum, and 0.33 ± 0.20, 0.26 ± 0.17 and 82% ± 42% for sigmoid. Dosimetric variability was: for bladder, CV = 31% ± 19% (SDTOT = 72 ± 64 Gy) for D0.1cc and CV = 16% + 10% (SDTOT = 9 ± 6 Gy) for D2cc; for rectum, CV = 11% ± 5% (SDTOT = 16 ± 17 Gy) for D0.1cc and CV = 7% ± 2% (SDTOT = 4 ± 3 Gy) for D2cc; for sigmoid, CV = 39% ± 28% (SDTOT = 12 ± 18 Gy) for D0.1cc and CV = 34% ± 19% (SDTOT = 4 ± 4 Gy) for D2cc. Conclusions Delineation of bladder and rectum by 13 physicians demonstrated substantial geometric agreement and resulted in good dosimetric agreement for all dose-volume histogram parameters except bladder D0.1cc. Small delineation differences in high-dose regions by the posterior bladder wall may explain these results. The delineation of sigmoid showed fair geometric agreement. The higher dosimetric variability for sigmoid compared with rectum and bladder did not correlate with higher variability in the total brachytherapy dose but rather may be due to the sigmoid being positioned in low-dose regions in

  19. Dosimetric Consequences of Interobserver Variability in Delineating the Organs at Risk in Gynecologic Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Damato, Antonio L.; Bair, Ryan J.; Cormack, Robert A.; Kovacs, Arpad; Lee, Larissa J.; Lewis, John H.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric variability associated with interobserver organ-at-risk delineation differences on computed tomography in patients undergoing gynecologic interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: The rectum, bladder, and sigmoid of 14 patients treated with gynecologic interstitial brachytherapy were retrospectively contoured by 13 physicians. Geometric variability was calculated using κ statistics, conformity index (CI{sub gen}), and coefficient of variation (CV) of volumes contoured across physicians. Dosimetric variability of the single-fraction D{sub 0.1cc} and D{sub 2cc} was assessed through CV across physicians, and the standard deviation of the total EQD2 (equivalent dose in 2 Gy per fraction) brachytherapy dose (SD{sup TOT}) was calculated. Results: The population mean ± 1 standard deviation of κ, CI{sub gen}, and volume CV were, respectively: 0.77 ± 0.06, 0.70 ± 0.08, and 20% ± 6% for bladder; 0.74 ± 06, 0.67 ± 0.08, and 20% ± 5% for rectum; and 0.33 ± 0.20, 0.26 ± 0.17, and 82% ± 42% for sigmoid. Dosimetric variability was as follows: for bladder, CV = 31% ± 19% (SD{sup TOT} = 72 ± 64 Gy) for D{sub 0.1cc} and CV = 16% ± 10% (SD{sup TOT} = 9 ± 6 Gy) for D{sub 2cc}; for rectum, CV = 11% ± 5% (SD{sup TOT} = 16 ± 17 Gy) for D{sub 0.1cc} and CV = 7% ± 2% (SD{sup TOT} = 4 ± 3 Gy) for D{sub 2cc}; for sigmoid, CV = 39% ± 28% (SD{sup TOT} = 12 ± 18 Gy) for D{sub 0.1cc} and CV = 34% ± 19% (SD{sup TOT} = 4 ± 4 Gy) for D{sub 2cc.} Conclusions: Delineation of bladder and rectum by 13 physicians demonstrated substantial geometric agreement and resulted in good dosimetric agreement for all dose-volume histogram parameters except bladder D{sub 0.1cc.} Small delineation differences in high-dose regions by the posterior bladder wall may explain these results. The delineation of sigmoid showed fair geometric agreement. The higher dosimetric variability for sigmoid compared with rectum and bladder did not correlate with

  20. Consensus Guidelines and Contouring Atlas for Pelvic Node Delineation in Prostate and Pelvic Node Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Victoria A.; Staffurth, John; Naismith, Olivia; Esmail, Alikhan; Gulliford, Sarah; Khoo, Vincent; Lewis, Rebecca; Littler, John; McNair, Helen; Sadoyze, Azmat; Scrase, Christopher; Sohaib, Aslam; Syndikus, Isabel; Zarkar, Anjali; Hall, Emma; Dearnaley, David

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to establish reproducible guidelines for delineating the clinical target volume (CTV) of the pelvic lymph nodes (LN) by combining the freehand Royal Marsden Hospital (RMH) and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) vascular expansion techniques. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with prostate cancer underwent standard planning computed tomography scanning. Four different CTVs (RMH, RTOG, modified RTOG, and Prostate and pelvIs Versus prOsTate Alone treatment for Locally advanced prostate cancer [PIVOTAL] trial) were created for each patient, and 6 different bowel expansion margins (BEM) were created to assess bowel avoidance by the CTV. The resulting CTVs were compared visually and by using Jaccard conformity indices. The volume of overlap between bowel and planning target volume (PTV) was measured to aid selection of an appropriate BEM to enable maximal LN yet minimal normal tissue coverage. Results: In total, 84 nodal contours were evaluated. LN coverage was similar in all groups, with all of the vascular-expansion techniques (RTOG, modified RTOG, and PIVOTAL), resulting in larger CTVs than that of the RMH technique (mean volumes: 287.3 cm{sup 3}, 326.7 cm{sup 3}, 310.3 cm{sup 3}, and 256.7 cm{sup 3}, respectively). Mean volumes of bowel within the modified RTOG PTV were 19.5 cm{sup 3} (with 0 mm BEM), 17.4 cm{sup 3} (1-mm BEM), 10.8 cm{sup 3} (2-mm BEM), 6.9 cm{sup 3} (3-mm BEM), 5.0 cm{sup 3} (4-mm BEM), and 1.4 cm{sup 3} (5-mm BEM) in comparison with an overlap of 9.2 cm{sup 3} seen using the RMH technique. Evaluation of conformity between LN-CTVs from each technique revealed similar volumes and coverage. Conclusions: Vascular expansion techniques result in larger LN-CTVs than the freehand RMH technique. Because the RMH technique is supported by phase 1 and 2 trial safety data, we proposed modifications to the RTOG technique, including the addition of a 3-mm BEM, which resulted in LN-CTV coverage similar

  1. Seeing and Being Seen: Predictors of Accurate Perceptions about Classmates’ Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Jennifer Watling; Neal, Zachary P.; Cappella, Elise

    2015-01-01

    This study examines predictors of observer accuracy (i.e. seeing) and target accuracy (i.e. being seen) in perceptions of classmates’ relationships in a predominantly African American sample of 420 second through fourth graders (ages 7 – 11). Girls, children in higher grades, and children in smaller classrooms were more accurate observers. Targets (i.e. pairs of children) were more accurately observed when they occurred in smaller classrooms of higher grades and involved same-sex, high-popularity, and similar-popularity children. Moreover, relationships between pairs of girls were more accurately observed than relationships between pairs of boys. As a set, these findings suggest the importance of both observer and target characteristics for children’s accurate perceptions of classroom relationships. Moreover, the substantial variation in observer accuracy and target accuracy has methodological implications for both peer-reported assessments of classroom relationships and the use of stochastic actor-based models to understand peer selection and socialization processes. PMID:26347582

  2. LIQUID TARGET

    DOEpatents

    Martin, M.D.; Salsig, W.W. Jr.

    1959-01-13

    A liquid handling apparatus is presented for a liquid material which is to be irradiated. The apparatus consists essentially of a reservoir for the liquid, a target element, a drain tank and a drain lock chamber. The target is in the form of a looped tube, the upper end of which is adapted to be disposed in a beam of atomic particles. The lower end of the target tube is in communication with the liquid in the reservoir and a means is provided to continuously circulate the liquid material to be irradiated through the target tube. Means to heat the reservoir tank is provided in the event that a metal is to be used as the target material. The apparatus is provided with suitable valves and shielding to provide maximum safety in operation.

  3. Higher order accurate partial implicitization: An unconditionally stable fourth-order-accurate explicit numerical technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, R. A., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The previously obtained second-order-accurate partial implicitization numerical technique used in the solution of fluid dynamic problems was modified with little complication to achieve fourth-order accuracy. The Von Neumann stability analysis demonstrated the unconditional linear stability of the technique. The order of the truncation error was deduced from the Taylor series expansions of the linearized difference equations and was verified by numerical solutions to Burger's equation. For comparison, results were also obtained for Burger's equation using a second-order-accurate partial-implicitization scheme, as well as the fourth-order scheme of Kreiss.

  4. Canonical Decomposition of Ictal Scalp EEG and Accurate Source Localisation: Principles and Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    De Vos, Maarten; De Lathauwer, Lieven; Vanrumste, Bart; Van Huffel, Sabine; Van Paesschen, W.

    2007-01-01

    Long-term electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings are important in the presurgical evaluation of refractory partial epilepsy for the delineation of the ictal onset zones. In this paper, we introduce a new concept for an automatic, fast, and objective localisation of the ictal onset zone in ictal EEG recordings. Canonical decomposition of ictal EEG decomposes the EEG in atoms. One or more atoms are related to the seizure activity. A single dipole was then fitted to model the potential distribution of each epileptic atom. In this study, we performed a simulation study in order to estimate the dipole localisation error. Ictal dipole localisation was very accurate, even at low signal-to-noise ratios, was not affected by seizure activity frequency or frequency changes, and was minimally affected by the waveform and depth of the ictal onset zone location. Ictal dipole localisation error using 21 electrodes was around 10.0 mm and improved more than tenfold in the range of 0.5–1.0 mm using 148 channels. In conclusion, our simulation study of canonical decomposition of ictal scalp EEG allowed a robust and accurate localisation of the ictal onset zone. PMID:18301715

  5. Accurate attitude determination of the LACE satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miglin, M. F.; Campion, R. E.; Lemos, P. J.; Tran, T.

    1993-01-01

    The Low-power Atmospheric Compensation Experiment (LACE) satellite, launched in February 1990 by the Naval Research Laboratory, uses a magnetic damper on a gravity gradient boom and a momentum wheel with its axis perpendicular to the plane of the orbit to stabilize and maintain its attitude. Satellite attitude is determined using three types of sensors: a conical Earth scanner, a set of sun sensors, and a magnetometer. The Ultraviolet Plume Instrument (UVPI), on board LACE, consists of two intensified CCD cameras and a gimbal led pointing mirror. The primary purpose of the UVPI is to image rocket plumes from space in the ultraviolet and visible wavelengths. Secondary objectives include imaging stars, atmospheric phenomena, and ground targets. The problem facing the UVPI experimenters is that the sensitivity of the LACF satellite attitude sensors is not always adequate to correctly point the UVPI cameras. Our solution is to point the UVPI cameras at known targets and use the information thus gained to improve attitude measurements. This paper describes the three methods developed to determine improved attitude values using the UVPI for both real-time operations and post observation analysis.

  6. Incongruence between mtDNA and nuclear data in the freshwater mussel genus Cyprogenia (Bivalvia: Unionidae) and its impact on species delineation.

    PubMed

    Chong, Jer Pin; Harris, John L; Roe, Kevin J

    2016-04-01

    Accurately identifying species is a crucial step for developing conservation strategies for freshwater mussels, one of the most imperiled faunas in North America. This study uses genetic data to re-examine species delineation in the genus Cyprogenia. Historically, Cyprogenia found west of the Mississippi River have been ascribed to Cyprogenia aberti (Conrad 1850), and those east of the Mississippi River were classified as Cyprogenia stegaria (Rafinesque 1820). Previous studies using mitochondrial DNA sequences indicated that C. aberti and C. stegaria were not reciprocally monophyletic groups, suggesting the need for systematic revision. We generated a novel dataset consisting of 10 microsatellite loci and combined it with sequence data from the mitochondrial ND1 gene for 223 Cyprogenia specimens. Bayesian analysis of the ND1 nucleotide sequences identified two divergent clades that differ by 15.9%. Members of these two clades occur sympatrically across most sampling locations. In contrast, microsatellite genotypes support recognition of three allopatric clusters defined by major hydrologic basins. The divergent mitochondrial lineages are highly correlated with the color of the conglutinate lures used by mussels to attract and infest host fishes, and tests for selection at the ND1 locus were positive. We infer that the incongruence between mtDNA and microsatellite data in Cyprogenia may be the result of a combination of incomplete lineage sorting and balancing selection on lure color. Our results provide further evidence that mitochondrial markers are not always neutral with respect to selection, and highlight the potential problems of relying on a single-locus-marker for delineating species.

  7. Interobserver variation in cervical cancer tumor delineation for image-based radiotherapy planning among and within different specialties.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dee H; Mayr, Nina A; Karatas, Yasemin; Karatas, Rifat; Adli, Mustafa; Edwards, Susan M; Wolff, James D; Movahed, Allen; Montebello, Joseph F; Yuh, William T C

    2005-01-01

    Radiation therapy for cervical cancer involves a team of specialists, including diagnostic radiologists (DRs), radiation oncologists (ROs), and medical physicists (MPs), to optimize imaging-based radiation therapy planning. The purpose of the study was to investigate the interobserver variations in tumor delineation on MR images of cervical cancer within the same and among different specialties. Twenty MRI cervical cancer studies were independently reviewed by two DRs, two ROs, and two MPs. For every study, each specialist contoured the tumor regions of interest (ROIs) on T2-weighted Turbo Spin Echo sagittal images on all slices containing tumor, and the total tumor volume was computed for statistical analysis. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare the differences in tumor volume delineation among the observers. A graph of all tumor-delineated volumes was generated, and differences between the maximum and minimum volumes over all the readers for each patient dataset were computed. Challenges during the evaluation process for tumor delineation were recorded for each specialist. Interobserver variations of delineated tumor volumes were significant (p < 0.01) among all observers based on a repeated measures ANOVA, which produced an F(5,95) = 3.55. The median difference between the maximum delineated volume and minimum delineated volume was 33.5 cm3 (which can be approximated by a sphere of 4.0 cm diameter) across all 20 patients. Challenges noted for tumor delineation included the following: (1) partial voluming by parametrial fat at the periphery of the uterus; (2) extension of the tumor into parametrial space; (3) similar signal intensity of structures proximal to the tumor such as ovaries, muscles, bladder wall, bowel loops, and pubic symphysis; (4) postradiation changes such as heterogeneity and necrosis; (5) susceptibility artifacts from bowels and vaginal tampons; (6) presence of other pathologies such as atypical myoma; (7) factors that affect pelvic

  8. Does a pneumotach accurately characterize voice function?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Gage; Krane, Michael

    2016-11-01

    A study is presented which addresses how a pneumotach might adversely affect clinical measurements of voice function. A pneumotach is a device, typically a mask, worn over the mouth, in order to measure time-varying glottal volume flow. By measuring the time-varying difference in pressure across a known aerodynamic resistance element in the mask, the glottal volume flow waveform is estimated. Because it adds aerodynamic resistance to the vocal system, there is some concern that using a pneumotach may not accurately portray the behavior of the voice. To test this hypothesis, experiments were performed in a simplified airway model with the principal dimensions of an adult human upper airway. A compliant constriction, fabricated from silicone rubber, modeled the vocal folds. Variations of transglottal pressure, time-averaged volume flow, model vocal fold vibration amplitude, and radiated sound with subglottal pressure were performed, with and without the pneumotach in place, and differences noted. Acknowledge support