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Sample records for accurate temperature profiles

  1. Easy and accurate calculation of programmed temperature gas chromatographic retention times by back-calculation of temperature and hold-up time profiles.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Paul G; Carr, Peter W; Cohen, Jerry D; Hegeman, Adrian D

    2012-11-01

    Linear retention indices are commonly used to identify compounds in programmed-temperature gas chromatography (GC), but they are unreliable unless the original experimental conditions used to measure them are stringently reproduced. However, differences in many experimental conditions may be properly taken into account by calculating programmed-temperature retention times of compounds from their measured isothermal retention vs. temperature relationships. We call this approach "retention projection". Until now, retention projection has been impractical because it required very precise, meticulous measurement of the temperature vs. time and hold-up time vs. temperature profiles actually produced by a specific GC instrument to be accurate. Here we present a new, easy-to-use methodology to precisely measure those profiles: we spike a sample with 25 n-alkanes and use their measured, programmed-temperature retention times to precisely back-calculate what the instrument profiles must have been. Then, when we use those back-calculated profiles to project retention times of 63 chemically diverse compounds, we found that the projections are extremely accurate (e.g. to ±0.9 s in a 40 min ramp). They remained accurate with different temperature programs, GC instruments, inlet pressures, flow rates, and with columns taken from different batches of stationary phase while the accuracy of retention indices became worse the more the experimental conditions were changed from the original ones used to measure them. We also developed new, open-source software (http://www.retentionprediction.org/gc) to demonstrate the system.

  2. Mill profiler machines soft materials accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Mill profiler machines bevels, slots, and grooves in soft materials, such as styrofoam phenolic-filled cores, to any desired thickness. A single operator can accurately control cutting depths in contour or straight line work.

  3. Beam Profile Monitor With Accurate Horizontal And Vertical Beam Profiles

    DOEpatents

    Havener, Charles C [Knoxville, TN; Al-Rejoub, Riad [Oak Ridge, TN

    2005-12-26

    A widely used scanner device that rotates a single helically shaped wire probe in and out of a particle beam at different beamline positions to give a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is modified by the addition of a second wire probe. As a result, a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a first beamline position, and a second pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a second beamline position. The simple modification not only provides more accurate beam profiles, but also provides a measurement of the beam divergence and quality in a single compact device.

  4. Temperature profile for Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, B. D.; Evans, Denis J.

    1997-03-01

    For planar Poiseuille flow of an atomic fluid in the weak-flow regime, we find that the classical Navier-Stokes prediction of a quartic temperature profile is incorrect. Our results, which confirm a prediction made by Baranyai, Evans, and Daivis (BED) [Phys. Rev. A 46, 7593 (1992)], indicate that near the center of the channel the temperature profile is quadratic. When the temperature profile is fitted to the theoretical predictions of BED we obtain estimates of the thermal conductivity that are in excellent agreement with accurate independent estimates of this transport coefficient. If the presence of the quadratic component of the temperature profile is ignored, the derived value of the thermal conductivity is in error by some 50%.

  5. Accurate measurement of unsteady state fluid temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, two accurate methods for determining the transient fluid temperature were presented. Measurements were conducted for boiling water since its temperature is known. At the beginning the thermometers are at the ambient temperature and next they are immediately immersed into saturated water. The measurements were carried out with two thermometers of different construction but with the same housing outer diameter equal to 15 mm. One of them is a K-type industrial thermometer widely available commercially. The temperature indicated by the thermometer was corrected considering the thermometers as the first or second order inertia devices. The new design of a thermometer was proposed and also used to measure the temperature of boiling water. Its characteristic feature is a cylinder-shaped housing with the sheath thermocouple located in its center. The temperature of the fluid was determined based on measurements taken in the axis of the solid cylindrical element (housing) using the inverse space marching method. Measurements of the transient temperature of the air flowing through the wind tunnel using the same thermometers were also carried out. The proposed measurement technique provides more accurate results compared with measurements using industrial thermometers in conjunction with simple temperature correction using the inertial thermometer model of the first or second order. By comparing the results, it was demonstrated that the new thermometer allows obtaining the fluid temperature much faster and with higher accuracy in comparison to the industrial thermometer. Accurate measurements of the fast changing fluid temperature are possible due to the low inertia thermometer and fast space marching method applied for solving the inverse heat conduction problem.

  6. Temperature profile detector

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Temperature profiles at elevated temperature conditions are monitored by use of an elongated device having two conductors spaced by the minimum distance required to normally maintain an open circuit between them. The melting point of one conductor is selected at the elevated temperature being detected, while the melting point of the other is higher. As the preselected temperature is reached, liquid metal will flow between the conductors, creating short circuits which are detectable as to location.

  7. Temperature-profile detector

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    Temperature profiles at elevated temperature conditions are monitored by use of an elongated device having two conductors spaced by the minimum distance required to normally maintain an open circuit between them. The melting point of one conductor is selected at the elevated temperature being detected, while the melting point of the other is higher. As the preselected temperature is reached, liquid metal will flow between the conductors creating short circuits which are detectable as to location.

  8. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, D.D.

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperatures in the range of about 1800/sup 0/ to 2700/sup 0/C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  9. Temperature profile detector

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, R.D.

    1983-10-11

    Disclosed is a temperature profile detector shown as a tubular enclosure surrounding an elongated electrical conductor having a plurality of meltable conductive segments surrounding it. Duplicative meltable segments are spaced apart from one another along the length of the enclosure. Electrical insulators surround these elements to confine molten material from the segments in bridging contact between the conductor and a second electrical conductor, which might be the confining tube. The location and rate of growth of the resulting short circuits between the two conductors can be monitored by measuring changes in electrical resistance between terminals at both ends of the two conductors. Additional conductors and separate sets of meltable segments operational at differing temperatures can be monitored simultaneously for measuring different temperature profiles. 8 figs.

  10. Temperature profile detector

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature profile detector shown as a tubular enclosure surrounding an elongated electrical conductor having a plurality of meltable conductive segments surrounding it. Duplicative meltable segments are spaced apart from one another along the length of the enclosure. Electrical insulators surround these elements to confine molten material from the segments in bridging contact between the conductor and a second electrical conductor, which might be the confining tube. The location and rate of growth of the resulting short circuits between the two conductors can be monitored by measuring changes in electrical resistance between terminals at both ends of the two conductors. Additional conductors and separate sets of meltable segments operational at differing temperatures can be monitored simultaneously for measuring different temperature profiles.

  11. Accurate hydrogen depth profiling by reflection elastic recoil detection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Verda, R. D.; Tesmer, Joseph R.; Nastasi, Michael Anthony,; Bower, R. W.

    2001-01-01

    A technique to convert reflection elastic recoil detection analysis spectra to depth profiles, the channel-depth conversion, was introduced by Verda, et al [1]. But the channel-depth conversion does not correct for energy spread, the unwanted broadening in the energy of the spectra, which can lead to errors in depth profiling. A work in progress introduces a technique that corrects for energy spread in elastic recoil detection analysis spectra, the energy spread correction [2]. Together, the energy spread correction and the channel-depth conversion comprise an accurate and convenient hydrogen depth profiling method.

  12. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperaes in the range of about 1800.degree. to 2700.degree. C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  13. Accurate deterministic solutions for the classic Boltzmann shock profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yubei

    The Boltzmann equation or Boltzmann transport equation is a classical kinetic equation devised by Ludwig Boltzmann in 1872. It is regarded as a fundamental law in rarefied gas dynamics. Rather than using macroscopic quantities such as density, temperature, and pressure to describe the underlying physics, the Boltzmann equation uses a distribution function in phase space to describe the physical system, and all the macroscopic quantities are weighted averages of the distribution function. The information contained in the Boltzmann equation is surprisingly rich, and the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations of fluid dynamics can be derived from it using series expansions. Moreover, the Boltzmann equation can reach regimes far from the capabilities of fluid dynamical equations, such as the realm of rarefied gases---the topic of this thesis. Although the Boltzmann equation is very powerful, it is extremely difficult to solve in most situations. Thus the only hope is to solve it numerically. But soon one finds that even a numerical simulation of the equation is extremely difficult, due to both the complex and high-dimensional integral in the collision operator, and the hyperbolic phase-space advection terms. For this reason, until few years ago most numerical simulations had to rely on Monte Carlo techniques. In this thesis I will present a new and robust numerical scheme to compute direct deterministic solutions of the Boltzmann equation, and I will use it to explore some classical gas-dynamical problems. In particular, I will study in detail one of the most famous and intrinsically nonlinear problems in rarefied gas dynamics, namely the accurate determination of the Boltzmann shock profile for a gas of hard spheres.

  14. Accurate, Fully-Automated NMR Spectral Profiling for Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Ravanbakhsh, Siamak; Liu, Philip; Bjordahl, Trent C.; Mandal, Rupasri; Grant, Jason R.; Wilson, Michael; Eisner, Roman; Sinelnikov, Igor; Hu, Xiaoyu; Luchinat, Claudio; Greiner, Russell; Wishart, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases cause significant changes to the concentrations of small molecules (a.k.a. metabolites) that appear in a person’s biofluids, which means such diseases can often be readily detected from a person’s “metabolic profile"—i.e., the list of concentrations of those metabolites. This information can be extracted from a biofluids Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrum. However, due to its complexity, NMR spectral profiling has remained manual, resulting in slow, expensive and error-prone procedures that have hindered clinical and industrial adoption of metabolomics via NMR. This paper presents a system, BAYESIL, which can quickly, accurately, and autonomously produce a person’s metabolic profile. Given a 1D 1H NMR spectrum of a complex biofluid (specifically serum or cerebrospinal fluid), BAYESIL can automatically determine the metabolic profile. This requires first performing several spectral processing steps, then matching the resulting spectrum against a reference compound library, which contains the “signatures” of each relevant metabolite. BAYESIL views spectral matching as an inference problem within a probabilistic graphical model that rapidly approximates the most probable metabolic profile. Our extensive studies on a diverse set of complex mixtures including real biological samples (serum and CSF), defined mixtures and realistic computer generated spectra; involving > 50 compounds, show that BAYESIL can autonomously find the concentration of NMR-detectable metabolites accurately (~ 90% correct identification and ~ 10% quantification error), in less than 5 minutes on a single CPU. These results demonstrate that BAYESIL is the first fully-automatic publicly-accessible system that provides quantitative NMR spectral profiling effectively—with an accuracy on these biofluids that meets or exceeds the performance of trained experts. We anticipate this tool will usher in high-throughput metabolomics and enable a wealth of new applications

  15. Accurate, fully-automated NMR spectral profiling for metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Ravanbakhsh, Siamak; Liu, Philip; Bjorndahl, Trent C; Bjordahl, Trent C; Mandal, Rupasri; Grant, Jason R; Wilson, Michael; Eisner, Roman; Sinelnikov, Igor; Hu, Xiaoyu; Luchinat, Claudio; Greiner, Russell; Wishart, David S

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases cause significant changes to the concentrations of small molecules (a.k.a. metabolites) that appear in a person's biofluids, which means such diseases can often be readily detected from a person's "metabolic profile"-i.e., the list of concentrations of those metabolites. This information can be extracted from a biofluids Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrum. However, due to its complexity, NMR spectral profiling has remained manual, resulting in slow, expensive and error-prone procedures that have hindered clinical and industrial adoption of metabolomics via NMR. This paper presents a system, BAYESIL, which can quickly, accurately, and autonomously produce a person's metabolic profile. Given a 1D 1H NMR spectrum of a complex biofluid (specifically serum or cerebrospinal fluid), BAYESIL can automatically determine the metabolic profile. This requires first performing several spectral processing steps, then matching the resulting spectrum against a reference compound library, which contains the "signatures" of each relevant metabolite. BAYESIL views spectral matching as an inference problem within a probabilistic graphical model that rapidly approximates the most probable metabolic profile. Our extensive studies on a diverse set of complex mixtures including real biological samples (serum and CSF), defined mixtures and realistic computer generated spectra; involving > 50 compounds, show that BAYESIL can autonomously find the concentration of NMR-detectable metabolites accurately (~ 90% correct identification and ~ 10% quantification error), in less than 5 minutes on a single CPU. These results demonstrate that BAYESIL is the first fully-automatic publicly-accessible system that provides quantitative NMR spectral profiling effectively-with an accuracy on these biofluids that meets or exceeds the performance of trained experts. We anticipate this tool will usher in high-throughput metabolomics and enable a wealth of new applications of NMR in

  16. Using a straightness reference in obtaining more accurate surface profiles from a Long Trace Profiler

    SciTech Connect

    Irick, S.C.; McKinney, W.R.; Lunt, D.L.J.; Takacs, P.Z.

    1991-07-15

    The Long Trace Profiler has found significant applications in measuring the surfaces of synchrotron optics. However, requirements of small slope errors at all spatial wavelengths of the synchrotron optics mandate more accurate slope measurements. A straightness reference for the Long Trace Profiler greatly increases the accuracy of the instrument. Methods of using the straightness reference by interpreting the sequential interference patterns are discussed and results of measurements are presented.

  17. A method for accurate temperature measurement using infrared thermal camera.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Tomoharu; Narushima, Takashi; Yonezawa, Tetsu; Sudo, Takayuki; Okubo, Shuichi; Komatsubara, Shigeyuki; Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Takahisa

    2012-08-01

    The temperature distribution on a centre-holed thin foil of molybdenum, used as a sample and heated using a sample-heating holder for electron microscopy, was measured using an infrared thermal camera. The temperature on the heated foil area located near the heating stage of the heating holder is almost equal to the temperature on the heating stage. However, during the measurement of the temperature at the edge of the hole of the foil located farthest from the heating stage, a drop in temperature should be taken into consideration; however, so far, no method has been developed to locally measure the temperature distribution on the heated sample. In this study, a method for the accurate measurement of temperature distribution on heated samples for electron microscopy is discussed.

  18. An Accurate Temperature Correction Model for Thermocouple Hygrometers 1

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Michael J.; Cass, Alfred; de Jager, James M.

    1982-01-01

    Numerous water relation studies have used thermocouple hygrometers routinely. However, the accurate temperature correction of hygrometer calibration curve slopes seems to have been largely neglected in both psychrometric and dewpoint techniques. In the case of thermocouple psychrometers, two temperature correction models are proposed, each based on measurement of the thermojunction radius and calculation of the theoretical voltage sensitivity to changes in water potential. The first model relies on calibration at a single temperature and the second at two temperatures. Both these models were more accurate than the temperature correction models currently in use for four psychrometers calibrated over a range of temperatures (15-38°C). The model based on calibration at two temperatures is superior to that based on only one calibration. The model proposed for dewpoint hygrometers is similar to that for psychrometers. It is based on the theoretical voltage sensitivity to changes in water potential. Comparison with empirical data from three dewpoint hygrometers calibrated at four different temperatures indicates that these instruments need only be calibrated at, e.g. 25°C, if the calibration slopes are corrected for temperature. PMID:16662241

  19. An accurate temperature correction model for thermocouple hygrometers.

    PubMed

    Savage, M J; Cass, A; de Jager, J M

    1982-02-01

    Numerous water relation studies have used thermocouple hygrometers routinely. However, the accurate temperature correction of hygrometer calibration curve slopes seems to have been largely neglected in both psychrometric and dewpoint techniques.In the case of thermocouple psychrometers, two temperature correction models are proposed, each based on measurement of the thermojunction radius and calculation of the theoretical voltage sensitivity to changes in water potential. The first model relies on calibration at a single temperature and the second at two temperatures. Both these models were more accurate than the temperature correction models currently in use for four psychrometers calibrated over a range of temperatures (15-38 degrees C). The model based on calibration at two temperatures is superior to that based on only one calibration.The model proposed for dewpoint hygrometers is similar to that for psychrometers. It is based on the theoretical voltage sensitivity to changes in water potential. Comparison with empirical data from three dewpoint hygrometers calibrated at four different temperatures indicates that these instruments need only be calibrated at, e.g. 25 degrees C, if the calibration slopes are corrected for temperature.

  20. An accurate temperature correction model for thermocouple hygrometers.

    PubMed

    Savage, M J; Cass, A; de Jager, J M

    1982-02-01

    Numerous water relation studies have used thermocouple hygrometers routinely. However, the accurate temperature correction of hygrometer calibration curve slopes seems to have been largely neglected in both psychrometric and dewpoint techniques.In the case of thermocouple psychrometers, two temperature correction models are proposed, each based on measurement of the thermojunction radius and calculation of the theoretical voltage sensitivity to changes in water potential. The first model relies on calibration at a single temperature and the second at two temperatures. Both these models were more accurate than the temperature correction models currently in use for four psychrometers calibrated over a range of temperatures (15-38 degrees C). The model based on calibration at two temperatures is superior to that based on only one calibration.The model proposed for dewpoint hygrometers is similar to that for psychrometers. It is based on the theoretical voltage sensitivity to changes in water potential. Comparison with empirical data from three dewpoint hygrometers calibrated at four different temperatures indicates that these instruments need only be calibrated at, e.g. 25 degrees C, if the calibration slopes are corrected for temperature. PMID:16662241

  1. Instrument accurately measures small temperature changes on test surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. D.; Miller, H. B.

    1966-01-01

    Calorimeter apparatus accurately measures very small temperature rises on a test surface subjected to aerodynamic heating. A continuous thin sheet of a sensing material is attached to a base support plate through which a series of holes of known diameter have been drilled for attaching thermocouples to the material.

  2. Configurational temperature profile in confined fluids. II. Molecular fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delhommelle, Jerome; Evans, Denis J.

    2001-04-01

    In an earlier paper, we applied configurational expressions of the temperature to the calculation of temperature profiles within a confined atomic fluid. This paper focuses on the application of these expressions to confined molecular fluids using ethane and hexane as examples. We first give configurational expressions for the temperature for these constrained systems. The configurational temperature profiles so obtained are compared to the kinetic temperature calculated using the equipartition principle, in equilibrium systems. These expressions are then used in nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations of fluids undergoing planar Poiseuille flow. We show that these configurational expressions provide a direct and accurate determination of the temperature profile for these systems.

  3. The Microwave Temperature Profiler (PERF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Boon; Mahoney, Michael; Haggerty, Julie; Denning, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The JPL developed Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP) has recently participated in GloPac, HIPPO (I to V) and TORERO, and the ongoing ATTREX campaigns. The MTP is now capable of supporting the NASA Global Hawk and a new canister version supports the NCAR G-V. The primary product from the MTP is remote measurements of the atmospheric temperature at, above and below the flight path, providing for the vertical state of the atmosphere. The NCAR-MTP has demonstrated unprecedented instrument performance and calibration with plus or minus 0.2 degrees Kelvin flight level temperature error. Derived products include curtain plots, isentropes, lapse rate, cold point height and tropopause height.

  4. A more accurate profile of Achyrocline satureioides hypocholesterolemic activity.

    PubMed

    Espiña, Débora Corrêa; Carvalho, Fabiano Barbosa; Zanini, Daniela; Schlemmer, Josiane Bizzi; Coracini, Juliane Dors; Rubin, Maribel Antonello; Morsch, Vera Maria; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina; Leal, Daniela Bitencourt Rosa; Baiotto, Cléia Rosani; Jaques, Jeandre Augusto dos Santos

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the aqueous extract (AE) of Achyrocline satureioides on serum lipid profile, liver oxidative profile and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity of rats submitted to a hyperlipidic diet. The animals were divided into four groups: control (C), AE 10% (A(10)), hyperlipidic (H) and hyperlipidic/AE 10% (HA(10)). In serum, we measured the levels of total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein, very-low-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and triglyceride (TG). In liver homogenates, we measured the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, the carbonyl proteins, the non-protein thiols (NPSHs) and the activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase (CAT) and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. We observed a significant increase in the TC and LDL levels in the H group. A. satureioides prevented these effects, decreased the TG levels in the HA(10) group and increased the NPSH levels in the A(10) and HA(10) groups. The H group showed an increase in the carbonyl protein level and a decrease in CAT and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activities. With the use of this model, results show that increased levels of lipids are related to a redox imbalance in the liver, which is also related to the inhibition of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, and that chronic administration of the AE of A. satureioides is capable of changing this profile.

  5. Temperature and velocity profiles in sooting free boundary layer flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ang, J. A.; Pagni, P. J.; Mataga, T. G.; Margle, J. M.; Lyons, V. J.

    1986-01-01

    Temperature and velocity profiles are presented for cyclohexane, n-heptane, and iso-octane free, laminar, boundary layer, sooting, diffusion flames. Temperatures are measured with 3 mil Pt/Pt-13 percent Rh thermocouples. Corrected gas temperatures are derived by performing an energy balance of convection to and radiation from the thermocouple bead incorporating the variation of air conductivity and platinum emissivity with temperature. Velocities are measured using laser doppler velocimetry techniques. Profiles are compared with previously reported analytic temperature and velocity fields. Comparison of theoretical and experimental temperature profiles suggests improvement in the analytical treatment is needed, which accounts more accurately for the local soot radiation. The velocity profiles are in good agreement, with the departure of the theory from observation partially due to the small fluctuations inherent in these free flows.

  6. Estimating Mixing Heights Using Microwave Temperature Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson-Gammon, John; Powell, Christina; Mahoney, Michael; Angevine, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    A paper describes the Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP) for making measurements of the planetary boundary layer thermal structure data necessary for air quality forecasting as the Mixing Layer (ML) height determines the volume in which daytime pollution is primarily concentrated. This is the first time that an airborne temperature profiler has been used to measure the mixing layer height. Normally, this is done using a radar wind profiler, which is both noisy and large. The MTP was deployed during the Texas 2000 Air Quality Study (TexAQS-2000). An objective technique was developed and tested for estimating the ML height from the MTP vertical temperature profiles. In order to calibrate the technique and evaluate the usefulness of this approach, estimates from a variety of measurements during the TexAQS-2000 were compared. Estimates of ML height were used from radiosondes, radar wind profilers, an aerosol backscatter lidar, and in-situ aircraft measurements in addition to those from the MTP.

  7. Temperature and humidity profiles over coastal water

    SciTech Connect

    Leeuw, G. de; Neele, F.P.

    1994-12-31

    In 1992, June 1--19, experiments were conducted at the North Sea, about 10 km southwest from the German island Sylt, to study atmospheric effects on IR and radar propagation. As part of this experiment, temperature and humidity profiles were measured for testing current models describing IR and RF propagation. In particular the authors aimed to address the effect of waves on the surface layer profiles, in particular at low altitudes, and the formulation of the surface layer profiles in stable stratification.

  8. Maine Geological Survey Borehole Temperature Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Marvinney, Robert

    2013-11-06

    This dataset includes temperature profiles from 30 boreholes throughout Maine that were selected for their depth, location, and lithologies encountered. Depths range from about 300 feet to 2,200 feet. Most of the boreholes selected for measurement were completed in granite because this lithology can be assumed to be nearly homogeneous over the depth of the borehole. Boreholes were also selected to address gaps in existing geothermal datasets. Temperature profiles were collected in October and November, 2012.

  9. Platinum thin film resistors as accurate and stable temperature sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, W.

    1984-01-01

    The measurement characteristics of thin-Pt-film temperature sensors fabricated using advanced methods are discussed. The limitations of wound-wire Pt temperature sensors and the history of Pt-film development are outlined, and the commonly used film-deposition, structuring, and trimming methods are presented in a table. The development of a family of sputtered film resistors is described in detail and illustrated with photographs of the different types. The most commonly used tolerances are reported as + or - 0.3 C + 0.5 percent of the temperature measured.

  10. ACCURATE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN A NATURALLY-ASPIRATED RADIATION SHIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.

    2009-09-09

    Experiments and calculations were conducted with a 0.13 mm fine wire thermocouple within a naturally-aspirated Gill radiation shield to assess and improve the accuracy of air temperature measurements without the use of mechanical aspiration, wind speed or radiation measurements. It was found that this thermocouple measured the air temperature with root-mean-square errors of 0.35 K within the Gill shield without correction. A linear temperature correction was evaluated based on the difference between the interior plate and thermocouple temperatures. This correction was found to be relatively insensitive to shield design and yielded an error of 0.16 K for combined day and night observations. The correction was reliable in the daytime when the wind speed usually exceeds 1 m s{sup -1} but occasionally performed poorly at night during very light winds. Inspection of the standard deviation in the thermocouple wire temperature identified these periods but did not unambiguously locate the most serious events. However, estimates of sensor accuracy during these periods is complicated by the much larger sampling volume of the mechanically-aspirated sensor compared with the naturally-aspirated sensor and the presence of significant near surface temperature gradients. The root-mean-square errors therefore are upper limits to the aspiration error since they include intrinsic sensor differences and intermittent volume sampling differences.

  11. Skin Temperature Over the Carotid Artery, an Accurate Non-invasive Estimation of Near Core Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Imani, Farsad; Karimi Rouzbahani, Hamid Reza; Goudarzi, Mehrdad; Tarrahi, Mohammad Javad; Ebrahim Soltani, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: During anesthesia, continuous body temperature monitoring is essential, especially in children. Anesthesia can increase the risk of loss of body temperature by three to four times. Hypothermia in children results in increased morbidity and mortality. Since the measurement points of the core body temperature are not easily accessible, near core sites, like rectum, are used. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to measure skin temperature over the carotid artery and compare it with the rectum temperature, in order to propose a model for accurate estimation of near core body temperature. Patients and Methods: Totally, 124 patients within the age range of 2 - 6 years, undergoing elective surgery, were selected. Temperature of rectum and skin over the carotid artery was measured. Then, the patients were randomly divided into two groups (each including 62 subjects), namely modeling (MG) and validation groups (VG). First, in the modeling group, the average temperature of the rectum and skin over the carotid artery were measured separately. The appropriate model was determined, according to the significance of the model’s coefficients. The obtained model was used to predict the rectum temperature in the second group (VG group). Correlation of the predicted values with the real values (the measured rectum temperature) in the second group was investigated. Also, the difference in the average values of these two groups was examined in terms of significance. Results: In the modeling group, the average rectum and carotid temperatures were 36.47 ± 0.54°C and 35.45 ± 0.62°C, respectively. The final model was obtained, as follows: Carotid temperature × 0.561 + 16.583 = Rectum temperature. The predicted value was calculated based on the regression model and then compared with the measured rectum value, which showed no significant difference (P = 0.361). Conclusions: The present study was the first research, in which rectum temperature was compared with that

  12. A GAS TEMPERATURE PROFILE BY INFRARED EMISSION-ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    This computer program calculates the temperature profile of a flame or hot gas. Emphasis is on profiles found in jet engine or rocket engine exhaust streams containing water vapor or carbon dioxide as radiating gases. The temperature profile is assumed to be axisymmetric with a functional form controlled by two variable parameters. The parameters are calculated using measurements of gas radiation at two wavelengths in the infrared spectrum. Infrared emission and absorption measurements at two or more wavelengths provide a method of determining a gas temperature profile along a path through the gas by using a radiation source and receiver located outside the gas stream being measured. This permits simplified spectral scanning of a jet or rocket engine exhaust stream with the instrumentation outside the exhaust gas stream. This program provides an iterative-cyclic computation in which an initial assumed temperature profile is altered in shape until the computed emission and absorption agree, within specified limits, with the actual instrument measurements of emission and absorption. Temperature determination by experimental measurements of emission and absorption at two or more wavelengths is also provided by this program. Additionally, the program provides a technique for selecting the wavelengths to be used for determining the temperature profiles prior to the beginning of the experiment. By using this program feature, the experimenter has a higher probability of selecting wavelengths which will result in accurate temperature profile measurements. This program provides the user with a technique for determining whether this program will be sufficiently accurate for his particular application, as well as providing a means of finding the solution. The input to the program consists of four types of data: (1) computer program control constants, (2) measurements of gas radiance and transmittance at selected wavelengths, (3) tabulations from the literature of gas

  13. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Temperature Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides temperature profiles at 15 heights, containing the variables of virtual temperature, vertical velocity, the speed of sound, and w-bar. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean temperature profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  14. Short hyperdynamic profiles influence primate temperature regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.; Williams, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    Primates have been shown to be sensitive to hyperdynamic fields. That is, when exposed to + 2Gz, body temperature falls. The purpose of this study was to examine the relative sensitivity of these animals to short centrifugation profiles which mimic the gravitational envelope seen on the Space Shuttle during launch (8 minutes, 2.9 Gz max) and re-entry (19 min, 1.7 Gz max). Four loosely restrained squirrel monkeys, isolated from additional external stimuli, were exposed to these profiles. During launch simulation, the temperatures never fell markedly below control levels. However, subsequent to return to 1G, the recovery phase showed decreases in body temperature in all four animals averaging 0.4 C over the next 10 to 15 minutes. The two animals exposed to the reentry profile showed decreases in body temperature within five minutes of the onset of centrifugation. Maximum fall in body temperature was reached by the end of the centrifugation phase and averaged 0.7 C. Thus, the temperature regulation system of this primate is sensitive to short hyperdynamic field exposures.

  15. Water level sensor and temperature profile detector

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature profile detector comprising a surrounding length of metal tubing and an interior electrical conductor both constructed of high temperature high electrical resistance materials. A plurality of gas-filled expandable bellows made of electrically conductive material is electrically connected to the interior electrical conductor and positioned within the length of metal tubing. The bellows are sealed and contain a predetermined volume of a gas designed to effect movement of the bellows from an open circuit condition to a closed circuit condition in response to monitored temperature changes sensed by each bellows.

  16. Reconstructing accurate ToF-SIMS depth profiles for organic materials with differential sputter rates

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Adam J.; Graham, Daniel J.; Castner, David G.

    2015-01-01

    To properly process and reconstruct 3D ToF-SIMS data from systems such as multi-component polymers, drug delivery scaffolds, cells and tissues, it is important to understand the sputtering behavior of the sample. Modern cluster sources enable efficient and stable sputtering of many organics materials. However, not all materials sputter at the same rate and few studies have explored how different sputter rates may distort reconstructed depth profiles of multicomponent materials. In this study spun-cast bilayer polymer films of polystyrene and PMMA are used as model systems to optimize methods for the reconstruction of depth profiles in systems exhibiting different sputter rates between components. Transforming the bilayer depth profile from sputter time to depth using a single sputter rate fails to account for sputter rate variations during the profile. This leads to inaccurate apparent layer thicknesses and interfacial positions, as well as the appearance of continued sputtering into the substrate. Applying measured single component sputter rates to the bilayer films with a step change in sputter rate at the interfaces yields more accurate film thickness and interface positions. The transformation can be further improved by applying a linear sputter rate transition across the interface, thus modeling the sputter rate changes seen in polymer blends. This more closely reflects the expected sputtering behavior. This study highlights the need for both accurate evaluation of component sputter rates and the careful conversion of sputter time to depth, if accurate 3D reconstructions of complex multi-component organic and biological samples are to be achieved. The effects of errors in sputter rate determination are also explored. PMID:26185799

  17. Electron Bernstein wave electron temperature profile diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    G. Taylor; P. Efthimion; B. Jones; T. Munsat; J. Spaleta; J. Hosea; R. Kaita; R. Majeski; J. Menard

    2000-07-20

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) has been employed as a standard electron temperature profile diagnostic on many tokamaks and stellarators, but most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard ECE diagnostics to measure temperature. They are either overdense, operating at high density relative to the magnetic field (e.g. where the plasma frequency is much greater than the electron cyclotron frequency, as in a spherical torus) or they have insufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition. Electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) are electrostatic waves that can propagate in overdense plasmas and have a high optical thickness at the electron cyclotron resonance layers, as a result of their large perpendicular wavenumber. This paper reports on measurements of EBW emission on the CDX-U spherical torus, where B{sub o} {approximately} 2 kG, {approximately}10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} and T{sub e} {approx} to 10 -- 200 eV. Results are presented for electromagnetic measurements of EBW emission, mode-converted near the plasma edge. The EBW emission was absolutely calibrated and compared to the electron temperature profile measured by a multi-point Thomson scattering diagnostic. Depending on the plasma conditions, the mode converted EBW radiation temperature was found to be less than or equal to T{sub e} and the emission source was determined to be radially localized at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. A Langmuir triple probe and a 140 GHz interferometer were employed to measure changes in edge density profile in the vicinity of the upper hybrid resonance, where the mode conversion of the EBWs is expected to occur. Initial results suggest EBW emission and EBW heating are viable concepts for overdense plasmas.

  18. Eliminating Piezoresistivity in Flexible Conducting Polymers for Accurate Temperature Sensing under Dynamic Mechanical Deformations.

    PubMed

    Sezen, Melda; Register, Jeffrey T; Yao, Yao; Glisic, Branko; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2016-06-01

    The polarity and the magnitude of polyaniline's gauge factor are tuned through structural modification. Combining conducting polymers with gauge factors of opposite polarities yields an accurate temperature sensor, even when deployed under dynamic strains. PMID:27061270

  19. Effective Temperatures of Selected Main-Sequence Stars with the Most Accurate Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soydugan, F.; Eker, Z.; Soydugan, E.; Bilir, S.; Gökçe, E. Y.; Steer, I.; Tüysüz, M.; Šenyüz, T.; Demircan, O.

    2015-07-01

    In this study we investigate the distributions of the properties of detached double-lined binaries (DBs) in the mass-luminosity, mass-radius, and mass-effective temperature diagrams. We have improved the classical mass-luminosity relation based on the database of DBs by Eker et al. (2014a). Based on the accurate observational data available to us we propose a method for improving the effective temperatures of eclipsing binaries with accurate mass and radius determinations.

  20. Blood temperature profiles of diving elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Meir, Jessica U; Ponganis, Paul J

    2010-01-01

    Hypothermia-induced reductions in metabolic rate have been proposed to suppress metabolism and prolong the duration of aerobic metabolism during dives of marine mammals and birds. To determine whether core hypothermia might contribute to the repetitive long-duration dives of the northern elephant seal Mirounga angustirostris, blood temperature profiles were obtained in translocated juvenile elephant seals equipped with a thermistor and backpack recorder. Representative temperature (the y-intercept of the mean temperature vs. dive duration relationship) was 37.2 degrees C +/- 0.6 degrees C (n=3 seals) in the extradural vein, 38.1 degrees C +/- 0.7 degrees C (n = 4 seals) in the hepatic sinus, and 38.8 degrees +/- 1.6 degrees C (n = 6 deals) in the aorta. Mean temperature was significantly though weakly negatively related to dive duration in all but one seal. Mean venous temperatures of all dives of individual seals ranged between 36 degrees and 38 degrees C, while mean arterial temperatures ranged between 35 degrees and 39 degrees C. Transient decreases in venous and arterial temperatures to as low as 30 degrees -33 degrees C occurred in some dives >30 min (0.1% of dives in the study). The lack of significant core hypothermia during routine dives (10-30 min) and only a weak negative correlation of mean temperature with dive duration do not support the hypothesis that a cold-induced Q(10) effect contributes to metabolic suppression of central tissues during dives. The wide range of arterial temperatures while diving and the transient declines in temperature during long dives suggest that alterations in blood flow patterns and peripheral heat loss contribute to thermoregulation during diving.

  1. Limits on the lunar temperature profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, L. L.; Sonett, C. P.

    1982-01-01

    Limits on the selenotherm are estimated using (1) a preferred set of bounds on the lunar electrical conductivity profile; (2) published laboratory conductivity vs. temperature data for an olivine and several aluminous orthopyroxenes; and (3) estimates for the Al2O3 content of the deep interior suggested by bulk composition models. The inferred limits are narrowest in the depth range 450 to 1350 km and are in accord with independent geophysical constraints. Thermal history models which yield present-day selenotherms that are in best agreement with these limits are those which permit subsolidus convection at depths greater than 800 km in the moon.

  2. 40 CFR 1066.950 - Fuel temperature profile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Test Procedures for Motor Vehicles § 1066.950 Fuel temperature profile. Develop fuel temperature profiles for running loss testing as described in 40 CFR 86.129-94(d). ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fuel temperature profile....

  3. Assessment of hemoglobin dynamics in traumatic bruises using temperature depth profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidovič, Luka; Milanič, Matija; Majaron, Boris

    2013-11-01

    Perceived color of traumatic bruise depends strongly on depth of the spilled blood, natural skin tone, ambient light conditions, etc., which prevents an accurate and reliable determination of the time of the injury. Pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) allows noninvasive determination of the laser-induced temperature depth profile in human skin. We have applied this technique to characterize dynamics of extravasated hemoglobin in the bruise. Next, we use simple model of mass diffusion and biochemical transformation kinetics to simulate bruise dynamics. By applying Monte Carlo simulation of laser energy deposition, comparison with measured temperature profiles is possible. However, parameters of the model were previously not determined directly. Instead, biologically plausible values were assumed. We show how temperature depth profiling enables accurate monitoring of hemoglobin diffusion and degradation. Parameters of the model, hemoglobin mass diffusivity, hemoglobin degradation time, and skin geometry, can be estimated rather accurately. Derivation of bruise evolution parameters will be a valuable addition to existing bruise age determination techniques.

  4. Temperature-feedback upconversion nanocomposite for accurate photothermal therapy at facile temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xingjun; Feng, Wei; Chang, Jian; Tan, Yan-Wen; Li, Jiachang; Chen, Min; Sun, Yun; Li, Fuyou

    2016-02-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) at present, following the temperature definition for conventional thermal therapy, usually keeps the temperature of lesions at 42-45 °C or even higher. Such high temperature kills cancer cells but also increases the damage of normal tissues near lesions through heat conduction and thus brings about more side effects and inhibits therapeutic accuracy. Here we use temperature-feedback upconversion nanoparticle combined with photothermal material for real-time monitoring of microscopic temperature in PTT. We observe that microscopic temperature of photothermal material upon illumination is high enough to kill cancer cells when the temperature of lesions is still low enough to prevent damage to normal tissue. On the basis of the above phenomenon, we further realize high spatial resolution photothermal ablation of labelled tumour with minimal damage to normal tissues in vivo. Our work points to a method for investigating photothermal properties at nanoscale, and for the development of new generation of PTT strategy.

  5. Temperature-feedback upconversion nanocomposite for accurate photothermal therapy at facile temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xingjun; Feng, Wei; Chang, Jian; Tan, Yan-Wen; Li, Jiachang; Chen, Min; Sun, Yun; Li, Fuyou

    2016-02-04

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) at present, following the temperature definition for conventional thermal therapy, usually keeps the temperature of lesions at 42-45 °C or even higher. Such high temperature kills cancer cells but also increases the damage of normal tissues near lesions through heat conduction and thus brings about more side effects and inhibits therapeutic accuracy. Here we use temperature-feedback upconversion nanoparticle combined with photothermal material for real-time monitoring of microscopic temperature in PTT. We observe that microscopic temperature of photothermal material upon illumination is high enough to kill cancer cells when the temperature of lesions is still low enough to prevent damage to normal tissue. On the basis of the above phenomenon, we further realize high spatial resolution photothermal ablation of labelled tumour with minimal damage to normal tissues in vivo. Our work points to a method for investigating photothermal properties at nanoscale, and for the development of new generation of PTT strategy.

  6. Configurational temperature profile in confined fluids. I. Atomic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delhommelle, Jerome; Evans, Denis J.

    2001-04-01

    Two configurational expressions for the temperature are applied to the calculation of temperature profiles within a confined atomic fluid in a narrow slit pore. The configurational temperatures profiles so obtained are compared to the kinetic temperature, calculated from the equipartition principle, in equilibrium (EMD), and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations of planar Poiseuille flow. We show that one of the configurational expressions exhibits a system-size dependence which prevents its application to the determination of high-resolution temperature profiles. The other expression yields good agreement with the kinetic temperature profile in both equilibrium and nonequilibrium systems.

  7. Temperature-feedback upconversion nanocomposite for accurate photothermal therapy at facile temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xingjun; Feng, Wei; Chang, Jian; Tan, Yan-Wen; Li, Jiachang; Chen, Min; Sun, Yun; Li, Fuyou

    2016-01-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) at present, following the temperature definition for conventional thermal therapy, usually keeps the temperature of lesions at 42-45 °C or even higher. Such high temperature kills cancer cells but also increases the damage of normal tissues near lesions through heat conduction and thus brings about more side effects and inhibits therapeutic accuracy. Here we use temperature-feedback upconversion nanoparticle combined with photothermal material for real-time monitoring of microscopic temperature in PTT. We observe that microscopic temperature of photothermal material upon illumination is high enough to kill cancer cells when the temperature of lesions is still low enough to prevent damage to normal tissue. On the basis of the above phenomenon, we further realize high spatial resolution photothermal ablation of labelled tumour with minimal damage to normal tissues in vivo. Our work points to a method for investigating photothermal properties at nanoscale, and for the development of new generation of PTT strategy. PMID:26842674

  8. Temperature-feedback upconversion nanocomposite for accurate photothermal therapy at facile temperature

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xingjun; Feng, Wei; Chang, Jian; Tan, Yan-Wen; Li, Jiachang; Chen, Min; Sun, Yun; Li, Fuyou

    2016-01-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) at present, following the temperature definition for conventional thermal therapy, usually keeps the temperature of lesions at 42–45 °C or even higher. Such high temperature kills cancer cells but also increases the damage of normal tissues near lesions through heat conduction and thus brings about more side effects and inhibits therapeutic accuracy. Here we use temperature-feedback upconversion nanoparticle combined with photothermal material for real-time monitoring of microscopic temperature in PTT. We observe that microscopic temperature of photothermal material upon illumination is high enough to kill cancer cells when the temperature of lesions is still low enough to prevent damage to normal tissue. On the basis of the above phenomenon, we further realize high spatial resolution photothermal ablation of labelled tumour with minimal damage to normal tissues in vivo. Our work points to a method for investigating photothermal properties at nanoscale, and for the development of new generation of PTT strategy. PMID:26842674

  9. MicroRNA-200 Family Profile: A Promising Ancillary Tool for Accurate Cancer Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jianhua; Xie, Botao; Li, Hao; Shen, Jihong; Chen, Jianheng

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most threatening diseases in the world and great interests have been paid to discover accurate and noninvasive methods for cancer diagnosis. The value of microRNA-200 (miRNA-200, miR-200) family has been revealed in many studies. However, the results from various studies were inconsistent, and thus a meta-analysis was designed and performed to assess the overall value of miRNA200 in cancer diagnosis. Relevant studies were searched electronically from the following databases: PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure. Keyword combined with "miR-200," "cancer," and "diagnosis" in any fields was used for searching relevant studies. Then, the pooled sensitivity, specificity, area under the curve (AUC), and partial AUC were calculated using the random-effects model. Heterogeneity among individual studies was also explored by subgroup analyses. A total of 28 studies from 18 articles with an overall sample size of 3676 subjects (2097 patients and 1579 controls) were included in this meta-analysis. The overall sensitivity and specificity with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) are 0.709 (95% CI: 0.657-0.755) and 0.667 (95% CI: 0.617-0.713), respectively. Additionally, AUC and partial AUC for the pooled data is 0.735 and 0.627, respectively. Subgroup analyses revealed that using miRNA-200 family for cancer diagnosis is more effective in white than in Asian ethnic groups. In addition, cancer diagnosis by miRNA using circulating specimen is more effective than that using noncirculating specimen. Finally, miRNA is more accurate in diagnosing endometrial cancer than other types of cancer, and some miRNA family members (miR-200b and miR-429) have superior diagnostic accuracy than other miR-200 family members. In conclusion, the profiling of miRNA-200 family is likely to be a valuable tool in cancer detection and diagnosis.

  10. Accurate Behavioral Simulator of All-Digital Time-Domain Smart Temperature Sensors by Using SIMULINK.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Chen, Chao-Lieh; Lin, You-Ting

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a new behavioral simulator that uses SIMULINK for all-digital CMOS time-domain smart temperature sensors (TDSTSs) for performing rapid and accurate simulations. Inverter-based TDSTSs offer the benefits of low cost and simple structure for temperature-to-digital conversion and have been developed. Typically, electronic design automation tools, such as HSPICE, are used to simulate TDSTSs for performance evaluations. However, such tools require extremely long simulation time and complex procedures to analyze the results and generate figures. In this paper, we organize simple but accurate equations into a temperature-dependent model (TDM) by which the TDSTSs evaluate temperature behavior. Furthermore, temperature-sensing models of a single CMOS NOT gate were devised using HSPICE simulations. Using the TDM and these temperature-sensing models, a novel simulator in SIMULINK environment was developed to substantially accelerate the simulation and simplify the evaluation procedures. Experiments demonstrated that the simulation results of the proposed simulator have favorable agreement with those obtained from HSPICE simulations, showing that the proposed simulator functions successfully. This is the first behavioral simulator addressing the rapid simulation of TDSTSs. PMID:27509507

  11. Accurate Behavioral Simulator of All-Digital Time-Domain Smart Temperature Sensors by Using SIMULINK

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Chen, Chao-Lieh; Lin, You-Ting

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a new behavioral simulator that uses SIMULINK for all-digital CMOS time-domain smart temperature sensors (TDSTSs) for performing rapid and accurate simulations. Inverter-based TDSTSs offer the benefits of low cost and simple structure for temperature-to-digital conversion and have been developed. Typically, electronic design automation tools, such as HSPICE, are used to simulate TDSTSs for performance evaluations. However, such tools require extremely long simulation time and complex procedures to analyze the results and generate figures. In this paper, we organize simple but accurate equations into a temperature-dependent model (TDM) by which the TDSTSs evaluate temperature behavior. Furthermore, temperature-sensing models of a single CMOS NOT gate were devised using HSPICE simulations. Using the TDM and these temperature-sensing models, a novel simulator in SIMULINK environment was developed to substantially accelerate the simulation and simplify the evaluation procedures. Experiments demonstrated that the simulation results of the proposed simulator have favorable agreement with those obtained from HSPICE simulations, showing that the proposed simulator functions successfully. This is the first behavioral simulator addressing the rapid simulation of TDSTSs. PMID:27509507

  12. Temperature Profiles and Hydrologic Implications from the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    David Gillespie

    2005-03-01

    In this investigation, 145 previously recorded temperature logs from 63 boreholes on or near the NTS were examined. Thirteen of these temperature logs were determined to be suitable for the determination of heat flow values. Additionally, 36 new temperature profiles were obtained in the field, either to validate existing temperature profiles, or to provide additional temperature profiles for heat flow determination. Of these, 23 boreholes were found to have temperature profiles suitable for the determination of additional heat flow values from one or more intervals within the boreholes. Comparison of the previously existing and relogged temperature profiles, in general, displayed excellent correlations, and demonstrated the usefulness and reliability of existing temperature profiles from the NTS. Heat flow values for intervals contained within the 36 boreholes from which values could be determined ranged from a low of 8.0 mW m-2 to a high of 181.6 mW m-2. Vertical variations in heat flow values, within individual boreholes, were readily explained by the advection of heat by groundwater flow. Horizontal consistencies and variations in heat flow values between various boreholes were dependent upon the geologic setting of the borehole, and the effect of vertical fluid movement. Temperature profiles are extremely easy and inexpensive to obtain. Considerable hydrologic information can be determined from the examination of a single temperature profile; however, if sufficient spatially distributed heat flow values are obtained, a heat transport model of the NTS could be used to reduce the uncertainty of nonisothermal hydrologic models.

  13. Main-Sequence Effective Temperatures from a Revised Mass-Luminosity Relation Based on Accurate Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eker, Z.; Soydugan, F.; Soydugan, E.; Bilir, S.; Yaz Gökçe, E.; Steer, I.; Tüysüz, M.; Şenyüz, T.; Demircan, O.

    2015-04-01

    The mass-luminosity (M-L), mass-radius (M-R), and mass-effective temperature (M-{{T}eff}) diagrams for a subset of galactic nearby main-sequence stars with masses and radii accurate to ≤slant 3% and luminosities accurate to ≤slant 30% (268 stars) has led to a putative discovery. Four distinct mass domains have been identified, which we have tentatively associated with low, intermediate, high, and very high mass main-sequence stars, but which nevertheless are clearly separated by three distinct break points at 1.05, 2.4, and 7 {{M}⊙ } within the studied mass range of 0.38-32 {{M}⊙ }. Further, a revised mass-luminosity relation (MLR) is found based on linear fits for each of the mass domains identified. The revised, mass-domain based MLRs, which are classical (L\\propto {{M}α }), are shown to be preferable to a single linear, quadratic, or cubic equation representing an alternative MLR. Stellar radius evolution within the main sequence for stars with M\\gt 1 {{M}⊙ } is clearly evident on the M-R diagram, but it is not clear on the M-{{T}eff} diagram based on published temperatures. Effective temperatures can be calculated directly using the well known Stephan-Boltzmann law by employing the accurately known values of M and R with the newly defined MLRs. With the calculated temperatures, stellar temperature evolution within the main sequence for stars with M\\gt 1 {{M}⊙ } is clearly visible on the M-{{T}eff} diagram. Our study asserts that it is now possible to compute the effective temperature of a main-sequence star with an accuracy of ˜6%, as long as its observed radius error is adequately small (\\lt 1%) and its observed mass error is reasonably small (\\lt 6%).

  14. Accurate Histological Techniques to Evaluate Critical Temperature Thresholds for Prostate In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronskill, Michael; Chopra, Rajiv; Boyes, Aaron; Tang, Kee; Sugar, Linda

    2007-05-01

    Various histological techniques have been compared to evaluate the boundaries of thermal damage produced by ultrasound in vivo in a canine model. When all images are accurately co-registered, H&E stained micrographs provide the best assessment of acute cellular damage. Estimates of the boundaries of 100% and 0% cell killing correspond to maximum temperature thresholds of 54.6 ± 1.7°C and 51.5 ± 1.9°C, respectively.

  15. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system for temperature and humidity profile retrieval from microwave radiometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, K.; Kesarkar, A. P.; Bhate, J.; Venkat Ratnam, M.; Jayaraman, A.

    2015-01-01

    The retrieval of accurate profiles of temperature and water vapour is important for the study of atmospheric convection. Recent development in computational techniques motivated us to use adaptive techniques in the retrieval algorithms. In this work, we have used an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) to retrieve profiles of temperature and humidity up to 10 km over the tropical station Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E), India. ANFIS is trained by using observations of temperature and humidity measurements by co-located Meisei GPS radiosonde (henceforth referred to as radiosonde) and microwave brightness temperatures observed by radiometrics multichannel microwave radiometer MP3000 (MWR). ANFIS is trained by considering these observations during rainy and non-rainy days (ANFIS(RD + NRD)) and during non-rainy days only (ANFIS(NRD)). The comparison of ANFIS(RD + NRD) and ANFIS(NRD) profiles with independent radiosonde observations and profiles retrieved using multivariate linear regression (MVLR: RD + NRD and NRD) and artificial neural network (ANN) indicated that the errors in the ANFIS(RD + NRD) are less compared to other retrieval methods. The Pearson product movement correlation coefficient (r) between retrieved and observed profiles is more than 92% for temperature profiles for all techniques and more than 99% for the ANFIS(RD + NRD) technique Therefore this new techniques is relatively better for the retrieval of temperature profiles. The comparison of bias, mean absolute error (MAE), RMSE and symmetric mean absolute percentage error (SMAPE) of retrieved temperature and relative humidity (RH) profiles using ANN and ANFIS also indicated that profiles retrieved using ANFIS(RD + NRD) are significantly better compared to the ANN technique. The analysis of profiles concludes that retrieved profiles using ANFIS techniques have improved the temperature retrievals substantially; however, the retrieval of RH by all techniques considered in this paper (ANN, MVLR and

  16. Estimating upper ocean phosphate concentrations using ARGO float temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamykowski, Daniel

    2008-11-01

    The ARGO free-drifting profiling float array, with >3125 floats deployed between 60°N and 60°S latitudes at about 3° resolution as of May 2008 and each float profiling through 2000 m every 10 days, provides a comprehensive four-dimensional view of temperature and salinity in the world ocean. The resulting dataset complements satellite-based sea surface temperature (SST) measurements and similarly will complement future satellite-based sea surface salinity measurements. Although plans exist to add biogeochemical sensors to future floats, cost and depth restrictions may limit comprehensive upgrades to a fraction of all floats deployed after 2008. Temperature-nutrient (TN) relationships provide a mechanism to estimate nutrient concentrations from temperature to supplement sparser nutrient concentration measurements potentially obtained using non-chemical approaches like ISUS-based nitrate. Both negative and positive aspects of applying a temperature-phosphate (TP) linear regression matrix with global coverage (70°N and 70°S) are examined. The TP linear regression matrix was derived by combining an existing 1° latitude and longitude table of phosphate depletion temperatures (PDT) or X-intercepts with representative TP linear regression slopes derived from the GEOSECS dataset. Temperatures from datasets with associated latitude and longitude coordinates and, in some cases, measured phosphate concentrations ([PO 4]) were matched with calculated TP linear regression slopes and Y-intercepts in the global matrix with 1° resolution using MSExcel Lookup worksheet functions to calculate TP-estimated [PO 4]. The mean deviation of TP-estimated [PO 4] <3.0 μM from measured [PO 4] is 0.18±0.18 μM at Hawaii (HOT) and 0.04±0.08 μM at Bermuda (BATS) time series stations and 0.28±0.27 μM over all considered World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) stations representing the different ocean basins. In general, TP-estimated [PO 4] represents measured [PO 4] more accurately

  17. Extracting accurate temperatures of molten basalts from non-contact thermal infrared radiance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontanella, N. R.; Ramsey, M. S.; Lee, R.

    2013-12-01

    The eruptive and emplacement temperature of a lava flow relates important information on parameters such as the composition, rheology, and emplacement processes. It can also serve as a critical input into flow cooling and propagation models used for hazard prediction. One of the most common ways to determine temperatures of active lava flows is to use non-contact thermal infrared (TIR) measurements, either from ground-based radiometers and cameras or air and space-based remote sensing instruments. These temperature measurements assume a fixed value for the lava emissivity in order to solve the Planck Equation for temperature. The research presented here examines the possibility of variable emissivity in a material's molten state and the effect it has on deriving accurate surface temperature. Emplacement of a pahoehoe lava lobe at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii was captured with high spatial resolution/high frame rate TIR video in order to study this phenomenon. The data show the appearance of molten lava at a breakout point until it cools to form a glassy crust that begins to fold. Emissivity was adjusted sequentially along linear transects from a starting value of 1.0 to lower values until the TIR temperature matched the known temperature measured with a thermocouple. Below an emissivity of ~0.89, temperatures of the molten lava rose above the known lava temperature. This value suggests a decrease in emissivity with a change of state and is likely due to changes in the atomic bond structure of the melt. We have also recently completed the first ever calibrated laboratory-based emissivity measurements of molten basalts, and these high spectral resolution data confirm the field-based estimates. In contrast to rhyolites, basalts appear to display a less dramatic change between their glassy and molten spectra due to their higher melting and glass transition temperatures and the quick formation time of the crust. Therefore, the change in emissivity for molten rhyolite could

  18. Fast and accurate quantum molecular dynamics of dense plasmas across temperature regimes

    DOE PAGES

    Sjostrom, Travis; Daligault, Jerome

    2014-10-10

    Here, we develop and implement a new quantum molecular dynamics approximation that allows fast and accurate simulations of dense plasmas from cold to hot conditions. The method is based on a carefully designed orbital-free implementation of density functional theory. The results for hydrogen and aluminum are in very good agreement with Kohn-Sham (orbital-based) density functional theory and path integral Monte Carlo calculations for microscopic features such as the electron density as well as the equation of state. The present approach does not scale with temperature and hence extends to higher temperatures than is accessible in the Kohn-Sham method and lowermore » temperatures than is accessible by path integral Monte Carlo calculations, while being significantly less computationally expensive than either of those two methods.« less

  19. Fast and accurate quantum molecular dynamics of dense plasmas across temperature regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Sjostrom, Travis; Daligault, Jerome

    2014-10-10

    Here, we develop and implement a new quantum molecular dynamics approximation that allows fast and accurate simulations of dense plasmas from cold to hot conditions. The method is based on a carefully designed orbital-free implementation of density functional theory. The results for hydrogen and aluminum are in very good agreement with Kohn-Sham (orbital-based) density functional theory and path integral Monte Carlo calculations for microscopic features such as the electron density as well as the equation of state. The present approach does not scale with temperature and hence extends to higher temperatures than is accessible in the Kohn-Sham method and lower temperatures than is accessible by path integral Monte Carlo calculations, while being significantly less computationally expensive than either of those two methods.

  20. Methods for accurate cold-chain temperature monitoring using digital data-logger thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chojnacky, M. J.; Miller, W. M.; Strouse, G. F.

    2013-09-01

    Complete and accurate records of vaccine temperature history are vital to preserving drug potency and patient safety. However, previously published vaccine storage and handling guidelines have failed to indicate a need for continuous temperature monitoring in vaccine storage refrigerators. We evaluated the performance of seven digital data logger models as candidates for continuous temperature monitoring of refrigerated vaccines, based on the following criteria: out-of-box performance and compliance with manufacturer accuracy specifications over the range of use; measurement stability over extended, continuous use; proper setup in a vaccine storage refrigerator so that measurements reflect liquid vaccine temperatures; and practical methods for end-user validation and establishing metrological traceability. Data loggers were tested using ice melting point checks and by comparison to calibrated thermocouples to characterize performance over 0 °C to 10 °C. We also monitored logger performance in a study designed to replicate the range of vaccine storage and environmental conditions encountered at provider offices. Based on the results of this study, the Centers for Disease Control released new guidelines on proper methods for storage, handling, and temperature monitoring of vaccines for participants in its federally-funded Vaccines for Children Program. Improved temperature monitoring practices will ultimately decrease waste from damaged vaccines, improve consumer confidence, and increase effective inoculation rates.

  1. Initial-temperature profiles on the PDX inner toroidal limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrickson, M.; Kugel, H.W.

    1983-09-01

    The temperature profiles resulting from plasma operation on the PDX vertical, large area, inner toroidal limiter have been measured during both ohmic and neutral-beam-heated discharges using a scanning infrared camera. An asymmetric double-peaked temperature profile is seen after neutral-beam-heated discharges. Disruptions in ohmically heated discharges are found to be preceded by a single-peaked deposition and succeeded by an initially symmetric double-peaked deposition. The results were compared with the Schmidt model for scrape-off at a toroidal limiter and it was found that the measured double-peaked temperature profiles yielded scrape-off lengths consistent with previous measurements.

  2. Initial temperature profiles of the PDX inner toroidal limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrickson, M.; Kugel, H.W.

    1983-09-01

    The temperature profiles resulting from plasma operation on the PDX vertical, large area, inner toroidal limiter have been measured during both ohmic and neutral beam heated discharges using a scanning infrared camera. An asymmetric double peaked temperature profile is seen after neutral beam heated discharges. Disruptions in ohmically heated discharges are found to be preceded by a single peaked deposition and succeeded by a initially symmetric double peaked deposition. The results were compared with the Schmidt model for scrapeoff at a toroidal limiter and it was found that the measured double peaked temperature profiles yielded scrape-off lengths consistent with previous measurements.

  3. Analysis of algebraic reconstruction technique for accurate imaging of gas temperature and concentration based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui-Hui, Xia; Rui-Feng, Kan; Jian-Guo, Liu; Zhen-Yu, Xu; Ya-Bai, He

    2016-06-01

    An improved algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) combined with tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy(TDLAS) is presented in this paper for determining two-dimensional (2D) distribution of H2O concentration and temperature in a simulated combustion flame. This work aims to simulate the reconstruction of spectroscopic measurements by a multi-view parallel-beam scanning geometry and analyze the effects of projection rays on reconstruction accuracy. It finally proves that reconstruction quality dramatically increases with the number of projection rays increasing until more than 180 for 20 × 20 grid, and after that point, the number of projection rays has little influence on reconstruction accuracy. It is clear that the temperature reconstruction results are more accurate than the water vapor concentration obtained by the traditional concentration calculation method. In the present study an innovative way to reduce the error of concentration reconstruction and improve the reconstruction quality greatly is also proposed, and the capability of this new method is evaluated by using appropriate assessment parameters. By using this new approach, not only the concentration reconstruction accuracy is greatly improved, but also a suitable parallel-beam arrangement is put forward for high reconstruction accuracy and simplicity of experimental validation. Finally, a bimodal structure of the combustion region is assumed to demonstrate the robustness and universality of the proposed method. Numerical investigation indicates that the proposed TDLAS tomographic algorithm is capable of detecting accurate temperature and concentration profiles. This feasible formula for reconstruction research is expected to resolve several key issues in practical combustion devices. Project supported by the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61205151), the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Project of China (Grant

  4. Analysis of algebraic reconstruction technique for accurate imaging of gas temperature and concentration based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui-Hui, Xia; Rui-Feng, Kan; Jian-Guo, Liu; Zhen-Yu, Xu; Ya-Bai, He

    2016-06-01

    An improved algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) combined with tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy(TDLAS) is presented in this paper for determining two-dimensional (2D) distribution of H2O concentration and temperature in a simulated combustion flame. This work aims to simulate the reconstruction of spectroscopic measurements by a multi-view parallel-beam scanning geometry and analyze the effects of projection rays on reconstruction accuracy. It finally proves that reconstruction quality dramatically increases with the number of projection rays increasing until more than 180 for 20 × 20 grid, and after that point, the number of projection rays has little influence on reconstruction accuracy. It is clear that the temperature reconstruction results are more accurate than the water vapor concentration obtained by the traditional concentration calculation method. In the present study an innovative way to reduce the error of concentration reconstruction and improve the reconstruction quality greatly is also proposed, and the capability of this new method is evaluated by using appropriate assessment parameters. By using this new approach, not only the concentration reconstruction accuracy is greatly improved, but also a suitable parallel-beam arrangement is put forward for high reconstruction accuracy and simplicity of experimental validation. Finally, a bimodal structure of the combustion region is assumed to demonstrate the robustness and universality of the proposed method. Numerical investigation indicates that the proposed TDLAS tomographic algorithm is capable of detecting accurate temperature and concentration profiles. This feasible formula for reconstruction research is expected to resolve several key issues in practical combustion devices. Project supported by the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61205151), the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Project of China (Grant

  5. [Raman Lidar measuring tropospheric temperature profiles with many rotational Raman lines].

    PubMed

    Su, Jia; Zhang, Yin-chao; Hu, Shun-xing; Cao, Kai-fa; Zhao, Pei-tao; Wang, Shao-lin; Xie, Jun

    2008-08-01

    Due to lower tropospheric aerosols, the Rayleigh and vibrational Raman methods can't measure lower tropospheric temperature profiles accurately. By using N2 and O2 molecular pure rotational Raman scattering signals, lower tropospheric temperature profiles can be gained without influence of lower tropospheric aerosols. So we decide to use a pure rotational Raman Lidar to get lower tropospheric temperature profiles. At present, because the most light-splitting systems of pure rotational Raman Lidar measure temperature by gaining a single rotational Raman line, the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of these Lidar systems are very low. So we design a new kind of Lidar light-splitting system which can sum different rotational Raman lines and it can improve SNR And we can find the sensitivity of the temperature of the ratios of multi rotational Raman lines is as same as single rotational Raman line's through theoretical analysis. Moreover, we can obtain the temperature profiles with good SNR fromthis new the system with a normal laser and a small telescope up to several kilometers. At last, with the new light-splitting system, the lower tropospheric temperature profiles are measured from 0.3 km to 5 km altitude. They agree well with radiosonde observations, which demonstrate the results of our rotational Raman lidar are reasonable.

  6. Optimal Detection of Global Warming using Temperature Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leroy, Stephen S.

    1997-01-01

    Optimal fingerprinting is applied to estimate the amount of time it would take to detect warming by increased concentrations of carbon dioxide in monthly averages of temperature profiles over the Indian Ocean.

  7. Computer Program for Calculation of a Gas Temperature Profile by Infrared Emission: Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program to calculate the temperature profile of a flame or hot gas was presented in detail. Emphasis was on profiles found in jet engine or rocket engine exhaust streams containing H2O or CO2 radiating gases. The temperature profile was assumed axisymmetric with an assumed functional form controlled by two variable parameters. The parameters were calculated using measurements of gas radiation at two wavelengths in the infrared. The program also gave some information on the pressure profile. A method of selection of wavelengths was given that is likely to lead to an accurate determination of the parameters. The program is written in FORTRAN IV language and runs in less than 60 seconds on a Univac 1100 computer.

  8. Temperature dependent effective potential method for accurate free energy calculations of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellman, Olle; Steneteg, Peter; Abrikosov, I. A.; Simak, S. I.

    2013-03-01

    We have developed a thorough and accurate method of determining anharmonic free energies, the temperature dependent effective potential technique (TDEP). It is based on ab initio molecular dynamics followed by a mapping onto a model Hamiltonian that describes the lattice dynamics. The formalism and the numerical aspects of the technique are described in detail. A number of practical examples are given, and results are presented, which confirm the usefulness of TDEP within ab initio and classical molecular dynamics frameworks. In particular, we examine from first principles the behavior of force constants upon the dynamical stabilization of the body centered phase of Zr, and show that they become more localized. We also calculate the phase diagram for 4He modeled with the Aziz potential and obtain results which are in favorable agreement both with respect to experiment and established techniques.

  9. Accurate force fields and methods for modelling organic molecular crystals at finite temperatures.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Jonas; Pundyke, Orla Sheehan; Day, Graeme M

    2016-06-21

    We present an assessment of the performance of several force fields for modelling intermolecular interactions in organic molecular crystals using the X23 benchmark set. The performance of the force fields is compared to several popular dispersion corrected density functional methods. In addition, we present our implementation of lattice vibrational free energy calculations in the quasi-harmonic approximation, using several methods to account for phonon dispersion. This allows us to also benchmark the force fields' reproduction of finite temperature crystal structures. The results demonstrate that anisotropic atom-atom multipole-based force fields can be as accurate as several popular DFT-D methods, but have errors 2-3 times larger than the current best DFT-D methods. The largest error in the examined force fields is a systematic underestimation of the (absolute) lattice energy.

  10. Prediction of temperature profile in MCFC stack

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kab Soo; Kim, Hwayong; Hong, Seong-An; Lim, Hee Chun

    1996-12-31

    A simple three dimensional model was developed to simulate the temperature distribution and the performance of various flow types of the MCFC stack. The objective of this study was to understand the complicated phenomena occurring in the MCFC stack and to supply the basic data for optimizing the operating condition of the MCFC stack. Assuming that the stack consists of a number of differential elements which have uniform temperature and gas composition, the model was solved by finite difference method. The performance of this model was demonstrated by comparing the calculated value with experimental data of the 1.5kW class co-flow type MCFC stack operated in KIST. This model can be utilized as a simple diagnostic tool in case of the operational abnormality such as the hot spot which often occurs inside the stack.

  11. MICCA: a complete and accurate software for taxonomic profiling of metagenomic data.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Davide; Fontana, Paolo; De Filippo, Carlotta; Cavalieri, Duccio; Donati, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of high throughput sequencing technologies has triggered an increase of the number of studies in which the microbiota of environmental and human samples is characterized through the sequencing of selected marker genes. While experimental protocols have undergone a process of standardization that makes them accessible to a large community of scientist, standard and robust data analysis pipelines are still lacking. Here we introduce MICCA, a software pipeline for the processing of amplicon metagenomic datasets that efficiently combines quality filtering, clustering of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs), taxonomy assignment and phylogenetic tree inference. MICCA provides accurate results reaching a good compromise among modularity and usability. Moreover, we introduce a de-novo clustering algorithm specifically designed for the inference of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs). Tests on real and synthetic datasets shows that thanks to the optimized reads filtering process and to the new clustering algorithm, MICCA provides estimates of the number of OTUs and of other common ecological indices that are more accurate and robust than currently available pipelines. Analysis of public metagenomic datasets shows that the higher consistency of results improves our understanding of the structure of environmental and human associated microbial communities. MICCA is an open source project. PMID:25988396

  12. MICCA: a complete and accurate software for taxonomic profiling of metagenomic data.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Davide; Fontana, Paolo; De Filippo, Carlotta; Cavalieri, Duccio; Donati, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of high throughput sequencing technologies has triggered an increase of the number of studies in which the microbiota of environmental and human samples is characterized through the sequencing of selected marker genes. While experimental protocols have undergone a process of standardization that makes them accessible to a large community of scientist, standard and robust data analysis pipelines are still lacking. Here we introduce MICCA, a software pipeline for the processing of amplicon metagenomic datasets that efficiently combines quality filtering, clustering of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs), taxonomy assignment and phylogenetic tree inference. MICCA provides accurate results reaching a good compromise among modularity and usability. Moreover, we introduce a de-novo clustering algorithm specifically designed for the inference of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs). Tests on real and synthetic datasets shows that thanks to the optimized reads filtering process and to the new clustering algorithm, MICCA provides estimates of the number of OTUs and of other common ecological indices that are more accurate and robust than currently available pipelines. Analysis of public metagenomic datasets shows that the higher consistency of results improves our understanding of the structure of environmental and human associated microbial communities. MICCA is an open source project.

  13. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric temperature and pressure profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The theory and methodology of using differential absorption lidar techniques for the remote measurement of atmospheric pressure profiles, surface pressure, and temperature profiles from ground, air, and space-based platforms are presented. Pressure measurements are effected by means of high resolution measurement of absorption at the edges of the oxygen A band lines where absorption is pressure dependent due to collisional line broadening. Temperature is assessed using measurements of the absorption at the center of the oxygen A band line originating from a quantum state with high ground state energy. The population of the state is temperature dependent, allowing determination of the temperature through the Boltzmann term. The results of simulations of the techniques using Voigt profile and variational analysis are reported for ground-based, airborne, and Shuttle-based systems. Accuracies in the 0.5-1.0 K and 0.1-0.3% range are projected.

  14. A new temperature profiling probe for investigating groundwater-surface water interaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naranjo, Ramon C.; Robert Turcotte,

    2015-01-01

    Measuring vertically nested temperatures at the streambed interface poses practical challenges that are addressed here with a new discrete subsurface temperature profiling probe. We describe a new temperature probe and its application for heat as a tracer investigations to demonstrate the probe's utility. Accuracy and response time of temperature measurements made at 6 discrete depths in the probe were analyzed in the laboratory using temperature bath experiments. We find the temperature probe to be an accurate and robust instrument that allows for easily installation and long-term monitoring in highly variable environments. Because the probe is inexpensive and versatile, it is useful for many environmental applications that require temperature data collection for periods of several months in environments that are difficult to access or require minimal disturbance.

  15. Accurate mass - time tag library for LC/MS-based metabolite profiling of medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbertson, Daniel J.; Johnson, Sean R.; Piljac-Žegarac, Jasenka; Kappel, Julia; Schäfer, Sarah; Wüst, Matthias; Ketchum, Raymond E. B.; Croteau, Rodney B.; Marques, Joaquim V.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.; Rolf, Megan; Kutchan, Toni M.; Soejarto, D. Doel; Lange, B. Markus

    2013-01-01

    We report the development and testing of an accurate mass – time (AMT) tag approach for the LC/MS-based identification of plant natural products (PNPs) in complex extracts. An AMT tag library was developed for approximately 500 PNPs with diverse chemical structures, detected in electrospray and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization modes (both positive and negative polarities). In addition, to enable peak annotations with high confidence, MS/MS spectra were acquired with three different fragmentation energies. The LC/MS and MS/MS data sets were integrated into online spectral search tools and repositories (Spektraris and MassBank), thus allowing users to interrogate their own data sets for the potential presence of PNPs. The utility of the AMT tag library approach is demonstrated by the detection and annotation of active principles in 27 different medicinal plant species with diverse chemical constituents. PMID:23597491

  16. Accurate High-Temperature Reaction Networks for Alternative Fuels: Butanol Isomers

    SciTech Connect

    Van Geem, K. M.; Pyl, S. P.; Marin, G. B.; Harper, M. R.; Green, W. H.

    2010-11-03

    Oxygenated hydrocarbons, particularly alcohol compounds, are being studied extensively as alternatives and additives to conventional fuels due to their propensity of decreasing soot formation and improving the octane number of gasoline. However, oxygenated fuels also increase the production of toxic byproducts, such as formaldehyde. To gain a better understanding of the oxygenated functional group’s influence on combustion properties—e.g., ignition delay at temperatures above the negative temperature coefficient regime, and the rate of benzene production, which is the common precursor to soot formation—a detailed pressure-dependent reaction network for n-butanol, sec-butanol, and tert-butanol consisting of 281 species and 3608 reactions is presented. The reaction network is validated against shock tube ignition delays and doped methane flame concentration profiles reported previously in the literature, in addition to newly acquired pyrolysis data. Good agreement between simulated and experimental data is achieved in all cases. Flux and sensitivity analyses for each set of experiments have been performed, and high-pressure-limit reaction rate coefficients for important pathways, e.g., the dehydration reactions of the butanol isomers, have been computed using statistical mechanics and quantum chemistry. The different alcohol decomposition pathways, i.e., the pathways from primary, secondary, and tertiary alcohols, are discussed. Furthermore, comparisons between ethanol and n-butanol, two primary alcohols, are presented, as they relate to ignition delay.

  17. Development of an Accurate Feed-Forward Temperature Control Tankless Water Heater

    SciTech Connect

    David Yuill

    2008-06-30

    The following document is the final report for DE-FC26-05NT42327: Development of an Accurate Feed-Forward Temperature Control Tankless Water Heater. This work was carried out under a cooperative agreement from the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, with additional funding from Keltech, Inc. The objective of the project was to improve the temperature control performance of an electric tankless water heater (TWH). The reason for doing this is to minimize or eliminate one of the barriers to wider adoption of the TWH. TWH use less energy than typical (storage) water heaters because of the elimination of standby losses, so wider adoption will lead to reduced energy consumption. The project was carried out by Building Solutions, Inc. (BSI), a small business based in Omaha, Nebraska. BSI partnered with Keltech, Inc., a manufacturer of electric tankless water heaters based in Delton, Michigan. Additional work was carried out by the University of Nebraska and Mike Coward. A background study revealed several advantages and disadvantages to TWH. Besides using less energy than storage heaters, TWH provide an endless supply of hot water, have a longer life, use less floor space, can be used at point-of-use, and are suitable as boosters to enable alternative water heating technologies, such as solar or heat-pump water heaters. Their disadvantages are their higher cost, large instantaneous power requirement, and poor temperature control. A test method was developed to quantify performance under a representative range of disturbances to flow rate and inlet temperature. A device capable of conducting this test was designed and built. Some heaters currently on the market were tested, and were found to perform quite poorly. A new controller was designed using model predictive control (MPC). This control method required an accurate dynamic model to be created and required significant tuning to the controller before good control was achieved. The MPC design

  18. Bacterial Cytological Profiling (BCP) as a Rapid and Accurate Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Method for Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Quach, D T; Sakoulas, G; Nizet, V; Pogliano, J; Pogliano, K

    2016-02-01

    Successful treatment of bacterial infections requires the timely administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The failure to initiate the correct therapy in a timely fashion results in poor clinical outcomes, longer hospital stays, and higher medical costs. Current approaches to antibiotic susceptibility testing of cultured pathogens have key limitations ranging from long run times to dependence on prior knowledge of genetic mechanisms of resistance. We have developed a rapid antimicrobial susceptibility assay for Staphylococcus aureus based on bacterial cytological profiling (BCP), which uses quantitative fluorescence microscopy to measure antibiotic induced changes in cellular architecture. BCP discriminated between methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) and -resistant (MRSA) clinical isolates of S. aureus (n = 71) within 1-2 h with 100% accuracy. Similarly, BCP correctly distinguished daptomycin susceptible (DS) from daptomycin non-susceptible (DNS) S. aureus strains (n = 20) within 30 min. Among MRSA isolates, BCP further identified two classes of strains that differ in their susceptibility to specific combinations of beta-lactam antibiotics. BCP provides a rapid and flexible alternative to gene-based susceptibility testing methods for S. aureus, and should be readily adaptable to different antibiotics and bacterial species as new mechanisms of resistance or multidrug-resistant pathogens evolve and appear in mainstream clinical practice. PMID:26981574

  19. Bacterial Cytological Profiling (BCP) as a Rapid and Accurate Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Method for Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Quach, D.T.; Sakoulas, G.; Nizet, V.; Pogliano, J.; Pogliano, K.

    2016-01-01

    Successful treatment of bacterial infections requires the timely administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The failure to initiate the correct therapy in a timely fashion results in poor clinical outcomes, longer hospital stays, and higher medical costs. Current approaches to antibiotic susceptibility testing of cultured pathogens have key limitations ranging from long run times to dependence on prior knowledge of genetic mechanisms of resistance. We have developed a rapid antimicrobial susceptibility assay for Staphylococcus aureus based on bacterial cytological profiling (BCP), which uses quantitative fluorescence microscopy to measure antibiotic induced changes in cellular architecture. BCP discriminated between methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) and -resistant (MRSA) clinical isolates of S. aureus (n = 71) within 1–2 h with 100% accuracy. Similarly, BCP correctly distinguished daptomycin susceptible (DS) from daptomycin non-susceptible (DNS) S. aureus strains (n = 20) within 30 min. Among MRSA isolates, BCP further identified two classes of strains that differ in their susceptibility to specific combinations of beta-lactam antibiotics. BCP provides a rapid and flexible alternative to gene-based susceptibility testing methods for S. aureus, and should be readily adaptable to different antibiotics and bacterial species as new mechanisms of resistance or multidrug-resistant pathogens evolve and appear in mainstream clinical practice. PMID:26981574

  20. Accurate Prediction of Severe Allergic Reactions by a Small Set of Environmental Parameters (NDVI, Temperature)

    PubMed Central

    Andrianaki, Maria; Azariadis, Kalliopi; Kampouri, Errika; Theodoropoulou, Katerina; Lavrentaki, Katerina; Kastrinakis, Stelios; Kampa, Marilena; Agouridakis, Panagiotis; Pirintsos, Stergios; Castanas, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Severe allergic reactions of unknown etiology,necessitating a hospital visit, have an important impact in the life of affected individuals and impose a major economic burden to societies. The prediction of clinically severe allergic reactions would be of great importance, but current attempts have been limited by the lack of a well-founded applicable methodology and the wide spatiotemporal distribution of allergic reactions. The valid prediction of severe allergies (and especially those needing hospital treatment) in a region, could alert health authorities and implicated individuals to take appropriate preemptive measures. In the present report we have collecterd visits for serious allergic reactions of unknown etiology from two major hospitals in the island of Crete, for two distinct time periods (validation and test sets). We have used the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), a satellite-based, freely available measurement, which is an indicator of live green vegetation at a given geographic area, and a set of meteorological data to develop a model capable of describing and predicting severe allergic reaction frequency. Our analysis has retained NDVI and temperature as accurate identifiers and predictors of increased hospital severe allergic reactions visits. Our approach may contribute towards the development of satellite-based modules, for the prediction of severe allergic reactions in specific, well-defined geographical areas. It could also probably be used for the prediction of other environment related diseases and conditions. PMID:25794106

  1. Measurements of temperature profiles at the exit of small rockets.

    PubMed

    Griggs, M; Harshbarger, F C

    1966-02-01

    The sodium line reversal technique was used to determine the reversal temperature profile across the exit of small rockets. Measurements were made on one 73-kg thrust rocket, and two 23-kg thrust rockets with different injectors. The large rocket showed little variation of reversal temperature across the plume. However, the 23-kg rockets both showed a large decrease of reversal temperature from the axis to the edge of the plume. In addition, the sodium line reversal technique of temperature measurement was compared with an infrared technique developed in these laboratories.

  2. Finite difference program for calculating hydride bed wall temperature profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.

    1992-10-29

    A QuickBASIC finite difference program was written for calculating one dimensional temperature profiles in up to two media with flat, cylindrical, or spherical geometries. The development of the program was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the Tritium metal hydrides beds for thermal fatigue analysis. The purpose of this report is to document the equations and the computer program used to calculate transient wall temperatures in stainless steel hydride vessels. The development of the computer code was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the hydrides beds in the Tritium Facility for thermal fatigue analysis.

  3. Impacts of a Warmer Climate on Lake Geneva Temperature Profiles Using a Single- Column Lake Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perroud, M.; Goyette, S.

    2008-12-01

    The main objective of this study is to assess the impacts of a warmer climate on Lake Geneva, a deep, extensive lake located in peri-alpine area of Switzerland. In a first step, temperature profiles have been investigated using different 1-D lake models in order to select the most suitable for long term simulation. Subsequently, one-way and two-way coupling methods with the processes at the lake-atmosphere interface have been used to evaluate future temperature profiles. The numerical lake model Simstrat reproduces accurately the thermal profiles prevailing at the centre of the lake and the model may therefore serve for studies on lake temperature evolution by the end of the century. Simulations run with the one-way coupling method are based on hourly observed data recorded between 1960-1990 and perturbed with future atmospheric conditions deduced from a statistical analysis using outputs from an RCM produced in the context of the EU-Prudence project under IPCC A2 scenario. In the two-way method where mutual exchanges between the lake and atmosphere are considered, then Simstrat is coupled to an atmospheric column model (Fiz), and future temperature profiles are evaluated following the doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentration. The juxtaposition of outputs using the one-way or the two-way coupling method allows for comparison of individual performances, verification of energy budgets and validation of temperature trends, based on the simulation with respect to future conditions.

  4. Rolling mill optimization using an accurate and rapid new model for mill deflection and strip thickness profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Arif Sultan

    This work presents improved technology for attaining high-quality rolled metal strip. The new technology is based on an innovative method to model both the static and dynamic characteristics of rolling mill deflection, and it applies equally to both cluster-type and non cluster-type rolling mill configurations. By effectively combining numerical Finite Element Analysis (FEA) with analytical solid mechanics, the devised approach delivers a rapid, accurate, flexible, high-fidelity model useful for optimizing many important rolling parameters. The associated static deflection model enables computation of the thickness profile and corresponding flatness of the rolled strip. Accurate methods of predicting the strip thickness profile and strip flatness are important in rolling mill design, rolling schedule set-up, control of mill flatness actuators, and optimization of ground roll profiles. The corresponding dynamic deflection model enables solution of the standard eigenvalue problem to determine natural frequencies and modes of vibration. The presented method for solving the roll-stack deflection problem offers several important advantages over traditional methods. In particular, it includes continuity of elastic foundations, non-iterative solution when using pre-determined elastic foundation moduli, continuous third-order displacement fields, simple stress-field determination, the ability to calculate dynamic characteristics, and a comparatively faster solution time. Consistent with the most advanced existing methods, the presented method accommodates loading conditions that represent roll crowning, roll bending, roll shifting, and roll crossing mechanisms. Validation of the static model is provided by comparing results and solution time with large-scale, commercial finite element simulations. In addition to examples with the common 4-high vertical stand rolling mill, application of the presented method to the most complex of rolling mill configurations is demonstrated

  5. Hall Thruster Modeling with a Given Temperature Profile

    SciTech Connect

    L. Dorf; V. Semenov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2002-06-12

    A quasi one-dimensional steady-state model of the Hall thruster is presented. For given mass flow rate, magnetic field profile, and discharge voltage the unique solution can be constructed, assuming that the thruster operates in one of the two regimes: with or without the anode sheath. It is shown that for a given temperature profile, the applied discharge voltage uniquely determines the operating regime; for discharge voltages greater than a certain value, the sheath disappears. That result is obtained over a wide range of incoming neutral velocities, channel lengths and widths, and cathode plane locations. A good correlation between the quasi one-dimensional model and experimental results can be achieved by selecting an appropriate temperature profile. We also show how the presented model can be used to obtain a two-dimensional potential distribution.

  6. Water-level sensor and temperature-profile detector

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    A temperature profile detector is described which comprises a surrounding length of metal tubing and an interior electrical conductor both constructed of high temperature high electrical resistance materials. A plurality of gas-filled expandable bellows made of electrically conductive material are positioned at spaced locations along a length of the conductors. The bellows are sealed and contain a predetermined volume of a gas designed to effect movement of the bellows from an open circuit condition to a closed circuit condition in response to monitored temperature changes sensed by each bellows.

  7. Acoustic thermometric reconstruction of a time-varying temperature profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Kazanskii, A. S.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Sharakshane, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    The time-varying temperature profiles were reconstructed in an experiment using a thermal acoustic radiation receiving array containing 14 sensors. The temperature was recovered by performing similar experiments using plasticine, as well as in vivo with a human hand. Plasticine preliminarily heated up to 36.5°C and a human hand were placed into water for 50 s at a temperature of 20°C. The core temperature of the plasticine was independently measured using thermocouples. The spatial resolution of the reconstruction in the lateral direction was determined by the distance between neighboring sensors and was equal to10 mm; the averaging time was 10 s. The error in reconstructing the core temperature determined in the experiment with plasticine was 0.5 K. The core temperature of the hand changed with time (in 50 s it decreased from 35 to 34°C) and space (the mean square deviation was 1.5 K). The experiment with the hand revealed that multichannel detection of thermal acoustic radiation using a compact 45 × 36 mm array to reconstruct the temperature profile could be performed during medical procedures.

  8. Error analysis for mesospheric temperature profiling by absorptive occultation sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, M. J.; Kirchengast, G.

    2001-01-01

    An error analysis for mesospheric profiles retrieved from absorptive occultation data has been performed, starting with realistic error assumptions as would apply to intensity data collected by available high-precision UV photodiode sensors. Propagation of statistical errors was investigated through the complete retrieval chain from measured intensity profiles to atmospheric density, pressure, and temperature profiles. We assumed unbiased errors as the occultation method is essentially self-calibrating and straight-line propagation of occulted signals as we focus on heights of 50 100 km, where refractive bending of the sensed radiation is negligible. Throughout the analysis the errors were characterized at each retrieval step by their mean profile, their covariance matrix and their probability density function (pdf). This furnishes, compared to a variance-only estimation, a much improved insight into the error propagation mechanism. We applied the procedure to a baseline analysis of the performance of a recently proposed solar UV occultation sensor (SMAS Sun Monitor and Atmospheric Sounder) and provide, using a reasonable exponential atmospheric model as background, results on error standard deviations and error correlation functions of density, pressure, and temperature profiles. Two different sensor photodiode assumptions are discussed, respectively, diamond diodes (DD) with 0.03% and silicon diodes (SD) with 0.1% (unattenuated intensity) measurement noise at 10 Hz sampling rate. A factor-of-2 margin was applied to these noise values in order to roughly account for unmodeled cross section uncertainties. Within the entire height domain (50 100 km) we find temperature to be retrieved to better than 0.3 K (DD) / 1 K (SD) accuracy, respectively, at 2 km height resolution. The results indicate that absorptive occultations acquired by a SMAS-type sensor could provide mesospheric profiles of fundamental variables such as temperature with unprecedented accuracy and

  9. Exercise-induced hyperthermia may prevent accurate core temperature measurement by tympanic membrane thermometer.

    PubMed

    Yeo, S; Scarbough, M

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of exercise-induced hyperthermia on brain and deep trunk temperature measurement in order to determine the optimal temperature site of the body for varying nursing practices in outpatient clinical settings. Eight women, 18 to 50 years old (30.9 +/- 12.6; mean +/- SD), participated in the study. Subjects were asked to perform their regular aerobic exercise in a natural environment while body temperature (ear and rectal) and heart rate (HR) were measured simultaneously and repeatedly before, during, and after exercise. Glass mercury rectal thermometers were used for measurement of deep trunk temperature, an infrared tympanic membrane thermometer for measurement of brain temperature, and a portable heart rate monitor for monitoring heart rate. Rectal temperature was higher than ear temperature for all but one of the 40 pairs of observation. The time pattern varied for the two modes of temperature (F = 9.67; df 4,28; p < .001). Rectal temperature changed over time (F = 7.86; df 4,28; p < .002), and ear temperature did not (F = 1.5; df 4,28; p = .25), indicating that ear temperature did not respond to exercise. While rectal temperature was strongly correlated with HR (r = .60), ear temperature did not correlate either with rectal temperature (r = .02) or with HR (r = .08). Thus deep trunk temperature responds to exercise at moderate levels. On the other hand, ear temperature does not increase due to exercise. Ear temperature is not a valid indicator of trunk temperature during and immediately after exercise.

  10. Temperature profile around a basaltic sill intruded into wet sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, Leslie; Bernard, Andrew; Rember, William C.; Milazzo, Moses; Dundas, Colin M.; Abramov, Oleg; Kestay, Laszlo P.

    2015-01-01

    The transfer of heat into wet sediments from magmatic intrusions or lava flows is not well constrained from field data. Such field constraints on numerical models of heat transfer could significantly improve our understanding of water–lava interactions. We use experimentally calibrated pollen darkening to measure the temperature profile around a basaltic sill emplaced into wet lakebed sediments. It is well known that, upon heating, initially transparent palynomorphs darken progressively through golden, brown, and black shades before being destroyed; however, this approach to measuring temperature has not been applied to volcanological questions. We collected sediment samples from established Miocene fossil localities at Clarkia, Idaho. Fossils in the sediments include pollen from numerous tree and shrub species. We experimentally calibrated changes in the color of Clarkia sediment pollen and used this calibration to determine sediment temperatures around a Miocene basaltic sill emplaced in the sediments. Results indicated a flat temperature profile above and below the sill, with T > 325 °C within 1 cm of the basalt-sediment contact, near 300 °C at 1–2 cm from the contact, and ~ 250 °C at 1 m from the sill contact. This profile suggests that heat transport in the sediments was hydrothermally rather than conductively controlled. This information will be used to test numerical models of heat transfer in wet sediments on Earth and Mars.

  11. Temperature and humidity profiles in the atmosphere from spaceborne lasers: A feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grassl, H.; Schluessel, P.

    1984-01-01

    Computer simulations of the differential absorption lidar technique in a space craft for the purpose of temperature and humidity profiling indicate: (1) Current technology applied to O2 and H2O lines in the .7 to .8 micrometers wavelength band gives sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratios (up to 50 for a single pulse pair) if backscattering by aerosol particles is high, i.e. profiling accurate to 2 K for temperature and 10% for humidity should be feasible within the turbid lower troposphere in 1 km layers and with an averaging over approximately 100 pulses. (2) The impact of short term fluctuations in aerosol particle concentration is too big for a one laser system. Only a two laser system firing at a time lag of about 1 millisecond can surmount these difficulties. (3) The finite width of the laser line and the quasi-random shift of this line introduce tolerable, partly systematic errors.

  12. A multi-channel radiometric profiler of temperature, humidity and cloud liquid.

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, R.; Carpenter, R.; Guldner, J.; Liljegren, J.; Nehrkorn, T.; Solheim, F.; Vandenberghe, F.; Environmental Research; Radiometrics Corp.; Univ. Corp. for Atmospheric Research; Weather Decision Technologies Inc.; Atmospheric and Environmental Research Inc.; National Center for Atmospheric Research

    2003-07-31

    A microwave radiometer is described that provides continuous thermodynamic (temperature, water vapor, and moisture) soundings during clear and cloudy conditions. The radiometric profiler observes radiation intensity at 12 microwave frequencies, along with zenith infrared and surface meteorological measurements. Historical radiosonde and neural network or regression methods are used for profile retrieval. We compare radiometric, radiosonde, and forecast soundings and evaluate the accuracy of radiometric temperature and water vapor soundings on the basis of statistical comparison with radiosonde soundings. We find that radiometric soundings are equivalent in accuracy to radiosonde soundings when used in numerical weather forecasting. A case study is described that demonstrates improved fog forecasting on the basis of variational assimilation of radiometric soundings. The accuracy of radiometric cloud liquid soundings is evaluated by comparison with cloud liquid sensors carried by radiosondes. Accurate high-resolution three-dimensional water vapor and wind analysis is described on the basis of assimilation of simulated thermodynamic and wind soundings along with GPS slant delays. Examples of mobile thermodynamic and wind profilers are shown. Thermodynamic profiling, particularly when combined with wind profiling and slant GPS, provides continuous atmospheric soundings for improved weather and dispersion forecasting.

  13. An accurate air temperature measurement system based on an envelope pulsed ultrasonic time-of-flight technique.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y S; Huang, Y P; Huang, K N; Young, M S

    2007-11-01

    A new microcomputer based air temperature measurement system is presented. An accurate temperature measurement is derived from the measurement of sound velocity by using an ultrasonic time-of-flight (TOF) technique. The study proposes a novel algorithm that combines both amplitude modulation (AM) and phase modulation (PM) to get the TOF measurement. The proposed system uses the AM and PM envelope square waveform (APESW) to reduce the error caused by inertia delay. The APESW ultrasonic driving waveform causes an envelope zero and phase inversion phenomenon in the relative waveform of the receiver. To accurately achieve a TOF measurement, the phase inversion phenomenon was used to sufficiently identify the measurement pulse in the received waveform. Additionally, a counter clock technique was combined to compute the phase shifts of the last incomplete cycle for TOF. The presented system can obtain 0.1% TOF resolution for the period corresponding to the 40 kHz frequency ultrasonic wave. Consequently, with the integration of a humidity compensation algorithm, a highly accurate and high resolution temperature measurement can be achieved using the accurate TOF measurement. Experimental results indicate that the combined standard uncertainty of the temperature measurement is approximately 0.39 degrees C. The main advantages of this system are high resolution measurements, narrow bandwidth requirements, and ease of implementation.

  14. A new device for high precision in situ sediment temperature profile measurements at the seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feseker, T.; Wetzel, G.; Heesemann, B.

    2012-04-01

    In situ sediment temperature profile measurements at the seafloor provide valuable information on fluid seepage, hydrate stability, and ambient temperature of samples. In addition, it can be convenient to approximate other parameters such as concentrations of porewater constituents from temperature or temperature gradient using transfer functions if their distribution is controlled by the same processes and direct quantification involves time-consuming sampling and laboratory analyses. We present a new instrument that can be used to obtain precisely positioned sediment temperature profile measurements from the seafloor during ROV dives. Consisting of a 0.4 m-long sensor rod equipped with eight temperature sensors and a standard data logger, the new T-Stick can be operated by an ROV in a fully autonomous mode. The temperature range of the instrument is -5 °C to 35 °C and it can withstand pressures of up to 600 bar. Compared to previously used instruments, the smaller diameter of the new T-Stick reduces the thermal inertia of the lance and results in shorter equilibration times. Virtual measurements generated by a numerical model showed that the T-Stick provides highly accurate temperature profile measurements with a root mean square error of 0.0027 K for a wide range of thermal sediment properties. Modeled temperature gradients are representative of both normal deep sea settings and cold seep environments with elevated temperature gradients of up to three orders of magnitude above normal background values, which are the primary target areas for T-Stick measurements. Deviations from the true in situ temperature profiles are caused by disturbance of the temperature field by the probe itself and may lead to underestimation of gradients and curvature in the profiles. A first field test of the T-Stick was conducted at the Håkon Mosby mud volcano at 1250 m water depth on the Barents Sea slope, where the new instrument provided useful information about the origin and

  15. Measuring velocity and temperature profile sectional pipeline behind confuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siažik, Ján; Malcho, Milan; Lenhard, Richard; Novomestský, Marcel

    2016-06-01

    The article deals with the measuring of temperature and velocity profile in area behind confuser in real made scale model of bypass. For proper operation of the equipment it is necessary to know the actual flow in the pipe. Bypasses have wide application and can be also associated with devices for heat recovery, heat exchangers different designs in which may be used in certain circumstances. In the present case, the heat that would otherwise has not been used is used for heating of insulators, and heating the air in the spray-dryer. The measuring principle was verify how the above-mentioned temperature and velocity profile decomposition above confuser on real made scale model.

  16. Logarithmic temperature profiles in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlers, Guenter; He, Xiaozhou; Funfschilling, Denis; van Gils, Dennis; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2012-11-01

    We report experimental results for the vertical profiles of the mean temperature < T > and the rms temperature fluctuation σ for turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in the interior of a cylindrical sample of aspect ratio Γ ≡ D / L = 0 . 50 (D = 112 cm and L = 224 cm are the diameter and height respectively) over the Rayleigh number range 4 ×1012 <= Ra <=1015 for a Prandtl number Pr ~= 0 . 8 . We found that < T > and σ vary linearly with ln (z / L) where z is the distance from the bottom or top plate. Such a dependence had been predicted for the ultimate state (Ra > 5 ×1014), but was unexpected for the classical state (Ra <1013). The results for < T > and σ suggest similarities to the logarithmic profiles found for the velocity in shear flows. Supported by the Max Planck Society, the Volkswagen Stiftung, the DFD Sonderforschungsbereich SFB963, and NSF grant DMR11-58514.

  17. On the weighting of SABER temperature profiles for comparison with ground based hydroxyl rotational temperatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, William; Mulligan, Frank

    2010-05-01

    Kinetic temperature profiles are retrieved from limb-emission radiance measurements of CO2 at 15 and 4.3 um by the SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry) instrument on the TIMED (Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics) satellite. Profiles extend from about 20-120km and measurements are available since the spacecraft launch in Dec-2001. Hydroxyl (6-2) band rotational temperatures are measured using a ground-based scanning spectrometer at Davis station, Antarctica (68°S, 78°E). Measurements are available each year since 1995 on nights between early February and late October, when the sun is more than 6° below the horizon. In order to compare temperatures from these two instruments we must derive hydroxyl layer equivalent temperatures for the SABER profiles using a weighting function which represents the hydroxyl layer profile. In this study, we examine a number of different weighting profiles to determine the best equivalent to hydroxyl nightly average temperatures at Davis. These profiles include (1) the customary Gaussian peaked at 87km and width 8km [Baker and Stair, 1988 :Physica Scripta. 37 611-622], (2) the layer profile derived from WINDIIUARS hydroxyl height profiles [She and Lowe, 1998 :JASTP 60, 1573-1583], (3) layer profiles derived from the hydroxyl volume emission rate (VER) from the SABER OH-B channel at 1.6um, which contains the Meinel OH(4-2) and OH(5-3) bands and (4) a Gaussian fitted to the SABER hydroxyl VER peak. The comparison is made with approximately 2500 SABER retrievals from overpasses within 500km of Davis station, and with solar zenith angle >97°, which have coincident hydroxyl temperature measurements over the 8 winters between 2002 and 2009. Due to the satellite 60 day yaw cycle the sampling over Davis has occurred in approximately the same three time intervals each year; between days 75-140, 196-262 and 323-014, however the latter interval is entirely rejected on the solar zenith

  18. Time-temperature profiles of post-cure composite ovens.

    PubMed

    Loza-Herrero, M A; Rueggeberg, F A

    1998-01-01

    Previous research indicates that there are improved physical properties resulting from post-cure heating of light-activated resin composite. Currently, a large variety of commercial devices and techniques are used for post-cure heating. This study determined differences among the time-temperature profiles of selected commercial post-cure devices. It also compared the biaxial flexure strength of resin composite which was post-cure heated in each device.

  19. Stream bed temperature profiles as indicators of percolation characteristics beneath arroyos in the middle Rio Grande Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, J.; Thomas, C.L.

    1997-01-01

    Stream bed temperature profiles were monitored continuously during water year 1990 and 1991 (WY90 and 91) in two New Mexico arroyos, similar in their meteorological features and dissimilar in their hydrological features. Stream bed temperature profiles between depths of 30 and 300 cm were examined to determine whether temporal changes in temperature profiles represent accurate indicators of the timing, depth and duration of percolation in each stream bed. These results were compared with stream flow, air temperature, and precipitation records for WY90 and 91, to evaluate the effect of changing surface conditions on temperature profiles. Temperature profiles indicate a persistently high thermal gradient with depth beneath Grantline Arroyo, except during a semi-annual thermal reversal in spring and autumn. This typifies the thermal response of dry sediments with low thermal conductivities. High thermal gradients were disrupted only during infrequent stream flows, followed by rapid re-establishment of high gradients. The stream bed temperature at 300 cm was unresponsive to individual precipitation or stream flow during WY90 and 91. This thermal pattern provides strong evidence that most seepage into Grantline Arroyo failed to percolate at a sufficient rate to reach 300 cm before being returned to the atmosphere. A distinctly different thermal pattern was recorded beneath Tijeras Arroyo. Low thermal gradients between 30 and 300 cm and large diurnal variations in temperature, suggest that stream flow created continuous, advection-dominated heat transport for over 300 days, annually. Beneath Tijeras Arroyo, low thermal gradients were interrupted only briefly during periodic, dry summer conditions. Comparisons of stream flow records for WY90 and 91 with stream bed temperature profiles indicate that independent analysis of thermal patterns provides accurate estimates of the timing, depth and duration of percolation beneath both arroyos. Stream flow loss estimates indicate

  20. Wind effect on PV module temperature: Analysis of different techniques for an accurate estimation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwingshackl, Clemens; Petitta, Marcello; Ernst Wagner, Jochen; Belluardo, Giorgio; Moser, David; Castelli, Mariapina; Zebisch, Marc; Tetzlaff, Anke

    2013-04-01

    In this abstract a study on the influence of wind to model the PV module temperature is presented. This study is carried out in the framework of the PV-Alps INTERREG project in which the potential of different photovoltaic technologies is analysed for alpine regions. The PV module temperature depends on different parameters, such as ambient temperature, irradiance, wind speed and PV technology [1]. In most models, a very simple approach is used, where the PV module temperature is calculated from NOCT (nominal operating cell temperature), ambient temperature and irradiance alone [2]. In this study the influence of wind speed on the PV module temperature was investigated. First, different approaches suggested by various authors were tested [1], [2], [3], [4], [5]. For our analysis, temperature, irradiance and wind data from a PV test facility at the airport Bolzano (South Tyrol, Italy) from the EURAC Institute of Renewable Energies were used. The PV module temperature was calculated with different models and compared to the measured PV module temperature at the single panels. The best results were achieved with the approach suggested by Skoplaki et al. [1]. Preliminary results indicate that for all PV technologies which were tested (monocrystalline, amorphous, microcrystalline and polycrystalline silicon and cadmium telluride), modelled and measured PV module temperatures show a higher agreement (RMSE about 3-4 K) compared to standard approaches in which wind is not considered. For further investigation the in-situ measured wind velocities were replaced with wind data from numerical weather forecast models (ECMWF, reanalysis fields). Our results show that the PV module temperature calculated with wind data from ECMWF is still in very good agreement with the measured one (R² > 0.9 for all technologies). Compared to the previous analysis, we find comparable mean values and an increasing standard deviation. These results open a promising approach for PV module

  1. Electron Bernstein wave electron temperature profile diagnostic (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.; Jones, B.; Munsat, T.; Spaleta, J.; Hosea, J.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Menard, J.

    2001-01-01

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) has been employed as a standard electron temperature profile diagnostic on many tokamaks and stellarators, but most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard ECE diagnostics to measure temperature. They are either ''overdense,'' operating at high density relative to the magnetic field (e.g., {omega}{sub pe}>>{Omega}{sub ce} in a spherical torus) or they have insufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition ({tau}>2). Electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) are electrostatic waves that can propagate in overdense plasmas and have a high optical thickness at the electron cyclotron resonance layers as a result of their large k{sub perp}. In this article we report on measurements of EBW emission on the CDX-U spherical torus, where B{sub 0}{approx}2kG, {approx}10{sup 13}cm{sup -3} and T{sub e}{approx}10--200eV. Results are presented for electromagnetic measurements of EBW emission, mode converted near the plasma edge. The EBW emission was absolutely calibrated and compared to the electron temperature profile measured by a multipoint Thomson scattering diagnostic. Depending on the plasma conditions, the mode-converted EBW radiation temperature was found to be {<=}T{sub e} and the emission source was determined to be radially localized at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. A Langmuir triple probe and a 140 GHz interferometer were employed to measure changes in the edge density profile in the vicinity of the upper hybrid resonance where the mode conversion of the EBWs is expected to occur. Initial results suggest EBW emission and EBW heating are viable concepts for plasmas where {omega}{sub pe}>>{Omega}{sub ce}.

  2. Temperature Profile in Fuel and Tie-Tubes for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vishal Patel

    2015-02-01

    A finite element method to calculate temperature profiles in heterogeneous geometries of tie-tube moderated LEU nuclear thermal propulsion systems and HEU designs with tie-tubes is developed and implemented in MATLAB. This new method is compared to previous methods to demonstrate shortcomings in those methods. Typical methods to analyze peak fuel centerline temperature in hexagonal geometries rely on spatial homogenization to derive an analytical expression. These methods are not applicable to cores with tie-tube elements because conduction to tie-tubes cannot be accurately modeled with the homogenized models. The fuel centerline temperature directly impacts safety and performance so it must be predicted carefully. The temperature profile in tie-tubes is also important when high temperatures are expected in the fuel because conduction to the tie-tubes may cause melting in tie-tubes, which may set maximum allowable performance. Estimations of maximum tie-tube temperature can be found from equivalent tube methods, however this method tends to be approximate and overly conservative. A finite element model of heat conduction on a unit cell can model spatial dependence and non-linear conductivity for fuel and tie-tube systems allowing for higher design fidelity of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion.

  3. Modeling the microbial growth and temperature profile in a fixed-bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    da Silveira, Christian L; Mazutti, Marcio A; Salau, Nina P G

    2014-10-01

    Aiming to scale up and apply control and optimization strategies, currently is required the development of accurate plant models to forecast the process nonlinear dynamics. In this work, a mathematical model to predict the growth of the Kluyveromyces marxianus and temperature profile in a fixed-bed bioreactor for solid-state fermentation using sugarcane bagasse as substrate was built up. A parameter estimation technique was performed to fit the mathematical model to the experimental data. The estimated parameters and the model fitness were evaluated with statistical analyses. The results have shown the estimated parameters significance, with 95 % confidence intervals, and the good quality of process model to reproduce the experimental data.

  4. Accurate determination of specific heat at high temperatures using the flash diffusivity method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, J. W.; Zoltan, A.; Wood, C.

    1989-01-01

    The flash diffusivity method of Parker et al. (1961) was used to measure accurately the specific heat of test samples simultaneously with thermal diffusivity, thus obtaining the thermal conductivity of these materials directly. The accuracy of data obtained on two types of materials (n-type silicon-germanium alloys and niobium), was + or - 3 percent. It is shown that the method is applicable up to at least 1300 K.

  5. Influence of Saline on Temperature Profile of Laser Lithotripsy Activation

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Igor N.; Donalisio da Silva, Rodrigo; Gustafson, Diedra; Sehrt, David; Kim, Fernando J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: We established an ex vivo model to evaluate the temperature profile of the ureter during laser lithotripsy, the influence of irrigation on temperature, and thermal spread during lithotripsy with the holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser. Materials and Methods: Two ex vivo models of Ovis aries urinary tract and human calcium oxalate calculi were used. The Open Ureteral Model was opened longitudinally to measure the thermal profile of the urothelium. On the Clinical Model, anterograde ureteroscopy was performed in an intact urinary system. Temperatures were measured on the external portion of the ureter and the urothelium during lithotripsy and intentional perforation. The lithotripsy group (n=20) was divided into irrigated (n=10) and nonirrigated (n=10), which were compared for thermal spread length and values during laser activation. The intentional perforation group (n=10) was evaluated under saline flow. The Ho:YAG laser with a 365 μm laser fiber and power at 10W was used (1J/Pulse at 10 Hz). Infrared Fluke Ti55 Thermal Imager was used for evaluation. Maximum temperature values were recorded and compared. Results: On the Clinical Model, the external ureteral wall obtained a temperature of 37.4°C±2.5° and 49.5°C±2.3° (P=0.003) and in the Open Ureteral Model, 49.7°C and 112.4°C with and without irrigation, respectively (P<0.05). The thermal spread along the external ureter wall was not statically significant with or without irrigation (P=0.065). During intentional perforation, differences in temperatures were found between groups (opened with and without irrigation): 81.8°±8.8° and 145.0°±15.0°, respectively (P<0.005). Conclusion: There is an increase in the external ureteral temperature during laser activation, but ureteral thermal values decreased when saline flow was applied. Ureter thermal spread showed no difference between irrigated and nonirrigated subgroups. This is the first laser lithotripsy thermography study

  6. Retrieval of atmospheric temperature profiles by a scanning microwave spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenkranz, P. W.; Staelin, D. H.; Pettyjohn, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The Nimbus-6 satellite carries a scanning microwave spectrometer (SCAMS) experiment. The five frequency bands observed are near 22.2, 31.6, 52.8, 53.8, and 55.4 GHz. The calibration system permitted preflight calibration to an accuracy of about 1 K. In orbit, small empirical corrections were made to the calibration constants to obtain agreement in the mean of SCAMS measurements with computations based on conventional data analyzed by the National Meteorological Center (NMC). Global maps of temperature profiles were retrieved from the SCAMS measurements by a statistical method. Using the NMC analysis as the verification, RMS errors in level temperatures range of about 2-4 K, depending on altitude. Errors for layers of octave extent in pressure are uniformly about 2 K. Theoretical computations show that additional spectrometer channels would improve temperature sensing performance

  7. Exploration of ion temperature profile measurements at JET using the upgraded neutron profile monitora)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marocco, D.; Esposito, B.; Riva, M.; JET-EFDA Contributors

    2012-10-01

    The neutron profile monitor (NPM), routinely used at the Joint European Torus for neutron emissivity profile measurements, consists of two fan-shaped arrays of collimators and each line of sight (LOS) is equipped with a NE213 liquid organic scintillator for simultaneous measurements of the 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV neutrons. A digital system developed in ENEA has replaced the analog acquisition electronics and now enables the NPM to perform spatially resolved neutron spectrometry by providing neutron pulse height spectra (PHS) for each LOS. However, the NPM was not originally designed as a spectrometer and, therefore, lacks several key features, such as detailed measurements of the detector response functions and the presence of detector stability monitors. We present a proof of principle of ion temperature profile measurements derived from the NPM PHS in high plasma current discharges using simulated detector response functions.

  8. Evaluation of a low-cost and accurate ocean temperature logger on subsurface mooring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Chuan; Deng, Zhiqun; Lu, Jun; Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Ming

    2014-06-23

    Monitoring seawater temperature is important to understanding evolving ocean processes. To monitor internal waves or ocean mixing, a large number of temperature loggers are typically mounted on subsurface mooring systems to obtain high-resolution temperature data at different water depths. In this study, we redesigned and evaluated a compact, low-cost, self-contained, high-resolution and high-accuracy ocean temperature logger, TC-1121. The newly designed TC-1121 loggers are smaller, more robust, and their sampling intervals can be automatically changed by indicated events. They have been widely used in many mooring systems to study internal wave and ocean mixing. The logger’s fundamental design, noise analysis, calibration, drift test, and a long-term sea trial are discussed in this paper.

  9. L-DNA molecular beacon: a safe, stable, and accurate intracellular nano-thermometer for temperature sensing in living cells.

    PubMed

    Ke, Guoliang; Wang, Chunming; Ge, Yun; Zheng, Nanfeng; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2012-11-21

    Noninvasive and accurate measurement of intracellular temperature is of great significance in biology and medicine. This paper describes a safe, stable, and accurate intracellular nano-thermometer based on an L-DNA molecular beacon (L-MB), a dual-labeled hairpin oligonucleotide built from the optical isomer of naturally occurring d-DNA. Relying on the temperature-responsive hairpin structure and the FRET signaling mechanism of MBs, the fluorescence of L-MBs is quenched below the melting temperature and enhanced with increasing temperature. Because of the excellent reversibility and tunable response range, L-MBs are very suitable for temperature sensing. More importantly, the non-natural L-DNA backbone prevents the L-MBs from binding to cellular nucleic acids and proteins as well as from being digested by nucleases inside the cells, thus ensuring excellent stability and accuracy of the nano-thermometer in a complex cellular environment. The L-MB nano-thermometer was used for the photothermal study of Pd nanosheets in living cells, establishing the nano-thermometer as a useful tool for intracellular temperature measurement.

  10. Uniform temperature profile for a dense array CPV receiver under non uniform illumination profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera, Sara; Barrau, Jérôme; Perona, Arnaud; Dollet, Alain; Rosell, Joan I.; Fréchette, Luc

    2014-09-01

    Previous experimental and numerical studies of hybrid cooling devices for CPV receivers were developed under uniform illumination profile conditions; but literature review shows that this uniformity assumption is difficult to satisfy in real conditions. This investigation presents the design and the validation of a hybrid cooling device able to tailor its local heat extraction capacity to 2D illumination profiles in order to provide a uniform temperature profile of the PV receiver as well as a low global thermal resistance coefficient. The inputs of the design procedure are the solar concentration, the coolant flow rate and its inlet temperature. As the illumination profile is 2D dependent, a matrix of pin fins is implemented and a hybrid Jet Impingement /Matrix of Pin Fins cooling device is experimentally tested and compared to a hybrid Jet Impingement / Microchannels cooling device developed previously. The results demonstrate similar performances for both designs. Furthermore, in contrast to the cooling scheme using longitudinal fins, the distribution of the pin fins can be tailored, in two dimensions, to the local need of heat extraction capacity.

  11. Validation of the Global Land Data Assimilation System based on measurements of soil temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Li, Xiuping; Chen, Yingying; Yang, Kun; Chen, Deliang

    2016-04-01

    Soil temperature is a key parameter in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere system. It plays an important role in the land surface water and energy cycles, and has a major influence on vegetation growth and other hydrological aspects. We evaluated the accuracy of the soil temperature profiles from the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) using nine observational networks across the world and aimed to find a reliable global soil temperature profile dataset for future hydrological and ecological studies. In general, the soil temperature profile data generated by the Noah model driven by the GLDAS forcing data (GLDAS_Noah10 and GLDAS_Noah10_v2) were found to have high skills in terms of daily, monthly, and mean seasonal variations, indicated by smaller bias and root-mean-square-error (RMSE) (both < 3 °C) and correlation coefficients larger than 0.90. Conversely, the Community Land Model (CLM) results (GLDAS_CLM10) generally showed larger bias and RMSE (both > 4°C). Further analysis showed that the overestimation by GLDAS_CLM10 was mainly caused by overestimation of the ground heat flux, determined by the thermal conductivity parameterization scheme, whereas the underestimation by GLDAS_Noah10 was due to underestimation of downward longwave radiation from the forcing data. Thus, more accurate forcing data should be required for the Noah model and an improved thermal parameterization scheme should be developed for the CLM. These approaches will improve the accuracy of simulated soil temperatures. To our knowledge, it is the first study to evaluate the GLDAS soil temperatures with comprehensive in situ observations across the world, and has a potential to facilitate an overall improvement of the GLDAS products (not only soil temperatures but also the related energy and water fluxes) as well as a refinement of the land surface parameterization used in GLDAS.

  12. Synergy benefit in temperature, humiditiy and cloud property profiling by integrating ground based and satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebell, K.; Orlandi, E.; Hünerbein, A.; Crewell, S.; Löhnert, U.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate, highly vertically resolved temperature, humidity and cloud property profiles are needed for many applications. They are essential for climate monitoring, a better process understanding and the subsequent improvement of parameterizations in numerical weather prediction and climate models. In order to provide such profiles with a high temporal resolution, multiple wavelength active and passive remote sensing techniques available at ground based observatories, e.g. the Atmospheric Radiation Measruement (ARM) Program and Cloudnet facilities, need to be exploited. In particular, the Integrated Profiling Technique (IPT, Löhnert et al., 2008) has been successfully applied to simultaneously derive profiles of temperature, humidity and liquid water by a Bayesian based retrieval using a combination of ground based microwave radiometer, cloud radar and a priori information. Within the project ICOS (Integrating Cloud Observations from Ground and Space - a Way to Combine Time and Space Information), we develop a flexible IPT, which allows for the combination of a variety of ground based measurements from cloud radar, microwave radiometer (MWR) and IR spectrometer as well as satellite based information from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) onboard of METEOSAT. As ground based observations are mainly sensitive to the lower parts of the troposphere, the satellite measurements provide complementary information and are thus expected to improve the estimates of the thermodynamic and cloud property profiles, i. e. hydrometeor content and effective radius, considerably. In addition to the SEVIRI IR measurements, which are provided with a high repetition time, information from polar orbiting satellites could be included. In paticular, the potential of the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) and Microwave Sounding Unit (MHS) in the retrieval is investigated. In order to understand the improvement by integrating the measurements of the above

  13. Temperature profile retrievals with extended Kalman-Bucy filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledsham, W. H.; Staelin, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    The Extended Kalman-Bucy Filter is a powerful technique for estimating non-stationary random parameters in situations where the received signal is a noisy non-linear function of those parameters. A practical causal filter for retrieving atmospheric temperature profiles from radiances observed at a single scan angle by the Scanning Microwave Spectrometer (SCAMS) carried on the Nimbus 6 satellite typically shows approximately a 10-30% reduction in rms error about the mean at almost all levels below 70 mb when compared with a regression inversion.

  14. Adaptive temperature profile control of a multizone crystal growth furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batur, C.; Sharpless, R. B.; Duval, W. M. B.; Rosenthal, B. N.

    1991-01-01

    An intelligent measurement system is described which is used to assess the shape of a crystal while it is growing inside a multizone transparent furnace. A color video imaging system observes the crystal in real time, and determines the position and the shape of the interface. This information is used to evaluate the crystal growth rate, and to analyze the effects of translational velocity and temperature profiles on the shape of the interface. Creation of this knowledge base is the first step to incorporate image processing into furnace control.

  15. Temperature, Density, and Heating Profiles of Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plowman, Joseph; Martens, P. C.; Kankelborg, C.; Ritchie, M.; Scott, J.; Sharma, R.

    2013-07-01

    We show detailed results of a combined DEM and density-sensitive line ratio analysis of coronal loops observed simultaneously by EIS and AIA. The temperature and density profiles of the loop are compared to and isolated from those of the surrounding material, and these properties are fit to an analytic strand heating model developed by Martens (2010). This research builds on our previously reported work by analyzing a number of coronal loops (including one observed by the Hi-C rocket), improved background subtraction and loop fitting. These improvements allow us to place significant constraints on the heating distribution of coronal loops.

  16. Atmospheric Temperature Profile Measurements Using Mobile High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razenkov, Ilya I.; Eloranta, Edwin W.

    2016-06-01

    The High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) designed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison discriminates between Mie and Rayleigh backscattering [1]. It exploits the Doppler effect caused by thermal motion of molecules, which broadens the spectrum of the transmitted laser light. That allows for absolute calibration of the lidar and measurements of the aerosol volume backscatter coefficient. Two iodine absorption filters with different absorption line widths (a regular iodine vapor filter and Argon buffered iodine filter) allow for atmospheric temperature profile measurements. The sensitivity of the measured signal-to-air temperature ratio is around 0.14%/K. The instrument uses a shared telescope transmitter-receiver design and operates in eyesafe mode (the product of laser average power and telescope aperture equals 0.1 Wm2 at 532 nm).

  17. Accurate sampling of PCDD/F in high temperature flue-gas using cooled sampling probes.

    PubMed

    Phan, Duong Ngoc Chau; Weidemann, Eva; Lundin, Lisa; Marklund, Stellan; Jansson, Stina

    2012-08-01

    In a laboratory-scale combustion reactor, flue-gas samples were collected at two temperatures in the post-combustion zone, 700°C and 400°C, using two different water-cooled sampling probes. The probes were the cooled probe described in the European Standard method EN-1948:1, referred to as the original probe, and a modified probe that contained a salt/ice mixture to assist the cooling, referred to as the sub-zero probe. To determine the efficiency of the cooling probes, internal temperature measurements were recorded at 5cm intervals inside the probes. Flue-gas samples were analyzed for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). Samples collected at 700°C using the original cooling probe showed higher concentrations of PCDD/Fs compared to samples collected using the sub-zero probe. No significant differences were observed between samples collected at 400°C. The results indicated that artifact formation of PCDD/Fs readily occurs during flue-gas sampling at high temperatures if the cooling within the probe is insufficient, as found for the original probe at 700°C. It was also shown that this problem could be alleviated by using probes with an enhanced cooling capacity, such as the sub-zero probe. Although this may not affect samples collected for regulatory purposes in exit gases, it is of great importance for research conducted in the high-temperature region of the post-combustion zone.

  18. Microwave Temperature Profiler Mounted in a Standard Airborne Research Canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, Michael J.; Denning, Richard F.; Fox, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Many atmospheric research aircraft use a standard canister design to mount instruments, as this significantly facilitates their electrical and mechanical integration and thereby reduces cost. Based on more than 30 years of airborne science experience with the Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP), the MTP has been repackaged with state-of-the-art electronics and other design improvements to fly in one of these standard canisters. All of the controlling electronics are integrated on a single 4 5-in. (.10 13- cm) multi-layer PCB (printed circuit board) with surface-mount hardware. Improved circuit design, including a self-calibrating RTD (resistive temperature detector) multiplexer, was implemented in order to reduce the size and mass of the electronics while providing increased capability. A new microcontroller-based temperature controller board was designed, providing better control with fewer components. Five such boards are used to provide local control of the temperature in various areas of the instrument, improving radiometric performance. The new stepper motor has an embedded controller eliminating the need for a separate controller board. The reference target is heated to avoid possible emissivity (and hence calibration) changes due to moisture contamination in humid environments, as well as avoiding issues with ambient targets during ascent and descent. The radiometer is a double-sideband heterodyne receiver tuned sequentially to individual oxygen emission lines near 60 GHz, with the line selection and intermediate frequency bandwidths chosen to accommodate the altitude range of the aircraft and mission.

  19. Profiles of electron temperature and Bz along Earth's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Petrukovich, A. A.; Nakamura, R.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2013-06-01

    We study the electron temperature distribution and the structure of the current sheet along the magnetotail using simultaneous observations from THEMIS spacecraft. We perform a statistical study of 40 crossings of the current sheet when the three spacecraft THB, THC, and THD were distributed along the tail in the vicinity of midnight with coordinates XB \\in [-30 RE, -20 RE], XC \\in [-20 RE, -15 RE], and XD ~ -10 RE. We obtain profiles of the average electron temperature \\mlab Te\\mrab and the average magnetic field \\mlab Bz\\mrab along the tail. Electron temperature and \\mlab Bz\\mrab increase towards the Earth with almost the same rates (i.e., ratio \\mlab Te\\mrab/\\mlab Bz\\mrab ≈ 2 keV/7 nT is approximately constant along the tail). We also use statistics of 102 crossings of the current sheet from THB and THC to estimate dependence of Te and Bz distributions on geomagnetic activity. The ratio \\mlab Te \\mrab/\\mlab Bz\\mrab depends on geomagnetic activity only slightly. Additionally we demonstrate that anisotropy of the electron temperature \\mlab T∥/T⊥\\mrab ≈ 1.1 is almost constant along the tail for X \\in [-30 RE, -10 RE].

  20. Thermal diffusivity of seasonal snow determined from temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldroyd, H. J.; Higgins, C. W.; Huwald, H.; Selker, J. S.; Parlange, M. B.

    2013-05-01

    Thermal diffusivity of snow is an important thermodynamic property associated with key hydrological phenomena such as snow melt and heat and water vapor exchange with the atmosphere. Direct determination of snow thermal diffusivity requires coupled point measurements of thermal conductivity and density, which continually change due to snow metamorphism. Traditional methods for determining these two quantities are generally limited by temporal resolution. In this study we present a method to determine the thermal diffusivity of snow with high temporal resolution using snow temperature profile measurements. High resolution (between 2.5 and 10 cm at 1 min) temperature measurements from the seasonal snow pack at the Plaine-Morte glacier in Switzerland are used as initial conditions and Neumann (heat flux) boundary conditions to numerically solve the one-dimensional heat equation and iteratively optimize for thermal diffusivity. The implementation of Neumann boundary conditions and a t-test, ensuring statistical significance between solutions of varied thermal diffusivity, are important to help constrain thermal diffusivity such that spurious high and low values as seen with Dirichlet (temperature) boundary conditions are reduced. The results show that time resolved thermal diffusivity can be determined from temperature measurements of seasonal snow and support density-based empirical parameterizations for thermal conductivity.

  1. How accurately do we know the temperature of the surface of the earth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    2016-04-01

    The earth's surface temperature is important in a variety of applications including global warming. We analyze six monthly series from 1880 - 2012, each produced with different methodologies with uncertainties (errors) estimated using various statistical assumptions and models. In the first part of this presentation, we estimate the error in a new way, by systematically determining how close the different series are to each other, the error at a given time scale is quantified by the root mean square fluctuation in the difference between the series as well as the difference between individual series and the average of all the available series. By examining the differences systematically from months to over a century, we find that the standard short range correlation assumption is untenable, that the differences in the series have long range statistical dependencies and that the error is roughly constant between one month and one century - varying only slightly between ±0.03 and ±0.05oC. In the second part of the presentation, we make a stochastic model of both the earth temperature and a model of how the error varies with time scale. The temperature model combines a fractional Gaussian noise (fGn) for the natural variability with a superposed linear model of the anthropogenic warming. The fGn has long range statistical dependencies with fluctuation exponent H = -0.1. The error model has three components: a white noise measurement error, a missing data bias and an areal reduction factor (bias). Whereas the white noise error has only short term correlations, the second - due differing amounts of missing data - is a random process of the same statistical type as the temperature (fGn) but with an amplitude that depends on the amount of data missing from each set. The third correction is an "areal reduction factor" that takes into account the fact that the space-time resolution of the data (here monthly, at 5ox5o) is not quite correct. We use the six global series to

  2. Liquid-crystal-modulated correlated color temperature tunable light-emitting diode with highly accurate regulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiu-Chang; Kuo, Yu-Yi; Chen, Szu-Hua; Chen, Wei-Ting; Chao, Chih-Yu

    2015-02-01

    A precise correlated color temperature (CCT) tuning method for light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has been developed and is demonstrated in this article. By combining LEDs and a liquid crystal (LC) cell, a light source with continuous CCT variation along a straight track on the chromaticity diagram is achieved. Moreover, the manner of CCT variation can be modulated by choosing appropriate LEDs and phosphors to yield a variation going from 3800 K to 6100 K with the track near the black-body locus. By adapting various developed LC technologies for diverse demands, the performance and applications of LEDs can be greatly improved.

  3. Photo-detachment signal analysis to accurately determine electronegativity, electron temperature, and charged species density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudini, N.; Sirse, N.; Taccogna, F.; Ellingboe, A. R.; Bendib, A.

    2016-09-01

    Laser pulse induced photo-detachment combined with Langmuir probing has been introduced to diagnose plasma electronegativity. This technique uses a laser pulse to convert negative ions into electron-atom pairs and tracks the change of electron saturation current by a Langmuir probe. The existing model determines plasma electronegativity as the ratio of electron saturation current before and after detachment. However, this model depends on various assumptions and neglects the formation of a potential barrier between the laser channel and surrounding electronegative plasma. In this letter, we present a new analytical model to analyze photo-detachment signals in order to improve the accuracy of electronegativity measurements and extend this technique for measuring electron temperature and charged species density. This analytical model is supported by Particle-In-Cell simulation of electronegative plasma dynamics following laser photo-detachment. The analysis of the signal, detected on a simulated probe, shows that the present analytical model determines electronegativity, electron temperature, and plasma density with a relative error of ˜20%, ˜20%, and ˜50%, respectively, whereas the electronegativity obtained from a previous model is underestimated by an order of magnitude.

  4. Temperature Profile Measurements During Heat Treatment of BSCCO 2212 Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Tollestrup, Alvin; /Fermilab

    2011-04-14

    The temperature profile of two different BSCCO 2212 coils has been analyzed. The profiles are obtained from thermocouples imbedded in the windings during the heat treatment that activates the 2212. The melting and freezing of the 2212 is clearly observed. A model that describes the data and can be used to guide the processing of new coils has been developed. We have obtained the thermal history of two BSCCO coils, one from NHMFL (1) that had 10 layers of 1 mm diameter wire with 0.15 mm insulation and a second coil from OST that had 24 layers with similar insulation and conductor size. Both coils had thermocouples imbedded in the windings and excellent recordings of the temperature over the whole reaction cycle were available for analysis. There are several features that we will address in this note. Measurements have shown that the I{sub c} of the conductor is a sensitive function of its thermal history. This brings up the question of the absolute accuracy of the thermometry in the range around 882 C, the MP of 2212. The reference for the treatment profile is really related to this MP and to small deviations around it. Since the heat of fusion of 2212 is rather large, it generates a clear signal during the melting and cooling transition that automatically generates the relative temperature markers. The physics is the same as the way ice in water maintains an isothermal environment until it is all melted. A related question is the thermal response time of the coil package. The temperature cycles that are being used to optimize strand and small coils can have rapid changes easily implemented whereas a large coil may have such a large thermal time constant that the optimum cycle may not be attainable. A simple analytical model that works well for small solenoids has been developed and an ANSYS (5) program that works for larger coils with more complicated geometry has been set up but will not be discussed in this note.

  5. Communication: Accurate hydration free energies at a wide range of temperatures from 3D-RISM.

    PubMed

    Misin, Maksim; Fedorov, Maxim V; Palmer, David S

    2015-03-01

    We present a new model for computing hydration free energies by 3D reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) that uses an appropriate initial state of the system (as suggested by Sergiievskyi et al.). The new adjustment to 3D-RISM theory significantly improves hydration free energy predictions for various classes of organic molecules at both ambient and non-ambient temperatures. An extensive benchmarking against experimental data shows that the accuracy of the model is comparable to (much more computationally expensive) molecular dynamics simulations. The calculations can be readily performed with a standard 3D-RISM algorithm. In our work, we used an open source package AmberTools; a script to automate the whole procedure is available on the web (https://github.com/MTS-Strathclyde/ISc). PMID:25747054

  6. Repeat temperature measurements in borehole GC-1, northwestern Utah - Towards isolating a climate-change signal in borehole temperature profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, D.S.; Harris, R.N. )

    1993-09-01

    Temperature-depth profiles in borehole GC-1, northwestern Utah, were measured in 1978, 1990, and 1992. Borehole temperatures below 80 m depth are highly reproducible over the 14 year period indicating long term thermal stability. A slowly changing temperature field above 80 m depth has similiar characteristics to synthetic temperature profiles computed from a 100 year record of air temperature changes at Park Valley weather station 50 km northeast of the borehole site. 6 refs.

  7. Temperature profiles of different cooling methods in porcine pancreas procurement.

    PubMed

    Weegman, Bradley P; Suszynski, Thomas M; Scott, William E; Ferrer Fábrega, Joana; Avgoustiniatos, Efstathios S; Anazawa, Takayuki; O'Brien, Timothy D; Rizzari, Michael D; Karatzas, Theodore; Jie, Tun; Sutherland, David E R; Hering, Bernhard J; Papas, Klearchos K

    2014-01-01

    Porcine islet xenotransplantation is a promising alternative to human islet allotransplantation. Porcine pancreas cooling needs to be optimized to reduce the warm ischemia time (WIT) following donation after cardiac death, which is associated with poorer islet isolation outcomes. This study examines the effect of four different cooling Methods on core porcine pancreas temperature (n = 24) and histopathology (n = 16). All Methods involved surface cooling with crushed ice and chilled irrigation. Method A, which is the standard for porcine pancreas procurement, used only surface cooling. Method B involved an intravascular flush with cold solution through the pancreas arterial system. Method C involved an intraductal infusion with cold solution through the major pancreatic duct, and Method D combined all three cooling Methods. Surface cooling alone (Method A) gradually decreased core pancreas temperature to <10 °C after 30 min. Using an intravascular flush (Method B) improved cooling during the entire duration of procurement, but incorporating an intraductal infusion (Method C) rapidly reduced core temperature 15-20 °C within the first 2 min of cooling. Combining all methods (Method D) was the most effective at rapidly reducing temperature and providing sustained cooling throughout the duration of procurement, although the recorded WIT was not different between Methods (P = 0.36). Histological scores were different between the cooling Methods (P = 0.02) and the worst with Method A. There were differences in histological scores between Methods A and C (P = 0.02) and Methods A and D (P = 0.02), but not between Methods C and D (P = 0.95), which may highlight the importance of early cooling using an intraductal infusion. In conclusion, surface cooling alone cannot rapidly cool large (porcine or human) pancreata. Additional cooling with an intravascular flush and intraductal infusion results in improved core porcine pancreas temperature profiles during procurement and

  8. Accurate and efficient integration for molecular dynamics simulations at constant temperature and pressure.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Ross A; Predescu, Cristian; Ierardi, Douglas J; Mackenzie, Kenneth M; Eastwood, Michael P; Dror, Ron O; Shaw, David E

    2013-10-28

    In molecular dynamics simulations, control over temperature and pressure is typically achieved by augmenting the original system with additional dynamical variables to create a thermostat and a barostat, respectively. These variables generally evolve on timescales much longer than those of particle motion, but typical integrator implementations update the additional variables along with the particle positions and momenta at each time step. We present a framework that replaces the traditional integration procedure with separate barostat, thermostat, and Newtonian particle motion updates, allowing thermostat and barostat updates to be applied infrequently. Such infrequent updates provide a particularly substantial performance advantage for simulations parallelized across many computer processors, because thermostat and barostat updates typically require communication among all processors. Infrequent updates can also improve accuracy by alleviating certain sources of error associated with limited-precision arithmetic. In addition, separating the barostat, thermostat, and particle motion update steps reduces certain truncation errors, bringing the time-average pressure closer to its target value. Finally, this framework, which we have implemented on both general-purpose and special-purpose hardware, reduces software complexity and improves software modularity.

  9. Comparison of climate model simulated and observed borehole temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Rouco, J. F.; Stevens, M. B.; Beltrami, H.; Goosse, H.; Rath, V.; Zorita, E.; Smerdon, J.

    2009-04-01

    Advances in understanding climate variability through the last millennium lean on simulation and reconstruction efforts. Progress in the integration of both approaches can potentially provide new means of assessing confidence on model projections of future climate change, of constraining the range of climate sensitivity and/or attributing past changes found in proxy evidence to external forcing. This work addresses specifically possible strategies for comparison of paleoclimate model simulations and the information recorded in borehole temperature profiles (BTPs). First efforts have allowed to design means of comparison of model simulated and observed BTPs in the context of the climate of the last millennium. This can be done by diffusing the simulated temperatures into the ground in order to produce synthetic BTPs that can be in turn assigned to collocated, real BTPs. Results suggest that there is sensitivity of borehole temperatures at large and regional scales to changes in external forcing over the last centuries. The comparison between borehole climate reconstructions and model simulations may also be subjected to non negligible uncertainties produced by the influence of past glacial and Holocene changes. While the thermal climate influence of the last deglaciation can be found well below 1000 m depth, such type of changes can potentially exert an influence on our understanding of subsurface climate in the top ca. 500 m. This issue is illustrated in control and externally forced climate simulations of the last millennium with the ECHO-G and LOVECLIM models, respectively.

  10. Intercomparison of stratospheric ozone and temperature profiles during the October 2005 Hohenpeissenberg Ozone Profiling Experiment (HOPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbrecht, W.; McGee, T. J.; Twigg, L. W.; Claude, H.; Schönenborn, F.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Silbert, D.

    2009-01-01

    Thirteen clear nights in October 2005 allowed successful intercomparison of the stationary lidar operated since 1987 by the German Weather Service (DWD) at Hohenpeissenberg (47.8° N, 11.0° E) with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) travelling standard lidar operated by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Both lidars provide ozone profiles in the stratosphere, and temperature profiles in the strato- and mesosphere. Additional ozone profiles came from on-site Brewer/Mast ozonesondes, additional temperature profiles from Vaisala RS92 radiosondes launched at Munich (65 km north-east), and from operational analyses by the US National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The intercomparison confirmed a low bias for ozone from the DWD lidar in the 33 to 43 km region, by up to 10%. This bias is caused by the DWD ozone algorithm. It will be removed in a future version. Between 20 and 33 km, agreement between both lidars, and ozonesondes below 30 km, is good with ozone differences less than 3 to 5%. Results are consistent with previous comparisons of the DWD lidar with SAGE, GOMOS and other satellite instruments. The intercomparison did uncover a 290 m upward shift of the DWD lidar data. When this shift is removed, agreement with ozone from the NASA lidar improves below 20 km, with remaining differences usually less than 5%, and not statistically significant. Precision (repeatability) for the lidar ozone data is better than 5% between 20 and 40 km altitude, dropping to 10% near 45 km, and 50% near 50 km. Temperature from the DWD lidar has a 1 to 2 K cold bias from 30 to 65 km against the NASA lidar, and a 2 to 4 K cold bias against radiosondes and NCEP. This is consistent with previous intercomparisons against NCEP or radiosondes. The cold bias against the NASA lidar disappears when the DWD lidar data are corrected for the afore-mentioned 290 m range error, and more appropriate values for the Earth's gravity acceleration are

  11. Species and temperature profiles in ignition and deflagration of HMX

    SciTech Connect

    Parr, T.; Hanson-Parr, D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on progress made in a program investigating the chemistry and kinetics of the ignition and combustion of solid propellants and their ingredients. Experiments were performed using imaging Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) to measure species and temperture profiles during CO/sub 2/ laser ignition and steady state deflagration of HMX. All experiments were done at one atmosphere. Time resolved PLIF images were obtained for NO/sub 2/, NO, CN, NH, H/sub 2/CO, OH, and OH rotational temperatures during ignition and deflagration of HMX. CN and NH form at reasonably large heights off the sample surface in gas phase ignition kernels at finite delays, and reform into relatively thin flame sheets which snap back towards the sample surface. NO/sub 2/ and NO are initial products during laser ignition, beginning to form at minimum delay times and producing tall plumes until ignition occurs in the gas phase. The NO/sub 2/ and NO PLIF signals are then confined to an expanding spherical shell plus a steady state solid core between the sample surface and the CN or NH flame sheet. Thus it appears that NO/sub 2/ and NO are early decomposition products which are consumed in a flame separated significantly from the surface. The CN and NH are produced in this flame as transient radicals. OH is produced at the same delay as CN and NH but extends very far beyond the thin CNNH flame front. OH rotational temperature profiles rise sharply at the CNNH flame sheet and level off at about 2772 degrees K beyond it. Evidence is given that the flames are two phase even for neat HMX. Little or no evidence for H/sub 2/CO was seen during ignition of HMX. Although large concentrations are seen during ignition of a nitramine composite propellant, this signal appears to be due to formaldehyde from decomposition of the PEG binder.

  12. Velocity and temperature profiles in near-critical nitrogen flowing past a horizontal flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoneau, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Boundary layer velocity and temperature profiles were measured for nitrogen near its thermodynamic critical point flowing past a horizontal flat plate. The results were compared measurements made for vertically upward flow. The boundary layer temperatures ranged from below to above the thermodynamic critical temperature. For wall temperatures below the thermodynamic critical temperature there was little variation between the velocity and temperature profiles in three orientations. In all three orientations the point of crossing into the critical temperature region is marked by a significant flattening of the velocity and temperature profiles and also a decrease in heat transfer coefficient.

  13. A Simple Dewar/Cryostat for Thermally Equilibrating Samples at Known Temperatures for Accurate Cryogenic Luminescence Measurements.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Phoebe G; Jagow, Devin M; Portune, Cameron M; Kenney, John W

    2016-01-01

    The design and operation of a simple liquid nitrogen Dewar/cryostat apparatus based upon a small fused silica optical Dewar, a thermocouple assembly, and a CCD spectrograph are described. The experiments for which this Dewar/cryostat is designed require fast sample loading, fast sample freezing, fast alignment of the sample, accurate and stable sample temperatures, and small size and portability of the Dewar/cryostat cryogenic unit. When coupled with the fast data acquisition rates of the CCD spectrograph, this Dewar/cryostat is capable of supporting cryogenic luminescence spectroscopic measurements on luminescent samples at a series of known, stable temperatures in the 77-300 K range. A temperature-dependent study of the oxygen quenching of luminescence in a rhodium(III) transition metal complex is presented as an example of the type of investigation possible with this Dewar/cryostat. In the context of this apparatus, a stable temperature for cryogenic spectroscopy means a luminescent sample that is thermally equilibrated with either liquid nitrogen or gaseous nitrogen at a known measureable temperature that does not vary (ΔT < 0.1 K) during the short time scale (~1-10 sec) of the spectroscopic measurement by the CCD. The Dewar/cryostat works by taking advantage of the positive thermal gradient dT/dh that develops above liquid nitrogen level in the Dewar where h is the height of the sample above the liquid nitrogen level. The slow evaporation of the liquid nitrogen results in a slow increase in h over several hours and a consequent slow increase in the sample temperature T over this time period. A quickly acquired luminescence spectrum effectively catches the sample at a constant, thermally equilibrated temperature. PMID:27501355

  14. Thermal conductivity and temperature profiles in carbon electrodes for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burheim, Odne S.; Aslan, Mesut; Atchison, Jennifer S.; Presser, Volker

    2014-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of supercapacitor film electrodes composed of activated carbon (AC), AC with 15 mass% multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), AC with 15 mass% onion-like carbon (OLC), and only OLC, all mixed with polymer binder (polytetrafluoroethylene), has been measured. This was done for dry electrodes and after the electrodes have been saturated with an organic electrolyte (1 M tetraethylammonium-tetrafluoroborate in acetonitrile, TEA-BF4). The thermal conductivity data was implemented in a simple model of generation and transport of heat in a cylindrical cell supercapacitor systems. Dry electrodes showed a thermal conductivity in the range of 0.09-0.19 W K-1 m-1 and the electrodes soaked with an organic electrolyte yielded values for the thermal conductivity between 0.42 and 0.47 W K-1 m-1. It was seen that the values related strongly to the porosity of the carbon electrode materials. Modeling of the internal temperature profiles of a supercapacitor under conditions corresponding to extreme cycling demonstrated that only a moderate temperature gradient of several degrees Celsius can be expected and which depends on the ohmic resistance of the cell as well as the wetting of the electrode materials.

  15. Impacts of snow and organic soils parameterization on northern Eurasian soil temperature profiles simulated by the ISBA land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decharme, Bertrand; Brun, Eric; Boone, Aaron; Delire, Christine; Le Moigne, Patrick; Morin, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    In this study we analyzed how an improved representation of snowpack processes and soil properties in the multilayer snow and soil schemes of the Interaction Soil-Biosphere-Atmosphere (ISBA) land surface model impacts the simulation of soil temperature profiles over northern Eurasian regions. For this purpose, we refine ISBA's snow layering algorithm and propose a parameterization of snow albedo and snow compaction/densification adapted from the detailed Crocus snowpack model. We also include a dependency on soil organic carbon content for ISBA's hydraulic and thermal soil properties. First, changes in the snowpack parameterization are evaluated against snow depth, snow water equivalent, surface albedo, and soil temperature at a 10 cm depth observed at the Col de Porte field site in the French Alps. Next, the new model version including all of the changes is used over northern Eurasia to evaluate the model's ability to simulate the snow depth, the soil temperature profile, and the permafrost characteristics. The results confirm that an adequate simulation of snow layering and snow compaction/densification significantly impacts the snowpack characteristics and the soil temperature profile during winter, while the impact of the more accurate snow albedo computation is dominant during the spring. In summer, the accounting for the effect of soil organic carbon on hydraulic and thermal soil properties improves the simulation of the soil temperature profile. Finally, the results confirm that this last process strongly influences the simulation of the permafrost active layer thickness and its spatial distribution.

  16. Optimization of tissue physical parameters for accurate temperature estimation from finite-element simulation of radiofrequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Swetha; Mast, T. Douglas

    2015-09-01

    Computational finite element models are commonly used for the simulation of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatments. However, the accuracy of these simulations is limited by the lack of precise knowledge of tissue parameters. In this technical note, an inverse solver based on the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is proposed to optimize values for specific heat, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity resulting in accurately simulated temperature elevations. A total of 15 RFA treatments were performed on ex vivo bovine liver tissue. For each RFA treatment, 15 finite-element simulations were performed using a set of deterministically chosen tissue parameters to estimate the mean and variance of the resulting tissue ablation. The UKF was implemented as an inverse solver to recover the specific heat, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity corresponding to the measured area of the ablated tissue region, as determined from gross tissue histology. These tissue parameters were then employed in the finite element model to simulate the position- and time-dependent tissue temperature. Results show good agreement between simulated and measured temperature.

  17. Optimization of tissue physical parameters for accurate temperature estimation from finite-element simulation of radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Swetha; Mast, T Douglas

    2015-10-01

    Computational finite element models are commonly used for the simulation of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatments. However, the accuracy of these simulations is limited by the lack of precise knowledge of tissue parameters. In this technical note, an inverse solver based on the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is proposed to optimize values for specific heat, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity resulting in accurately simulated temperature elevations. A total of 15 RFA treatments were performed on ex vivo bovine liver tissue. For each RFA treatment, 15 finite-element simulations were performed using a set of deterministically chosen tissue parameters to estimate the mean and variance of the resulting tissue ablation. The UKF was implemented as an inverse solver to recover the specific heat, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity corresponding to the measured area of the ablated tissue region, as determined from gross tissue histology. These tissue parameters were then employed in the finite element model to simulate the position- and time-dependent tissue temperature. Results show good agreement between simulated and measured temperature. PMID:26352462

  18. Critical body temperature profile as indicator of heat stress vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Nag, P K; Dutta, Priya; Nag, Anjali

    2013-01-01

    Extreme climatic heat is a major health concern among workers in different occupational pursuits. People in the regions of western India confront frequent heat emergencies, with great risk of mortality and morbidity. Taking account of informal occupational groups (foundry and sheet metal, FSM, N=587; ceramic and pottery, CP, N=426; stone quarry, SQ, N=934) in different seasons, the study examined the body temperature profiling as indicator of vulnerability to environmental warmth. About 3/4th of 1947 workers had habitual exposure at 30.1-35.5°C WBGT and ~10% of them were exposed to 38.2-41.6°C WBGT. The responses of FSM, CP and SQ workers indicated prevailing high heat load during summer and post-monsoon months. Local skin temperatures (T(sk)) varied significantly in different seasons, with consistently high level in summer, followed by post-monsoon and winter months. The mean difference of T(cr) and T(sk) was ~5.2°C up to 26.7°C WBGT, and ~2.5°C beyond 30°C WBGT. Nearly 90% of the workers had T(cr) within 38°C, suggesting their self-adjustment strategy in pacing work and regulating T(cr). In extreme heat, the limit of peripheral adjustability (35-36°C T(sk)) and the narrowing down of the difference between T(cr) and T(sk) might indicate the limit of one's ability to withstand heat exposure. PMID:23411761

  19. Accurate small and wide angle x-ray scattering profiles from atomic models of proteins and nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Hung T.; Pabit, Suzette A.; Meisburger, Steve P.; Pollack, Lois; Case, David A.

    2014-12-14

    A new method is introduced to compute X-ray solution scattering profiles from atomic models of macromolecules. The three-dimensional version of the Reference Interaction Site Model (RISM) from liquid-state statistical mechanics is employed to compute the solvent distribution around the solute, including both water and ions. X-ray scattering profiles are computed from this distribution together with the solute geometry. We describe an efficient procedure for performing this calculation employing a Lebedev grid for the angular averaging. The intensity profiles (which involve no adjustable parameters) match experiment and molecular dynamics simulations up to wide angle for two proteins (lysozyme and myoglobin) in water, as well as the small-angle profiles for a dozen biomolecules taken from the BioIsis.net database. The RISM model is especially well-suited for studies of nucleic acids in salt solution. Use of fiber-diffraction models for the structure of duplex DNA in solution yields close agreement with the observed scattering profiles in both the small and wide angle scattering (SAXS and WAXS) regimes. In addition, computed profiles of anomalous SAXS signals (for Rb{sup +} and Sr{sup 2+}) emphasize the ionic contribution to scattering and are in reasonable agreement with experiment. In cases where an absolute calibration of the experimental data at q = 0 is available, one can extract a count of the excess number of waters and ions; computed values depend on the closure that is assumed in the solution of the Ornstein–Zernike equations, with results from the Kovalenko–Hirata closure being closest to experiment for the cases studied here.

  20. Accurate small and wide angle x-ray scattering profiles from atomic models of proteins and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hung T; Pabit, Suzette A; Meisburger, Steve P; Pollack, Lois; Case, David A

    2014-12-14

    A new method is introduced to compute X-ray solution scattering profiles from atomic models of macromolecules. The three-dimensional version of the Reference Interaction Site Model (RISM) from liquid-state statistical mechanics is employed to compute the solvent distribution around the solute, including both water and ions. X-ray scattering profiles are computed from this distribution together with the solute geometry. We describe an efficient procedure for performing this calculation employing a Lebedev grid for the angular averaging. The intensity profiles (which involve no adjustable parameters) match experiment and molecular dynamics simulations up to wide angle for two proteins (lysozyme and myoglobin) in water, as well as the small-angle profiles for a dozen biomolecules taken from the BioIsis.net database. The RISM model is especially well-suited for studies of nucleic acids in salt solution. Use of fiber-diffraction models for the structure of duplex DNA in solution yields close agreement with the observed scattering profiles in both the small and wide angle scattering (SAXS and WAXS) regimes. In addition, computed profiles of anomalous SAXS signals (for Rb(+) and Sr(2+)) emphasize the ionic contribution to scattering and are in reasonable agreement with experiment. In cases where an absolute calibration of the experimental data at q = 0 is available, one can extract a count of the excess number of waters and ions; computed values depend on the closure that is assumed in the solution of the Ornstein-Zernike equations, with results from the Kovalenko-Hirata closure being closest to experiment for the cases studied here.

  1. Accurate small and wide angle x-ray scattering profiles from atomic models of proteins and nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hung T.; Pabit, Suzette A.; Meisburger, Steve P.; Pollack, Lois; Case, David A.

    2014-12-01

    A new method is introduced to compute X-ray solution scattering profiles from atomic models of macromolecules. The three-dimensional version of the Reference Interaction Site Model (RISM) from liquid-state statistical mechanics is employed to compute the solvent distribution around the solute, including both water and ions. X-ray scattering profiles are computed from this distribution together with the solute geometry. We describe an efficient procedure for performing this calculation employing a Lebedev grid for the angular averaging. The intensity profiles (which involve no adjustable parameters) match experiment and molecular dynamics simulations up to wide angle for two proteins (lysozyme and myoglobin) in water, as well as the small-angle profiles for a dozen biomolecules taken from the BioIsis.net database. The RISM model is especially well-suited for studies of nucleic acids in salt solution. Use of fiber-diffraction models for the structure of duplex DNA in solution yields close agreement with the observed scattering profiles in both the small and wide angle scattering (SAXS and WAXS) regimes. In addition, computed profiles of anomalous SAXS signals (for Rb+ and Sr2+) emphasize the ionic contribution to scattering and are in reasonable agreement with experiment. In cases where an absolute calibration of the experimental data at q = 0 is available, one can extract a count of the excess number of waters and ions; computed values depend on the closure that is assumed in the solution of the Ornstein-Zernike equations, with results from the Kovalenko-Hirata closure being closest to experiment for the cases studied here.

  2. Accurate determination of the temperature dependent thermalization coefficient (Q) in InAs/AlAsSb quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaielpour, Hamidreza; Tang, Jinfeng; Whiteside, Vincent R.; Vijeyaragunathan, Sangeetha; Mishima, Tetsuya D.; Santos, Michael B.; Sellers, Ian R.

    2015-03-01

    We present an investigation of hot carriers in InAs/AlAsSb quantum wells as a practical candidate for a hot carrier solar cell absorber. The thermalization coefficient (Q) of the sample is investigated using continuous wave photoluminescence (PL). The Q is accurately determined through transfer matrix calculations of the absorption, analysis of the power density, penetration depth, diffusion, and recombination rates using a combination of simulation and empirical methods. A precise measurement of laser spot size is important in order to determine the absorbed power density. Simulations were performed based on our PL geometry in order to calculate the excitation spot size, which was compared with experiment by measurements using variable diameter pinholes to determine beam radius. Here, these techniques are described, in addition to, the temperature dependent hot carrier dynamics and phonon mediated thermalization coefficient for the InAs/AlAsSb quantum well structure.

  3. Accurate Lineshapes from Sub-1 cm-1 Resolution Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of α-Pinene at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Mifflin, Amanda L.; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Ho, Junming; Psciuk, Brian; Negre, Christian; Ebben, Carlena J.; Upshur, Mary Alice; Lu, Zhou; Strick, Benjamin; Thomson, Regan; Batista, Victor; Wang, Hongfei; Geiger, Franz M.

    2015-02-26

    Room temperature sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation (HR-BB-SFG) spectra of the common terpene (+)-α-pinene reveal ten peaks in the C–H stretching region. The spectral resolution exceeds that of Fourier transform infrared, femtosecond stimulated Raman, and traditional BB-SFG and scanning SFG spectroscopy of the same molecule. Experiment and simulation show the spectral lineshapes to be accurate. Homogeneous vibrational decoherence lifetimes of up to 1.7 psec are assigned to specific oscillators and compare favorably to lifetimes computed from density functional tight binding molecular dynamics calculations, while phase-resolved spectra yield orientation information for them. We propose the new spectroscopy as an attractive alternative to time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy or heterodyne-detection schemes for studying vibrational energy relaxation and vibrational coherences in molecules.

  4. The average size and temperature profile of quasar accretion disks

    SciTech Connect

    Jiménez-Vicente, J.; Mediavilla, E.; Muñoz, J. A.; Motta, V.; Falco, E.

    2014-03-01

    We use multi-wavelength microlensing measurements of a sample of 10 image pairs from 8 lensed quasars to study the structure of their accretion disks. By using spectroscopy or narrowband photometry, we have been able to remove contamination from the weakly microlensed broad emission lines, extinction, and any uncertainties in the large-scale macro magnification of the lens model. We determine a maximum likelihood estimate for the exponent of the size versus wavelength scaling (r{sub s} ∝λ {sup p}, corresponding to a disk temperature profile of T∝r {sup –1/p}) of p=0.75{sub −0.2}{sup +0.2} and a Bayesian estimate of p = 0.8 ± 0.2, which are significantly smaller than the prediction of the thin disk theory (p = 4/3). We have also obtained a maximum likelihood estimate for the average quasar accretion disk size of r{sub s}=4.5{sub −1.2}{sup +1.5} lt-day at a rest frame wavelength of λ = 1026 Å for microlenses with a mean mass of M = 1 M {sub ☉}, in agreement with previous results, and larger than expected from thin disk theory.

  5. New technique for retrieval of atmospheric temperature profiles from Rayleigh-scatter lidar measurements using nonlinear inversion.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Jaya; Bandoro, Justin; Sica, R J; McElroy, C Thomas

    2012-11-20

    The conventional method of calculating atmospheric temperature profiles using Rayleigh-scattering lidar measurements has limitations that necessitate abandoning temperatures retrieved at the greatest heights, due to the assumption of a pressure value required to initialize the integration at the highest altitude. An inversion approach is used to develop an alternative way of retrieving nightly atmospheric temperature profiles from the lidar measurements. Measurements obtained by the Purple Crow lidar facility located near The University of Western Ontario are used to develop and test this new technique. Our results show temperatures can be reliably retrieved at all heights where measurements with adequate signal-to-noise ratio exist. A Monte Carlo technique was developed to provide accurate estimates of both the systematic and random uncertainties for the retrieved nightly average temperature profile. An advantage of this new method is the ability to seed the temperature integration from the lowest rather than the greatest height, where the variability of the pressure is smaller than in the mesosphere or lower thermosphere and may in practice be routinely measured by a radiosonde, rather than requiring a rocket or satellite-borne measurement. Thus, this new technique extends the altitude range of existing Rayleigh-scatter lidars 10-15 km, producing the equivalent of four times the power-aperture product.

  6. On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Anbo Wang

    2007-03-31

    This report summarizes technical progress October 2006 - March 2007 on the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. During the second phase, an alternative high temperature sensing system based on Fabry-Perot interferometry was developed that offers a number of advantages over the BPDI solution. The objective of this program is to bring the sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. The sapphire wafer-based interferometric sensing system that was installed at TECO's Polk Power Station remained in operation for seven months. Our efforts have been focused on monitoring and analyzing the real-time data collected, and preparing for a second field test.

  7. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang; Zhengyu Huang; Yizheng Zhu

    2005-04-01

    This report summarizes technical progress October 2004-March 2005 on the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Due to the difficulties described on the last report, field testing of the BPDI system has not continued to date. However, we have developed an alternative high temperature sensing solution, which is described in this report.

  8. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2003-11-01

    This report summarizes technical progress over the second six month period of the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Research efforts were focused on evaluating corrosion effects in single crystal sapphire at temperatures up to 1400 C, and designing the sensor mechanical packaging with input from Wabash River Power Plant. Upcoming meetings will establish details for the gasifier field test.

  9. On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2005-11-01

    This report summarizes technical progress April-September 2005 on the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Due to the difficulties described on the last report, field testing of the BPDI system has not continued to date. However, we have developed an alternative high temperature sensing solution, which is described in this report. The sensing system will be installed and tested at TECO's Polk Power Station. Following a site visit in June 2005, our efforts have been focused on preparing for that field test, including he design of the sensor mechanical packaging, sensor electronics, the data transfer module, and the necessary software codes to accommodate this application.. We are currently ready to start sensor fabrication.

  10. Selection of suitable reference genes for accurate normalization of gene expression profile studies in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Silvia, Saviozzi; Francesca, Cordero; Marco, Lo Iacono; Silvia, Novello; Giorgio V, Scagliotti; Raffaele, Calogero A

    2006-01-01

    Background In real-time RT quantitative PCR (qPCR) the accuracy of normalized data is highly dependent on the reliability of the reference genes (RGs). Failure to use an appropriate control gene for normalization of qPCR data may result in biased gene expression profiles, as well as low precision, so that only gross changes in expression level are declared statistically significant or patterns of expression are erroneously characterized. Therefore, it is essential to determine whether potential RGs are appropriate for specific experimental purposes. Aim of this study was to identify and validate RGs for use in the differentiation of normal and tumor lung expression profiles. Methods A meta-analysis of lung cancer transcription profiles generated with the GeneChip technology was used to identify five putative RGs. Their consistency and that of seven commonly used RGs was tested by using Taqman probes on 18 paired normal-tumor lung snap-frozen specimens obtained from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients during primary curative resection. Results The 12 RGs displayed showed a wide range of Ct values: except for rRNA18S (mean 9.8), the mean values of all the commercial RGs and ESD ranged from 19 to 26, whereas those of the microarray-selected RGs (BTF-3, YAP1, HIST1H2BC, RPL30) exceeded 26. RG expression stability within sample populations and under the experimental conditions (tumour versus normal lung specimens) was evaluated by: (1) descriptive statistic; (2) equivalence test; (3) GeNorm applet. All these approaches indicated that the most stable RGs were POLR2A, rRNA18S, YAP1 and ESD. Conclusion These data suggest that POLR2A, rRNA18S, YAP1 and ESD are the most suitable RGs for gene expression profile studies in NSCLC. Furthermore, they highlight the limitations of commercial RGs and indicate that meta-data analysis of genome-wide transcription profiling studies may identify new RGs. PMID:16872493

  11. Velocity, temperature, and electrical conductivity profiles in hydrogen-oxygen MHD duct flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greywall, M. S.; Pian, C. C. P.

    1978-01-01

    Two-dimensional duct flow computations for radial distributions of velocity, temperature, and electrical conductivity are reported. Calculations were carried out for the flow conditions representative of a hydrogen-oxygen combustion driven MHD duct. Results are presented for: profiles of developing flow in a smooth duct, and for profiles of fully developed pipe flow with a specified streamwise shear stress distribution. The predicted temperature and electrical conductivity profiles for the developing flows compare well with available experimental data.

  12. Effect of ambient temperature on the thermal profile of the human forearm, hand, and fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, L. D.; Williams, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    Forearm, hand, and finger skin temperatures were measured on the right and left sides of seven resting men. The purpose was to determine the bilateral symmetry of these segmental temperature profiles at ambient temperatures from 10 to 45 C. Thermistors placed on the right and left forearms, hands, and index fingers were used to monitor the subjects until equilibration was reached at each ambient temperature. Additionally, thermal profiles of both hands were measured with copper-constantan thermocouples. During one experimental condition (23 C ambient), rectal, ear canal, and 24 skin temperatures were measured on each subject. Average body and average skin temperatures are given for each subject at the 23 C ambient condition. Detailed thermal profiles are also presented for the dorsal, ventral, and circumferential left forearm, hand, and finger skin temperatures at 23 C ambient. No significant differences were found between the mean skin temperatures of the right and left contralateral segments at any of the selected ambient temperatures.

  13. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2003-04-01

    This report summarizes technical progress over the first six months of the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Research efforts were focused on analyzing and testing factors that impact performance degradation of the initially designed sensor prototype, including sensing element movement within the sensing probe and optical signal quality degradation. Based these results, a new version of the sensing system was designed by combining the sapphire disk sensing element and the single crystal zirconia right angle light reflector into one novel single crystal sapphire right angle prism. The new sensor prototype was tested up to 1650 C.

  14. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang; Zhengyu Huang

    2004-04-01

    This report summarizes technical progress over the third six month period of the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Research efforts were focused on sensor probe design and machining, sensor electronics design, software algorithm design, sensor field installation procedures, and sensor remote data access and control. Field testing will begin in the next several weeks.

  15. MBRidge: an accurate and cost-effective method for profiling DNA methylome at single-base resolution

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wanshi; Mao, Fengbiao; Teng, Huajing; Cai, Tao; Zhao, Fangqing; Wu, Jinyu; Sun, Zhong Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Organisms and cells, in response to environmental influences or during development, undergo considerable changes in DNA methylation on a genome-wide scale, which are linked to a variety of biological processes. Using MethylC-seq to decipher DNA methylome at single-base resolution is prohibitively costly. In this study, we develop a novel approach, named MBRidge, to detect the methylation levels of repertoire CpGs, by innovatively introducing C-hydroxylmethylated adapters and bisulfate treatment into the MeDIP-seq protocol and employing ridge regression in data analysis. A systematic evaluation of DNA methylome in a human ovarian cell line T29 showed that MBRidge achieved high correlation (R > 0.90) with much less cost (∼10%) in comparison with MethylC-seq. We further applied MBRidge to profiling DNA methylome in T29H, an oncogenic counterpart of T29's. By comparing methylomes of T29H and T29, we identified 131790 differential methylation regions (DMRs), which are mainly enriched in carcinogenesis-related pathways. These are substantially different from 7567 DMRs that were obtained by RRBS and related with cell development or differentiation. The integrated analysis of DMRs in the promoter and expression of DMR-corresponding genes revealed that DNA methylation enforced reverse regulation of gene expression, depending on the distance from the proximal DMR to transcription starting sites in both mRNA and lncRNA. Taken together, our results demonstrate that MBRidge is an efficient and cost-effective method that can be widely applied to profiling DNA methylomes. PMID:26078362

  16. [Analysis of the Influence of Temperature on the Retrieval of Ozone Vertical Profiles Using the Thermal Infrared CrIS Sounder].

    PubMed

    Ma, Peng-fei; Chen, Liang-fu; Zou, Ming-min; Zhang, Ying; Tao, Ming-hui; Wang, Zi-leng; Su, Lin

    2015-12-01

    Ozone is a particularly critical trace gas in the Earth's atmosphere, since this molecule plays a key role in the photochemical reactions and climate change. The TIR measurements can capture the variability of ozone and are weakly sensitive to the lowermost tropospheric ozone content but can provide accurate measurements of tropospheric ozone and higher vertical resolution ozone profiles, with the additional advantage that measurements are also possible during the night. Because of the influence of atmospheric temperature, the ozone profile retrieval accuracy is severely limited. This paper analyze and discuss the ozone absorption spectra and weighting function sensitivity of temperature and its influence on ozone profile retrieval in detail. First, we simulate the change of atmospheric transmittance and radiance by importing 1 K temperature uncertainty, using line-by-line radiative transfer mode under 6 different atmosphere modes. The results show that the transmittance change ratio for 1 K temperature variation was consistent with the transmittance change ratio for 5%-6% change of ozone density variation in all layers of the profile. Then, we calculate the change of weighting function by a temperature error of 1 K, using the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) for the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite and calculate the corresponding change of retrieval result. The results demonstrate that CrIS is sensitive to Ozone in the middle to upper stratosphere, with the peak vertical sensitivity between 10-100 hPa and the change of weighting function for 1 K temperature variation was consistent with 6% change in the ozone profile. Finally, the paper retrieves ozone profiles from the CrIS radiances with a nonlinear Newton iteration method and use the eigenvector regression algorithm to construct the a priori state. In order to resolve the problem of temperature uncertainty and get high accuracy

  17. [Temperature profile in the enamel during cold tests].

    PubMed

    Wichmann, M

    1991-01-01

    The temperatures on the surface of human teeth during pulp vitality tests with frigen and carbon dioxide snow were recorded in an in vitro study. Frigen spray caused particularly rapid changes in temperature. The lowest temperature (-52 degrees C) was measured with CO2-snow (with a pressure of 9.81 N against the tooth surface). To obtain higher temperatures at lower rates of change, the use of a thin latex fingerstall proved to be effective.

  18. Observing Volcanic Thermal Anomalies from Space: How Accurate is the Estimation of the Hotspot's Size and Temperature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaksek, K.; Pick, L.; Lombardo, V.; Hort, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring the heat emission from active volcanic features on the basis of infrared satellite images contributes to the volcano's hazard assessment. Because these thermal anomalies only occupy a small fraction (< 1 %) of a typically resolved target pixel (e.g. from Landsat 7, MODIS) the accurate determination of the hotspot's size and temperature is however problematic. Conventionally this is overcome by comparing observations in at least two separate infrared spectral wavebands (Dual-Band method). We investigate the resolution limits of this thermal un-mixing technique by means of a uniquely designed indoor analog experiment. Therein the volcanic feature is simulated by an electrical heating alloy of 0.5 mm diameter installed on a plywood panel of high emissivity. Two thermographic cameras (VarioCam high resolution and ImageIR 8300 by Infratec) record images of the artificial heat source in wavebands comparable to those available from satellite data. These range from the short-wave infrared (1.4-3 µm) over the mid-wave infrared (3-8 µm) to the thermal infrared (8-15 µm). In the conducted experiment the pixel fraction of the hotspot was successively reduced by increasing the camera-to-target distance from 3 m to 35 m. On the basis of an individual target pixel the expected decrease of the hotspot pixel area with distance at a relatively constant wire temperature of around 600 °C was confirmed. The deviation of the hotspot's pixel fraction yielded by the Dual-Band method from the theoretically calculated one was found to be within 20 % up until a target distance of 25 m. This means that a reliable estimation of the hotspot size is only possible if the hotspot is larger than about 3 % of the pixel area, a resolution boundary most remotely sensed volcanic hotspots fall below. Future efforts will focus on the investigation of a resolution limit for the hotspot's temperature by varying the alloy's amperage. Moreover, the un-mixing results for more realistic multi

  19. Accurate Profiling of Gene Expression and Alternative Polyadenylation with Whole Transcriptome Termini Site Sequencing (WTTS-Seq)

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Li, Rui; Michal, Jennifer J.; Wu, Xiao-Lin; Liu, Zhongzhen; Zhao, Hui; Xia, Yin; Du, Weiwei; Wildung, Mark R.; Pouchnik, Derek J.; Harland, Richard M.; Jiang, Zhihua

    2016-01-01

    Construction of next-generation sequencing (NGS) libraries involves RNA manipulation, which often creates noisy, biased, and artifactual data that contribute to errors in transcriptome analysis. In this study, a total of 19 whole transcriptome termini site sequencing (WTTS-seq) and seven RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) libraries were prepared from Xenopus tropicalis adult and embryo samples to determine the most effective library preparation method to maximize transcriptomics investigation. We strongly suggest that appropriate primers/adaptors are designed to inhibit amplification detours and that PCR overamplification is minimized to maximize transcriptome coverage. Furthermore, genome annotation must be improved so that missing data can be recovered. In addition, a complete understanding of sequencing platforms is critical to limit the formation of false-positive results. Technically, the WTTS-seq method enriches both poly(A)+ RNA and complementary DNA, adds 5′- and 3′-adaptors in one step, pursues strand sequencing and mapping, and profiles both gene expression and alternative polyadenylation (APA). Although RNA-seq is cost prohibitive, tends to produce false-positive results, and fails to detect APA diversity and dynamics, its combination with WTTS-seq is necessary to validate transcriptome-wide APA. PMID:27098915

  20. Generalized inverse analysis for fins of different profiles with all temperature-dependent parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kuljeet; Das, Ranjan

    2016-08-01

    An inverse analysis is done to predict unknown and optimal dimensions of a fin satisfying either a given temperature or maximizing heat transfer rate. The profile simulating many geometries involves all temperature-dependent heat transfer modes. A hybrid algorithm is used to estimate relevant fin parameters. The present study shall be useful in selecting optimal dimensions to achieve either a particular temperature distribution or maximize heat transfer rate on various profiles.

  1. A Simple and Accurate Method To Calculate Free Energy Profiles and Reaction Rates from Restrained Molecular Simulations of Diffusive Processes.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Victor; Nam, Kwangho; Karplus, Martin

    2016-08-25

    A method is developed to obtain simultaneously free energy profiles and diffusion constants from restrained molecular simulations in diffusive systems. The method is based on low-order expansions of the free energy and diffusivity as functions of the reaction coordinate. These expansions lead to simple analytical relationships between simulation statistics and model parameters. The method is tested on 1D and 2D model systems; its accuracy is found to be comparable to or better than that of the existing alternatives, which are briefly discussed. An important aspect of the method is that the free energy is constructed by integrating its derivatives, which can be computed without need for overlapping sampling windows. The implementation of the method in any molecular simulation program that supports external umbrella potentials (e.g., CHARMM) requires modification of only a few lines of code. As a demonstration of its applicability to realistic biomolecular systems, the method is applied to model the α-helix ↔ β-sheet transition in a 16-residue peptide in implicit solvent, with the reaction coordinate provided by the string method. Possible modifications of the method are briefly discussed; they include generalization to multidimensional reaction coordinates [in the spirit of the model of Ermak and McCammon (Ermak, D. L.; McCammon, J. A. J. Chem. Phys. 1978, 69, 1352-1360)], a higher-order expansion of the free energy surface, applicability in nonequilibrium systems, and a simple test for Markovianity. In view of the small overhead of the method relative to standard umbrella sampling, we suggest its routine application in the cases where umbrella potential simulations are appropriate.

  2. CLASH-VLT: Constraints on the Dark Matter Equation of State from Accurate Measurements of Galaxy Cluster Mass Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartoris, Barbara; Biviano, Andrea; Rosati, Piero; Borgani, Stefano; Umetsu, Keiichi; Bartelmann, Matthias; Girardi, Marisa; Grillo, Claudio; Lemze, Doron; Zitrin, Adi; Balestra, Italo; Mercurio, Amata; Nonino, Mario; Postman, Marc; Czakon, Nicole; Bradley, Larry; Broadhurst, Tom; Coe, Dan; Medezinski, Elinor; Melchior, Peter; Meneghetti, Massimo; Merten, Julian; Annunziatella, Marianna; Benitez, Narciso; Czoske, Oliver; Donahue, Megan; Ettori, Stefano; Ford, Holland; Fritz, Alexander; Kelson, Dan; Koekemoer, Anton; Kuchner, Ulrike; Lombardi, Marco; Maier, Christian; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Munari, Emiliano; Presotto, Valentina; Scodeggio, Marco; Seitz, Stella; Tozzi, Paolo; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Bodo

    2014-03-01

    A pressureless scenario for the dark matter (DM) fluid is a widely adopted hypothesis, despite the absence of direct observational evidence. According to general relativity, the total mass-energy content of a system shapes the gravitational potential well, but different test particles perceive this potential in different ways depending on their properties. Cluster galaxy velocities, being Ltc, depend solely on the gravitational potential, whereas photon trajectories reflect the contributions from the gravitational potential plus a relativistic-pressure term that depends on the cluster mass. We exploit this phenomenon to constrain the equation of state (EoS) parameter of the fluid, primarily DM, contained in galaxy clusters. We use complementary information provided by the kinematic and lensing mass profiles of the galaxy cluster MACS 1206.2-0847 at z = 0.44, as obtained in an extensive imaging and spectroscopic campaign within the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble. The unprecedented high quality of our data set and the properties of this cluster are well suited to determine the EoS parameter of the cluster fluid. Since baryons contribute at most 15% to the total mass in clusters and their pressure is negligible, the EoS parameter we derive describes the behavior of the DM fluid. We obtain the most stringent constraint on the DM EoS parameter to date, w = (pr + 2 pt )/(3 c 2ρ) = 0.00 ± 0.15 (stat) ± 0.08 (syst), averaged over the radial range 0.5 Mpc <= r <= r 200, where pr and pt are the radial and tangential pressure, and ρ is the density. We plan to further improve our constraint by applying the same procedure to all clusters from the ongoing Cluster Lensing And Supernova Survey with Hubble-Very Large Telescope program.

  3. CLASH-VLT: CONSTRAINTS ON THE DARK MATTER EQUATION OF STATE FROM ACCURATE MEASUREMENTS OF GALAXY CLUSTER MASS PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Sartoris, Barbara; Borgani, Stefano; Girardi, Marisa; Biviano, Andrea; Balestra, Italo; Nonino, Mario; Umetsu, Keiichi; Czakon, Nicole; Bartelmann, Matthias; Grillo, Claudio; Lemze, Doron; Medezinski, Elinor; Zitrin, Adi; Mercurio, Amata; Broadhurst, Tom; Melchior, Peter; and others

    2014-03-01

    A pressureless scenario for the dark matter (DM) fluid is a widely adopted hypothesis, despite the absence of direct observational evidence. According to general relativity, the total mass-energy content of a system shapes the gravitational potential well, but different test particles perceive this potential in different ways depending on their properties. Cluster galaxy velocities, being <profiles of the galaxy cluster MACS 1206.2–0847 at z = 0.44, as obtained in an extensive imaging and spectroscopic campaign within the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble. The unprecedented high quality of our data set and the properties of this cluster are well suited to determine the EoS parameter of the cluster fluid. Since baryons contribute at most 15% to the total mass in clusters and their pressure is negligible, the EoS parameter we derive describes the behavior of the DM fluid. We obtain the most stringent constraint on the DM EoS parameter to date, w = (p{sub r} + 2 p{sub t} )/(3 c {sup 2}ρ) = 0.00 ± 0.15 (stat) ± 0.08 (syst), averaged over the radial range 0.5 Mpc ≤ r ≤ r {sub 200}, where p{sub r} and p{sub t} are the radial and tangential pressure, and ρ is the density. We plan to further improve our constraint by applying the same procedure to all clusters from the ongoing Cluster Lensing And Supernova Survey with Hubble-Very Large Telescope program.

  4. Exploiting the structure of MWR-derived temperature profile for stable boundary-layer height estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Umar; Rocadenbosch, Francesc

    2015-10-01

    A method for the estimation of Stable Boundary Layer Height (SBLH) using curvature of the potential temperature profiles retrieved by a Microwave Radiometer (MWR) is presented. The vertical resolution of the MWR-derived temperature profile decreases with the height. A spline interpolation is carried-out to obtain a uniformly discretized temperature profile. The curvature parameter is calculated from the first and second order derivatives of the interpolated potential temperature profile. The first minima of the curvature parameter signifies the point where the temperature profile starts changing from the stable to the residual conditions. The performance of the method is analyzed by comparing it against physically idealized models of the stable boundary-layer temperature profile available in the literature. There are five models which include stable-mixed, mixed-linear, linear, polynomial and exponential. For a given temperature profile these five models are fitted using the non-linear least-squares approach. The best fitting model is chosen as the one which fits with the minimum root-mean-square error. Comparison of the SBLH estimates from curvature-based method with the physically idealized models shows that the method works qualitatively and quantitatively well with lower variation. Potential application of this approach is the situation where given temperature profiles are significantly deviant from the idealized models. The method is applied to data from a Humidity-and-Temperature Profiler (HATPRO) MWR collected during the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) campaign at Jülich, Germany. Radiosonde data, whenever available, is used as the ground-truth.

  5. Thermal Buckling Analysis of Rectangular Panels Subjected to Humped Temperature Profile Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William I.

    2004-01-01

    This research investigates thermal buckling characteristics of rectangular panels subjected to different types of humped temperature profile heating. Minimum potential energy and finite-element methods are used to calculate the panel buckling temperatures. The two methods give fairly close thermal buckling solutions. 'Buckling temperature magnification factor of the first kind, eta' is established for the fixed panel edges to scale up the buckling solution of uniform temperature loading case to give the buckling solution of the humped temperature profile loading cases. Also, 'buckling temperature magnification factor of the second kind, xi' is established for the free panel edges to scale up the buckling solution of humped temperature profile loading cases with unheated boundary heat sinks to give the buckling solutions when the boundary heat sinks are heated up.

  6. Profiling and accurate quantification of Rubus ellagitannins and ellagic acid conjugates using direct UPLC-Q-TOF HDMS and HPLC-DAD analysis.

    PubMed

    Gasperotti, Mattia; Masuero, Domenico; Vrhovsek, Urska; Guella, Graziano; Mattivi, Fulvio

    2010-04-28

    Accurate quantification and structural characterization of ellagitannins and ellagic acid conjugates in food, beverages, and food supplements are essential starting points for studying their effect on human health. However, accuracy is hindered both by the lack of pure standard compounds and by methods that maintain the compounds in their native form, avoiding any chemical modification of the structure. The objective of this work was to develop a new method for the purification, chromatographic separation, and accurate quantification of ellagitannins and ellagic acid conjugates to provide thorough characterization of the diversity in composition of 11 Rubus cultivars grown in Trentino, Italy. As such, two major steps were required: (i) the isolation and purification (with associated detailed structural characterization and determination of their molar extinction coefficients) of sanguiin H-6 and lambertianin C, providing essential data for their use, together with ellagic acid, as external standards, and (ii) the determination of the chemical structure of 20 novel minor ellagitannins and 4 ellagic acid conjugates on the basis of their Q-TOF-HDMS and DAD spectra. This survey of ellagitannins and ellagic acid conjugates provides evidence for the existence of significant differences in the pattern between and within blackberry and raspberry cultivars. To our knowledge, this is the first paper that has combined detailed metabolite profiling with accurate quantification of the main ellagitannins in Rubus using their respective standards.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of temperature profile in partially hydrogenated graphene and graphene with grain boundary.

    PubMed

    Lotfi, Erfan; Neek-Amal, M; Elahi, M

    2015-11-01

    Temperature profile in graphene, graphene with grain boundary and vacancy defects and hydrogenated graphene with different percentage of H-atoms are determined using molecular dynamics simulation. We also obtained the temperature profile in a graphene nanoribbon containing two types of grain boundaries with different misorientation angles, θ=21.8° and θ=32.2°. We found that a temperature gap appears in the temperature profile of a graphene nanoribbon with a grain boundary at the middle. Moreover, we found that the temperature profile in the partially hydrogenated graphene varies with the percentage of hydrogens, i.e. the C:H ratio. Our results show that a grain boundary line in the graphene sheet can change the thermal transport through the system which might be useful for controlling thermal flow in nanostructured graphene.

  8. Simultaneous Retrieval of Temperature, Water Vapor and Ozone Atmospheric Profiles from IASI: Compression, De-noising, First Guess Retrieval and Inversion Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aires, F.; Rossow, W. B.; Scott, N. A.; Chedin, A.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A fast temperature water vapor and ozone atmospheric profile retrieval algorithm is developed for the high spectral resolution Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) space-borne instrument. Compression and de-noising of IASI observations are performed using Principal Component Analysis. This preprocessing methodology also allows, for a fast pattern recognition in a climatological data set to obtain a first guess. Then, a neural network using first guess information is developed to retrieve simultaneously temperature, water vapor and ozone atmospheric profiles. The performance of the resulting fast and accurate inverse model is evaluated with a large diversified data set of radiosondes atmospheres including rare events.

  9. Peaking profiles for achieving long-term temperature targets with more likelihood at lower costs

    PubMed Central

    den Elzen, Michel G. J.; van Vuuren, Detlef P.

    2007-01-01

    How can dangerous interference with the climate system be avoided? Science can help decision-makers answer this political question. Earlier publications have focused on the probability of keeping global mean temperature change below certain thresholds by stabilizing greenhouse gas concentrations at particular levels. We compare the results of such “stabilization profiles” with a set of “peaking profiles” that reduce emissions further after stabilization and thus result in a concentration peak. Given the inertia in the climate system, stabilization profiles lead to ongoing warming beyond 2100 until the temperature reaches equilibrium. This warming partly can be prevented for peaking profiles. In this way, these profiles can increase the likelihood of achieving temperature thresholds by 10–20% compared with the likelihood for the associated stabilization profiles. Because the additional mitigation efforts and thus costs for peaking profiles lie mainly beyond 2100, peaking profiles achieving temperature thresholds with the same likelihood as the original stabilization profile, but at considerably lower cost (up to 40%), can be identified. The magnitude of the cost reductions depends on the assumptions on discounting. Peaking profiles and overshoot profiles with a limited overshoot may, in particular, play an important role in making more ambitious climate targets feasible. PMID:17989238

  10. An array for measuring detailed soil temperature profiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil temperature dynamics can provide insights into soil variables which are much more difficult or impossible to measure. We designed an array to measure temperature at precise depth increments. Data was collected to determine if the construction materials influence surface and near-surface tempera...

  11. An evaluation of temperature profiles from falling sphere soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiroz, R. S.; Gelman, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    An evaluation of 30 pairs of high-altitude inflatable falling spheres and independent thermistor soundings with a mean rocket-launch-time separation of 27 min shows average temperature differences within 6 C at 32-70 km, except for an average difference of 10 C at 68 km near Mach 1 in the sphere descent curve. The mean difference is exhibited as a negative bias (sphere temperature colder) for which various explanations are considered. The rms temperature differences are greatest near 50 km (7 C) and 68 km (11 C). From 70 to approximately 87.5 km, confidence in the reliability of the sphere temperature soundings is based on the 'repeatability' of pairs of sphere soundings taken within 20 min, temperature differences generally being less than 10 C. Illustrations of large atmospheric variations measured by the sphere soundings are given along with verification from independent measurements.

  12. 40 CFR 86.1229-85 - Dynamometer load determination and fuel temperature profile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Vapor space pressure (the Administrator may omit measurement of fuel tank pressure). (iii) The data... track temperature may be measured with an embedded sensor, a portable temperature probe, or an infrared... for developing corrected liquid fuel and vapor space temperature profiles may be used if...

  13. 40 CFR 86.1229-85 - Dynamometer load determination and fuel temperature profile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Vapor space pressure (the Administrator may omit measurement of fuel tank pressure). (iii) The data... track temperature may be measured with an embedded sensor, a portable temperature probe, or an infrared... for developing corrected liquid fuel and vapor space temperature profiles may be used if...

  14. Ion temperature profile simulation of JT-60 and TFTR plasmas with ion temperature gradient mode transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, H.; Hirayama, T.; Koide, Y.; Yoshida, H.; Naito, O.; Sato, M.; Fukuda, T.; Sugie, T.; Azumi, M.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Scott, S. D.; Grek, B.; Hill, K. W.; Johnson, D. W.; Mansfield, D. K.; Park, H. K.; Stratton, B. C.; Synakowski, E. J.; Taylor, G.; Towner, H. H.

    1994-05-01

    Ion temperature profiles of neutral beam heated plasmas in JT-60 and TFTR have been simulated using models of ion thermal diffusivity, χi, based on ion temperature gradient mode (ηi mode) turbulence and drift wave turbulence (trapped electron mode and circulating electron mode). The ion temperature profiles measured by charge exchange recombination spectroscopy are compared to predicted Ti profiles calculated from three theoretical models for ion heat transport by Dominguez and Waltz (1987), Lee and Diamond (1986), and Romanelli (1989). All three χi models can reproduce the measured Ti profile over a wide range of parameters in JT-60 L mode plasmas, except for two 1 MA limiter cases. With the use of transport models, which were adjusted to fit JT-60 plasmas, it was found that the Dominguez and Waltz and Romanelli models agree with measured Ti, profiles in TFTR L mode discharges in the region a/4 < r < a/2. The observed central peaking of Ti near the magnetic axis of TFTR L mode plasmas cannot be reproduced. It was found that the Lee and Diamond model does not fit me data as well. The χi models studied cannot consistently reproduce the measured Ti in the peripheral region of either JT-60 or TFTR plasmas. In the high ion temperature (high Ti) plasmas of JT-60 and supershot plasmas of TFTR, the predicted Ti profiles are much broader than the measured profile. In supershot plasmas, the measured central ion temperature greatly exceeds the predicted temperature, although there is reasonable agreement near the edge

  15. A direct detection 1.6μm DIAL with three wavelengths for high accuracy measurements of vertical CO2 concentration and temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Yasukuni; Nagasawa, Chikao; Abo, Makoto

    2013-10-01

    The accurate vertical CO2 profiles in the troposphere are highly desirable in the inverse techniques to improve quantification and understanding of the global budget of CO2 and also global climate changes. Moreover, wind information is an important parameter for transport simulations and inverse estimation of surface CO2 flux. A differential absorption lidar (DIAL) is an attractive method for obtaining vertical CO2 profiles and we have developed an 1.6μm DIAL system to perform simultaneous measurements of CO2 concentration, atmospheric temperature profile and wind profile. The absorption cross sections of gas and air density depends on atmospheric temperature and pressure. Then precise temperature and pressure profiles are necessary for accurate CO2 mixing ratio measurement by DIAL. Laser beams of three wavelengths around a CO2 absorption line are transmitted alternately to the atmosphere for simultaneous measurements of CO2 concentration and temperature. The receiving optics include the near-infrared photomultiplier tube and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) filter to detect a Doppler shift.

  16. Effects of air flow directions on composting process temperature profile

    SciTech Connect

    Kulcu, Recep; Yaldiz, Osman

    2008-07-01

    In this study, chicken manure mixed with carnation wastes was composted by using three different air flow directions: R1-sucking (downward), R2-blowing (upward) and R3-mixed. The aim was to find out the most appropriate air flow direction type for composting to provide more homogenous temperature distribution in the reactors. The efficiency of each aeration method was evaluated by monitoring the evolution of parameters such as temperature, moisture content, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} ratio in the material and dry material losses. Aeration of the reactors was managed by radial fans. The results showed that R3 resulted in a more homogenous temperature distribution and high dry material loss throughout the composting process. The most heterogeneous temperature distribution and the lowest dry material loss were obtained in R2.

  17. Stratospheric and Mesospheric Pressure-Temperature Profiles from the Rotational Analysis of CO subscript2 Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunson, M.; Lowes, L.; Abrams, M.; Raper, O.; Farmer, C.; Stiller, G.; Zander, R.; Rinsland, C.

    1994-01-01

    A simple, classical, and expedient method for the retrieval of atmospheric pressure-temperature profiles has been applied to the high-resolution infrared solar absorption spectra obtained with the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument.

  18. The Internal Temperature Profiles of Large Micrometeorites During Atmospheric Entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szydlik, P. P.; Flynn, G. J.

    1992-07-01

    Micrometeorites up to several hundred micrometers in diameter survive atmospheric entry without melting. A method to calculate the surface temperature of micrometeorites during atmospheric entry was developed by Whipple (1950). Flynn (1990) and Love and Brownlee (1991), using computer simulations of the Whipple method, concluded that large micrometeorites (>75 micrometers in diameter) survive unmelted only if their atmospheric entry velocities are near Earth escape velocity, suggesting main-belt asteroidal parents. This conclusion depends on the assumption of uniform internal temperature in the particles. Large micrometeorites recovered from polar ices have textures ranging from pristine through highly porous, scoriated and finally completely melted, indicating a range of alterations during atmospheric entry. Several 50- to 100-micrometer-diameter Antarctic micrometeorites contain pristine phyllosilicates intermixed with scoriated material, suggesting partial heating (Sutton et al., 1992). Substantial temperature gradients would be required to produce this range of textures by differential heating. We modeled the interior temperature of a 60-micrometer-diameter micrometeorite experiencing a thermal spike at its surface. For a thermal diffusivity of 1x10^-9 m^2/sec, the value measured for lunar soil in a vacuum (Cremers and Hsia, 1974), the entire particle reached the surface temperature within 0.5 seconds (Szydlik and Flynn, 1992). Since the entry heating pulse lasts several seconds (Flynn, 1989) significant temperature gradients would not be expected. We have extended our calculations using the Crank-Nicholson method to compute the internal temperature as a function of radial position and time for homogeneous, spherical micrometeorites experiencing the surface thermal pulse calculated using the Flynn (1989) entry heating simulation. Figure 1 shows the results for a 100-micrometer particle at normal incidence with an atmospheric entry velocity of 15 km/sec. For a

  19. Profiles of the structure characteristic of temperature in the atmospheric surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkikh, V. A.; Odintsov, S. L.

    2015-11-01

    The results of measurement of the structure characteristic of air temperature C 2/T in the atmospheric surface layer at the three height levels in the summer period are analyzed. Ultrasonic anemometers-thermometers were used for the measurements. The vertical profiles of C 2/T are systematized, and empirical models are developed for some types of profiles.

  20. Ion temperature and flow profiles in Comet Halley's close environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenn, R.; Ip, WING-H.; Rosenbauer, H.; Balsiger, H.; Buehler, F.; Goldstein, R.; Meier, A.; Shelley, E. G.

    1986-01-01

    The Giotto high intensity spectrometer identified the contact surface 4800 km from the comet nucleus. This boundary is clearly seen by a drastic drop in the temperatures of different ion species from 2000 K outside to values as low as 300 K inside. Inside the contact surface outflow speed = > 1 km/sec, in contrast to a value around 0 right outside. These numbers might be affected by a potential charge-up of the spacecraft. Outside the contact surface, the ion temperature rises gradually with increasing distance. Between 9000 and 10,000 km distance the ion density increases by a factor of 4. At 27,000 km distance there is again a rather abrupt jump to significantly higher temperatures, higher outflow speeds, and lower densities.

  1. Granular temperature profiles in three-dimensional vibrofluidized granular beds

    SciTech Connect

    Wildman, R. D.; Huntley, J. M.; Parker, D. J.

    2001-06-01

    The motion of grains in a three-dimensional vibrofluidized granular bed has been measured using the technique of positron emission particle tracking, to provide three-dimensional packing fraction and granular temperature distributions. The mean square fluctuation velocity about the mean was calculated through analysis of the short time mean squared displacement behavior, allowing measurement of the granular temperature at packing fractions of up to {eta}{similar_to}0.15. The scaling relationship between the granular temperature, the number of layers of grains, and the base velocity was determined. Deviations between the observed scaling exponents and those predicted by recent theories are attributed to the influence of dissipative grain-sidewall collisions.

  2. Microwave temperature profiler for clear air turbulence prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Bruce L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method is disclosed for determining Richardson Number, Ri, or its reciprocal, RRi, for clear air prediction using measured potential temperature and determining the vertical gradient of potential temperature, d(theta)/dz. Wind vector from the aircraft instrumentation versus potential temperature, dW/D(theta), is determined and multiplies by d(theta)/dz to obtain dW/dz. Richardson number or its reciprocal is then determined from the relationship Ri = K(d theta)/dz divided by (dW/dz squared) for use in detecting a trend toward a threshold value for the purpose of predicting clear air turbulence. Other equations for this basic relationship are disclosed together with the combination of other atmospheric observables using multiple regression techniques.

  3. Argon Cluster Sputtering Source for ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling of Insulating Materials: High Sputter Rate and Accurate Interfacial Information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoying; Liu, Bingwen; Zhao, Evan W; Jin, Ke; Du, Yingge; Neeway, James J; Ryan, Joseph V; Hu, Dehong; Zhang, Kelvin H L; Hong, Mina; Le Guernic, Solenne; Thevuthasan, Suntharampilai; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2015-08-01

    The use of an argon cluster ion sputtering source has been demonstrated to perform superiorly relative to traditional oxygen and cesium ion sputtering sources for ToF-SIMS depth profiling of insulating materials. The superior performance has been attributed to effective alleviation of surface charging. A simulated nuclear waste glass (SON68) and layered hole-perovskite oxide thin films were selected as model systems because of their fundamental and practical significance. Our results show that high sputter rates and accurate interfacial information can be achieved simultaneously for argon cluster sputtering, whereas this is not the case for cesium and oxygen sputtering. Therefore, the implementation of an argon cluster sputtering source can significantly improve the analysis efficiency of insulating materials and, thus, can expand its applications to the study of glass corrosion, perovskite oxide thin film characterization, and many other systems of interest.

  4. Temperature Profile Measurements in a Newly Constructed 30-Stage 5 cm Centrifugal Contactor pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Troy G. Garn; Dave H. Meikrantz; Mitchell R. Greenhalgh; Jack D. Law

    2008-09-01

    An annular centrifugal contactor pilot plant incorporating 30 stages of commercial 5 cm CINC V-02 units has been built and operated at INL during the past year. The pilot plant includes an automated process control and data acquisitioning system. The primary purpose of the pilot plant is to evaluate the performance of a large number of inter-connected centrifugal contactors and obtain temperature profile measurements within a 30-stage cascade. Additional solvent extraction flowsheet testing using stable surrogates is also being considered. Preliminary hydraulic testing was conducted with all 30 contactors interconnected for continuous counter-current flow. Hydraulic performance and system operational tests were conducted successfully but with higher single-stage rotor speeds found necessary to maintain steady interstage flow at flowrates of 1 L/min and higher. Initial temperature profile measurements were also completed in this configuration studying the performance during single aqueous and two-phase counter-current flow at ambient and elevated inlet solution temperatures. Temperature profile testing of two discreet sections of the cascade required additional feed and discharge connections. Lamp oil, a commercially available alkane mixture of C14 to C18 chains, and tap water adjusted to pH 2 were the solution feeds for all the testing described in this report. Numerous temperature profiles were completed using a newly constructed 30-stage centrifugal contactor pilot plant. The automated process control and data acquisition system worked very well throughout testing. Temperature data profiles for an array of total flowrates (FT) and contactor rpm values for both single-phase and two-phase systems have been collected with selected profiles and comparisons reported. Total flowrates (FT) ranged from 0.5-1.4 L/min with rotor speeds from 3500-4000 rpm. Solution inlet temperatures ranging from ambient up to 50° C were tested. Ambient temperature testing shows that a

  5. Calibration and Temperature Profile of a Tungsten Filament Lamp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Izarra, Charles; Gitton, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work proposed for undergraduate students and teachers is the calibration of a tungsten filament lamp from electric measurements that are both simple and precise, allowing to determine the temperature of tungsten filament as a function of the current intensity. This calibration procedure was first applied to a conventional filament…

  6. Metabolic profiling of yeast culture using gas chromatography coupled with orthogonal acceleration accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry: application to biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Elsuida; Marriott, Philip J; Parker, Rhiannon M; Kouremenos, Konstantinos A; Morrison, Paul; Adams, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Yeast and yeast cultures are frequently used as additives in diets of dairy cows. Beneficial effects from the inclusion of yeast culture in diets for dairy mammals have been reported, and the aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive analytical method for the accurate mass identification of the 'global' metabolites in order to differentiate a variety of yeasts at varying growth stages (Diamond V XP, Yea-Sacc and Levucell). Microwave-assisted derivatization for metabolic profiling is demonstrated through the analysis of differing yeast samples developed for cattle feed, which include a wide range of metabolites of interest covering a large range of compound classes. Accurate identification of the components was undertaken using GC-oa-ToFMS (gas chromatography-orthogonal acceleration-time-of-flight mass spectrometry), followed by principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) for data reduction and biomarker discovery. Semi-quantification (fold changes in relative peak areas) was reported for metabolites identified as possible discriminative biomarkers (p-value <0.05, fold change >2), including D-ribose (four fold decrease), myo-inositol (five fold increase), L-phenylalanine (three fold increase), glucopyranoside (two fold increase), fructose (three fold increase) and threitol (three fold increase) respectively. PMID:24356230

  7. An autonomous expendable conductivity, temperature, depth profiler for ocean data collection

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, J.; McCoy, K.

    1992-10-01

    An Autonomous Expendable Conductivity-Temperature-Depth Profiler (AXCTD) for profiling temperature, conductivity, pressure, and other parameters in remote oceanic regions is described. The AXCTD is a microcomputer-controlled sensor package that can be deployed by unskilled operators from ships or aircraft. It records two CTD profiles (one during descent and another during ascent) and CTD times series while on the bottom and adrift at the surface. Recorded data are transmitted to an ARGOS satellite with ground-positioning capabilities. The AXCTD can provide ``sea truth`` for remote sensing, perform environmental and military surveillance missions, and acquire time-series and synoptic data for computer models.

  8. An autonomous expendable conductivity, temperature, depth profiler for ocean data collection

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, J. ); DeRoos, B.G. ); McCoy, K. )

    1992-10-01

    An Autonomous Expendable Conductivity-Temperature-Depth Profiler (AXCTD) for profiling temperature, conductivity, pressure, and other parameters in remote oceanic regions is described. The AXCTD is a microcomputer-controlled sensor package that can be deployed by unskilled operators from ships or aircraft. It records two CTD profiles (one during descent and another during ascent) and CTD times series while on the bottom and adrift at the surface. Recorded data are transmitted to an ARGOS satellite with ground-positioning capabilities. The AXCTD can provide sea truth'' for remote sensing, perform environmental and military surveillance missions, and acquire time-series and synoptic data for computer models.

  9. Retrieving Temperature and Moisture Profiles from AERI Radiance Observations. AERIPROF Value-Added Product Technical Description

    SciTech Connect

    Feltz, W. F.; Howell, H. B.; Comstock, J.; Mahon, R.; Turner, D. D.; Smith, W. L.; Woolf, H. M.; Halter, T.

    2007-04-01

    One of the goals of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is to collect a long-term series of radiative and atmospheric state observations to improve the parameterization of these processes in global climate models. The ARM Program intended to move away from the traditional approach of directly measuring profiles of temperature and moisture using radiosondes, which is expensive in terms of expendables and manpower, and develop methods to retrieve these profiles with ground-based remote sensors. The atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI), whose radiance data contains information on the vertical distribution of water vapor and temperature, is an integral part of the ARM profiling plan.

  10. Velocity, temperature, and electrical conductivity profiles in hydrogen-oxygen MHD duct flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greywall, M. S.; Pian, C. C. P.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents results of two-dimensional duct flow computations for radial distributions of velocity, temperature, and electrical conductivity. Calculations were carried out for the flow conditions representative of NASA Lewis hydrogen-oxygen combustion driven MHD duct. Results are presented for two sets of computations: (1) profiles of developing flow in a smooth duct, and (2) profiles of fully developed pipe flow with a specified streamwise shear stress distribution. The predicted temperature and electrical conductivity profiles for the developing flows compared well with available experimental data.

  11. Profile-QSAR: a novel meta-QSAR method that combines activities across the kinase family to accurately predict affinity, selectivity, and cellular activity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Eric; Mukherjee, Prasenjit; Sullivan, David; Jansen, Johanna

    2011-08-22

    Profile-QSAR is a novel 2D predictive model building method for kinases. This "meta-QSAR" method models the activity of each compound against a new kinase target as a linear combination of its predicted activities against a large panel of 92 previously studied kinases comprised from 115 assays. Profile-QSAR starts with a sparse incomplete kinase by compound (KxC) activity matrix, used to generate Bayesian QSAR models for the 92 "basis-set" kinases. These Bayesian QSARs generate a complete "synthetic" KxC activity matrix of predictions. These synthetic activities are used as "chemical descriptors" to train partial-least squares (PLS) models, from modest amounts of medium-throughput screening data, for predicting activity against new kinases. The Profile-QSAR predictions for the 92 kinases (115 assays) gave a median external R²(ext) = 0.59 on 25% held-out test sets. The method has proven accurate enough to predict pairwise kinase selectivities with a median correlation of R²(ext) = 0.61 for 958 kinase pairs with at least 600 common compounds. It has been further expanded by adding a "C(k)XC" cellular activity matrix to the KxC matrix to predict cellular activity for 42 kinase driven cellular assays with median R²(ext) = 0.58 for 24 target modulation assays and R²(ext) = 0.41 for 18 cell proliferation assays. The 2D Profile-QSAR, along with the 3D Surrogate AutoShim, are the foundations of an internally developed iterative medium-throughput screening (IMTS) methodology for virtual screening (VS) of compound archives as an alternative to experimental high-throughput screening (HTS). The method has been applied to 20 actual prospective kinase projects. Biological results have so far been obtained in eight of them. Q² values ranged from 0.3 to 0.7. Hit-rates at 10 uM for experimentally tested compounds varied from 25% to 80%, except in K5, which was a special case aimed specifically at finding "type II" binders, where none of the compounds were predicted to be

  12. Measured and predicted temperature profiles along MEMS bridges at pressures from 0.05 to 625 torr.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Torczynski, John Robert; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Gorby, Allen D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2010-10-01

    We will present experimental and computational investigations of the thermal performance of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) as a function of the surrounding gas pressure. Lowering the pressure in MEMS packages reduces gas damping, providing increased sensitivity for certain MEMS sensors; however, such packaging also dramatically affects their thermal performance since energy transfer to the environment is substantially reduced. High-spatial-resolution Raman thermometry was used to measure the temperature profiles on electrically heated, polycrystalline silicon bridges that are nominally 10 microns wide, 2.25 microns thick, 12 microns above the substrate, and either 200 or 400 microns long in nitrogen atmospheres with pressures ranging from 0.05 to 625 Torr. Finite element modeling of the thermal behavior of the MEMS bridges is performed and compared to the experimental results. Noncontinuum gas effects are incorporated into the continuum finite element model by imposing temperature discontinuities at gas-solid interfaces that are determined from noncontinuum simulations. The experimental and simulation results indicate that at pressures below 0.5 Torr the gas-phase heat transfer is negligible compared to heat conduction through the thermal actuator legs. As the pressure increases above 0.5 Torr, the gas-phase heat transfer becomes more significant. At ambient pressures, gas-phase heat transfer drastically impacts the thermal performance. The measured and simulated temperature profiles are in qualitative agreement in the present study. Quantitative agreement between experimental and simulated temperature profiles requires accurate knowledge of temperature-dependent thermophysical properties, the device geometry, and the thermal accommodation coefficient.

  13. Selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension and mutational profiling (SHAPE-MaP) for direct, versatile, and accurate RNA structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    Smola, Matthew J.; Rice, Greggory M.; Busan, Steven; Siegfried, Nathan A.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    SHAPE chemistries exploit small electrophilic reagents that react with the 2′-hydroxyl group to interrogate RNA structure at single-nucleotide resolution. Mutational profiling (MaP) identifies modified residues based on the ability of reverse transcriptase to misread a SHAPE-modified nucleotide and then counting the resulting mutations by massively parallel sequencing. The SHAPE-MaP approach measures the structure of large and transcriptome-wide systems as accurately as for simple model RNAs. This protocol describes the experimental steps, implemented over three days, required to perform SHAPE probing and construct multiplexed SHAPE-MaP libraries suitable for deep sequencing. These steps include RNA folding and SHAPE structure probing, mutational profiling by reverse transcription, library construction, and sequencing. Automated processing of MaP sequencing data is accomplished using two software packages. ShapeMapper converts raw sequencing files into mutational profiles, creates SHAPE reactivity plots, and provides useful troubleshooting information, often within an hour. SuperFold uses these data to model RNA secondary structures, identify regions with well-defined structures, and visualize probable and alternative helices, often in under a day. We illustrate these algorithms with the E. coli thiamine pyrophosphate riboswitch, E. coli 16S rRNA, and HIV-1 genomic RNAs. SHAPE-MaP can be used to make nucleotide-resolution biophysical measurements of individual RNA motifs, rare components of complex RNA ensembles, and entire transcriptomes. The straightforward MaP strategy greatly expands the number, length, and complexity of analyzable RNA structures. PMID:26426499

  14. A lidar system for measuring atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Dombrowski, Mark; Korb, C. Laurence; Milrod, Jeffry; Walden, Harvey

    1987-01-01

    The design and operation of a differential absorption lidar system capable of remotely measuring the vertical structure of tropospheric pressure and temperature are described. The measurements are based on the absorption by atmospheric oxygen of the spectrally narrowband output of two pulsed alexandrite lasers. Detailed laser output spectral characteristics, which are critical to successful lidar measurements, are presented. Spectral linewidths of 0.026 and 0.018 per cm for the lasers were measured with over 99.99 percent of the energy contained in three longitudinal modes.

  15. Ultraviolet Rayleigh scatter imaging in atmospheric microdischarges for spatial temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplinger, James; Adams, Steven; Hensley, Amber; Tolson, Boyd

    2014-10-01

    Spatially resolved temperature measurements within a microdischarge in atmospheric pressure air have been conducted using Rayleigh scattering of a pulsed ultraviolet laser. The scatter image intensity along the laser beam axis is proportional to the background gas target density and thus, according to the ideal gas law, is inversely proportional to gas translational temperature. By measuring the scatter image with and without a discharge, the temperature was determined in 1-dimension along the laser beam passing radially through the discharge. The 1-dimensional scattering intensity profiles were then used to generate 2-dimensional cross-sectional slices of temperature by transitioning the height of the laser beam. The cross-sectional temperature profiles exhibited a high degree of cylindrical symmetry with the radial width of the high temperature region expanding with increasing discharge current. Peak temperatures determined by Rayleigh scattering for each current were compared to temperatures derived from standard optical emission spectral analyses of N2(C-B) bands, where the calculated rotational temperatures from emission were in reasonable agreement with the Rayleigh translational temperature profiles. Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  16. Translational Temperature Profiles in Atmospheric Air Microdischarges by Ultraviolet Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Steven; Caplinger, James; Hensley, Amber; Tolson, Allen

    2014-03-01

    Spatially resolved temperature measurements within a microdischarge in atmospheric pressure air have been conducted using Rayleigh scattering of a pulsed ultraviolet laser. The scatter image intensity along the laser beam axis is proportional to the background gas target density and thus, according to the ideal gas law, is inversely proportional to gas translational temperature. By measuring the scatter image with and without a discharge, the temperature was determined in 1-dimension along the laser beam passing radially through the discharge. The 1-dimensional scattering intensity profiles were then used to generate 2-dimensional cross-sectional slices of temperature by transitioning the height of the laser beam. The cross-sectional temperature profiles exhibited a high degree of cylindrical symmetry with the radial width of the high temperature region expanding with increasing discharge current. Peak temperatures determined by Rayleigh scattering for each current were compared to temperatures derived from standard optical emission spectral analyses of N2(C-B) bands, where the calculated rotational temperatures from emission were in reasonable agreement with the Rayleigh translational temperature profiles.

  17. Self-similarity of temperature profiles in distant galaxy clusters: the quest for a universal law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, A.; Ettori, S.; Molendi, S.; Gastaldello, F.

    2012-09-01

    Context. We present the XMM-Newton temperature profiles of 12 bright (LX > 4 × 1044 erg s-1) clusters of galaxies at 0.4 < z < 0.9, having an average temperature in the range 5 ≲ kT ≲ 11 keV. Aims: The main goal of this paper is to study for the first time the temperature profiles of a sample of high-redshift clusters, to investigate their properties, and to define a universal law to describe the temperature radial profiles in galaxy clusters as a function of both cosmic time and their state of relaxation. Methods: We performed a spatially resolved spectral analysis, using Cash statistics, to measure the temperature in the intracluster medium at different radii. Results: We extracted temperature profiles for the clusters in our sample, finding that all profiles are declining toward larger radii. The normalized temperature profiles (normalized by the mean temperature T500) are found to be generally self-similar. The sample was subdivided into five cool-core (CC) and seven non cool-core (NCC) clusters by introducing a pseudo-entropy ratio σ = (TIN/TOUT) × (EMIN/EMOUT)-1/3 and defining the objects with σ < 0.6 as CC clusters and those with σ ≥ 0.6 as NCC clusters. The profiles of CC and NCC clusters differ mainly in the central regions, with the latter exhibiting a slightly flatter central profile. A significant dependence of the temperature profiles on the pseudo-entropy ratio σ is detected by fitting a function of r and σ, showing an indication that the outer part of the profiles becomes steeper for higher values of σ (i.e. transitioning toward the NCC clusters). No significant evidence of redshift evolution could be found within the redshift range sampled by our clusters (0.4 < z < 0.9). A comparison of our high-z sample with intermediate clusters at 0.1 < z < 0.3 showed how the CC and NCC cluster temperature profiles have experienced some sort of evolution. This can happen because higher z clusters are at a less advanced stage of their formation and

  18. Evolution of the electron temperature profile of ohmically heated plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.C.; Arunasalam, V.; Goldston, R.J.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Johnson, D.W.; McGuire, K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Stauffer, F.J.

    1985-08-01

    Blackbody electron cyclotron emission was used to ascertain and study the evolution and behavior of the electron temperature profile in ohmically heated plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The emission was measured with absolutely calibrated millimeter wavelength radiometers. The temperature profile normalized to the central temperature and minor radius is observed to broaden substantially with decreasing limiter safety factor q/sub a/, and is insensitive to the plasma minor radius. Sawtooth activity was seen in the core of most TFTR discharges and appeared to be associated with a flattening of the electron temperature profile within the plasma core where q less than or equal to 1. Two types of sawtooth behavior were identified in large TFTR plasmas (minor radius, a less than or equal to 0.8 m) : a typically 35 to 40 msec period ''normal'' sawtooth, and a ''compound'' sawtooth with 70 to 80 msec period.

  19. Measurement of temperature profiles in flames by emission-absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, F. S.; Arnold, C. B.; Lindquist, G. H.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to explore the use of infrared and ultraviolet emission-absorption spectroscopy for determination of temperature profiles in flames. Spectral radiances and absorptances were measured in the 2.7-micron H2O band and the 3064-A OH band in H2/O2 flames for several temperature profiles which were directly measured by a sodium line-reversal technique. The temperature profiles, determined by inversion of the infrared and ultraviolet spectra, showed an average disagreement with line-reversal measurements of 50 K for the infrared and 200 K for the ultraviolet at a temperature of 2600 K. The reasons for these discrepancies are discussed in some detail.

  20. Estimation of the diversity between DNA calorimetric profiles, differential melting curves and corresponding melting temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Ling; Fridman, Alexander S; Grigoryan, Inessa E; Galyuk, Elena N; Murashko, Oleg N; Hu, Chin-Kun; Lando, Dmitri Y

    2016-11-01

    The Poland-Fixman-Freire formalism was adapted for modeling of calorimetric DNA melting profiles, and applied to plasmid pBR 322 and long random sequences. We studied the influence of the difference (HGC -HAT ) between the helix-coil transition enthalpies of AT and GC base pairs on the calorimetric melting profile and on normalized calorimetric melting profile. A strong alteration of DNA calorimetrical profile with HGC -HAT was demonstrated. In contrast, there is a relatively slight change in the normalized profiles and in corresponding ordinary (optical) normalized differential melting curves (DMCs). For fixed HGC -HAT , the average relative deviation (S) between DMC and normalized calorimetric profile, and the difference between their melting temperatures (Tcal -Tm ) are weakly dependent on peculiarities of the multipeak fine structure of DMCs. At the same time, both the deviation S and difference (Tcal -Tm ) enlarge with the temperature melting range of the helix-coil transition. It is shown that the local deviation between DMC and normalized calorimetric profile increases in regions of narrow peaks distant from the melting temperature. PMID:27422497

  1. Shrinkage behavior of low profile unsaturated polyester resins at low temperature and low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Li; Lee, L.J.

    1996-12-31

    In order to achieve excellent surface quality and dimension control of molded polymer composites, low profile additives (LPA) are widely used in low shrinkage unsaturated polyester (UPE) molding compound. Although the detailed LPA mechanism is still a subject of controversy, it is now generally agreed that the most important factor for the low profile behavior is the strong phase separation between LPA and UPE resin during curing. Among the extensive studies of LPA mechanism, most of the work focused on the reaction at high temperatures, since LPAs found most of their applications in high temperature and high pressure processes like sheet molding compound (SMC) and bulk molding compound (BMC). Recently, because of the growing interests of new processes such as low pressure SMC and vacuum infusion resin transfer molding, low shrinkage molding compound with the ability to be processed at low temperature and low pressure have attracted considerable attention from the composite industry. Therefore, further understanding of the low profile mechanism at low temperature and low pressure cure is necessary. Moreover, the relatively long reaction time at low temperature cure provides an opportunity to decouple the factors such as phase separation and microvoid formation, which occur almost at the same time in high temperature cure. The objective of this study is to determine LPA performance as well as to provide a better understanding of low profile mechanism at low temperature and low pressure.

  2. Compact and cost-effective temperature-insensitive bio-sensor based on long-period fiber gratings for accurate detection of E. coli bacteria in water.

    PubMed

    Dandapat, Krishnendu; Tripathi, Saurabh Mani; Chinifooroshan, Yasser; Bock, Wojtek J; Mikulic, Predrag

    2016-09-15

    We propose and demonstrate a novel temperature-insensitive bio-sensor for accurate and quantitative detection of Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria in water. Surface sensitivity is maximized by operating the long-period fiber grating (LPFG) closest to its turnaround wavelength, and the temperature insensitivity is achieved by selectively exciting a pair of cladding modes with opposite dispersion characteristics. Our sensor shows a nominal temperature sensitivity of ∼1.25  pm/°C, which can be further reduced by properly adjusting the LPFG lengths, while maintaining a high refractive index sensitivity of 1929 nm/RIU. The overall length of the sensor is ∼3.6  cm, making it ideally suitable for bio-sensing applications. As an example, we also show the sensor's capability for reliable, quantitative detection of E. coli bacteria in water over a temperature fluctuation of room temperature to 40°C. PMID:27628356

  3. Is it Possible that the Solar Corona Temperature Profile Does Not Require Mechanical Deposition of Energy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Roytershteyn, V.; Karimabadi, H.; Daughton, W. S.

    2012-12-01

    The solar corona, like other main sequence stars, has a non-monotonic temperature inversion. Prevailing ideas have suggested that the inversion is the result of deposition of mechanical energy near the temperature maximum, possibly afforded by the damping of wave trains. The adequacy of ones quantitative description of heat flow in the corona plays a central role in the association of non-monotonic profile and a heating requirement. Using first principles calculations we demonstrate that neither the size nor the direction of the heat flow in the corona is implied by knowing the temperature profile. The usually used Spitzer-Braginskii transport is not appropriate for the solar corona, but has until now been used to infer the sign of the heat flow divergence at the temperature maximum. By vacating the certainty of heat flow diverging from the coronal temperature maximum there is no immediate connection between the non-monotonic temperature profile and the need for energy or momentum addition to the corona at the temperature maximum. Thus the coronal problem is to explain the temperature profile, not necessarily produce an energy deposition, predicted by a broken transport description. The same argument that shows that Spitzer-Braginskii transport is inadequate also implies that the underlying kinetic state of the plasma is non-local and will be permeated by non-thermal distributions. Such non-thermal distributions are a necessary prerequisite for the alternate velocity filtration model that explains the non-monotonic temperature profile of the solar corona as well as all stars on the zero age main sequence.

  4. Development of a Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) for continuous temperature profiling upto lower stratospheric altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekhar Sarma, T. V.; Tsuda, Toshitaka

    2012-07-01

    The Gadanki (13.46°N, 79.17°E) MST radar is a high power VHF pulsed coherent Doppler radar established for remote probing of atmospheric phenomena in the Mesosphere Stratosphere Troposphere regions. Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) was developed using this radar to obtain height profiles of atmospheric temperature up to lower stratospheric altitudes. RASS uses the effect of temperature on the speed of sound in air as a means to sense the atmospheric temperature. It is the combination of a Doppler radar and acoustic exciters. The radar was augmented with acoustic exciters that were designed and constructed for this purpose. The Doppler radar profiles the speed of refractive index perturbations induced by the acoustic source. RASS has been demonstrated to be a reliable ground-based remote profiling technique to obtain altitude profiles of atmospheric virtual temperature, Tv over the past two decades. This work describes the design of the system and its application to the observation of height profiles of atmospheric virtual temperature up to and beyond tropical tropopause altitudes. Observations were made during 2007, 2008 and 2009 over periods extending up to 72 hours. These observations demonstrate temperature profiling capability up to about 18 km in altitude, though on an occasion height coverage upto 22.8km was obtained briefly; lowest height covered is from about 1.5km onwards. During the period of the RASS observations simultaneous data from radiosonde was used to validate the temperature measurements. Simultaneous satellite-based measurement of outgoing long wave radiation (OLR) and precipitation from ground-based instruments was used to study the atmospheric phenomena of gravity waves and atmospheric stability during a convection event.

  5. Fast and accurate determination of 3D temperature distribution using fraction-step semi-implicit method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Wei; Hoppe, Ralph; Gu, Ning

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we proposed a method to numerically determinate 3-dimensional thermal response due to electromagnetic exposure quickly and accurately. Due to the stability criterion the explicit finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method works fast only if the spatial step is not set very small. In this paper, the semi-implicit Crank-Nicholson method for time domain discretization with unconditional time stability is proposed, where the idea of fractional steps method was utilized in 3-dimension so that an efficient numerical implementation is obtained. Compared with the explicit FDTD, with similar numerical precision, the proposed method takes less than 1/200 of the execution time.

  6. A Temperature-Profile Method for Estimating Flow Processes inGeologic Heat Pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Birkholzer, Jens T.

    2004-12-06

    Above-boiling temperature conditions, as encountered, forexample, in geothermal reservoirs and in geologic repositories for thestorage of heat-producing nuclear wastes, may give rise to stronglyaltered liquid and gas flow processes in porous subsurface environments.The magnitude of such flow perturbation is extremely hard to measure inthe field. We therefore propose a simple temperature-profile method thatuses high-resolution temperature data for deriving such information. Theenergy that is transmitted with the vapor and water flow creates a nearlyisothermal zone maintained at about the boiling temperature, referred toas a heat pipe. Characteristic features of measured temperature profiles,such as the differences in the gradients inside and outside of the heatpipe regions, are used to derive the approximate magnitude of the liquidand gas fluxes in the subsurface, for both steady-state and transientconditions.

  7. A Temperature-Profile Method for Estimating Flow Processes in Geologic Heat Pipes

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2005-01-21

    Above-boiling temperature conditions, as encountered, for example, in geothermal reservoirs and in geologic repositories for the storage of heat-producing nuclear wastes, may give rise to strongly altered liquid and gas flow processes in porous subsurface environments. The magnitude of such flow perturbation is extremely hard to measure in the field. We therefore propose a simple temperature-profile method that uses high-resolution temperature data for deriving such information. The energy that is transmitted with the vapor and water flow creates a nearly isothermal zone maintained at about the boiling temperature, referred to as a heat pipe. Characteristic features of measured temperature profiles, such as the differences in the gradients inside and outside of the heat pipe regions, are used to derive the approximate magnitude of the liquid and gas fluxes in the subsurface, for both steady-state and transient conditions.

  8. The generalization of upper atmospheric wind and temperature based on the Voigt line shape profile.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunmin; He, Jian

    2006-12-25

    The principle of probing the upper atmospheric wind field, which is the Voigt profile spectral line shape, is presented for the first time. By the Fourier Transform of Voigt profile, with the Imaging Spectroscope and the Doppler effect of electromagnetic wave, the distribution and calculation formulae of the velocity field, temperature field, and pressure field of the upper atmosphere wind field are given. The probed source is the two major aurora emission lines originated from the metastable O(1S) and O(1D) at 557.7nm and 630.0nm. From computer simulation and error analysis, the Voigt profile, which is the correlation of the Gaussian profile and Lorentzian profile, is closest to the actual airglow emission lines. PMID:19532147

  9. A Mathematical Model for the Exhaust Gas Temperature Profile of a Diesel Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, C. H. G.; Maia, C. B.; Sodré, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    This work presents a heat transfer model for the exhaust gas of a diesel power generator to determine the gas temperature profile in the exhaust pipe. The numerical methodology to solve the mathematical model was developed using a finite difference method approach for energy equation resolution and determination of temperature profiles considering turbulent fluid flow and variable fluid properties. The simulation was carried out for engine operation under loads from 0 kW to 40 kW. The model was compared with results obtained using the multidimensional Ansys CFX software, which was applied to solve the governor equations of turbulent fluid flow. The results for the temperature profiles in the exhaust pipe show a good proximity between the mathematical model developed and the multidimensional software.

  10. Satellite sounding of cloud parameters and temperature profiles in cloudy atmospheres from infrared and microwave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, H. Y.

    The utilization of both infrared and microwave sounding channels for the simultaneous inference of the cloud parameters and temperature profiles in cloudy atmospheres is studied. The necessary parameterized equations for infrared and microwave radiative transfer were derived, and the retrieval programs were developed for the determination of the high cloud top height, high cloud thickness, low cloud top height, surface emissivities, cloud liquid water content, and temperature profile successively utilizing selected HIRS and SCAMS channels. Hypothetical error analyses were performed and it is found that the retrieval technique is theoretically rigorous and practically feasible. The retrieval technique is then applied to the Nimbus 4 HIRS and SCAMS data for a number of carefully selected cases associated with summertime convective cloud systems and wintertime large scale synoptic cyclones. Cloud parameters and temperature profiles appear to be in qualitative agreement with the available synoptic, radiosonde, surface, and radar observations.

  11. River Inflows into Lakes: Basin Temperature Profiles Driven By Peeling Detrainment from Dense Underflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, C. A. R.; Huppert, H. E.; Imberger, J.; Dalziel, S. B.

    2014-12-01

    Dense gravity currents from river inflows feed fluid into confined basins in lakes. Large inflows can influence temperature profiles in the basins. Existing parameterisations of the circulation and mixing of such inflows are often based on the entrainment of ambient fluid into the underflowing gravity currents. However, recent observations have suggested that uni-directional entrainment into a gravity current does not fully describe the transfer between such gravity currents and the ambient water. Laboratory experiments visualised peeling detrainment from the gravity current occurring when the ambient fluid was stratified. A theoretical model of the observed peeling detrainment was developed to predict the temperature profile in the basin. This new model gives a better approximation of the temperature profile observed in the experiments than the pre-existing entraining model. The model can now be developed such that it integrates into operational models of lake basins.

  12. Fitting of the Thomson scattering density and temperature profiles on the COMPASS tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanikova, E.; Peterka, M.; Bohm, P.; Bilkova, P.; Aftanas, M.; Sos, M.; Urban, J.; Hron, M.; Panek, R.

    2016-11-01

    A new technique for fitting the full radial profiles of electron density and temperature obtained by the Thomson scattering diagnostic in H-mode discharges on the COMPASS tokamak is described. The technique combines the conventionally used modified hyperbolic tangent function for the edge transport barrier (pedestal) fitting and a modification of a Gaussian function for fitting the core plasma. Low number of parameters of this combined function and their straightforward interpretability and controllability provide a robust method for obtaining physically reasonable profile fits. Deconvolution with the diagnostic instrument function is applied on the profile fit, taking into account the dependence on the actual magnetic configuration.

  13. Statistical analysis of stratospheric temperature and ozone profile data for trends and model comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiao, G. C.

    1992-01-01

    Work performed during the project period July 1, 1990 to June 30, 1992 on the statistical analysis of stratospheric temperature data, rawinsonde temperature data, and ozone profile data for the detection of trends is described. Our principal topics of research are trend analysis of NOAA stratospheric temperature data over the period 1978-1989; trend analysis of rawinsonde temperature data for the period 1964-1988; trend analysis of Umkehr ozone profile data for the period 1977-1991; and comparison of observed ozone and temperature trends in the lower stratosphere. Analysis of NOAA stratospheric temperature data indicates the existence of large negative trends at 0.4 mb level, with magnitudes increasing with latitudes away from the equator. Trend analysis of rawinsonde temperature data over 184 stations shows significant positive trends about 0.2 C per decade at surface to 500 mb range, decreasing to negative trends about -0.3 C at 100 to 50 mb range, and increasing slightly at 30 mb level. There is little evidence of seasonal variation in trends. Analysis of Umkehr ozone data for 12 northern hemispheric stations shows significant negative trends about -.5 percent per year in Umkehr layers 7-9 and layer 3, but somewhat less negative trends in layers 4-6. There is no pronounced seasonal variation in trends, especially in layers 4-9. A comparison was made of empirical temperature trends from rawinsonde data in the lower stratosphere with temperature changes determined from a one-dimensional radiative transfer calculation that prescribed a given ozone change over the altitude region, surface to 50 km, obtained from trend analysis of ozonsonde and Umkehr profile data. The empirical and calculated temperature trends are found in substantive agreement in profile shape and magnitude.

  14. Assessing Radiometric Calibration, Retrieved Atmospheric Temperature Profiles Quality and Radiative Transfer Model Accuracy Using GPS-RO temperature Profiles in the Summer Stratospheric Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishbein, E.; Ao, C. O.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Lee, S.; Mannucci, A.

    2012-12-01

    The summer stratospheric hemisphere is a uniquely simply environment in which to study the performance of satellite-based atmospheric sounders. The stratosphere is primarily in radiative balance with high pressure over the pole and weak axisymmetric easterly flow persisting for months. Temperature is highly correlated zonally and intercomparisons between observations have precision better than 1 K over zonal distances greater than 1,000 km. Therefore good sampling statistics are possible with infrequent observations because mismatch error grows slowly with increasing coincidence time and distance. In this presentation we compare ATMS and CrIS radiances in stratospheric temperature sounding channels against calculated radiances from GPS radio occultation (GPS-RO) profiles and numerical weather forecast (NWF) models. The GPS-RO comparisons are generally good in the mid-stratosphere, while the NWF intercomparisons are generally poorer, limited by radiation modeling of the stratosphere in the NWF. We have analyzed dependence of the radiance residuals on cloud contamination in tropospheric channels, because clouds are not expected to influence stratosphere-sensing IR radiances and this is a simple test on the CrIS instrument performance. ATMS brightness temperatures are sorted by latitude and scan angle and compared with near coincident GPS-RO temperature profiles to separate errors in radiative transfer modeling from antenna pattern and spectroscopy. We demonstrate the value of stratospheric observations for characterizing instrument performance, which can than be applied to climatically more interesting regimes.

  15. Measuring centimeter-resolution air temperature profiles above land and water using fiber-optic Distributed Temperature Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmund, Armin; Pfister, Lena; Olesch, Johannes; Thomas, Christoph K.

    2016-04-01

    The precise determination of near-surface air temperature profiles is of special importance for the characterization of airflows (e.g. cold air) and the quantification of sensible heat fluxes according to the flux-gradient similarity approach. In contrast to conventional multi-sensor techniques, measuring temperature profiles using fiber-optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) provides thousands of measurements referenced to a single calibration standard at much reduced costs. The aim of this work was to enhance the vertical resolution of Raman scatter DTS measurements up to the centimeter-scale using a novel approach for atmospheric applications: the optical fiber was helically coiled around a meshed fabric. In addition to testing the new fiber geometry, we quantified the measurement uncertainty and demonstrated the benefits of the enhanced-resolution profiles. The fiber-optic cable was coiled around a hollow column consisting of white reinforcing fabric supported by plexiglass rings every meter. Data from two columns of this type were collected for 47 days to measure air temperature vertically over 3.0 and 5.1 m over a gently inclined meadow and over and in a small lake, respectively. Both profiles had a vertical resolution of 1 cm in the lower section near the surface and 5 cm in the upper section with an along-fiber instrument-specific averaging of 1.0 m and a temporal resolution of 30 s. Measurement uncertainties, especially from conduction between reinforcing fabric and fiber-optic cable, were estimated by modeling the fiber temperature via a detailed energy balance approach. Air temperature, wind velocity and radiation components were needed as input data and measured separately. The temperature profiles revealed valuable details, especially in the lowest 1 m above surface. This was best demonstrated for nighttime observations when artefacts due to solar heating did not occur. For example, the dynamics of a cold air layer was detected in a clear night

  16. Comparison of temperature and humidity profiles with elastic-backscatter lidar data

    SciTech Connect

    Soriano, C. |; Buttler, W.T.; Baldasano, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    This contribution analyzes elastic-backscatter lidar data and temperature and humidity profiles from radiosondes acquired in Barcelona in July 1992. Elastic-backscatter lidar data reveal the distribution of aerosols within the volume of atmosphere scanned. By comparing this information with temperature and humidity profiles of the atmosphere at a similar time, we are able to asses de relationship among aerosol distribution and atmospheric stability or water content, respectively. Comparisons have shown how lidar`s revealed layers of aerosols correspond to atmospheric layers with different stability condition and water content.

  17. Profile Measurement of Ion Temperature and Toroidal Rotation Velocity with Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy Diagnostics in the HL-2A Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jing; Yao, Lieming; Zhu, Jianhua; Han, Xiaoyu; Li, Wenzhu

    2012-11-01

    This paper deals with the profile measurement of impurity ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity that can be achieved by using the charge exchange recombination spectrum (CXRS) diagnostics tool built on the HL-2A tokamak. By using CXRS, an accurate impurity ion temperature and toroidal plasma rotation velocity profile can be achieved under the condition of neutral beam injection (NBI) heating. Considering the edge effect of the line of CVI 529.06 nm (n = 8~7), which contains three lines (active exciting spectral line (ACX), passivity exciting spectral line (PCX) and electron exciting spectral line (ICE)), and using three Gaussian fitted curves, we obtain the following experimental results: the core ion temperature of HL-2A device is nearly thousands of eV, and the plasma rotation velocity reaches about 104 m · s-1. At the end of paper, some explanations are presented for the relationship between the curves and the inner physical mechanism.

  18. An Experimental Investigation Into the Temperature Profile of a Compliant Foil Air Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radil, Kevin; Zeszotek, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    A series of tests was performed to determine the internal temperature profile in a compliant bump-type foil journal air bearing operating at room temperature under various speeds and load conditions. The temperature profile was collected by instrumenting a foil bearing with nine, type K thermocouples arranged in the center and along the bearing s edges in order to measure local temperatures and estimate thermal gradients in the axial and circumferential directions. To facilitate the measurement of maximum temperatures from viscous shearing in the air film, the thermocouples were tack welded to the backside of the bumps that were in direct contact with the top foil. The mating journal was coated with a high temperature solid lubricant that, together with the bearing, underwent high temperature start-stop cycles to produce a smooth, steady-state run-in surface. Tests were conducted at speeds from 20 to 50 krpm and loads ranging from 9 to 222 N. The results indicate that, over the conditions tested, both journal rotational speed and radial load are responsible for heat generation with speed playing a more significant role in the magnitude of the temperatures. The temperature distribution was nearly symmetric about the bearing center at 20 and 30 krpm but became slightly skewed toward one side at 40 and 50 krpm. Surprisingly, the maximum temperatures did not occur at the bearing edge where the minimum film thickness is expected but rather in the middle of the bearing where analytical investigations have predicted the air film to be much thicker. Thermal gradients were common during testing and were strongest in the axial direction from the middle of the bearing to its edges, reaching 3.78 8C/mm. The temperature profile indicated the circumferential thermal gradients were negligible.

  19. Optical measurement of static temperature and hydroxyl radical profiles in a hydrogen-fueled supersonic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaugler, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    Profiles of static temperature and hydroxyl radical concentration were measured in a two-dimensional supersonic combustor test section 22.8 cm downstream of hydrogen injection. A high-pressure gas generator supplied vitiated air to the test section at Mach 2.44, atmospheric pressure, and a total temperature of about 2240 K. Room-temperature hydrogen was injected through a 0.40-cm step slot at Mach 1 and matched pressure. The measurements utilized a noninterfering spectral line absorption technique in which narrow ultraviolet emission lines of the hydroxyl electronic transition are absorbed by the broader absorption lines in the combustion gas. Comparison of the measured temperature profiles with theoretical calculations showed good agreement.

  20. Retrieval of humidity and temperature profiles over the oceans from INSAT 3D satellite radiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, C.; Kumar, Deo; Balaji, C.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, retrieval of temperature and humidity profiles of atmosphere from INSAT 3D-observed radiances has been accomplished. As the first step, a fast forward radiative transfer model using an Artificial neural network has been developed and it was proven to be highly effective, giving a correlation coefficient of 0.97. In order to develop this, a diverse set of physics-based clear sky profiles of pressure ( P), temperature ( T) and specific humidity ( q) has been developed. The developed database was further used for geophysical retrieval experiments in two different frameworks, namely, an ANN and Bayesian estimation. The neural network retrievals were performed for three different cases, viz., temperature only retrieval, humidity only retrieval and combined retrieval. The temperature/humidity only ANN retrievals were found superior to combined retrieval using an ANN. Furthermore, Bayesian estimation showed superior results when compared with the combined ANN retrievals.

  1. Effect of leaf incubation temperature profiles on Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient expression.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sang-Kyu; McDonald, Karen A; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2015-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient expression is known to be highly dependent on incubation temperature. Compared with early studies that were conducted at constant temperature, we examined the effect of variable leaf incubation temperature on transient expression. As a model system, synthetic endoglucanase (E1) and endoxylanase (Xyn10A) genes were transiently expressed in detached whole sunflower leaves via vacuum infiltration for biofuel applications. We found that the kinetics of transient expression strongly depended on timing of the temperature change as well as leaf incubation temperature. Surprisingly, we found that high incubation temperature (27-30 °C) which is suboptimal for T-DNA transfer, significantly enhanced transient expression if the high temperature was applied during the late phase (Day 3-6) of leaf incubation whereas incubation temperature in a range of 20-25 °C for an early phase (Day 0-2) resulted in higher production. On the basis of these results, we propose that transient expression is governed by both T-DNA transfer and protein synthesis in plant cells that have different temperature dependent kinetics. Because the phases were separated in time and had different optimal temperatures, we were then able to develop a novel two phase optimization strategy for leaf incubation temperature. Applying the time-varying temperature profile, we were able to increase the protein accumulation by fivefold compared with the control at a constant temperature of 20 °C. From our knowledge, this is the first report illustrating the effect of variable temperature profiling for improved transient expression.

  2. Enhanced detection of hydraulically active fractures by temperature profiling in lined heated bedrock boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pehme, P. E.; Parker, B. L.; Cherry, J. A.; Molson, J. W.; Greenhouse, J. P.

    2013-03-01

    SummaryThe effectiveness of borehole profiling using a temperature probe for identifying hydraulically active fractures in rock has improved due to the combination of two advances: improved temperature sensors, with resolution on the order of 0.001 °C, and temperature profiling within water inflated flexible impermeable liners used to temporarily seal boreholes from hydraulic cross-connection. The open-hole cross-connection effects dissipate after inflation, so that both the groundwater flow regime and the temperature distribution return to the ambient (background) condition. This paper introduces a third advancement: the use of an electrical heating cable that quickly increases the temperature of the entire static water column within the lined hole and thus places the entire borehole and its immediate vicinity into thermal disequilibrium with the broader rock mass. After heating for 4-6 h, profiling is conducted several times over a 24 h period as the temperature returns to background conditions. This procedure, referred to as the Active Line Source (ALS) method, offers two key improvements over prior methods. First, there is no depth limit for detection of fractures with flow. Second, both identification and qualitative comparison of evidence for ambient groundwater flow in fractures is improved throughout the entire test interval. The benefits of the ALS method are demonstrated by comparing results from two boreholes tested to depths of 90 and 120 m in a dolostone aquifer used for municipal water supply and in which most groundwater flow occurs in fractures. Temperature logging in the lined holes shows many fractures in the heterothermic zone both with and without heating, but only the ALS method shows many hydraulically active fractures in the deeper homothermic portion of the hole. The identification of discrete groundwater flow at many depths is supported by additional evidence concerning fracture occurrence, including continuous core visual inspection

  3. Time-evolution of ion-temperature radial profiles for high performance FRC (HPF) plasma in C-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Deepak; Granstedt, E.; Gupta, S.; Magee, R.; Osin, D.; Tuszewski, M.; TAE Team

    2014-10-01

    Measurements of ion temperature profile and its time evolution is important for the understanding of FRC confinement and transport properties. Recently, in C-2 plasma device, FRCs with significantly improved confinement and transport properties are observed (HPF14) using higher formation DC field and Lithium wall conditioning. Time evolutions of ion-temperature profiles in these FRCs are measured using upgraded impurity ions passive Doppler spectroscopy system. Measured line integration profiles are inverted to get the local ion-temperature profiles, by taking in to consideration the local emissivity and directed ion-velocity. These profiles are measured under different C-2 operation conditions; for example, Neutral Beam power, plasma gun and magnetic field configurations. Radial profiles of ion temperature and its time evolution will be presented. Comparison of ion-temperature time-evolution with neutron measurements, deuterium-ion temperature measurements, and 1-d transport modeling will also be presented.

  4. Infrared multidetector spectrometer for remote sensing of temperature profiles in the presence of clouds.

    PubMed

    Aumann, H H; Chahine, M T

    1976-09-01

    An infrared multidetector spectrometer with channels in the 4.3-microm and 15-microm CO(2) bands for the remote sensing of temperature profiles in the presence of clouds is described. Results obtained from aircraft flights in July 1975 over ocean sites under various conditions of cloudiness demonstrate the capability of the dual frequency technique to recover surface temperatures to an accuracy of +/-0.5 K in the presence of up to 90% cloud cover.

  5. Characterization of small thermal structures in RFX-mod electron temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassina, A.; Gobbin, M.; Spagnolo, S.; Franz, P.; Terranova, D.

    2016-05-01

    In the RFX-mod reverse field pinch (RFP) experiment, electron temperature profiles often feature structures and fluctuations at fine scale. The present work aims at characterizing their occurrence and their localization, in particular by linking them to underlying tearing modes magnetic islands. The confinement characteristics are discussed, identifying analogies with respect to high scale T e structures. Finally, high frequency magnetic activity (i.e. microtearing instabilities) is confirmed to be closely correlated to the presence and proximity of temperature gradients.

  6. Retrieval of upper atmosphere pressure-temperature profiles from high resolution solar occultation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Russell, J. M., III; Park, J. H.; Namkung, J.

    1987-01-01

    Pressure-temperature profiles over the 18 to 75 km altitude range were retrieved from 0.01 cm(-1) resolution infrared solar absorption spectra recorded with the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier transform spectrometer operating in the solar occultation mode during the Spacelab 3 shuttle mission (April 30 to May 1, 1985). The analysis method is described and preliminary results deduced for five occultation events are compared to correlative pressure-temperature measurments.

  7. Effects of inlet distortion on gas turbine combustion chamber exit temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqsood, Omar Shahzada

    Damage to a nozzle guide vane or blade, caused by non-uniform temperature distributions at the combustion chamber exit, is deleterious to turbine performance and can lead to expensive and time consuming overhaul and repair. A test rig was designed and constructed for the Allison 250-C20B combustion chamber to investigate the effects of inlet air distortion on the combustion chamber's exit temperature fields. The rig made use of the engine's diffuser tubes, combustion case, combustion liner, and first stage nozzle guide vane shield. Rig operating conditions simulated engine cruise conditions, matching the quasi-non-dimensional Mach number, equivalence ratio and Sauter mean diameter. The combustion chamber was tested with an even distribution of inlet air and a 4% difference in airflow at either side. An even distribution of inlet air to the combustion chamber did not create a uniform temperature profile and varying the inlet distribution of air exacerbated the profile's non-uniformity. The design of the combustion liner promoted the formation of an oval-shaped toroidal vortex inside the chamber, creating localized hot and cool sections separated by 90° that appeared in the exhaust. Uneven inlet air distributions skewed the oval vortex, increasing the temperature of the hot section nearest the side with the most mass flow rate and decreasing the temperature of the hot section on the opposite side. Keywords: Allison 250, Combustion, Dual-Entry, Exit Temperature Profile, Gas Turbine, Pattern Factor, Reverse Flow.

  8. Experimental study on temperature profile of fixed - bed gasification of oil-palm fronds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atnaw, Samson M.; Sulaiman, Shaharin A.; Moni, M. Nazmi Z.

    2012-06-01

    Currently the world's second largest palm oil producer Malaysia produces large amount of oil palm biomass each year. The abundance of the biomass introduces a challenge to utilize them as main feedstock for heat and energy generation. Although some oil palm parts and derivatives like empty fruit bunch and fibre have been commercialized as fuel, less attention has been given to oil palm fronds (OPF). Initial feasibility and characterization studies of OPF showed that it is highly feasible as fuel for gasification to produce high value gaseous fuel or syngas. This paper discusses the experimental gasification attempt carried out on OPF using a 50 kW lab scale downdraft gasifier and its results. The conducted study focused on the temperature distributions within the reactor and the characteristics of the dynamic temperature profile for each temperature zones during operation. OPF feedstock of one cubic inch in individual size with 15% average moisture content was utilized. An average pyrolysis zone temperature of 324°Cand an average oxidation zone temperature of 796°Cwere obtained over a total gasification period of 74 minutes. A maximum oxidation zone temperature of 952°Cwas obtained at 486 lpm inlet air flow rate and 10 kg/hr feedstock consumption rate. Stable bluish flare was produced for more than 70% of the total gasification time. The recorded temperature profiles produced closely similar patterns with the temperature profiles recorded from the gasification of woody materials. Similar temperature profile was obtained comparing the results from OPF gasification with that of woody biomass. Furthermore, the successful ignition of the syngas produced from OPF gasification ascertained that OPF indeed has a higher potential as gasification feedstock. Hence, more detailed studies need to be done for better understanding in exploiting the biomass as a high prospect alternative energy solution. In addition, a study of the effect of initial moisture content of OPF

  9. Plant Canopy Temperature and Heat Flux Profiles: What Difference Does an Isothermal Skin Make?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crago, R. D.; Qualls, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface temperature Ts plays a vital role in the determination of sensible (H) and latent heat flux, upwelling long-wave radiation, and ground heat flux. While it is widely recognized that there is a range of skin temperatures represented in even a homogeneous canopy, it is often necessary or convenient to treat the surface as isothermal. This study investigates, at the sub-canopy scale, the implications of assuming that a canopy is isothermal. The focus is on profiles within the canopy of air, foliage, and soil surface temperature, and of sensible and latent heat flux source strength. Data from a dense grassland at the Southern Great Plains experiment in 1997 (SGP97) were used to assess the ability of a multi-layer canopy model to match measured sensible and latent heat fluxes along with radiometric surface temperatures. In its standard mode, the model solves the energy balance for each canopy layer and uses Localized Near Field (LNF) theory to model the turbulent transport. The results suggest the model captures the most important features of canopy flux generation and transport, and support its use to investigate scalar profiles within canopies. For 112 data points at SGP97, the model produced realistic temperature and sensible heat flux source profiles. In addition, it was run in a mode that seeks the isothermal (soil and foliage) skin temperature (Ti) that provides the same Hproduced by the model in its standard mode. This produces profiles of air and foliage temperature and of sensible heat source strength that differ significantly from profiles from the standard mode. Based on these simulations, realistic canopies may have a mixture of positive and negative sensible heat flux sources at various heights, typically with large contributions from the soil surface. There is frequently a discontinuity between foliage temperatures near the soil and the actual soil surface temperature. For isothermal canopies, heat sources at all levels had the same sign and

  10. Theoretical and Experimental Research of Error of Method of Thermocouple with Controlled Profile of Temperature Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Su; Kochan, O.; Chunzhi, Wang; Kochan, R.

    2015-12-01

    The method of study and experimental researches of the error of method of the thermocouple with controlled profile of temperature field along the main thermocouple are considered in this paper. Experimentally determined values of error of method are compared to the theoretical estimations done using Newton's law of cooling. They converge well.

  11. Analysis of temperature profiles for investigating stream losses beneath ephemeral channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, J.; Stewart, A.E.; Niswonger, R.; Sarma, L.

    2002-01-01

    Continuous estimates of streamflow are challenging in ephemeral channels. The extremely transient nature of ephemeral streamflows results in shifting channel geometry and degradation in the calibration of streamflow stations. Earlier work suggests that analysis of streambed temperature profiles is a promising technique for estimating streamflow patterns in ephemeral channels. The present work provides a detailed examination of the basis for using heat as a tracer of stream/groundwater exchanges, followed by a description of an appropriate heat and water transport simulation code for ephemeral channels, as well as discussion of several types of temperature analysis techniques to determine streambed percolation rates. Temperature-based percolation rates for three ephemeral stream sites are compared with available surface water estimates of channel loss for these sites. These results are combined with published results to develop conclusions regarding the accuracy of using vertical temperature profiles in estimating channel losses. Comparisons of temperature-based streambed percolation rates with surface water-based channel losses indicate that percolation rates represented 30% to 50% of the total channel loss. The difference is reasonable since channel losses include both vertical and nonvertical component of channel loss as well as potential evapotranspiration losses. The most significant advantage of the use of sediment-temperature profiles is their robust and continuous nature, leading to a long-term record of the timing and duration of channel losses and continuous estimates of streambed percolation. The primary disadvantage is that temperature profiles represent the continuous percolation rate at a single point in an ephemeral channel rather than an average seepage loss from the entire channel.

  12. Acousto-thermometric recovery of the deep temperature profile using heat conduction equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Vilkov, V. A.; Dvornikova, M. V.; Dvornikova, V. V.; Kazanskii, A. S.; Kuryatnikova, N. A.; Mansfel'd, A. D.

    2012-09-01

    In a model experiment using the acousto-thermographic method, deep temperature profiles varying in time are recovered. In the recovery algorithm, we used a priori information in the form of a requirement that the calculated temperature must satisfy the heat conduction equation. The problem is reduced to determining two parameters: the initial temperature and the temperature conductivity coefficient of the object under consideration (the plasticine band). During the experiment, there was independent inspection using electronic thermometers mounted inside the plasticine. The error in the temperature conductivity coefficient was about 17% and the error in initial temperature determination was less than one degree. Such recovery results allow application of this approach to solving a number of medical problems. It is experimentally proved that acoustic irregularities influence the acousto-thermometric results as well. It is shown that in the chosen scheme of experiment (which corresponds to measurements of human muscle tissue), this influence can be neglected.

  13. Measurements of the O2A- and B-bands for determining temperature and pressure profiles from ACE MAESTRO: Forward model and retrieval algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowlan, C. R.; McElroy, C. T.; Drummond, J. R.

    2007-12-01

    The ACE-MAESTRO (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation) instrument on the SCISAT satellite is able to measure solar occultation absorption in the A- and B-bands of molecular oxygen with a spectral resolution of 2 nm. Profiles of total atmospheric density are derived by exploiting the constant and known mixing ratio of O2, and are used to determine profiles of pressure and temperature using hydrostatic balance and the ideal gas law. A highly accurate combined fast-line-by-line and extended correlated-k technique is implemented to fast forward model MAESTRO's O2 absorption measurements, which ensures that errors in pressure and temperature resulting from the forward model approximation are essentially negligible. Estimated errors in pressure and temperature are determined for the A-, B-, and combined A B-band retrievals for a typical retrieval, and demonstrate that pressure profiles should be derivable to within 1% and temperature to within 2 K over most altitudes using a combined A B retrieval. The combined retrieval provides an improvement of up to 0.25% in pressure and 0.5 K in temperature over the A-band retrieval alone. The B-band could also be used alone below about 50 km, where its independent retrieval produces error estimates of 1 1.5% in pressure and 2 3 K in temperature.

  14. Environmental profile and critical temperature effects on milk production of Holstein cows in desert climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igono, M. O.; Bjotvedt, G.; Sanford-Crane, H. T.

    1992-06-01

    The environmental profile of central Arizona is quantitatively described using meteorological data between 1971 and 1986. Utilizing ambient temperature criteria of hours per day less than 21° C, between 21 and 27° C, and more than 27° C, the environmental profile of central Arizona consists of varying levels of thermoneutral and heat stress periods. Milk production data from two commercial dairy farms from March 1990 to February 1991 were used to evaluate the seasonal effects identified in the environmental profile. Overall, milk production is lower during heat stress compared to thermoneutral periods. During heat stress, the cool period of hours per day with temperature less than 21° C provides a margin of safety to reduce the effects of heat stress on decreased milk production. Using minimum, mean and maximum ambient temperatures, the upper critical temperatures for milk production are 21, 27 and 32° C, respectively. Using the temperature-humidity index as the thermal environment indicator, the critical values for minimum, mean and maximum THI are 64, 72 and 76, respectively.

  15. Improving 7-Day Forecast Skill by Assimilation of Retrieved AIRS Temperature Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Rosenberg, Bob

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a new set of Data Assimilation Experiments covering the period January 1 to February 29, 2016 using the GEOS-5 DAS. Our experiments assimilate all data used operationally by GMAO (Control) with some modifications. Significant improvement in Global and Southern Hemisphere Extra-tropical 7-day forecast skill was obtained when: We assimilated AIRS Quality Controlled temperature profiles in place of observed AIRS radiances, and also did not assimilate CrISATMS radiances, nor did we assimilate radiosonde temperature profiles or aircraft temperatures. This new methodology did not improve or degrade 7-day Northern Hemispheric Extra-tropical forecast skill. We are conducting experiments aimed at further improving of Northern Hemisphere Extra-tropical forecast skill.

  16. Mixed convective/dynamic roll vortices and their effects on initial wind and temperature profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haack, Tracy; Shirer, Hampton N.

    1991-01-01

    The onset and development of both dynamically and convectively forced boundary layer rolls are studied with linear and nonlinear analyses of a truncated spectral model of shallow Boussinesq flow. Emphasis is given here on the energetics of the dominant roll modes, on the magnitudes of the roll-induced modifications of the initial basic state wind and temperature profiles, and on the sensitivity of the linear stability results to the use of modified profiles as basic states. It is demonstrated that the roll circulations can produce substantial changes to the cross-roll component of the initial wind profile and that significant changes in orientation angle estimates can result from use of a roll-modified profile in the stability analysis. These results demonstrate that roll contributions must be removed from observed background wind profiles before using them to investigate the mechanisms underlying actual secondary flows in the boundary layer. The model is developed quite generally to accept arbitrary basic state wind profiles as dynamic forcing. An Ekman profile is chosen here merely to provide a means for easy comparison with other theoretical boundary layer studies; the ultimate application of the model is to study observed boundary layer profiles. Results of the analytic stability analysis are validated by comparing them with results from a larger linear model. For an appropriate Ekman depth, a complete set of transition curves is given in forcing parameter space for roll modes driven both thermally and dynamically. Preferred orientation angles, horizontal wavelengths and propagation frequencies, as well as energetics and wind profile modifications, are all shown to agree rather well with results from studies on Ekman layers as well as with studies on near-neutral and convective atmospheric boundary layers.

  17. Measurement of gas temperature and convection velocity profiles in a dc atmospheric glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Stepaniuk, Vadim P.; Ioppolo, Tindaro; Oetuegen, M. Volkan; Sheverev, Valery A.

    2007-12-15

    Gas temperature and convective velocity distributions are presented for an unconfined glow discharge in air at atmospheric pressure, with electric currents ranging between 30 and 92 mA. The vertically oriented discharge was formed between a pin anode (top) and an extended cathode. The temperature and velocity profiles were measured using laser-induced Rayleigh scattering and laser Doppler anemometry techniques, respectively. The temperature field exhibited a conical shape with the radius of hot temperature zone increasing toward the anode. A maximum temperature of 2470 K was observed on the discharge axis with the discharge current of 92 mA. Air velocity measurements around the discharge demonstrated that the shape and magnitude of the temperature field are strongly affected by natural convection. Estimates indicate that convective losses may account for more than 50% of the power input into the positive column of the discharge. The measured temperature fields and convective velocity profiles provide a set of data that is important for the evaluation of dc atmospheric glow discharges in various applications such as sound manipulation and acoustic noise mitigation.

  18. Effect of temperature on the substrate utilization profiles of microbial communities in different sewer sediments.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Catherine A; Olaleye, Omolara I; Jeanmeure, Laurent F C; Deines, Peter; Jensen, Henriette S; Tait, Simon J; Wright, Phillip C

    2011-01-01

    Sewer systems represent an essential component of modern society. They have a major impact on our quality of life by preventing serious illnesses caused by waterborne diseases, by protecting the environment, and by enabling economic and social development through reducing flood risk. In the UK, systems are normally large and complex and, because of the long lifespan of these assets, their performance and hence their management are influenced by long-term environmental and urban changes. Recent work has focussed on the long-term changes in the hydraulic performance of these systems in response to climate change, e.g. rainfall and economic development. One climate-related driver that has received little attention is temperature, which may in itself have a complex dependence on factors such as rainfall. This study uses Biolog EcoPlates to investigate the effect of different temperatures (4 degrees C, 24 degrees C and 30 degrees C) on the carbon substrate utilization profiles of bacterial communities within sewer sediment deposits. Distinct differences in the metabolic profiles across the different temperatures were observed. Increasing temperature resulted in a shift in biological activity with an increase in the number of different carbon sources that can be utilized. Certain carboxylic and amino acids, however, did not support growth, regardless of temperature. Distinct differences in carbon utilization profiles were also found within sewers that have similar inputs. Therefore, this study has demonstrated that the carbon utilization profile for microbial communities found within sewer sediment deposits is dependent on both temperature and spatial variations. PMID:21473276

  19. Improving Soil Moisture and Temperature Profile and Surface Turbulent Fluxes Estimations in Irrigated Field by Assimilating Multi-source Data into Land Surface Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weijing; Huang, Chunlin; Shen, Huanfeng; Wang, Weizhen

    2016-04-01

    The optimal estimation of hydrothermal conditions in irrigation field is restricted by the deficiency of accurate irrigation information (when and how much to irrigate). However, the accurate estimation of soil moisture and temperature profile and surface turbulent fluxes are crucial to agriculture and water management in irrigated field. In the framework of land surface model, soil temperature is a function of soil moisture - subsurface moisture influences the heat conductivity at the interface of layers and the heat storage in different layers. In addition, soil temperature determines the phase of soil water content with the transformation between frozen and unfrozen. Furthermore, surface temperature affects the partitioning of incoming radiant energy into ground (sensible and latent heat flux), as a consequence changes the delivery of soil moisture and temperature. Given the internal positive interaction lying in these variables, we attempt to retrieve the accurate estimation of soil moisture and temperature profile via assimilating the observations from the surface under unknown irrigation. To resolve the input uncertainty of imprecise irrigation quantity, original EnKS is implemented with inflation and localization (referred to as ESIL) aiming at solving the underestimation of the background error matrix and the extension of observation information from the top soil to the bottom. EnKS applied in this study includes the states in different time points which tightly connect with adjacent ones. However, this kind of relationship gradually vanishes along with the increase of time interval. Thus, the localization is also employed to readjust temporal scale impact between states and filter out redundant or invalid correlation. Considering the parameter uncertainty which easily causes the systematic deviation of model states, two parallel filters are designed to recursively estimate both states and parameters. The study area consists of irrigated farmland and is

  20. Spectroscopic study of temperature and density spatial profiles and mix in implosion cores

    SciTech Connect

    Welser-Sherrill, L.; Mancini, R. C.; Koch, J. A.; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Haan, S. W.; Haynes, D. A.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Regan, S. P.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2008-10-22

    New techniques of x-ray spectroscopy have been developed to extract the temperature and density spatial structure of implosion cores. Results from an emissivity analysis, which neglects optical depth effects, compare well with the independent results of an intensity analysis used in the low optical depth limit. The intensity analysis has also been applied in its full form, in which case density spatial profiles demonstrate significant opacity effects. The emissivity and intensity analyses were combined to infer the spatial profile of mixing between shell and fuel material. This experimentally-derived information on mix is compared with predictions from two standard theoretical mix models.

  1. Temperature, N2, and N density profiles of Triton's atmosphere - Observations and model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasnopolsky, V. A.; Sandel, B. R.; Herbert, F.; Vervack, R. J., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Improved analysis of the Voyager Ultraviolet Spectrometer observations of the solar occultation by Triton yields the isothermal temperature and N2 number densities in the altitude range 475-675 km. The signature of atomic nitrogen in the occultation spectra is identified, its density profile is derived, and an experimental value of the escape rate of N atoms is given. The one-dimensional thermal conductivity equation for a spherical atmosphere is solved, taking into account CO heating and cooling and heating by precipitating electrons, solar radiation, and chemical effects. Finally, profiles of number densities of N, H2, and H are calculated.

  2. Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Data: Temperature profile, logs, schematic model and cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    This dataset contains a variety of data about the Fort Bliss geothermal area, part of the southern portion of the Tularosa Basin, New Mexico. The dataset contains schematic models for the McGregor Geothermal System, a shallow temperature survey of the Fort Bliss geothermal area. The dataset also contains Century OH logs, a full temperature profile, and complete logs from well RMI 56-5, including resistivity and porosity data, drill logs with drill rate, depth, lithology, mineralogy, fractures, temperature, pit total, gases, and descriptions among other measurements as well as CDL, CNL, DIL, GR Caliper and Temperature files. A shallow (2 meter depth) temperature survey of the Fort Bliss geothermal area with 63 data points is also included. Two cross sections through the Fort Bliss area, also included, show well position and depth. The surface map included shows faults and well spatial distribution. Inferred and observed fault distributions from gravity surveys around the Fort Bliss geothermal area.

  3. Connection between variations of the atmosphere temperature profile and variations of the meson component intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blokh, Y. L.; Rogovaya, S. I.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of temperature effects on intensity variations of the cosmic ray meson component were studied. The connection between the temperature variation delta T and the intensity variation delta I was established by using the temperature coefficient density technique. To realize how many devices are needed on the Earth for predicting the temperature variation of the atmosphere profile with a reasonable accuracy, IO isobaric levels and IO were calculated. The set of initial elements of the cosmic ray mesons are varied and it is shown that the matrix of the coefficients B sub ij is rather sensitive to their choice. It is found that if for the calculations of the atmospheric temperature variations the model is used, the number of meson components, essentially exceeding 3, should be considered.

  4. Radial profile of micro-discharge temperature measured by ultraviolet laser Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Steven; Caplinger, James

    2012-10-01

    Air micro-discharge temperature profiles have been derived from measurements of elastic Rayleigh scatter of an ultraviolet laser pulse. Rayleigh scatter images have been recorded to measure spatially resolved translational temperatures along the radial dimension of the dc micro-discharge at various currents. The scatter image intensity along the laser beam axis is proportional to the background gas target density and thus, according to the ideal gas law, is inversely proportional to gas translational temperature. By measuring the scatter image with and without a discharge, the temperature was determined in one-dimension along the laser beam passing radially through the discharge. This laser scatter technique was compared to the technique of measuring rotational and vibrational temperatures by passive optical emission spectroscopy (OES) of the N2 second positive system. Results were generally consistent with the common assumption that Tvibrational>>Trotational=Ttranslational. Slight differences between Trotational and Ttranslational measured by laser scatter and OES techniques respectively are discussed.

  5. The thermal structure of Titan’s upper atmosphere, I: Temperature profiles from Cassini INMS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snowden, D.; Yelle, R. V.; Cui, J.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Edberg, N. J. T.; Ågren, K.

    2013-09-01

    We derive vertical temperature profiles from Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) N2 density measurements from 32 Cassini passes. We find that the average temperature of Titan’s thermosphere varies significantly from pass-to-pass between 112 and 175 K. The temperatures from individual temperature profiles also varies considerably, with many passes exhibiting wave-like temperature perturbations and large temperature gradients. Wave-like temperature perturbations have wavelengths between 150 and 420 km and amplitudes between 3% and 22% and vertical wave power spectra of the INMS data and HASI data have a slope between -2 and -3, which is consistent with vertically propagating atmospheric waves. The lack of a strong correlation between temperature and latitude, longitude, solar zenith angle, or local solar time indicates that the thermal structure of Titan’s thermosphere is not primarily determined by the absorption of solar EUV flux. At N2 densities greater than 108 cm-3, Titan’s thermosphere is colder when Titan is observed in Saturn’s magnetospheric lobes compared to Saturn’s plasma sheet as proposed by Westlake et al. (Westlake, J.H. et al. [2011]. J. Geophys. Res. 116, A03318. http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2010JA016251). This apparent correlation suggests that magnetospheric particle precipitation causes the temperature variability in Titan’s thermosphere; however, at densities smaller than 108 cm-3 the lobe passes are hotter than the plasma sheet passes and we find no correlation between the temperature of Titan’s thermosphere and ionospheric signatures of enhanced particle precipitation, which suggests that the correlation is not indicative of a physical connection. The temperature of Titan’s thermosphere also may have decreased by ∼10 K around mid-2007. Finally, we classify the vertical temperature profiles to show which passes are hot and cold and which passes have the largest temperature variations. In a companion paper (Part II), we estimate

  6. Using Multispectral Imaging to Measure Temperature Profiles and Emissivity of Large Thermionic Dispenser, Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    D.F. Simmons; C.M. Fortgang; D.B. Holtkamp

    2001-09-01

    Thermionic dispenser cathodes are widely used in modern high-power microwave tubes. Use of these cathodes has led to significant improvement in performance. In recent years these cathodes have been used in electron linear accelerators (LINACs), particularly in induction LINACs, such as the Experimental Test Accelerator at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Relativistic Test Accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. For induction LINACs, the thermionic dispenser cathode provides greater reproducibility, longer pulse lengths, and lower emittance beams than does a field emission cathode. Los Alamos National Laboratory is fabricating a dual-axis X-ray radiography machine called dual-axis radiograph hydrodynamic test (DARHT). The second axis of DARHT consists of a 2-kA, 20-MeV induction LINAC that uses a 3.2-MeV electron gun with a tungsten thermionic-dispenser cathode. Typically the DARHT cathode current density is 10 A/cm{sup 2} at 1050 C. Under these conditions current density is space-charge limited, which is desirable since current density is independent of temperature. At lower temperature (the temperature-limited regime) there are variations in the local current density due to a nonuniform temperature profile. To obtain the desired uniform current density associated with space-charge limited operation, the coolest area on the cathode must be at a sufficiently high temperature so that the emission is space-charge limited. Consequently, the rest of the cathode is emitting at the same space-charge-limited current density but is at a higher temperature than necessary. Because cathode lifetime is such a strong function of cathode temperature, there is a severe penalty for nonuniformity in the cathode temperature. For example, a temperature increase of 50 C means cathode lifetime will decrease by a factor of at least four. Therefore, we are motivated to measure the temperature profiles of our large-area cathodes.

  7. Temperature Profiles Along the Root with Gutta-percha Warmed through Different Heat Sources

    PubMed Central

    Simeone, Michele; Santis, Roberto De; Ametrano, Gianluca; Prisco, Davide; Borrelli, Marino; Paduano, Sergio; Riccitiello, Francesco; Spagnuolo, Gianrico

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate temperature profiles developing in the root during warm compaction of gutta-percha with the heat sources System B and System MB Obtura (Analityc Technology, Redmond, WA, USA). Thirty extracted human incisor teeth were used. Root canals were cleaned and shaped by means of Protaper rotary files (Dentsply-Maillefer, Belgium), and imaging was performed by micro-CT (Skyscan 1072, Aartselaar, Belgium). Methods: Teeth were instrumented with K-type thermocouples, and the roots were filled with thermoplastic gutta-percha. Vertical compaction was achieved through the heat sources System B and System MB, and temperature profiles were detect-ed by means of NI Dac Interface controlled by the LabView System. With both heat sources, higher temperature levels were recorded in the region of the root far from the apex. When the warm plugger tip was positioned at a distance of 3 mm from the root apex, temperature levels of about 180°C were used to soften gutta-percha, and no statistically significant differences were observed between peak temperatures developed by the two heating sources at the root apex. However, a temperature level higher than 40°C was maintained for a longer time with System MB. Results: Statistically significant differences were observed in peak temperature levels recorded far from the root apex. Thus, with a temperature of about 180°C and the warm plugger positioned at 3 mm from the root apex, both heating sources led to a temperature slightly higher than 40°C at the apex of the root, suggesting that the gutta-percha was properly softened. Significance: A temperature level higher than 40°C was maintained for a longer time with System MB, thus providing an ad-equate time for warm compaction of the gutta-percha. PMID:25614768

  8. What we can learn from peak temperatures profiles in inverted metamorphic sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duprat-Oualid, Sylvia; Yamato, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Inverted metamorphic sequences correspond to the stacking of structural units through which the metamorphic peak temperatures progressively increase upwards. Such thermal profiles, already studied for years, are characteristic of lithospheric-scale thrust zones. Nevertheless, the processes allowing their formation still remain contentious. Several processes can, indeed, lead to peak temperatures inversion: heat advection, shear heating, in-depth accretion and/or erosion (allowing the exhumation of the overthrusting block). Furthermore, heat diffusion also has an important effect on temperatures distribution on both sides of the thrust. Each one of these processes distinctly impacts on the metamorphic thermal field in the vicinity of the thrust zone. However, their respective influences were never clearly analyzed and compared despite their crucial importance for the interpretation of the inverted peak temperatures signatures. Here, we thus propose to address this shortcoming by using two-dimensional numerical models simulating intra-continental thrusts systems. To do so, we combine a parametric numerical study and the "analytical characterization" of the computed inverted peak temperatures recorded, in our models, along profiles perpendicular to the thrust zone. The parametric combinations, including kinematic setting (i.e., convergence, erosion and accretion), thermal properties, mechanical strength and heat sources, control the processes into play during the thrust activity whose relative importances can be quantified. When the resulting peak temperatures profiles present a noticeable inversion, they are converted into a function of approximation characterized by six parameters. These six outputs then constitute the keys to quantitatively decipher the inversions features, not only in terms of spatial extent and intensity over time, but also by characterizing the peak temperatures trends on either sides of the domain of inversion. This numerical and analytical

  9. Integrated modeling of temperature profiles in L-mode tokamak discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H.; Tangri, V.; Pankin, A. Y.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Budny, R. V.

    2014-12-15

    Simulations of doublet III-D, the joint European tokamak, and the tokamak fusion test reactor L-mode tokamak plasmas are carried out using the PTRANSP predictive integrated modeling code. The simulation and experimental temperature profiles are compared. The time evolved temperature profiles are computed utilizing the Multi-Mode anomalous transport model version 7.1 (MMM7.1) which includes transport associated with drift-resistive-inertial ballooning modes (the DRIBM model [T. Rafiq et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 082511 (2010)]). The tokamak discharges considered involved a broad range of conditions including scans over gyroradius, ITER like current ramp-up, with and without neon impurity injection, collisionality, and low and high plasma current. The comparison of simulation and experimental temperature profiles for the discharges considered is shown for the radial range from the magnetic axis to the last closed flux surface. The regions where various modes in the Multi-Mode model contribute to transport are illustrated. In the simulations carried out using the MMM7.1 model it is found that: The drift-resistive-inertial ballooning modes contribute to the anomalous transport primarily near the edge of the plasma; transport associated with the ion temperature gradient and trapped electron modes contribute in the core region but decrease in the region of the plasma boundary; and neoclassical ion thermal transport contributes mainly near the center of the discharge.

  10. Transcriptional profile of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121 at low temperature: Physiology of phytopathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Low temperatures play key roles in the development of most plant diseases, mainly because of their influence on the expression of various virulence factors in phytopathogenic bacteria. Thus far, studies regarding this environmental parameter have focused on specific themes and little is known about phytopathogenic bacteria physiology under these conditions. To obtain a global view regarding phytopathogenic bacteria strategies in response to physiologically relevant temperature changes, we used DNA microarray technology to compare the gene expression profile of the model bacterial pathogen P. syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121 grown at 18°C and 28°C. Results A total of 236 differentially regulated genes were identified, of which 133 were up-regulated and 103 were down-regulated at 18°C compared to 28°C. The majority of these genes are involved in pathogenicity and virulence processes. In general, the results of this study suggest that the expression profile obtained may be related to the fact that low temperatures induce oxidative stress in bacterial cells, which in turn influences the expression of iron metabolism genes. The expression also appears to be correlated with the profile expression obtained in genes related to motility, biofilm production, and the type III secretion system. Conclusions From the data obtained in this study, we can begin to understand the strategies used by this phytopathogen during low temperature growth, which can occur in host interactions and disease development. PMID:23587016

  11. Validation of stratospheric temperature profiles from a ground-based microwave radiometer with other techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Haefele, Alexander; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature trends has become recognized as an important indicator of climate change, because different climate forcing mechanisms exhibit distinct vertical warming and cooling patterns. For example, the cooling of the stratosphere is an indicator for climate change as it provides evidence of natural and anthropogenic climate forcing just like surface warming. Despite its importance, our understanding of the observed stratospheric temperature trend and our ability to test simulations of the stratospheric response to emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances remains limited. One of the main reason is because stratospheric long-term datasets are sparse and obtained trends differ from one another. Different techniques allow to measure stratospheric temperature profiles as radiosonde, lidar or satellite. The main advantage of microwave radiometers against these other instruments is a high temporal resolution with a reasonable good spatial resolution. Moreover, the measurement at a fixed location allows to observe local atmospheric dynamics over a long time period, which is crucial for climate research. This study presents an evaluation of the stratospheric temperature profiles from a newly ground-based microwave temperature radiometer (TEMPERA) which has been built and designed at the University of Bern. The measurements from TEMPERA are compared with the ones from other different techniques such as in-situ (radiosondes), active remote sensing (lidar) and passive remote sensing on board of Aura satellite (MLS) measurements. In addition a statistical analysis of the stratospheric temperature obtained from TEMPERA measurements during four years of data has been performed. This analysis evidenced the capability of TEMPERA radiometer to monitor the temperature in the stratosphere for a long-term. The detection of some singular sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) during the analyzed period shows the necessity of these

  12. Temperature and age affect the life history characteristics and fatty acid profiles of Moina macrocopa (Cladocera).

    PubMed

    Gama-Flores, José Luis; Huidobro-Salas, María Elena; Sarma, S S S; Nandini, S; Zepeda-Mejia, Ricardo; Gulati, Ramesh D

    2015-10-01

    Demographic responses and fatty acid profiles of Moina macrocopa were quantified under different temperature regimes (20°C, 25°C and 30°C and diurnally variable 20-30°C) and at fixed ration (10.65µgDWml(-1)) of Chlorella. Highest constant temperature (30°C) reduced the density of M. macrocopa. The cladocerans under the fluctuating temperature regime too had lower population growth (about 50% lower than that at constant 25°C). The survivorship of M. macrocopa was higher at 20°C than that at 25°C and 30°C or at variable temperature regime. Gross and net reproductive rates were higher at 25°C. At 20°C, neonates had the highest proportion (67%) of myristic, palmitic and stearic acids while the adults had the lowest (26%) proportion. For both adults and neonates, palmitoleic, linoleic and linolenic comprised of 15-35% of the total fatty acids. Higher percentage (19%) of linoleic acid was present in adults than neonates (7%). Adults had linolenic acid level which was 3-times higher than in neonates. Linoleic and linolenic fatty acids decreased with increasing temperature for neonates and adults from 20°C to 30°C. The demographic responses and fatty acid profiles of M. macrocopa were discussed in relation to level and mode of temperature exposure. PMID:26590466

  13. Temperature and age affect the life history characteristics and fatty acid profiles of Moina macrocopa (Cladocera).

    PubMed

    Gama-Flores, José Luis; Huidobro-Salas, María Elena; Sarma, S S S; Nandini, S; Zepeda-Mejia, Ricardo; Gulati, Ramesh D

    2015-10-01

    Demographic responses and fatty acid profiles of Moina macrocopa were quantified under different temperature regimes (20°C, 25°C and 30°C and diurnally variable 20-30°C) and at fixed ration (10.65µgDWml(-1)) of Chlorella. Highest constant temperature (30°C) reduced the density of M. macrocopa. The cladocerans under the fluctuating temperature regime too had lower population growth (about 50% lower than that at constant 25°C). The survivorship of M. macrocopa was higher at 20°C than that at 25°C and 30°C or at variable temperature regime. Gross and net reproductive rates were higher at 25°C. At 20°C, neonates had the highest proportion (67%) of myristic, palmitic and stearic acids while the adults had the lowest (26%) proportion. For both adults and neonates, palmitoleic, linoleic and linolenic comprised of 15-35% of the total fatty acids. Higher percentage (19%) of linoleic acid was present in adults than neonates (7%). Adults had linolenic acid level which was 3-times higher than in neonates. Linoleic and linolenic fatty acids decreased with increasing temperature for neonates and adults from 20°C to 30°C. The demographic responses and fatty acid profiles of M. macrocopa were discussed in relation to level and mode of temperature exposure.

  14. Analytical solution and computer program (FAST) to estimate fluid fluxes from subsurface temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurylyk, Barret L.; Irvine, Dylan J.

    2016-02-01

    This study details the derivation and application of a new analytical solution to the one-dimensional, transient conduction-advection equation that is applied to trace vertical subsurface fluid fluxes. The solution employs a flexible initial condition that allows for nonlinear temperature-depth profiles, providing a key improvement over most previous solutions. The boundary condition is composed of any number of superimposed step changes in surface temperature, and thus it accommodates intermittent warming and cooling periods due to long-term changes in climate or land cover. The solution is verified using an established numerical model of coupled groundwater flow and heat transport. A new computer program FAST (Flexible Analytical Solution using Temperature) is also presented to facilitate the inversion of this analytical solution to estimate vertical groundwater flow. The program requires surface temperature history (which can be estimated from historic climate data), subsurface thermal properties, a present-day temperature-depth profile, and reasonable initial conditions. FAST is written in the Python computing language and can be run using a free graphical user interface. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of the analytical solution and FAST using measured subsurface temperature and climate data from the Sendia Plain, Japan. Results from these illustrative examples highlight the influence of the chosen initial and boundary conditions on estimated vertical flow rates.

  15. Modeling of the thermal expansion behaviour of ZERODUR at arbitrary temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Johansson, Thoralf; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Modeling of the thermal expansion behavior of ZERODUR® for the site conditions of the upcoming Extremely Large Telescope's (ELT's) allows an optimized material selection to yield the best performing ZERODUR® for the mirror substrates. The thermal expansion of glass ceramics is a function of temperature and a function of time, due to the structural relaxation behavior of the materials. The application temperature range of the upcoming ELT projects varies depending on the possible construction site between -13°C and +27°C. Typical temperature change rates during the night are in the range between 0.1°C/h and 0.3°C/h. Such temperature change rates are much smaller than the typical economic laboratory measurement rate, therefore the material behavior under these conditions can not be measured directly. SCHOTT developed a model approach to describe the structural relaxation behavior of ZERODUR®. With this model it is possible to precisely predict the thermal expansion behavior of the individual ZERODUR® material batches at any application temperature profile T(t). This paper presents results of the modeling and shows ZERODUR® material behavior at typical temperature profiles of different applications.

  16. Contribution of thermal radiation to the temperature profile of ceramic composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tremante, A.; Malpica, F. )

    1994-07-01

    The steady energy transfer equation for simultaneous conduction and radiation in an absorbing, emitting, and nonscattering gray planar medium is studied theoretically. For extremely high-temperature applications, where radiative transfer plays an important role, ceramic-matrix composites, considered as semitransparent materials, are being explored for potential use in turbine and compressor components, spacecraft structures, engine control systems, and nuclear reactors. Exact solution of the above-mentioned radiative problems is seldom possible and time-consuming numerical approximations are then used. A technique combining an accurate physical formulation, the two-flux model, coupled to a fast numerical procedure for the calculation of the temperature and heat fluxes is described.

  17. Development of ultrasonic thermometry for high-temperature high-resolution temperature profiling applications in LMFBR safety research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, M. E.

    1986-05-01

    Ultrasonic thermometry was developed as a high temperature profiling diagnostic for use in the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Debris Coolability Program at Sandia National Laboratories. These instruments were used successfully in the DC series experiments and the D10 experiment. Temperatures approaching 3000 C with spatial resolution of 10 mm and indicated temperature gradients of 700 C/cm were measured. Instruments were operated in molten sodium, molten steel, and molten UO2 environments. Up to 14 measurement zones on a single instrument in molten sodium were used with 12 mm and 15 mm spatial resolution. Hermetically sealed units operating at elevated temperatures were used. Post-test examination revealed very little systematic calibration drifts (less than 10 C) with random drifts occuring with less than 40 C standard deviation in a 10 to 12 mm measured zone. The stability of the system varies from +/- 1 C to +/- 15 C depending on the sensor design constraints for a particular application. Doped tungsten sensors were developed to permit operation of total measurement zone length of 30 cm at temperatures above 2500 C.

  18. Accurate measurements and temperature dependence of the water vapor self-continuum absorption in the 2.1 μm atmospheric window.

    PubMed

    Ventrillard, I; Romanini, D; Mondelain, D; Campargue, A

    2015-10-01

    In spite of its importance for the evaluation of the Earth radiative budget, thus for climate change, very few measurements of the water vapor continuum are available in the near infrared atmospheric windows especially at temperature conditions relevant for our atmosphere. In addition, as a result of the difficulty to measure weak broadband absorption signals, the few available measurements show large disagreements. We report here accurate measurements of the water vapor self-continuum absorption in the 2.1 μm window by Optical Feedback Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) for two spectral points located at the low energy edge and at the center of the 2.1 μm transparency window, at 4302 and 4723 cm(-1), respectively. Self-continuum cross sections, CS, were retrieved with a few % relative uncertainty, from the quadratic dependence of the spectrum base line level measured as a function of water vapor pressure, between 0 and 16 Torr. At 296 K, the CS value at 4302 cm(-1) is found 40% higher than predicted by the MT_CKD V2.5 model, while at 4723 cm(-1), our value is 5 times larger than the MT_CKD value. On the other hand, these OF-CEAS CS values are significantly smaller than recent measurements by Fourier transform spectroscopy at room temperature. The temperature dependence of the self-continuum cross sections was also investigated for temperatures between 296 K and 323 K (23-50 °C). The derived temperature variation is found to be similar to that derived from previous Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) measurements performed at higher temperatures, between 350 K and 472 K. The whole set of measurements spanning the 296-472 K temperature range follows a simple exponential law in 1/T with a slope close to the dissociation energy of the water dimer, D0 ≈ 1100 cm(-1). PMID:26450311

  19. Correlation for temperature profiles in the plane of symmetry downstream of a jet injected normal to a crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    A correlation method is presented for approximating the temperature distribution in the plane of symmetry downstream of a jet injected normal to a uniform crossflow. Correlations are developed for the scaling parameters required to define the temperature profile at any desired location from the dimensionless universal form which has been experimentally observed. Profiles calculated using the correlation methods are compared with experimental profiles for several momentum and density ratios at various downstream distances.

  20. An extended Kalman-Bucy filter for atmospheric temperature profile retrieval with a passive microwave sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledsham, W. H.; Staelin, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    An extended Kalman-Bucy filter has been implemented for atmospheric temperature profile retrievals from observations made using the Scanned Microwave Spectrometer (SCAMS) instrument carried on the Nimbus 6 satellite. This filter has the advantage that it requires neither stationary statistics in the underlying processes nor linear production of the observed variables from the variables to be estimated. This extended Kalman-Bucy filter has yielded significant performance improvement relative to multiple regression retrieval methods. A multi-spot extended Kalman-Bucy filter has also been developed in which the temperature profiles at a number of scan angles in a scanning instrument are retrieved simultaneously. These multi-spot retrievals are shown to outperform the single-spot Kalman retrievals.

  1. Temperature and weight loss profiles of model cakes baked in the microwave oven.

    PubMed

    Sumnu, G; Ndife, M K; Bayindirli, L

    1999-01-01

    Model cake systems were formulated with wheat and rice starches at hydration levels of 112.5% and 137.5% (flour weight basis) and baked in a microwave oven at power levels of 80% and 100%. Temperature profiles and weight loss profiles of the cakes baked in the microwave oven were compared with those of the cakes baked conventionally. One cake was baked at a time, and three replications of each treatment were used. Center and edge temperatures of microwave cakes increased significantly with increasing moisture content of the batter and oven power. Weight loss of the cakes was dependent on oven power, starch type and hydration levels. Cakes baked in the microwave oven had greater weight loss than the cakes baked in convection mode. Wheat starch cakes had greater volumes than rice starch cakes. Rice starch cakes were more tender than wheat starch cakes.

  2. Mars dayside temperature from airglow limb profiles : comparison with in situ measurements and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, Jean-Claude; Bougher, Stephen; Montmessin, Franck; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Stiepen, A.

    The thermal structure of the Mars upper atmosphere is the result of the thermal balance between heating by EUV solar radiation, infrared heating and cooling, conduction and dynamic influences such as gravity waves, planetary waves, and tides. It has been derived from observations performed from different spacecraft. These include in situ measurements of orbital drag whose strength depends on the local gas density. Atmospheric temperatures were determined from the altitude variation of the density measured in situ by the Viking landers and orbital drag measurements. Another method is based on remote sensing measurements of ultraviolet airglow limb profiles obtained over 40 years ago with spectrometers during the Mariner 6 and 7 flybys and from the Mariner 9 orbiter. Comparisons with model calculations indicate that they both reflect the CO_2 scale height from which atmospheric temperatures have been deduced. Upper atmospheric temperatures varying over the wide range 270-445 K, with a mean value of 325 K were deduced from the topside scale height of the airglow vertical profile. We present an analysis of limb profiles of the CO Cameron (a(3) Pi-X(1) Sigma(+) ) and CO_2(+) doublet (B(2) Sigma_u(+) - X(2) PiΠ_g) airglows observed with the SPICAM instrument on board Mars Express. We show that the temperature in the Mars thermosphere is very variable with a mean value of 270 K, but values ranging between 150 and 400 K have been observed. These values are compared to earlier determinations and model predictions. No clear dependence on solar zenith angle, latitude or season is apparent. Similarly, exospheric variations with F10.7 in the SPICAM airglow dataset are small over the solar minimum to moderate conditions sampled by Mars Express since 2005. We conclude that an unidentified process is the cause of the large observed temperature variability, which dominates the other sources of temperature variations.

  3. Use of temperature profiles and stable isotopes to trace flow lines: Nagaoka area, Japan.

    PubMed

    Salem, Zenhom El-said; Taniguchi, Makoto; Sakura, Yasua

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we use borehole temperature data and stable isotopes to delineate the flow system and estimate the effect of urbanization in the Nagaoka area of Japan. Temperature profiles were measured four times in observation wells during the period 2000-2001 and compared with those measured in the same wells during the period 1977-1983 (Taniguchi 1986). Water was sampled in both observation and pumping wells during the same period. The temporal and spatial variability in temperature indicate clearly the effect of urban warming and heavy pumping on the ground water system. Urban warming caused higher temperatures recently as compared to the older values, and pumping caused induced recharge from the river to the ground water. The stable isotope data show the ground water flow system is divided into shallow, intermediate, and deep systems, and that land use and infiltration rate are affecting the shallow flow system.

  4. Differential absorption lidars for remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Famiglietti, Joseph; Walden, Harvey; Prasad, Coorg

    1995-01-01

    A near infrared differential absorption lidar technique is developed using atmospheric oxygen as a tracer for high resolution vertical profiles of pressure and temperature with high accuracy. Solid-state tunable lasers and high-resolution spectrum analyzers are developed to carry out ground-based and airborne measurement demonstrations and results of the measurements presented. Numerical error analysis of high-altitude airborne and spaceborne experiments is carried out, and system concepts developed for their implementation.

  5. Atmospheric pressure and temperature profiling using near IR differential absorption lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Dombrowski, M.; Weng, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with differential absorption lidar techniques for remotely measuring the atmospheric temperature and pressure profile, surface pressure, and cloud top pressure-height. The procedure used in determining the pressure is based on the conduction of high-resolution measurements of absorption in the wings of lines in the oxygen A band. Absorption with respect to these areas is highly pressure sensitive in connection with the mechanism of collisional line broadening. The method of temperature measurement utilizes a determination of the absorption at the center of a selected line in the oxygen A band which originates from a quantum state with high ground state energy.

  6. Gas temperature and electron density profiles in an argon dc microdischarge measured by optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belostotskiy, Sergey G.; Ouk, Tola; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J.; Sadeghi, Nader

    2010-03-01

    Optical emisssion spectroscopy was employed to study a high pressure (100 s of Torr), slot-type (600 μm interelectrode gap), argon dc microdischarge, with added traces of nitrogen. Spatially resolved gas temperature profiles were obtained by analyzing rovibrational bands of the N2 first positive system. The gas temperature peaked near the cathode and increased with current. The contribution of Stark broadening to the hydrogen Hβ emission lineshape was used to extract the electron density. The axial distribution of electron density as well as visual observation revealed that the microdischarge positive column was highly constricted. The electron density near the sheath edge increased with both pressure and current.

  7. Time-series analysis of temperature profiles from VIRTIS Venus Express data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, D.; Migliorini, A.; Politi, R.; Montabone, L.; Piccioni, G.; Drossart, P.

    2012-04-01

    Nighttime infrared observations of the VIRTIS instrument on board Venus Express have already demonstrated their potential in the study of air temperature fields of the Venusian mesosphere. The entire available dataset acquired by the VIRTIS-M IR channel was processed at moderate spatial resolution (i.e. averaging pixels in 8x8 boxes) to derive an unprecedented dataset of air temperature profiles in the pressure range 100-0.1 mbar, covering mostly the latitudes south of 45S. We presented in Grassi et al. (2010, doi:10.1029/2009JE003553) an analysis of the mean properties of temperature profiles, once binned in the latitude/local time/pressure space. Here we discuss the preliminary findings of time-series analysis of data from individual bins. Despite the sparsity of most series, Lomb-Scargle periodogram can be effectively applied in the regions south of 70S, where better coverage is made possible by specific properties of Venus Express orbit. Here the algorithm is able to extract a clear signature related to a period of about 115-120 Earth days, i.e. one Venus solar day, particularly strong at the level around 10 mbar. Further analysis of average temperature fields in the latitude - longitude space demonstrated, for different local times during night, that air temperatures east of Lada Terra (most specifically in a region centered around 130°E and about 60° wide) are about 10K warmer than in other longitudes at 75S.

  8. Isoflavone Profiles and Kinetic Changes during Ultra-High Temperature Processing of Soymilk.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Chang, Sam K C

    2016-03-01

    Isoflavone profile is greatly affected by heating process. However, kinetic analyses of isoflavone conversion and degradation using a continuous industry processing method have never been characterized. In this study, Proto soybean was soaked and blanched at 80 °C for 2 min and then processed into soymilk, which underwent UHT (ultra-high temperature) at 135 to 150 °C for 10 to 50 s with a pilot plant-scale Microthermics processor. The isoflavone profile was determined at different time/temperature combinations. The results showed that all isoflavone forms exhibited distinct changing patterns over time. In the soymilk under UHT conditions, the degradation (disappearance) of malonyldaizin and malonylgenistin exhibited first-order kinetics with activation energies of 59 and 84 kj/mole, respectively. At all UHT temperatures, malonylgenistin showed higher rate constants than malonyldaidzin. However, malonylglycitin changed irregularly under these UHT temperatures. The increase of genistin, daidzin, glycitein and acetlydaidzin during heating demonstrated zero-order kinetics and the rate constants increased with temperature except for the conditions of 145 to 150 °C for 50 s. Overall, genistein series exhibited higher stability than daidzein series. Under all UHT conditions, total isoflavone decreased from 12% to 24%. PMID:26814612

  9. Normal range and lateral symmetry in the skin temperature profile of pregnant women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Tânia; Nogueira-Silva, Cristina; Simoes, Ricardo

    2016-09-01

    Body skin temperature is a useful parameter for diagnosing diseases and infrared thermography can be a powerful tool in providing important information to detect body temperature changes in a noninvasive way. The aim of this work was to study the pattern of skin temperature during pregnancy, to establish skin temperature reference values and to find correlations between these and the pregnant population characteristics. Sixty-one healthy pregnant women (mean age 30.6 ± 5.1 years) in the 8th-40th gestational week with normal pregnancies were examined in 31 regions of interest (ROI). The ROIs were defined all over the body in order to determine the most influenced by factors such as age or body mass index (BMI). The results obtained in this work highlight that in normal pregnant women the skin temperature is symmetrically distributed, with the symmetrical areas differing less than 0.5 °C , with a mean value of 0.25 ± 0.23 °C . This study identified a significant negative correlation between the BMI and temperature. Age has been shown to have great influence on the skin temperature, with a significant increase of temperature observed with age. This work explores a novel medical application of infrared thermography and provides a characterization of thermal skin profile in human pregnancy for a large set of ROIs while also evaluating the effects of age and BMI.

  10. Spectroscopic determination of temperature and density spatial profiles and mix in indirect-drive implosion cores

    SciTech Connect

    Welser-Sherrill, L.; Mancini, R. C.; Koch, J. A.; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Haan, S. W.; Haynes, D. A.; Kyrala, G.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Regan, S. P.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2007-11-15

    In the field of inertial confinement fusion (ICF), work has been consistently progressing in the past decade toward a more fundamental understanding of the plasma conditions in ICF implosion cores. The research presented here represents a substantial evolution in the ability to diagnose plasma temperatures and densities, along with characteristics of mixing between fuel and shell materials. Mixing is a vital property to study and quantify, since it can significantly affect implosion quality. We employ a number of new spectroscopic techniques that allow us to probe these important quantities. The first technique developed is an emissivity analysis, which uses the emissivity ratio of the optically thin Ly{beta} and He{beta} lines to spectroscopically extract temperature profiles, followed by the solution of emissivity equations to infer density profiles. The second technique, an intensity analysis, models the radiation transport through the implosion core. The nature of the intensity analysis allows us to use an optically thick line, the Ly{alpha}, to extract information on mixing near the core edge. With this work, it is now possible to extract directly from experimental data not only detailed temperature and density maps of the core, but also spatial mixing profiles.

  11. Ground surface temperature history inferred from a borehole temperature profile through the permafrost in northern Quebec: Evidence for recent warming.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouinard, C.; Fortier, R.; Mareschal, J.

    2006-12-01

    A 430 meters temperature depth profile in permafrost was measured at the Raglan mine located in the Cape Smith foldbelt at the tip of the Ungava peninsula, south of Deception Bay in Northern Quebec. The site is located on a high plateau (600 m) and is mostly a barren rock desert with minimal vegetation cover. The borehole had been fitted with a capped steel pipe filled with silicone oil and measurements were made more than 15 months after drilling was completed, insuring that thermal equilibrium had been reached. In order to infer the ground surface temperature history (GSTH), an inversion was performed using an algorithm based on singular value decomposition. The presence of instabilities due to the inversion technique made impossible the identification of an unusual cooling period in Northern Quebec between the 1940s and 1990s described by numerous authors. Using forward modeling techniques, we computed different warming/cooling scenarios numerically in order to reproduce both the experimental data and other researchers surface temperatures results. None of the models that fit the experimental data indicate a cooling of ground temperatures at any time during the past 150 years. We inferred that the total warming of the past 150-200 years ranges between 1.5 and 2.5 degrees.

  12. Skin temperature profiles on the human chest and in the wrist area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissila, Seppo M.; Ahola, Onni; Heikkilae, Ilkka; Ruha, Antti; Kopola, Harri K.

    1996-01-01

    Skin temperatures on the chest and in the wrist area are interesting for continuous monitoring because they can be easily instrumented using an elastic belt or wristband which do not hamper movement in sports, for example. An infrared thermograph camera and NTC thermistors were used to take temperature profiles at these sensing points with a resolution of 0.1 degrees Celsius, and colored thermograms were used to analyze and compare the results. The effect of environmental changes on the skin temperature in the wrist area was studied by cooling and heating the fingers in water at 10 degrees Celsius and 40 degrees Celsius, and the effects of a loading situation on the chest area and wrist area were tested by means of a 30 min bicycle ergometer exercise. NTC thermistors were also used to measure wrist and chest temperatures in two environmental tests at minus 10 degrees Celsius and plus 60 degrees Celsius. Cooling of the fingers naturally reduces the skin temperature in the wrist area and heating increases it due to the venous circulation. The area of the radial artery in the wrist seems to be the most stable temperature point, altering by only about 2 degrees Celsius, whereas the temperature change at other points is up to 4 degrees Celsius. The bicycle ergometer exercise caused a decrease in skin temperature on the chest because of sweating. At the same time the skin temperature on the wrist decreased by about 1.5 degrees Celsius after the first 20 minutes and then returned to its previous level. The area of the radial artery in the wrist seems to be an attractive point for continuous temperature monitoring, especially under normal conditions, and also seems to reflect body temperature quite well upon loading and under different environmental conditions.

  13. Cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry and the temperature dependence of molecular depth profiles.

    PubMed

    Mao, Dan; Wucher, Andreas; Brenes, Daniel A; Lu, Caiyan; Winograd, Nicholas

    2012-05-01

    The quality of molecular depth profiles created by erosion of organic materials by cluster ion beams exhibits a strong dependence upon temperature. To elucidate the fundamental nature of this dependence, we employ the Irganox 3114/1010 organic delta-layer reference material as a model system. This delta-layer system is interrogated using a 40 keV C(60)(+) primary ion beam. Parameters associated with the depth profile such as depth resolution, uniformity of sputtering yield, and topography are evaluated between 90 and 300 K using a unique wedge-crater beveling strategy that allows these parameters to be determined as a function of erosion depth from atomic force microscope (AFM) measurements. The results show that the erosion rate calibration performed using the known Δ-layer depth in connection with the fluence needed to reach the peak of the corresponding secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) signal response is misleading. Moreover, we show that the degradation of depth resolution is linked to a decrease of the average erosion rate and the buildup of surface topography in a thermally activated manner. This underlying process starts to influence the depth profile above a threshold temperature between 210 and 250 K for the system studied here. Below that threshold, the process is inhibited and steady-state conditions are reached with constant erosion rate, depth resolution, and molecular secondary ion signals from both the matrix and the Δ-layers. In particular, the results indicate that further reduction of the temperature below 90 K does not lead to further improvement of the depth profile. Above the threshold, the process becomes stronger at higher temperature, leading to an immediate decrease of the molecular secondary ion signals. This signal decay is most pronounced for the highest m/z ions but is less for the smaller m/z ions, indicating a shift toward small fragments by accumulation of chemical damage. The erosion rate decay and surface roughness buildup

  14. Assimilation of Quality Controlled AIRS Temperature Profiles using the NCEP GFS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Reale, Oreste; Iredell, Lena; Rosenberg, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We have previously conducted a number of data assimilation experiments using AIRS Version-5 quality controlled temperature profiles as a step toward finding an optimum balance of spatial coverage and sounding accuracy with regard to improving forecast skill. The data assimilation and forecast system we used was the Goddard Earth Observing System Model , Version-5 (GEOS-5) Data Assimilation System (DAS), which represents a combination of the NASA GEOS-5 forecast model with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) operational Grid Point Statistical Interpolation (GSI) global analysis scheme. All analyses and forecasts were run at a 0.5deg x 0.625deg spatial resolution. Data assimilation experiments were conducted in four different seasons, each in a different year. Three different sets of data assimilation experiments were run during each time period: Control; AIRS T(p); and AIRS Radiance. In the "Control" analysis, all the data used operationally by NCEP was assimilated, but no AIRS data was assimilated. Radiances from the Aqua AMSU-A instrument were also assimilated operationally by NCEP and are included in the "Control". The AIRS Radiance assimilation adds AIRS observed radiance observations for a select set of channels to the data set being assimilated, as done operationally by NCEP. In the AIRS T(p) assimilation, all information used in the Control was assimilated as well as Quality Controlled AIRS Version-5 temperature profiles, i.e., AIRS T(p) information was substituted for AIRS radiance information. The AIRS Version-5 temperature profiles were presented to the GSI analysis as rawinsonde profiles, assimilated down to a case-by-case appropriate pressure level p(sub best) determined using the Quality Control procedure. Version-5 also determines case-by-case, level-by-level error estimates of the temperature profiles, which were used as the uncertainty of each temperature measurement. These experiments using GEOS-5 have shown that forecasts

  15. Intercomparison of Ozone and Temperature Profiles During OZITOS+ 2014 Campaign in Río Gallegos, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, Jacobo; Wolfram, Elian; Orte, Facundo; D'Elia, Raúl; Quiroga, Jonathan; Quel, Eduardo; Zamorano, Felix; Pérez, Raúl; Villa, Israel; Oyama, Hirofumi; Mizuno, Akira

    2016-06-01

    In the framework of SAVER-Net project, the OZone profIle aT Río GallegOS (OZITOS+) campaign was held in the city of Río Gallegos, Argentina (51.5 S; 69.1 W). This experiment was conducted on October 14 -18, 2014 and its main goal was to compare the ozone and temperature profiles using three different measurement techniques such as Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL), ozonesonde and Millimeter Wave Radiometer (MWR). Also other ground-based and satellite-based instruments were included in the experiment but in this work we only present preliminary results from ground-based instruments deployed in the site. The DIAL instrument is part of Network Data for Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) network, and the usual protocols of quality assurance imposed for the network involve regular validation/comparisons experiments. The lidar ozone profiles measured with the lidar are compared with ozone profiles obtained with independent techniques, usually with higher or same resolution as lidar. The experiment are made collocated spatial and temporally. For that reason the Chilean team joined to Japanese and Argentine team at Río Gallegos to develop the experiment. On October 2014, the Río Gallegos Observatory station was inside the polar vortex during first two weeks and after that polar vortex have moved far away from Río Gallegos during the 3rd week of October, when the intercomparison campaign was held. In this paper we are present a preliminary results of the campaign, computing the ozone and temperature profiles from DIAL with ozonesondes and MWR.

  16. Volatile compound profile of sous-vide cooked lamb loins at different temperature-time combinations.

    PubMed

    Roldán, Mar; Ruiz, Jorge; Del Pulgar, José Sánchez; Pérez-Palacios, Trinidad; Antequera, Teresa

    2015-02-01

    Lamb loins were subjected to sous-vide cooking at different combinations of temperature (60 and 80°C) and time (6 and 24h) to assess the effect on the volatile compound profile. Major chemical families in cooked samples were aliphatic hydrocarbons and aldehydes. The volatile compound profile in sous-vide cooked lamb loin was affected by the cooking temperature and time. Volatile compounds arising from lipid oxidation presented a high abundance in samples cooked at low or moderate cooking conditions (60°C for 6 and 24h, 80°C for 6h), while a more intense time and temperature combination (80°C for 24h) resulted on a higher concentration of volatile compounds arising from Strecker degradations of amino acids, as 2-methylpropanal and 3-methylbutanal. Therefore, sous-vide cooking at moderately high temperatures for long times would result in the formation of a stronger meaty flavor and roast notes in lamb meat. PMID:25306511

  17. Volatile compound profile of sous-vide cooked lamb loins at different temperature-time combinations.

    PubMed

    Roldán, Mar; Ruiz, Jorge; Del Pulgar, José Sánchez; Pérez-Palacios, Trinidad; Antequera, Teresa

    2015-02-01

    Lamb loins were subjected to sous-vide cooking at different combinations of temperature (60 and 80°C) and time (6 and 24h) to assess the effect on the volatile compound profile. Major chemical families in cooked samples were aliphatic hydrocarbons and aldehydes. The volatile compound profile in sous-vide cooked lamb loin was affected by the cooking temperature and time. Volatile compounds arising from lipid oxidation presented a high abundance in samples cooked at low or moderate cooking conditions (60°C for 6 and 24h, 80°C for 6h), while a more intense time and temperature combination (80°C for 24h) resulted on a higher concentration of volatile compounds arising from Strecker degradations of amino acids, as 2-methylpropanal and 3-methylbutanal. Therefore, sous-vide cooking at moderately high temperatures for long times would result in the formation of a stronger meaty flavor and roast notes in lamb meat.

  18. Accurate Monte Carlo simulations on FCC and HCP Lennard-Jones solids at very low temperatures and high reduced densities up to 1.30.

    PubMed

    Adidharma, Hertanto; Tan, Sugata P

    2016-07-01

    Canonical Monte Carlo simulations on face-centered cubic (FCC) and hexagonal closed packed (HCP) Lennard-Jones (LJ) solids are conducted at very low temperatures (0.10 ≤ T(∗) ≤ 1.20) and high densities (0.96 ≤ ρ(∗) ≤ 1.30). A simple and robust method is introduced to determine whether or not the cutoff distance used in the simulation is large enough to provide accurate thermodynamic properties, which enables us to distinguish the properties of FCC from that of HCP LJ solids with confidence, despite their close similarities. Free-energy expressions derived from the simulation results are also proposed, not only to describe the properties of those individual structures but also the FCC-liquid, FCC-vapor, and FCC-HCP solid phase equilibria.

  19. Accurate Monte Carlo simulations on FCC and HCP Lennard-Jones solids at very low temperatures and high reduced densities up to 1.30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adidharma, Hertanto; Tan, Sugata P.

    2016-07-01

    Canonical Monte Carlo simulations on face-centered cubic (FCC) and hexagonal closed packed (HCP) Lennard-Jones (LJ) solids are conducted at very low temperatures (0.10 ≤ T∗ ≤ 1.20) and high densities (0.96 ≤ ρ∗ ≤ 1.30). A simple and robust method is introduced to determine whether or not the cutoff distance used in the simulation is large enough to provide accurate thermodynamic properties, which enables us to distinguish the properties of FCC from that of HCP LJ solids with confidence, despite their close similarities. Free-energy expressions derived from the simulation results are also proposed, not only to describe the properties of those individual structures but also the FCC-liquid, FCC-vapor, and FCC-HCP solid phase equilibria.

  20. Temperature profile in the lowermost mantle from seismological and mineral physics joint modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Kenji; Tsuchiya, Taku

    2009-01-01

    The internal structure of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) region of the Earth plays a crucial role in controlling the dynamics and evolution of our planet. We have developed a comprehensive model based on the radial variations of shear velocity in the D″ layer (the base of the lower mantle) and the high-P,T elastic properties of major candidate minerals, including the effects of post-perovskite phase changes. This modeling shows a temperature profile in the lowermost mantle with a CMB temperature of 3,800 ± 200 K, which suggests that lateral temperature variations of 200–300 K can explain much of the large velocity heterogeneity observed in D″. A single-crossing phase transition model was found to be more favorable in reproducing the observed seismic wave velocity structure than a double-crossing phase transition model. PMID:20018735

  1. Theory-based transport simulations of TFTR L-mode temperature profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, G.

    1991-10-24

    The temperature profiles from a selection of TFTR L-mode discharges are simulated with the 1-1/2-D BALDUR transport code using a combination of theoretically derived transport models, called the Multi-Mode Model. The present version of the Multi-Mode Model consists of effective thermal diffusivities resulting from trapped electron modes and ion temperature gradient ({eta}{sub i}) modes, which dominate in the core of the plasma, together with resistive ballooning modes, which dominate in the periphery. Within the context of this transport model and the TFTR simulations reported here, the scaling of confinement with heating power comes from the temperature dependence of the {eta}{sub i} and trapped electron modes, while the scaling with current comes mostly from resistive ballooning modes. 24 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Temperature and depth profiles recorded during dives of elephant seals reflect distinct ocean environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagna, Claudio; Rivas, Andrés L.; Marin, M. Rosa

    2000-03-01

    Foraging adult southern elephant seals, Mirounga leonina, from Penı´nsula Valdés, Argentina, dive continuously while travelling across the continental shelf towards deep waters of the SW Atlantic. This study attempted to identify distinct ocean environments encountered by these seals during foraging migrations based on bathymetric and water temperature profiles, and to interpret these profiles in terms of mixing and systems of currents. Depth and water temperature were obtained with data loggers carried by 14 diving adult animals during spring (October-December) and summer (February-March) months. Dive depths allowed us to unmistakably differentiate extensive areas of the SW Atlantic: the Patagonian shelf, shelf slope and open waters of the Argentine Basin. Water temperature profiles added further details to the latter general oceanographic areas, and could be related to large-scale oceanographic processes that led to different water column structures. Temperature data reflected the mixing effects of winds and tides in coastal waters, the formation of a thermocline in mid-shelf areas, the northward flow of the sub-antartic Malvinas Current at the edge of the shelf, and the effect of the subtropical Brazil Current further east over deep off-shelf waters. Some of these distinct areas are known for their enhanced primary production associated with frontal systems. The study shows that elephant seals could be useful, low-cost platforms to obtain oceanographic data. Studies that require extensive sampling of physical variables in large areas over long periods of time would benefit from this approach, pending on more precise and frequent locations of animals at sea.

  3. Correlation Between Immersion Profile and Measured Value of Fixed-Point Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulgat, O. S.; Fuksov, V. M.; Ivanova, A. G.; Gerasimov, S. F.; Pokhodun, A. I.

    2014-04-01

    Assessment of thermal immersion effects in the melting and freezing points defined by the International Temperature Scale of 1990 is one of the vital issues of modern thermometry. In documents of the Consultative Committee for Thermometry, the deviation of the experimental immersion profile from the theoretical value of the hydrostatic effect at a height of about 3 cm to 5 cm from the thermometer well bottom is used for the estimation of the uncertainty due to unwanted thermal effects. This estimation assumes the occurrence of solely the hydrostatic effect all along the height of the well inner wall. Real distortions of the temperature gradient at the bottom and at the top part of the well caused by the change of heat-exchange conditions are not taken into account. To define more precisely the temperature gradient along the height of the well, a miniature PRT with a 30 mm sensitive element and a sheath length and diameter of about 60 mm and 6 mm, respectively, were used. Also, the measurements of fixed-points temperature at noticeably different slopes of immersion profiles due to variations of the thermometer heat exchange and phase transition realization conditions were produced by means of a standard platinum resistance thermometer (SPRT). The measurements were carried out at the tin and zinc freezing points. The immersion curves measured with a miniature thermometer demonstrated an increase of the temperature during its lifting in the first 1 cm to 3 cm above the bottom of the well. The measurement results at the zinc freezing point by means of the SPRT have not confirmed the correlation between the immersion curves, the received value of the Zn freezing temperature, and the estimation of its uncertainty.

  4. Return glider radiosonde to measure temperature, humidity and radiation profiles through the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraeuchi, Andreas; Philipona, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Very promising radiation profile measurements through the atmosphere were made in 2011 with a balloon borne short- and longwave net radiometer. New and improved radiation sensors from Kipp&Zonen are now used in a glider aircraft together with a standard Swiss radiosonde from Meteolabor AG. This new return glider radiosonde (RG-R), is lifted up with double balloon technique to prevent pendulum motion and to keep the radiation instruments as horizontal as possible during the ascent measuring phase. The RG-R is equipped with a mechanism that allows to release the radiosonde at a preset altitude, and an autopilot allowing to fly the radiosonde back to the launch site and to land it savely with a parachute at a preset location. The return glider radiosonde technique as well as new measurement possibilities will be shown. First measurements show temperature, humidity and radiation profiles through the atmosphere up to 30 hPa (24 km) during different atmospheric conditions. Radiation profiles during different daytimes show possibilities with respect to temporal resolution of vertical radiation profiles trough the atmosphere.

  5. Accurate measurements and temperature dependence of the water vapor self-continuum absorption in the 2.1 μm atmospheric window

    SciTech Connect

    Ventrillard, I.; Romanini, D.; Mondelain, D.; Campargue, A.

    2015-10-07

    In spite of its importance for the evaluation of the Earth radiative budget, thus for climate change, very few measurements of the water vapor continuum are available in the near infrared atmospheric windows especially at temperature conditions relevant for our atmosphere. In addition, as a result of the difficulty to measure weak broadband absorption signals, the few available measurements show large disagreements. We report here accurate measurements of the water vapor self-continuum absorption in the 2.1 μm window by Optical Feedback Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) for two spectral points located at the low energy edge and at the center of the 2.1 μm transparency window, at 4302 and 4723 cm{sup −1}, respectively. Self-continuum cross sections, C{sub S}, were retrieved with a few % relative uncertainty, from the quadratic dependence of the spectrum base line level measured as a function of water vapor pressure, between 0 and 16 Torr. At 296 K, the C{sub S} value at 4302 cm{sup −1} is found 40% higher than predicted by the MT-CKD V2.5 model, while at 4723 cm{sup −1}, our value is 5 times larger than the MT-CKD value. On the other hand, these OF-CEAS C{sub S} values are significantly smaller than recent measurements by Fourier transform spectroscopy at room temperature. The temperature dependence of the self-continuum cross sections was also investigated for temperatures between 296 K and 323 K (23-50 °C). The derived temperature variation is found to be similar to that derived from previous Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) measurements performed at higher temperatures, between 350 K and 472 K. The whole set of measurements spanning the 296-472 K temperature range follows a simple exponential law in 1/T with a slope close to the dissociation energy of the water dimer, D{sub 0} ≈ 1100 cm{sup −1}.

  6. The Radiative Effects of Martian Water Ice Clouds on the Local Atmospheric Temperature Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colaprete, Anthony; Toon, Owen B.

    2000-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder made numerous discoveries, one of which was a deep temperature inversion that extended from about 15 km down to 8 km above the surface. It has been suggested by Haberle et al. (1999. J. Geophys. Res. 104, 8957-8974.) that radiative cooling by a water ice cloud may generate such an inversion. Clouds can strongly affect the local air temperature due to their ability to radiate efficiently in the infrared and due to the low air mass of the martian atmosphere, which allows the temperature to change during the relatively short lifetime of a cloud. We utilize a time-dependent microphysical aerosol model coupled to a radiative--convective model to explore the effects water ice clouds have on the local martian temperature profile. We constrain the dust and water vapor abundance using data from the Viking Missions and Mars Pathfinder. Water t ice clouds with visible optical depths of r > 0.1 form readily in these simulations. These clouds alter the local air temperature directly, through infrared cooling, and indirectly, by redistributing atmospheric dust. With this model we are able to reproduce the temperature inversions observed by Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global t Surveyor 2000 Academic Press

  7. 40 CFR 86.129-94 - Road load power, test weight, inertia weight class determination, and fuel temperature profile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... liquid fuel temperature (Tliq); and (D) Vapor space pressure (the Administrator may omit measurement of... embedded sensor, a portable temperature probe, or an infrared pyrometer that can provide an accuracy of ±2... for developing corrected liquid fuel and vapor space temperature profiles may be used if...

  8. 40 CFR 86.129-94 - Road load power, test weight, inertia weight class determination, and fuel temperature profile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... liquid fuel temperature (Tliq); and (D) Vapor space pressure (the Administrator may omit measurement of... embedded sensor, a portable temperature probe, or an infrared pyrometer that can provide an accuracy of ±2... for developing corrected liquid fuel and vapor space temperature profiles may be used if...

  9. DA white dwarf effective temperatures determined from IUE Lyman-alpha profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holberg, J. B.; Basile, J.; Wesemael, F.

    1986-01-01

    The Lyman-alpha profiles of 12 DA white dwarfs have been obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite. Analysis of these profiles provides an improved, uniform, and relatively bias-free measure of effective temperature for these stars over the range 20,000-60,000 K. Simultaneous estimates of surface gravity yield a mean gravity of log g = 7.96 for the entire sample, with the hottest stars tending to have the lowest gravities. A significant exception to this trend occurs in the case of the gravitation of HZ 43. An important by-product of this work has been the determination of a correction to IUE fluxes over the 1150-1350 A range.

  10. The New Weather Radar for America's Space Program in Florida: A Temperature Profile Adaptive Scan Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, L. D.; Petersen, W. A.; Deierling, W.; Roeder, W. P.

    2009-01-01

    A new weather radar is being acquired for use in support of America s space program at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, NASA Kennedy Space Center, and Patrick AFB on the east coast of central Florida. This new radar replaces the modified WSR-74C at Patrick AFB that has been in use since 1984. The new radar is a Radtec TDR 43-250, which has Doppler and dual polarization capability. A new fixed scan strategy was designed to best support the space program. The fixed scan strategy represents a complex compromise between many competing factors and relies on climatological heights of various temperatures that are important for improved lightning forecasting and evaluation of Lightning Launch Commit Criteria (LCC), which are the weather rules to avoid lightning strikes to in-flight rockets. The 0 C to -20 C layer is vital since most generation of electric charge occurs within it and so it is critical in evaluating Lightning LCC and in forecasting lightning. These are two of the most important duties of 45 WS. While the fixed scan strategy that covers most of the climatological variation of the 0 C to -20 C levels with high resolution ensures that these critical temperatures are well covered most of the time, it also means that on any particular day the radar is spending precious time scanning at angles covering less important heights. The goal of this project is to develop a user-friendly, Interactive Data Language (IDL) computer program that will automatically generate optimized radar scan strategies that adapt to user input of the temperature profile and other important parameters. By using only the required scan angles output by the temperature profile adaptive scan strategy program, faster update times for volume scans and/or collection of more samples per gate for better data quality is possible, while maintaining high resolution at the critical temperature levels. The temperature profile adaptive technique will also take into account earth curvature and refraction

  11. Estimating Liquid Fluxes in Thermally Perturbed Fractured Rock Using Measured Temperature Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2005-02-14

    A new temperature-profile method was recently developed for analyzing perturbed flow conditions in superheated porous media. The method uses high-resolution temperature data to estimate the magnitude of the heat-driven liquid and gas fluxes that form as a result of boiling, condensation, and recirculation of pore water. In this paper, we evaluate the applicability of this new method to the more complex flow behavior in fractured formations with porous rock matrix. In such formations, with their intrinsic heterogeneity, the porous but low-permeable matrix provides most of the mass and heat storage capacity, and dominates conductive heat transfer, Fractures, on the other hand, offer highly effective conduits for gas and liquid flow, thereby generating significant convective heat transfer. After establishing the accuracy of the temperature-profile method for fractured porous formations, we apply the method in analyzing the perturbed flow conditions in a large-scale underground heater test conducted in unsaturated fractured porous tuff. The flux estimates for this test indicate a significant reflux of water near the heat source, on the order of a few hundred millimeter per year-much larger than the ambient percolation flux of only a few millimeter per year.

  12. In-Situ Acoustic Measurements of Temperature Profile in Extreme Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Skliar, Mikhail

    2015-03-31

    A gasifier’s temperature is the primary characteristic that must be monitored to ensure its performance and the longevity of its refractory. One of the key technological challenges impacting the reliability and economics of coal and biomass gasification is the lack of temperature sensors that are capable of providing accurate, reliable, and long-life performance in an extreme gasification environment. This research has proposed, demonstrated, and validated a novel approach that uses a noninvasive ultrasound method that provides real-time temperature distribution monitoring across the refractory, especially the hot face temperature of the refractory. The essential idea of the ultrasound measurements of segmental temperature distribution is to use an ultrasound propagation waveguide across a refractory that has been engineered to contain multiple internal partial reflectors at known locations. When an ultrasound excitation pulse is introduced on the cold side of the refractory, it will be partially reflected from each scatterer in the US propagation path in the refractory wall and returned to the receiver as a train of partial echoes. The temperature in the corresponding segment can be determined based on recorded ultrasonic waveform and experimentally defined relationship between the speed of sound and temperature. The ultrasound measurement method offers a powerful solution to provide continuous real time temperature monitoring for the occasions that conventional thermal, optical and other sensors are infeasible, such as the impossibility of insertion of temperature sensor, harsh environment, unavailable optical path, and more. Our developed ultrasound system consists of an ultrasound engineered waveguide, ultrasound transducer/receiver, and data acquisition, logging, interpretation, and online display system, which is simple to install on the existing units with minimal modification on the gasifier or use with new units. This system has been successfully tested

  13. Comparison of Temperature Measurements in the Middle Atmosphere by Satellite with Profiles Obtained by Meteorological Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Richard A.; Schmidlin, Francis J.; Feofilov, Artem; Bedrick, M.; Rose, R. Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Measurements using the inflatable falling sphere technique have occasionally been used to obtain temperature results from density data and thereby provide comparison with temperature profiles obtained by satellite sounders in the mesosphere and stratosphere. To insure density measurements within narrow time frames and close in space, the inflatable falling sphere is launched within seconds of the nearly overhead satellite pass. Sphere measurements can be used to validate remotely measured temperatures but also have the advantage of measuring small-scale atmospheric features. Even so, with the dearth of remaining falling spheres available (the manufacture of these systems has been discontinued), it may be time to consider whether the remote measurements are mature enough to stand alone. Three field studies are considered, one in 2003 from Northern Sweden, and two in 2010 from the vicinity of Kwajalein Atoll in the South Pacific and from Barking Sands, Hawaii. All three sites are used to compare temperature retrievals between satellite and in situ falling spheres. The major satellite instruments employed are SABER, MLS, and AIRS. The comparisons indicate that remotely measured temperatures mimic the sphere temperature measurements quite well. The data also confirm that satellite retrievals, while not always at the exact location required for detailed studies in space and time, compare sufficiently well to be highly useful. Although the falling sphere will provide a measurement at a specific location and time, satellites only pass a given location daily or less frequently. This report reveals that averaged satellite measurements can provide temperatures and densities comparable to those obtained from the falling sphere, thereby providing a reliable measure of global temperature

  14. Comparison of Temperature Measurements in the Middle Atmosphere by Satellite with Profiles Obtained by Meteorological Rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Feofilov, A. G.; Bedrick, M.; Rose, R. L.

    2012-04-01

    Measurements using the inflatable falling sphere technique have occasionally been used to obtain temperature results from density data and thereby provide comparison with temperature profiles obtained by satellite sounders in the mesosphere and stratosphere. To insure density measurements within narrow time frames and close in space, the inflatable falling sphere is launched within seconds of the nearly overhead satellite pass. Sphere measurements can be used to validate remotely measured temperatures but also have the advantage of measuring small-scale atmospheric features. Even so, with the dearth of remaining falling spheres available (the manufacture of these systems has been discontinued), it may be time to consider whether the remote measurements are mature enough to stand alone. Three field studies are considered, one in 2003 from Northern Sweden, and two in 2010 from the vicinity of Kwajalein Atoll in the South Pacific and from Barking Sands, Hawaii. All three sites are used to compare temperature retrievals between satellite and in situ falling spheres. The major satellite instruments employed are SABER, MLS, and AIRS. The comparisons indicate that remotely measured temperatures mimic the sphere temperature measurements quite well. The data also confirm that satellite retrievals, while not always at the exact location required for detailed studies in space and time, compare sufficiently well to be highly useful. Although the falling sphere will provide a measurement at a specific location and time, satellites only pass a given location daily or less frequently. This report reveals that averaged satellite measurements can provide temperatures and densities comparable to those obtained from the falling sphere, thereby providing a reliable measure of global temperature.

  15. Two-tracer spectroscopy diagnostics of temperature profile in the conduction layer of a laser-ablated plastic foil

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jiyan; Yang Guohong; Hu Xin; Yang Jiamin; Ding Yaonan; Ding Yongkun; Zhang Baohan; Zheng Zhijian; Xu Yan; Yan Jun; Pei Wenbin

    2010-11-15

    A technique that combines the diagnostics of electron temperature history and the measurements of ablation velocity with two-tracer x-ray spectroscopy has been developed for diagnosing the temperature profiles in the thermal conduction layers of laser-ablated plastic foils. The electron temperature in the plastic ablator was diagnosed using the isoelectronic line ratios of Al Ly{alpha} line to Mg Ly{alpha} line, emitted from a tracer layer of Al/Mg mixture buried under the ablator. The ablation velocity was inferred from the time delay between the onset time of x-ray line emissions from Al and Mg tracer layers buried at two depths in the ablator, respectively. From the measured electron temperatures and ablation velocity, the electron temperature profile in the conduction layer was inferred. The measured temperature profile was compared with the simulated one and reasonable agreement was found.

  16. Steady-state hollow electron temperature profiles in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hogeweij, G.M.; Oomens, A.A.; Barth, C.J.; Beurskens, M.N.; Chu, C.C.; van Gelder, J.F.; Lok, J.; Lopes Cardozo, N.J.; Pijper, F.J.; Polman, R.W.; Rommers, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    In the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project steady-state hollow electron temperature ({ital T}{sub {ital e}}) profiles have been sustained with strong off-axis electron cyclotron heating, creating a region of reversed magnetic shear. In this region the effective electron thermal diffusivity ({chi}{sub {ital e}}{sup {ital pb}}) is close to neoclassical in high density plasmas. For medium density, {chi}{sub {ital e}}{sup {ital pb}} is lower than neoclassical and may even be negative, indicating that off-diagonal elements in the transport matrix drive an electron heat flux up the {ital T}{sub {ital e}} gradient. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  17. 1DTempPro: analyzing temperature profiles for groundwater/surface-water exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voytek, Emily B.; Drenkelfuss, Anja; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Healy, Richard; Lane, Jr., John W.; Werkema, Dale

    2014-01-01

    A new computer program, 1DTempPro, is presented for the analysis of vertical one-dimensional (1D) temperature profiles under saturated flow conditions. 1DTempPro is a graphical user interface to the U.S. Geological Survey code Variably Saturated 2-Dimensional Heat Transport (VS2DH), which numerically solves the flow and heat-transport equations. Pre- and postprocessor features allow the user to calibrate VS2DH models to estimate vertical groundwater/surface-water exchange and also hydraulic conductivity for cases where hydraulic head is known.

  18. Underestimation of oxygen deficiency hazard through use of linearized temperature profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kerby, J.

    1989-06-15

    The failure mode analysis for any cryogenic system includes the effects of a large liquid spill due to vessel rupture or overfilling. The Oxygen Deficiency Hazard (ODH) analysis for this event is a strong function of the estimated heat flux entering the spilled liquid. A common method for estimating the heat flux is to treat the surface on which the liquid spills as a semi-infinite solid. This note addresses the effect of linearizing the temperature profile in this form of analysis, and shows it to cause the calculated flux to be underestimated by more than a factor of two. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Line profile analysis and low temperature AC susceptibility of Cu-Zn ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Lamani, Ashok. R.; Jayanna, H. S.; Prasanna, G. D.

    2012-06-05

    The Cu{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0, 0{center_dot}2, 0{center_dot}4, 0{center_dot}6, 0{center_dot}8, 1.0) samples were prepared using double sintering ceramic method by adding Zn{sup 2+} at different concentration. The X-ray line profile analysis were carried out to confirm the spinel phase formation as well as to know the (%) strain in the crystal. The real and imaginary part of a.c. susceptibility measured from 77K to room temperature. The high temperature peak corresponds to magnetic blocking of individual particles, while the low temperature peak is attributed to surface spin-glass freezing. To prove the dynamics of the spin (dis)order in both regimes of freezing and blocking, the frequency dependent ac susceptibility is investigated under a biasing dc field. The frequency shift in the ''frozen'' low-temperature ac susceptibility peak is fitted to a dynamic scaling law which indicates a spin-glass phase. Exchange bias is turned on at low temperature which signifies the existence of a strong core-shell interaction.

  20. Effect of growth temperature on glucosinolate profiles in Arabidopsis thaliana accessions.

    PubMed

    Kissen, Ralph; Eberl, Franziska; Winge, Per; Uleberg, Eivind; Martinussen, Inger; Bones, Atle M

    2016-10-01

    Glucosinolates are plant secondary metabolites with important roles in plant defence against pathogens and pests and are also known for their health benefits. Understanding how environmental factors affect the level and composition of glucosinolates is therefore of importance in the perspective of climate change. In this study we analysed glucosinolates in Arabidopsis thaliana accessions when grown at constant standard (21 °C), moderate (15 °C) and low (9 °C) temperatures during three generations. In most of the tested accessions moderate and pronounced chilling temperatures led to higher levels of glucosinolates, especially aliphatic glucosinolates. Which temperature yielded the highest glucosinolate levels was accession-dependent. Transcriptional profiling revealed also accession-specific gene responses, but only a limited correlation between changes in glucosinolate-related gene expression and glucosinolate levels. Different growth temperatures in one generation did not consistently affect glucosinolate composition in subsequent generations, hence a clear transgenerational effect of temperature on glucosinolates was not observed. PMID:27319377

  1. Accurate experimental determination of the isotope effects on the triple point temperature of water. I. Dependence on the 2H abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faghihi, V.; Peruzzi, A.; Aerts-Bijma, A. T.; Jansen, H. G.; Spriensma, J. J.; van Geel, J.; Meijer, H. A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Variation in the isotopic composition of water is one of the major contributors to uncertainty in the realization of the triple point of water (TPW). Although the dependence of the TPW on the isotopic composition of the water has been known for years, there is still a lack of a detailed and accurate experimental determination of the values for the correction constants. This paper is the first of two articles (Part I and Part II) that address quantification of isotope abundance effects on the triple point temperature of water. In this paper, we describe our experimental assessment of the 2H isotope effect. We manufactured five triple point cells with prepared water mixtures with a range of 2H isotopic abundances encompassing widely the natural abundance range, while the 18O and 17O isotopic abundance were kept approximately constant and the 18O  -  17O ratio was close to the Meijer-Li relationship for natural waters. The selected range of 2H isotopic abundances led to cells that realised TPW temperatures between approximately  -140 μK to  +2500 μK with respect to the TPW temperature as realized by VSMOW (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water). Our experiment led to determination of the value for the δ2H correction parameter of A2H  =  673 μK / (‰ deviation of δ2H from VSMOW) with a combined uncertainty of 4 μK (k  =  1, or 1σ).

  2. Measuring Vertical Profiles of Wind, Temperature and Humidity within the Atmospheric Boundary Layer using the Research UAVs 'M2AV Carolo'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bange, J.; Martin, S.

    2009-09-01

    The measurement of vertical profiles is important to characterise the vertical structure of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). For instance, the dependence of the potential temperature on altitude defines the thermal stratification. The mechanical shear (i.e. the variation of wind speed and direction) produces turbulence and turbulent fluxes. The top of the ABL is required for scaling approaches (e.g. Deardorff scaling in the convective boundary layer, local scaling in the stable boundary layer). The Meteorological Mini Aerial Vehicles (M²AV) are self-constructed, automatically operating research aircraft of 6 kg in weight (including 1.5 kg scientific payload) and 2 m wingspan. These systems are capable of performing turbulence measurements (wind vector, temperature and humidity) and are used as a new instrument for measuring vertical profiles of the lower troposphere. Compared to a radiosonde, the spatial resolution of the M²AV is significantly higher. Especially the wind measurement is significantly more accurate compared to radiosonde data when using an aircraft that is equipped with a proper flow sensor (mainly a five-hole probe). It is important to maintain flow angles (sideslip and angle of attack) within the calibration range (typically 10 to 20 degree). This limits the vertical speed (the rate of climb and descent) of the research aircraft. In general there are two approaches to measure vertical profiles with research aircraft. Instantaneous profiles (slant flight pattern) are suitable if only little time is available, if the ABL is very in-stationary (or the aircraft is slow), if the dependence of the profile on time is requested (repeated slant flight patterns over one location) or if the dependence of the profile on the location is requested (saw-tooth pattern). For mean profiles (horizontal straight and level flights 'legs' at several altitudes within the ABL) it is necessary to use fast sensors. If the response time is too large, the vertical

  3. Estimates of the potential temperature profile from lidar measurements of boundary layer evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, H. E.; Eichinger, W. E.

    2006-10-01

    The Soil Moisture-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (SMACEX) was conducted in the Walnut Creek Watershed near Ames, Iowa, over the period from 15 June to 11 July 2002. A main focus of SMACEX is the investigation of the interactions between the atmospheric boundary layer, surface moisture, and canopy. A vertically staring elastic lidar was used to provide a high time resolution, continuous record of the mixed layer height at the edge between a soybean and a corn field. The height and thickness of the entrainment zone are used to estimate the vertical potential temperature profile in the boundary layer using surface energy measurements in the Batchvarova-Gryning mixed layer model. Calculated values of potential temperature compared well to radiosonde measurements taken simultaneously with the lidar measurements. The root-mean-square difference between the lidar-derived values and the balloon-based values is 1.20°C.

  4. Ion temperature and plasma rotation profile effects in the neutron emission spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.; Henriksson, H.; Källne, J.

    2004-03-01

    The instrumental factors and measuring conditions affecting neutron emission spectrometry measurements of tokamak plasmas are described and analyzed. The measured energy broadening and shift of the neutron emission is used to deduce ion temperature (Ti) and toroidal plasma rotation velocity (Vt) representing average (effective) values for the nonuniform plasma volume viewed. Analytical expressions are derived for the relationship between the line-volume integrated effective temperature (Teff) and the radial profile Ti(r) for the case of thermal plasmas with isotropic neutron emission; effects on Teff due to spectral broadening from the radial dependence Vt(r) were also considered. The analysis method presented here is applied to high quality data obtained with the magnetic proton recoil neutron spectrometer installed at Joint European Torus for measurements of deuterium-tritium plasmas. Similarly, cases of anisotropic neutron emission were quantitatively assessed.

  5. Can ice sheet models contribute to the understanding of deep borehole temperature profiles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Volker; Tarasov, Lev; Mottaghy, Darius; Kukkonen, Ilmo; Majorowicz, Jacek; Safanda, Jan; Demezhko, Dmitry

    2013-04-01

    It has been argued many times that deep boreholes in Northern America and Europe have recorded basal ice sheet conditions during the last glacial cycle. However, though most of the very deep and well documented boreholes available today belong into this group, systematic investigations of this effects have been rare, and are only now emerging (Matharoo et al., Rath et al., in prep.). Here we present some early results from a case study in Northern Europe,analyzing several well-known deep boreholes in the light of the recent ice sheet model of Tarasov et al.(2008). These boreholes include temperature profiles from the Kola SG3 (Russia, >4000 m) Outokumpu (Finland, 2500 m), Udryn (Poland, 2250 m), Torun (Poland, 2920 m), and Czeszowo (Poland, 3450 m). All of these data have been independently investigated before with forward and inverse methods. For this study, we have chosen a very simple approach. Starting from a small ensemble of ground surface temperatures derived from the data-calibrated glacial Systems Model, we employed an 1D subsurface model based on the best available knowledge on local geology and climatic conditions. The synthetic borehole temperature profiles derived are then compared to the observations, and discussed with respect to earlier interpretations. Several problems related to this approach are discussed: (1) the imperfect representation of local subsurface conditions, e.g., the assumption of 1D structure; (2) the role of the driving climate, which will determine the conditions under ice-free conditions; (3) the well-known imperfect coupling of surface air and ground temperatures. We believe that this contribution will be the base for in-depth discussions, and could be seminal for further investigations.

  6. Real-time measurements of temperature, pressure and moisture profiles in High-Performance Concrete exposed to high temperatures during neutron radiography imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Toropovs, N.; Lo Monte, F.; Wyrzykowski, M.; Weber, B.; Sahmenko, G.; Vontobel, P.; Felicetti, R.; Lura, P.

    2015-02-15

    High-Performance Concrete (HPC) is particularly prone to explosive spalling when exposed to high temperature. Although the exact causes that lead to spalling are still being debated, moisture transport during heating plays an important role in all proposed mechanisms. In this study, slabs made of high-performance, low water-to-binder ratio mortars with addition of superabsorbent polymers (SAP) and polypropylene fibers (PP) were heated from one side on a temperature-controlled plate up to 550 °C. A combination of measurements was performed simultaneously on the same sample: moisture profiles via neutron radiography, temperature profiles with embedded thermocouples and pore pressure evolution with embedded pressure sensors. Spalling occurred in the sample with SAP, where sharp profiles of moisture and temperature were observed. No spalling occurred when PP-fibers were introduced in addition to SAP. The experimental procedure described here is essential for developing and verifying numerical models and studying measures against fire spalling risk in HPC.

  7. Laboratory demonstration of a Brillouin lidar to remotely measure temperature profiles of the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, Andreas; Walther, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    We report on the successful laboratory demonstration of a real-time lidar system to remotely measure temperature profiles in water. In the near future, it is intended to be operated from a mobile platform, e.g., a helicopter or vessel, in order to precisely determine the temperature of the surface mixed layer of the ocean with high spatial resolution. The working principle relies on the active generation and detection of spontaneous Brillouin scattering. The light source consists of a frequency-doubled fiber-amplified external cavity diode laser and provides high-energy, Fourier transform-limited laser pulses in the green spectral range. The detector is based on an atomic edge filter and allows the challenging extraction of the temperature information from the Brillouin scattered light. In the lab environment, depending on the amount of averaging, water temperatures were resolved with a mean accuracy of up to 0.07°C and a spatial resolution of 1 m, proving the feasibility and the large potential of the overall system.

  8. Expression Profiling the Temperature-Dependent Amphibian Response to Infection by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Laia; Li, Ming-Shi; Doddington, Benjamin J.; Robert, Jacques; Seidel, Judith A.; Kroll, J. Simon; Zimmerman, Lyle B.; Grassly, Nicholas C.; Garner, Trenton W. J.; Fisher, Matthew C.

    2009-01-01

    Amphibians are experiencing a panzootic of unprecedented proportions caused by the emergence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). However, all species are not equally at risk of infection, and risk is further modified by environmental variables, specifically temperature. In order to understand how, and when, hosts mount a response to Bd we analysed infection dynamics and patterns of gene expression in the model amphibian species Silurana (Xenopus) tropicalis. Mathematical modelling of infection dynamics demonstrate the existence of a temperature-dependent protective response that is largely independent of the intrinsic growth-rate of Bd. Using temporal expression-profiling by microarrays and qRT-PCR, we characterise this response in the main amphibian lymphoid tissue, the spleen. We demonstrate that clearance of Bd at the host-optimal temperature is not clearly associated with an adaptive immune response, but rather is correlated with the induction of components of host innate immunity including the expression of genes that are associated with the production of the antimicrobial skin peptide preprocareulein (PPCP) as well as inflammatory responses. We find that adaptive immunity appears to be lacking at host-optimal temperatures. This suggests that either Bd does not stimulate, or suppresses, adaptive immunity, or that trade-offs exist between innate and adaptive limbs of the amphibian immune system. At cold temperatures, S. tropicalis loses the ability to mount a PPCP-based innate response, and instead manifests a more pronounced inflammatory reaction that is characterised by the production of proteases and higher pathogen burdens. This study demonstrates the temperature-dependency of the amphibian response to infection by Bd and indicates the influence that changing climates may exert on the ectothermic host response to pathogens. PMID:20027316

  9. Daytime temperature profiling of UV rotational Raman lidar using a multispectral detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okatani, Y.; Yabuki, M.; Tsukamoto, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Tsuda, T.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature profiling in the atmospheric boundary layer is essential in meteorological studies for understanding atmospheric processes. In this study, we developed a temperature lidar with a multispectral detector to construct a system that is compact, robust, and easy to align for the detection of rotational Raman signals. The multispectral lidar detector, which is based on a linear array multianode photomultiplier tube assembly, allows simultaneous detection of multiple spectrometer wavelengths. We can select a suitable observation wavelength using motorized accessory controls in spectroscopy and scanning software. The developed system enables the acquisition of shapes of rotational Raman spectra. Atmospheric temperature can be estimated by direct fitting of the observed lidar signals to the acquired theoretical shapes that exhibit different dependencies on temperature.In the laser wavelength of the Raman lidar system, the ultraviolet (UV) wavelength has advantages over the visible wavelength because the rotational Raman backscatter coefficient is proportional to the minus fourth power of wavelength. Moreover, UV lidars achieve better daytime performances than visible systems because of reduced sky background. Here, we have developed two Raman lidar systems, which are equipped with lasers at wavelengths of 266 nm and355 nm. In the multispectral detector, the rotational Raman lidar signal has several uncertainties that cause significant errors during temperature estimation. For example, the light detection efficiency is not uniform for each channel in the multispectral detector. Here, we demonstrate the calibration techniques of the developed system and report the preliminary results of temperature observations in the planetary boundary layer at the middle and upper (MU) radar observatory (34.8°N, 136.1°E) in Shigaraki, Japan.

  10. Backus-Gilbert theory and its application to retrieval of ozone and temperature profiles. [from remote sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrath, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    The inversion method provides a quantitative evaluation of the trade-off between vertical resolution of a retrieved profile and formal root-mean-square (rms) error due to measurement noise propagation. The problem of retrieving the top-side ozone profile from backscattered ultraviolet (BUV) measurements is considered. For measurements of the type currently being obtained with the Nimbus 4 and AE-E BUV experiments, it is found that a vertical resolution of approximately 0.75 scale height can be achieved for a formal volume mixing ratio profile error of 10%. Other examples include treatments of the retrieval of temperature profiles from measurements in the 15 micron CO2 absorption band for both the terrestrial and Martian atmospheres. Finally, the method is applied to the problem of retrieving temperature profiles of the Jovian planets from measurements in the far infrared pressure induced H2 lines to be obtained from the Mariner Jupiter/Saturn fly-by missions.

  11. Accurate line shapes from sub-1 cm(-1) resolution sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy of α-pinene at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Mifflin, Amanda L; Velarde, Luis; Ho, Junming; Psciuk, Brian T; Negre, Christian F A; Ebben, Carlena J; Upshur, Mary Alice; Lu, Zhou; Strick, Benjamin L; Thomson, Regan J; Batista, Victor S; Wang, Hong-Fei; Geiger, Franz M

    2015-02-26

    Despite the importance of terpenes in biology, the environment, and catalysis, their vibrational spectra remain unassigned. Here, we present subwavenumber high-resolution broad-band sum frequency generation (HR-BB-SFG) spectra of the common terpene (+)-α-pinene that reveal 10 peaks in the C-H stretching region at room temperature. The high spectral resolution resulted in spectra with more and better resolved spectral features than those of the Fourier transform infrared, femtosecond stimulated Raman spectra in the bulk condensed phase and those of the conventional BB-SFG and scanning SFG spectroscopy of the same molecule on a surface. Experiment and simulation show the spectral line shapes with HR-BB-SFG to be accurate. Homogeneous vibrational decoherence lifetimes of up to 1.7 ps are assigned to specific oscillators and compare favorably to lifetimes computed from density functional tight binding molecular dynamics calculations. Phase-resolved spectra provided their orientational information. We propose the new spectroscopy as an attractive alternative to time domain vibrational spectroscopy or heterodyne detection schemes for studying vibrational energy relaxation and vibrational coherences in molecules at molecular surfaces or interfaces.

  12. Performance optimization of apodized FBG-based temperature sensors in single and quasi-distributed DWDM systems with new and different apodization profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed, Nazmi A.; Ali, Taha A. Aly, Moustafa H.

    2013-12-15

    In this work, different FBG temperature sensors are designed and evaluated with various apodization profiles. Evaluation is done under a wide range of controlling design parameters like sensor length and refractive index modulation amplitude, targeting a remarkable temperature sensing performance. New judgment techniques are introduced such as apodization window roll-off rate, asymptotic sidelobe (SL) decay level, number of SLs, and average SL level (SLav). Evaluation techniques like reflectivity, Full width at Half Maximum (FWHM), and Sidelobe Suppression Ratio (SLSR) are also used. A “New” apodization function is proposed, which achieves better performance like asymptotic decay of 18.4 dB/nm, high SLSR of 60 dB, high channel isolation of 57.9 dB, and narrow FWHM less than 0.15 nm. For a single accurate temperature sensor measurement in extensive noisy environment, optimum results are obtained by the Nuttall apodization profile and the new apodization function, which have remarkable SLSR. For a quasi-distributed FBG temperature sensor the Barthann and the new apodization profiles obtain optimum results. Barthann achieves a high asymptotic decay of 40 dB/nm, a narrow FWHM (less than 25 GHZ), a very low SLav of −45.3 dB, high isolation of 44.6 dB, and a high SLSR of 35 dB. The new apodization function achieves narrow FWHM of 0.177 nm, very low SL of −60.1, very low SLav of −63.6 dB, and very high SLSR of −57.7 dB. A study is performed on including an unapodized sensor among apodized sensors in a quasi-distributed sensing system. Finally, an isolation examination is performed on all the discussed apodizations and a linear relation between temperature and the Bragg wavelength shift is observed experimentally and matched with the simulated results.

  13. PSSP-RFE: Accurate Prediction of Protein Structural Class by Recursive Feature Extraction from PSI-BLAST Profile, Physical-Chemical Property and Functional Annotations

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sanjiu; Zhang, Yuan; Luo, Zhong; Yang, Hua; Zhou, Yue; Zheng, Xiaoqi

    2014-01-01

    Protein structure prediction is critical to functional annotation of the massively accumulated biological sequences, which prompts an imperative need for the development of high-throughput technologies. As a first and key step in protein structure prediction, protein structural class prediction becomes an increasingly challenging task. Amongst most homological-based approaches, the accuracies of protein structural class prediction are sufficiently high for high similarity datasets, but still far from being satisfactory for low similarity datasets, i.e., below 40% in pairwise sequence similarity. Therefore, we present a novel method for accurate and reliable protein structural class prediction for both high and low similarity datasets. This method is based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) in conjunction with integrated features from position-specific score matrix (PSSM), PROFEAT and Gene Ontology (GO). A feature selection approach, SVM-RFE, is also used to rank the integrated feature vectors through recursively removing the feature with the lowest ranking score. The definitive top features selected by SVM-RFE are input into the SVM engines to predict the structural class of a query protein. To validate our method, jackknife tests were applied to seven widely used benchmark datasets, reaching overall accuracies between 84.61% and 99.79%, which are significantly higher than those achieved by state-of-the-art tools. These results suggest that our method could serve as an accurate and cost-effective alternative to existing methods in protein structural classification, especially for low similarity datasets. PMID:24675610

  14. In Situ Chemical Profiling of an Extremely low Temperature Hydrothermal System at Loihi Seamount, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazer, B. T.; Briggs, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    Loihi Seamount is a submarine, active volcano located on the southeast flanks of the Big Island of Hawaii. It is considered to be the youngest volcano in the chain, sharing the hot spot magma chamber with Mauna Loa and Kilauea. Sites of both vigorous and diffuse hydrothermal venting can be found surrounding the pit crater summit (1000m) and on the flanks of the seamount, down to its base (5000m). Vent fluids at Loihi are chemically distinct from other well-studied marine hydrothermal systems and have been shown to be enriched in carbon dioxide, iron(II), and manganese(II), and deplete in sulfur species. The Loihi summit is located within a zone of low oxygen, further enabling elevated iron(II) concentrations and support for a dominant community of iron-oxidizing bacteria. We deployed a sensor wand consisting of up to four voltammetric working electrodes and the ROV Jason temperature probe, and/or a submersible micromanipulator with voltammetric electrodes to provide real time in situ redox characterizations of hydrothermal fluids and geochemical gradients associated with iron-oxidizing microbial mats and flocs. In addition to surveying known areas of warm temperature (10-60 degrees C) venting at the Loihi summit, we performed widespread profiling of a previously undescribed site at 5000m, that exhibits temperature anomalies of just 0.2 degrees C. Extensive iron-oxidizing microbial mats were shown to occur up to 2m in thickness over several hundred square meters. Bottom water oxygen concentrations were near-saturation, and we observed steep gradients at the mat-interface, with little oxygen penetration and iron(II) concentrations of up to 150 micromolar. Our in situ electrochemical analyses provided an efficient and valuable means for directed discrete sampling of hydrothermal fluids and microbial flocs, as well as previously unattainable high spatial resolution geochemical profiles through the mats.

  15. Diagnosing shock temperature with NH3 and H2O profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Ruiz, A. I.; Codella, C.; Viti, S.; Jiménez-Serra, I.; Navarra, G.; Bachiller, R.; Caselli, P.; Fuente, A.; Gusdorf, A.; Lefloch, B.; Lorenzani, A.; Nisini, B.

    2016-10-01

    In a previous study of the L1157 B1 shocked cavity, a comparison between NH3(10-00) and H2O(110-101) transitions showed a striking difference in the profiles, with H2O emitting at definitely higher velocities. This behaviour was explained as a result of the high-temperature gas-phase chemistry occurring in the post-shock gas in the B1 cavity of this outflow. If the differences in behaviour between ammonia and water are indeed a consequence of the high gas temperatures reached during the passage of a shock, then one should find such differences to be ubiquitous among chemically rich outflows. In order to determine whether the difference in profiles observed between NH3 and H2O is unique to L1157 or a common characteristic of chemically rich outflows, we have performed Herschel-HIFI observations of the NH3(10-00) line at 572.5 GHz in a sample of eight bright low-mass outflow spots already observed in the H2O(110-101) line within the Water In Star-forming regions with Herschel Key Programme. We detected the ammonia emission at high velocities at most of the outflows positions. In all cases, the water emission reaches higher velocities than NH3, proving that this behaviour is not exclusive of the L1157-B1 position. Comparisons with a gas-grain chemical and shock model confirms, for this larger sample, that the behaviour of ammonia is determined principally by the temperature of the gas.

  16. The use of NO2 absorption cross section temperature sensitivity to derive NO2 profile temperature and stratospheric/tropospheric column partitioning from visible direct sun DOAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinei, E.; Cede, A.; Swartz, W. H.; Herman, J.; Mount, G. H.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a TEmperature SEnsitivity Method (TESEM) to accurately calculate total vertical NO2 column, atmospheric slant NO2 profile-weighted temperature (T), and to separate stratospheric and tropospheric columns from direct-sun (DS) ground-based measurements using the retrieved T. TESEM is based on Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) fitting of the linear temperature-dependent NO2 absorption cross section, σ (T), regression model (Vandaele et al., 2003). The direct result of the DOAS spectral fitting retrieval is NO2 differential slant column density (Δ SCD) at the actual atmospheric NO2 T. Atmospheric NO2 T is determined from the DOAS fitting results after SCD in the reference spectrum is estimated using the Minimum Langley Extrapolation method (MLE). Since NO2 is mostly distributed between the lower troposphere and middle stratosphere and direct sun measurements have almost equal sensitivity to stratospheric and tropospheric absorption at solar zenith angles < 75° with a well known photon path, we assume that the retrieved total column NO2 T can be represented as a sum of the NO2 stratospheric and tropospheric Ts multiplied by the corresponding stratospheric and tropospheric fractions of the total SCDNO2. We use Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemistry-transport model (CTM) simulations to evaluate diurnal and seasonal variability of stratospheric and tropospheric NO2 T over two northern middle latitude sites in 2011. GMI simulations reveal that stratospheric NO2 T over northern middle latitudes can be estimated with an error of less than 3 K by the simulated temperature at 27 km from April to October. During November-March months the error can reach as high as 10 K. The tropospheric NO2 T can be approximated by the surface temperature within 3-5 K according to GMI simulations. Traditionally, either σ (NO2) is fitted at a single estimated NO2 T, or two predetermined (stratospheric and tropospheric) temperatures. Use of a single T

  17. Temperature profiles of 980- and 1,470-nm endovenous laser ablation, endovenous radiofrequency ablation and endovenous steam ablation.

    PubMed

    Malskat, W S J; Stokbroekx, M A L; van der Geld, C W M; Nijsten, T E C; van den Bos, R R

    2014-03-01

    Endovenous thermal ablation (EVTA) techniques are very effective for the treatment of varicose veins, but their exact working mechanism is still not well documented. The lack of knowledge of mechanistic properties has led to a variety of EVTA protocols and a commercially driven dissemination of new or modified techniques without robust scientific evidence. The aim of this study is to compare temperature profiles of 980-and 1,470-nm endovenous laser ablation (EVLA), segmental radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and endovenous steam ablation (EVSA). In an experimental setting, temperature measurements were performed using thermocouples; raw potato was used to mimic a vein wall. Two laser wavelengths (980 and 1,470 nm) were used with tulip-tip fibers and 1,470 nm also with a radial-emitting fiber. Different powers and pullback speeds were used to achieve fluences of 30, 60, and 90 J/cm. For segmental RFA, 1 cycle of 20 s was analyzed. EVSA was performed with two and three pulses of steam per centimeter. Maximum temperature increase, time span of relevant temperature increase, and area under the curve of the time of relevant temperature increase were measured. In all EVLA settings, temperatures increased and decreased rapidly. High fluence is associated with significantly higher temperatures and increased time span of temperature rise. Temperature profiles of 980- and 1,470-nm EVLA with tulip-tip fibers did not differ significantly. Radial EVLA showed significantly higher maximum temperatures than tulip-tip EVLA. EVSA resulted in mild peak temperatures for longer durations than EVLA. Maximum temperatures with three pulses per centimeter were significantly higher than with two pulses. RFA temperature rises were relatively mild, resulting in a plateau-shaped temperature profile, similar to EVSA. Temperature increase during EVLA is fast with a high-peak temperature for a short time, where EVSA and RFA have longer plateau phases and lower maximum temperatures. PMID

  18. Quantitative profiling of bile acids in biofluids and tissues based on accurate mass high resolution LC-FT-MS: compound class targeting in a metabolomics workflow.

    PubMed

    Bobeldijk, Ivana; Hekman, Maarten; de Vries-van der Weij, Jitske; Coulier, Leon; Ramaker, Raymond; Kleemann, Robert; Kooistra, Teake; Rubingh, Carina; Freidig, Andreas; Verheij, Elwin

    2008-08-15

    We report a sensitive, generic method for quantitative profiling of bile acids and other endogenous metabolites in small quantities of various biological fluids and tissues. The method is based on a straightforward sample preparation, separation by reversed-phase high performance liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) and electrospray ionisation in the negative ionisation mode (ESI-). Detection is performed in full scan using the linear ion trap Fourier transform mass spectrometer (LTQ-FTMS) generating data for many (endogenous) metabolites, not only bile acids. A validation of the method in urine, plasma and liver was performed for 17 bile acids including their taurine, sulfate and glycine conjugates. The method is linear in the 0.01-1 microM range. The accuracy in human plasma ranges from 74 to 113%, in human urine 77 to 104% and in mouse liver 79 to 140%. The precision ranges from 2 to 20% for pooled samples even in studies with large number of samples (n>250). The method was successfully applied to a multi-compartmental APOE*3-Leiden mouse study, the main goal of which was to analyze the effect of increasing dietary cholesterol concentrations on hepatic cholesterol homeostasis and bile acid synthesis. Serum and liver samples from different treatment groups were profiled with the new method. Statistically significant differences between the diet groups were observed regarding total as well as individual bile acid concentrations.

  19. 40 CFR 86.129-94 - Road load power, test weight, inertia weight class determination, and fuel temperature profile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... liquid fuel temperature (Tliq); and (D) Vapor space pressure (the Administrator may omit measurement of... embedded sensor, a portable temperature probe, or an infrared pyrometer that can provide an accuracy of ±2... relative profile. Other methodologies for developing corrected liquid fuel and vapor space...

  20. Process-based modeling of temperature and water profiles in the seedling recruitment zone: Part I. Model validation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Process-based modeling provides detailed spatial and temporal information of the soil environment in the shallow seedling recruitment zone across field topography where measurements of soil temperature and water may not sufficiently describe the zone. Hourly temperature and water profiles within the...

  1. Ultraviolet Rayleigh-Mie lidar for daytime-temperature profiling of the troposphere.

    PubMed

    Hua, Dengxin; Uchida, Masaru; Kobayashi, Takao

    2005-03-01

    A UV Rayleigh-Mie scattering lidar has been developed for daytime measurement of temperature and aerosol optical properties in the troposphere. The transmitter is a narrowband, injection-seeded, pulsed, third-harmonic Nd:YAG laser at an eye-safe wavelength of 355 nm. Two Fabry-Perot etalons (FPEs) with a dual-pass optical layout filter the molecular Rayleigh scattering components spectrally for retrieval of the temperature and provide a high rejection rate for aerosol Mie scattering in excess of 43 dB. The Mie signal is filtered with a third FPE filter for direct profiling of aerosol optical properties. The Mie scattering component in the Rayleigh signals, which will have influence on temperature measurements, is corrected by using a measure of aerosol scattering because of the relative insufficiency of Mie rejection of Rayleigh filters in the presence of dense aerosols or clouds, and the Mie rejection capability of system is thus improved. A narrowband interference filter is incorporated with the FPEs to block solar radiation. Also, the small field of view (0.1 mrad) of the receiver and the UV wavelength used enhance the ability of the lidar to suppress the solar background signal in daytime measurement. The system is relatively compact, with a power-aperture product of 0.18 W m(-2), and has a high sensitivity to temperature change (0.62%/K). Lidar measurements taken under different weather conditions (winter and summer) are demonstrated. Good agreement between the lidar and the radiosonde measurements was obtained in terms of lapse rates and inversions. Statistical temperature errors of less than 1 K up to a height of 2 km are obtainable, with an averaging time of approximately 12 min for daytime measurements.

  2. Ultraviolet Rayleigh-Mie lidar for daytime-temperature profiling of the troposphere.

    PubMed

    Hua, Dengxin; Uchida, Masaru; Kobayashi, Takao

    2005-03-01

    A UV Rayleigh-Mie scattering lidar has been developed for daytime measurement of temperature and aerosol optical properties in the troposphere. The transmitter is a narrowband, injection-seeded, pulsed, third-harmonic Nd:YAG laser at an eye-safe wavelength of 355 nm. Two Fabry-Perot etalons (FPEs) with a dual-pass optical layout filter the molecular Rayleigh scattering components spectrally for retrieval of the temperature and provide a high rejection rate for aerosol Mie scattering in excess of 43 dB. The Mie signal is filtered with a third FPE filter for direct profiling of aerosol optical properties. The Mie scattering component in the Rayleigh signals, which will have influence on temperature measurements, is corrected by using a measure of aerosol scattering because of the relative insufficiency of Mie rejection of Rayleigh filters in the presence of dense aerosols or clouds, and the Mie rejection capability of system is thus improved. A narrowband interference filter is incorporated with the FPEs to block solar radiation. Also, the small field of view (0.1 mrad) of the receiver and the UV wavelength used enhance the ability of the lidar to suppress the solar background signal in daytime measurement. The system is relatively compact, with a power-aperture product of 0.18 W m(-2), and has a high sensitivity to temperature change (0.62%/K). Lidar measurements taken under different weather conditions (winter and summer) are demonstrated. Good agreement between the lidar and the radiosonde measurements was obtained in terms of lapse rates and inversions. Statistical temperature errors of less than 1 K up to a height of 2 km are obtainable, with an averaging time of approximately 12 min for daytime measurements. PMID:15765712

  3. Atmospheric temperature profiles from ground to stratopause with a new microwave radiometer (51-57 GHz)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stähli, Oliver; Murk, Axel; Kämpfer, Niklaus

    2013-04-01

    This instrument is the first ground-based radiometer which can measure tropospheric and stratospheric temperature profiles at the same time. TEMPERA operates in the frequency range from 51 to 57 GHz in the oxygen-emission region of the microwave spectrum and is measuring continuously since 2012 in our lab on the roof. The spectral analysis is done with a filterbank with 12 channels for the troposphere and with a digital FFT spectrometer which measures two oxygen-emission lines around 53 GHz with 32000 channels for the stratophere. In the measured spectra the influence of the Zeeman effect can be seen. A measurement is built up of a tipping curve from 30 to 70 degree zenith angle. For every zenith angle we change the frequency of the local oscillator to three different frequencies with a synthesizer in combination with an active multiplier. With this method we can measure 12 frequencies with only 4 detectors. The frontend is thermally stabilized with Peltier elements. An off-axis parabolic mirror feeds the incoming microwave radiation to the horn antenna providing an angular resolution of 4 degree (FWHM). Absolute calibration is done with a hot load and a noise diode. The noise diode is calibrated regularly with a liquid nitrogen load and a hot load. The temperature retrieval is done with the optimal estimation method by using the QPack2/ARTS2 software. For the a priori profile of the atmospheric temperature we use monthly mean of radiosonde data for the troposphere and climatology of satellite data (MLS) for the upper atmosphere. The forward model is calculated with the Rosenkranz 98 model. As atmopheric temperature is a key parameter for the investigation of dynamical and chemical processes in the atmosphere, this new instrument provides important information about the local atmospheric temperature over a high altitude range (ground to 50 km). The temporal resolution is about 15 minutes for the troposphere and about 2 hours in the stratosphere. We will present the

  4. Venus Then and Now: Simulating Sulfuric Acid Clouds Using Latitudinally Dependent VIRA and VeRA Temperature Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, P.; Parkinson, C. D.; Bardeen, C.; Yung, Y. L.

    2014-12-01

    Observations from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) and from SPICAV/SOIR aboard Venus Express (VEx) have shown the upper haze (UH) of Venus to be highly spatially and temporally variable. Previous models of this system, using typical temperature profiles representative of the Venus atmosphere as a whole, did not investigate the effects of temperature variations on the UH particle distributions. Parkinson et al. (2014, submitted) showed that the inclusion of latitudinally dependent temperature profiles retrieved from SPICAV/SOIR observations in the Venus cloud model of Gao et al. (2014) resulted in markedly different cloud distributions between the different latitude cases, such as a lowered cloud base near the equator and a slightly thicker UH at the poles. Thus, temperature variations across Venus could help explain spatial variations in the atmospheric aerosol distribution. In this work, we expand on the aforementioned study by including VIRA temperature profiles derived from Venera and PVO observations (Kliore et al. 1985) at similar latitudes as the SPICAV/SOIR profiles to assess how the aerosol distribution varies spatially and temporally. By comparing the simulated cloud and haze distributions arising from the two sets of temperature profiles, we can evaluate whether secular changes have occurred in the ~30 years between the PVO and VEx epochs.

  5. Magnon, phonon, and electron temperature profiles and the spin Seebeck effect in magnetic insulator/normal metal hybrid structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Michael; Kamra, Akashdeep; Weiler, Mathias; Xiao, Jiang; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.; Gross, Rudolf; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2013-09-01

    We calculate the phonon, electron, and magnon temperature profiles in yttrium iron garnet/platinum bilayers by diffusive theory with appropriate boundary conditions, in particular taking into account interfacial thermal resistances. Our calculations show that in thin film hybrids, the interface magnetic heat conductance qualitatively affects the magnon temperature. Based on published material parameters we assess the degree of nonequilibrium at the yttrium iron garnet/platinum interface. The magnitude of the spin Seebeck effect derived from this approach compares well with experimental results for the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect. Additionally, we address the temperature profiles in the transverse spin Seebeck effect.

  6. Experimental determination of the radial temperature profile in a non-neutral plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Grant W.

    2005-10-01

    In 1992 Eggleston, et al.^1 reported on a technique for measuring the radial temperature profile in a pure electron plasma by partially dumping the plasma onto a charge collector. Several of their assumptions do not apply to our plasma, and so last year^2 we reported on a modified method which uses a form of equilibrium calculation to determine the temperature. We applied the method to the results of a simulation and found that it gave the correct temperature distribution, but we had no experimental data to apply the method to. We have now applied it to real data and found that the method was extremely sensitive to experimental noise. We have modified the method to make it less sensitive to noise and compared it to the standard `evaporation' method. These experimental results will be presented. ^1D.L.Eggleston, C.F. Driscoll, B.R. Beck, A.W. Hyatt and J.H. Malmberg, Phys. Fluids B 4, 3432 (1992).^2Grant W. Hart and Bryan G. Peterson, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 49, 320.

  7. Vertical level selection for temperature and trace gas profile retrievals using IASI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, R. A.; Dudhia, A.; Ventress, L. J.

    2015-06-01

    This work presents a new iterative method for optimally selecting a vertical retrieval grid based on the location of the information while accounting for inter-level correlations. Sample atmospheres initially created to parametrise the Radiative Transfer Model for the Television Infrared Observation Satellite Operational Vertical Sounder (RTTOV) forward model are used to compare the presented iterative selection method with two other common approaches, which are using levels of equal vertical spacing and selecting levels based on the cumulative trace of the averaging kernel matrix (AKM). This new method is shown to outperform compared methods for simulated profile retrievals of temperature, H2O, O3, CH4, and CO with the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI). However, the benefits of using the more complicated iterative approach compared to the simpler cumulative trace method are slight and may not justify the added effort for the cases studied, but may be useful in other scenarios where temperature and trace gases have strong vertical gradients with significant estimate sensitivity. Furthermore, comparing retrievals using a globally optimised static grid vs. a locally adapted one shows that a static grid performs nearly as well for retrievals of O3, CH4, and CO. However, developers of temperature and H2O retrieval schemes may at least consider using adaptive or location specific vertical retrieval grids.

  8. Validation of the IASI temperature and water vapor profile retrievals by correlative radiosondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pougatchev, Nikita; August, Thomas; Calbet, Xavier; Hultberg, Tim; Oduleye, Osoji; Schlüssel, Peter; Stiller, Bernd; St. Germain, Karen; Bingham, Gail

    2008-08-01

    The METOP-A satellite Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) Level 2 products comprise retrievals of vertical profiles of temperature and water vapor. The L2 data were validated through assessment of their error covariances and biases using radiosonde data for the reference. The radiosonde data set includes dedicated launches as well as the ones performed at regular synoptic times at Lindenberg station, Germany). For optimal error estimate the linear statistical Validation Assessment Model (VAM) was used. The model establishes relation between the compared satellite and reference measurements based on their relations to the true atmospheric state. The VAM utilizes IASI averaging kernels and statistical characteristics of the ensembles of the reference data to allow for finite vertical resolution of the retrievals and spatial and temporal non-coincidence. For temperature retrievals expected and assessed errors are in good agreement; error variances/rms of a single FOV retrieval are 1K between 800 - 300 mb with an increase to ~1K in tropopause and ~2K at the surface, possibly due to wrong surface parameters and undetected clouds/haze. Bias against radiosondes oscillates within +/-0 5K . between 950 - 100 mb. As for water vapor, its highly variable complex spatial structure does not allow assessment of retrieval errors with the same degree of accuracy as for temperature. Error variances/rms of a single FOV relative humidity retrieval are between 10 - 13% RH in the 800 - 300 mb range.

  9. Heat Transport in a Three-Dimensional Slab Geometry and the Temperature Profile of Ingen-Hausz Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Shiladitya; Mukherjee, Krishnendu

    2013-05-01

    We study the transport of heat in a three-dimensional, harmonic crystal of slab geometry whose boundaries and the intermediate surfaces are connected to stochastic, white noise heat baths at different temperatures. Heat baths at the intermediate surfaces are required to fix the initial state of the slab in respect of its surroundings. We allow the flow of energy fluxes between the intermediate surfaces and the attached baths and impose conditions that relate the widths of Gaussian noises of the intermediate baths. The radiated heat obeys Newton's law of cooling when intermediate baths collectively constitute the environment surrounding the slab. We show that Fourier's law holds in the continuum limit. We obtain an exponentially falling temperature profile from high to low temperature end of the slab and this very nature of the profile was already confirmed by Ingen-Hausz's experiment. Temperature profile of similar nature is also obtained in the one-dimensional version of this model.

  10. Daytime measurements of atmospheric temperature profiles (2-15 km) by lidar utilizing Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering.

    PubMed

    Witschas, Benjamin; Lemmerz, Christian; Reitebuch, Oliver

    2014-04-01

    In this Letter, we report on a novel method for measuring atmospheric temperature profiles by lidar during daytime for heights of 2-15.3 km, with a vertical resolution of 0.3-2.2 km, using Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering. The measurements are performed by scanning a laser (λ=355 nm) over a 12 GHz range and using a Fabry-Pérot interferometer as discriminator. The temperature is derived by using a new analytical line shape model assuming standard atmospheric pressure conditions. Two exemplary temperature profiles resulting from measurements over 14 and 27 min are shown. A comparison with radiosonde temperature measurements shows reasonable agreement. In cloud-free conditions, the temperature difference reaches up to 5 K within the boundary layer, and is smaller than 2.5 K above. The statistical error of the derived temperatures is between 0.15 and 1.5 K. PMID:24686652

  11. Argon Cluster Sputtering Source for ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling of Insulating Materials: High Sputter Rate and Accurate Interfacial Information

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhaoying; Liu, Bingwen; Zhao, Evan; Jin, Ke; Du, Yingge; Neeway, James J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Hu, Dehong; Zhang, Hongliang; Hong, Mina; Le Guernic, Solenne; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2015-08-01

    For the first time, the use of an argon cluster ion sputtering source has been demonstrated to perform superiorly relative to traditional oxygen and cesium ion sputtering sources for ToF-SIMS depth profiling of insulating materials. The superior performance has been attributed to effective alleviation of surface charging. A simulated nuclear waste glass, SON68, and layered hole-perovskite oxide thin films were selected as model systems due to their fundamental and practical significance. Our study shows that if the size of analysis areas is same, the highest sputter rate of argon cluster sputtering can be 2-3 times faster than the highest sputter rates of oxygen or cesium sputtering. More importantly, high quality data and high sputter rates can be achieved simultaneously for argon cluster sputtering while this is not the case for cesium and oxygen sputtering. Therefore, for deep depth profiling of insulating samples, the measurement efficiency of argon cluster sputtering can be about 6-15 times better than traditional cesium and oxygen sputtering. Moreover, for a SrTiO3/SrCrO3 bi-layer thin film on a SrTiO3 substrate, the true 18O/16O isotopic distribution at the interface is better revealed when using the argon cluster sputtering source. Therefore, the implementation of an argon cluster sputtering source can significantly improve the measurement efficiency of insulating materials, and thus can expand the application of ToF-SIMS to the study of glass corrosion, perovskite oxide thin films, and many other potential systems.

  12. Electron temperature profile invariance on OH, L- and H-mode plasmas and consequences for the anomalous transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, G.

    1992-01-01

    The shapes of the electron temperature and electron density profiles in the OH, L- and H-mode confinement regimes of ASDEX are explored by statistical analysis. It is shown that the shape of Te(r) is conserved in the outer half of the plasma in these regimes and that it is invariant with respect to heating power, heating profile, density, density scale length, q value and ion mass. These results suggest that microturbulence constrains the shape of the temperature profile by adjusting the electron heat diffusivity χe(r). No such invariance is found for the temperature profile in the inner half of the plasma and for the density profile over the whole cross-section. Properties of the empirical electron heat diffusivity and the diffusion coefficient in different regimes can be described by Te profile invariance. The improved confinement with peaked density profiles, the reduction of χe in the bulk of H-mode plasmas and the power dependence of χe in the L-regime are discussed

  13. Increased production of cellulase of Trichoderma sp. By pH cycling and temperature profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, S.N.; Malik, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    Cultivation of Trichoderma reesei QM 9414 on 3% cellulose medium (C/N ratio equal to 8.5) produced 4.5 IU/mL cellulase in 180 h at a cell growth of 8.0 g/L. It corresponded to an average cellulase productivity of 25.0 IU/L/h. In the same medium 9.5 g/L cell mass, 6.2 IU/mL cellulase, and 38.75 IU/L/h cellulase productivity could be obtained using pH cycling during cultivation. Cell mass, cellulase yield, and productivity were further increased to 10,0 g/L, 7.2 IU/mL, and 44.0 IU/L/h (4.5 IU/g cell/h), respectively, by simultaneous pH cycling and temperature profiling. Results are described.

  14. CONSERVB: A numerical method to compute soil water content and temperature profiles under a bare surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanbavel, C. H. M.; Lascano, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive, yet fairly simple model of water disposition in a bare soil profile under the sequential impact of rain storms and other atmospheric influences, as they occur from hour to hour is presented. This model is intended mostly to support field studies of soil moisture dynamics by our current team, to serve as a background for the microwave measurements, and, eventually, to serve as a point of departure for soil moisture predictions for estimates based in part upon airborne measurements. The main distinction of the current model is that it accounts not only for the moisture flow in the soil-atmosphere system, but also for the energy flow and, hence, calculates system temperatures. Also, the model is of a dynamic nature, capable of supporting any required degree of resolution in time and space. Much critical testing of the sample is needed before the complexities of the hydrology of a vegetated surface can be related meaningfully to microwave observations.

  15. Automatic tuning of Bragg condition in a Radio-Acoustic System for PBL temperature profile measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonino, G.; Trivero, P.

    A Radio-Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) with acoustic wavelength λa ~ 1 m was designed and successfully tested. The system proved to be capable of measuring the vertical temperature profile in the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) with an accuracy and vertical resolution comparable to that of traditional apparatus (radiothermosondes borne by tethered or disposable balloons, thermosondes borne by aircraft and so on), yet combined with the advantages typical of remote sensing techniques. Up to the summer of 1983 the system needed attendance by an operator who had to identify the acoustic sounding frequency affording the fundamental condition of Bragg resonance between acoustic and radio wavelengths. Features and performance of the new completely automatic RASS arrangement are presented. These include the possibility of obtaining average thermal vertical profiles at preset time intervals. Maximum range of measurements obtained in about 1000 1/2-h averages was: in 90% of cases ⩾ 600m; in 50% of cases ⩾ 1100m. Such results indicate the usefulness of automatic RASS as a tool for meteorological purposes and for the application of air pollution control strategies.

  16. A single field of view method for retrieving tropospheric temperature profiles from cloud-contaminated radiance data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, D. B.; Scoggins, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents a method for retrieving single field of view tropospheric temperature profiles directly from cloud-contaminated radiance data through the use of auxiliary data such as observed shelter temperatures and estimated cloud-top height. A model was formulated to calculate cloud parameters for use with the radiative transport equation at an estimated cloud-top level. The cloud and temperature data are used in conjunction with real and simulated radiance data from NOAA satellites.

  17. Analytical predictions of the temperature profile within semiconductor nanostructures for solid-state laser refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Bennett E.; Zhou, Xuezhe; Davis, E. James; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2016-03-01

    The laser refrigeration of solid-state materials with nanoscale dimensions has been demonstrated for both semi- conducting (cadmium sulfide, CdS) and insulating dielectrics (Yb:YLiF4, YLF) in recent years. During laser refrigeration it is possible to observe morphology dependent resonances (MDRs), analogous to what is well- known in classical (Mie) light scattering theory, when the characteristic dimensions of the nanostructure are comparable to the wavelength of light used to initiate the laser cooling process. Mie resonances can create substantial increases for internal optical fields within a given nanostructure with the potential to enhance the absorption efficiency at the beginning of the cooling cycle. Recent breakthroughs in the laser refrigeration of semiconductor nanostructures have relied on materials that exhibit rectangular symmetry (nanoribbons). Here, we will present recent analytical, closed-form solutions to the energy partial differential equation that can be used to calculate the internal spatial temperature profile with a given semiconductor nanoribbon during irradiation by a continuous-wave laser. First, the energy equation is made dimensionless through the substitution of variables before being solved using the classical separation-of-variables approach. In particular, calculations will be presented for chalcogenide (CdS) nanoribbons using a pump wavelength of 1064 nm. For nanostructures with lower symmetry (such as YLF truncated tetragonal bipyramids) it is also possible to observe MDRs through numerical simulations using either the discrete dipole approximation or finite-difference time-domain simulations, and the resulting temperature profile can be calculated using the finite element method. Theoretical predictions are presented using parameters that will allow comparison with experimental data in the near future.

  18. Using conversions of chemically reacting tracers for numerical determination of temperature profiles in flowing systems and temperature histories in batch systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.F.; Chemburkar, R.M.; Robinson, B.A.; Travis, B.J.

    1996-04-01

    This report presents the mathematical bases for measuring internal temperatures within batch and flowing systems using chemically reacting tracers. This approach can obtain temperature profiles of plug-flow systems and temperature histories within batch systems. The differential equations for reactant conversion can be converted into Fredholm integral equations of the first kind. The experimental variable is the tracer-reaction activation energy. When more than one tracer is used, the reactions must have different activation energies to gain information. In systems with temperature extrema, multiple solutions for the temperature profiles or histories can exist, When a single parameter in the temperature distribution is needed, a single-tracer test may furnish this information. For multi-reaction tracer tests, three Fredholm equations are developed. Effects of tracer-reaction activation energy, number of tracers used, and error in the data are evaluated. The methods can determine temperature histories and profiles for many existing systems, and can be a basis for analysis of the more complicated dispersed-flow systems. An alternative to using the Fredholm-equation approach is the use of an assumed temperature- distribution function and incorporation of this function into the basic integral equation describing tracer behavior. The function contains adjustable parameters which are optimized to give the temperature distribution. The iterative Fredholm equation method is tested to see what is required to discriminate between two models of the temperature behavior of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. Experimentally, ester and amide hydrolyses are valid HDR tracer reactions for measuring temperatures in the range 75-100{degrees}C. Hydrolyses of bromobenzene derivatives are valid HDR tracer reactions for measuring temperatures in the range 150-275{degrees}C.

  19. Remote Sensing the Vertical Profile of Cloud Droplet Effective Radius, Thermodynamic Phase, and Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martins, J. V.; Marshak, A.; Remer, L. A.; Rosenfeld, D.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Fernandez-Borda, R.; Koren, I.; Correia, A. L.; Zubko, V.; Artaxo, P.

    2011-01-01

    Cloud-aerosol interaction is a key issue in the climate system, affecting the water cycle, the weather, and the total energy balance including the spatial and temporal distribution of latent heat release. Information on the vertical distribution of cloud droplet microphysics and thermodynamic phase as a function of temperature or height, can be correlated with details of the aerosol field to provide insight on how these particles are affecting cloud properties and their consequences to cloud lifetime, precipitation, water cycle, and general energy balance. Unfortunately, today's experimental methods still lack the observational tools that can characterize the true evolution of the cloud microphysical, spatial and temporal structure in the cloud droplet scale, and then link these characteristics to environmental factors and properties of the cloud condensation nuclei. Here we propose and demonstrate a new experimental approach (the cloud scanner instrument) that provides the microphysical information missed in current experiments and remote sensing options. Cloud scanner measurements can be performed from aircraft, ground, or satellite by scanning the side of the clouds from the base to the top, providing us with the unique opportunity of obtaining snapshots of the cloud droplet microphysical and thermodynamic states as a function of height and brightness temperature in clouds at several development stages. The brightness temperature profile of the cloud side can be directly associated with the thermodynamic phase of the droplets to provide information on the glaciation temperature as a function of different ambient conditions, aerosol concentration, and type. An aircraft prototype of the cloud scanner was built and flew in a field campaign in Brazil.

  20. Two dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging study of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations in Tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Bihe

    An innovative plasma diagnostic technique, electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI), was successfully developed and implemented on the TEXT-U and RTP tokamaks for the study of plasma electron temperature profiles and fluctuations. Due to the high spatial and temporal resolution of this new diagnostic, plasma filamentation was observed during high power electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in TEXT-U, and was identified as multiple rotating magnetic islands. In RTP, under special plasma conditions, evidence for magnetic bubbling was first observed, which is characterized by the flattening of the electron temperature and pressure profiles over a small annular region of about 1-2 cm extent near the q = 2 surface. More important results arose from the detailed study of the broadband plasma turbulence in TEXT-U and RTP. With the first measurements of poloidal wavenumbers and dispersion relations, turbulent Te fluctuations in the confinement region of TEXT-U plasmas were identified as electron drift wave turbulence. The fluctuation amplitude is found to follow the mixing length scaling, and the fluctuation-induced conducted- heat flux can account for the observed anomalous energy transport in TEXT-U. In RTP, detailed ECEI study of broadband Te fluctuations has shown that many characteristics of the observed fluctuations are consistent with the predictions of toroidal ηi mode theory. These include the global dependence of the fluctuation frequency and amplitude on the plasma density and current. The measured isotope and impurity scalings quantitatively match the predictions of toroidal ηi mode theory. The ECEI measurements in combination with ECRH modification of T e profiles argue against the Te gradients serving as the driving force of the turbulence. With the detailed 2- D measurements of the fluctuation distribution over the plasma minor cross-section, large scale, coherent structures similar to the eigenmode structures predicted by toroidal ηi mode theory

  1. Investigation of the feasibility of temperature profiling optical diagnostics in the SSME fuel pre-burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirley, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Results of an analytical investigation to determine the feasibility of temperature profiling in the space shuttle main engine (SSME) fuel preburner are presented. In this application it is desirable to measure temperature in the preburner combustor with a remote, nonintrusive optical technique. Several techniques using laser excitation were examined with a consideration of the constraints imposed by optical access in the fuel preburner and the problems associated with operation near the functioning space shuttle engine. The potential performance of practical diagnostic systems based on spontaneous Raman backscattering, laser induced fluorescence, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy were compared analytically. A system using collection of spontaneous Raman backscattering excited by a remotely located 5 to 10 watt laser propagated to the SSME through a small diameter optical fiber was selected as the best approach. Difficulties normally associated with Raman scattering: weak signal strength and interference due to background radiation are not expected to be problematic due to the very high density in this application, and the low flame luminosity expected in the fuel rich hydrogen oxygen flame.

  2. Bias Correction for Assimilation of Retrieved AIRS Profiles of Temperature and Humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, Clay; Zavodsky, Brad; Blackwell, William

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a hyperspectral radiometer aboard NASA's Aqua satellite designed to measure atmospheric profiles of temperature and humidity. AIRS retrievals are assimilated into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model over the North Pacific for some cases involving "atmospheric rivers". These events bring a large flux of water vapor to the west coast of North America and often lead to extreme precipitation in the coastal mountain ranges. An advantage of assimilating retrievals rather than radiances is that information in partly cloudy fields of view can be used. Two different Level 2 AIRS retrieval products are compared: the Version 6 AIRS Science Team standard retrievals and a neural net retrieval from MIT. Before assimilation, a bias correction is applied to adjust each layer of retrieved temperature and humidity so the layer mean values agree with a short-term model climatology. WRF runs assimilating each of the products are compared against each other and against a control run with no assimilation. This paper will describe the bias correction technique and results from forecasts evaluated by validation against a Total Precipitable Water (TPW) product from CIRA and against Global Forecast System (GFS) analyses.

  3. Bias Correction for Assimilation of Retrieved AIRS Profiles of Temperature and Humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakenship, Clay; Zavodsky, Bradley; Blackwell, William

    2014-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a hyperspectral radiometer aboard NASA's Aqua satellite designed to measure atmospheric profiles of temperature and humidity. AIRS retrievals are assimilated into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model over the North Pacific for some cases involving "atmospheric rivers". These events bring a large flux of water vapor to the west coast of North America and often lead to extreme precipitation in the coastal mountain ranges. An advantage of assimilating retrievals rather than radiances is that information in partly cloudy fields of view can be used. Two different Level 2 AIRS retrieval products are compared: the Version 6 AIRS Science Team standard retrievals and a neural net retrieval from MIT. Before assimilation, a bias correction is applied to adjust each layer of retrieved temperature and humidity so the layer mean values agree with a short-term model climatology. WRF runs assimilating each of the products are compared against each other and against a control run with no assimilation. Forecasts are against ERA reanalyses.

  4. Lithologic descriptions and temperature profiles of five wells in the southwestern Valles caldera region, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Shevenell, L.; Goff, F.; Miles, D.; Waibel, A.; Swanberg, C.

    1988-01-01

    The subsurface stratigraphy and temperature profiles of the southern and western Valles caldera region have been well constrained with the use of data from the VC-1, AET-4, WC 23-4, PC-1 and PC-2 wells. Data from these wells indicate that thermal gradients west of the caldera margin are between 110 and 140)degrees)C/km, with a maximum gradient occurring in the bottom of PC-1 equal to 240)degrees)C/km as a result of thermal fluid flow. Gradients within the caldera reach a maximum of 350)degrees)C/km, while the maximum thermal gradient measured southwest of the caldera in the thermal outflow plume is 140)degrees)C/km. The five wells exhibit high thermal gradients (>60)deghrees)C/km) resulting from high conductive heat flow associated with the Rio Grande rift and volcanism in the Valles caldera, as well as high convective heat flow associated with circulating geothermal fluids. Gamma logs run in four of the five wells appear to be of limited use for stratigraphic correlations in the caldera region. However, stratigraphic and temperature data from the five wells provide information about the structure and thermal regime of the southern and western Valles caldera region. 29 refs., 9 figs. 2 tabs.

  5. Processes of Equatorial Thermal Structure: An Analysis of Galileo Temperature Profile with 3-D Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majeed, T.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Bougher, S. W.; Gladstone, G. R.

    2005-01-01

    The Jupiter Thermosphere General Circulation Model (JTGCM) calculates the global dynamical structure of Jupiter's thermosphere self-consistently with its global thermal structure and composition. The main heat source that drives the thermospheric flow is high-latitude Joule heating. A secondary source of heating is the auroral process of particle precipitation. Global simulations of Jovian thermospheric dynamics indicate strong neutral outflows from the auroral ovals with velocities up to approximately 2 kilometers per second and subsequent convergence and downwelling at the Jovian equator. Such circulation is shown to be an important process for transporting significant amounts of auroral energy to equatorial latitudes and for regulating the global heat budget in a manner consistent with the high thermospheric temperatures observed by the Galileo probe. Adiabatic compression of the neutral atmosphere resulting from downward motion is an important source of equatorial heating (less than 0.06 microbar). The adiabatic heating continues to dominate between 0.06 and 0.2 microbar, but with an addition of comparable heating due to horizontal advection induced by the meridional flow. Thermal conduction plays an important role in transporting heat down to lower altitudes (greater than 0.2microbar) where it is balanced by the cooling associated with the wind transport processes. Interestingly, we find that radiative cooling caused by H3(+), CH4, and C2H2 emissions does not play a significant role in interpreting the Galileo temperature profile.

  6. Simulation of air and ground temperatures in PMIP3/CMIP5 last millennium simulations: implications for climate reconstructions from borehole temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-García, A.; Cuesta-Valero, F. J.; Beltrami, H.; Smerdon, J. E.

    2016-04-01

    For climate models to simulate the continental energy storage of the Earth’s energy budget they must capture the processes that partition energy across the land-atmosphere boundary. We evaluate herein the thermal consequences of these processes as simulated by models in the third phase of the paleoclimate modelling intercomparison project and the fifth phase of the coupled model intercomparison project (PMIP3/CMIP5). We examine air and ground temperature tracking at decadal and centennial time-scales within PMIP3 last-millennium simulations concatenated to historical simulations from the CMIP5 archive. We find a strong coupling between air and ground temperatures during the summer from 850 to 2005 CE. During the winter, the insulating effect of snow and latent heat exchanges produce a decoupling between the two temperatures in the northern high latitudes. Additionally, we use the simulated ground surface temperatures as an upper boundary condition to drive a one-dimensional conductive model in order to derive synthetic temperature-depth profiles for each PMIP3/CMIP5 simulation. Inversion of these subsurface profiles yields temperature trends that retain the low-frequency variations in surface air temperatures over the last millennium for all the PMIP3/CMIP5 simulations regardless of the presence of seasonal decoupling in the simulations. These results demonstrate the robustness of surface temperature reconstructions from terrestrial borehole data and their interpretation as indicators of past surface air temperature trends and continental energy storage.

  7. Achieving an Accurate Surface Profile of a Photonic Crystal for Near-Unity Solar Absorption in a Super Thin-Film Architecture.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ping; Eyderman, Sergey; Hsieh, Mei-Li; Post, Anthony; John, Sajeev; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2016-06-28

    In this work, a teepee-like photonic crystal (PC) structure on crystalline silicon (c-Si) is experimentally demonstrated, which fulfills two critical criteria in solar energy harvesting by (i) its Gaussian-type gradient-index profile for excellent antireflection and (ii) near-orthogonal energy flow and vortex-like field concentration via the parallel-to-interface refraction effect inside the structure for enhanced light trapping. For the PC structure on 500-μm-thick c-Si, the average reflection is only ∼0.7% for λ = 400-1000 nm. For the same structure on a much thinner c-Si ( t = 10 μm), the absorption is near unity (A ∼ 99%) for visible wavelengths, while the absorption in the weakly absorbing range (λ ∼ 1000 nm) is significantly increased to 79%, comparing to only 6% absorption for a 10-μm-thick planar c-Si. In addition, the average absorption (∼94.7%) of the PC structure on 10 μm c-Si for λ = 400-1000 nm is only ∼3.8% less than the average absorption (∼98.5%) of the PC structure on 500 μm c-Si, while the equivalent silicon solid content is reduced by 50 times. Furthermore, the angular dependence measurements show that the high absorption is sustained over a wide angle range (θinc = 0-60°) for teepee-like PC structure on both 500 and 10-μm-thick c-Si.

  8. Semi-analytical solution for the temperature profiles in solid-state laser disks mounted on heat spreaders.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Norman; Caprara, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Temperature profiles in pumped solid-state laser disks are generally calculated numerically by using finite-element programs to solve the heat conduction equation in the disk and the heat spreader. Analytical expressions exist for the longitudinal temperature profile in the case of an infinitely thick heat spreader or in the limit of zero thickness of the disk. We are presenting a simplified, semi-analytical method to calculate the three-dimensional temperature profiles for any disk or heat spreader dimensions by solving the heat conduction equation using Hankel transforms. This method allows for straightforward optimization of the cooling properties of heat-sink-mounted solid-state and semiconductor disk lasers.

  9. Semi-analytical solution for the temperature profiles in solid-state laser disks mounted on heat spreaders.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Norman; Caprara, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Temperature profiles in pumped solid-state laser disks are generally calculated numerically by using finite-element programs to solve the heat conduction equation in the disk and the heat spreader. Analytical expressions exist for the longitudinal temperature profile in the case of an infinitely thick heat spreader or in the limit of zero thickness of the disk. We are presenting a simplified, semi-analytical method to calculate the three-dimensional temperature profiles for any disk or heat spreader dimensions by solving the heat conduction equation using Hankel transforms. This method allows for straightforward optimization of the cooling properties of heat-sink-mounted solid-state and semiconductor disk lasers. PMID:27409198

  10. Molecular dynamic simulation of Ar-Kr mixture across a rough walled nanochannel: Velocity and temperature profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Pooja, Ahluwalia, P. K.; Pathania, Y.

    2015-05-15

    This paper presents the results from a molecular dynamics simulation of mixture of argon and krypton in the Poiseuille flow across a rough walled nanochannel. The roughness effect on liquid nanoflows has recently drawn attention The computational software used for carrying out the molecular dynamics simulations is LAMMPS. The fluid flow takes place between two parallel plates and is bounded by horizontal rough walls in one direction and periodic boundary conditions are imposed in the other two directions. Each fluid atom interacts with other fluid atoms and wall atoms through Leenard-Jones (LJ) potential with a cut off distance of 5.0. To derive the flow a constant force is applied whose value is varied from 0.1 to 0.3 and velocity profiles and temperature profiles are noted for these values of forces. The velocity profile and temperature profiles are also looked at different channel widths of nanochannel and at different densities of mixture. The velocity profile and temperature profile of rough walled nanochannel are compared with that of smooth walled nanochannel and it is concluded that mean velocity increases with increase in channel width, force applied and decrease in density also with introduction of roughness in the walls of nanochannel mean velocity again increases and results also agree with the analytical solution of a Poiseuille flow.

  11. A single field of view method for retrieving tropospheric temperature profiles from cloud-contaminated radiance data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    An iterative method is presented to retrieve single field of view (FOV) tropospheric temperature profiles directly from cloud-contaminated radiance data. A well-defined temperature profile may be calculated from the radiative transfer equation (RTE) for a partly cloudy atmosphere when the average fractional cloud amount and cloud-top height for the FOV are known. A cloud model is formulated to calculate the fractional cloud amount from an estimated cloud-top height. The method is then examined through use of simulated radiance data calculated through vertical integration of the RTE for a partly cloudy atmosphere using known values of cloud-top height(s) and fractional cloud amount(s). Temperature profiles are retrieved from the simulated data assuming various errors in the cloud parameters. Temperature profiles are retrieved from NOAA-4 satellite-measured radiance data obtained over an area dominated by an active cold front and with considerable cloud cover and compared with radiosonde data. The effects of using various guessed profiles and the number of iterations are considered.

  12. BELINDA: Broadband Emission Lidar with Narrowband Determination of Absorption. A new concept for measuring water vapor and temperature profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theopold, F. A.; Weitkamp, C.; Michaelis, W.

    1992-01-01

    We present a new concept for differential absorption lidar measurements of water vapor and temperature profiles. The idea is to use one broadband emission laser and a narrowband filter system for separation of the 'online' and 'offline' return signals. It is shown that BELINDA offers improvements as to laser emission shape and stability requirements, background suppression, and last and most important a significant reduction of the influence of Rayleigh scattering. A suitably designed system based on this concept is presented, capable of measuring water vapor or temperature profiles throughout the planetary boundary layer.

  13. Stratospheric temperature profile from balloon-borne measurements of the 10.4-micron band of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F.J.; Murcray, D. G.; Smith, M. A. H.; Seals, R. K., Jr.; Larsen, J. C.; Rinsland, P. L.

    1983-01-01

    The technique of nonlinear least squares spectral curve fitting has been used to derive the stratospheric vertical temperature profile from balloon-borne measurements of the 10.4 micron band of CO2. The spectral data were obtained at sunset with the approximately 0.02 per cm resolution University of Denver interferometer system from a float altitude of 33.5 km near Alamogordo, New Mexico, on 23 March 1981. The r.m.s. deviation between the retrieved temperature profile and correlative radiosonde measurements is 2.2 K.

  14. Stratospheric temperature profile from balloon-borne measurements of the 10.4-micron band of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Murcray, D. G.; Smith, M. A. H.; Seals, R. K., Jr.; Larsen, J. C.; Rinsland, P. L.

    1983-10-01

    The technique of nonlinear least squares spectral curve fitting has been used to derive the stratospheric vertical temperature profile from balloon-borne measurements of the 10.4 micron band of CO2. The spectral data were obtained at sunset with the approximately 0.02 per cm resolution University of Denver interferometer system from a float altitude of 33.5 km near Alamogordo, New Mexico, on 23 March 1981. The r.m.s. deviation between the retrieved temperature profile and correlative radiosonde measurements is 2.2 K.

  15. AROTAL Ozone and Temperature Vertical Profile Measurements from the NASA DC-8 during the SOLVE II Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, Thomas J.; Twigg, Laurence; Sumnicht, Grant; Hoegy, Walter; Burris, John; Silbert, Donald; Heaps, William; Neuber, R.; Trepte, C. R.

    2004-01-01

    The AROTAL instrument (Airborne Raman Ozone Temperature and Aerosol Lidar) - a collaboration between scientists at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and Langley Research Center - was flown on the NASA DC-8 during the SOLVE II Campaign during January and February, 2003. The flights were flown from the Arena Arctica in Kiruna, Sweden. We report measurements of temperature and ozone profiles showing approximately a 600 ppbv loss in ozone near 17.5 km, over the time frame of the aircraft campaign. Comparisons of ozone profiles from AROTAL are made with the SAGE III instrument.

  16. Simulation of Air and Ground Temperatures in PMIP3/CMIP5 Last Millennium Simulations: Implications for Climate Reconstructions from Borehole Temperature Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrami, Hugo; García-García, Almudena; José Cuesta-Valero, Francisco; Smerdon, Jason

    2016-04-01

    For General Circulation Models (GCMs) to simulate the continental energy storage of the Earth's energy budget it is crucial that they correctly capture the processes that partition energy across the land-atmosphere boundary. We evaluate herein the characteristics of these processes as simulated by models in the third phase of the Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project and the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (PMIP3/CMIP5). We examine the seasonal differences between air and ground temperatures within PMIP3 last-millennium simulations concatenated with historical simulations from the CMIP5 archive. We find a strong air-ground coupling during the summer from 850 to 2000 CE. During the winter, the insulating effect of snow and latent heat exchanges produce a decoupling between air and ground temperatures in the northern high latitudes. Additionally, we use the simulated temperature trends as an upper boundary condition to force a one-dimensional conductive model to derive synthetic temperature-depth profiles for each PMIP3/CMIP5 simulation. The inversions of these subsurface profiles yield temperature trends that retain the surface temperature variations of the last millennium for all the PMIP3/CMIP5 simulations. These results support the use of underground temperatures to reconstruct past changes in ground surface temperature and to estimate the continental energy storage.

  17. The redshift evolution of the mean temperature, pressure, and entropy profiles in 80 SPT-selected galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.; Bautz, M.; Benson, B. A.; Vikhlinin, A.; Bayliss, M.; Forman, W. R.; Aird, K. A.; Allen, S. W.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; De Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Foley, R. J.; and others

    2014-10-10

    We present the results of an X-ray analysis of 80 galaxy clusters selected in the 2500 deg{sup 2} South Pole Telescope survey and observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We divide the full sample into subsamples of ∼20 clusters based on redshift and central density, performing a joint X-ray spectral fit to all clusters in a subsample simultaneously, assuming self-similarity of the temperature profile. This approach allows us to constrain the shape of the temperature profile over 0 < r < 1.5R {sub 500}, which would be impossible on a per-cluster basis, since the observations of individual clusters have, on average, 2000 X-ray counts. The results presented here represent the first constraints on the evolution of the average temperature profile from z = 0 to z = 1.2. We find that high-z (0.6 < z < 1.2) clusters are slightly (∼30%) cooler both in the inner (r < 0.1R {sub 500}) and outer (r > R {sub 500}) regions than their low-z (0.3 < z < 0.6) counterparts. Combining the average temperature profile with measured gas density profiles from our earlier work, we infer the average pressure and entropy profiles for each subsample. Confirming earlier results from this data set, we find an absence of strong cool cores at high z, manifested in this analysis as a significantly lower observed pressure in the central 0.1R {sub 500} of the high-z cool-core subset of clusters compared to the low-z cool-core subset. Overall, our observed pressure profiles agree well with earlier lower-redshift measurements, suggesting minimal redshift evolution in the pressure profile outside of the core. We find no measurable redshift evolution in the entropy profile at r ≲ 0.7R {sub 500}—this may reflect a long-standing balance between cooling and feedback over long timescales and large physical scales. We observe a slight flattening of the entropy profile at r ≳ R {sub 500} in our high-z subsample. This flattening is consistent with a temperature bias due to the enhanced (∼3

  18. The Redshift Evolution of the Mean Temperature, Pressure, and Entropy Profiles in 80 SPT-Selected Galaxy Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.; et al.

    2014-09-24

    We present the results of an X-ray analysis of 80 galaxy clusters selected in the 2500 deg(2) South Pole Telescope survey and observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We divide the full sample into subsamples of ~20 clusters based on redshift and central density, performing a joint X-ray spectral fit to all clusters in a subsample simultaneously, assuming self-similarity of the temperature profile. This approach allows us to constrain the shape of the temperature profile over 0 < r < 1.5R (500), which would be impossible on a per-cluster basis, since the observations of individual clusters have, on average, 2000 X-ray counts. The results presented here represent the first constraints on the evolution of the average temperature profile from z = 0 to z = 1.2. We find that high-z (0.6 < z < 1.2) clusters are slightly (~30%) cooler both in the inner (r < 0.1R (500)) and outer (r > R (500)) regions than their low-z (0.3 < z < 0.6) counterparts. Combining the average temperature profile with measured gas density profiles from our earlier work, we infer the average pressure and entropy profiles for each subsample. Confirming earlier results from this data set, we find an absence of strong cool cores at high z, manifested in this analysis as a significantly lower observed pressure in the central 0.1R (500) of the high-z cool-core subset of clusters compared to the low-z cool-core subset. Overall, our observed pressure profiles agree well with earlier lower-redshift measurements, suggesting minimal redshift evolution in the pressure profile outside of the core. We find no measurable redshift evolution in the entropy profile at r lsim 0.7R (500)—this may reflect a long-standing balance between cooling and feedback over long timescales and large physical scales. We observe a slight flattening of the entropy profile at r gsim R (500) in our high-z subsample. This flattening is consistent with a temperature bias due to the enhanced (~3×) rate at which group-mass (~2

  19. The Redshift Evolution of the Mean Temperature, Pressure, and Entropy Profiles in 80 SPT-Selected Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M.; Benson, B. A.; Vikhlinin, A.; Aird, K. A.; Allen, S. W.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Bleem, L. E.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Foley, R. J.; Forman, W. R.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Liu, J.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; Mantz, A.; Marrone, D. P.; McMahon, J. J.; Meyer, S. S.; Miller, E. D.; Mocanu, L.; Mohr, J. J.; Murray, S. S.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shirokoff, E.; Spieler, H. G.; Stalder, B.; Stanford, S. A.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Stubbs, C. W.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of an X-ray analysis of 80 galaxy clusters selected in the 2500 deg2 South Pole Telescope survey and observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We divide the full sample into subsamples of ~20 clusters based on redshift and central density, performing a joint X-ray spectral fit to all clusters in a subsample simultaneously, assuming self-similarity of the temperature profile. This approach allows us to constrain the shape of the temperature profile over 0 < r < 1.5R 500, which would be impossible on a per-cluster basis, since the observations of individual clusters have, on average, 2000 X-ray counts. The results presented here represent the first constraints on the evolution of the average temperature profile from z = 0 to z = 1.2. We find that high-z (0.6 < z < 1.2) clusters are slightly (~30%) cooler both in the inner (r < 0.1R 500) and outer (r > R 500) regions than their low-z (0.3 < z < 0.6) counterparts. Combining the average temperature profile with measured gas density profiles from our earlier work, we infer the average pressure and entropy profiles for each subsample. Confirming earlier results from this data set, we find an absence of strong cool cores at high z, manifested in this analysis as a significantly lower observed pressure in the central 0.1R 500 of the high-z cool-core subset of clusters compared to the low-z cool-core subset. Overall, our observed pressure profiles agree well with earlier lower-redshift measurements, suggesting minimal redshift evolution in the pressure profile outside of the core. We find no measurable redshift evolution in the entropy profile at r <~ 0.7R 500—this may reflect a long-standing balance between cooling and feedback over long timescales and large physical scales. We observe a slight flattening of the entropy profile at r >~ R 500 in our high-z subsample. This flattening is consistent with a temperature bias due to the enhanced (~3×) rate at which group-mass (~2 keV) halos, which

  20. The impact of AIRS atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles on hurricane forecasts: Ike (2008) and Irene (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jing; Li, Jun; Schmit, Timothy J.; Li, Jinlong; Liu, Zhiquan

    2015-03-01

    Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) measurements are a valuable supplement to current observational data, especially over the oceans where conventional data are sparse. In this study, two types of AIRS-retrieved temperature and moisture profiles, the AIRS Science Team product (SciSup) and the single field-of-view (SFOV) research product, were evaluated with European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analysis data over the Atlantic Ocean during Hurricane Ike (2008) and Hurricane Irene (2011). The evaluation results showed that both types of AIRS profiles agreed well with the ECMWF analysis, especially between 200 hPa and 700 hPa. The average standard deviation of both temperature profiles was approximately 1 K under 200 hPa, where the mean AIRS temperature profile from the AIRS SciSup retrievals was slightly colder than that from the AIRS SFOV retrievals. The mean SciSup moisture profile was slightly drier than that from the SFOV in the mid troposphere. A series of data assimilation and forecast experiments was then conducted with the Advanced Research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and its three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) data assimilation system for hurricanes Ike and Irene. The results showed an improvement in the hurricane track due to the assimilation of AIRS clear-sky temperature profiles in the hurricane environment. In terms of total precipitable water and rainfall forecasts, the hurricane moisture environment was found to be affected by the AIRS sounding assimilation. Meanwhile, improving hurricane intensity forecasts through assimilating AIRS profiles remains a challenge for further study.

  1. Coupling Between Air and Ground Temperatures in PMIP3/CMIP5 Last Millennium Simulations and the Implications for Climate Reconstructions from Borehole Temperature Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrami, H.; García-García, A.; Cuesta-Valero, F. J.; Smerdon, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    The continental energy storage for the second half of the 20th20^{th} century has been estimated from geothermal data to be about 7±1×1021J7 ± 1 × 10^{21} J under the assumption that there exists a long-term coupling between the lower atmosphere and the continental subsurface. For General Circulation Models (GCMs) to simulate the continental energy storage of the Earth's energy budget, however, it is crucial that they correctly capture the processes that partition energy across the land-atmosphere boundary. We evaluate herein the characteristics of these processes as simulated by models in the third phase of the Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project and the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (PMIP33/CMIP55). We examine the seasonal differences between air and ground temperatures within PMIP3 last-millennium simulations concatenated with historical simulations from the CMIP5 archive. We find a strong air-ground coupling during the summer from 850850 to 20002000 CE. During the winter, the insulating effect of snow and latent heat exchanges produce a decoupling between air and ground temperatures in the northern high latitudes. These seasonal differences decrease with depth, supporting the central assumption of climate reconstructions from borehole temperature profiles. Additionally, we use the simulated temperature trends as an upper boundary condition to force a one-dimensional conductive model to derive synthetic temperature-depth profiles for each PMIP3/CMIP5 simulation. The inversions of these subsurface profiles yield temperature trends that retain the surface temperature variations of the last millennium for all the PMIP3/CMIP5 simulations. These results support the use of underground temperatures to reconstruct past changes in ground surface temperature and to estimate the continental energy storage. Results also provide guidance for improving the land-surface components of GCMs.

  2. Chemical composition profiles during alkaline flooding at different temperatures and extended residence times

    SciTech Connect

    Aflaki, R.; Handy, L.L.

    1992-12-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate whether or not caustic sweeps the major portion of the reservoir efficiently during an alkaline flood process. It was also the objective of this work to study the state of final equilibrium during a caustic flood through determination of the pH and chemical composition profiles along the porous medium. For this purpose, a long porous medium which provided extended residence times was required. It was necessary to set up the porous medium such that the changes in the pH and chemical composition of the solution could be monitored. Four Berea sandstone cores (8 in. length and1 in. diameter) placed in series provided the desired length and the opportunity for sampling in-between cores. This enabled establishment of pH and chemical composition profiles. The experiments were run at, temperatures up.to 180{degrees}C, and the flow rates varied from 4.8 to 0.2 ft/day. The samples were analyzed for pH and for Si and Al concentrations.The results show that caustic consumption is insignificant for temperatures up to 100{degrees}C. Above 100{degrees}C consumption increases and is accompanied by a significant decrease in pH. The sharp decline in pH also coincides with a sharp decline in concentration of silica in solution. The results also show that alumina is removed from the solution and solubility of alumina ultimately reaches zero. Sharp silica and pH declines take place even in the absence of any alumina in solution. As a result, removal of silica from solution is attributed to the irreversible caustic/rock interaction. This interaction is in the form of chemisorption reactions in which silica is adsorbed onto the rock surface consuming hydroxyl ion. Once these reactions were satisfied, caustic breakthrough occurs at a high pH. However, significant pore volumes of caustic must be injected for completion of the chemisorption.

  3. Chemical composition profiles during alkaline flooding at different temperatures and extended residence times

    SciTech Connect

    Aflaki, R.; Handy, L.L.

    1992-12-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate whether or not caustic sweeps the major portion of the reservoir efficiently during an alkaline flood process. It was also the objective of this work to study the state of final equilibrium during a caustic flood through determination of the pH and chemical composition profiles along the porous medium. For this purpose, a long porous medium which provided extended residence times was required. It was necessary to set up the porous medium such that the changes in the pH and chemical composition of the solution could be monitored. Four Berea sandstone cores (8 in. length and1 in. diameter) placed in series provided the desired length and the opportunity for sampling in-between cores. This enabled establishment of pH and chemical composition profiles. The experiments were run at, temperatures up.to 180[degrees]C, and the flow rates varied from 4.8 to 0.2 ft/day. The samples were analyzed for pH and for Si and Al concentrations.The results show that caustic consumption is insignificant for temperatures up to 100[degrees]C. Above 100[degrees]C consumption increases and is accompanied by a significant decrease in pH. The sharp decline in pH also coincides with a sharp decline in concentration of silica in solution. The results also show that alumina is removed from the solution and solubility of alumina ultimately reaches zero. Sharp silica and pH declines take place even in the absence of any alumina in solution. As a result, removal of silica from solution is attributed to the irreversible caustic/rock interaction. This interaction is in the form of chemisorption reactions in which silica is adsorbed onto the rock surface consuming hydroxyl ion. Once these reactions were satisfied, caustic breakthrough occurs at a high pH. However, significant pore volumes of caustic must be injected for completion of the chemisorption.

  4. The UTLS ENSO signal from high resolution GPS radio occultation temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherllin-Pirscher, Barbara; Deser, Clara; Ho, Shu-Peng; Chou, Chia; Randel, William; Kuo, Ying-Hwa

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the vertical and spatial structure of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) signal in the troposphere and lower stratosphere using radio occultation (RO) temperature profiles. The unprecedented vertical resolution and global coverage of the RO data do not only provide a detailed view of the full three dimensional ENSO structure they also enable studying dynamical coupling between the troposphere and lower stratosphere. Due to the strong confounding effects of the Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO) and ENSO in the short RO record we only use RO data below 20 km. In the equatorial region we find that interannual temperature anomalies show a natural decomposition into zonal-mean and eddy (deviations from the zonal-mean) components. Both components are related to ENSO. In the tropical troposphere zonal-mean temperature increases with height and reaches a maximum between 8 km and 12 km. Above the tropopause, the warm phase of ENSO is associated with stratospheric cooling. This zonal-mean response lags sea surface temperature anomalies in the eastern equatorial Pacific (N3.4 region) by 3 months. This lag can be attributed to exchange of fluxes at the atmosphere-ocean interface and the atmospheric energy loss to space and to mid-latitudes. The eddy component, in contrast, responds rapidly (within 1 month) to ENSO forcing. The corresponding pattern features a dipole between the Indian and Pacific Oceans at low latitudes, with off-equatorial maxima centered around 20° to 30° latitude in both hemispheres. Maximum amplitude of this signal in the troposphere occurs near 11 km and (with opposite polarity) in a shallow layer near the tropopause at approximately 17 km. At mid latitudes, the eddy ENSO signal tends to be out-of-phase with those at low latitudes in both the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The fast eddy ENSO response as well as its spatial pattern are consistent with Rossby and Kelvin wave circulations induced by equatorial heating anomalies

  5. Wind and temperature profiles in the boundary layer above the Kruger National Park during SAFARI-92

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, G.

    1996-10-01

    The experimental phase of SAFARI-92 in the Kruger National Park took place from September 7 to 26, 1992. Eskom's Environmental Sciences was committed to provide meteorological support during the experimental burns in the Pretoriuskop area of the KNP and to characterize the boundary layer during the field campaign. Surface temperature inversions were found during most nights when vertical soundings were available. The inversion strength was generally ≤3.5° with a depth of ≤270 m above ground level (agl). Low-level elevated inversions with a base height of 350 to 500 m agl and a strength of ≤3.6°C were found on four occasions. The base height of the subsidence inversion, when observed, varied between 1500 and 2500 m agl. Significant superadiabatic temperature gradients, impacting directly on the vertical dispersion of pyrogenic products, have been observed to reach as high as several hundred meters above ground level. Vertical profiles of wind speed and direction varied greatly from day to day in response to the changes in the synoptic pattern. However, weak low-level wind maxima just above the surface inversion were observed during most nights, generally with speeds of <10 m s-1. Detailed case studies of boundary layer conditions during the major burns have been included. Since the observations were made during spring it is suggested that the results could be more characteristic of summer conditions. It can be assumed that the inversions will be stronger and the low-level wind maxima more pronounced during winter.

  6. An atmospheric general circulation model for Pluto with predictions for New Horizons temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalucha, Angela M.

    2016-06-01

    Results are presented from a 3D Pluto general circulation model (GCM) that includes conductive heating and cooling, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) heating by methane at 2.3 and 3.3 μm, non-LTE cooling by cooling by methane at 7.6 μm, and LTE CO rotational line cooling. The GCM also includes a treatment of the subsurface temperature and surface-atmosphere mass exchange. An initially 1 m thick layer of surface nitrogen frost was assumed such that it was large enough to act as a large heat sink (compared with the solar heating term) but small enough that the water ice subsurface properties were also significant. Structure was found in all three directions of the 3D wind field (with a maximum magnitude of the order of 10 m s-1 in the horizontal directions and 10-5 microbar s-1 in the vertical direction). Prograde jets were found at several altitudes. The direction of flow over the poles was found to very with altitude. Broad regions of up-welling and down-welling were also found. Predictions of vertical temperature profiles are provided for the Alice and Radio science Experiment instruments on New Horizons, while predictions of light curves are provided for ground-based stellar occultation observations. With this model methane concentrations of 0.2 per cent and 1.0 per cent and 8 and 24 microbar surface pressures are distinguishable. For ground-based stellar occultations, a detectable difference exists between light curves with the different methane concentrations, but not for different initial global mean surface pressures.

  7. The use of streambed temperature profiles to estimate the depth, duration, and rate of percolation beneath arroyos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, J.; Thomas, C.L.

    1996-01-01

    Temporal variations in a streambed temperature profile between 30 and 300 cm beneath Tijeras Arroyo, New Mexico, were analyzed at 30-min intervals for 1990 to estimate the depth, duration, and rate of percolation during streamflows. The depth of percolation was clearly documented by the rapid response of the streambed temperature profile to streamflows. Results indicate that the streambed possessed small thermal gradients with significant diurnal variations from late November to late May, indicating that ephemeral streamflows created continuous, advection-dominated beat transport to depths below 300 cm during this period. Timing and duration of percolation suggested by temporal variations in the temperature profile were verified by comparison with measured streamflow records for the study reach over 1990. Percolation rates were estimated using a technique based on the travel time of the daily maximum temperature into the streambed. Percolation rates were compared with streambed seepage rates determined from measurements of streamflow loss, stream surface area, and stream evaporative loss for the entire study reach. Travel time estimates of streambed percolation rates ranged from 9 to 40 cm/hr, while streamflow estimates of streambed seepage rates ranged from 6 to 26 cm/hr during the study period. Discrepancies between streambed percolation and seepage rates may be caused by differences in the areal extent of measurements for percolation versus seepages rates. In summary, the depth, timing, and duration of streamflow- induced percolation were well documented by temporal variations in a single streambed temperature profile, while rates of percolation based on the temperature profile were about double the seepage rates based on streamflow records for the entire study reach.

  8. Temperature Profile and Imaging Analysis of Laser Additive Manufacturing of Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, M.; Purtonen, T.; Piili, H.; Salminen, A.; Nyrhilä, O.

    Powder bed fusion is a laser additive manufacturing (LAM) technology which is used to manufacture parts layer-wise from powdered metallic materials. The technology has advanced vastly in the recent years and current systems can be used to manufacture functional parts for e.g. aerospace industry. The performance and accuracy of the systems have improved also, but certain difficulties in the powder fusion process are reducing the final quality of the parts. One of these is commonly known as the balling phenomenon. The aim of this study was to define some of the process characteristics in powder bed fusion by performing comparative studies with two different test setups. This was done by comparing measured temperature profiles and on-line photography of the process. The material used during the research was EOS PH1 stainless steel. Both of the test systems were equipped with 200 W single mode fiber lasers. The main result of the research was that some of the process instabilities are resulting from the energy input during the process.

  9. MODEL FOR ALFVEN WAVE TURBULENCE IN SOLAR CORONAL LOOPS: HEATING RATE PROFILES AND TEMPERATURE FLUCTUATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Asgari-Targhi, M.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A.

    2012-02-10

    It has been suggested that the solar corona may be heated by dissipation of Alfven waves that propagate up from the solar photosphere. According to this theory, counterpropagating Alfven waves are subject to nonlinear interactions that lead to turbulent decay of the waves and heating of the chromospheric and coronal plasma. To test this theory, better models for the dynamics of Alfven waves in coronal loops are required. In this paper, we consider wave heating in an active region observed with the Solar Dynamics Observatory in 2010 May. First a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic model of the region is constructed, and ten magnetic field lines that match observed coronal loops are selected. For each loop we construct a 3D magnetohydrodynamic model of the Alfven waves near the selected field line. The waves are assumed to be generated by footpoint motions inside the kilogauss magnetic flux elements at the two ends of the loop. Based on such models, we predict the spatial and temporal profiles of the heating along the selected loops. We also estimate the temperature fluctuations resulting from such heating. We find that the Alfven wave turbulence model can reproduce the observed characteristics of the hotter loops in the active region core, but the loops at the periphery of the region have large expansion factors and are predicted to be thermally unstable.

  10. Increased production of cellulase of Trichoderma sp. by pH cycling and temperature profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, S.N.; Malik, R.K.

    1980-11-01

    Cultivation of Trichoderma reesei QM 9414 on 3% (w/v) cellulose medium (C/N ratio equal to 8.5) produced 4.5 IU/ml cellulase in 180 hr at a cell growth of 8.0 g/liter (0.266 g cell/g cellulose). It corresponded to an average cellulase productivity 25.0 IU/liter/hr (3.5 IU/g cell/hr. In the same medium 9.5 g/liter cell mass (0.316 g cell/g cellulose), 6.2 IU/ml cellulase, and 38.75 IU/liter/hr (4.0 IU/g cell/hr) cellulase productivity could be obtained using pH cycling condition during cultivation. Cell mass, cellulase yield, and productivity were further increased to 10.0 g/liter, 7.2 IU/ml and 44.0 IU/liter/hr (4.5 IU/g cell/hr), respectively, by simultaneous pH cycling and temperature profiling strategy. Results are described.

  11. Effects of Growth Temperature and Postharvest Cooling on Anthocyanin Profiles in Juvenile and Mature Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Socquet-Juglard, Didier; Bennett, Alexandra A; Manns, David C; Mansfield, Anna Katharine; Robbins, Rebecca J; Collins, Thomas M; Griffiths, Phillip D

    2016-02-24

    The effects of growth temperatures on anthocyanin content and profile were tested on juvenile cabbage and kale plants. The effects of cold storage time were evaluated on both juvenile and mature plants. The anthocyanin content in juvenile plants ranged from 3.82 mg of cyanidin-3,5-diglucoside equivalent (Cy equiv)/g of dry matter (dm) at 25 °C to 10.00 mg of Cy equiv/g of dm at 16 °C, with up to 76% diacylated anthocyanins. Cold storage of juvenile plants decreased the total amount of anthocyanins but increased the diacylated anthocyanin content by 3-5%. In mature plants, cold storage reduced the total anthocyanin content from 22 to 12.23 mg/g after 5 weeks of storage in red cabbage, while the total anthocyanin content increased after 2 weeks of storage from 2.34 to 3.66 mg of Cy equiv/g of dm in kale without having any effect on acylation in either morphotype. The results obtained in this study will be useful for optimizing anthocyanin production.

  12. First ion temperature profiles in the boundary of Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Dan; Labombard, Brian; Churchill, Michael; Lipschultz, Bruce; Ochoukov, Roman; Theiler, Christian; Whyte, Dennis

    2012-10-01

    The ion temperature is an important parameter in the boundary of magnetic fusion devices, playing a role in the sheath heat flux, total plasma pressure, plasma potential, and sound speed. High spatial resolution measurements of Ti and Te profiles are needed to evaluate these quantities and to unfold the rates of cross-field heat transport in each species. To this end, we have developed two specialized scanning probes: an Ion Sensitive Probe (ISP) and a Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA). Alcator C-Mod is a challenging environment for probes, with parallel heat fluxes comparable to that expected in reactors, 100's MW/m^2, necessitating the use of refractory materials in compact, optimized geometries. The two probes, along with Charge-eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) measurements of B^5+ ions, allow important cross-checks to be performed. Preliminary results indicate good agreement between the ISP and RFA. Comparison with B^5+ CXRS is also favorable. In ohmic-heated, sheath-limited plasmas the ratio of Ti/Te is ˜3 (150 and 50 eV) at the seperatrix and increases to ˜5 (50 and 10 eV) at the limiter boundary. Experiments with conduction-limited plasma conditions are planned and will be reported. Implications for boundary electron and ion heat transport will also be discussed.

  13. Effects of Growth Temperature and Postharvest Cooling on Anthocyanin Profiles in Juvenile and Mature Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Socquet-Juglard, Didier; Bennett, Alexandra A; Manns, David C; Mansfield, Anna Katharine; Robbins, Rebecca J; Collins, Thomas M; Griffiths, Phillip D

    2016-02-24

    The effects of growth temperatures on anthocyanin content and profile were tested on juvenile cabbage and kale plants. The effects of cold storage time were evaluated on both juvenile and mature plants. The anthocyanin content in juvenile plants ranged from 3.82 mg of cyanidin-3,5-diglucoside equivalent (Cy equiv)/g of dry matter (dm) at 25 °C to 10.00 mg of Cy equiv/g of dm at 16 °C, with up to 76% diacylated anthocyanins. Cold storage of juvenile plants decreased the total amount of anthocyanins but increased the diacylated anthocyanin content by 3-5%. In mature plants, cold storage reduced the total anthocyanin content from 22 to 12.23 mg/g after 5 weeks of storage in red cabbage, while the total anthocyanin content increased after 2 weeks of storage from 2.34 to 3.66 mg of Cy equiv/g of dm in kale without having any effect on acylation in either morphotype. The results obtained in this study will be useful for optimizing anthocyanin production. PMID:26828966

  14. Logarithmic Mean Temperature Profiles and Their Connection to Plume Emissions in Turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Poel, Erwin P.; Ostilla-Mónico, Rodolfo; Verzicco, Roberto; Grossmann, Siegfried; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional simulations of Rayleigh-Bénard convection at Ra =5 ×1 010 show that vertical logarithmic mean temperature profiles can be observed in regions of the boundary layer where thermal plumes are emitted. The profile is logarithmic only in these regions and not in the rest of the boundary layer where it is sheared by the large-scale wind and impacted by plumes. In addition, the logarithmic behavior is not visible in the horizontal average. The findings reveal that the temperature profiles are strongly connected to thermal plume emission, and they support a perception that parts of the boundary layer can be turbulent while others are not. The transition to the ultimate regime, in which the boundary layers are considered to be fully turbulent, can therefore be understood as a gradual increase in the fraction of the plume-emitting ("turbulent") regions of the boundary layer.

  15. Process-based modeling of temperature and water profiles in the seedling recruitment zone: Part II. Seedling emergence timing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Predictions of seedling emergence timing for spring wheat are facilitated by process-based modeling of the microsite environment in the shallow seedling recruitment zone. Hourly temperature and water profiles within the recruitment zone for 60 days after planting were simulated from the process-base...

  16. Probing channel temperature profiles in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN high electron mobility transistors on 200 mm diameter Si(111) by optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kyaw, L. M.; Bera, L. K.; Dolmanan, S. B.; Tan, H. R.; Bhat, T. N.; Tripathy, S.; Liu, Y.; Bera, M. K.; Singh, S. P.; Chor, E. F.

    2014-08-18

    Using micro-Raman and photoluminescence (PL) techniques, the channel temperature profile is probed in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) fabricated on a 200 mm diameter Si(111) substrate. In particular, RuO{sub x}-based gate is used due to the semitransparent nature to the optical excitation wavelengths, thus allowing much accurate thermal investigations underneath the gate. To determine the channel temperature profile in devices subjected to different electrical bias voltages, the GaN band-edge PL peak shift calibration with respect to temperature is used. PL analyses show a maximum channel temperature up to 435 K underneath the gate edge between gate and drain, where the estimated thermal resistance in such a HEMT structure is about 13.7 KmmW{sup −1} at a power dissipation of ∼10 W/mm. The temperature profiles from micro-Raman measurements are also addressed from the E{sub 2}-high optical phonon peak shift of GaN, and this method also probes the temperature-induced peak shifts of optical phonon from Si thus showing the nature of thermal characteristics at the AlN/Si substrate interface.

  17. Interpreting seasonal convective mixing in Devils Hole, Death Valley National Park, from temperature profiles observed by fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausner, Mark B.; Wilson, Kevin P.; Gaines, D. Bailey; Tyler, Scott W.

    2012-05-01

    Devils Hole, a groundwater-filled fracture in the carbonate aquifer of the southern Nevada Mojave Desert, represents a unique ecohydrological setting, as home to the only extant population of Cyprinodon diabolis, the endangered Devils Hole pupfish. Using water column temperatures collected with a fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (DTS) during four field campaigns in 2009, evidence of deep circulation and nutrient export are, for the first time, documented. The DTS was deployed to measure vertical temperature profiles in the system, and the raw data returned were postprocessed to refine the calibration beyond the precision of the instrument's native calibration routines. Calibrated temperature data serve as a tracer for water movement and reveal a seasonal pattern of convective mixing that is supported by numerical simulations of the system. The periodic presence of divers in the water is considered, and their impacts on the temperature profiles are examined and found to be minimal. The seasonal mixing cycle may deplete the pupfish's food supplies when nutrients are at their scarcest. The spatial and temporal scales of the DTS observations make it possible to observe temperature gradients on the order of 0.001°C m-1, revealing phenomena that would have been lost in instrument noise and uncertainty.

  18. The use of NO2 absorption cross section temperature sensitivity to derive NO2 profile temperature and stratospheric-tropospheric column partitioning from visible direct-sun DOAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinei, E.; Cede, A.; Swartz, W. H.; Herman, J.; Mount, G. H.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a temperature sensitivity method (TESEM) to accurately calculate total vertical NO2 column, atmospheric slant NO2 profile-weighted temperature (T), and to separate stratospheric and tropospheric columns from direct-sun (DS), ground-based measurements using the retrieved T. TESEM is based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) fitting of the linear temperature-dependent NO2 absorption cross section, σ (T), regression model (Vandaele et al., 2003). Separation between stratospheric and tropospheric columns is based on the primarily bimodal vertical distribution of NO2 and an assumption that stratospheric effective temperature can be represented by temperature at 27 km ± 3 K, and tropospheric effective temperature is equal to surface temperature within 3-5 K. These assumptions were derived from the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemistry-transport model (CTM) simulations over two northern midlatitude sites in 2011. TESEM was applied to the Washington State University Multi-Function DOAS instrument (MFDOAS) measurements at four midlatitude locations with low and moderate NO2 anthropogenic emissions: (1) the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Table Mountain Facility (JPL-TMF), CA, USA (34.38° N/117.68° W); (2) Pullman, WA, USA (46.73° N/117.17° W); (3) Greenbelt, MD, USA (38.99° N/76.84° W); and (4) Cabauw, the Netherlands (51.97° N/4.93° E) during July 2007, June-July 2009, July-August and October 2011, November 2012-May 2013, respectively. NO2 T and total, stratospheric, and tropospheric NO2 vertical columns were determined over each site.

  19. Optical measurements of soot and temperature profiles in premixed propane-oxygen flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Valerie J.; Pagni, Patrick J.

    1988-01-01

    Two laser diagnostic techniques were used to measure soot volume fractions, number densities and soot particle radii in premixed propane/oxygen flat flames. The two techniques used were two wavelength extinction, using 514.5 nm to 632.8 nm and 457.9 nm to 632.8 nm wavelength combinations, and extinction/scattering using 514.5 nm light. The flames wre fuel-rich (equivalence ratios from 2.1 to 2.8) and had cold gas velocities varying from 3.4 to 5.5 cm/s. Measurements were made at various heights above the sintered-bronze, water-cooled flat flame burner with the equivalence ratio and cold gas velocity fixed. Also, measurements were made at a fixed height above the burner and fixed cold gas velocity while varying the equivalence ratio. Both laser techniques are based on the same underlying assumptions of particle size distribution and soot optical properties. Full Mie theory was used to determine the extinction coefficients K sub ext, and the scattering efficiencies, Q sub vv. Temperature measurements in the flames were made using infrared radiometry. Good agreement between the two techniques in terms of soot particle radii, number density and volume fraction was found for intensity ratios (I/I sub o) between 0.1 and 0.8. For intensity ratios higher or lower than this range, the differences in extinction coefficients at the wavelengths chosen for the two-wavelength method are too small to give accurate results for comparing particle radii and number densities. However, when comparing only soot volume fractions, the agreement between the two techniques continued to be good for intensity ratios up to 0.95.

  20. Optical measurements of soot and temperature profiles in premixed propane-oxygen flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, V. J.; Pagni, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    Two laser diagnostic techniques were used to measure soot volume fractions, number densities and soot particle radii in premixed propane/oxygen flat flames. The two techniques used were two wavelength extinction, using 514.5 nm to 632.8 nm and 457.9 nm to 632.8 nm wavelength combinations, and extinction/scattering using 514.5 nm light. The flames were fuel-rich (equivalence ratios from 2.1 to 2.8) and had cold gas velocities varying from 3.4 to 5.5 cm/s. Measurements were made at various heights above the sintered-bronze, water-cooled flat flame burner with the equivalence ratio and cold gas velocity fixed. Also, measurements were made at a fixed height above the burner and fixed cold gas velocity while varying the equivalence ratio. Both laser techniques are based on the same underlying assumptions of particle size distribution and soot optical properties. Full Mie theory was used to determine the extinction coefficients K sub ext, and the scattering efficiencies, Q sub vv. Temperature measurements in the flames were made using infrared radiometry. Good agreement between the two techniques in terms of soot particle radii, number density and volume fraction was found for intensity ratios (I/I sub o) between 0.1 and 0.8. For intensity ratios higher or lower than this range, the differences in extinction coefficients at the wavelengths chosen for the two-wavelength method are too small to give accurate results for comparing particle radii and number densities. However, when comparing only soot volume fractions, the agreement between the two techniques continued to be good for intensity ratios up to 0.95.

  1. Temperature profile in apricot tree canopies under the soil and climate conditions of the Romanian Black Sea Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paltineanu, Cristian; Septar, Leinar; Chitu, Emil

    2016-03-01

    The paper describes the temperature profiles determined by thermal imagery in apricot tree canopies under the semi-arid conditions of the Black Sea Coast in a chernozem of Dobrogea Region, Romania. The study analyzes the thermal vertical profile of apricot orchards for three representative cultivars during summertime. Measurements were done when the soil water content (SWC) was at field capacity (FC) within the rooting depth, after intense sprinkler irrigation applications. Canopy temperature was measured during clear sky days at three heights for both sides of the apricot trees, sunlit (south), and shaded (north). For the SWC studied, i.e., FC, canopy height did not induce a significant difference between the temperature of apricot tree leaves (Tc) and the ambient air temperature (Ta) within the entire vertical tree profile, and temperature measurements by thermal imagery can therefore be taken at any height on the tree crown leaves. Differences between sunlit and shaded sides of the canopy were significant. Because of these differences for Tc-Ta among the apricot tree cultivars studied, lower base lines (LBLs) should be determined for each cultivar separately. The use of thermal imagery technique under the conditions of semi-arid coastal areas with low range of vapor pressure deficit could be useful in irrigation scheduling of apricot trees. The paper discusses the implications of the data obtained in the experiment under the conditions of the coastal area of the Black Sea, Romania, and neighboring countries with similar climate, such as Bulgaria and Turkey.

  2. Water temperature profiles for reaches of the Raging River during summer baseflow, King County, western Washington, July 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Opatz, Chad C.

    2016-03-22

    Re-introducing wood into rivers where it was historically removed is one approach to improving habitat conditions in rivers of the Pacific Northwest. The Raging River drainage basin, which flows into the Snoqualmie River at Fall City, western Washington, was largely logged during the 20th century and wood was removed from its channel. To improve habitat conditions for several species of anadromous salmonids that spawn and rear in the Raging River, King County Department of Transportation placed untethered log jams in a 250-meter reach where wood was historically removed. The U.S. Geological Survey measured longitudinal profiles of near-streambed temperature during summer baseflow along 1,026 meters of channel upstream, downstream, and within the area of wood placements. These measurements were part of an effort by King County to monitor the geomorphic and biological responses to these wood placements. Near-streambed temperatures averaged over about 1-meter intervals were measured with a fiber‑optic distributed temperature sensor every 30 minutes for 7 days between July 7 and 13, 2015. Vertical temperature profiles were measured coincident with the longitudinal temperature profile at four locations at 0 centimeters (cm) (at the streambed), and 35 and 70 cm beneath the streambed to document thermal dynamics of the hyporheic zone and surface water in the study reach.

  3. Temperature profile in apricot tree canopies under the soil and climate conditions of the Romanian Black Sea Coast.

    PubMed

    Paltineanu, Cristian; Septar, Leinar; Chitu, Emil

    2016-03-01

    The paper describes the temperature profiles determined by thermal imagery in apricot tree canopies under the semi-arid conditions of the Black Sea Coast in a chernozem of Dobrogea Region, Romania. The study analyzes the thermal vertical profile of apricot orchards for three representative cultivars during summertime. Measurements were done when the soil water content (SWC) was at field capacity (FC) within the rooting depth, after intense sprinkler irrigation applications. Canopy temperature was measured during clear sky days at three heights for both sides of the apricot trees, sunlit (south), and shaded (north). For the SWC studied, i.e., FC, canopy height did not induce a significant difference between the temperature of apricot tree leaves (Tc) and the ambient air temperature (Ta) within the entire vertical tree profile, and temperature measurements by thermal imagery can therefore be taken at any height on the tree crown leaves. Differences between sunlit and shaded sides of the canopy were significant. Because of these differences for Tc-Ta among the apricot tree cultivars studied, lower base lines (LBLs) should be determined for each cultivar separately. The use of thermal imagery technique under the conditions of semi-arid coastal areas with low range of vapor pressure deficit could be useful in irrigation scheduling of apricot trees. The paper discusses the implications of the data obtained in the experiment under the conditions of the coastal area of the Black Sea, Romania, and neighboring countries with similar climate, such as Bulgaria and Turkey.

  4. Temperature profile in apricot tree canopies under the soil and climate conditions of the Romanian Black Sea Coast.

    PubMed

    Paltineanu, Cristian; Septar, Leinar; Chitu, Emil

    2016-03-01

    The paper describes the temperature profiles determined by thermal imagery in apricot tree canopies under the semi-arid conditions of the Black Sea Coast in a chernozem of Dobrogea Region, Romania. The study analyzes the thermal vertical profile of apricot orchards for three representative cultivars during summertime. Measurements were done when the soil water content (SWC) was at field capacity (FC) within the rooting depth, after intense sprinkler irrigation applications. Canopy temperature was measured during clear sky days at three heights for both sides of the apricot trees, sunlit (south), and shaded (north). For the SWC studied, i.e., FC, canopy height did not induce a significant difference between the temperature of apricot tree leaves (Tc) and the ambient air temperature (Ta) within the entire vertical tree profile, and temperature measurements by thermal imagery can therefore be taken at any height on the tree crown leaves. Differences between sunlit and shaded sides of the canopy were significant. Because of these differences for Tc-Ta among the apricot tree cultivars studied, lower base lines (LBLs) should be determined for each cultivar separately. The use of thermal imagery technique under the conditions of semi-arid coastal areas with low range of vapor pressure deficit could be useful in irrigation scheduling of apricot trees. The paper discusses the implications of the data obtained in the experiment under the conditions of the coastal area of the Black Sea, Romania, and neighboring countries with similar climate, such as Bulgaria and Turkey. PMID:26188664

  5. Effect of Ambient Temperature on Total Organic Gas Speciation Profiles from Light-Duty Gasoline Vehicle Exhaust.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anirban; Sonntag, Darrell; Cook, Richard; Yanca, Catherine; Schenk, Charles; Choi, Yunsoo

    2016-06-21

    Total organic gases (TOG) emissions from motor vehicles include air toxic compounds and contribute to formation of ground-level ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). These emissions are known to be affected by temperature; however previous studies have typically focused only on the temperature dependence of total emission factors and select toxic compounds. This study builds on the previous research by performing an evaluation of a comprehensive set of gas-phase organic compounds present in gasoline motor vehicle exhaust. A fleet of five vehicles using port fuel injection engine technology and running on E10 fuel was tested. Overall, three temperatures (0, 20, and 75 °F; or -18, -7, and 24 °C), two driving conditions (urban-FTP75 and aggressive driving-US06) and 161 compounds were evaluated; the emissions distributions were used to construct speciation profiles for each driving cycle and temperature. Overall, the speciation results indicated a significant increase in alkane and methane content, and decrease in alcohol, aldehyde and ketone content with decreasing temperature. These were verified using a statistical significance test. The fraction and composition of Mobile Source Air Toxics (MSATs) were significantly affected by temperature for both driving cycles. The ozone forming potentials of these profiles were evaluated using the maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) scale. Aromatic content was predicted to be a major driver behind the ozone forming potentials. Additionally, the decreasing ozone potential could be attributed to increased methane fractions with increasing temperature. PMID:27203618

  6. Effect of Ambient Temperature on Total Organic Gas Speciation Profiles from Light-Duty Gasoline Vehicle Exhaust.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anirban; Sonntag, Darrell; Cook, Richard; Yanca, Catherine; Schenk, Charles; Choi, Yunsoo

    2016-06-21

    Total organic gases (TOG) emissions from motor vehicles include air toxic compounds and contribute to formation of ground-level ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). These emissions are known to be affected by temperature; however previous studies have typically focused only on the temperature dependence of total emission factors and select toxic compounds. This study builds on the previous research by performing an evaluation of a comprehensive set of gas-phase organic compounds present in gasoline motor vehicle exhaust. A fleet of five vehicles using port fuel injection engine technology and running on E10 fuel was tested. Overall, three temperatures (0, 20, and 75 °F; or -18, -7, and 24 °C), two driving conditions (urban-FTP75 and aggressive driving-US06) and 161 compounds were evaluated; the emissions distributions were used to construct speciation profiles for each driving cycle and temperature. Overall, the speciation results indicated a significant increase in alkane and methane content, and decrease in alcohol, aldehyde and ketone content with decreasing temperature. These were verified using a statistical significance test. The fraction and composition of Mobile Source Air Toxics (MSATs) were significantly affected by temperature for both driving cycles. The ozone forming potentials of these profiles were evaluated using the maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) scale. Aromatic content was predicted to be a major driver behind the ozone forming potentials. Additionally, the decreasing ozone potential could be attributed to increased methane fractions with increasing temperature.

  7. Measurements of Sheath Temperature Profiles in Bruce LVRF Bundles Under Post-Dryout Heat Transfer Conditions in Freon

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Bullock, D.E.; Pioro, I.L.; Martin, J.

    2006-07-01

    An experimental program has been completed to study the behaviour of sheath wall temperatures in the Bruce Power Station Low Void Reactivity Fuel (shortened hereafter to Bruce LVRF) bundles under post-dryout (PDO) heat-transfer conditions. The experiment was conducted with an electrically heated simulator of a string of nine Bruce LVRF bundles, installed in the MR-3 Freon heat transfer loop at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL), Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). The loop used Freon R-134a as a coolant to simulate typical flow conditions in CANDU{sup R} nuclear power stations. The simulator had an axially uniform heat flux profile. Two radial heat flux profiles were tested: a fresh Bruce LVRF profile and a fresh natural uranium (NU) profile. For a given set of flow conditions, the channel power was set above the critical power to achieve dryout, while heater-element wall temperatures were recorded at various overpower levels using sliding thermocouples. The maximum experimental overpower achieved was 64%. For the conditions tested, the results showed that initial dryout occurred at an inner-ring element at low flows and an outer-ring element facing internal subchannels at high flows. Dry-patches (regions of dryout) spread with increasing channel power; maximum wall temperatures were observed at the downstream end of the simulator, and immediately upstream of the mid-bundle spacer plane. In general, maximum wall temperatures were observed at the outer-ring elements facing the internal subchannels. The maximum water-equivalent temperature obtained in the test, at an overpower level of 64%, was significantly below the acceptable maximum temperature, indicating that the integrity of the Bruce LVRF will be maintained at PDO conditions. Therefore, the Bruce LVRF exhibits good PDO heat transfer performance. (authors)

  8. Update of the Venus density and temperature profiles at high altitude measured by SOIR on board Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahieux, A.; Vandaele, A. C.; Bougher, S. W.; Drummond, R.; Robert, S.; Wilquet, V.; Chamberlain, S.; Piccialli, A.; Montmessin, F.; Tellmann, S.; Pätzold, M.; Häusler, B.; Bertaux, J. L.

    2015-08-01

    The SOIR instrument on board Venus Express regularly sounds the Venus atmosphere using the solar occultation technique. The density and temperature profiles are inferred from SOIR spectra recorded in the infrared. The method has been described in a previous publication (Mahieux et al., 2012. J. Geophys. Res. 117. doi:10.1029/2012JE004058.). This paper is devoted to the update of the VAST (Venus Atmosphere from SOIR measurements at the Terminator) compilation that was initiated in the above cited work, which gives the mean CO2 number density and temperature profiles for different latitude bins. The method has been improved and has been applied to more data. The new compilation which is given on the same latitudinal grid now distinguishes between the two sides of the terminator. The compilation also confirms the main thermal layering characteristics that were identified in the earlier version: the succession of a warm layer (230±30 K, 1-σ standard deviation) at a pressure level of 3.2×10-7 mbar (~140 km), a very cold layer (125±32 K) at 2.5×10-5 mbar (~123 km), a warm layer (204±17 K) at 0.01 mbar (~102 km) and finally a colder layer at 0.4 mbar (171±34 K, ~87 km). The layering of all the temperature profiles is explained by radiative rather than dynamical processes. The temporal temperature variation is larger than the mean latitudinal temperature variation. VAST is compared with temperature profiles obtained from other Venus Express instruments, VeRa and SPICAV-UV, and ground based measurements.

  9. Measurement of the axial and radial temperature profiles of a chromatographic column. Influence of thermal insulation on column efficiency.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2007-01-01

    The temperatures of the metal wall along a chromatographic column (longitudinal temperature gradients) and of the liquid phase across the outlet section of the column (radial temperature gradients) were measured at different flow rates with the same chromatographic column (250 mm x 4.6 mm). The column was packed with 5 microm C18-bonded silica particles. The measurements were carried out with surface and immersion thermocouples (all junction Type T, +/-0.1 K) that measure the local temperature. The column was either left in a still-air bath (ambient temperature, T(ext) = 295-296 K) or insulated in a packing foam to avoid air convection around its surface. The temperature profiles were measured at several values of the inlet pressure (approximately = 100, 200, 300 and 350 bar) and with two mobile phases, pure methanol and a 2.5:97.5 (v/v, %) methanol:water solution. The experimental results show that the longitudinal temperature gradients never exceeded 8 K for a pressure drop of 350 bars. In the presence of the insulating foam, the longitudinal temperature gradients become quasi-linear and the column temperature increases by +1 and +3 K with a water-rich (heat conductivity approximately = 0.6 W/m/K) and pure methanol (heat conductivity approximately = 0.2 W/m/K), respectively. The radial temperature gradients are maximum with methanol (+1.5 K at 290 bar inlet pressure) and minimum with water (+0.8 K at 290 bar), as predicted by the solution of the heat transfer balance in a chromatographic column. The profile remains parabolic all along the column. Combining the results of these measurements (determination of the boundary conditions on the wall, at column inlet and at column outlet) with calculations using a realistic model of heat dispersion in a porous medium, the temperature inside the column could be assessed for any radial and axial position.

  10. Retrieving Atmospheric Temperature and Moisture Profiles from NPP CRIS/ATMS Sensors Using Crimss EDR Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, X.; Kizer, S.; Barnet, C.; Dvakarla, M.; Zhou, D. K.; Larar, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    The Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) is a U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) mission in collaboration with the U.S. National Aeronautical Space Administration (NASA) and international partners. The NPP Cross-track Infrared Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS) consists of the infrared (IR) Crosstrack Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and the microwave (MW) Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS). The CrIS instrument is hyperspectral interferometer, which measures high spectral and spatial resolution upwelling infrared radiances. The ATMS is a 22-channel radiometer similar to Advanced Microwave Sounding Units (AMSU) A and B. It measures top of atmosphere MW upwelling radiation and provides capability of sounding below clouds. The CrIMSS Environmental Data Record (EDR) algorithm provides three EDRs, namely the atmospheric vertical temperature, moisture and pressure profiles (AVTP, AVMP and AVPP, respectively), with the lower tropospheric AVTP and the AVMP being JPSS Key Performance Parameters (KPPs). The operational CrIMSS EDR an algorithm was originally designed to run on large IBM computers with dedicated data management subsystem (DMS). We have ported the operational code to simple Linux systems by replacing DMS with appropriate interfaces. We also changed the interface of the operational code so that we can read data from both the CrIMSS science code and the operational code and be able to compare lookup tables, parameter files, and output results. The detail of the CrIMSS EDR algorithm is described in reference [1]. We will present results of testing the CrIMSS EDR operational algorithm using proxy data generated from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) satellite data and from the NPP CrIS/ATMS data.

  11. Metabolomic profiling of beer reveals effect of temperature on non-volatile small molecules during short-term storage.

    PubMed

    Heuberger, Adam L; Broeckling, Corey D; Lewis, Matthew R; Salazar, Lauren; Bouckaert, Peter; Prenni, Jessica E

    2012-12-01

    The effect of temperature on non-volatile compounds in beer has not been well characterised during storage. Here, a metabolomics approach was applied to characterise the effect of storage temperature on non-volatile metabolite variation after 16weeks of storage, using fresh beer as a control. The metabolite profile of room temperature stored (RT) and cold temperature stored (CT) beer differed significantly from fresh, with the most substantial variation observed between RT and fresh beer. Metabolites that changed during storage included prenylated flavonoids, purines, and peptides, and all showed reduced quantitative variation under the CT storage conditions. Corresponding sensory panel observations indicated significant beer oxidation after 12 and 16weeks of storage, with higher values reported for RT samples. These data support that temperature affected beer oxidation during short-term storage, and reveal 5-methylthioadenosine (5-MTA) as a candidate non-volatile metabolite marker for beer oxidation and staling.

  12. High temperature- and high pressure-processed garlic improves lipid profiles in rats fed high cholesterol diets.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Chan Wok; Kim, Hyunae; You, Bo Ram; Kim, Min Jee; Kim, Hyo Jin; Lee, Ji Yeon; Sok, Dai-Eun; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Kun Jong; Kim, Mee Ree

    2012-05-01

    Garlic protects against degenerative diseases such as hyperlipidemia and cardiovascular diseases. However, raw garlic has a strong pungency, which is unpleasant. In this study, we examined the effect of high temperature/high pressure-processed garlic on plasma lipid profiles in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a normal control diet, a high cholesterol (0.5% cholesterol) diet (HCD) only, or a high cholesterol diet supplemented with 0.5% high temperature/high pressure-processed garlic (HCP) or raw garlic (HCR) for 10 weeks. The body weights of the rats fed the garlic-supplemented diets decreased, mostly because of reduced fat pad weights. Plasma levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride (TG) in the HCP and HCR groups decreased significantly compared with those in the HCD group. Additionally, fecal TC and TG increased significantly in the HCP and HCR groups. It is notable that no significant differences in plasma or fecal lipid profiles were observed between the HCP and HCR groups. High temperature/high pressure-processed garlic contained a higher amount of S-allyl cysteine than raw garlic (P<.05). The results suggest that high temperature/high pressure-processed garlic may be useful as a functional food to improve lipid profiles.

  13. Stabilized three-stage oxidation of DME/air mixture in a micro flow reactor with a controlled temperature profile

    SciTech Connect

    Oshibe, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Hisashi; Tezuka, Takuya; Hasegawa, Susumu; Maruta, Kaoru

    2010-08-15

    Ignition and combustion characteristics of a stoichiometric dimethyl ether (DME)/air mixture in a micro flow reactor with a controlled temperature profile which was smoothly ramped from room temperature to ignition temperature were investigated. Special attention was paid to the multi-stage oxidation in low temperature condition. Normal stable flames in a mixture flow in the high velocity region, and non-stationary pulsating flames and/or repetitive extinction and ignition (FREI) in the medium velocity region were experimentally confirmed as expected from our previous study on a methane/air mixture. In addition, stable double weak flames were observed in the low velocity region for the present DME/air mixture case. It is the first observation of stable double flames by the present methodology. Gas sampling was conducted to obtain major species distributions in the flow reactor. The results indicated that existence of low-temperature oxidation was conjectured by the production of CH{sub 2}O occured in the upstream side of the experimental first luminous flame, while no chemiluminescence from it was seen. One-dimensional computation with detailed chemistry and transport was conducted. At low mixture velocities, three-stage oxidation was confirmed from profiles of the heat release rate and major chemical species, which was broadly in agreement with the experimental results. Since the present micro flow reactor with a controlled temperature profile successfully presented the multi-stage oxidations as spatially separated flames, it is shown that this flow reactor can be utilized as a methodology to separate sets of reactions, even for other practical fuels, at different temperature. (author)

  14. Application of detailed temperature profile measurements for improving data quality check by Bowen Ratio/Energy Balance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozníková, Gabriela; Fischer, Milan; Orság, Matěj; Trnka, Miroslav; Žalud, Zdeněk

    2015-04-01

    Water plays a key role in the functionality and sustainability of the ecosystems. In the light of the predicted climate change research should be focused on the water cycle and its individual components. Apart from the runoff, the major component of the water balance which drives the water from the ecosystems is represented by the evapotranspiration (ET). One of the standard methods for measuring ET is Bowen Ratio/Energy Balance method (BREB). It is based on the assumption that the water vapour and heat are transported by identical eddies with equal efficiency. In fact, this basic premise is based on a more complicated Monin-Obukhov similarity theory that explains the relationship between the profiles of wind, temperature and water vapour in the surface layer of the atmosphere. When BREB method is used we assume that the profiles of temperature and air humidity are ideally logarithmic or at least consistent. However, as this method is usually based on the measurements of temperature and humidity in only two heights, it is difficult to verify this assumption. We therefore conducted a field experiment using 4m high measurement-mast with 20 thermocouples connected to data-logger for detailed measurement of air temperature profile above different covers, e.g. grassland, spring barley, poplar plantation. The main goal of our effort was to capture so called "kink" in the profile of the temperature and verify if the assumptions made by BREB hold under various weather conditions and over different canopies testing the basic requirements of the BREB method use. Finally we devised a technique improving data selection for subsequent ET calculation. This study was funded by project "Building up a multidisciplinary scientific team focused on drought" No. CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0248,PASED - project supported by Czech program KONTAKT II No. LH12037 "Development of models for assessment of abiotic stresses in selected bioenergy plants" and LD130030 project supporting COST action ES1106.

  15. Low temperature rate constants for the N + CN → N2 + C reaction: two-dimensional quantum capture calculations on an accurate potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianyi; Guo, Hua; Dawes, Richard

    2012-09-21

    The title reaction is thought to be responsible for the production of molecular nitrogen in interstellar clouds. In this work, we report quantum capture calculations on a new two-dimensional potential energy surface determined by interpolating high-level ab initio data. The low-temperature rate constant calculated using a capture model is quite large and has a positive temperature dependence, in agreement with a recent experiment. The origin of the aforementioned behaviors of the rate constant is analyzed.

  16. Determining the temporal variability in atmospheric temperature profiles measured using radiosondes and assessment of correction factors for different launch schedules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterfield, D.; Gardiner, T.

    2015-01-01

    Radiosondes provide one of the primary sources of upper troposphere and stratosphere temperature data for numerical weather prediction, the assessment of long-term trends in atmospheric temperature, study of atmospheric processes and provide intercomparison data for other temperature sensors, e.g. satellites. When intercomparing different temperature profiles it is important to include the effect of temporal mismatch between the measurements. To help quantify this uncertainty the atmospheric temperature variation through the day needs to be assessed, so that a correction and uncertainty for time difference can be calculated. Temperature data from an intensive radiosonde campaign, at Manus Island in Papua New Guinea, were analysed to calculate the hourly rate of change in temperature at different altitudes and provide recommendations and correction factors for different launch schedules. Using these results, three additional longer term data sets were analysed (Lindenberg 1999 to 2008; Lindenberg 2009 to 2012; and Southern Great Plains 2006 to 2012) to assess the diurnal variability of temperature as a function of altitude, time of day and season of the year. This provides the appropriate estimation of temperature differences for given temporal separation and the uncertainty associated with them. A general observation was that 10 or more repeat measurements would be required to get a standard error of the mean of less than 0.1 K per hour of temporal mismatch.

  17. Measurements from the Daytime Dynamo Sounding Rocket missions: Altitude Profiles of Neutral Temperature, Density, Winds, and Con Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemmons, J. H.; Bishop, R. L.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Rowland, D. E.; Larsen, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    Results from the two Daytime Dynamo sounding rocket missions launched from Wallops Island, Virginia, in July 2011 and July 2013 are presented and discussed. Measurements returned by the rockets' multiple-sensor ionization gauge instrumentation are used to derive profiles vs. altitude of neutral temperature, density, and, using a new technique, winds. The techniques used are described in detail and the resulting profiles discussed in the context of the daytime atmospheric dynamo. The profiles are also compared to those of established models. Also presented are measurements returned by the high-speed ion mass spectrometer on the 2011 flight. The measurements show the dominance of NO+ ions up to apogee at 160 km, but also reveal a significant admixture of O2+ ions below an intense daytime sporadic-E layer observed at 100.5 km.

  18. Temperature and bacterial profile of post chill poultry carcasses stored in processing combo held at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Handley, John A; Hanning, Irene; Ricke, Steven C; Johnson, Michael G; Jones, Frank T; Apple, Robert O

    2010-10-01

    Post chill whole poultry carcasses from a commercial processing plant were stored in a processing combo at room temperature (70 °F/21 °C) for 54 h to mimic the scenario of temperature abuse before further processing. Temperature data were collected in 1-min intervals and averaged each hour by 9 temperature data loggers. Two linear regressions were developed for the combo and internal breast temperature and slopes were nearly identical. Microbial data was collected by performing whole bird carcass rinses that were enumerated for aerobic plate count (APC), Enterobacteriaceae, Escherichia coli, and total coliform. Samples were collected from the chiller chute at time zero for initial bacterial counts. Carcass sampling continued once the internal breast temperature achieved 45 °F (7 °C 10 h) and continued every 2 h until the final internal breast temperature was 63 °F (17 °C 54 h). Linear regressions were developed for the first 26 h, which exhibited no statistically significant growth except for Enterobacteriaceae. A 2nd linear regression (28 to 54 h) exhibited significant growth for all analyses. Overall, APC increased from a log(10) colony forming unit (CFU)/mL count of 2.86 to 7.02, Enterobacteriaceae increased from 0.66 to 6.64, coliform increased from 0.72 to 4.81, and E. coli increased from 0.53 to 4.45. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was performed to detect changes in the bacterial populations, which indicated 95% similarity within sampled groups, but the overall percent similarity among samples collected over 54 h was 8%. From the data, microbial growth demonstrates a period of 26 h for minimal growth; therefore, the product could be further processed rather than designated as waste. PMID:21535507

  19. Gene Expression Profiles of Heat Shock Proteins 70 and 90 From Empoasca onukii (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) in Response to Temperature Stress

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Li; Wu, Jun X.; Qin, Dao Z.; Liu, Xiang C.; Lu, Zhao C.; Lv, Li Z.; Pan, Zi L.; Chen, Hao; Li, Guang W.

    2015-01-01

    Empoasca onukii Matsuda is a worldwide pest that causes great economic loss in tea growing areas and is significantly affected by temperatures. Heat shock protein (Hsp) genes are important in insects’ response to temperature stress. In this study, two full-length Hsp genes, Eohsp90 and Eohsp70, were cloned from E. onukii using rapid amplification of complementary DNA ends. The open reading frames of Eohsp90 and Eohsp70 were 2,172 bp and 2,016 bp in length, respectively. Their deduced amino acid sequences of Eohsp90 and Eohsp70 showed high homology with other species. Subsequently, the transcriptional expression of Eohsp90 and Eohsp70 in E. onukii adults exposed to various temperatures (−5, 0, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 38, 41 and 44°C) for 1 h, and at extreme temperatures (0°C and 41°C) for various time duration (0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, and 120 min) were investigated via real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The relative expression levels of both Eohsp90 and Eohsp70 in E. onukii adults were upregulated as the temperature rises or falls over time, except in the −5°C or 44°C temperature groups. Moreover, the expression level in the temperature elevated groups was higher than that of the lower temperature groups. In addition, the Eohsp70 generally demonstrated a higher transcriptional level than Eohsp90, and both genes had a higher expression profile in female adults compared with the males. The expression profiles indicated that Eohsp90 and Eohsp70 may play important roles in E. onukii adult responses to ecologically relevant environmental temperature threat. PMID:25888707

  20. Gene expression profiles of heat shock proteins 70 and 90 from Empoasca onukii (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) in response to temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Li; Wu, Jun X; Qin, Dao Z; Liu, Xiang C; Lu, Zhao C; Lv, Li Z; Pan, Zi L; Chen, Hao; Li, Guang W

    2015-01-01

    Empoasca onukii Matsuda is a worldwide pest that causes great economic loss in tea growing areas and is significantly affected by temperatures. Heat shock protein (Hsp) genes are important in insects' response to temperature stress. In this study, two full-length Hsp genes, Eohsp90 and Eohsp70, were cloned from E. onukii using rapid amplification of complementary DNA ends. The open reading frames of Eohsp90 and Eohsp70 were 2,172 bp and 2,016 bp in length, respectively. Their deduced amino acid sequences of Eohsp90 and Eohsp70 showed high homology with other species. Subsequently, the transcriptional expression of Eohsp90 and Eohsp70 in E. onukii adults exposed to various temperatures (-5, 0, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 38, 41 and 44°C) for 1 h, and at extreme temperatures (0°C and 41°C) for various time duration (0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, and 120 min) were investigated via real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The relative expression levels of both Eohsp90 and Eohsp70 in E. onukii adults were upregulated as the temperature rises or falls over time, except in the -5°C or 44°C temperature groups. Moreover, the expression level in the temperature elevated groups was higher than that of the lower temperature groups. In addition, the Eohsp70 generally demonstrated a higher transcriptional level than Eohsp90, and both genes had a higher expression profile in female adults compared with the males. The expression profiles indicated that Eohsp90 and Eohsp70 may play important roles in E. onukii adult responses to ecologically relevant environmental temperature threat.

  1. Comparison of stratospheric temperature profiles from a ground-based microwave radiometer with lidar, radiosonde and satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Haefele, Alexander; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2015-04-01

    The importance of the knowledge of the temperature structure in the atmosphere has been widely recognized. Temperature is a key parameter for dynamical, chemical and radiative processes in the atmosphere. The cooling of the stratosphere is an indicator for climate change as it provides evidence of natural and anthropogenic climate forcing just like surface warming ( [1] and references therein). However, our understanding of the observed stratospheric temperature trend and our ability to test simulations of the stratospheric response to emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances remains limited. Stratospheric long-term datasets are sparse and obtained trends differ from one another [1]. Therefore it is important that in the future such datasets are generated. Different techniques allow to measure stratospheric temperature profiles as radiosonde, lidar or satellite. The main advantage of microwave radiometers against these other instruments is a high temporal resolution with a reasonable good spatial resolution. Moreover, the measurement at a fixed location allows to observe local atmospheric dynamics over a long time period, which is crucial for climate research. TEMPERA (TEMPERature RAdiometer) is a newly developed ground-based microwave radiometer designed, built and operated at the University of Bern. The instrument and the retrieval of temperature profiles has been described in detail in [2]. TEMPERA is measuring a pressure broadened oxygen line at 53.1 GHz in order to determine stratospheric temperature profiles. The retrieved profiles of TEMPERA cover an altitude range of approximately 20 to 45 km with a vertical resolution in the order of 15 km. The lower limit is given by the instrumental baseline and the bandwidth of the measured spectrum. The upper limit is given by the fact that above 50 km the oxygen lines are splitted by the Zeeman effect in the terrestrial magnetic field. In this study we present a comparison of stratospheric

  2. Accuracy of retrieving temperature and humidity profiles by ground-based microwave radiometry in truly complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, G.; Stiperski, I.; Pospichal, B.; Rotach, M. W.

    2015-08-01

    Within the Innsbruck Box project, a ground-based microwave radiometer (RPG-HATPRO) was operated in the Inn Valley (Austria), in very complex terrain, between September 2012 and May 2013 to obtain temperature and humidity vertical profiles of the full troposphere with a specific focus on the valley boundary layer. In order to assess its performance in a deep alpine valley, the profiles obtained by the radiometer with different retrieval algorithms based on different climatologies are compared to local radiosonde data. A retrieval that is improved with respect to the one provided by the manufacturer, based on better resolved data, shows a significantly smaller root mean square error (RMSE), both for the temperature and humidity profiles. The improvement is particularly substantial at the heights close to the mountaintop level and in the upper troposphere. Lower-level inversions, common in an alpine valley, are resolved to a satisfactory degree. On the other hand, upper-level inversions (above 1200 m) still pose a significant challenge for retrieval. For this purpose, specialized retrieval algorithms were developed by classifying the radiosonde climatologies into specialized categories according to different criteria (seasons, daytime, nighttime) and using additional regressors (e.g., measurements from mountain stations). The training and testing on the radiosonde data for these specialized categories suggests that a classification of profiles that reproduces meaningful physical characteristics can yield improved targeted specialized retrievals. A novel and very promising method of improving the profile retrieval in a mountainous region is adding further information in the retrieval, such as the surface temperature at fixed levels along a topographic slope or from nearby mountaintops.

  3. An innovative rotational Raman lidar to measure the temperature profile from the surface to 30 km altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauchecorne, Alain; Keckhut, Philippe; Mariscal, Jean-François; d'Almeida, Eric; Dahoo, Pierre-Richard; Porteneuve, Jacques

    2016-06-01

    A concept of innovative rotational Raman lidar with daylight measurement capability is proposed to measure the vertical profile of temperature from the ground to the middle stratosphere. The optical filtering is made using a Fabry-Pérot Interferometer with line spacing equal to the line spacing of the Raman spectrum. The detection is made using a linear PMT array operated in photon counting mode. We plan to build a prototype and to test it at the Haute-Provence Observatory lidar facility. to achieve a time resolution permitting the observation of small-scale atmospheric processes playing a role in the troposphere-stratosphere interaction as gravity waves. If successful, this project will open the possibility to consider a Raman space lidar for the global observation of atmospheric temperature profiles.

  4. Line profile and translational temperature of Pb and metastable He atoms at middle pressures in micro hollow cathode discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Mari; Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi; Hori, Masaru

    2012-10-01

    Hollow cathode discharges have been studied as light sources. Conventional hollow cathode discharges have been operated at low pressure, while micro hollow cathode discharges at near atmospheric pressure. At the middle pressures below 40 kPa, the emission of metallic atoms is observed due to sputtering. Moreover, the line profile of atom shits from a Gaussian to Voigt profile as increasing pressure. In this study, the behaviors of Pb and metastable He atoms in the micro hollow cathode discharge at pressures of the order of kPa have been investigated by diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The pressure broadening effect for absorption line-profile was overlapped to Doppler profile and was estimated to be 0.26 MHz/Pa for metastable He atoms in the range from 5 to 10 kPa. The translational temperature decreased from 830 to 410 K with increasing the pressure. For Pb atoms, the temperature decreased from 820 to 610 K with increasing He pressure from 4.9 to 7.4 kPa. The pressure broadening effect for Pb atom has been estimated to be 0.22 MHz/Pa.

  5. Comparison of VLT/X-shooter OH and O2 rotational temperatures with consideration of TIMED/SABER emission and temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, S.; Kausch, W.; Kimeswenger, S.; Unterguggenberger, S.; Jones, A. M.

    2015-11-01

    Rotational temperatures Trot derived from lines of the same OH band are an important method to study the dynamics and long-term trends in the mesopause region near 87 km. To measure realistic temperatures, a corresponding Boltzmann distribution of the rotational level populations has to be achieved. However, this might not be fulfilled, especially at high emission altitudes. In order to quantify possible non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) contributions to the OH Trot as a function of the upper vibrational level v', we studied a sample of 343 echelle spectra taken with the X-shooter spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope at Cerro Paranal in Chile. These data allowed us to analyse 25 OH bands in each spectrum. Moreover, we could measure lines of O2b(0-1), which peaks at about 94 to 95 km, and O2a(0-0) with an emission peak at about 90 km. The latter altitude is reached in the second half of the night after a rise of several km because of the decay of a daytime population of excited O2. Since the radiative lifetimes for the upper levels of the two O2 bands are relatively long, the derived Trot are not significantly affected by non-LTE contributions. These bands are well suited for a comparison with OH if the differences in the emission profiles are corrected. For different sample averages, we made these corrections by using OH emission, O2a(0-0) emission, and CO2-based temperature profile data from the multi-channel radiometer SABER on the TIMED satellite. The procedure relies on differences of profile-weighted SABER temperatures. For an O2a(0-0)-based reference profile at 90 km, we found a good agreement of the O2 with the SABER-related temperatures, whereas the OH temperatures, especially for the high and even v', showed significant excesses with a maximum of more than 10 K for v' = 8. The exact value depends on the selected lines and molecular parameters. We could also find a nocturnal trend towards higher non-LTE effects, particularly for high v'. The

  6. Comparison of VLT/X-shooter OH and O2 rotational temperatures with consideration of TIMED/SABER emission and temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Stefan; Kausch, Wolfgang; Kimeswenger, Stefan; Unterguggenberger, Stefanie; Jones, Amy M.

    2016-04-01

    Rotational temperatures Trot derived from lines of the same OH band are an important method to study the dynamics and long-term trends in the mesopause region near 87 km. To measure realistic temperatures, the rotational level populations have to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). However, this might not be fulfilled, especially at high emission altitudes. In order to quantify possible non-LTE contributions to the OH Trot as a function of the upper vibrational level v', we studied a sample of 343 echelle spectra taken with the X-shooter spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope at Cerro Paranal in Chile. These data allowed us to analyse 25 OH bands in each spectrum. Moreover, we could measure lines of O2b(0-1), which peaks at about 94 to 95 km, and O2a(0-0) with an emission peak at about 90 km. The latter altitude is reached in the second half of the night after a rise of several km because of the decay of a daytime population of excited O2. Since the radiative lifetimes for the upper levels of the two O2 bands are relatively long, the derived Trot are not significantly affected by non-LTE contributions. These bands are well suited for a comparison with OH if the differences in the emission profiles are corrected. For different sample averages, we made these corrections by using OH emission, O2a(0-0) emission, and CO2-based temperature profile data from the multi-channel radiometer SABER on the TIMED satellite. The procedure relies on differences of profile-weighted SABER temperatures. For an O2a(0-0)-based reference profile at 90 km, we found a good agreement of the O2 with the SABER-related temperatures, whereas the OH temperatures, especially for the high and even v', showed significant excesses with a maximum of more than 10 K for v' = 8. The exact value depends on the selected lines and molecular parameters. We could also find a nocturnal trend towards higher non-LTE effects, particularly for high v'. The amplitude of these variations can be about 2 K

  7. Numerical simulation of transient temperature profiles for canned apple puree in semi-rigid aluminum based packaging during pasteurization.

    PubMed

    Shafiekhani, Soraya; Zamindar, Nafiseh; Hojatoleslami, Mohammad; Toghraie, Davood

    2016-06-01

    Pasteurization of canned apple puree was simulated for a 3-D geometry in a semi-rigid aluminum based container which was heated from all sides at 378 K. The computational fluid dynamics code Ansys Fluent 14.0 was used and the governing equations for energy, momentum, and continuity were computed using a finite volume method. The food model was assumed to have temperature-dependent properties. To validate the simulation, the apple puree was pasteurized in a water cascading retort. The effect of the mesh structures was studied for the temperature profiles during thermal processing. The experimental temperature in the slowest heating zone in the container was compared with the temperature predicted by the model and the difference was not significant. The study also investigated the impact of head space (water-vapor) on heat transfer. PMID:27478233

  8. Numerical simulation of transient temperature profiles for canned apple puree in semi-rigid aluminum based packaging during pasteurization.

    PubMed

    Shafiekhani, Soraya; Zamindar, Nafiseh; Hojatoleslami, Mohammad; Toghraie, Davood

    2016-06-01

    Pasteurization of canned apple puree was simulated for a 3-D geometry in a semi-rigid aluminum based container which was heated from all sides at 378 K. The computational fluid dynamics code Ansys Fluent 14.0 was used and the governing equations for energy, momentum, and continuity were computed using a finite volume method. The food model was assumed to have temperature-dependent properties. To validate the simulation, the apple puree was pasteurized in a water cascading retort. The effect of the mesh structures was studied for the temperature profiles during thermal processing. The experimental temperature in the slowest heating zone in the container was compared with the temperature predicted by the model and the difference was not significant. The study also investigated the impact of head space (water-vapor) on heat transfer.

  9. Biologically relevant physical measurements in the ice-free valleys of southern Victoria Land: soil temperature profiles and ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nienow, J. A.; Meyer, M. A.; Friedmann, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    As part of the ongoing comprehensive study of the cryptoendolithic microbial community in the ice-free valleys of southern Victoria Land, thermal properties of the soil and the ultraviolet radiation regime were measured. Although soil temperature profiles have been measured in the ice-free valleys (e.g., Cameron et al. 1970; Cameron 1972), these are the first such data from higher elevations. This is apparently the first time the ultraviolet radiation regime has been measured in the Antarctic.

  10. Systematic Temperature Effects in the Argon Cluster Ion Sputter Depth Profiling of Organic Materials Using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Seah, Martin P; Havelund, Rasmus; Gilmore, Ian S

    2016-08-01

    A study is presented of the effects of sample temperature on the sputter depth profiling of two organic materials, NPB (N,N'-Di(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine) and Irganox 1010, using a 5 keV Ar2000 (+) cluster ion beam and analysis by secondary ion mass spectrometry. It is shown that at low temperatures, the yields increase slowly with temperature in accordance with the Universal Sputtering Yield equation where the energy term is now modified by Trouton's rule. This occurs up to a transition temperature, T T, which is, in turn, approximately 0.8T M, where T M is the sample melting temperature in Kelvin. For NPB and Irganox 1010, these transition temperatures are close to 15 °C and 0 °C, respectively. Above this temperature, the rate of increase of the sputtering yield rises by an order of magnitude. During sputtering, the depth resolution also changes with temperature with a very small change occurring below T T. At higher temperatures, the depth resolution improves but then rapidly degrades, possibly as a result first of local crater surface diffusion and then of bulk inter-diffusion. The secondary ion spectra also change with temperature with the intensities of the molecular entities increasing least. This agrees with a model in which the molecular entities arise near the crater rim. It is recommended that for consistent results, measurements for organic materials are always made at temperatures significantly below T T or 0.8 T M, and this is generally below room temperature. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27106601

  11. Systematic Temperature Effects in the Argon Cluster Ion Sputter Depth Profiling of Organic Materials Using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Seah, Martin P; Havelund, Rasmus; Gilmore, Ian S

    2016-08-01

    A study is presented of the effects of sample temperature on the sputter depth profiling of two organic materials, NPB (N,N'-Di(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine) and Irganox 1010, using a 5 keV Ar2000 (+) cluster ion beam and analysis by secondary ion mass spectrometry. It is shown that at low temperatures, the yields increase slowly with temperature in accordance with the Universal Sputtering Yield equation where the energy term is now modified by Trouton's rule. This occurs up to a transition temperature, T T, which is, in turn, approximately 0.8T M, where T M is the sample melting temperature in Kelvin. For NPB and Irganox 1010, these transition temperatures are close to 15 °C and 0 °C, respectively. Above this temperature, the rate of increase of the sputtering yield rises by an order of magnitude. During sputtering, the depth resolution also changes with temperature with a very small change occurring below T T. At higher temperatures, the depth resolution improves but then rapidly degrades, possibly as a result first of local crater surface diffusion and then of bulk inter-diffusion. The secondary ion spectra also change with temperature with the intensities of the molecular entities increasing least. This agrees with a model in which the molecular entities arise near the crater rim. It is recommended that for consistent results, measurements for organic materials are always made at temperatures significantly below T T or 0.8 T M, and this is generally below room temperature. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. Systematic Temperature Effects in the Argon Cluster Ion Sputter Depth Profiling of Organic Materials Using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seah, Martin P.; Havelund, Rasmus; Gilmore, Ian S.

    2016-08-01

    A study is presented of the effects of sample temperature on the sputter depth profiling of two organic materials, NPB ( N,N'-Di(1-naphthyl)- N,N'-diphenyl-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine) and Irganox 1010, using a 5 keV Ar2000 + cluster ion beam and analysis by secondary ion mass spectrometry. It is shown that at low temperatures, the yields increase slowly with temperature in accordance with the Universal Sputtering Yield equation where the energy term is now modified by Trouton's rule. This occurs up to a transition temperature, T T, which is, in turn, approximately 0.8 T M, where T M is the sample melting temperature in Kelvin. For NPB and Irganox 1010, these transition temperatures are close to 15 °C and 0 °C, respectively. Above this temperature, the rate of increase of the sputtering yield rises by an order of magnitude. During sputtering, the depth resolution also changes with temperature with a very small change occurring below T T. At higher temperatures, the depth resolution improves but then rapidly degrades, possibly as a result first of local crater surface diffusion and then of bulk inter-diffusion. The secondary ion spectra also change with temperature with the intensities of the molecular entities increasing least. This agrees with a model in which the molecular entities arise near the crater rim. It is recommended that for consistent results, measurements for organic materials are always made at temperatures significantly below T T or 0.8 T M, and this is generally below room temperature.

  13. Determining the temporal variability in atmospheric temperature profiles measured using radiosondes and assessment of correction factors for different launch schedules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterfield, D.; Gardiner, T.

    2014-08-01

    Radiosondes provide one of the primary sources of upper atmosphere temperature data for numerical weather prediction, the assessment of long-term trends in atmospheric temperature, the study atmospheric processes and provide a source of intercomparison data for other temperature sensors e.g. satellites. When intercomparing different temperature profiles it is important to include the effect of temporal mis-match between the measurements. To help quantify this uncertainty the atmospheric temperature variation through the day needs to be assessed, so that a correction and uncertainty for time difference can be calculated. Temperature data from an intensive radiosonde campaign were analysed to calculate the hourly rate of change in temperature at different altitudes and provide recommendations and correction factors for different launch schedules. Using these results, three additional longer term data sets were analysed to assess the diurnal variability temperature as a function of altitude, time of day and season of the year. This provides data on the appropriate correction factors to use for a given temporal separation and the uncertainty associated with them. A general observation was that 10 or more repeat measurements would be required to get a standard uncertainty of less than 0.1 K h-1 of temporal mis-match.

  14. Temperature Dependence of the Proteome Profile of the Psychrotolerant Pathogenic Food Spoiler Bacillus weihenstephanensis Type Strain WSBC 10204.

    PubMed

    Stelder, Sacha K; Mahmud, Siraje A; Dekker, Henk L; de Koning, Leo J; Brul, Stanley; de Koster, Chris G

    2015-05-01

    Bacillus weihenstephanensis is a subspecies of the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group of spore-forming bacteria known to cause food spoilage or food poisoning. The key distinguishing phenotype of B. weihenstephanensis is its ability to grow below 7 °C or, from a food safety perspective, to grow and potentially produce toxins in a refrigerated environment. Comparison of the proteome profile of B. weihenstephanensis upon its exposure to different culturing conditions can reveal clues to the mechanistic basis of its psychrotolerant phenotype as well as elucidate relevant aspects of its toxigenic profile. To this end, the genome of the type strain B. weihenstephanensis WSBC 10204 was sequenced and annotated. Subsequently, the proteome profiles of cells grown at either 6 or 30 °C were compared, which revealed considerable differences and indicated several hundred (uncharacterized) proteins as being subproteome- and/or temperature-specific. In this manner, several processes were newly indicated to be dependent on growth temperature, such as varying carbon flux routes and a different role for the urea cycle. Furthermore, a possible post-translational regulatory function for acetylation was suggested. Toxin production was determined to be largely independent of growth temperature.

  15. Flow Rates Measurement and Uncertainty Analysis in Multiple-Zone Water-Injection Wells from Fluid Temperature Profiles.

    PubMed

    Reges, José E O; Salazar, A O; Maitelli, Carla W S P; Carvalho, Lucas G; Britto, Ursula J B

    2016-07-13

    This work is a contribution to the development of flow sensors in the oil and gas industry. It presents a methodology to measure the flow rates into multiple-zone water-injection wells from fluid temperature profiles and estimate the measurement uncertainty. First, a method to iteratively calculate the zonal flow rates using the Ramey (exponential) model was described. Next, this model was linearized to perform an uncertainty analysis. Then, a computer program to calculate the injected flow rates from experimental temperature profiles was developed. In the experimental part, a fluid temperature profile from a dual-zone water-injection well located in the Northeast Brazilian region was collected. Thus, calculated and measured flow rates were compared. The results proved that linearization error is negligible for practical purposes and the relative uncertainty increases as the flow rate decreases. The calculated values from both the Ramey and linear models were very close to the measured flow rates, presenting a difference of only 4.58 m³/d and 2.38 m³/d, respectively. Finally, the measurement uncertainties from the Ramey and linear models were equal to 1.22% and 1.40% (for injection zone 1); 10.47% and 9.88% (for injection zone 2). Therefore, the methodology was successfully validated and all objectives of this work were achieved.

  16. Flow Rates Measurement and Uncertainty Analysis in Multiple-Zone Water-Injection Wells from Fluid Temperature Profiles.

    PubMed

    Reges, José E O; Salazar, A O; Maitelli, Carla W S P; Carvalho, Lucas G; Britto, Ursula J B

    2016-01-01

    This work is a contribution to the development of flow sensors in the oil and gas industry. It presents a methodology to measure the flow rates into multiple-zone water-injection wells from fluid temperature profiles and estimate the measurement uncertainty. First, a method to iteratively calculate the zonal flow rates using the Ramey (exponential) model was described. Next, this model was linearized to perform an uncertainty analysis. Then, a computer program to calculate the injected flow rates from experimental temperature profiles was developed. In the experimental part, a fluid temperature profile from a dual-zone water-injection well located in the Northeast Brazilian region was collected. Thus, calculated and measured flow rates were compared. The results proved that linearization error is negligible for practical purposes and the relative uncertainty increases as the flow rate decreases. The calculated values from both the Ramey and linear models were very close to the measured flow rates, presenting a difference of only 4.58 m³/d and 2.38 m³/d, respectively. Finally, the measurement uncertainties from the Ramey and linear models were equal to 1.22% and 1.40% (for injection zone 1); 10.47% and 9.88% (for injection zone 2). Therefore, the methodology was successfully validated and all objectives of this work were achieved. PMID:27420068

  17. Flow Rates Measurement and Uncertainty Analysis in Multiple-Zone Water-Injection Wells from Fluid Temperature Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Reges, José E. O.; Salazar, A. O.; Maitelli, Carla W. S. P.; Carvalho, Lucas G.; Britto, Ursula J. B.

    2016-01-01

    This work is a contribution to the development of flow sensors in the oil and gas industry. It presents a methodology to measure the flow rates into multiple-zone water-injection wells from fluid temperature profiles and estimate the measurement uncertainty. First, a method to iteratively calculate the zonal flow rates using the Ramey (exponential) model was described. Next, this model was linearized to perform an uncertainty analysis. Then, a computer program to calculate the injected flow rates from experimental temperature profiles was developed. In the experimental part, a fluid temperature profile from a dual-zone water-injection well located in the Northeast Brazilian region was collected. Thus, calculated and measured flow rates were compared. The results proved that linearization error is negligible for practical purposes and the relative uncertainty increases as the flow rate decreases. The calculated values from both the Ramey and linear models were very close to the measured flow rates, presenting a difference of only 4.58 m³/d and 2.38 m³/d, respectively. Finally, the measurement uncertainties from the Ramey and linear models were equal to 1.22% and 1.40% (for injection zone 1); 10.47% and 9.88% (for injection zone 2). Therefore, the methodology was successfully validated and all objectives of this work were achieved. PMID:27420068

  18. Evaluation of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the metabolic profiling of plant-fungus interaction in Aquilaria malaccensis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yong Foo; Chin, Sung-Tong; Perlmutter, Patrick; Marriott, Philip J

    2015-03-27

    To explore the possible obligate interactions between the phytopathogenic fungus and Aquilaria malaccensis which result in generation of a complex array of secondary metabolites, we describe a comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) method, coupled to accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) for the untargeted and comprehensive metabolic profiling of essential oils from naturally infected A. malaccensis trees. A polar/non-polar column configuration was employed, offering an improved separation pattern of components when compared to other column sets. Four different grades of the oils displayed quite different metabolic patterns, suggesting the evolution of a signalling relationship between the host tree (emergence of various phytoalexins) and fungi (activation of biotransformation). In total, ca. 550 peaks/metabolites were detected, of which tentative identification of 155 of these compounds was reported, representing between 20.1% and 53.0% of the total ion count. These are distributed over the chemical families of monoterpenic and sesquiterpenic hydrocarbons, oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes (comprised of ketone, aldehyde, oxide, alcohol, lactone, keto-alcohol and diol), norterpenoids, diterpenoids, short chain glycols, carboxylic acids and others. The large number of metabolites detected, combined with the ease with which they are located in the 2D separation space, emphasises the importance of a comprehensive analytical approach for the phytochemical analysis of plant metabolomes. Furthermore, the potential of this methodology in grading agarwood oils by comparing the obtained metabolic profiles (pattern recognition for unique metabolite chemical families) is discussed. The phytocomplexity of the agarwood oils signified the production of a multitude of plant-fungus mediated secondary metabolites as chemical signals for natural ecological communication. To the best of our knowledge, this is the most complete

  19. The feasibility of retrieving vertical temperature profiles from satellite nadir UV observations: A sensitivity analysis and an inversion experiment with neural network algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, P.; Del Frate, F.

    2014-07-01

    Atmospheric temperature profiles are inferred from passive satellite instruments, using thermal infrared or microwave observations. Here we investigate on the feasibility of the retrieval of height resolved temperature information in the ultraviolet spectral region. The temperature dependence of the absorption cross sections of ozone in the Huggins band, in particular in the interval 320-325 nm, is exploited. We carried out a sensitivity analysis and demonstrated that a non-negligible information on the temperature profile can be extracted from this small band. Starting from these results, we developed a neural network inversion algorithm, trained and tested with simulated nadir EnviSat-SCIAMACHY ultraviolet observations. The algorithm is able to retrieve the temperature profile with root mean square errors and biases comparable to existing retrieval schemes that use thermal infrared or microwave observations. This demonstrates, for the first time, the feasibility of temperature profiles retrieval from space-borne instruments operating in the ultraviolet.

  20. Triacylglyceride composition and fatty acyl saturation profile of a psychrophilic and psychrotolerant fungal species grown at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Pannkuk, Evan L; Blair, Hannah B; Fischer, Amy E; Gerdes, Cheyenne L; Gilmore, David F; Savary, Brett J; Risch, Thomas S

    2014-01-01

    Pseudogymnoascus destructans is a psychrophilic fungus that infects cutaneous tissues in cave dwelling bats, and it is the causal agent for white nose syndrome (WNS) in North American (NA) bat populations. Geomyces pannorum is a related psychrotolerant keratinolytic species that is rarely a pathogen of mammals. In this study, we grew P. destructans and G. pannorum in static liquid cultures at favourable and suboptimal temperatures to: 1) determine if triacylglyceride profiles are species-specific, and 2) determine if there are differences in fatty acyl (FA) saturation levels with respect to temperature. Total lipids isolated from both fungal spp. were separated by thin-layer chromatography and determined to be primarily sterols (∼15 %), free fatty acids (FFAs) (∼45 %), and triacylglycerides (TAGs) (∼50 %), with minor amounts of mono-/diacylglycerides and sterol esters. TAG compositions were profiled by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF). Total fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) and acyl lipid unsaturation levels were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Pseudogymnoascus destructans produced higher proportions of unsaturated 18C fatty acids and TAGs than G. pannorum. Pseudogymnoascus destructans and G. pannorum produced up to a two-fold increase in 18:3 fatty acids at 5 °C than at higher temperatures. TAG proportion for P. destructans at upper and lower temperature growth limits was greater than 50 % of total dried mycelia mass. These results indicate fungal spp. alter acyl lipid unsaturation as a strategy to adapt to cold temperatures. Differences between their glycerolipid profiles also provide evidence for a different metabolic strategy to support psychrophilic growth, which may influence P. destructans' pathogenicity to bats. PMID:25209638

  1. A comparison between Nimbus 5 THIR and ITPR temperatures and derived winds with rawinsonde data obtained in the AVE II experiment. [Temperature-Humidity Infrared Radiometer and Infrared Temperature Profile Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. E.; Scoggins, J. R.; Fuelberg, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    During the second Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE II), atmospheric temperature profiles were computed from Nimbus 5 data, which comprised ITPR, NEMS, and SCR measurements. Rawinsonde data were obtained from NWS stations in the AVE II network and processed for each pressure contact; the soundings closest in space and time were interpolated to the Nimbus 5 sounding points for comparison purposes. Cross sections of thermal and geostrophic winds were computed from satellite-derived cross sections of temperature along the Nimbus orbital track.

  2. Impact of water temperature on the growth and fatty acid profiles of juvenile sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka).

    PubMed

    Yu, Haibo; Zhang, Cheng; Gao, Qinfeng; Dong, Shuanglin; Ye, Zhi; Tian, Xiangli

    2016-08-01

    The present study determined the changes in the fatty acid (FA) profiles of juvenile sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus in response to the varied water temperature. Sea cucumbers with similar size (4.02±0.11g) were cultured for 8 weeks at 14°C, 18°C, 22°C and 26°C, respectively. At the end of the experiment, the specific growth rate (SGR) and the profiles of FAs in neutral lipids and phospholipids of the juvenile sea cucumbers cultured at different temperatures were determined. The SGRs of the sea cucumbers cultured at 26°C significantly decreased 46.3% compared to thos cultured at 18°C. Regression analysis showed that the SGR-temperature (T) relationship can be expressed as SGR=-0.0073T(2)+0.255T -1.0231 (R(2)=0.9936) and the highest SGR was predicted at 17.5°C. For the neutral lipids, the sum of saturated FAs (SFAs), monounsaturated FAs (MUFAs) or polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs) of the sea cucumbers that were cultured at the water temperature from 18°C-26°C did not change significantly, indicating the insensitivity of FA profiles for the neutral lipids of sea cucumbers in response to increasing water temperature. For phospholipids, the sum of PUFAs in the sea cucumbers dramatically decreased with the gradually increased water temperature. The sum of SFAs and MUFAs of sea cucumbers, however, increased with the gradually elevated water temperature. In particular, the contents of highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs), including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), in the phospholipids of the sea cucumbers decreased 37.2% and 26.1%, respectively, when the water temperature increased from 14°C to 26°C. In summary, the sea cucumbers A. japonicus can regulate the FA compositions, especially the contents of EPA and DHA, in the phospholipids so as to adapt to varied water temperature.

  3. Impact of water temperature on the growth and fatty acid profiles of juvenile sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka).

    PubMed

    Yu, Haibo; Zhang, Cheng; Gao, Qinfeng; Dong, Shuanglin; Ye, Zhi; Tian, Xiangli

    2016-08-01

    The present study determined the changes in the fatty acid (FA) profiles of juvenile sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus in response to the varied water temperature. Sea cucumbers with similar size (4.02±0.11g) were cultured for 8 weeks at 14°C, 18°C, 22°C and 26°C, respectively. At the end of the experiment, the specific growth rate (SGR) and the profiles of FAs in neutral lipids and phospholipids of the juvenile sea cucumbers cultured at different temperatures were determined. The SGRs of the sea cucumbers cultured at 26°C significantly decreased 46.3% compared to thos cultured at 18°C. Regression analysis showed that the SGR-temperature (T) relationship can be expressed as SGR=-0.0073T(2)+0.255T -1.0231 (R(2)=0.9936) and the highest SGR was predicted at 17.5°C. For the neutral lipids, the sum of saturated FAs (SFAs), monounsaturated FAs (MUFAs) or polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs) of the sea cucumbers that were cultured at the water temperature from 18°C-26°C did not change significantly, indicating the insensitivity of FA profiles for the neutral lipids of sea cucumbers in response to increasing water temperature. For phospholipids, the sum of PUFAs in the sea cucumbers dramatically decreased with the gradually increased water temperature. The sum of SFAs and MUFAs of sea cucumbers, however, increased with the gradually elevated water temperature. In particular, the contents of highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs), including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), in the phospholipids of the sea cucumbers decreased 37.2% and 26.1%, respectively, when the water temperature increased from 14°C to 26°C. In summary, the sea cucumbers A. japonicus can regulate the FA compositions, especially the contents of EPA and DHA, in the phospholipids so as to adapt to varied water temperature. PMID:27503728

  4. Oxygen Profiling of the Atmospheric Limb (OPAL) Sensor for Thermospheric Temperature Monitoring from a CubeSat Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, S. W.; Marchant, A.; Stromberg, E. M.; Swenson, C.; Fish, C. S.

    2012-12-01

    The physics of the Earth's lower thermosphere (~90-140 km) has proven difficult to study due to the wide range of processes that occur in that region and the paucity of critical data. The main energy input is solar EUV but during geomagnetically active times, additional energy is deposited into the high-latitude thermosphere in the form of Joule heating and particle precipitation, which subsequently leads to a change in the thermospheric temperature profiles on a global-scale. The method of global temperature distribution is not well understood. The Oxygen Profiling of the Atmospheric Limb (OPAL) instrument is a high resolution imaging spectrometer that simultaneously collects spatially-resolved A-band spectra in multiple azimuthal directions and across the full altitude range of A-band emission. The spectral data can be converted to neutral temperature at each spatial point using previously demonstrated techniques. OPAL collects measurements from 90 to 140km altitudes with 5km vertical resolution and 250km horizontal sample spacing. Predicted temperature precision is better than 5% of the absolute temperature. This resolution is sufficient to study the dynamic response of thermospheric temperatures to geomagnetic storms. OPAL has a novel optical design and operates with no moving parts. Its size, weight, power and interface requirements are compatible with a 3-U CubeSat platform. While a single OPAL sensor would produce data of great scientific utility, the low cost CubeSat platform allows for an affordable constellation of thermospheric temperature sensors providing continuous global coverage to the thermospheric weather community. OPAL is compatible with many launch opportunities including the J-SSOD release module on the ISS and PPOD releases from a low earth orbit launch with inclination greater than 50 degrees. This paper focuses on the OPAL sensor design and a notional CubeSat implementation.; OPAL Instrument ; OPAL Instrument on a 3-U CubeSat

  5. The results of complex optical measurements of vertical temperature profile of the atmos-phere in the winter in Yakutsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolashkin, Semyen; Ignatyev, V. M.; Ammosov, Petr; Koltovskoy, Igor; Titov, Semen; Reshetnikov, Alexander

    The results of simultaneous measurements of atmospheric temperature from 0 to 100 km by lidar, spectrometric and interferometric methods in winter 2008 in Yakutsk are presented. Temperature measurements for the surface layer from 0 to 20-25 km were obtained from radio-sonde data on upper-air station in Yakutsk. Measuring the temperature of the middle atmosphere from 25 to 55-60 km made using Rayleigh Lidar near Yakutsk, with the following parameters: a transmitter Nd-YAG laser at a wavelength of 532 nm and a pulse energy of 200 mJ receiver - a telescope with a primary mirror diameter of 60 cm and a focal length of 200 cm, with a photon counting system and a spectrum analyzer. The temperature of the upper atmosphere was meas-ured at three altitude levels: by hydroxyl emission layer at the mesopause (6,2 band) , molecular oxygen radiation using an infrared spectrograph with a CCD camera and atomic oxygen emission line 557.7 nm with Fabry-Perot spectrometer (FPS) at the Maimaga optic range. FPS aperture was 15 cm, gap 1.5 cm, plate’s reflectance 0.85 and finess12. Thus, in this work, we covered by the temperature measuring most of the atmosphere ex-cept for a layer of the mesosphere from 60 to 87 km. For comparison, also are used CIRA model and the AURA MLS instrument (MicroLimb Sounder) temperature profiles data. Data analysis showed that there is a wave-like change in the vertical temperature profile, which is the result of vertical transmission features planetary waves during a stratospheric warming. This work is supported by the Integration project of the SB RAS No. 106 and RFBR grant No. 12-05-98547-r-vostok-a.

  6. Field calibration of stable isotopes (δ18O) in coccoliths : Toward an accurate carbonate record-based reconstruction of the photic zone temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candelier, Y.; Minoletti, F.; Hermoso, M.; Probert, I.

    2010-12-01

    Oxygen-isotopes from biogenic carbonates have been widely used to estimate SSTs during the Cenozoic. The full potential of coccolithophores for reconstructing past temperatures is still unexploited owing to two major issues: their minute size that prevents their isotopic analyzes at the specific level as done for foraminifera, and the large range of interspecific isotopic offsets (~ 5‰) ascribed to the vital effect (Ziveri et al., 2003). To test the suitability of applying in vitro data for the truly pelagic natural record, we established new coccolithophorid δ18O-temperature calibrations from sediments that we compared to empirical thermodependance equations from previous culture experiments. In this respect, we focused on two foremost coccolithophore species: Calcidicus leptoporus and Gephyrocapsa oceanica. We successfully obtained monospecific fractions of those taxa by applying a microfiltering protocol (Minoletti et al., 2009) on Holocene sediments for which the temperature of the photic zone water has been directly measured. For G. oceanica, the constant offset (δcGo-δceq) of ~ +1.5‰ with respect to equilibrium is in a good agreement with previous culture experiments (~ +1.6‰; Ziveri et al., 2003). Conversely, for C. leptoporus, although the relation between temperature and oxygen-isotopic fractionation is also well-behaved between 16 and 27°C, we found a significant discrepancy with previous cultures (-2.8‰; Dudley et al., 1986). This difference could be the result of growing conditions in the lab that may not mimate the natural environment (seawater chemistry such as pH, nutrient level, cell concentration, …). We generated new isotopic results of preliminary temperature-controlled experiments for C. leptoporus in constrained conditions close to the natural environment. We measured an isotopic offset comparable to the one from our sedimentologic study. Hence, we suggest a new correction of -1.2‰ for C. leptoporus, which may be more

  7. Middle and upper atmosphere pressure-temperature profiles and the abundances of CO2 and CO in the upper atmosphere from ATMOS/Spacelab 3 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Gunson, M. R.; Zander, R.; Lopez-Puertas, M.

    1992-01-01

    An improved method for retrieving pressure-temperature profiles is described and is used to retrieve profiles of the kinetic-temperature and atmospheric-pressure profiles between 20 and 116 km altitudes and the CO2 and CO volume-mixing ratios between 70 and 116 km, using the IR occultation spectra recorded by the Spacelab 3 atmospheric trace molecular spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier transform spectrometer between April 29 and May 6, 1985. Profiles are derived for six ATMOS occultations. The CO2 and CO volume-mixing profiles are compared with previous observations and model predictions. Evidence is found for vibrational non-LTE by analyzing the lines of the (nu-2 + nu-3 - nu-2) (C-12)(O-16) band. Results are used for deriving (C-12)(O-16) (010) vibrational temperatures, which are compared with the retrieved kinetic temperatures and the predictions of non-LTE effects by recent models.

  8. The effects of consistent chemical kinetics calculations on the pressure-temperature profiles and emission spectra of hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, B.; Tremblin, P.; Baraffe, I.; Amundsen, D. S.; Mayne, N. J.; Venot, O.; Goyal, J.

    2016-10-01

    In this work we investigate the impact of calculating non-equilibrium chemical abundances consistently with the temperature structure for the atmospheres of highly-irradiated, close-in gas giant exoplanets. Chemical kinetics models have been widely used in the literature to investigate the chemical compositions of hot Jupiter atmospheres which are expected to be driven away from chemical equilibrium via processes such as vertical mixing and photochemistry. All of these models have so far used pressure-temperature (P-T) profiles as fixed model input. This results in a decoupling of the chemistry from the radiative and thermal properties of the atmosphere, despite the fact that in nature they are intricately linked. We use a one-dimensional radiative-convective equilibrium model, ATMO, which includes a sophisticated chemistry scheme to calculate P-T profiles which are fully consistent with non-equilibrium chemical abundances, including vertical mixing and photochemistry. Our primary conclusion is that, in cases of strong chemical disequilibrium, consistent calculations can lead to differences in the P-T profile of up to 100 K compared to the P-T profile derived assuming chemical equilibrium. This temperature change can, in turn, have important consequences for the chemical abundances themselves as well as for the simulated emission spectra. In particular, we find that performing the chemical kinetics calculation consistently can reduce the overall impact of non-equilibrium chemistry on the observable emission spectrum of hot Jupiters. Simulated observations derived from non-consistent models could thus yield the wrong interpretation. We show that this behaviour is due to the non-consistent models violating the energy budget balance of the atmosphere.

  9. Novel Ground-Based Instrument For Day-And-Night Monitoring Of The Stratosphere And The Upper Troposphere Temperature Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigin, A.; Shvetsov, A.; Fedoseev, L.; Karashtin, D.; Bolshakov, O.; Mukhin, D.; Skalyga, N.

    2012-04-01

    The thermal structure of the stratosphere and the upper troposphere is one of the most important atmospheric characteristics determining the dynamic and photochemical processes in the atmosphere. At present, the data on the altitude distribution of the middle atmospheric temperature are almost entirely obtained by remote methods, mainly, radiometric sounding from the satellites within infrared and microwave frequency bands. Such measurements allow one to retrieve the temperature profile in a very wide altitude range from the surface layer to the mesosphere. However, they do not ensure obtaining of the data with time and space resolution that is required for studying the fast local atmospheric processes. A promising information resource about fast local temperature variations is atmospheric self-radiation in lines of different spin-rotational transitions of molecular oxygen. Among with better time and space resolution advantages of this measurement method are its usability for round-the-clock and almost all-weather (excluding heavy clouds, rainfalls, and snowstorms conditions) observations. The potential of the ground-based microwave remote sensing of the middle atmosphere has been discussed for a sufficiently long time [1]. Nevertheless up to date the ground-based microwave diagnostics of the middle atmosphere has not been realized for some hardware and software reasons. In this work, we describe the design and characteristics of the novel complex combining new method for retrieval of the altitude profile of the middle-atmosphere temperature on the basis of the results of the ground-based observation of emission in the lines at the slope of the 5-millimeter absorption band of molecular oxygen, and a high-sensitive spectroradiometer for such sensing. The spectroradiometer measures the spectrum of atmospheric self-radiation brightness temperature within (52.5-53.5) GHz frequency bands with the resolution of 61 kHz. The retrieval method is based first on the Bayesian

  10. Seasonal variations in Titan's stratosphere observed with Cassini/CIRS: temperature, trace molecular gas and aerosol mixing ratio profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinatier, S.; Bézard, B.; Anderson, C.; Teanby, N.; Lebonnois, S.; Rannou, P.; de Kok, R.; T. CIRS Team

    2013-09-01

    Titan's northern spring equinox occurred in August 2009. General Circulation Models (e.g. [1]) predict strong modifications of the global circulation in this period, with formation of two circulation cells instead of the pole-to-pole cell that occurred during northern winter. This winter single cell, which had its descending branch at the north pole, was at the origin of the enrichment of molecular abundances and high stratopause temperatures observed by Cassini/CIRS at high northern latitudes (e.g., [2], [3], [4], [5]). The predicted dynamical seasonal variations after the equinox have strong impact on the spatial distributions of trace gas, temperature and aerosol abundances. We will present here an analysis of CIRS limbgeometry datasets acquired in 2010, 2011 and 2012 that we used to monitor the seasonal evolution of the vertical profiles of temperature, molecular (C2H2, C2H6, HCN, ...) and aerosol abundances.

  11. Combined Radiometer-Radar Microphysical Profile Estimations with Emphasis on High Frequency Brightness Temperature Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Gail Skofronick; Wang, James R.; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Hood, Robbie; Manning, Will; Meneghini, Robert; Weinman, James A.; Hildebrand, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Information about the vertical microphysical cloud structure is useful in many modeling and predictive practices. Radiometers and radars are used to observe hydrometeor properties. This paper describes an iterative retrieval algorithm that combines the use of airborne active and wideband (10 to 340 GHz) passive observations to estimate the vertical content and particle size distributions of liquid and frozen hydrometeors. The physically-based retrieval algorithm relies on the high frequencies (greater than 89 GHz) to provide details on the frozen hydrometeors. Neglecting the high frequencies yielded acceptable estimates of the liquid profiles, but the ice profiles were poorly retrieved. Airborne radar and radiometer observations from the third Convection and Moisture EXperiment (CAMEX-3) were used in the retrieval algorithm as constraints. Nadir profiles were estimated for a minute each of flight time (approximately 12.5 km along track) from an anvil, convection, and quasi- stratiform rain. The complex structure of the frozen hydrometeors required the most iterations for convergence for the anvil cloud type. The wideband observations were found to more than double the estimated frozen hydrometeor content as compared to retrievals using only 90-GHz and below. The convective and quasi-stratiform quickly reached convergence (minimized difference between observations and calculations using the estimated profiles). A qualitative validation using coincident in situ CAMEX-3 observations shows that the retrieved particle size distributions are well corroborated with independent measurements.

  12. New experimental methodology, setup and LabView program for accurate absolute thermoelectric power and electrical resistivity measurements between 25 and 1600 K: Application to pure copper, platinum, tungsten, and nickel at very high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Abadlia, L.; Mayoufi, M.; Gasser, F.; Khalouk, K.; Gasser, J. G.

    2014-09-15

    In this paper we describe an experimental setup designed to measure simultaneously and very accurately the resistivity and the absolute thermoelectric power, also called absolute thermopower or absolute Seebeck coefficient, of solid and liquid conductors/semiconductors over a wide range of temperatures (room temperature to 1600 K in present work). A careful analysis of the existing experimental data allowed us to extend the absolute thermoelectric power scale of platinum to the range 0-1800 K with two new polynomial expressions. The experimental device is controlled by a LabView program. A detailed description of the accurate dynamic measurement methodology is given in this paper. We measure the absolute thermoelectric power and the electrical resistivity and deduce with a good accuracy the thermal conductivity using the relations between the three electronic transport coefficients, going beyond the classical Wiedemann-Franz law. We use this experimental setup and methodology to give new very accurate results for pure copper, platinum, and nickel especially at very high temperatures. But resistivity and absolute thermopower measurement can be more than an objective in itself. Resistivity characterizes the bulk of a material while absolute thermoelectric power characterizes the material at the point where the electrical contact is established with a couple of metallic elements (forming a thermocouple). In a forthcoming paper we will show that the measurement of resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power characterizes advantageously the (change of) phase, probably as well as DSC (if not better), since the change of phases can be easily followed during several hours/days at constant temperature.

  13. New experimental methodology, setup and LabView program for accurate absolute thermoelectric power and electrical resistivity measurements between 25 and 1600 K: application to pure copper, platinum, tungsten, and nickel at very high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Abadlia, L; Gasser, F; Khalouk, K; Mayoufi, M; Gasser, J G

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we describe an experimental setup designed to measure simultaneously and very accurately the resistivity and the absolute thermoelectric power, also called absolute thermopower or absolute Seebeck coefficient, of solid and liquid conductors/semiconductors over a wide range of temperatures (room temperature to 1600 K in present work). A careful analysis of the existing experimental data allowed us to extend the absolute thermoelectric power scale of platinum to the range 0-1800 K with two new polynomial expressions. The experimental device is controlled by a LabView program. A detailed description of the accurate dynamic measurement methodology is given in this paper. We measure the absolute thermoelectric power and the electrical resistivity and deduce with a good accuracy the thermal conductivity using the relations between the three electronic transport coefficients, going beyond the classical Wiedemann-Franz law. We use this experimental setup and methodology to give new very accurate results for pure copper, platinum, and nickel especially at very high temperatures. But resistivity and absolute thermopower measurement can be more than an objective in itself. Resistivity characterizes the bulk of a material while absolute thermoelectric power characterizes the material at the point where the electrical contact is established with a couple of metallic elements (forming a thermocouple). In a forthcoming paper we will show that the measurement of resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power characterizes advantageously the (change of) phase, probably as well as DSC (if not better), since the change of phases can be easily followed during several hours/days at constant temperature.

  14. Enhanced performance of CdS/CdTe thin-film devices through temperature profiling techniques applied to close-spaced sublimation deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaonan Li; Sheldon, P.; Moutinho, H.; Matson, R.

    1996-05-01

    The authors describe a methodology developed and applied to the close-spaced sublimation technique for thin-film CdTe deposition. The developed temperature profiles consisted of three discrete temperature segments, which the authors called the nucleation, plugging, and annealing temperatures. They have demonstrated that these temperature profiles can be used to grow large-grain material, plug pinholes, and improve CdS/CdTe photovoltaic device performance by about 15%. The improved material and device properties have been obtained while maintaining deposition temperatures compatible with commercially available substrates. This temperature profiling technique can be easily applied to a manufacturing environment by adjusting the temperature as a function of substrate position instead of time.

  15. Expression profiling of potato cultivars with contrasting tuberization at elevated temperature using microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anupama; Siddappa, Sunderasha; Bhardwaj, Vinay; Singh, Brajesh; Kumar, Devendra; Singh, Bir Pal

    2015-12-01

    Temperature is one of the most significant factors affecting potato yield. Night temperature beyond 18-22 °C drastically reduces tuber formation, constraining potato cultivation in tropics and subtropics. Identification of genes and pathways affected by high temperature is crucial for developing thermo tolerant cultivars for these regions. In the present study, two cultivars with contrasting tuberization behavior at night temperatures (24 °C) were selected for gene expression analysis using a customized microarray chip representing 39,031 potato genes. A total of 2500 genes were differentially expressed on 21 d and 4096 genes on 14 d after stress. Gene ontology and pathway analysis provided insights into the probable biological processes and pathways governing tuberization at elevated temperature. Pathway maps were constructed to graphically represent the gene expression patterns. Genes associated with photosynthesis, hormonal activity, sugar transporters and transcription factors were differentially expressed. The results are presented and discussed in terms of tuberization at high temperature. The effect of high temperature on expression of genes controlling tuberization was also analyzed. This study provided useful information on potato tuberization at elevated temperature and make available a framework for further investigations into heat stress in potato.

  16. Effect of rotation on the temperature profile of turbulent convection with a Prandtl number Pr = 12 . 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ping; Ahlers, Guenter

    2014-11-01

    We report on the influence of rotation about a vertical axis on the temperature profiles and the large-scale circulations (LSC) of turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) in a cylindrical sample with aspect ratio Γ = D / L = 1 . 00 (D is the diameter and L the height). The working fluid was a fluorocarbon at a mean temperature Tm =25° C with a Prandtl number Pr = 12 . 3 . The measurements covered the Rayleigh-number range 2 ×1010 <= Ra <= 2 ×1011 and the inverse Rossby number range 0 <= 1 / Ro <= 9 . With weak rotation the temperature in the fluid varied as A × ln (z / L) + B , where z is the distance from the bottom or top plate. For 1 / Ro >= 1 . 2 we found that the temperature varied linearly with z. The temperature signature of the LSC along the sidewall was detectable up to 1 / Ro ~= 0 . 5 . Retrograde rotation of the LSC was observed. The LSC temperature amplitude first decreased and then remained constant up to the critical inverse Rossby number 1 / Roc for the onset of Ekman-vortex formation, and then decreased again. Supported by NSF Grant DMR11-58514.

  17. Global profiling of influence of intra-ischemic brain temperature on gene expression in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Megumi Sugahara; Asai, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Koichi; Nishida, Yayoi; Nagata, Toshihito; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2008-06-01

    Mild to moderate differences in brain temperature are known to greatly affect the outcome of cerebral ischemia. The impact of brain temperature on ischemic disorders has been mainly evaluated through pathological analysis. However, no comprehensive analyses have been conducted at the gene expression level. Using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray, we screened 24000 genes in the hippocampus under hypothermic (32 degrees C), normothermic (37 degrees C), and hyperthermic (39 degrees C) conditions in a rat ischemia-reperfusion model. When the ischemic group at each intra-ischemic brain temperature was compared to a sham-operated control group, genes whose expression levels changed more than three-fold with statistical significance could be detected. In our screening condition, thirty-three genes (some of them novel) were obtained after screening, and extensive functional surveys and literature reviews were subsequently performed. In the hypothermic condition, many neuroprotective factor genes were obtained, whereas cell death- and cell damage-associated genes were detected as the brain temperature increased. At all intra-ischemic brain temperatures, multiple molecular chaperone genes were obtained. The finding that intra-ischemic brain temperature affects the expression level of many genes related to neuroprotection or neurotoxicity coincides with the different pathological outcomes at different brain temperatures, demonstrating the utility of the genetic approach.

  18. The interrelationships between wound management, thermal stress, energy metabolism, and temperature profiles of patients with burns.

    PubMed

    Wallace, B H; Caldwell, F T; Cone, J B

    1994-01-01

    This prospective randomized study was performed to evaluate the metabolic and thermal responsiveness of patients with burns to thermal stress with three protocols of wound care: group I (n = 7) treated with dressings and variable ambient temperature selected for patients subjective comfort; group II (n = 7) treated without dressings and variable ambient temperature for patient comfort; group III (n = 6) treated without dressings and ambient temperature of 25 degrees C, electromagnetic heaters were set to achieve patient subjective comfort; and group IV (n = 6) healthy volunteers. After baseline partitional calorimetry was performed, individual patients were cold-challenged while subjectively comfortable by sequentially lowering either the ambient temperature or the output from the electromagnetic heaters. Heat balance and temperatures were obtained after each perturbation in external energy support. For patients in groups I and II, subjective perception of thermal comfort (warm, neutral, neutral and fed, cool, or cold) was more strongly correlated (p < 0.02) with the changes in the rate of heat production than the actual ambient temperature. For patients treated with electromagnetic heaters, changes in heat production were most strongly correlated with the energy output from the electromagnetic heaters. Even though the environmental conditions required to achieve a particular level of comfort are quite different between treatment groups, the difference in temperature between the patient's surface and ambient is approximately the same for groups I, II, and IV for each subjective state.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Measurements of ion and electron temperature profiles on NSTX with an X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitter, M.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Gu, M. F.

    2005-10-01

    The prototype of a new X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer has been installed on NSTX to measure profiles of the ion and electron temperatures from spatially resolved dielectronic satellite spectra of ArXVII in the wavelength range from 3.9 to 4.0 A [1]. The spectrometer consists of a spherically bent 110-quartz crystal, with a radius of curvature of 389 cm and a diameter of 10 cm, and a 10 cm x 30 cm, two-dimensional, position-sensitive, multi-wire proportional counter. It projects an image of a large area of the plasma with an extension of +/- 40 cm below and above the horizontal mid-plane of NSTX onto the detector with a demagnification of 2.5. The resolution in the plasma is solely determined by the Bragg angle, the height of the crystal and its distance from the plasma; and it is about 3 cm, if the crystal is fully opened. The concept of this new spectrometer is also of interest for ion temperature measurements on ITER [2]. The paper will present results from profile measurements of the ion and electron temperature from NSTX discharges with pure ohmic heating as well as RF and neutral-beam heating. [1] M. Bitter et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum.75, 3660 (2004); [2] R. Barnsley et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum.75, 3743 (2004).

  20. Temperature dependence of mode conversion in warm, unmagnetized plasmas with a linear density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Dae Jung; Lee, Dong-Hun; Kim, Kihong

    2013-06-15

    We study theoretically the linear mode conversion between electromagnetic waves and Langmuir waves in warm, stratified, and unmagnetized plasmas, using a numerically precise calculation based on the invariant imbedding method. We verify that the principle of reciprocity for the forward and backward mode conversion coefficients holds precisely regardless of temperature. We also find that the temperature dependence of the mode conversion coefficient is substantially stronger than that previously reported. Depending on the wave frequency and the incident angle, the mode conversion coefficient is found to increase or decrease with the increase of temperature.

  1. The electromagnetic force field, fluid flow field and temperature profiles in levitated metal droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Kaddah, N.; Szekely, J.

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical representation was developed for the electromagnetic force field, the flow field, the temperature field (and for transport controlled kinetics), in a levitation melted metal droplet. The technique of mutual inductances was employed for the calculation of the electromagnetic force field, while the turbulent Navier - Stokes equations and the turbulent convective transport equations were used to represent the fluid flow field, the temperature field and the concentration field. The governing differential equations, written in spherical coordinates, were solved numerically. The computed results were in good agreement with measurements, regarding the lifting force, and the average temperature of the specimen and carburization rates, which were transport controlled.

  2. Ion temperature profiles in front of a negative planar electrode studied by a one-dimensional two-fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyergyek, T.; Kovačič, J.

    2016-06-01

    Plasma-wall transition is studied by a one-dimensional steady state two-fluid model. Continuity and momentum exchange equations are used for the electrons, while the continuity, momentum exchange, and energy transport equation are used for the ions. Electrons are assumed to be isothermal. The closure of ion equations is made by the assumption that the heat flux is zero. The model equations are solved for potential, ion and electron density, and velocity and ion temperature as independent variables. The model includes coulomb collisions between ions and electrons and charge exchange collisions between ions and neutral atoms of the same species and same mass. The neutral atoms are assumed to be essentially at rest. The model is solved for finite ratio ɛ = /λ D L between the Debye length and λD and ionization length L in the pre-sheath and in the sheath at the same time. Charge exchange collisions heat the ions in the sheath and the pre-sheath. Even a small increase of the frequency of charge exchange collisions causes a substantial increase of ion temperature. Coulomb collisions have negligible effect on ion temperature in the pre-sheath, while in the sheath they cause a small cooling of ions. The increase of ɛ causes the increase of ion temperature. From the ion density and temperature profiles, the polytropic function κ is calculated according to its definition given by Kuhn et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 013503 (2006)]. The obtained profiles of κ indicate that the ion flow is isothermal only in a relatively narrow region in the pre-sheath, while close to the sheath edge and in the sheath it is closer to adiabatic. The ion sound velocity is space dependent and exhibits a maximum. This maximum indicates the location of the sheath edge only in the limit ɛ → 0 .

  3. Investigation of breadboard temperature profiling system for SSME fuel preburner diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirley, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of measuring temperatures in the space shuttle main engine (SSME) fuel preburner using spontaneous Raman scattering from molecular hydrogen was studied. Laser radiation is transmitted to the preburner through a multimode optical fiber. Backscattered Raman-shifted light is collected and focused into a second fiber which connects to a remote-located spectrograph and a mutlichannel optical detector. Optics collimate and focus laser light from the transmitter fiber defining the probe volume. The high pressure, high temperature preburner environment was simulated by a heated pressure cell. Temperatures determined by the distribution of Q-branch co-vibrational transitions demonstrate precision and accuracy of 3%. It is indicated heat preburner temperatures can be determined with 5% accuracy with spatial resolution less than 1 cm and temporal resolution of 10 millisec at the nominal preburner operation conditions.

  4. Atmospheric Stability & Turbulence from Temperature Profiles over Sicily During Summer 2002 & 2003 HASI Balloon Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombatti, G.; Ferri, F.; Angrilli, F.; Fulchignoni, M.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental results and interpretation of the temperature measurements data retrieved during the balloon campaigns (in 2002 and in 2003) for testing HASI (Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument), launched from the Italian Space Agency Base in Trapani (Sicily), are presented. Both ascending and descending phases are analysed; data reveal interesting features near the tropopause (present in the region between 11km-14km), where temperature cooling can be related to layers with strong winds (2002 flight); in the troposphere a multistratified structure of the temperature field is observed and discussed (particularly in the 2003 flight) Finally, stability and turbulence of the atmosphere are analysed; the buoyancy N2 parameters for both the flights show lowers value respect to standard tropospheric values corresponding to a lower stability of the atmosphere; still there is a higher stability above the tropopause. The energy spectrum of temperature data is consistent with the Kolmogorov theory: the characteristic k(sup -5/3) behaviour is reproduced.

  5. Potential profile near singularity point in kinetic Tonks-Langmuir discharges as a function of the ion sources temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, L.; Tskhakaya, D. D.; Jelić, N.

    2011-05-01

    A plasma-sheath transition analysis requires a reliable mathematical expression for the plasma potential profile Φ(x) near the sheath edge xs in the limit ɛ ≡λD/ℓ =0 (where λD is the Debye length and ℓ is a proper characteristic length of the discharge). Such expressions have been explicitly calculated for the fluid model and the singular (cold ion source) kinetic model, where exact analytic solutions for plasma equation (ɛ =0) are known, but not for the regular (warm ion source) kinetic model, where no analytic solution of the plasma equation has ever been obtained. For the latter case, Riemann [J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 24, 493 (1991)] only predicted a general formula assuming relatively high ion-source temperatures, i.e., much higher than the plasma-sheath potential drop. Riemann's formula, however, according to him, never was confirmed in explicit solutions of particular models (e.g., that of Bissell and Johnson [Phys. Fluids 30, 779 (1987)] and Scheuer and Emmert [Phys. Fluids 31, 3645 (1988)]) since "the accuracy of the classical solutions is not sufficient to analyze the sheath vicinity" [Riemann, in Proceedings of the 62nd Annual Gaseous Electronic Conference, APS Meeting Abstracts, Vol. 54 (APS, 2009)]. Therefore, for many years, there has been a need for explicit calculation that might confirm the Riemann's general formula regarding the potential profile at the sheath edge in the cases of regular very warm ion sources. Fortunately, now we are able to achieve a very high accuracy of results [see, e.g., Kos et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 093503 (2009)]. We perform this task by using both the analytic and the numerical method with explicit Maxwellian and "water-bag" ion source velocity distributions. We find the potential profile near the plasma-sheath edge in the whole range of ion source temperatures of general interest to plasma physics, from zero to "practical infinity." While within limits of "very low" and "relatively high" ion source temperatures

  6. Metabolite profiling reveals temperature effects on the VOCs and flavonoids of different plant populations.

    PubMed

    Goh, H-H; Khairudin, K; Sukiran, N A; Normah, M N; Baharum, S N

    2016-01-01

    Temperature is one of the key factors in limiting the distribution of plants and controlling major metabolic processes. A series of simulated reciprocal transplant experiments were performed to investigate the effect of temperature on plant chemical composition. Polygonum minus of different lowland and highland origin were grown under a controlled environment with different temperature regimes to study the effects on secondary metabolites. We applied gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify the chemical compounds. A total of 37 volatile organic compounds and 85 flavonoids were detected, with the largest response observed in the compositional changes of aldehydes and terpenes in highland plants under higher temperature treatment. Significantly less anthocyanidin compounds and larger amounts of flavonols were detected under higher temperature treatment. We also studied natural variation in the different plant populations growing under the same environment and identified compounds unique to each population through metabolite fingerprinting. This study shows that the origin of different plant populations influences the effects of temperature on chemical composition. PMID:26417881

  7. Temperature-dependent dielectric properties and line profile analysis of zinc-substituted copper ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamani, A. R.; Jayanna, H. S.; Naveen, C. S.; Rajeeva, M. P.; Prasanna, G. D.; Chaturmukha, V. S.; Harish, B. M.; Suresh, S.; Avinash, B. S.

    2016-05-01

    Temperature dependence of dielectric constant and loss has been investigated for different compositions of Zinc substituted copper ferrites with general formula Cu1-xZnxFe2O4 (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0) prepared by ceramic method. XRD analysis confirms all the samples exhibit single phase cubic spinel structure. The dielectric constant and loss of the sample were studied in the temperature ranges from RT to 1000K at different constant frequency. Samples of the composition with x = 0.8 show low dielectric loss up to a measured temperature around 770 °C at higher frequencies as compared to samples of other compositions. A plot of dielectric constant versus temperature shows a transition near the Curie temperature, an attempt is made to explain the possible mechanism for this observation. The dielectric constant increases slowly from 309°C to 770°C with temperature in the beginning and sharply decreases with increase in frequency for all the samples. The variation of tanδ with frequency shows cusps for all the samples except for x = 0.6. These variations have been explained on the basis of Koop's phenomenological theory. The variation of dielectric loss tangent with frequency showed maxima for the 1 KHz. These maxima are also found to shift towards low-frequency region as the content of Zn increases.

  8. Retrieving Temperature and Moisture Profiles from AERI Radiance Observations: AERIPROF Value-Added Product Technical Description Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    WF Feltz; HB Howell; RO Knuteson; JM Comstock; R Mahon; DD Turner; WL Smith; HM Woolf; C Sivaraman; TD Halter

    2007-04-30

    This document explains the procedure to retrieve temperature and moisture profiles from high-spectral resolution infrared radiance data measured by the U.S. Department Of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation (ARM) Program’s atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) instrument. The technique has been named the AERIPROF thermodynamic retrieval algorithm. The software has been developed over the last decade at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has matured into an ARM Value-Added Procedure. This document will describe the AERIPROF retrieval procedure, outline the algorithm routines, discuss the software heritage, and, finally, provide references with further documentation.

  9. Radial profile measurement of electron temperature in edge stochastic magnetic field layer of LHD using intensity ratio of extreme ultraviolet line emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Erhui; Morita, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Masahiko; Murakami, Izumi; Goto, Motoshi; Dong Chunfeng

    2012-10-15

    Vertical profile of neon line emissions in 30-650 A wavelength range has been observed in horizontally elongated plasma cross section of Large Helical Device (LHD). Intensity ratio between the neon line emissions is studied to measure the radial profile of electron temperature in the edge stochastic magnetic field layer of LHD. The edge temperature profile successfully obtained from the line ratio of NeVIII 2s-3p to 2p-3s transitions is compared with the simulation based on three-dimensional edge transport code. The result shows a reasonably good agreement with the edge temperature profile analyzed from atomic data and analysis structure code. The electron temperature at last closed flux surface measured from the intensity ratio is also in good agreement with that measured from Thomson scattering.

  10. Temperature profiles from Salt Valley, Utah, thermal conductivity of 10 samples from drill hole DOE 3, and preliminary estimates of heat flow

    SciTech Connect

    Sass, J.H.; Lachenbruch, A.H.; Smith, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    As part of a thermal study of the Salt Valley anticline, Paradox Basin, Utah, temperature profiles were obtained in nine wells drilled by the Department of Energy. Thermal conductivities were also measured on ten samples judged to be representative of the rocks encountered in the deepest hole (DOE 3) (R. J. Hite, personal communication, November 21, 1980). In this interim report, the temperature profiles and thermal conductivities are presented, together with some preliminary interpretive remarks and some suggestions for additional work.

  11. First measurement of time evolution of electron temperature profiles with Nd:YAG Thomson scattering system on Heliotron J

    SciTech Connect

    Kenmochi, N. Tei, S.; Zang, L.; Ohtani, Y.; Kasajima, K.; Minami, T.; Takahashi, C.; Mizuuchi, T.; Kobayashi, S.; Nagasaki, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Okada, H.; Kado, S.; Yamamoto, S.; Ohshima, S.; Konoshima, S.; Shi, N.; Sano, F.

    2014-11-15

    A Nd:YAG Thomson scattering system has been developed for Heliotron J. The system consists of two 550 mJ 50 Hz lasers, large collection optics, and 25 radial channel (∼1 cm spatial resolution) interference polychromators. This measurement system achieves a S/N ratio of ∼50 for low-density plasma (n{sub e} ∼ 0.5 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}). A time evolution of electron temperature profiles was measured with this system for a high-intensity gas-puff (HIGP) fueling neutral-beam-injection plasma. The peripheral temperature of the higher-density phase after HIGP recovers to the low-density pre-HIGP level, suggesting that improving particle transport in the HIGP plasma may be possible.

  12. Experimental observation of the influence of furnace temperature profile on convection and segregation in the vertical Bridgman crystal growth technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, G. T.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Azulene-doped naphtalene was directionally solidified using the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. Doping homogeneity and convection are determined as a function of the temperature profile in the furnace and the freezing rate. Convective velocities are two orders of magnitude lower when the temperature increases with height. The cross sectional variation in azulene concentration tends to be asymmetric. Neither rotation of the ampoule nor deliberate introduction of thermal asymmetries during solidification had a significant influence on cross sectional variations in doping. It is predicted that slow directional solidification under microgravity conditions can produce greater inhomogeneities than on earth. Thus when low freezing rates are necessary in order to avoid constitutional supercooling, it may be necessary to combine microgravity and magnetic fields in order to achieve homogeneous crystals.

  13. Simulation of fluidized bed combustors. I - Combustion efficiency and temperature profile. [for coal-fired gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horio, M.; Wen, C. Y.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical engineering analysis is made of fluidized-bed combustor (FBC) performance, with FBC models developed to aid estimation of combustion efficiency and axial temperature profiles. The FBC is intended for combustion of pulverized coal and a pressurized FBC version is intended for firing gas turbines by burning coal. Transport phenomena are analyzed at length: circulation, mixing models, drifting, bubble wake lift, heat transfer, division of the FB reactor into idealized mixing cells. Some disadvantages of a coal FBC are pointed out: erosion of immersed heat-transfer tubing, complex feed systems, carryover of unburned coal particles, high particulate emission in off-streams. The low-temperature bed (800-950 C) contains limestone, and flue-gas-entrained SO2 and NOx can be kept within acceptable limits.

  14. Temperature profiling of pulverized coal flames using multicolor pyrometric and digital imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, G.; Yan, Y.

    2006-08-15

    This paper presents an imaging-based multicolor pyrometric system for the monitoring of temperature and its distribution in a coal-fired flame. A novel optical splitting/filtering device is designed and used to split the light of flame into three beams at three selected wavelengths as required in the multicolor principle. A high-resolution charge-coupled device camera is employed to collect the three beams of the light of flame. The three resulting images provide the basis for the determination of temperature and its distribution in the flame field. The system is evaluated on a 0.5-MWth coal-fired combustion test facility under various combustion conditions. Results obtained demonstrate that the system is capable of measuring the temperature and its distribution concurrently in the flame field. Quantitative relationships between the measured results and the main combustion process data are also discussed.

  15. Reconstructing thermal properties of firn at Summit, Greenland from a temperature profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, A. L.; Hawley, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Thermodynamic properties of firn are important factors when considering energy balance and temperature-dependent physical processes in the near-surface of glaciers. Of particular interest is thermal diffusivity, which can take a range of values and which governs both the temperature gradient and its evolution through time. Given that temperature is a well-established driver of firn densification, a better understanding of heat transfer will permit greater accuracy in the compaction models essential for interpreting inter-annual and seasonal ice surface elevation changes detected by airborne and satellite altimetry. Due to its dependence on microstructure, diffusivity can vary significantly by location. Rather than directly measuring diffusivity or one of its proxies (e.g. density, hardness, shear strength), this study inverts the heat equation to reconstruct diffusivity values. This is a less logistically-intensive approach which circumvents many of the challenges associated with imperfect proxies and snow metamorphism during measurement. Hourly records (May 2004 - July 2008) from 8 thermistors placed in the top 10 m at Summit, Greenland provide temperature values for Summit's firn, which is broadly representative of firn across the ice sheet's dry snow zone. In this study, we use both physical analysis and a finite-difference numerical model to determine a diffusivity magnitude and gradient; we find that diffusivity of Summit firn falls in the lower end of the range expected from local density and temperature conditions alone (i.e. 15 - 36 m^2/a for firn at -30C). Further, we assess the utility of our modeling approach, explore the validity of assuming bulk conductive heat transfer when modeling temperature changes in non-homogeneous firn, and investigate the implications of a low-end diffusivity value for surface compaction modeling in Greenland.

  16. Atmospheric Heating by Saharan Dust and Its Implication on the Temperature Profiles over the Tropical Cyclone Main Development Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S.; Dessler, A. E.; Mahowald, N.; Yang, P.; Feng, Q.

    2007-12-01

    We have investigated anomalies in atmospheric temperature profiles that are associated with Saharan dust over the tropical cyclone main development region (10°-20°N, 20°-30°W), using temperature data from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and aerosol data from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We find that Saharan dust is associated with a vertical temperature structure that has a warm anomaly lying above the marine boundary layer (~850 hPa) and a cold anomaly throughout the middle troposphere (~350-600 hPa). We then estimate dynamical and dust radiative heating of the atmospheric column. The dynamical heating is estimated using wind and temperature data from NCEP reanalysis, while the dust radiative heating is computed using the NASA/GSFC CLIRAD radiative transfer model for both shortwave and longwave. Dust particle size distributions and vertical concentration profiles for use in the radiative transfer calculations are prescribed according to the simulation of the MATCH dust transport model. The warm anomaly in the lower tropsphere can be explained by the dynamical and dust radiative heating. For air columns with aerosol optical thickness greater than one, the dust heating rate is at least 20% of the dynamical heating rate in the lower troposphere. The cold anomaly in the middle troposphere cannot be explained by dynamical or radiative heating. Suppression of deep convection probably plays an essential role in cooling the middle troposphere over the dust layer by reduction of latent heat release. We will also investigate the sensitivity of dust radiative heating rate using assumed particle shapes for dust.

  17. Use of temperature profiles beneath streams to determine rates of vertical ground-water flow and vertical hydraulic conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lapham, Wayne W.

    1989-01-01

    The use of temperature profiles beneath streams to determine rates of vertical ground-water flow and effective vertical hydraulic conductivity of sediments was evaluated at three field sites by use of a model that numerically solves the partial differential equation governing simultaneous vertical flow of fluid and heat in the Earth. The field sites are located in Hardwick and New Braintree, Mass., and in Dover, N.J. In New England, stream temperature varies from about 0 to 25 ?C (degrees Celsius) during the year. This stream-temperature fluctuation causes ground-water temperatures beneath streams to fluctuate by more than 0.1 ?C during a year to a depth of about 35 ft (feet) in fine-grained sediments and to a depth of about 50 ft in coarse-grained sediments, if ground-water velocity is 0 ft/d (foot per day). Upward flow decreases the depth affected by stream-temperature fluctuation, and downward flow increases the depth. At the site in Hardwick, Mass., ground-water flow was upward at a rate of less than 0.01 ft/d. The maximum effective vertical hydraulic conductivity of the sediments underlying this site is 0.1 ft/d. Ground-water velocities determined at three locations at the site in New Braintree, Mass., where ground water discharges naturally from the underlying aquifer to the Ware River, ranged from 0.10 to 0.20 ft/d upward. The effective vertical hydraulic conductivity of the sediments underlying this site ranged from 2.4 to 17.1 ft/d. Ground-water velocities determined at three locations at the Dover, N.J., site, where infiltration from the Rockaway River into the underlying sediments occurs because of pumping, were 1.5 ft/d downward. The effective vertical hydraulic conductivity of the sediments underlying this site ranged from 2.2 to 2.5 ft/d. Independent estimates of velocity at two of the three sites are in general agreement with the velocities determined using temperature profiles. The estimates of velocities and conductivities derived from the

  18. 40 CFR 86.1229-85 - Dynamometer load determination and fuel temperature profile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... temperatures, such as solar loading, pavement heat, and relative wind velocities around and underneath the test.... (ii) Wind conditions shall be calm to light with maximum wind speed of 15 mph. In the case of temporary gusting, wind speeds between 15 and 25 mph may occur for up to 5 percent of the total driving...

  19. 40 CFR 86.1229-85 - Dynamometer load determination and fuel temperature profile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... temperatures, such as solar loading, pavement heat, and relative wind velocities around and underneath the test.... (ii) Wind conditions shall be calm to light with maximum wind speed of 15 mph. In the case of temporary gusting, wind speeds between 15 and 25 mph may occur for up to 5 percent of the total driving...

  20. Transcriptome profiling and expression analyses of genes critical to wheat adaptation to low temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: To identify the genes involved in the development of low temperature (LT) tolerance in hexaploid wheat, we examined the global changes in expression in response to cold of the 55,052 potentially unique genes represented in the Affymetrix Wheat Genome microarray. We compared the expressi...

  1. Temperature profiles and thermal losses in 150 W high-intensity discharge lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, J. J.; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Wang, J.

    2005-09-01

    A series of 150 W quartz metal-halide test lamps containing four different chemistries has been studied with optical emission spectroscopy and x-ray absorption imaging. The four chemistries are pure Hg, Hg-HgI2, Hg-NaI and Hg-NaI-DyI3. Core temperatures and comprehensive distributions of Hg vapour densities were measured and combined to obtain comprehensive gas temperature distributions. The concentrations of additives in these specially designed test lamps were found to be much smaller than is typical for a commercial metal-halide lamp. As a consequence, the core temperatures in all lamps are largely characteristic of a pure Hg discharge. The gas temperature distributions have been used to determine power losses resulting from thermal conduction through the Hg vapour. The fraction of total input power dissipated thermally was found to be 0.49 ± 0.01 in pure Hg, similar to published measurements for such lamps. In the Hg-NaI and Hg-NaI-DyI3 lamps, thermal losses are 0.41 ± 0.01 and 0.42 ± 0.01, respectively. The Hg-HgI2 lamp has thermal losses of 0.29 ± 0.03.

  2. Long Length, High-Density Carbon Nanotube Film Grown by Slope Control of Temperature Profile for Applications in Heat Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Akio; Murakami, Tomo; Nihei, Mizuhisa; Yokoyama, Naoki

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a new growth method for a film of dense, vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We varied the slope of the growth temperature profile between 450 and 800 °C. By using the method with an Fe/Ti catalyst, the filling factor of the CNT film was measured to be 0.28, which is 20 times denser than that in the case where conventional CVD growth is utilized. We name this growth method the slope control of temperature profile (STEP) growth. Another feature of CNT films obtained by STEP growth is their mirror like surfaces. This allows for the measurement of the thermal conductivity by a pulse optical heating thermoreflectance method. The maximum thermal conductivity of the STEP-grown CNT film was 260 W m-1 K-1, which is higher than those of a solder and Si. This result suggests that STEP-grown CNT films are effective heat dissipation materials and can be used as thermal interface material (TIM) and thermal through silicon via (TSV).

  3. Anisotropic Deviations from Fourier's Law in Si and MgO and the Importance of Temperature-Profile Extrema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Richard; Cahill, David

    2014-03-01

    Efforts to engineer thermal conductivity values by alloying, doping, or nanostructuring rely on a fundamental understanding of phonon-phonon and phonon-defect scattering. However, experimentally resolving phonon dynamics remains challenging. Recent studies demonstrate that time-domain thermoreflectance and frequency-domain thermoreflectance are sensitive to the mean-free-paths of heat-carrying phonons. The sensitivity of both techniques relies on the failure of Fourier theory when important length-scales of the temperature-profile become shorter than phonon mean-free-paths. However the correct interpretation of these experiments remains unclear. To address this issue, we characterize the relationship between the failure of Fourier's law, phonon mean-free-paths, important length-scales of the temperature-profile, and interfacial phonon scattering by performing extensive time-domain thermoreflectance experiments on Si, Si0.99Ge0.01, boron doped Si, and MgO crystals between 40 and 300 K. We find the failure of Fourier's law causes anisotropic thermal transport in Si and MgO despite cubic symmetry, and that in situations where Fourier's law fails, interfacial phonon scattering can affect the heat-current away from the interface.

  4. Model of a surface-wave discharge at atmospheric pressure with a fixed profile of the gas temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikovski, M.; Kiss'ovski, Zh; Tatarova, E.

    2016-03-01

    We present a 3D model of a surface-wave-sustained discharge at 2.45 GHz at atmospheric pressure. A small plasma source creates a plasma column in a dielectric tube and a plasma torch is observed above the top. The plasma parameters and the axial profile of the gas temperature are significantly changed in the presence of the substrate above the plasma torch. The Boltzmann equation for electrons under the local approximation is solved, together with the heavy particle balance equations at a fixed axial profile of the gas temperature. The model of this finite length plasma column includes also the dispersion relation of azimuthally-symmetric surface waves. A detailed collisional-radiative model is also implemented for argon discharge at atmospheric pressure, which includes 21 rate balance equations for excited Ar atoms [(Ar(1s5-1s2), Ar(2p10-2p1), Ar(2s3d), Ar(3p)], for positive Ar+ and Ar2 + ions and for excited molecules. The changes in the EEDF shape and the mean electron energy along the plasma column are investigated and the axial structures of the discharge and plasma parameters are obtained.

  5. Atmospheric temperature profiling in the presence of clouds with a pure rotational Raman lidar by use of an interference-filter-based polychromator.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, A; Reichardt, J

    2000-03-20

    A lidar polychromator design for the measurement of atmospheric temperature profiles in the presence of clouds with the rotational Raman method is presented. The design utilizes multicavity interference filters mounted sequentially at small angles of incidence. Characteristics of this design are high signal efficiency and adjustable center wavelengths of the filters combined with a stable and relatively simple experimental setup. High suppression of the elastic backscatter signal in the rotational Raman detection channels allows temperature measurements independent of the presence of thin clouds or aerosol layers; no influence of particle scattering on the lidar temperature profile was observed in clouds with a backscatter ratio of at least 45. The minimum integration time needed for temperature profiling with a statistical temperature error of +/-1 K at, e.g., 20-km height and 960-m height resolution is 1.5 h.

  6. Corrosion Resistant FBG-Based Quasi-Distributed Sensor for Crude Oil Tank Dynamic Temperature Profile Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Marques, Rogério; Prado, Adilson Ribeiro; da Costa Antunes, Paulo Fernando; de Brito André, Paulo Sérgio; Ribeiro, Moisés R. N.; Frizera-Neto, Anselmo; Pontes, Maria José

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a corrosion resistant, maneuverable, and intrinsically safe fiber Bragg grating (FBG)-based temperature optical sensor. Temperature monitoring is a critical activity for the oil and gas industry. It typically involves acquiring the desired parameters in a hazardous and corrosive environment. The use of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was proposed as a means of simultaneously isolating the optical fiber from the corrosive environment and avoiding undesirable mechanical tensions on the FBGs. The presented sensor head is based on multiple FBGs inscribed in a lengthy single mode fiber. The sensor presents an average thermal sensitivity of 8.82 ± 0.09 pm/°C, resulting in a typical temperature resolution of ~0.1 °C and an average time constant value of 6.25 ± 0.08 s. Corrosion and degradation resistance were verified by infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy during 90 days exposure to high salinity crude oil samples. The developed sensor was tested in a field pilot test, mimicking the operation of an inland crude tank, demonstrating its abilities to dynamically monitor temperature profile. PMID:26690166

  7. Measurements of electron temperature profiles on Alcator C-Mod using a novel energy-resolving x-ray camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, J.; Delgado, L.; Pablant, N.; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Efthimion, P.; Rice, J.

    2015-11-01

    The most common electron temperature diagnostics, Thomson Scattering (TS) and Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE), both require large diagnostic footprints and expensive optics. Another electron temperature diagnostic is the Pulse-Height-Analysis (PHA) system, which derives the electron temperature from the x-ray bremsstrahlung continuum. However, the main disadvantage of the PHA method is poor temporal resolution of the Si(Li) diode detectors. This paper presents a novel x-ray pinhole camera, which uses a pixilated Pilatus detector that allows single photon counting at a rate 2MHz per pixel and the setting of energy thresholds. The detector configuration is optimized by Shannon-sampling theory, such that spatial profiles of the x-ray continuum intensity can be obtained simultaneously for different energies, in the range from 4 to 16 keV. The exponential-like dependence of the x-ray intensity with photon energies is compared with a model describing the Be filter, attenuation in air, and detector efficiency, as well as different sets of energy thresholds. Electron temperature measurements are compared with TS and ECE measurements. This work was supported by the US DOE Contract No.DE-AC02-09CH11466 and the DoE Summer Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program.

  8. Corrosion Resistant FBG-Based Quasi-Distributed Sensor for Crude Oil Tank Dynamic Temperature Profile Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Marques, Rogério da Silva; Prado, Adilson Ribeiro; Antunes, Paulo Fernando da Costa; André, Paulo Sérgio de Brito; Ribeiro, Moisés R N; Frizera-Neto, Anselmo; Pontes, Maria José

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a corrosion resistant, maneuverable, and intrinsically safe fiber Bragg grating (FBG)-based temperature optical sensor. Temperature monitoring is a critical activity for the oil and gas industry. It typically involves acquiring the desired parameters in a hazardous and corrosive environment. The use of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was proposed as a means of simultaneously isolating the optical fiber from the corrosive environment and avoiding undesirable mechanical tensions on the FBGs. The presented sensor head is based on multiple FBGs inscribed in a lengthy single mode fiber. The sensor presents an average thermal sensitivity of 8.82 ± 0.09 pm/°C, resulting in a typical temperature resolution of ~0.1 °C and an average time constant value of 6.25 ± 0.08 s. Corrosion and degradation resistance were verified by infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy during 90 days exposure to high salinity crude oil samples. The developed sensor was tested in a field pilot test, mimicking the operation of an inland crude tank, demonstrating its abilities to dynamically monitor temperature profile. PMID:26690166

  9. Experimental observation of the influence of furnace temperature profile on convection and segregation in the vertical Bridgman crystal growth technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, G. T.; Wilcox, William R.

    1992-01-01

    Azulene-doped naphthalene was directionally solidified during the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. Doping homogeneity and convection were determined as a function of the temperature profile in the furnace and the freezing rate. Convection velocities were two orders of magnitude lower when the temperature increased with height. Rarely was the convection pattern axisymmetric, even though the temperature varied less than 0.1 K around the circumference of the growth ampoule. Correspondingly the cross sectional variation in azulene concentration tended to be asymmetric, especially when the temperature increased with height. This cross sectional variation changed dramatically along the ingot, reflecting changes in convection presumably due to the decreasing height of the melt. Although there was large scatter and irreproducibility in the cross sectional variation in doping, this variation tended to be least when the growth rate was low and the convection was vigorous. It is expected that compositional variations would also be small at high growth rates with weak convection and flat interfaces, although this was not investigated in the present experiments. Neither rotation of the ampoule nor deliberate introduction of thermal asymmetries during solidification had a significant influence on cross sectional variations in doping. It is predicted that slow directional solidification under microgravity conditions could produce greater inhomogeneities than on Earth. Combined use of microgravity and magnetic fields would be required to achieve homogeneity when it is necessary to freeze slowly in order to avoid constitutional supercooling.

  10. Distribution of sulphuric acid aerosols in the clouds and upper haze of Venus using Venus Express VAST and VeRa temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Christopher D.; Gao, Peter; Schulte, Rick; Bougher, Stephen W.; Yung, Yuk L.; Bardeen, Charles G.; Wilquet, Valérie; Vandaele, Ann Carine; Mahieux, Arnaud; Tellmann, Silvia; Pätzold, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Observations from Pioneer Venus and from SPICAV/SOIR aboard Venus Express (VEx) have shown the upper haze (UH) of Venus to be highly spatially and temporally variable, and populated by multiple particle size modes. Previous models of this system (e.g., Gao et al., 2014. Icarus 231, 83-98), using a typical temperature profile representative of the atmosphere (viz., equatorial VIRA profile), did not investigate the effect of temperature on the UH particle distributions. We show that the inclusion of latitude-dependent temperature profiles for both the morning and evening terminators of Venus helps to explain how the atmospheric aerosol distributions vary spatially. In this work we use temperature profiles obtained by two instruments onboard VEx, VeRa and SPICAV/SOIR, to represent the latitudinal temperature dependence. We find that there are no significant differences between results for the morning and evening terminators at any latitude and that the cloud base moves downwards as the latitude increases due to decreasing temperatures. The UH is not affected much by varying the temperature profiles; however, the haze does show some periodic differences, and is slightly thicker at the poles than at the equator. We also find that the sulphuric acid "rain" seen in previous models may be restricted to the equatorial regions of Venus, such that the particle size distribution is relatively stable at higher latitudes and at the poles.

  11. Temperature profiling of the atmospheric boundary layer with rotational Raman lidar during the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammann, E.; Behrendt, A.; Le Mounier, F.; Wulfmeyer, V.

    2015-03-01

    The temperature measurements of the rotational Raman lidar of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH RRL) during the High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2) Observation Prototype Experiment (HOPE) in April and May 2013 are discussed. The lidar consists of a frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm with 10 W average power at 50 Hz, a two-mirror scanner, a 40 cm receiving telescope, and a highly efficient polychromator with cascading interference filters for separating four signals: the elastic backscatter signal, two rotational Raman signals with different temperature dependence, and the vibrational Raman signal of water vapor. The main measurement variable of the UHOH RRL is temperature. For the HOPE campaign, the lidar receiver was optimized for high and low background levels, with a novel switch for the passband of the second rotational Raman channel. The instrument delivers atmospheric profiles of water vapor mixing ratio as well as particle backscatter coefficient and particle extinction coefficient as further products. As examples for the measurement performance, measurements of the temperature gradient and water vapor mixing ratio revealing the development of the atmospheric boundary layer within 25 h are presented. As expected from simulations, a reduction of the measurement uncertainty of 70% during nighttime was achieved with the new low-background setting. A two-mirror scanner allows for measurements in different directions. When pointing the scanner to low elevation, measurements close to the ground become possible which are otherwise impossible due to the non-total overlap of laser beam and receiving telescope field of view in the near range. An example of a low-level temperature measurement is presented which resolves the temperature gradient at the top of the stable nighttime boundary layer 100 m above the ground.

  12. Temperature profiling of the atmospheric boundary layer with rotational Raman lidar during the HD(CP)2 observational prototype experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammann, E.; Behrendt, A.; Le Mounier, F.; Wulfmeyer, V.

    2014-11-01

    The temperature measurements of the Rotational Raman Lidar of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH RRL) during the High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2 Prototype Experiment (HOPE) in April and May 2013 are discussed. The lidar consists of a frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm with 10 W average power at 50 Hz, a two-mirror scanner, a 40 cm receiving telescope and a highly efficient polychromator with cascading interference filters for separating four signals: the elastic backscatter signal, two rotational Raman signals with different temperature dependence, and the vibrational Raman signal of water vapor. The main measurement variable of the UHOH RRL is temperature. For the HOPE campaign, the lidar receiver was optimized for high and low background levels, respectively, with a novel switch for the passband of the second rotational Raman channel. The instrument delivers atmospheric profiles of water vapor mixing ratio as well as particle backscatter coefficient and particle extinction coefficient as further products. As examples for the measurement performance, measurements of the temperature gradient and water vapor mixing ratio revealing the development of the atmospheric boundary layer within 25 h are presented. As expected from simulations, a significant advance during nighttime was achieved with the new low-background setting. A two-mirror scanner allows for measurements in different directions. When pointing the scanner to low elevation, measurements close to the ground become possible which are otherwise impossible due to the non-total overlap of laser beam and receiving telescope field-of-view in the near range. We present an example of a low-level temperature measurement which resolves the temperature gradient at the top of the stable nighttime boundary layer a hundred meters above the ground.

  13. The timing of the human circadian clock is accurately represented by the core body temperature rhythm following phase shifts to a three-cycle light stimulus near the critical zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewett, M. E.; Duffy, J. F.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    A double-stimulus experiment was conducted to evaluate the phase of the underlying circadian clock following light-induced phase shifts of the human circadian system. Circadian phase was assayed by constant routine from the rhythm in core body temperature before and after a three-cycle bright-light stimulus applied near the estimated minimum of the core body temperature rhythm. An identical, consecutive three-cycle light stimulus was then applied, and phase was reassessed. Phase shifts to these consecutive stimuli were no different from those obtained in a previous study following light stimuli applied under steady-state conditions over a range of circadian phases similar to those at which the consecutive stimuli were applied. These data suggest that circadian phase shifts of the core body temperature rhythm in response to a three-cycle stimulus occur within 24 h following the end of the 3-day light stimulus and that this poststimulus temperature rhythm accurately reflects the timing of the underlying circadian clock.

  14. Frontal surveys with a towed profiling conductivity /temperature/depth measurement package (SeaSoar)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Raymond

    1986-10-01

    In April 1986, RV Oceanus participated in the Frontal Air-Sea Interaction Experiment (FASINEX1) in the region 27-29 N, 68-71 W. The objective was to survey a pronounced oceanic front2-4 and its effect on the oceanic and atmospheric boundary layers. Although moorings have yet to be recovered, and much of the data analysis is as yet only preliminary, it is possible to report here the typical density structure of a front as derived from SeaSoar5,6 (Fig. 1a) observations, which were analysed within a few hours of collection. Previously unreported detail is revealed, including subducted pycnostads (areas of weak vertical density gradient) with anomalous temperature/salinity signature, splitting of the frontal jet and three-dimensional structure not apparent in the surface temperature field.

  15. Reconstruction of soot temperature and volume fraction profiles of an asymmetric flame using stereoscopic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qun-xing; Wang, Fei; Liu, Dong; Ma, Zeng-yi; Yan, Jian-hua; Chi, Yong; Cen, Ke-fa

    2009-03-15

    The present study attempts to reconstruct soot temperature and volume fraction distributions for the asymmetric diffusive flame using a tomography technique. A high-resolution camera equipped with a stereo adapter was employed to capture stereoscopic flame images, which were used to obtain monochromatic line-of-sight flame emission projections within the visible range. A matrix-decomposition-based least squares algorithm was introduced to reconstruct the emission intensity distributions in the flame sections. The retrieved intensities were used to infer local soot temperature and volume fraction. Numerical assessments show that for soot volume fraction measurement, the system signal-to-noise ratio should be larger than 62.5 dB. The proposed tomography system was found to be capable of symmetric and asymmetric flame measurements. (author)

  16. Dopant profile control of epitaxial emitter for silicon solar cells by low temperature epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Donny; Tan, Yew Heng; Gunawan, Oki; He, Lining; Seng Tan, Chuan

    2011-07-01

    We report an alternative approach to grow phosphorus-doped epitaxial silicon emitter by rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition at low temperature (T ≥ 700 °C). A power conversion efficiency (PCE) of (6.6 ± 0.3)% and a pseudo PCE of (10.2 ± 0.2)% has been achieved for the solar cell with epi-emitter grown at 700 °C, in the absence of surface texturization, antireflective coating, and back surface field enhancement, without considering front contact shading. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy revealed that lower temperature silicon epitaxy yields a more abrupt p-n junction, suggesting potential applications for radial p-n junction wire array solar cells.

  17. Raman Investigation of Temperature Profiles of Phospholipid Dispersions in the Biochemistry Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Norman C.

    2015-06-01

    The temperature dependence of self-assembled, cell-like dispersions of phospholipids is investigated with Raman spectroscopy in the biochemistry laboratory. Vibrational modes in the hydrocarbon interiors of phospholipid bilayers are strongly Raman active, whereas the vibrations of the polar head groups and the water matrix have little Raman activity. From Raman spectra increases in fluidity of the hydrocarbon chains can be monitored with intensity changes as a function of temperature in the CH-stretching region. The experiment uses detection of scattered 1064-nm laser light (Nicolet NXR module) by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (Nicolet 6700). A thermoelectric heater-cooler device (Melcor) gives convenient temperature control from 5 to 95°C for samples in melting point capillaries. Use of deuterium oxide instead of water as the matrix avoids some absorption of the exciting laser light and interference with intensity observations in the CH-stretching region. Phospholipids studied range from dimyristoylphosphotidyl choline (C14, transition T = 24°C) to dibehenoylphosphotidyl choline (C22, transition T = 74°C).

  18. A versatile phenomenological model for the S-shaped temperature dependence of photoluminescence energy for an accurate determination of the exciton localization energy in bulk and quantum well structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, V. K.; Porwal, S.; Singh, S. D.; Sharma, T. K.; Ghosh, Sandip; Oak, S. M.

    2014-02-01

    Temperature dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) peak energy of bulk and quantum well (QW) structures is studied by using a new phenomenological model for including the effect of localized states. In general an anomalous S-shaped temperature dependence of the PL peak energy is observed for many materials which is usually associated with the localization of excitons in band-tail states that are formed due to potential fluctuations. Under such conditions, the conventional models of Varshni, Viña and Passler fail to replicate the S-shaped temperature dependence of the PL peak energy and provide inconsistent and unrealistic values of the fitting parameters. The proposed formalism persuasively reproduces the S-shaped temperature dependence of the PL peak energy and provides an accurate determination of the exciton localization energy in bulk and QW structures along with the appropriate values of material parameters. An example of a strained InAs0.38P0.62/InP QW is presented by performing detailed temperature and excitation intensity dependent PL measurements and subsequent in-depth analysis using the proposed model. Versatility of the new formalism is tested on a few other semiconductor materials, e.g. GaN, nanotextured GaN, AlGaN and InGaN, which are known to have a significant contribution from the localized states. A quantitative evaluation of the fractional contribution of the localized states is essential for understanding the temperature dependence of the PL peak energy of bulk and QW well structures having a large contribution of the band-tail states.

  19. A three-month comparison of hourly winds and temperatures from co-located 50-MHz and 915-MHz RASS profilers

    SciTech Connect

    Coulter, R.L.; Holdridge, D.J.

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has operated a 915-MHz and a 50-MHz radar wind profiler (boundary layer profiler (BLP) and tropospheric profiler (TP), respectively], each coupled with a Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) since April 1994 at its Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) central facility in north central Oklahoma. The dual system is designed to provide continuous wind profiles from near the surface to 12 km or more and virtual temperature profiles from near the surface to 6 km. Because the BLP has a larger antenna than many other 915-MHz systems, the wind profiles sampled by the two systems overlap between 1.5 km and 5.5 km. The two systems are adjacent, so the wind profilers sample almost identical air masses in their overlap region during the averaging period. Nevertheless, the two RASS systems can be compared, and methods can be devised to estimate the temperature profile in the inaccessible region. Data used in all comparisons and calculations discussed below are consensus-averaged values supplied by the profiler software. Although the spectra and moments from the data are available, they were not accessed for this analysis.

  20. Identification, classification, and expression profiles of heat shock transcription factors in tea plant (Camellia sinensis) under temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Wei; Wu, Zhi-Jun; Li, Xing-Hui; Huang, Ying; Li, Hui; Wang, Yong-Xin; Zhuang, Jing

    2016-01-15

    In vascular plants, heat shock transcription factors (Hsfs) regulate heat stress response by regulating the expression of heat shock proteins. This study systematically and comprehensively analyzed the Hsf family in tea plant [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze]. A total of 16 CsHsfs were identified from the transcriptome database of tea plant and analyzed for their phylogenetic relationships, motifs, and physicochemical characteristics. On the basis of the phylogenetic comparison of tea plant with Arabidopsis thaliana, Populus trichocarpa, Theobroma cacao, and Oryza sativa, the CsHsfs were classified into three classes, namely, A (56.25%), B (37.50%), and C (6.25%). Heat mapping showed that the expression profiles of CsHsf genes under non-stress conditions varied among four tea plant cultivars, namely, 'Yunnanshilixiang', 'Chawansanhao', 'Ruchengmaoyecha', and 'Anjibaicha'. Six CsHsf genes (CsHsfA1a, CsHsfA1b, CsHsfA6, CsHsfB1, CsHsfB2b, and CsHsfC1) were selected from classes A, B, and C to analyze the expression profiles of CsHsf genes through quantitative real-time PCR in 'Yingshuang', 'Anjibaicha', and 'Yunnanshilixiang' under high (38 °C) or low (4 °C) temperature stress. Temperature stress positively or negatively regulated all of the selected CsHsf genes, and the expression levels evidently varied even among CsHsf genes belonging to the same class. This study provided a relatively detailed summary of Hsfs in tea plant and may serve as a reference for further studies on the mechanism of temperature stress regulation by CsHsfs.

  1. Identification, classification, and expression profiles of heat shock transcription factors in tea plant (Camellia sinensis) under temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Wei; Wu, Zhi-Jun; Li, Xing-Hui; Huang, Ying; Li, Hui; Wang, Yong-Xin; Zhuang, Jing

    2016-01-15

    In vascular plants, heat shock transcription factors (Hsfs) regulate heat stress response by regulating the expression of heat shock proteins. This study systematically and comprehensively analyzed the Hsf family in tea plant [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze]. A total of 16 CsHsfs were identified from the transcriptome database of tea plant and analyzed for their phylogenetic relationships, motifs, and physicochemical characteristics. On the basis of the phylogenetic comparison of tea plant with Arabidopsis thaliana, Populus trichocarpa, Theobroma cacao, and Oryza sativa, the CsHsfs were classified into three classes, namely, A (56.25%), B (37.50%), and C (6.25%). Heat mapping showed that the expression profiles of CsHsf genes under non-stress conditions varied among four tea plant cultivars, namely, 'Yunnanshilixiang', 'Chawansanhao', 'Ruchengmaoyecha', and 'Anjibaicha'. Six CsHsf genes (CsHsfA1a, CsHsfA1b, CsHsfA6, CsHsfB1, CsHsfB2b, and CsHsfC1) were selected from classes A, B, and C to analyze the expression profiles of CsHsf genes through quantitative real-time PCR in 'Yingshuang', 'Anjibaicha', and 'Yunnanshilixiang' under high (38 °C) or low (4 °C) temperature stress. Temperature stress positively or negatively regulated all of the selected CsHsf genes, and the expression levels evidently varied even among CsHsf genes belonging to the same class. This study provided a relatively detailed summary of Hsfs in tea plant and may serve as a reference for further studies on the mechanism of temperature stress regulation by CsHsfs. PMID:26431998

  2. Toward accurate thermochemistry of the {sup 24}MgH, {sup 25}MgH, and {sup 26}MgH molecules at elevated temperatures: Corrections due to unbound states

    SciTech Connect

    Szidarovszky, Tamás; Császár, Attila G.

    2015-01-07

    The total partition functions Q(T) and their first two moments Q{sup ′}(T) and Q{sup ″}(T), together with the isobaric heat capacities C{sub p}(T), are computed a priori for three major MgH isotopologues on the temperature range of T = 100–3000 K using the recent highly accurate potential energy curve, spin-rotation, and non-adiabatic correction functions of Henderson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 117, 13373 (2013)]. Nuclear motion computations are carried out on the ground electronic state to determine the (ro)vibrational energy levels and the scattering phase shifts. The effect of resonance states is found to be significant above about 1000 K and it increases with temperature. Even very short-lived states, due to their relatively large number, have significant contributions to Q(T) at elevated temperatures. The contribution of scattering states is around one fourth of that of resonance states but opposite in sign. Uncertainty estimates are given for the possible error sources, suggesting that all computed thermochemical properties have an accuracy better than 0.005% up to 1200 K. Between 1200 and 2500 K, the uncertainties can rise to around 0.1%, while between 2500 K and 3000 K, a further increase to 0.5% might be observed for Q{sup ″}(T) and C{sub p}(T), principally due to the neglect of excited electronic states. The accurate thermochemical data determined are presented in the supplementary material for the three isotopologues of {sup 24}MgH, {sup 25}MgH, and {sup 26}MgH at 1 K increments. These data, which differ significantly from older standard data, should prove useful for astronomical models incorporating thermodynamic properties of these species.

  3. Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Menzel, W. Paul; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Gao, Bo-Cai; Platnick, Steven; Ackerman, Steven A.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Pincus, Robert; Hubanks, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is an earth-viewing sensor that flies on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellites, launched in 1999 and 2002, respectively. MODIS scans a swath width of 2330 km that is sufficiently wide to provide nearly complete global coverage every two days from a polar-orbiting, sun-synchronous, platform at an altitude of 705 km. MODIS provides images in 36 spectral bands between 0.415 and 14.235 pm with spatial resolutions of 250 m (2 bands), 500 m (5 bands) and 1000 m (29 bands). These bands have been carefully selected to en- able advanced studies of land, ocean, and atmospheric properties. Twenty-six bands are used to derive atmospheric properties such as cloud mask, atmospheric profiles, aerosol properties, total precipitable water, and cloud properties. In this paper we describe each of these atmospheric data products, including characteristics of each of these products such as file size, spatial