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Sample records for accurate thermal conductivity

  1. Accurate Thermal Conductivities from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbogno, Christian

    2015-03-01

    In spite of significant research efforts, a first-principles determination of the thermal conductivity at high temperatures has remained elusive. On the one hand, Boltzmann transport techniques that include anharmonic effects in the nuclear dynamics only perturbatively become inaccurate or inapplicable under such conditions. On the other hand, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) methods suffer from enormous finite-size artifacts in the computationally feasible supercells, which prevent an accurate extrapolation to the bulk limit of the thermal conductivity. In this work, we overcome this limitation by performing ab initio MD simulations in thermodynamic equilibrium that account for all orders of anharmonicity. The thermal conductivity is then assessed from the auto-correlation function of the heat flux using the Green-Kubo formalism. Foremost, we discuss the fundamental theory underlying a first-principles definition of the heat flux using the virial theorem. We validate our approach and in particular the techniques developed to overcome finite time and size effects, e.g., by inspecting silicon, the thermal conductivity of which is particularly challenging to converge. Furthermore, we use this framework to investigate the thermal conductivity of ZrO2, which is known for its high degree of anharmonicity. Our calculations shed light on the heat resistance mechanism active in this material, which eventually allows us to discuss how the thermal conductivity can be controlled by doping and co-doping. This work has been performed in collaboration with R. Ramprasad (University of Connecticut), C. G. Levi and C. G. Van de Walle (University of California Santa Barbara).

  2. Accurate calculation of conductive conductances in complex geometries for spacecrafts thermal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmendia, Iñaki; Anglada, Eva; Vallejo, Haritz; Seco, Miguel

    2016-02-01

    The thermal subsystem of spacecrafts and payloads is always designed with the help of Thermal Mathematical Models. In the case of the Thermal Lumped Parameter (TLP) method, the non-linear system of equations that is created is solved to calculate the temperature distribution and the heat power that goes between nodes. The accuracy of the results depends largely on the appropriate calculation of the conductive and radiative conductances. Several established methods for the determination of conductive conductances exist but they present some limitations for complex geometries. Two new methods are proposed in this paper to calculate accurately these conductive conductances: The Extended Far Field method and the Mid-Section method. Both are based on a finite element calculation but while the Extended Far Field method uses the calculation of node mean temperatures, the Mid-Section method is based on assuming specific temperature values. They are compared with traditionally used methods showing the advantages of these two new methods.

  3. Accurately simulating anisotropic thermal conduction on a moving mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Rahul; Springel, Volker; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Marinacci, Federico; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2016-05-01

    We present a novel implementation of an extremum preserving anisotropic diffusion solver for thermal conduction on the unstructured moving Voronoi mesh of the AREPO code. The method relies on splitting the one-sided facet fluxes into normal and oblique components, with the oblique fluxes being limited such that the total flux is both locally conservative and extremum preserving. The approach makes use of harmonic averaging points and a simple, robust interpolation scheme that works well for strong heterogeneous and anisotropic diffusion problems. Moreover, the required discretization stencil is small. Efficient fully implicit and semi-implicit time integration schemes are also implemented. We perform several numerical tests that evaluate the stability and accuracy of the scheme, including applications such as point explosions with heat conduction and calculations of convective instabilities in conducting plasmas. The new implementation is suitable for studying important astrophysical phenomena, such as the conductive heat transport in galaxy clusters, the evolution of supernova remnants, or the distribution of heat from black hole-driven jets into the intracluster medium.

  4. Towards more accurate molecular dynamics calculation of thermal conductivity: Case study of GaN bulk crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. W.; Aubry, S.; Jones, R. E.; Greenstein, A.; Schelling, P. K.

    2009-03-01

    Significant differences exist among literature for thermal conductivity of various systems computed using molecular dynamics simulation. In some cases, unphysical results, for example, negative thermal conductivity, have been found. Using GaN as an example case and the direct nonequilibrium method, extensive molecular dynamics simulations and Monte Carlo analysis of the results have been carried out to quantify the uncertainty level of the molecular dynamics methods and to identify the conditions that can yield sufficiently accurate calculations of thermal conductivity. We found that the errors of the calculations are mainly due to the statistical thermal fluctuations. Extrapolating results to the limit of an infinite-size system tend to magnify the errors and occasionally lead to unphysical results. The error in bulk estimates can be reduced by performing longer time averages using properly selected systems over a range of sample lengths. If the errors in the conductivity estimates associated with each of the sample lengths are kept below a certain threshold, the likelihood of obtaining unphysical bulk values becomes insignificant. Using a Monte Carlo approach developed here, we have determined the probability distributions for the bulk thermal conductivities obtained using the direct method. We also have observed a nonlinear effect that can become a source of significant errors. For the extremely accurate results presented here, we predict a [0001] GaN thermal conductivity of 185W/Km at 300 K, 102W/Km at 500 K, and 74W/Km at 800 K. Using the insights obtained in the work, we have achieved a corresponding error level (standard deviation) for the bulk (infinite sample length) GaN thermal conductivity of less than 10W/Km , 5W/Km , and 15W/Km at 300 K, 500 K, and 800 K, respectively.

  5. Thermal Conductivities in Solids from First Principles: Accurate Computations and Rapid Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbogno, Christian; Scheffler, Matthias

    In spite of significant research efforts, a first-principles determination of the thermal conductivity κ at high temperatures has remained elusive. Boltzmann transport techniques that account for anharmonicity perturbatively become inaccurate under such conditions. Ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) techniques using the Green-Kubo (GK) formalism capture the full anharmonicity, but can become prohibitively costly to converge in time and size. We developed a formalism that accelerates such GK simulations by several orders of magnitude and that thus enables its application within the limited time and length scales accessible in ab initio MD. For this purpose, we determine the effective harmonic potential occurring during the MD, the associated temperature-dependent phonon properties and lifetimes. Interpolation in reciprocal and frequency space then allows to extrapolate to the macroscopic scale. For both force-field and ab initio MD, we validate this approach by computing κ for Si and ZrO2, two materials known for their particularly harmonic and anharmonic character. Eventually, we demonstrate how these techniques facilitate reasonable estimates of κ from existing MD calculations at virtually no additional computational cost.

  6. Accurate measurements of cross-plane thermal conductivity of thin films by dual-frequency time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Puqing; Huang, Bin; Koh, Yee Kan

    2016-07-01

    Accurate measurements of the cross-plane thermal conductivity Λcross of a high-thermal-conductivity thin film on a low-thermal-conductivity (Λs) substrate (e.g., Λcross/Λs > 20) are challenging, due to the low thermal resistance of the thin film compared with that of the substrate. In principle, Λcross could be measured by time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR), using a high modulation frequency fh and a large laser spot size. However, with one TDTR measurement at fh, the uncertainty of the TDTR measurement is usually high due to low sensitivity of TDTR signals to Λcross and high sensitivity to the thickness hAl of Al transducer deposited on the sample for TDTR measurements. We observe that in most TDTR measurements, the sensitivity to hAl only depends weakly on the modulation frequency f. Thus, we performed an additional TDTR measurement at a low modulation frequency f0, such that the sensitivity to hAl is comparable but the sensitivity to Λcross is near zero. We then analyze the ratio of the TDTR signals at fh to that at f0, and thus significantly improve the accuracy of our Λcross measurements. As a demonstration of the dual-frequency approach, we measured the cross-plane thermal conductivity of a 400-nm-thick nickel-iron alloy film and a 3-μm-thick Cu film, both with an accuracy of ∼10%. The dual-frequency TDTR approach is useful for future studies of thin films. PMID:27475589

  7. Accurate measurements of cross-plane thermal conductivity of thin films by dual-frequency time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Puqing; Huang, Bin; Koh, Yee Kan

    2016-07-01

    Accurate measurements of the cross-plane thermal conductivity Λcross of a high-thermal-conductivity thin film on a low-thermal-conductivity (Λs) substrate (e.g., Λcross/Λs > 20) are challenging, due to the low thermal resistance of the thin film compared with that of the substrate. In principle, Λcross could be measured by time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR), using a high modulation frequency fh and a large laser spot size. However, with one TDTR measurement at fh, the uncertainty of the TDTR measurement is usually high due to low sensitivity of TDTR signals to Λcross and high sensitivity to the thickness hAl of Al transducer deposited on the sample for TDTR measurements. We observe that in most TDTR measurements, the sensitivity to hAl only depends weakly on the modulation frequency f. Thus, we performed an additional TDTR measurement at a low modulation frequency f0, such that the sensitivity to hAl is comparable but the sensitivity to Λcross is near zero. We then analyze the ratio of the TDTR signals at fh to that at f0, and thus significantly improve the accuracy of our Λcross measurements. As a demonstration of the dual-frequency approach, we measured the cross-plane thermal conductivity of a 400-nm-thick nickel-iron alloy film and a 3-μm-thick Cu film, both with an accuracy of ∼10%. The dual-frequency TDTR approach is useful for future studies of thin films.

  8. Accurate measurements of cross-plane thermal conductivity of thin films by dual-frequency time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Puqing; Huang, Bin; Koh, Yee Kan

    2016-07-01

    Accurate measurements of the cross-plane thermal conductivity Λcross of a high-thermal-conductivity thin film on a low-thermal-conductivity (Λs) substrate (e.g., Λcross/Λs > 20) are challenging, due to the low thermal resistance of the thin film compared with that of the substrate. In principle, Λcross could be measured by time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR), using a high modulation frequency fh and a large laser spot size. However, with one TDTR measurement at fh, the uncertainty of the TDTR measurement is usually high due to low sensitivity of TDTR signals to Λcross and high sensitivity to the thickness hAl of Al transducer deposited on the sample for TDTR measurements. We observe that in most TDTR measurements, the sensitivity to hAl only depends weakly on the modulation frequency f. Thus, we performed an additional TDTR measurement at a low modulation frequency f0, such that the sensitivity to hAl is comparable but the sensitivity to Λcross is near zero. We then analyze the ratio of the TDTR signals at fh to that at f0, and thus significantly improve the accuracy of our Λcross measurements. As a demonstration of the dual-frequency approach, we measured the cross-plane thermal conductivity of a 400-nm-thick nickel-iron alloy film and a 3-μm-thick Cu film, both with an accuracy of ˜10%. The dual-frequency TDTR approach is useful for future studies of thin films.

  9. Cermet fuel thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Peddicord, K.L. ); Alvis, J.M. Jr.; Thomas, J.K.

    1991-01-01

    Cermets have been proposed as a candidate fuel for space reactors for several reasons, including their potential for high thermal conductivity. However, there is currently no accepted model for cermet fuel thermal conductivity. The objective of the work reported in this paper was to (a) investigate the adequacy of existing models; (b) develop, if necessary, an improved model; and (c) provide recommendations for future work on cermet thermal conductivity. The results from this work indicate that further work is needed to accurately characterize cermet fuel thermal conductivity. It was determined that particle shape and orientation have a large impact on cermet thermal conductivity.

  10. Necessary Conditions for Accurate, Transient Hot-Wire Measurements of the Apparent Thermal Conductivity of Nanofluids are Seldom Satisfied

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, Konstantinos D.; Tertsinidou, Georgia J.; Assael, Marc J.; Wakeham, William A.

    2016-08-01

    The paper considers the conditions that are necessary to secure accurate measurement of the apparent thermal conductivity of two-phase systems comprising nanoscale particles of one material suspended in a fluid phase of a different material. It is shown that instruments operating according to the transient hot-wire technique can, indeed, produce excellent measurements when a finite element method (FEM) is employed to describe the instrument for the exact geometry of the hot wire. Furthermore, it is shown that an approximate analytic solution can be employed with equal success, over the time range of 0.1 s to 1 s, provided that (a) two wires are employed, so that end effects are canceled, (b) each wire is very thin, less than 30 \\upmu m diameter, so that the line source model and the corresponding corrections are valid, (c) low values of the temperature rise, less than 4 K, are employed in order to minimize the effect of convection on the heat transfer in the time of measurement of 1 s, and (d) insulated wires are employed for measurements in electrically conducting or polar liquids to avoid current leakage or other electrical distortions. According to these criteria, a transient hot-wire instrument has been designed, constructed, and employed for the measurement of the enhancement of the thermal conductivity of water when TiO2 or multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are added. These new results, together with a critical evaluation of other measurements, demonstrate the importance of proper implementation of the technique.

  11. Soft, thermally conductive material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon rubber filled with high percentage of silver-plated copper microspheres provides soft, thermally conductive seat for thermal switch. Material also could be used in thin sheet form to prevent corrosion between dissimilar metals while maintaining good thermal communication. It could be used as thermal gasketing.

  12. Thermal Contact Conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, Louis J.; Kittel, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The performance of cryogenic instruments is often a function of their operating temperature. Thus, designers of cryogenic instruments often are required to predict the operating temperature of each instrument they design. This requires accurate thermal models of cryogenic components which include the properties of the materials and assembly techniques used. When components are bolted or otherwise pressed together, a knowledge of the thermal performance of such joints are also needed. In some cases, the temperature drop across these joints represents a significant fraction of the total temperature difference between the instrument and its cooler. While extensive databases exist on the thermal properties of bulk materials, similar databases for pressed contacts do not. This has often lead to instrument designs that avoid pressed contacts or to the over-design of such joints at unnecessary expense. Although many people have made measurements of contact conductances at cryogenic temperatures, this data is often very narrow in scope and even more often it has not been published in an easily retrievable fashion, if published at all. This paper presents a summary of the limited pressed contact data available in the literature.

  13. Thermal conductivity of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vachon, R. I.; Kumar, G. N.; Khader, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    A value is described for the thermal conductivity of the frost layer and for the water-ice solid debris mixture. The value of the porous structure is discussed as a function of depth only. Graphs show thermal conductivity as a function of depth and temperature at constant porosity and density.

  14. Conducting a thermal conductivity survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, P. B.

    1985-01-01

    A physically transparent approximate theory of phonon decay rates is presented starting from a pair potential model of the interatomic forces in an insulator or semiconductor. The theory applies in the classical regime and relates the 3-phonon decay rate to the third derivative of the pair potential. Phonon dispersion relations do not need to be calculated, as sum rules relate all the needed quantities directly to the pair potential. The Brillouin zone averaged phonon lifetime turns out to involve a dimensionless measure of the anharmonicity multiplied by an effective density of states for 3-phonon decay. Results are given for rare gas and alkali halide crystals. For rare gases, the results are in good agreement with more elaborate perturbation calculations. Comparison to experimental data on phonon linewidths and thermal conductivity are made.

  15. Highly Thermal Conductive Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Ya-Ping (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Veca, Lucia Monica (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed are methods for forming carbon-based fillers as may be utilized in forming highly thermal conductive nanocomposite materials. Formation methods include treatment of an expanded graphite with an alcohol/water mixture followed by further exfoliation of the graphite to form extremely thin carbon nanosheets that are on the order of between about 2 and about 10 nanometers in thickness. Disclosed carbon nanosheets can be functionalized and/or can be incorporated in nanocomposites with extremely high thermal conductivities. Disclosed methods and materials can prove highly valuable in many technological applications including, for instance, in formation of heat management materials for protective clothing and as may be useful in space exploration or in others that require efficient yet light-weight and flexible thermal management solutions.

  16. Thermal conductivity of metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazem, Sayyed M.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to familiarize students with steady and unsteady heat transfer by conduction and with the effect of thermal conductivity upon temperature distribution through a homogeneous substance. The elementary heat conduction experiment presented is designed for associate degree technology students in a simple manner to enhance their intuition and to clarify many confusing concepts such as temperature, thermal energy, thermal conductivity, heat, transient and steady flows. The equipment set is safe, small, portable (10 kg) and relatively cheap (about $1200): the electric hot plate 2 kg (4.4 lb) for $175: the 24 channel selector and Thermocouple Digital Readout (Trendicator) 4.5 kg (10 lb) for about $1000; the three metal specimens (each of 2.5 cm diameter and 11 cm length), base plate and the bucket all about 3 kg (7 lb) for about $25. The experiment may take from 60 to 70 minutes. Although the hot plate surface temperature could be set from 90 to 370 C (maximum of 750 watts) it is a good practice to work with temperatures of 180 to 200 C (about 400 watts). They may experiment in squads of 2, 3 or even 4, or the instructor may demonstrate it for the whole class.

  17. Thermally conductive polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, N. R.; Jenkins, R. K.; Lister, J. L. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A thermally conductive polymer is provided having physical and chemical properties suited to use as a medium for potting electrical components. The polymer is prepared from hydroquinone, phenol, and formaldehyde, by conventional procedures employed for the preparation of phenol-formaldehyde resins. While the proportions of the monomers can be varied, a preferred polymer is formed from the monomers in a 1:1:2.4 molar or ratio of hydroquinone:phenol:formaldehyde.

  18. How Accurately can we Calculate Thermal Systems?

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D; Blomquist, R N; Dean, C; Heinrichs, D; Kalugin, M A; Lee, M; Lee, Y; MacFarlan, R; Nagaya, Y; Trkov, A

    2004-04-20

    I would like to determine how accurately a variety of neutron transport code packages (code and cross section libraries) can calculate simple integral parameters, such as K{sub eff}, for systems that are sensitive to thermal neutron scattering. Since we will only consider theoretical systems, we cannot really determine absolute accuracy compared to any real system. Therefore rather than accuracy, it would be more precise to say that I would like to determine the spread in answers that we obtain from a variety of code packages. This spread should serve as an excellent indicator of how accurately we can really model and calculate such systems today. Hopefully, eventually this will lead to improvements in both our codes and the thermal scattering models that they use in the future. In order to accomplish this I propose a number of extremely simple systems that involve thermal neutron scattering that can be easily modeled and calculated by a variety of neutron transport codes. These are theoretical systems designed to emphasize the effects of thermal scattering, since that is what we are interested in studying. I have attempted to keep these systems very simple, and yet at the same time they include most, if not all, of the important thermal scattering effects encountered in a large, water-moderated, uranium fueled thermal system, i.e., our typical thermal reactors.

  19. Thermal Conductivity of Coated Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, Lei L; Pan, Yun-Long; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Wang, Hsin; Peterson, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a method for measuring the thermal conductivity of paper using a hot disk system. To the best of our knowledge, few publications are found discussing the thermal conductivity of a coated paper although it is important to various forms of today s digital printing where heat is used for imaging as well as for toner fusing. This motivates us to investigate the thermal conductivity of paper coating. Our investigation demonstrates that thermal conductivity is affected by the coat weight and the changes in the thermal conductivity affect ink gloss and density. As the coat weight increases, the thermal conductivity increases. Both the ink gloss and density decrease as the thermal conductivity increases. The ink gloss appears to be more sensitive to the changes in the thermal conductivity.

  20. Thermal conductivity of thermal-battery insulations

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, R.A.; Moss, M.

    1995-08-01

    The thermal conductivities of a variety of insulating materials used in thermal batteries were measured in atmospheres of argon and helium using several techniques. (Helium was used to simulate the hydrogen atmosphere that results when a Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal battery ages.) The guarded-hot-plate method was used with the Min-K insulation because of its extremely low thermal conductivity. For comparison purposes, the thermal conductivity of the Min-K insulating board was also measured using the hot-probe method. The thermal-comparator method was used for the rigid Fiberfrax board and Fiberfrax paper. The thermal conductivity of the paper was measured under several levels of compression to simulate the conditions of the insulating wrap used on the stack in a thermal battery. The results of preliminary thermal-characterization tests with several silica aerogel materials are also presented.

  1. Accurate Thermal Stresses for Beams: Normal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Pilkey, Walter D.

    2003-01-01

    Formulations for a general theory of thermoelasticity to generate accurate thermal stresses for structural members of aeronautical vehicles were developed in 1954 by Boley. The formulation also provides three normal stresses and a shear stress along the entire length of the beam. The Poisson effect of the lateral and transverse normal stresses on a thermally loaded beam is taken into account in this theory by employing an Airy stress function. The Airy stress function enables the reduction of the three-dimensional thermal stress problem to a two-dimensional one. Numerical results from the general theory of thermoelasticity are compared to those obtained from strength of materials. It is concluded that the theory of thermoelasticity for prismatic beams proposed in this paper can be used instead of strength of materials when precise stress results are desired.

  2. Accurate Thermal Stresses for Beams: Normal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Pilkey, Walter D.

    2002-01-01

    Formulations for a general theory of thermoelasticity to generate accurate thermal stresses for structural members of aeronautical vehicles were developed in 1954 by Boley. The formulation also provides three normal stresses and a shear stress along the entire length of the beam. The Poisson effect of the lateral and transverse normal stresses on a thermally loaded beam is taken into account in this theory by employing an Airy stress function. The Airy stress function enables the reduction of the three-dimensional thermal stress problem to a two-dimensional one. Numerical results from the general theory of thermoelasticity are compared to those obtained from strength of materials. It is concluded that the theory of thermoelasticity for prismatic beams proposed in this paper can be used instead of strength of materials when precise stress results are desired.

  3. Shape memory thermal conduction switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, Rajan (Inventor); Krishnan, Vinu (Inventor); Notardonato, William U. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A thermal conduction switch includes a thermally-conductive first member having a first thermal contacting structure for securing the first member as a stationary member to a thermally regulated body or a body requiring thermal regulation. A movable thermally-conductive second member has a second thermal contacting surface. A thermally conductive coupler is interposed between the first member and the second member for thermally coupling the first member to the second member. At least one control spring is coupled between the first member and the second member. The control spring includes a NiTiFe comprising shape memory (SM) material that provides a phase change temperature <273 K, a transformation range <40 K, and a hysteresis of <10 K. A bias spring is between the first member and the second member. At the phase change the switch provides a distance change (displacement) between first and second member by at least 1 mm, such as 2 to 4 mm.

  4. Thermal conductivity of zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinwiddie, R. B.; Beecher, S. C.; Nagaraj, B. A.; Moore, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBC's is of primary importance. Physical vapor description (PVD) and plasma spraying (PS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The PS coatings were applied with either standard power or hollow sphere particles. The hollow sphere particles yielded a lower density and lower thermal conductivity coating. The thermal conductivity of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia, before and after thermal aging, will be compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increase upon being exposed to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. Sintering of the as fabricated plasma sprayed lamellar structure is observed by scanning electron microscopy of coatings isothermally heat treated at temperatures greater than 1100 C. During this sintering process the planar porosity between lamella is converted to a series of small spherical pores. The change in pore morphology is the primary reason for the observed increase in thermal conductivity. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, preliminary results suggest that they have a higher thermal conductivity than PS coatings, both before and after thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for partially stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia have been found to be less than for fully stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia coatings. The high temperature thermal diffusivity data indicates that if these coatings reach a temperature above

  5. Thermal conductivity of zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinwiddie, R. B.; Beecher, S. C.; Nagaraj, B. A.; Moore, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBC's is of primary importance. Physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma spraying (PS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The PS coatings were applied with either standard powder or hollow sphere particles. The hollow sphere particles yielded a lower density and lower thermal conductivity coating. The thermal conductivity of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia, before and after thermal aging, will be compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposed to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. Sintering of the as-fabricated plasma sprayed lamellar structure is observed by scanning electron microscopy of coatings isothermally heat treated at temperatures greater than 1100 C. During this sintering process the planar porosity between lamella is converted to a series of small spherical pores. The change in pore morphology is the primary reason for the observed increase in thermal conductivity. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, preliminary results suggest that they have a higher thermal conductivity than PS coatings, both before and after thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for partially stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia have been found to be less than for fully stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia coatings. The high temperature thermal diffusivity data indicate that if these coatings reach a temperature above 1100 C

  6. Thermal conductivity of supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Biddle, John W; Holten, Vincent; Sengers, Jan V; Anisimov, Mikhail A

    2013-04-01

    The heat capacity of supercooled water, measured down to -37°C, shows an anomalous increase as temperature decreases. The thermal diffusivity, i.e., the ratio of the thermal conductivity and the heat capacity per unit volume, shows a decrease. These anomalies may be associated with a hypothesized liquid-liquid critical point in supercooled water below the line of homogeneous nucleation. However, while the thermal conductivity is known to diverge at the vapor-liquid critical point due to critical density fluctuations, the thermal conductivity of supercooled water, calculated as the product of thermal diffusivity and heat capacity, does not show any sign of such an anomaly. We have used mode-coupling theory to investigate the possible effect of critical fluctuations on the thermal conductivity of supercooled water and found that indeed any critical thermal-conductivity enhancement would be too small to be measurable at experimentally accessible temperatures. Moreover, the behavior of thermal conductivity can be explained by the observed anomalies of the thermodynamic properties. In particular, we show that thermal conductivity should go through a minimum when temperature is decreased, as Kumar and Stanley observed in the TIP5P model of water. We discuss physical reasons for the striking difference between the behavior of thermal conductivity in water near the vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid critical points.

  7. Thermal conductivity of boron carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbide is necessary to evaluate its potential for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. Measurements have been conducted of the thermal diffusivity of hot-pressed boron carbide BxC samples as a function of composition (x in the range from 4 to 9), temperature (300-1700 K), and temperature cycling. These data, in concert with density and specific-heat data, yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results are discussed in terms of a structural model that has been previously advanced to explain the electronic transport data. Some novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are briefly discussed.

  8. Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and requirements will be discussed. An experimental approach is established to monitor in real time the thermal conductivity of the coating systems subjected to high-heat-flux, steady-state and cyclic temperature gradients. Advanced low conductivity thermal barrier coatings have also been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability. The durability and erosion resistance of low conductivity thermal barrier coatings have been improved utilizing advanced coating architecture design, composition optimization, in conjunction with more sophisticated modeling and design tools.

  9. Radiative thermal conduction fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Balbus, Steven A.; Fristrom, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of the O VI interstellar absorption lines in our Galaxy by the Copernicus observatory was a turning point in our understanding of the Interstellar Medium (ISM). It implied the presence of widespread hot (approx. 10 to the 6th power K) gas in disk galaxies. The detection of highly ionized species in quasi-stellar objects' absorption spectra may be the first indirect observation of this hot phase in external disk galaxies. Previous efforts to understand extensive O VI absorption line data from our Galaxy were not very successful in locating the regions where this absorption originates. The location at interfaces between evaporating ISM clouds and hot gas was favored, but recent studies of steady-state conduction fronts in spherical clouds by Ballet, Arnaud, and Rothenflug (1986) and Bohringer and Hartquist (1987) rejected evaporative fronts as the absorption sites. Researchers report here on time-dependent nonequilibrium calculations of planar conductive fronts whose properties match well with observations, and suggest reasons for the difference between the researchers' results and the above. They included magnetic fields in additional models, not reported here, and the conclusions are not affected by their presence.

  10. Thermal Conductances Of Metal Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.; Scherkenbach, F. E.; Spivak, A. L.

    1988-01-01

    Report presents results of measurements of thermal conductances of aluminum and stainless-steel contacts at temperatures from 1.6 to 6.0 K. Measurement apparatus includes gearmotor assembly connected to rocker arm by music wire to load sample pair with forces up to 670 N. Heater placed above upper sample. Germanium resistance thermometers in upper and lower samples measured temperature difference across interface over range of heater powers from 0.1 to 10.0 mW. The thermal conductance calculated from temperature difference. Measurements provide data for prediction of thermal conductances of bolted joints in cryogenic infrared instruments.

  11. Low Thermal Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2003-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used extensively in modern gas turbine engines to thermally insulate air-cooled metallic components from the hot gases in the engine. These coatings typically consist of a zirconia-yttria ceramic that has been applied by either plasma spraying or physical vapor deposition. Future engines will rely even more heavily on TBCs and will require materials that have even higher temperature capability with improved insulation (i.e., lower thermal conductivity even after many hours at high temperature). This report discusses new TBCs that have been developed with these future requirements in mind. The Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center is funding this effort, which has been conducted primarily at Glenn with contractor support (GE and Howmet) for physical vapor deposition. As stated, the new TBC not only had to be more insulating but the insulation had to persist even after many hours of exposure-that is, the new TBC had to have both lower conductivity and improved sintering resistance. A new type of test rig was developed for this task. This new test approach used a laser to deliver a known high heat flux in an essentially uniform pattern to the surface of the coating, thereby establishing a realistic thermal gradient across its thickness. This gradient was determined from surface and backside pyrometry; and since the heat flux and coating thickness are known, this permitted continuous monitoring of thermal conductivity. Thus, this laser rig allowed very efficient screening of candidate low-conductivity, sinter-resistant TBCs. The coating-design approach selected for these new low-conductivity TBCs was to identify oxide dopants that had the potential to promote the formation of relatively large and stable groupings of defects known as defect clusters. This approach was used because it was felt that such clusters would reduce conductivity while enhancing stability. The approach proved to be

  12. Thermal conductivity of graphene laminate.

    PubMed

    Malekpour, H; Chang, K-H; Chen, J-C; Lu, C-Y; Nika, D L; Novoselov, K S; Balandin, A A

    2014-09-10

    We have investigated thermal conductivity of graphene laminate films deposited on polyethylene terephthalate substrates. Two types of graphene laminate were studied, as deposited and compressed, in order to determine the physical parameters affecting the heat conduction the most. The measurements were performed using the optothermal Raman technique and a set of suspended samples with the graphene laminate thickness from 9 to 44 μm. The thermal conductivity of graphene laminate was found to be in the range from 40 to 90 W/mK at room temperature. It was found unexpectedly that the average size and the alignment of graphene flakes are more important parameters defining the heat conduction than the mass density of the graphene laminate. The thermal conductivity scales up linearly with the average graphene flake size in both uncompressed and compressed laminates. The compressed laminates have higher thermal conductivity for the same average flake size owing to better flake alignment. Coating plastic materials with thin graphene laminate films that have up to 600× higher thermal conductivity than plastics may have important practical implications.

  13. Thermal Conductivity in Supercooled Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biddle, John; Holten, Vincent; Sengers, Jan; Anisimov, Mikhail

    2013-03-01

    The heat capacity of supercooled water, measured down to -37 C, shows an anomalous increase as temperature decreases. The thermal diffusivity, the ratio of thermal conductivity and the heat capacity per unit volume, shows a decrease. These anomalies may be associated with a hypothetical liquid-liquid critical point in metastable water below the line of homogeneous nucleation. The data suggest that the thermal conductivity does not show a significant critical enhancement, in contrast to what is observed near the vapor-liquid critical point. We have used mode-coupling theory to investigate the possible effect of critical fluctuations on the thermal conductivity of supercooled water, and shown that indeed this effect would be too small to be measurable at experimentally accessible temperatures. We discuss physical reasons for the striking difference between the vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid critical enhancements of thermal conductivity in water. We also discuss the discrepancy between the thermal conductivity calculated from experimental data and that obtained by computer simulations of the TIP5P water-like model. American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund Grant No. 52666-ND6

  14. Thermal conductivity of carbonate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, J.; Frost, R.R.; Harvey, R.D.

    1973-01-01

    The thermal conductivities of several well-defined carbonate rocks were determined near 40??C. Values range from 1.2 W m-1 C-1 for a highly porous chalk to 5.1 W m-1 C-1 for a dolomite. The thermal conductivity of magnesite (5.0) is at the high end of the range, and that for Iceland Spar Calcite (3.2) is near the middle. The values for limestones decrease linearly with increasing porosity. Dolomites of comparable porosity have greater thermal conductivities than limestones. Water-sorbed samples have expected greater thermal conductivities than air-saturated (dry) samples of the same rock. An anomalously large increase in the thermal conductivity of a water-sorbed clayey dolomite over that of the same sample when dry is attributed to the clay fraction, which swells during water inhibition, causing more solid-to-solid contacts within the dolomite framework. Measurements were made with a Colora Thermoconductometer. Chemical and mineralogical analyses were made and tabulated. Porosity of the rocks was determined by mercury porosimetry and also from density measurements. The Iceland Spar Calcite and magnesite were included for reference. ?? 1973.

  15. Thermal conductivity of cane fiberboard

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1995-05-01

    The thermal conductivity of cane fiberboard was measured in two planes; parallel to the surface and perpendicular to the surface of the manufactured sheet. The information was necessary to better understand the thermal response of a loaded shipping container. The tests demonstrated that the thermal conductivity of cane fiberboard in the plane parallel to the surface of the sheet was nearly twice as great as the conductivity of the same material in a plane perpendicular to the sheet. There was no significant difference in the conductivity in different directions within the plane parallel to the surface, and the presence of glue between layers of fiberboard did not significantly change the conductivity of the assembly. The tests revealed that the thermal conductivity measured in a direction perpendicular to the plane of the surface of a stack of cane fiberboard sheets not bonded together, decreases with an increase in the mean temperature. This was determined to be the result of air gaps between the sheets of fiberboard, and not related to the properties of the material itself

  16. Thermal conductance of superlattice junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Simon; McGaughey, Alan J. H.

    2015-05-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations and the lattice-based scattering boundary method to compute the thermal conductance of finite-length Lennard-Jones superlattice junctions confined by bulk crystalline leads. The superlattice junction thermal conductance depends on the properties of the leads. For junctions with a superlattice period of four atomic monolayers at temperatures between 5 and 20 K, those with mass-mismatched leads have a greater thermal conductance than those with mass-matched leads. We attribute this lead effect to interference between and the ballistic transport of emergent junction vibrational modes. The lead effect diminishes when the temperature is increased, when the superlattice period is increased, and when interfacial disorder is introduced, but is reversed in the harmonic limit.

  17. Thermal conductivity calculation of complex (dusty) plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shahzad, Aamir; He Maogang

    2012-08-15

    The thermal conductivity of three-dimensional (3D) strongly coupled complex (dusty) plasmas has been calculated through the improved Evan-Gillan nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) algorithm. The extensive NEMD simulations are performed to study the performance of the algorithm and compared the results determined for perturbed heat energy current to the results obtained by equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations. The calculations show that the present algorithm gives accurate results with fast convergence and small size effects over a wide range of plasma coupling and screening parameters. The present simulation results are in agreement with part of others NEMD and EMD data in the literature with simulation values generally overpredicting the thermal conductivity by 3%-20%, depending on plasma parameters. It is shown that the homogenous perturbed method can be employed to estimate the thermal conductivity and to understand the fundamental behaviors in 3D complex Yukawa liquids.

  18. Thermal conductivity of liquid n-alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Calado, J.C.G.; Fareleira, J.M.N.A.; Mardolcar, U.V.; Nieto de Castro, C.A.

    1988-05-01

    The thermal conductivity of liquids has been shown in the past to be difficult to predict with a reasonable accuracy, due to the lack of accurate experimental data and reliable prediction schemes. However, data of a high accuracy, and covering wide density ranges, obtained recently in laboratories in Boulder, Lisbon, and London with the transient hot-wire technique, can be used to revise an existing correlation scheme and to develop a new universal predictive technique for the thermal conductivity of liquid normal alkanes. The proposed correlation scheme is constructed on a theoretically based treatment of the van der Waals model of a liquid, which permits the prediction of the density dependence and the thermal conductivity of liquid n-alkanes, methane to tridecane, for temperatures between 110 and 370 K and pressures up to 0.6 MPa, i.e., for 0.3 less than or equal to T/T/sub c/ less than or equal to 0.7 and 2.4 less than or equal to rho/rho/sub c/ less than or equal to 3.7, with an accuracy of +/-1%, given a known value of the thermal conductivity of the fluid at the desired temperature. A generalization of the hard-core volumes obtained, as a function of the number of carbon atoms, showed that it was possible to predict the thermal conductivity of pentane to tetradecane +/- 2%, without the necessity of available experimental measurements.

  19. Low conductivity thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hengbei

    The dissertation begins by exploring the growth of 7YSZ coatings at different rotation rates. The experiments show that as the rotation rate was increased, the texture changes from <111> to <100> and the total pore fraction slowly decreased. The intercolumnar pores perpendicular to the coating surface are very effective at strain accommodation during thermal cycling. The intra-columnar pores appear the most effective for the reduction of thermal conductivity of the coatings. The minimum thermal conductivity occurs at a low rotation rate and is 0.8 W/mK. The failure modes and mechanisms of 7YSZ coatings during thermal cycling have been investigated. The primary mode of failure on rough bond coat surfaces involves delamination within the ceramic coating, just above the thermally-grown oxide (TGO). It was initiated by a bond coat rumpling mechanism. The delaminations were initiated preferentially at "corn kernel" growth defects in the coating. Ceramic coatings applied to polished bond coat surfaces had much longer spallation lifetimes and the delamination fracture shifted to the interface of TGO/bond coat. These delaminations were extended by a mechanism involving the formation and coalescence of interfacial voids. The enhanced coating life is shown to be a consequence of their lower density and hence, lower elastic modulus. Rare earth zirconates appear to be a promising candidate due to their reported low intrinsic thermal conductivity, good phase stability and greater resistance to sintering and CMAS attack compared to 7YSZ. The SZO coatings had as-deposited conductivities of 0.5+/-0.1 W/mK. When these SZO coatings were subjected to thermal cycling, it was found to have a much shorter lifetime (on both rough and smooth bond coats) than similarly deposited 7YSZ material. It was also found that samaria tended to react with alumina to form a SmAlO 3 interphase of the TBC/TGO interface which appears to significantly lower the interface toughness. To improve the

  20. High-Thermal-Conductivity Fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chibante, L. P. Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Heat management with common textiles such as nylon and spandex is hindered by the poor thermal conductivity from the skin surface to cooling surfaces. This innovation showed marked improvement in thermal conductivity of the individual fibers and tubing, as well as components assembled from them. The problem is centered on improving the heat removal of the liquid-cooled ventilation garments (LCVGs) used by astronauts. The current design uses an extensive network of water-cooling tubes that introduces bulkiness and discomfort, and increases fatigue. Range of motion and ease of movement are affected as well. The current technology is the same as developed during the Apollo program of the 1960s. Tubing material is hand-threaded through a spandex/nylon mesh layer, in a series of loops throughout the torso and limbs such that there is close, form-fitting contact with the user. Usually, there is a nylon liner layer to improve comfort. Circulating water is chilled by an external heat exchanger (sublimator). The purpose of this innovation is to produce new LCVG components with improved thermal conductivity. This was addressed using nanocomposite engineering incorporating high-thermalconductivity nanoscale fillers in the fabric and tubing components. Specifically, carbon nanotubes were added using normal processing methods such as thermoplastic melt mixing (compounding twin screw extruder) and downstream processing (fiber spinning, tubing extrusion). Fibers were produced as yarns and woven into fabric cloths. The application of isotropic nanofillers can be modeled using a modified Nielsen Model for conductive fillers in a matrix based on Einstein s viscosity model. This is a drop-in technology with no additional equipment needed. The loading is limited by the ability to maintain adequate dispersion. Undispersed materials will plug filtering screens in processing equipment. Generally, the viscosity increases were acceptable, and allowed the filled polymers to still be

  1. Thermal Conductivity of Humid Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirão, S. G. S.; Ribeiro, A. P. C.; Lourenço, M. J. V.; Santos, F. J. V.; Nieto de Castro, C. A.

    2012-09-01

    In this article, measurements of the thermal conductivity of humid air as a function of pressure, temperature, and mole fraction of water, for pressures up to 5 MPa and temperatures up to 430 K, for different water contents (up to 10 % vapor mole fraction) are reported. Measurements were performed using a transient hot-wire apparatus capable of obtaining data with an uncertainty of 0.8 % for gases. However, as moist air becomes corrosive above 373 K and at pressures >5 MPa, the apparatus, namely, the pressure vessel and the cells had to be modified, by coating all stainless-steel parts with a titanium nitride thin film coating, about 4 μm thick, obtained by physical vapor deposition. The expanded uncertainty (coverage factor k = 2) of the present experimental thermal conductivity data is 1.7 %, while the uncertainty in the mole fraction is estimated to be better than 0.0006. Experimental details regarding the preparation of the samples, the precautions taken to avoid condensation in the tubes connected to the measuring cell, and the method developed for obtaining reliable values of the water content for the gas mixtures are discussed. A preliminary analysis of the application of the kinetic theory of transport properties in reacting mixtures to interpret the complex dependence of the thermal conductivity of humid air on water composition is addressed.

  2. Thermal Conductance of Andreev Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z.; Chandrasekhar, V.

    2005-04-01

    We calculate the thermal conductance GT of diffusive Andreev interferometers, which are hybrid loops with one superconducting arm and one normal-metal arm. The presence of the superconductor suppresses GT; however, unlike a conventional superconductor, GT/GTN does not vanish as the temperature T→0, but saturates at a finite value that depends on the resistance of the normal-superconducting interfaces, and their distance from the path of the temperature gradient. The reduction of GT is determined primarily by the suppression of the density of states in the proximity-coupled normal metal along the path of the temperature gradient. GT is also a strongly nonlinear function of the thermal current, as found in recent experiments.

  3. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY ANALYSIS OF GASES

    DOEpatents

    Clark, W.J.

    1949-06-01

    This patent describes apparatus for the quantitative analysis of a gaseous mixture at subatmospheric pressure by measurement of its thermal conductivity. A heated wire forms one leg of a bridge circuit, while the gas under test is passed about the wire at a constant rate. The bridge unbalance will be a measure of the change in composition of the gas, if compensation is made for the effect due to gas pressure change. The apparatus provides a voltage varying with fluctuations of pressure in series with the indicating device placed across the bridge, to counterbalance the voltage change caused by fluctuations in the pressure of the gaseous mixture.

  4. Conductivity Cell Thermal Inertia Correction Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, C. C.

    2012-12-01

    Salinity measurements made with a CTD (conductivity-temperature-depth instrument) rely on accurate estimation of water temperature within their conductivity cell. Lueck (1990) developed a theoretical framework for heat transfer between the cell body and water passing through it. Based on this model, Lueck and Picklo (1990) introduced the practice of correcting for cell thermal inertia by filtering a temperature time series using two parameters, an amplitude α and a decay time constant τ, a practice now widely used. Typically these two parameters are chosen for a given cell configuration and internal flushing speed by a statistical method applied to a particular data set. Here, thermal inertia correction theory has been extended to apply to flow speeds spanning well over an order of magnitude, both within and outside a conductivity cell, to provide predictions of α and τ from cell geometry and composition. The extended model enables thermal inertia correction for the variable flows encountered by conductivity cells on autonomous gliders and floats, as well as tethered platforms. The length scale formed as the product of cell encounter speed of isotherms, α, and τ can be used to gauge the size of the temperature correction for a given thermal stratification. For cells flushed by dynamic pressure variation induced by platform motion, this length varies by less than a factor of 2 over more than a decade of speed variation. The magnitude of correction for free-flow flushed sensors is comparable to that of pumped cells, but at an order of magnitude in energy savings. Flow conditions around a cell's exterior are found to be of comparable importance to thermal inertia response as flushing speed. Simplification of cell thermal response to a single normal mode is most valid at slow speed. Error in thermal inertia estimation arises from both neglect of higher modes and numerical discretization of the correction scheme, both of which can be easily quantified

  5. Radiative magnetized thermal conduction fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Balbus, Steven A.; Fristrom, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of plane-parallel magnetized thermal conduction fronts in the interstellar medium (ISM) was studied. Separating the coronal ISM phase and interstellar clouds, these fronts have been thought to be the site of the intermediate-temperature regions whose presence was inferred from O VI absorption-line studies. The front evolution was followed numerically, starting from the initial discontinuous temperature distribution between the hot and cold medium, and ending in the final cooling stage of the hot medium. It was found that, for the typical ISM pressure of 4000 K/cu cm and the hot medium temperature of 10 to the 6th K, the transition from evaporation to condensation in a nonmagnetized front occurs when the front thickness is 15 pc. This thickness is a factor of 5 smaller than previously estimated. The O VI column densities in both evaporative and condensation stages agree with observations if the initial hot medium temperature Th exceeds 750,000 K. Condensing conduction fronts give better agreement with observed O VI line profiles because of lower gas temperatures.

  6. Measurement of the anisotropic thermal conductivity of the porcine cornea.

    PubMed

    Barton, Michael D; Trembly, B Stuart

    2013-10-01

    Accurate thermal models for the cornea of the eye support the development of thermal techniques for reshaping the cornea and other scientific purposes. Heat transfer in the cornea must be quantified accurately so that a thermal treatment does not destroy the endothelial layer, which cannot regenerate, and yet is responsible for maintaining corneal transparency. We developed a custom apparatus to measure the thermal conductivity of ex vivo porcine corneas perpendicular to the surface and applied a commercial apparatus to measure thermal conductivity parallel to the surface. We found that corneal thermal conductivity is 14% anisotropic at the normal state of corneal hydration. Small numbers of ex vivo feline and human corneas had a thermal conductivity perpendicular to the surface that was indistinguishable from the porcine corneas. Aqueous humor from ex vivo porcine, feline, and human eyes had a thermal conductivity nearly equal to that of water. Including the anisotropy of corneal thermal conductivity will improve the predictive power of thermal models of the eye.

  7. Thermal conductivity of sputtered amorphous Ge films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Tianzhuo; Xu, Yibin; Goto, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Kato, Ryozo; Sasaki, Michiko; Kagawa, Yutaka

    2014-02-15

    We measured the thermal conductivity of amorphous Ge films prepared by magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity was significantly higher than the value predicted by the minimum thermal conductivity model and increased with deposition temperature. We found that variations in sound velocity and Ge film density were not the main factors in the high thermal conductivity. Fast Fourier transform patterns of transmission electron micrographs revealed that short-range order in the Ge films was responsible for their high thermal conductivity. The results provide experimental evidences to understand the underlying nature of the variation of phonon mean free path in amorphous solids.

  8. Thermal conductance of pressed contacts at liquid helium temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.; Spivak, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that the optimum design of cryogenic instruments requires accurate thermal models. The present models are limited by a lack of knowledge of the low temperature thermal conductance of the bolted joints which are typically used in the instrument-to-system interface. In connection with studies of pressed contacts, it has been found that the thermal conductance does not obey the Wiedemann-Franz law. The present investigation is concerned with the characterization of the thermal conductance of pressed contacts at liquid helium-4 temperatures, taking into account the dependence of thermal contact conductance on applied force and temperature. It is shown that for the 0.4 micron OFHC copper pressed contact pair, the thermal conductance varies roughly as the second power of the temperature, and increases with increasing applied force.

  9. Radiometrically accurate thermal imaging in the Landsat program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lansing, Jack C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Methods of calibrating Landsat TM thermal IR data have been developed so that the residual error is reduced to 0.9 K (1 standard deviation). Methods for verifying the radiometric performance of TM on orbit and ground calibration methods are discussed. The preliminary design of the enhanced TM for Landsat-6 is considered. A technique for accurately reducing raw data from the Landsat-5 thermal band is described in detail.

  10. Method for Measuring Thermal Conductivity of Small Samples Having Very Low Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria a.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a hot plate method capable of using air as a standard reference material for the steady-state measurement of the thermal conductivity of very small test samples having thermal conductivity on the order of air. As with other approaches, care is taken to ensure that the heat flow through the test sample is essentially one-dimensional. However, unlike other approaches, no attempt is made to use heated guards to block the flow of heat from the hot plate to the surroundings. It is argued that since large correction factors must be applied to account for guard imperfections when sample dimensions are small, it may be preferable to simply measure and correct for the heat that flows from the heater disc to directions other than into the sample. Experimental measurements taken in a prototype apparatus, combined with extensive computational modeling of the heat transfer in the apparatus, show that sufficiently accurate measurements can be obtained to allow determination of the thermal conductivity of low thermal conductivity materials. Suggestions are made for further improvements in the method based on results from regression analyses of the generated data.

  11. Measurement of Fracture Geometry for Accurate Computation of Hydraulic Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, B.; Ichikawa, Y.; Kim, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Fluid flow in rock mass is controlled by geometry of fractures which is mainly characterized by roughness, aperture and orientation. Fracture roughness and aperture was observed by a new confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM; Olympus OLS1100). The wavelength of laser is 488nm, and the laser scanning is managed by a light polarization method using two galvano-meter scanner mirrors. The system improves resolution in the light axis (namely z) direction because of the confocal optics. The sampling is managed in a spacing 2.5 μ m along x and y directions. The highest measurement resolution of z direction is 0.05 μ m, which is the more accurate than other methods. For the roughness measurements, core specimens of coarse and fine grained granites were provided. Measurements were performed along three scan lines on each fracture surface. The measured data were represented as 2-D and 3-D digital images showing detailed features of roughness. Spectral analyses by the fast Fourier transform (FFT) were performed to characterize on the roughness data quantitatively and to identify influential frequency of roughness. The FFT results showed that components of low frequencies were dominant in the fracture roughness. This study also verifies that spectral analysis is a good approach to understand complicate characteristics of fracture roughness. For the aperture measurements, digital images of the aperture were acquired under applying five stages of uniaxial normal stresses. This method can characterize the response of aperture directly using the same specimen. Results of measurements show that reduction values of aperture are different at each part due to rough geometry of fracture walls. Laboratory permeability tests were also conducted to evaluate changes of hydraulic conductivities related to aperture variation due to different stress levels. The results showed non-uniform reduction of hydraulic conductivity under increase of the normal stress and different values of

  12. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Corrugated Insulating Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Etsuro; Kato, Masayasu; Tomikawa, Takayuki; Takahashi, Kaneko

    The effective thermal conductivity of corrugated insulating materials which are made by polypropylene or polycarbonate have been measured by employing steady state comparison method for several specimen having various thickness and specific weight. The thermal conductivity of them evaluated are also by using the thermal resistance models, and are compared with above measured values and raw materials' conductivity. The main results obtained in this paper are as follows: (1) In regard to the specimen in this paper, the effective thermal conductivity increases with increasing temperature, but the increasing rate of them is small. (2) There are considerable differences between the measured values and the predicted ones that are estimated by using the thermal resistance model in which heat flow by conduction only. This differences increase with increasing specimens' thickness. This difference become extinct by considering the coexistence heat flow of conduction and radiation in the air phase of specimen. (3) The thermal resistance of specimen increases linearly with increasing specimens' thickness.

  13. Thermal conductivity analysis of lanthanum doped manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Mansuri, Irfan; Shaikh, M. W.; Khan, E.; Varshney, Dinesh

    2014-04-24

    The temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of the doped manganites La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} is theoretically analyzed within the framework of Kubo formulae. The Hamiltonian consists of phonon, electron and magnon thermal conductivity contribution term. In this process we took defects, carrier, grain boundary, scattering process term and then calculate phonon, electron and magnon thermal conductivity.

  14. Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity of Exfoliated Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyejin; Wood, Joshua D; Ryder, Christopher R; Hersam, Mark C; Cahill, David G

    2015-12-22

    The anisotropic thermal conductivity of passivated black phosphorus (BP), a reactive two-dimensional material with strong in-plane anisotropy, is ascertained. The room-temperature thermal conductivity for three crystalline axes of exfoliated BP is measured by time-domain thermo-reflectance. The thermal conductivity along the zigzag direction is ≈2.5 times higher than that of the armchair direction.

  15. Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity of Exfoliated Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyejin; Wood, Joshua D; Ryder, Christopher R; Hersam, Mark C; Cahill, David G

    2015-12-22

    The anisotropic thermal conductivity of passivated black phosphorus (BP), a reactive two-dimensional material with strong in-plane anisotropy, is ascertained. The room-temperature thermal conductivity for three crystalline axes of exfoliated BP is measured by time-domain thermo-reflectance. The thermal conductivity along the zigzag direction is ≈2.5 times higher than that of the armchair direction. PMID:26516073

  16. Low lattice thermal conductivity of stanene.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Zhang, Hao; Shao, Hezhu; Xu, Yuchen; Zhang, Xiangchao; Zhu, Heyuan

    2016-02-03

    A fundamental understanding of phonon transport in stanene is crucial to predict the thermal performance in potential stanene-based devices. By combining first-principle calculation and phonon Boltzmann transport equation, we obtain the lattice thermal conductivity of stanene. A much lower thermal conductivity (11.6 W/mK) is observed in stanene, which indicates higher thermoelectric efficiency over other 2D materials. The contributions of acoustic and optical phonons to the lattice thermal conductivity are evaluated. Detailed analysis of phase space for three-phonon processes shows that phonon scattering channels LA + LA/TA/ZA ↔ TA/ZA are restricted, leading to the dominant contributions of high-group-velocity LA phonons to the thermal conductivity. The size dependence of thermal conductivity is investigated as well for the purpose of the design of thermoelectric nanostructures.

  17. Low lattice thermal conductivity of stanene

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Bo; Zhang, Hao; Shao, Hezhu; Xu, Yuchen; Zhang, Xiangchao; Zhu, Heyuan

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of phonon transport in stanene is crucial to predict the thermal performance in potential stanene-based devices. By combining first-principle calculation and phonon Boltzmann transport equation, we obtain the lattice thermal conductivity of stanene. A much lower thermal conductivity (11.6 W/mK) is observed in stanene, which indicates higher thermoelectric efficiency over other 2D materials. The contributions of acoustic and optical phonons to the lattice thermal conductivity are evaluated. Detailed analysis of phase space for three-phonon processes shows that phonon scattering channels LA + LA/TA/ZA ↔ TA/ZA are restricted, leading to the dominant contributions of high-group-velocity LA phonons to the thermal conductivity. The size dependence of thermal conductivity is investigated as well for the purpose of the design of thermoelectric nanostructures. PMID:26838731

  18. Thermal conductivity of a zirconia thermal barrier coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slifka, A. J.; Filla, B. J.; Phelps, J. M.; Bancke, G.; Berndt, C. C.

    1998-03-01

    The conductivity of a thermal-barrier coating composed of atmospheric plasma sprayed 8 mass percent yttria partially stabilized zirconia has been measured. This coating was sprayed on a substrate of 410 stainless steel. An absolute, steady-state measurement method was used to measure thermal conductivity from 400 to 800 K. The thermal conductivity of the coating is 0.62 W/(m·K). This measurement has shown to be temperature independent.

  19. Thermal conductivity behavior of boron carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.; Zoltan, A.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1983-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbides is necessary to evaluate its potential for high temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. The thermal diffusivity of hot pressed boron carbide B/sub 1-x/C/sub x/ samples as a function of composition, temperature and temperature cycling was measured. These data in concert with density and specific heat data yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results in terms of a structural model to explain the electrical transport data and novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are discussed.

  20. Electrically conductive fibers thermally isolate temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Waard, R.; Norton, B.

    1966-01-01

    Mounting assembly provides thermal isolation and an electrical path for an unbacked thermal sensor. The sensor is suspended in the center of a plastic mounting ring from four plastic fibers, two of which are coated with an electrically conductive material and connected to electrically conductive coatings on the ring.

  1. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Adsorbent Packed Beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Hideo; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Suguru

    The effective thermal conductivity of adsorbent packed beds of granular zeolite 13X and granular silica gel A in the presence of stagnant steam or air was measured under different conditions of the adsorbent bed temperature, particle size and filler-gas pressure. The measured effective thermal conductivity showed to become smaller with decreasing particle size or decreasing pressure, but it was nearly independent of the bed temperature. When steam was the filler-gas, the rise in the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent particles due to steam adsorption led to the increase in the effective thermal conductivity of the bed, and this effect was not negligible at high steam pressure for the bed of large particle size. It was found that both the predictions of the effective thermal conductivity by the Hayashi et al.'s model and the Bauer-Schlünder model generally agreed well with the measurements, by considering the particle thermal conductivity rise due to steam adsorption. The thermal conductivity of a consolidated bed of granular zeolite 13X was also measured, and it was found to be much larger than that of the packed bed especially at lower pressure. The above prediction models underestimated the effective thermal conductivity of the consolidated bed.

  2. Accurate Development of Thermal Neutron Scattering Cross Section Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Hawari, Ayman; Dunn, Michael

    2014-06-10

    The objective of this project is to develop a holistic (fundamental and accurate) approach for generating thermal neutron scattering cross section libraries for a collection of important enutron moderators and reflectors. The primary components of this approach are the physcial accuracy and completeness of the generated data libraries. Consequently, for the first time, thermal neutron scattering cross section data libraries will be generated that are based on accurate theoretical models, that are carefully benchmarked against experimental and computational data, and that contain complete covariance information that can be used in propagating the data uncertainties through the various components of the nuclear design and execution process. To achieve this objective, computational and experimental investigations will be performed on a carefully selected subset of materials that play a key role in all stages of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  3. Thermal conductivity of nanoparticle-fluid mixture.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Xu, X.; Choi, S. U.-S.; Energy Technology; Purdue Univ.

    1999-10-01

    Effective thermal conductivity of mixtures of fluids and nanometer-size particles is measured by a steady-state parallel-plate method. The tested fluids contain two types of nanoparticles, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CuO, dispersed in water, vacuum pump fluid, engine oil, and ethylene glycol. Experimental results show that the thermal conductivities of nanoparticle-fluid mixtures are higher than those of the base fluids. Using theoretical models of effective thermal conductivity of a mixture, we have demonstrated that the predicted thermal conductivities of nanoparticle-fluid mixtures are much lower than our measured data, indicating the deficiency in the existing models when used for nanoparticle-fluid mixtures. Possible mechanisms contributing to enhancement of the thermal conductivity of the mixtures are discussed. A more comprehensive theory is needed to fully explain the behavior of nanoparticle-fluid mixtures.

  4. Thermal conductivity in porous silicon nanowire arrays

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The nanoscale features in silicon nanowires (SiNWs) can suppress phonon propagation and strongly reduce their thermal conductivities compared to the bulk value. This work measures the thermal conductivity along the axial direction of SiNW arrays with varying nanowire diameters, doping concentrations, surface roughness, and internal porosities using nanosecond transient thermoreflectance. For SiNWs with diameters larger than the phonon mean free path, porosity substantially reduces the thermal conductivity, yielding thermal conductivities as low as 1 W/m/K in highly porous SiNWs. However, when the SiNW diameter is below the phonon mean free path, both the internal porosity and the diameter significantly contribute to phonon scattering and lead to reduced thermal conductivity of the SiNWs. PMID:23039084

  5. Thermal conductivity in porous silicon nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Weisse, Jeffrey M; Marconnet, Amy M; Kim, Dong Rip; Rao, Pratap M; Panzer, Matthew A; Goodson, Kenneth E; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2012-10-06

    The nanoscale features in silicon nanowires (SiNWs) can suppress phonon propagation and strongly reduce their thermal conductivities compared to the bulk value. This work measures the thermal conductivity along the axial direction of SiNW arrays with varying nanowire diameters, doping concentrations, surface roughness, and internal porosities using nanosecond transient thermoreflectance. For SiNWs with diameters larger than the phonon mean free path, porosity substantially reduces the thermal conductivity, yielding thermal conductivities as low as 1 W/m/K in highly porous SiNWs. However, when the SiNW diameter is below the phonon mean free path, both the internal porosity and the diameter significantly contribute to phonon scattering and lead to reduced thermal conductivity of the SiNWs.

  6. Thermal conductance imaging of graphene contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jia; Ziade, Elbara; Maragliano, Carlo; Crowder, Robert; Wang, Xuanye; Stefancich, Marco; Chiesa, Matteo; Swan, Anna K.; Schmidt, Aaron J.

    2014-07-01

    Suspended graphene has the highest measured thermal conductivity of any material at room temperature. However, when graphene is supported by a substrate or encased between two materials, basal-plane heat transfer is suppressed by phonon interactions at the interfaces. We have used frequency domain thermoreflectance to create thermal conductance maps of graphene contacts, obtaining simultaneous measurements of the basal-plane thermal conductivity and cross-plane thermal boundary conductance for 1-7 graphitic layers encased between titanium and silicon dioxide. We find that the basal-plane thermal conductivity is similar to that of graphene supported on silicon dioxide. Our results have implications for heat transfer in two-dimensional material systems, and are relevant for applications such as graphene transistors and other nanoelectronic devices.

  7. Thermal conductivity in porous silicon nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisse, Jeffrey M.; Marconnet, Amy M.; Kim, Dong Rip; Rao, Pratap M.; Panzer, Matthew A.; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2012-10-01

    The nanoscale features in silicon nanowires (SiNWs) can suppress phonon propagation and strongly reduce their thermal conductivities compared to the bulk value. This work measures the thermal conductivity along the axial direction of SiNW arrays with varying nanowire diameters, doping concentrations, surface roughness, and internal porosities using nanosecond transient thermoreflectance. For SiNWs with diameters larger than the phonon mean free path, porosity substantially reduces the thermal conductivity, yielding thermal conductivities as low as 1 W/m/K in highly porous SiNWs. However, when the SiNW diameter is below the phonon mean free path, both the internal porosity and the diameter significantly contribute to phonon scattering and lead to reduced thermal conductivity of the SiNWs.

  8. Anisotropic thermal conductivity in uranium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Gofryk, K; Du, S; Stanek, C R; Lashley, J C; Liu, X-Y; Schulze, R K; Smith, J L; Safarik, D J; Byler, D D; McClellan, K J; Uberuaga, B P; Scott, B L; Andersson, D A

    2014-08-01

    The thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide has been studied for over half a century, as uranium dioxide is the fuel used in a majority of operating nuclear reactors and thermal conductivity controls the conversion of heat produced by fission events to electricity. Because uranium dioxide is a cubic compound and thermal conductivity is a second-rank tensor, it has always been assumed to be isotropic. We report thermal conductivity measurements on oriented uranium dioxide single crystals that show anisotropy from 4 K to above 300 K. Our results indicate that phonon-spin scattering is important for understanding the general thermal conductivity behaviour, and also explains the anisotropy by coupling to the applied temperature gradient and breaking cubic symmetry.

  9. The Electronic Thermal Conductivity of Graphene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Yun; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Marzari, Nicola

    2016-04-13

    Graphene, as a semimetal with the largest known thermal conductivity, is an ideal system to study the interplay between electronic and lattice contributions to thermal transport. While the total electrical and thermal conductivity have been extensively investigated, a detailed first-principles study of its electronic thermal conductivity is still missing. Here, we first characterize the electron-phonon intrinsic contribution to the electronic thermal resistivity of graphene as a function of doping using electronic and phonon dispersions and electron-phonon couplings calculated from first-principles at the level of density-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory (GW). Then, we include extrinsic electron-impurity scattering using low-temperature experimental estimates. Under these conditions, we find that the in-plane electronic thermal conductivity κe of doped graphene is ∼300 W/mK at room temperature, independently of doping. This result is much larger than expected and comparable to the total thermal conductivity of typical metals, contributing ∼10% to the total thermal conductivity of bulk graphene. Notably, in samples whose physical or domain sizes are of the order of few micrometers or smaller, the relative contribution coming from the electronic thermal conductivity is more important than in the bulk limit, because lattice thermal conductivity is much more sensitive to sample or grain size at these scales. Last, when electron-impurity scattering effects are included we find that the electronic thermal conductivity is reduced by 30 to 70%. We also find that the Wiedemann-Franz law is broadly satisfied at low and high temperatures but with the largest deviations of 20-50% around room temperature.

  10. Electrically conductive and thermally conductive materials for electronic packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zongrong

    The aim of this dissertation is to develop electrically or thermally conductive materials that are needed for electronic packaging and microelectronic cooling. These materials are in the form of coatings and are made from pastes. The research work encompasses paste formulation, studying the process of converting a paste to a conductive material, relating the processing conditions to the structure and performance, and evaluating performance attributes that are relevant to the application of these conductive materials. The research has resulted in new information that is valuable to the microelectronic industry. Work on electrically conductive materials emphasizes the development of electrical interconnection materials in the form of air-firable glass-free silver-based electrically conductive thick films, which use the Ti-Al alloy as the binder and are in contrast to conventional films that use glass as the binder. The air-firability, as enabled by minor additions of tin and zinc to the paste, is in contrast to previous glass-free films that are not firable. The recommended firing condition is 930°C in air. The organic vehicle in the paste comprises ethyl cellulose, which undergoes thermal decomposition during burnout of the paste. The ethyl cellulose is dissolved in ether, which facilitates the burnout. Excessive ethyl cellulose hinders the burnout. A higher heating rate results in more residue after burnout. The presence of silver particles facilitates drying and burnout. Firing in air gives lower resistivity than firing in oxygen. Firing in argon gives poor films. Compared to conventional films that use glass as the binder, these films, when appropriately fired, exhibit lower electrical resistivity (2.5 x 10-6 O.cm) and higher scratch resistance. Work on thermally conductive materials addresses thermal interface materials, which are materials placed at the interface between a heat sink and a heat source for the purpose of improving the thermal contact. Heat

  11. Engineering thermal conductance using a two-dimensional phononic crystal

    PubMed Central

    Zen, Nobuyuki; Puurtinen, Tuomas A.; Isotalo, Tero J.; Chaudhuri, Saumyadip; Maasilta, Ilari J.

    2014-01-01

    Controlling thermal transport has become relevant in recent years. Traditionally, this control has been achieved by tuning the scattering of phonons by including various types of scattering centres in the material (nanoparticles, impurities, etc). Here we take another approach and demonstrate that one can also use coherent band structure effects to control phonon thermal conductance, with the help of periodically nanostructured phononic crystals. We perform the experiments at low temperatures below 1 K, which not only leads to negligible bulk phonon scattering, but also increases the wavelength of the dominant thermal phonons by more than two orders of magnitude compared to room temperature. Thus, phononic crystals with lattice constants ≥1 μm are shown to strongly reduce the thermal conduction. The observed effect is in quantitative agreement with the theoretical calculation presented, which accurately determined the ballistic thermal conductance in a phononic crystal device. PMID:24647049

  12. Indirect measurement of thermal conductivity in silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Pennelli, Giovanni Nannini, Andrea; Macucci, Massimo

    2014-02-28

    We report indirect measurements of thermal conductivity in silicon nanostructures. We have exploited a measurement technique based on the Joule self-heating of silicon nanowires. A standard model for the electron mobility has been used to determine the temperature through the accurate measurement of the nanowire resistance. We have applied this technique to devices fabricated with a top-down process that yields nanowires together with large silicon areas used both as electrical and as thermal contacts. As there is crystalline continuity between the nanowires and the large contact areas, our thermal conductivity measurements are not affected by any temperature drop due to the contact thermal resistance. Our results confirm the observed reduction of thermal conductivity in nanostructures and are comparable with those previously reported in the literature, achieved with more complex measurement techniques.

  13. Engineering thermal conductance using a two-dimensional phononic crystal.

    PubMed

    Zen, Nobuyuki; Puurtinen, Tuomas A; Isotalo, Tero J; Chaudhuri, Saumyadip; Maasilta, Ilari J

    2014-03-19

    Controlling thermal transport has become relevant in recent years. Traditionally, this control has been achieved by tuning the scattering of phonons by including various types of scattering centres in the material (nanoparticles, impurities, etc). Here we take another approach and demonstrate that one can also use coherent band structure effects to control phonon thermal conductance, with the help of periodically nanostructured phononic crystals. We perform the experiments at low temperatures below 1 K, which not only leads to negligible bulk phonon scattering, but also increases the wavelength of the dominant thermal phonons by more than two orders of magnitude compared to room temperature. Thus, phononic crystals with lattice constants ≥1 μm are shown to strongly reduce the thermal conduction. The observed effect is in quantitative agreement with the theoretical calculation presented, which accurately determined the ballistic thermal conductance in a phononic crystal device.

  14. Contact thermal conductivity in lunar aggregates.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilbeam, C. C.; Vaisnys, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The contribution of the contact conductivity to the thermal conductivity in aggregates is found to depend on pressure with an exponent greater than 1/3 and, for a specific model with an exponent of 3/5, when the particle packing is irregular. A lunar thermal conductivity profile near the surface, including a term involving depth to the 3/5 power, is considered.

  15. Lattice thermal conductivity crossovers in semiconductor nanowires.

    PubMed

    Mingo, N; Broido, D A

    2004-12-10

    For binary compound semiconductor nanowires, we find a striking relationship between the nanowire's thermal conductivity kappa(nwire), the bulk material's thermal conductivity kappa(bulk), and the mass ratio of the material's constituent atoms, r, as kappa(bulk)/kappa(nwire) (alpha) (1+1/r)(-3/2). A significant consequence is the presence of crossovers in which a material with higher bulk thermal conductivity than the rest is no longer the best nanowire thermal conductor. We show that this behavior stems from a change in the dominant phonon scattering mechanism with decreasing nanowire size. The results have important implications for nanoscale heat dissipation, thermoelectricity, and thermal conductivity of nanocomposites. PMID:15697834

  16. Thermal conductivity of electrospun polyethylene nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jian; Zhang, Qian; Mayo, Anthony; Ni, Zhonghua; Yi, Hong; Chen, Yunfei; Mu, Richard; Bellan, Leon M.; Li, Deyu

    2015-10-01

    We report on the structure-thermal transport property relation of individual polyethylene nanofibers fabricated by electrospinning with different deposition parameters. Measurement results show that the nanofiber thermal conductivity depends on the electric field used in the electrospinning process, with a general trend of higher thermal conductivity for fibers prepared with stronger electric field. Nanofibers produced at a 45 kV electrospinning voltage and a 150 mm needle-collector distance could have a thermal conductivity of up to 9.3 W m-1 K-1, over 20 times higher than the typical bulk value. Micro-Raman characterization suggests that the enhanced thermal conductivity is due to the highly oriented polymer chains and enhanced crystallinity in the electrospun nanofibers.

  17. Conductivity-limiting bipolar thermal conductivity in semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanyu; Yang, Jiong; Toll, Trevor; Yang, Jihui; Zhang, Wenqing; Tang, Xinfeng

    2015-01-01

    Intriguing experimental results raised the question about the fundamental mechanisms governing the electron-hole coupling induced bipolar thermal conduction in semiconductors. Our combined theoretical analysis and experimental measurements show that in semiconductors bipolar thermal transport is in general a “conductivity-limiting” phenomenon, and it is thus controlled by the carrier mobility ratio and by the minority carrier partial electrical conductivity for the intrinsic and extrinsic cases, respectively. Our numerical method quantifies the role of electronic band structure and carrier scattering mechanisms. We have successfully demonstrated bipolar thermal conductivity reduction in doped semiconductors via electronic band structure modulation and/or preferential minority carrier scatterings. We expect this study to be beneficial to the current interests in optimizing thermoelectric properties of narrow gap semiconductors. PMID:25970560

  18. Conductivity-limiting bipolar thermal conductivity in semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanyu; Yang, Jiong; Toll, Trevor; Yang, Jihui; Zhang, Wenqing; Tang, Xinfeng

    2015-01-01

    Intriguing experimental results raised the question about the fundamental mechanisms governing the electron-hole coupling induced bipolar thermal conduction in semiconductors. Our combined theoretical analysis and experimental measurements show that in semiconductors bipolar thermal transport is in general a "conductivity-limiting" phenomenon, and it is thus controlled by the carrier mobility ratio and by the minority carrier partial electrical conductivity for the intrinsic and extrinsic cases, respectively. Our numerical method quantifies the role of electronic band structure and carrier scattering mechanisms. We have successfully demonstrated bipolar thermal conductivity reduction in doped semiconductors via electronic band structure modulation and/or preferential minority carrier scatterings. We expect this study to be beneficial to the current interests in optimizing thermoelectric properties of narrow gap semiconductors. PMID:25970560

  19. Thermal conductivity measurements of Summit polycrystalline silicon.

    SciTech Connect

    Clemens, Rebecca; Kuppers, Jaron D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2006-11-01

    A capability for measuring the thermal conductivity of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) materials using a steady state resistance technique was developed and used to measure the thermal conductivities of SUMMiT{trademark} V layers. Thermal conductivities were measured over two temperature ranges: 100K to 350K and 293K to 575K in order to generate two data sets. The steady state resistance technique uses surface micromachined bridge structures fabricated using the standard SUMMiT fabrication process. Electrical resistance and resistivity data are reported for poly1-poly2 laminate, poly2, poly3, and poly4 polysilicon structural layers in the SUMMiT process from 83K to 575K. Thermal conductivity measurements for these polysilicon layers demonstrate for the first time that the thermal conductivity is a function of the particular SUMMiT layer. Also, the poly2 layer has a different variation in thermal conductivity as the temperature is decreased than the poly1-poly2 laminate, poly3, and poly4 layers. As the temperature increases above room temperature, the difference in thermal conductivity between the layers decreases.

  20. Thermal Conductivity and Sintering Behavior of Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Advanced thermal barrier coatings, having significantly reduced long-term thermal conductivities, are being developed using an approach that emphasizes real-time monitoring of thermal conductivity under conditions that are engine-like in terms of temperatures and heat fluxes. This is in contrast to the traditional approach where coatings are initially optimized in terms of furnace and burner rig durability with subsequent measurement in the as-processed or furnace-sintered condition. The present work establishes a laser high-heat-flux test as the basis for evaluating advanced plasma-sprayed and physical vapor-deposited thermal barrier coatings under the NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. The candidate coating materials for this program are novel thermal barrier coatings that are found to have significantly reduced thermal conductivities due to an oxide-defect-cluster design. Critical issues for designing advanced low conductivity coatings with improved coating durability are also discussed.

  1. Electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Faussurier, G. Blancard, C.; Combis, P.; Videau, L.

    2014-09-15

    Expressions for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas are derived combining the Chester-Thellung-Kubo-Greenwood approach and the Kramers approximation. The infrared divergence is removed assuming a Drude-like behaviour. An analytical expression is obtained for the Lorenz number that interpolates between the cold solid-state and the hot plasma phases. An expression for the electrical resistivity is proposed using the Ziman-Evans formula, from which the thermal conductivity can be deduced using the analytical expression for the Lorenz number. The present method can be used to estimate electrical and thermal conductivities of mixtures. Comparisons with experiment and quantum molecular dynamics simulations are done.

  2. Increased thermal conductivity monolithic zeolite structures

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James; Klett, Lynn; Kaufman, Jonathan

    2008-11-25

    A monolith comprises a zeolite, a thermally conductive carbon, and a binder. The zeolite is included in the form of beads, pellets, powders and mixtures thereof. The thermally conductive carbon can be carbon nano-fibers, diamond or graphite which provide thermal conductivities in excess of about 100 W/mK to more than 1,000 W/mK. A method of preparing a zeolite monolith includes the steps of mixing a zeolite dispersion in an aqueous colloidal silica binder with a dispersion of carbon nano-fibers in water followed by dehydration and curing of the binder is given.

  3. Size effects in molecular dynamics thermal conductivity predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellan, D. P.; Landry, E. S.; Turney, J. E.; McGaughey, A. J. H.; Amon, C. H.

    2010-06-01

    We predict the bulk thermal conductivity of Lennard-Jones argon and Stillinger-Weber silicon using the Green-Kubo (GK) and direct methods in classical molecular dynamics simulations. While system-size-independent thermal conductivities can be obtained with less than 1000 atoms for both materials using the GK method, the linear extrapolation procedure [Schelling , Phys. Rev. B 65, 144306 (2002)] must be applied to direct method results for multiple system sizes. We find that applying the linear extrapolation procedure in a manner consistent with previous researchers can lead to an underprediction of the GK thermal conductivity (e.g., by a factor of 2.5 for Stillinger-Weber silicon at a temperature of 500 K). To understand this discrepancy, we perform lattice dynamics calculations to predict phonon properties and from these, length-dependent thermal conductivities. From these results, we find that the linear extrapolation procedure is only accurate when the minimum system size used in the direct method simulations is comparable to the largest mean-free paths of the phonons that dominate the thermal transport. This condition has not typically been satisfied in previous works. To aid in future studies, we present a simple metric for determining if the system sizes used in direct method simulations are sufficiently large so that the linear extrapolation procedure can accurately predict the bulk thermal conductivity.

  4. Thermal Conductivities of Crystalline Organic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, Joseph

    2014-03-01

    As applications for organic semiconductors grow, it is becoming increasingly important to know their thermal conductivities, k. For example, for sub-micron electronic devices, values of k>k0 ~ 5 mW/cm/K are needed, while values kthermal conductivities below k0, many molecular organic crystals also have values of k below this value. We have started measurements of both the in-plane and interplane thermal diffusivities of layered crystalline organic semiconductors using frequency[2] and position dependent[3] ac-calorimetry; the thermal conductivities are then determined from the specific heats measured with differential scanning calorimetry. For rubrene, which has kthermal conductivity is several times smaller than the in-plane value, although its temperature dependence indicates that the phonon mean-free path is at least a few layers.[4] On the other hand, the in-plane thermal conductivity of TIPS-pentacene,[5] is several times greater than k0, similar to that of the quasi-one dimensional organic metal TTF-TCNQ.[6] Remarkably, its interlayer thermal conductivity is several times larger than its in-plane value,[7] perhaps due to interactions between the large (triisopropylsilylethynyl) side groups on the pentacene backbone. Research done with Hao Zhang and Yulong Yao and supported by NSF grants DMR-0800367, EPS-0814194, and DMR-1262261.

  5. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Graded Nanocomposites with Interfacial Thermal Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, H. M.; Paulino, G. H.; Buttlar, W. G.; Sun, L. Z.

    2008-02-01

    This work employs the self-consistent method to investigate the effective thermal conductivity distribution in functionally graded materials (FGMs) considering the Kapitza interfacial thermal resistance. A heat conduction solution is first derived for one spherical particle embedded in a graded matrix with a prefect interface. The interfacial thermal resistance of a nanoparticle is simulated by a new particle with a lower thermal conductivity. A novel self-consistent formulation is developed to derive the averaged heat flux field of the particle phase. Then the temperature gradient can be obtained in the gradation direction. From the relation between the effective flux and temperature gradient in the gradation direction, the effective thermal conductivity distribution is solved. If the gradient of the volume fraction distribution is zero, the FGM is reduced to a composite containing uniformly dispersed nanoparticles and a explicit solution of the effective thermal conductivity is provided. Disregarding the interfacial thermal resistance, the proposed model recovers the conventional self-consistent model. Mathematically, effective thermal conductivity is a quantity exactly analogous to effective electric conductivity, dielectric permittivity, magnetic permeability and water permeability in a linear static state, so this method can be extended to those problems for graded materials.

  6. Thermal Conductivity in Nanocrystalline Ceria Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Marat Khafizov; In-Wook Park; Aleksandr Chernatynskiy; Lingfeng He; Jianliang Lin; John J. Moore; David Swank; Thomas Lillo; Simon R. Phillpot; Anter El-Azab; David H. Hurley

    2014-02-01

    The thermal conductivity of nanocrystalline ceria films grown by unbalanced magnetron sputtering is determined as a function of temperature using laser-based modulated thermoreflectance. The films exhibit significantly reduced conductivity compared with stoichiometric bulk CeO2. A variety of microstructure imaging techniques including X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron analysis, and electron energy loss spectroscopy indicate that the thermal conductivity is influenced by grain boundaries, dislocations, and oxygen vacancies. The temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity is analyzed using an analytical solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. The conclusion of this study is that oxygen vacancies pose a smaller impediment to thermal transport when they segregate along grain boundaries.

  7. Thermal Conductance of Poly(3-methylthiophene) Brushes.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anandi; Bougher, Thomas L; Geng, Rugang; Ke, Yutian; Locklin, Jason; Cola, Baratunde A

    2016-09-28

    A wide variety of recent work has demonstrated that the thermal conductivity of polymers can be improved dramatically through the alignment of polymer chains in the direction of heat transfer. Most of the polymeric samples exhibit high conductivity in either the axial direction of a fiber or in the in-plane direction of a thin film, while the most useful direction for thermal management is often the cross-plane direction of a film. Here we show poly(3-methylthiophene) brushes grafted from phosphonic acid monolayers using surface initiated polymerization can exhibit through-plane thermal conductivity greater than 2 W/(m K), a 6-fold increase compared to spin-coated poly(3-hexylthiophene) samples. The thickness of these films (10-40 nm) is somewhat less than that required in most applications, but the method demonstrates a route toward higher thermal conductivity in covalently grafted, aligned polymer films. PMID:27579585

  8. Fiber/Matrix Interfacial Thermal Conductance Effect on the Thermal Conductivity of SiC/SiC Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-04-20

    SiC/SiC composites used in fusion reactor applications are subjected to high heat fluxes and require knowledge and tailoring of their in-service thermal conductivity. Accurately predicting the thermal conductivity of SiC/SiC composites as a function of temperature will guide the design of these materials for their intended use, which will eventually include the effects of 14-MeV neutron irradiations. This paper applies an Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka approach (EMTA) to compute the thermal conductivity of unirradiated SiC/SiC composites. The homogenization procedure includes three steps. In the first step EMTA computes the homogenized thermal conductivity of the unidirectional (UD) SiC fiber embraced by its coating layer. The second step computes the thermal conductivity of the UD composite formed by the equivalent SiC fibers embedded in a SiC matrix, and finally the thermal conductivity of the as-formed SiC/SiC composite is obtained by averaging the solution for the UD composite over all possible fiber orientations using the second-order fiber orientation tensor. The EMTA predictions for the transverse thermal conductivity of several types of SiC/SiC composites with different fiber types and interfaces are compared to the predicted and experimental results by Youngblood et al.

  9. Polyethylene nanofibres with very high thermal conductivities.

    PubMed

    Shen, Sheng; Henry, Asegun; Tong, Jonathan; Zheng, Ruiting; Chen, Gang

    2010-04-01

    Bulk polymers are generally regarded as thermal insulators, and typically have thermal conductivities on the order of 0.1 W m(-1) K(-1). However, recent work suggests that individual chains of polyethylene--the simplest and most widely used polymer--can have extremely high thermal conductivity. Practical applications of these polymers may also require that the individual chains form fibres or films. Here, we report the fabrication of high-quality ultra-drawn polyethylene nanofibres with diameters of 50-500 nm and lengths up to tens of millimetres. The thermal conductivity of the nanofibres was found to be as high as approximately 104 W m(-1) K(-1), which is larger than the conductivities of about half of the pure metals. The high thermal conductivity is attributed to the restructuring of the polymer chains by stretching, which improves the fibre quality toward an 'ideal' single crystalline fibre. Such thermally conductive polymers are potentially useful as heat spreaders and could supplement conventional metallic heat-transfer materials, which are used in applications such as solar hot-water collectors, heat exchangers and electronic packaging. PMID:20208547

  10. Coronal Kink Instability With Parallel Thermal Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botha, Gert J. J.; Arber, Tony D.; Hood, Alan W.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal conduction along magnetic field lines plays an important role in the evolution of the kink instability in coronal loops. In the nonlinear phase of the instability, local heating occurs due to reconnection, so that the plasma reaches high temperatures. To study the effect of parallel thermal conduction in this process, the 3D nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations are solved for an initially unstable equilibrium. The initial state is a cylindrical loop with zero net current. Parallel thermal conduction reduces the local temperature, which leads to temperatures that are an order of magnitude lower than those obtained without thermal conduction. This process is important on the timescale of fast MHD phenomena; it reduces the kinetic energy released by an order of magnitude. The impact of this process on observational signatures is presented. Synthetic observables are generated that include spatial and temporal averaging to account for the resolution and exposure times of TRACE images. It was found that the inclusion of parallel thermal conductivity does not have as large an impact on observables as the order of magnitude reduction in the maximum temperature would suggest. The reason is that response functions sample a broad range of temperatures, so that the net effect of parallel thermal conduction is a blurring of internal features of the loop structure.

  11. Thermal Conductivity Of Earth's Deepest Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, A. M.

    2006-05-01

    Thermal transport properties in the deep mantle are estimated, due to the lack of suitable samples and difficulties in attaining realistic temperatures: (1)The lattice component of thermal diffusivity (D) is constrained through measurements of dense phases with diverse chemical compositions made using the laser-flash technique, which is accurate (2%) and eliminates spurious direct radiative transfer. Thermal diffusivity is constant once a critical temperature (Tsat) of 1100 to 1500K is exceeded. The saturated mean free path (Lsat, computed from Dsat and sound velocities) nearly equals the primitive lattice parameter A. This relationship is used to estimate temperature independent values of D and klat in the lower mantle. Pressure derivatives are predicted by the damped harmonic oscillator model. (2)An effective thermal conductivity krad due to diffusion of heat by phonons is calculated from near-IR to UV spectra. To represent the internally heated, grainy mantle, our formulation accounts for emissivity depending on frequency, physical scattering depending on grain-size (d), and for reduction of intensity through back-reflections at interfaces. Pressure effects should be insignificant. To obtain krad at high T from perovskite spectra that are taken only at 298K, an approximate analytical solution is derived, which indicates that krad depends nearly linearly on T in the lower mantle. For perovskite (and probably post-pv), krad has a maximum at X=0.05 Fe no. for d=1 mm. At X=0.1, krad is maximized at d=3 mm. Because our approximation does not account for interface reflections, krad is overestimated at large X and d. The maxima would be sharper and shifted to slightly lower values, had this effect been included. Due to grain-size size effects, mainly shortening the mean free path, krad is low for minerals with low spin Fe, for which case a maximumin krad exists at high Fe content. Plumes are expected to form under destabilizing conditions of low thermal conductivity

  12. System to Measure Thermal Conductivity and Seebeck Coefficient for Thermoelectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Skuza, Jonathan R.; Park, Yeonjoon; King, Glen C.; Choi, Sang H.; Nagavalli, Anita

    2012-01-01

    The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at elevated temperatures. This has led to the implementation of nonstandardized practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. The major objective of the procedure described is for the simultaneous measurement of the Seebeck coefficient and thermal diffusivity within a given temperature range. These thermoelectric measurements must be precise, accurate, and reproducible to ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data. The custom-built thermal characterization system described in this NASA-TM is specifically designed to measure the inplane thermal diffusivity, and the Seebeck coefficient for materials in the ranging from 73 K through 373 K.

  13. Thermal conductance of hydrophilic and hydrophobic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhenbin; Cahill, David G; Braun, Paul V

    2006-05-12

    Using time-domain thermoreflectance, we have measured the transport of thermally excited vibrational energy across planar interfaces between water and solids that have been chemically functionalized with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM). The Kapitza length--i.e., the thermal conductivity of water divided by the thermal conductance per unit area of the interface--is analogous to the "slip length" for water flowing tangentially past a solid surface. We find that the Kapitza length at hydrophobic interfaces (10-12 nm) is a factor of 2-3 larger than the Kapitza length at hydrophilic interfaces (3-6 nm). If a vapor layer is present at the hydrophobic interface, and this vapor layer has a thermal conductivity that is comparable to bulk water vapor, then our experimental results constrain the thickness of the vapor layer to be less than 0.25 nm.

  14. Thermal Conductivity of Carbon Nanotube Composite Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Quoc; Cruden, Brett A.; Cassell, Alan M.; Walker, Megan D.; Koehne, Jessica E.; Meyyappan, M.; Li, Jun; Yang, Cary Y.

    2004-01-01

    State-of-the-art ICs for microprocessors routinely dissipate power densities on the order of 50 W/sq cm. This large power is due to the localized heating of ICs operating at high frequencies, and must be managed for future high-frequency microelectronic applications. Our approach involves finding new and efficient thermally conductive materials. Exploiting carbon nanotube (CNT) films and composites for their superior axial thermal conductance properties has the potential for such an application requiring efficient heat transfer. In this work, we present thermal contact resistance measurement results for CNT and CNT-Cu composite films. It is shown that Cu-filled CNT arrays enhance thermal conductance when compared to as-grown CNT arrays. Furthermore, the CNT-Cu composite material provides a mechanically robust alternative to current IC packaging technology.

  15. Lower-Conductivity Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming

    2003-01-01

    Thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs) that have both initial and post-exposure thermal conductivities lower than those of yttria-stabilized zirconia TBCs have been developed. TBCs are thin ceramic layers, generally applied by plasma spraying or physical vapor deposition, that are used to insulate air-cooled metallic components from hot gases in gas turbine and other heat engines. Heretofore, yttria-stabilized zirconia (nominally comprising 95.4 atomic percent ZrO2 + 4.6 atomic percent Y2O3) has been the TBC material of choice. The lower-thermal-conductivity TBCs are modified versions of yttria-stabilized zirconia, the modifications consisting primarily in the addition of other oxides that impart microstructural and defect properties that favor lower thermal conductivity.

  16. Thermal conductivity behavior of superatom molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Wee-Liat; O'Brien, Evan; Dougherty, Patrick; Epstein, Jillian; Higgs, C. Fred; McGaughey, Alan; Roy, Xavier; Malen, Jonathan

    The room temperature thermal conductivity of several superatom molecular crystals (SMCs) are measured and found to be below 0.3 W/mK. The trend of room temperature thermal conductivity of the different crystals agree well with their sound speeds obtained independently using nano-indentation. These crystals, however, can exhibit non-crystalline thermal conductivity behavior depending on their constituent elements. A superatom is a cluster of atoms that acts as a stable entity [e.g., fullerenes (C60)]. By careful mixing and assembling these nano-sized superatoms, the resulting superatom-assembled materials hold promises for improving various technological devices. Organic-inorganic superatoms can assemble into unary SMCs or co-crystallized with C60 superatoms into binary SMCs. Thermal transport is of considerable interest with possible new physics in these hierarchically atomic precise crystals in the low temperature regime. The thermal conductivity of the SMCs are measured using the frequency domain thermoreflectance setup. Unary SMCs exhibit an almost invariant thermal conductivity down to a temperature of 150 K. Binary SMCs, however, can either show a crystalline-like increase or an amorphous-like decrease with decreasing temperature.

  17. Measurement of Thermal Conductivity of Anisotropic SiC Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Guo-Ping; Zheng, Xing-Hua; Qiu, Lin; Tang, Da-Wei; Zhu, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) crystals with excellent heat conduction and thermal stability can be widely used in microelectronic devices and integrated circuits. It is important for the study of a functional type SiC material to have accurate thermal-conductivity and thermal-diffusivity values of SiC crystal. A 3 ω technique is employed to determine the anisotropic thermal conductivity of SiC crystal. Three micrometal probes with different widths are deposited by chemical-vapor deposition on the surface of SiC crystal. Each micrometal probe is used as a heater, and also as a thermometer. The temperature fluctuation signals of a micrometal probe represent heat conduction in different directions in the specimen. Thermal conductivities both in the cross-plane and in-plane directions of SiC crystal are achieved through fitted values. The results indicate that thermal conductivities in three different directions of SiC crystal can be characterized using the metal heater construction.

  18. Thermal Conductivity Of Natural Type IIa Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, Jan; Vining, Cronin; Zoltan, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Report describes application of flash diffusivity method to measure thermal conductivity of 8.04 x 8.84 x 2.35-mm specimen of natural, white, type-IIa diamond at temperatures between 500 and 1,250 K. Provides baseline for comparison to isotopically pure (12C) diamond. Results used as reference against which diamond films produced by chemical-vapor deposition at low pressures can be compared. High thermal conductivity of diamond exploited for wide variety of applications, and present results also used to estimate heat-conduction performances of diamond films in high-temperature applications.

  19. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2008-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the apparent thermal conductivity of the coating to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature and the scattering and absorption properties of the coating material. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can also be derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. The model prediction is found to have good agreement with experimental observations.

  20. Thermal conductivity of tubrostratic carbon nanofiber networks

    DOE PAGES

    Bauer, Matthew L.; Saltonstall, Chris B.; Leseman, Zayd C.; Beechem, Thomas E.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Norris, Pamela M.

    2016-01-01

    Composite material systems composed of a matrix of nano materials can achieve combinations of mechanical and thermophysical properties outside the range of traditional systems. While many reports have studied the intrinsic thermal properties of individual carbon fibers, to be useful in applications in which thermal stability is critical, an understanding of heat transport in composite materials is required. In this work, air/ carbon nano fiber networks are studied to elucidate the system parameters influencing thermal transport. Sample thermal properties are measured with varying initial carbon fiber fill fraction, environment pressure, loading pressure, and heat treatment temperature through a bidirectional modificationmore » of the 3ω technique. The nanostructures of the individual fibers are characterized with small angle x-ray scattering and Raman spectroscopy providing insight to individual fiber thermal conductivity. Measured thermal conductivity varied from 0.010 W/(m K) to 0.070 W/(m K). An understanding of the intrinsic properties of the individual fibers and the interactions of the two phase composite is used to reconcile low measured thermal conductivities with predictive modeling. This methodology can be more generally applied to a wide range of fiber composite materials and their applications.« less

  1. Thermal conductivity of tubrostratic carbon nanofiber networks

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Matthew L.; Saltonstall, Chris B.; Leseman, Zayd C.; Beechem, Thomas E.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Norris, Pamela M.

    2016-01-01

    Composite material systems composed of a matrix of nano materials can achieve combinations of mechanical and thermophysical properties outside the range of traditional systems. While many reports have studied the intrinsic thermal properties of individual carbon fibers, to be useful in applications in which thermal stability is critical, an understanding of heat transport in composite materials is required. In this work, air/ carbon nano fiber networks are studied to elucidate the system parameters influencing thermal transport. Sample thermal properties are measured with varying initial carbon fiber fill fraction, environment pressure, loading pressure, and heat treatment temperature through a bidirectional modification of the 3ω technique. The nanostructures of the individual fibers are characterized with small angle x-ray scattering and Raman spectroscopy providing insight to individual fiber thermal conductivity. Measured thermal conductivity varied from 0.010 W/(m K) to 0.070 W/(m K). An understanding of the intrinsic properties of the individual fibers and the interactions of the two phase composite is used to reconcile low measured thermal conductivities with predictive modeling. This methodology can be more generally applied to a wide range of fiber composite materials and their applications.

  2. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cortes, D.D.; Martin, A.I.; Yun, T.S.; Francisca, F.M.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Understanding Thermal Conductivity in Amorphous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kommandur, Sampath; Yee, Shannon

    2014-03-01

    Current energy technologies such as thermoelectrics, photovoltaics, and LEDs make extensive use of amorphous materials and are limited by heat transfer. Device improvements necessitate a better understanding of the thermal conductivity in amorphous materials. While there are basic theories that capture the trends in thermal conductivity of a select set of amorphous materials, a general framework is needed to explain the fundamental transport of heat in all amorphous materials. One empirical theory that has been successful at describing the thermal conductivity in some materials is the k-min model, however, assumptions in that model limit its generalizability. Another theory defines the existence of propagons, diffusons, and locons, which constitute vibrational modes that carry heat. Our work first presents a summary of literature on the thermal conductivity in amorphous materials and then compares those theories to a breadth of experimental data. Based upon those results, a generic model is proposed that is widely applicable with the ultimate goal of this work being to describe the temperature dependent thermal conductivity of polymers. -/abstract- Sampath Kommandur and Shannon K. Yee 21.1.1: Thermoelectric Phenomena, Materials, Devices, and Applications (GER

  4. Role of interfaces on thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liping

    Using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we study the role of interfaces on the thermal transport properties, and their role in overall heat flow in nanoscale materials. For the simple monoatomic liquid-solid interface, our simulations reveal that the key factor controlling interfacial thermal resistance is the strength of the bonding between liquid and solid atoms. The functional dependence of the thermal resistance on the strength of the liquid-solid interactions exhibits two distinct regimes. Surprisingly, ordering of the liquid at the liquid-solid interface shows no effect on the thermal transport either normal to the surface or parallel to the surface. The results suggest that the experimentally observed large enhancement of thermal conductivity in suspension of solid nanosized particles (nanofluids) can not be explained by altered thermal transport properties of the layered liquid. For the heat flow between a carbon nanotube and octane liquid interface, our simulation demonstrates the key role played by the soft vibrational modes in the mechanism of the heat flow. The results also imply that the thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube polymer composites and organic suspensions is limited by the interfacial thermal resistance and are consistent with recent experiments. We find that chemical functionalization of carbon nanotube reduces significantly the tube-matrix thermal boundary resistance, but at the same time decreases intrinsic tube conductivity. Interestingly, at high degrees of chemical functionalization, intrinsic tube conductivity becomes independent of the bond density, indicating important role of long-wavelength phonons in carbon nanotubes. Finally, we explore a different type of interfacial system: a bulk macromolecular liquid. In this case, the heat flow is controlled by the inter- and intra-chain thermal transport properties. Our simulations demonstrate that in order to significantly enhance the thermal conductivity of the liquid

  5. A method for accurate temperature measurement using infrared thermal camera.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Tomoharu; Narushima, Takashi; Yonezawa, Tetsu; Sudo, Takayuki; Okubo, Shuichi; Komatsubara, Shigeyuki; Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Takahisa

    2012-08-01

    The temperature distribution on a centre-holed thin foil of molybdenum, used as a sample and heated using a sample-heating holder for electron microscopy, was measured using an infrared thermal camera. The temperature on the heated foil area located near the heating stage of the heating holder is almost equal to the temperature on the heating stage. However, during the measurement of the temperature at the edge of the hole of the foil located farthest from the heating stage, a drop in temperature should be taken into consideration; however, so far, no method has been developed to locally measure the temperature distribution on the heated sample. In this study, a method for the accurate measurement of temperature distribution on heated samples for electron microscopy is discussed.

  6. Thermal conduction in graphene and graphene multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Suchismita

    There has been increasing interest in thermal conductivity of materials motivated by the heat removal issues in electronics and by the need of fundamental science to understand heat conduction at nanoscale [1, 2, 3]. This dissertation reports the results of the experimental investigation of heat conduction in graphene and graphene multilayers. Graphene is a planar single sheet of sp2-bonded carbon atoms arranged in honeycomb lattice. It reveals many unique properties, including the extraordinarily high carrier mobility. In order to measure the thermal conductivity of graphene we developed an original non-contact technique based on micro-Raman spectroscopy. The samples for this study were prepared by mechanical exfoliation and suspended across trenches in Si/SiO2 substrates. The number of atomic planes was determined by deconvolution of the Raman 2D band. The suspended graphene flakes attached to the heat sinks were heated by the laser light focused in the middle. The Raman G peak's temperature sensitivity allowed us to monitor the local temperature change produced by the variation of the excitation laser power. A special calibration procedure was developed to determine the fraction of power absorbed by graphene. Our measurements revealed that single-layer graphene has an extremely high room-temperature thermal conductivity in the range 3800-5300 W/mK depending on the flake size and quality. It was also found that most of the heat near room temperature is transferred by acoustic phonons rather than electrons. Theoretical studies of the phonon thermal conduction in graphene, which included detail treatment of the Umklapp scattering, are in agreement with our experiments. The measurements were also extended to few-layer graphene. It was shown that the thermal conductivity reduces with the increasing number of layers approaching the bulk graphite limit. To validate the measurement technique we investigated the thermal conductivity of the polycrystalline graphene films

  7. Gas storage carbon with enhanced thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.; Rogers, M.R.; Judkins, R.R.

    2000-07-18

    A carbon fiber carbon matrix hybrid adsorbent monolith with enhanced thermal conductivity for storing and releasing gas through adsorption and desorption is disclosed. The heat of adsorption of the gas species being adsorbed is sufficiently large to cause hybrid monolith heating during adsorption and hybrid monolith cooling during desorption which significantly reduces the storage capacity of the hybrid monolith, or efficiency and economics of a gas separation process. The extent of this phenomenon depends, to a large extent, on the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent hybrid monolith. This invention is a hybrid version of a carbon fiber monolith, which offers significant enhancements to thermal conductivity and potential for improved gas separation and storage systems.

  8. Modulating thermal conduction by the axial strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jianjun; Zhao, Hong

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the symmetry of interparticle potential plays an important role in the one-dimensional thermal conduction problem. Here we demonstrate that, by introducing strain into the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-β lattice, the interparticle potential can be converted from symmetric to asymmetric, which leads to a change of the asymptotic decaying behavior of the heat current autocorrelation function. More specifically, such a change in the symmetry of the potential induces a fast decaying stage, in which the heat current autocorrelation function decays faster than power-law manners or in a power-law manner but faster than ~t -1, in the transient stage. The duration of the fast decaying stage increases with increasing strain ratio and decreasing of the temperature. As a result, the thermal conductivity calculated following the Green-Kubo formula may show a truncation-time independent behavior, suggesting a system-size independent thermal conductivity.

  9. Gas storage carbon with enhanced thermal conductivity

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Rogers, Michael Ray; Judkins, Roddie R.

    2000-01-01

    A carbon fiber carbon matrix hybrid adsorbent monolith with enhanced thermal conductivity for storing and releasing gas through adsorption and desorption is disclosed. The heat of adsorption of the gas species being adsorbed is sufficiently large to cause hybrid monolith heating during adsorption and hybrid monolith cooling during desorption which significantly reduces the storage capacity of the hybrid monolith, or efficiency and economics of a gas separation process. The extent of this phenomenon depends, to a large extent, on the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent hybrid monolith. This invention is a hybrid version of a carbon fiber monolith, which offers significant enhancements to thermal conductivity and potential for improved gas separation and storage systems.

  10. Enhancing thermal conductivity of fluids with nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, S.U.S.; Eastman, J.A.

    1995-10-01

    Low thermal conductivity is a primary limitation in the development of energy-efficient heat transfer fluids that are required in many industrial applications. In this paper we propose that an innovative new class of heat transfer fluids can be engineered by suspending metallic nanoparticles in conventional heat transfer fluids. The resulting {open_quotes}nanofluids{close_quotes} are expected to exhibit high thermal conductivities compared to those of currently used heat transfer fluids, and they represent the best hope for enhancement of heat transfer. The results of a theoretical study of the thermal conductivity of nanofluids with copper nanophase materials are presented, the potential benefits of the fluids are estimated, and it is shown that one of the benefits of nanofluids will be dramatic reductions in heat exchanger pumping power.

  11. Thermal conductivity and interface thermal conductance of thin films in Li ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannadham, K.

    2016-09-01

    Laser physical vapor deposition is used to deposit thin films of lithium phosphorous oxynitride in nitrogen and lithium nickel manganese oxide in oxygen ambient on Si substrate. LIPON film is also deposited on LiNiMnO film that is deposited on Si. Graphene films consisting of graphene platelets are deposited on Si substrate from a suspension in isopropyl alcohol. Li-graphene films are obtained after Li adsorption by immersion in LiCl solution and further drying. Transient thermo reflectance signal is used to determine the cross-plane thermal conductivity of different layers and interface thermal conductance of the interfaces. The results show that LIPON film with lower thermal conductivity is a thermal barrier. The interface thermal conductance between LIPON and Au or Si is found to be very low. Thermal conductivity of LiNiMnO is found to be reasonably high so that it is not a barrier to thermal transport. Film with graphene platelets shows a higher value and Li adsorbed graphene film shows a much higher value of cross-plane thermal conductivity. The value of interface thermal conductance between graphene and Au or Si (100) substrate is also much lower. The implications of the results for the thermal transport in thin film Li batteries are discussed.

  12. An Innovative High Thermal Conductivity Fuel Design

    SciTech Connect

    PI: James S. Tulenko; Co-PI: Ronald H. Baney,

    2007-10-14

    Uranium dioxide (UO2) is the most common fuel material in commercial nuclear power reactors. UO2 has the advantages of a high melting point, good high-temperature stability, good chemical compatibility with cladding and coolant, and resistance to radiation. The main disadvantage of UO2 is its low thermal conductivity. During a reactor’s operation, because the thermal conductivity of UO2 is very low, for example, about 2.8 W/m-K at 1000 oC [1], there is a large temperature gradient in the UO2 fuel pellet, causing a very high centerline temperature, and introducing thermal stresses, which lead to extensive fuel pellet cracking. These cracks will add to the release of fission product gases after high burnup. The high fuel operating temperature also increases the rate of fission gas release and the fuel pellet swelling caused by fission gases bubbles. The amount of fission gas release and fuel swelling limits the life time of UO2 fuel in reactor. In addition, the high centerline temperature and large temperature gradient in the fuel pellet, leading to a large amount of stored heat, increase the Zircaloy cladding temperature in a lost of coolant accident (LOCA). The rate of Zircaloy-water reaction becomes significant at the temperature above 1200 oC [2]. The ZrO2 layer generated on the surface of the Zircaloy cladding will affect the heat conduction, and will cause a Zircaloy cladding rupture. The objective of this research is to increase the thermal conductivity of UO2, while not affecting the neutronic property of UO2 significantly. The concept to accomplish this goal is to incorporate another material with high thermal conductivity into the UO2 pellet. Silicon carbide (SiC) is a good candidate, because the thermal conductivity of single crystal SiC is 60 times higher than that of UO2 at room temperature and 30 times higher at 800 oC [3]. Silicon carbide also has the properties of low thermal neutron absorption cross section, high melting point, good chemical

  13. Estimating thermal diffusivity and specific heat from needle probe thermal conductivity data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, W.F.; Gilbert, L.Y.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity and specific heat can be estimated from thermal conductivity measurements made using a standard needle probe and a suitably high data acquisition rate. Thermal properties are calculated from the measured temperature change in a sample subjected to heating by a needle probe. Accurate thermal conductivity measurements are obtained from a linear fit to many tens or hundreds of temperature change data points. In contrast, thermal diffusivity calculations require a nonlinear fit to the measured temperature change occurring in the first few tenths of a second of the measurement, resulting in a lower accuracy than that obtained for thermal conductivity. Specific heat is calculated from the ratio of thermal conductivity to diffusivity, and thus can have an uncertainty no better than that of the diffusivity estimate. Our thermal conductivity measurements of ice Ih and of tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate, made using a 1.6 mm outer diameter needle probe and a data acquisition rate of 18.2 pointss, agree with published results. Our thermal diffusivity and specific heat results reproduce published results within 25% for ice Ih and 3% for THF hydrate. ?? 2006 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Thermal conductivity of III-V semiconductor superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, S. Knezevic, I.

    2015-11-07

    This paper presents a semiclassical model for the anisotropic thermal transport in III-V semiconductor superlattices (SLs). An effective interface rms roughness is the only adjustable parameter. Thermal transport inside a layer is described by the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation time approximation and is affected by the relevant scattering mechanisms (three-phonon, mass-difference, and dopant and electron scattering of phonons), as well as by diffuse scattering from the interfaces captured via an effective interface scattering rate. The in-plane thermal conductivity is obtained from the layer conductivities connected in parallel. The cross-plane thermal conductivity is calculated from the layer thermal conductivities in series with one another and with thermal boundary resistances (TBRs) associated with each interface; the TBRs dominate cross-plane transport. The TBR of each interface is calculated from the transmission coefficient obtained by interpolating between the acoustic mismatch model (AMM) and the diffuse mismatch model (DMM), where the weight of the AMM transmission coefficient is the same wavelength-dependent specularity parameter related to the effective interface rms roughness that is commonly used to describe diffuse interface scattering. The model is applied to multiple III-arsenide superlattices, and the results are in very good agreement with experimental findings. The method is both simple and accurate, easy to implement, and applicable to complicated SL systems, such as the active regions of quantum cascade lasers. It is also valid for other SL material systems with high-quality interfaces and predominantly incoherent phonon transport.

  15. Thermal conductivity and diffusivity of soil

    SciTech Connect

    Sorour, M.M. ); Saleh, M.M.; Mahmoud, R.A. )

    1990-03-01

    The thermal conductivity and diffusivity of soil has been experimentally measured using the line heat source transient method. Representative samples of different textures were collected and analyzed from different localities and depths. The effect of temperatures, in the range of {minus}10{degrees}C {yields} 35{degrees}C and moisture content up to 40% on the conductivity and diffusivity were investigated. The results of this investigation indicate some interesting results and confirm some previously published data.

  16. Local measurement of thermal conductivity and diffusivity

    DOE PAGES

    Hurley, David H.; Schley, Robert S.; Khafizov, Marat; Wendt, Brycen L.

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous measurement of local thermal diffusivity and conductivity is demonstrated on a range of ceramic samples. This was accomplished by measuring the temperature field spatial profile of samples excited by an amplitude modulated continuous wave laser beam. A thin gold film is applied to the samples to ensure strong optical absorption and to establish a second boundary condition that introduces an expression containing the substrate thermal conductivity. The diffusivity and conductivity are obtained by comparing the measured phase profile of the temperature field to a continuum based model. A sensitivity analysis is used to identify the optimal film thickness formore » extracting the both substrate conductivity and diffusivity. Proof of principle studies were conducted on a range of samples having thermal properties that are representative of current and advanced accident tolerant nuclear fuels. It is shown that by including the Kapitza resistance as an additional fitting parameter, the measured conductivity and diffusivity of all the samples considered agree closely with literature values. Lastly, a distinguishing feature of this technique is that it does not require a priori knowledge of the optical spot size which greatly increases measurement reliability and reproducibility.« less

  17. Local measurement of thermal conductivity and diffusivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, David H.; Schley, Robert S.; Khafizov, Marat; Wendt, Brycen L.

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous measurement of local thermal diffusivity and conductivity is demonstrated on a range of ceramic samples. This was accomplished by measuring the temperature field spatial profile of samples excited by an amplitude modulated continuous wave laser beam. A thin gold film is applied to the samples to ensure strong optical absorption and to establish a second boundary condition that introduces an expression containing the substrate thermal conductivity. The diffusivity and conductivity are obtained by comparing the measured phase profile of the temperature field to a continuum based model. A sensitivity analysis is used to identify the optimal film thickness for extracting the both substrate conductivity and diffusivity. Proof of principle studies were conducted on a range of samples having thermal properties that are representative of current and advanced accident tolerant nuclear fuels. It is shown that by including the Kapitza resistance as an additional fitting parameter, the measured conductivity and diffusivity of all the samples considered agree closely with literature values. Lastly, a distinguishing feature of this technique is that it does not require a priori knowledge of the optical spot size which greatly increases measurement reliability and reproducibility.

  18. Local measurement of thermal conductivity and diffusivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, David H.; Schley, Robert S.; Khafizov, Marat; Wendt, Brycen L.

    2015-12-15

    Simultaneous measurement of local thermal diffusivity and conductivity is demonstrated on a range of ceramic samples. This was accomplished by measuring the temperature field spatial profile of samples excited by an amplitude modulated continuous wave laser beam. A thin gold film is applied to the samples to ensure strong optical absorption and to establish a second boundary condition that introduces an expression containing the substrate thermal conductivity. The diffusivity and conductivity are obtained by comparing the measured phase profile of the temperature field to a continuum based model. A sensitivity analysis is used to identify the optimal film thickness for extracting the both substrate conductivity and diffusivity. Proof of principle studies were conducted on a range of samples having thermal properties that are representatives of current and advanced accident tolerant nuclear fuels. It is shown that by including the Kapitza resistance as an additional fitting parameter, the measured conductivity and diffusivity of all the samples considered agreed closely with the literature values. A distinguishing feature of this technique is that it does not require a priori knowledge of the optical spot size which greatly increases measurement reliability and reproducibility.

  19. Thermal and electrical contact conductance studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansciver, S. W.; Nilles, M.

    1985-01-01

    Prediction of electrical and thermal contact resistance for pressed, nominally flat contacts is complicated by the large number of variables which influence contact formation. This is reflected in experimental results as a wide variation in contact resistances, spanning up to six orders of magnitude. A series of experiments were performed to observe the effects of oxidation and surface roughness on contact resistance. Electrical contact resistance and thermal contact conductance from 4 to 290 K on OFHC Cu contacts are reported. Electrical contact resistance was measured with a 4-wire DC technique. Thermal contact conductance was determined by steady-state longitudinal heat flow. Corrections for the bulk contribution ot the overall measured resistance were made, with the remaining resistance due solely to the presence of the contact.

  20. Infrared Detector System with Controlled Thermal Conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A thermal infrared detector system includes a heat sink, a support member, a connection support member connecting the support member to the heat sink and including a heater unit is reviewed. An infrared detector element is mounted on the support member and a temperature signal representative of the infrared energy contacting the support member can then be derived by comparing the temperature of the support member and the heat sink. The temperature signal from a support member and a temperature signal from the connection support member can then be used to drive a heater unit mounted on the connection support member to thereby control the thermal conductance of the support member. Thus, the thermal conductance can be controlled so that it can be actively increased or decreased as desired.

  1. Thermal Conductivity of Al-Salt Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Mei; Wang, Lijun; Seetharaman, Seshadri

    2015-11-01

    With a view to examine the possibility of estimating the content of entrapped metallic aluminium in the salt cake from aluminium remelting, the thermal diffusivity of reference composites of KCl-NaCl-Al was measured as a function of aluminium metal content at room temperature. The thermal conductivity of the reference composites was found to increase with the metallic Al content. The lumped parameter model approach was carried out to discuss the influence of different geometry arrangements of each phase, viz. air, salts and metallic aluminium on the thermal conductivity. Application of the present results to industrial samples indicates that factors such as the interfacial condition of metallic Al particles have to be considered in order to estimate the amount of entrapped Al in the salt cake.

  2. Thermal Conductivity of Polyimide/Nanofiller Blends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghose, S.; Watson, K. A.; Delozier, D. M.; Working, D. c.; Connell, J. W.; Smith, J. G.; Sun, Y. P.; Lin, Y.

    2006-01-01

    In efforts to improve the thermal conductivity of Ultem(TM) 1000, it was compounded with three carbon based nano-fillers. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), vapor grown carbon nanofibers (CNF) and expanded graphite (EG) were investigated. Ribbons were extruded to form samples in which the nano-fillers were aligned. Samples were also fabricated by compression molding in which the nano-fillers were randomly oriented. The thermal properties were evaluated by DSC and TGA, and the mechanical properties of the aligned samples were determined by tensile testing. The degree of dispersion and alignment of the nanoparticles were investigated with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. The thermal conductivity of the samples was measured in both the direction of alignment as well as perpendicular to that direction using the Nanoflash technique. The results of this study will be presented.

  3. Nanodiamond nanofluids for enhanced thermal conductivity.

    PubMed

    Branson, Blake T; Beauchamp, Paul S; Beam, Jeremiah C; Lukehart, Charles M; Davidson, Jim L

    2013-04-23

    Deaggregation of oxidized ultradispersed diamond (UDD) in dimethylsulfoxide followed by reaction with glycidol monomer, purification via aqueous dialysis, and dispersion in ethylene glycol (EG) base fluid affords nanodiamond (ND)-poly(glycidol) polymer brush:EG nanofluids exhibiting 12% thermal conductivity enhancement at a ND loading of 0.9 vol %. Deaggregation of UDD in the presence of oleic acid/octane followed by dispersion in light mineral oil and evaporative removal of octane gives ND·oleic acid:mineral oil dispersions exhibiting 11% thermal conductivity enhancement at a ND loading of 1.9 vol %. Average particle sizes of ND additives, determined by dynamic light scattering, are, respectively, ca. 11 nm (in H2O) and 18 nm (in toluene). Observed thermal conductivity enhancements outperform enhancement effects calculated using Maxwell's effective medium approximation by 2- to 4-fold. Covalent ND surface modification gives 2-fold greater thermal conductivity enhancement than ND surface modification via hydrogen-bonding interactions at similar concentrations. Stable, static ND:mineral oil dispersions are reported for the first time. PMID:23488739

  4. Reducing Thermal Conduction In Acoustic Levitators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lierke, Ernst G.; Leung, Emily W.; Bhat, Balakrishna T.

    1991-01-01

    Acoustic transducers containing piezoelectric driving elements made more resistant to heat by reduction of effective thermal-conductance cross sections of metal vibration-transmitting rods in them, according to proposal. Used to levitate small objects acoustically for noncontact processing in furnaces. Reductions in cross sections increase amplitudes of transmitted vibrations and reduce loss of heat from furnaces.

  5. Indium Foil Serves As Thermally Conductive Gasket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, G. Yale; Dussinger, Peter M.

    1993-01-01

    Indium foil found useful as gasket to increase thermal conductance between bodies clamped together. Deforms to fill imperfections on mating surfaces. Used where maximum temperature in joint less than melting temperature of indium. Because of low melting temperature of indium, most useful in cryogenic applications.

  6. Electrically Conductive White Thermal-Control Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Cheng-Hsien; Forsberg, Gustaf A.; O'Donnell, Timothy P.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes development of white thermal-control paint intended for use on spacecraft. Paint required to exhibit combination of high emittance (equal to or greater than 0.90), low absorptance (equal to or less than 0.20), and electrical conductivity sufficient to prevent charging with static electricity to potentials beyond range of plus or minus 10 V.

  7. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  8. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  9. Ultrafast thermoreflectance techniques for measuring thermal conductivity and interface thermal conductance of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jie; Tang, Dawei; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jun; Holub, Kristopher W.; Yang, Ronggui

    2010-11-01

    The thermal conductivity of thin films and interface thermal conductance of dissimilar materials play a critical role in the functionality and the reliability of micro/nanomaterials and devices. The ultrafast laser-based thermoreflectance techniques, including the time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) and the frequency-domain thermoreflectance (FDTR) techniques are excellent approaches for the challenging measurements of interface thermal conductance of dissimilar materials. Both TDTR and FDTR signals on a trilayer structure which consists of a thin film metal transducer, a target thin film, and a substrate are studied by a thermal conduction model. The sensitivity of TDTR signals to the thermal conductivity of thin films is analyzed to show that the modulation frequency needs to be selected carefully for a high precision TDTR measurement. However, such a frequency selection, which is closely related to the unknown thermal properties and consequently hard to make before TDTR measurement, can be avoided in FDTR measurement. We also found out that in FDTR method, the heat transport in a trilayer structure could be divided into three regimes, and the thermal conductivity of thin films and interface thermal conductance can be obtained subsequently by fitting the data in different frequency range of one FDTR measurement, based on the regime map. Both TDTR and FDTR measurements are then conducted along with the analysis to obtain the thermal conductivity of SiO2 thin films and interface thermal conductance between SiO2 and Si. FDTR measurement results agree well with the TDTR measurements, but promises to be a much easier implementation than TDTR measurements.

  10. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF SIC AND C FIBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, Gerald E.; Senor, David J.; Kowbel, W.; Webb, J.; Kohyama, Akira

    2000-09-01

    Several rod-shaped specimens with uniaxially packed fibers (Hi-Nicalon, Hi-Nicalon Type S, Tyranno SA and Amoco K1100 types) and a pre-ceramic polymer matrix have been fabricated. By using appropriate analytic models, the bare fiber thermal conductivity (Kf) and the interface thermal conductance (h) will be determined as a function of temperature up to 1000?C before and after irradiation for samples cut from these rods. Initial results are: (1) for unirradiated Hi-Nicalon SiC fiber, Kf varied from 4.3 up to 5.9 W/mK for the 27-1000?C range, (2) for unirradiated K1100 graphite fiber, Kf varied from 576 down to 242 W/mK for the 27-1000?C range, and (3) h = 43 W/cm2K at 27?C as a typical fiber/matrix interface conductance.

  11. Thermal Conductivity Measurements on consolidated Soil Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiferlin, K.; Heimberg, M.; Thomas, N.

    2007-08-01

    Heat transport in porous media such as soils and regolith is significantly reduced compared to the properties of compact samples of the same material. The bottle neck for solid state heat transport is the contact area between adjacent grains. For "dry" and unconsolidated materials the contact areas and thus the thermal conductivity are extremely small. Sintering and cementation are two processes that can increase the cross section of interstitial bonds signifcantly. On Mars, cementation can be caused by condensation of water or carbon dioxide ice from the vapor phase, or from salts and minerals that fall out from aqueous solutions. We produced several artificially cemented samples, using small glass beads of uniform size as soil analog. The cementation is achieved by initially molten wax that is mixed with the glass beads while liqiud. The wax freezes preferably at the contact points between grains, thus minimizing surface energy, and consolidates the samples. The thermal conductivity of these samples is then measured in vacuum. We present the results of these measurements and compare them with theoretical models. The observed range of thermal conductivity values can explain some, but not all of the variations in thermal intertia that can be seen in TES remote sensing data.

  12. The Apparent Thermal Conductivity of Pozzolana Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessenouci, M. Z.; Triki, N. E. Bibi; Khelladi, S.; Draoui, B.; Abene, A.

    The recent development of some lightweight construction materials, such as light concrete, can play an important role as an insulator, while maintaining sufficient levels of mechanical performance. The quality of insulation to provide depends on the climate, the exposure of the walls and also the materials used in the construction. The choice of a material to be used as an insulator, obviously, depends on its availability and its cost. This is a study of natural pozzolanas as basic components in building materials. It is intended to highlight their thermal advantage. It is economically advantageous to use pozzolana in substitution for a portion of the clinker as hydraulically active additions, as well as in compositions of lightweight concretes in the form of pozzolanic aggregate mixtures, which provide mechanical strengths that comply with current standards. A theoretical study is conducted on the apparent thermal conductivity of building materials, namely concrete containing pozzolana. Thermal modeling, apparent to that commonly used for porous materials, has been applied to pozzolana concrete. Experimental results on measurements of the apparent thermal conductivity of pozzolana concrete are reported in this study, using an approach that considers that concrete is composed of two solid ingredients, a binding matrix (hydrated cement paste) and all aggregates. A second comparative theoretical approach is used for the case where concrete consists of a solid phase and a fluid phase (air).

  13. Inhomogeneous thermal conductivity enhances thermoelectric cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tingyu; Zhou, Jun; Li, Nianbei; Yang, Ronggui; Li, Baowen

    2014-12-01

    We theoretically investigate the enhancement of thermoelectric cooling performance in thermoelectric refrigerators made of materials with inhomogeneous thermal conductivity, beyond the usual practice of enhancing thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) of materials. The dissipation of the Joule heat in such thermoelectric refrigerators is asymmetric which can give rise to better thermoelectric cooling performance. Although the thermoelectric figure of merit and the coefficient-of-performance are slightly enhanced, both the maximum cooling power and the maximum cooling temperature difference can be enhanced significantly. This finding can be used to increase the heat absorption at the cold end. We further find that the asymmetric dissipation of Joule heat leads to thermal rectification.

  14. Thermal conductivity of lower-mantle minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, Alexander F.; Beck, Pierre; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Haugen, Benjamin D.; Jacobsen, Steven D.

    2009-05-01

    Geodynamic models of heat transport and the thermal evolution of Earth's interior require knowledge of thermal conductivity for high-pressure phases at relevant temperatures and pressures. Here we present new data on radiative and lattice heat transfer in mantle materials determined from optical spectroscopy and time-resolved optical radiometry. The pressure dependence of optical absorption in ferropericlase (Mg,Fe)O, and silicate perovskite (Mg,Fe)SiO 3, has been determined in the IR through UV regions up to 133 GPa. Whereas (Mg,Fe)O exhibits a strong pressure dependence of absorption and spectral changes associated with the high-spin (HS) to low-spin (LS) transition of Fe 2+ [Goncharov, A.F., Struzhkin, V.V., Jacobsen, S.D. 2006. Reduced radiative conductivity of low-spin (Mg,Fe)O in the lower mantle. Science 312, 1205-1208], the pressure dependence of optical absorption in (Mg,Fe)SiO 3 is relatively weak. We observe a moderate increase in absorption with pressure for (Mg,Fe)SiO 3 in the visible and infrared spectral range due to a red-shift of absorption in ultraviolet, however the crystal-field transitions of Fe 2+ become weaker with pressure and disappear above 50 GPa as a result of the HS-LS transition in (Mg,Fe)SiO 3. Intervalence charge-transfer transitions in silicate perovskite shift to higher energies with pressure. The temperature dependence of the optical absorption of (Mg,Fe)O measured up to 65 GPa and 800 K is moderate below 30 GPa and weak above 30 GPa. Thus, the temperature correction of the radiative conductivity is insignificant. The estimated total pressure-dependent radiative conductivity (in approximation of a large grain size) is lower than expected from the pressure extrapolation of the ambient and low-pressure data [Hofmeister, A.M., 1999. Mantle values of thermal conductivity and the geotherm from phonon lifetimes. Science 283, 1699-1706; Hofmeister, A.M., 2005. Dependence of diffusive radiative transfer on grain-size, temperature, and Fe

  15. Thermal effects in microfluidics with thermal conductivity spatially modulated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Toro, Agustín.

    2014-05-01

    A heat transfer model on a microfluidic is resolved analytically. The model describes a fluid at rest between two parallel plates where each plate is maintained at a differentially specified temperature and the thermal conductivity of the microfluidic is spatially modulated. The heat transfer model in such micro-hydrostatic configuration is analytically resolved using the technique of the Laplace transform applying the Bromwich Integral and the Residue theorem. The temperature outline in the microfluidic is presented as an infinite series of Bessel functions. It is shown that the result for the thermal conductivity spatially modulated has as a particular case the solution when the thermal conductivity is spatially constant. All computations were performed using the computer algebra software Maple. It is claimed that the analytical obtained results are important for the design of nanoscale devices with applications in biotechnology. Furthermore, it is suggested some future research lines such as the study of the heat transfer model in a microfluidic resting between coaxial cylinders with radially modulated thermal conductivity in order to achieve future developments in this area.

  16. Ultralow Thermal Conductivity in Full Heusler Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    He, Jiangang; Amsler, Maximilian; Xia, Yi; Naghavi, S Shahab; Hegde, Vinay I; Hao, Shiqiang; Goedecker, Stefan; Ozoliņš, Vidvuds; Wolverton, Chris

    2016-07-22

    Semiconducting half and, to a lesser extent, full Heusler compounds are promising thermoelectric materials due to their compelling electronic properties with large power factors. However, intrinsically high thermal conductivity resulting in a limited thermoelectric efficiency has so far impeded their widespread use in practical applications. Here, we report the computational discovery of a class of hitherto unknown stable semiconducting full Heusler compounds with ten valence electrons (X_{2}YZ, X=Ca, Sr, and Ba; Y=Au and Hg; Z=Sn, Pb, As, Sb, and Bi) through high-throughput ab initio screening. These new compounds exhibit ultralow lattice thermal conductivity κ_{L} close to the theoretical minimum due to strong anharmonic rattling of the heavy noble metals, while preserving high power factors, thus resulting in excellent phonon-glass electron-crystal materials.

  17. Thermal Boundary Conductance: A Materials Science Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monachon, Christian; Weber, Ludger; Dames, Chris

    2016-07-01

    The thermal boundary conductance (TBC) of materials pairs in atomically intimate contact is reviewed as a practical guide for materials scientists. First, analytical and computational models of TBC are reviewed. Five measurement methods are then compared in terms of their sensitivity to TBC: the 3ω method, frequency- and time-domain thermoreflectance, the cut-bar method, and a composite effective thermal conductivity method. The heart of the review surveys 30 years of TBC measurements around room temperature, highlighting the materials science factors experimentally proven to influence TBC. These factors include the bulk dispersion relations, acoustic contrast, and interfacial chemistry and bonding. The measured TBCs are compared across a wide range of materials systems by using the maximum transmission limit, which with an attenuated transmission coefficient proves to be a good guideline for most clean, strongly bonded interfaces. Finally, opportunities for future research are discussed.

  18. The contact area dependent interfacial thermal conductance

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chenhan; Wei, Zhiyong; Bi, Kedong; Yang, Juekuan; Chen, Yunfei; Wang, Jian

    2015-12-15

    The effects of the contact area on the interfacial thermal conductance σ are investigated using the atomic Green’s function method. Different from the prediction of the heat diffusion transport model, we obtain an interesting result that the interfacial thermal conductance per unit area Λ is positively dependent on the contact area as the area varies from a few atoms to several square nanometers. Through calculating the phonon transmission function, it is uncovered that the phonon transmission per unit area increases with the increased contact area. This is attributed to that each atom has more neighboring atoms in the counterpart of the interface with the increased contact area, which provides more channels for phonon transport.

  19. Ultralow Thermal Conductivity in Full Heusler Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    He, Jiangang; Amsler, Maximilian; Xia, Yi; Naghavi, S Shahab; Hegde, Vinay I; Hao, Shiqiang; Goedecker, Stefan; Ozoliņš, Vidvuds; Wolverton, Chris

    2016-07-22

    Semiconducting half and, to a lesser extent, full Heusler compounds are promising thermoelectric materials due to their compelling electronic properties with large power factors. However, intrinsically high thermal conductivity resulting in a limited thermoelectric efficiency has so far impeded their widespread use in practical applications. Here, we report the computational discovery of a class of hitherto unknown stable semiconducting full Heusler compounds with ten valence electrons (X_{2}YZ, X=Ca, Sr, and Ba; Y=Au and Hg; Z=Sn, Pb, As, Sb, and Bi) through high-throughput ab initio screening. These new compounds exhibit ultralow lattice thermal conductivity κ_{L} close to the theoretical minimum due to strong anharmonic rattling of the heavy noble metals, while preserving high power factors, thus resulting in excellent phonon-glass electron-crystal materials. PMID:27494488

  20. Ultralow Thermal Conductivity in Full Heusler Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiangang; Amsler, Maximilian; Xia, Yi; Naghavi, S. Shahab; Hegde, Vinay I.; Hao, Shiqiang; Goedecker, Stefan; OzoliĆš, Vidvuds; Wolverton, Chris

    2016-07-01

    Semiconducting half and, to a lesser extent, full Heusler compounds are promising thermoelectric materials due to their compelling electronic properties with large power factors. However, intrinsically high thermal conductivity resulting in a limited thermoelectric efficiency has so far impeded their widespread use in practical applications. Here, we report the computational discovery of a class of hitherto unknown stable semiconducting full Heusler compounds with ten valence electrons (X2Y Z , X =Ca , Sr, and Ba; Y =Au and Hg; Z =Sn , Pb, As, Sb, and Bi) through high-throughput ab initio screening. These new compounds exhibit ultralow lattice thermal conductivity κL close to the theoretical minimum due to strong anharmonic rattling of the heavy noble metals, while preserving high power factors, thus resulting in excellent phonon-glass electron-crystal materials.

  1. Multiscale Modeling of UHTC: Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, John W.; Murry, Daw; Squire, Thomas; Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a multiscale framework in computational modeling for the ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC) ZrB2 and HfB2. These materials are characterized by high melting point, good strength, and reasonable oxidation resistance. They are candidate materials for a number of applications in extreme environments including sharp leading edges of hypersonic aircraft. In particular, we used a combination of ab initio methods, atomistic simulations and continuum computations to obtain insights into fundamental properties of these materials. Ab initio methods were used to compute basic structural, mechanical and thermal properties. From these results, a database was constructed to fit a Tersoff style interatomic potential suitable for atomistic simulations. These potentials were used to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity of single crystals and the thermal resistance of simple grain boundaries. Finite element method (FEM) computations using atomistic results as inputs were performed with meshes constructed on SEM images thereby modeling the realistic microstructure. These continuum computations showed the reduction in thermal conductivity due to the grain boundary network.

  2. Simultaneous Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity and Thermal Conductivity by Means of Inverse Solution for One-Dimensional Heat Conduction (Anisotropic Thermal Properties of CFRP for FCEV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaka, Masataka; Monde, Masanori

    2015-11-01

    For safe and fast fueling of hydrogen in a fuel cell electric vehicle at hydrogen fueling stations, an understanding of the heat transferred from the gas into the tank wall (carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) material) during hydrogen fueling is necessary. Its thermal properties are needed in estimating heat loss accurately during hydrogen fueling. The CFRP has anisotropic thermal properties, because it consists of an adhesive agent and layers of the CFRP which is wound with a carbon fiber. In this paper, the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of the tank wall material were measured by an inverse solution for one-dimensional unsteady heat conduction. As a result, the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity were 2.09 × 10^{-6}{ m}2{\\cdot }{s}^{-1} and 3.06{ W}{\\cdot }{m}{\\cdot }^{-1}{K}^{-1} for the axial direction, while they were 6.03 × 10^{-7} {m}2{\\cdot }{s}^{-1} and 0.93 {W}{\\cdot }{m}^{-1}{\\cdot }{K}^{-1} for the radial direction. The thermal conductivity for the axial direction was about three times higher than that for the radial direction. The thermal diffusivity shows the same trend in both directions because the thermal capacity, ρ c, is independent of direction, where ρ is the density and c is the heat capacity.

  3. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF THE POTENTIAL REPOSITORY HORIZON

    SciTech Connect

    J.E. BEAN

    2004-09-27

    The primary purpose of this report is to assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of bulk thermal conductivity in the host horizon for the repository at Yucca Mountain. More specifically, the lithostratigraphic units studied are located within the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) and consist of the upper lithophysal zone (Tptpul), the middle nonlithophysal zone (Tptpmn), the lower lithophysal zone (Tptpll), and the lower nonlithophysal zone (Tptpln). Design plans indicate that approximately 81 percent of the repository will be excavated in the Tptpll, approximately 12 percent in the Tptpmn, and the remainder in the Tptul and Tptpln (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168370]). This report provides three-dimensional geostatistical estimates of the bulk thermal conductivity for the four stratigraphic layers of the repository horizon. The three-dimensional geostatistical estimates of matrix and lithophysal porosity, dry bulk density, and matrix thermal conductivity are also provided. This report provides input to various models and calculations that simulate heat transport through the rock mass. These models include the ''Drift Degradation Analysis, Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model, Ventilation Model and Analysis Report, Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms, Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'', and ''Drift Scale THM Model''. These models directly or indirectly provide input to the total system performance assessment (TSPA). The main distinguishing characteristic among the lithophysal and nonlithophysal units is the percentage of large-scale (centimeters-meters) voids within the rock. The Tptpul and Tptpll, as their names suggest, have a higher percentage of lithophysae than the Tptpmn and the Tptpln. Understanding the influence of the lithophysae is of great importance to understanding bulk thermal conductivity.

  4. Design principles of interfacial thermal conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanco, Carlos; Rastgarkafshgarkolaei, Rouzbeh; Zhang, Jingjie; Le, Nam; Norris, Pamela; Ghosh, Avik

    We explore fundamental principles to design the thermal conductance across solid interfaces by changing the composition and disorder of an intermediate matching layer. In absence of phonon-phonon interactions, the layer addition involves two competing effects that influence the conductance. The layer can act as an impedance matching 'bridge' to increase the mode-averaged phonon transmission. However, it also reduces the relevant modes that conserve their momenta transverse to the interface, so that the net result depends on features such as the overlap of conserving modes and the dispersivity of the transverse subbands. Moving into the interacting anharmonic regime, we find that the added layer aids conductance when the decreased resistances at the contact-layer boundaries compensate for the layer resistance. In fact, we show that the maximum conductance corresponds to an exact matching of the two separate contact-layer resistances. For instance, if we vary just the atomic mass across layers, then maximum conductance happens when the intervening layer mass is the geometric mean of the contact masses. We conjecture that the best interfacial layer is one that is compositionally graded into many geometric means - in other words, an exponential variation in thermal impedance.

  5. Evaluation of New Thermally Conductive Geopolymer in Thermal Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Černý, Matěj; Uhlík, Jan; Nosek, Jaroslav; Lachman, Vladimír; Hladký, Radim; Franěk, Jan; Brož, Milan

    This paper describes an evaluation of a newly developed thermally conductive geopolymer (TCG), consisting of a mixture of sodium silicate and carbon micro-particles. The TCG is intended to be used as a component of high temperature energy storage (HTTES) to improve its thermal diffusivity. Energy storage is crucial for both ecological and economical sustainability. HTTES plays a vital role in solar energy technologies and in waste heat recovery. The most advanced HTTES technologies are based on phase change materials or molten salts, but suffer with economic and technological limitations. Rock or concrete HTTES are cheaper, but they have low thermal conductivity without incorporation of TCG. It was observed that TCG is stable up to 400 °C. The thermal conductivity was measured in range of 20-23 W m-1 K-1. The effect of TCG was tested by heating a granite block with an artificial fissure. One half of the fissure was filled with TCG and the other with ballotini. 28 thermometers, 5 dilatometers and strain sensors were installed on the block. The heat transport experiment was evaluated with COMSOL Multiphysics software.

  6. Thermal conductivity and contact resistance of metal foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, E.; Hsieh, S.; Bahrami, M.

    2011-03-01

    Accurate information on heat transfer and temperature distribution in metal foams is necessary for design and modelling of thermal-hydraulic systems incorporating metal foams. The analysis of heat transfer requires determination of the effective thermal conductivity as well as the thermal contact resistance (TCR) associated with the interface between the metal foam and the adjacent surfaces/layers. In this study, a test bed that allows the separation of effective thermal conductivity and TCR in metal foams is described. Measurements are performed in a vacuum under varying compressive loads using ERG Duocel aluminium foam samples with different porosities and pore densities. Also, a graphical method associated with a computer code is developed to demonstrate the distribution of contact spots and estimate the real contact area at the interface. Our results show that the porosity and the effective thermal conductivity remain unchanged with the variation of compression in the range 0-2 MPa; but TCR decreases significantly with pressure due to an increase in the real contact area at the interface. Moreover, the ratio of real to nominal contact area varies between 0 and 0.013, depending upon the compressive force, porosity, pore density and surface characteristics.

  7. Thermal conductivity and interfacial thermal conductance of HfN/ScN superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Schroeder, Jeremy; Koh, Yeekan

    2015-03-01

    Metal/semiconductor superlattices are known for their potential application as thermionic devices. Understanding thermal properties of such superlattices is essential for the design of new material structures and devices. Here, we measured the cross-plane thermal conductivity of HfN/ScN metal/semiconductor superlattices using time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR). HfN/ScN superlattices with different period thickness (2nm to 24 nm) were grown on MgO substrate using reactive magnetron sputtering. We found that the minimum thermal conductivity is 4.3 W/m K when the period thickness is 6 nm. By changing the ratio of layer thickness of HfN and ScN (1:4 to 4:1), we studied the contributions electrons and phonons to the thermal conductivity of superlattices. Use a simple thermal resistance calculation, we extract the interfacial thermal conductance between HfN and ScN. The interfacial thermal conductance is 1.8 GW/m2 K, which is 3 times higher than that of AlN/GaN.

  8. Analytical estimation of skeleton thermal conductivity of a geopolymer foam from thermal conductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henon, J.; Alzina, A.; Absi, J.; Smith, D. S.; Rossignol, S.

    2015-07-01

    The geopolymers are alumino-silicate binders. The addition of a high pores volume fraction, gives them a thermal insulation character desired in the building industry. In this work, potassium geopolymer foams were prepared at room temperature (< 70 ∘C) by a process of in situ gas release. The porosity distribution shows a multiscale character. However, the thermal conductivity measurements gave values from 0.35 to 0.12 Wm-1.K-1 for a pore volume fraction values between 65 and 85%. In the aim to predict the thermal properties of these foams and focus on the relationship "thermal-conductivity/microstructure", knowledge of the thermal conductivity of their solid skeleton (λ s ) is paramount. However, there is rare work on the determination of this value depending on the initial composition. By the formulation used, the foaming agent contributes to the final network, and it is not possible to obtain a dense material designate to make a direct measurement of λ s . The objective of this work is to use inverse analytical methods to identify the value of λ s . Measurements of thermal conductivity by the fluxmetre technique were performed. The obtained value of the solid skeleton thermal conductivity by the inverse numerical technique is situated in a framework between 0.95 and 1.35 Wm-1.K-1 and is in agreement with one issue from the literature.

  9. Thermal Expansion and Thermal Conductivity of Rare Earth Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Lee, Kang N.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2006-01-01

    Rare earth silicates are considered promising candidate materials for environmental barrier coatings applications at elevated temperature for ceramic matrix composites. High temperature thermophysical properties are of great importance for coating system design and development. In this study, the thermal expansion and thermal conductivity of hot-pressed rare earth silicate materials were characterized at temperatures up to 1400 C. The effects of specimen porosity, composition and microstructure on the properties were also investigated. The materials processing and testing issues affecting the measurements will also be discussed.

  10. Removing the thermal component from heart rate provides an accurate VO2 estimation in forest work.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Philippe-Antoine; Imbeau, Daniel; Dubeau, Denise; Lebel, Luc; Kolus, Ahmet

    2016-05-01

    Heart rate (HR) was monitored continuously in 41 forest workers performing brushcutting or tree planting work. 10-min seated rest periods were imposed during the workday to estimate the HR thermal component (ΔHRT) per Vogt et al. (1970, 1973). VO2 was measured using a portable gas analyzer during a morning submaximal step-test conducted at the work site, during a work bout over the course of the day (range: 9-74 min), and during an ensuing 10-min rest pause taken at the worksite. The VO2 estimated, from measured HR and from corrected HR (thermal component removed), were compared to VO2 measured during work and rest. Varied levels of HR thermal component (ΔHRTavg range: 0-38 bpm) originating from a wide range of ambient thermal conditions, thermal clothing insulation worn, and physical load exerted during work were observed. Using raw HR significantly overestimated measured work VO2 by 30% on average (range: 1%-64%). 74% of VO2 prediction error variance was explained by the HR thermal component. VO2 estimated from corrected HR, was not statistically different from measured VO2. Work VO2 can be estimated accurately in the presence of thermal stress using Vogt et al.'s method, which can be implemented easily by the practitioner with inexpensive instruments.

  11. Thermal conductivities of thin, sputtered optical films

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, C.H. Jr.; Pawlewicz, W.T.

    1991-05-01

    The normal component of the thin film thermal conductivity has been measured for the first time for several advanced sputtered optical materials. Included are data for single layers of boron nitride (BN), aluminum nitride (AIN), silicon aluminum nitride (Si-Al-N), silicon aluminum oxynitride (Si-Al-O-N), silicon carbide (SiC), and for dielectric-enhanced metal reflectors of the form Al(SiO{sub 2}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}){sup n} and Al(Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AIN){sup n}. Sputtered films of more conventional materials like SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}, Ti, and Si have also been measured. The data show that thin film thermal conductivities are typically 10 to 100 times lower than conductivities for the same materials in bulk form. Structural disorder in the amorphous or very fine-grained films appears to account for most of the conductivity difference. Conclusive evidence for a film/substrate interface contribution is presented.

  12. Thermal conductivity of silicene from first-principles

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Han; Bao, Hua E-mail: hua.bao@sjtu.edu.cn; Hu, Ming E-mail: hua.bao@sjtu.edu.cn

    2014-03-31

    Silicene, as a graphene-like two-dimensional material, now receives exceptional attention of a wide community of scientists and engineers beyond graphene. Despite extensive study on its electric property, little research has been done to accurately calculate the phonon transport of silicene so far. In this paper, thermal conductivity of monolayer silicene is predicted from first-principles method. At 300 K, the thermal conductivity of monolayer silicene is found to be 9.4 W/mK and much smaller than bulk silicon. The contributions from in-plane and out-of-plane vibrations to thermal conductivity are quantified, and the out-of-plane vibration contributes less than 10% of the overall thermal conductivity, which is different from the results of the similar studies on graphene. The difference is explained by the presence of small buckling, which breaks the reflectional symmetry of the structure. The flexural modes are thus not purely out-of-plane vibration and have strong scattering with other modes.

  13. Effective thermal conductivity of a thin composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, P.E.; Niemann, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    The thermal conductivity of a randomly oriented composite material is modeled using a probabilistic approach in order to determine if a size effect exists for the thermal conductivity at small composite thickness. The numerical scheme employs a random number generator to position the filler elements, which have a relatively high thermal conductivity, within a matrix having a relatively low thermal conductivity. Results indicate that, below some threshold thickness, the composite thermal conductivity increases with decreasing thickness, while above the threshold the thermal conductivity is independent of thickness. The threshold thickness increases for increasing filler fraction and increasing k{sub f}/k{sub m}, the ratio between filler and matrix thermal conductivities.

  14. Dependence of Thermal Conductivity on Thickness in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Min; Shrestha, Ramesh; Dangol, Ashesh; Chang, Won Seok; Coker, Zachary; Choi, Tae-Youl

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report experimentally dependence of thermal conductivity on thickness of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) thin films; the measurements are based on the micropipette thermal sensor technique. Accurate and well resolved measurements of thermal conductivity made by the micropipette sensor showed a correlated behavior of thickness and thermal conductivity of CNT films that thermal conductivity decreased as thickness increased. The thickness dependence is explained by reduction of mean free path (MFP), which is induced by more intertubular junctions in more dense-packed carbon nanotube (CNT) networks; the thicker SWCNT films were revealed to have higher density. PMID:27398564

  15. Measuring Thermal Conductivity at LH2 Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selvidge, Shawn; Watwood, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    For many years, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) produced reference materials for materials testing. One such reference material was intended for use with a guarded hot plate apparatus designed to meet the requirements of ASTM C177-97, "Standard Test Method for Steady-State Heat Flux Measurements and Thermal Transmission Properties by Means of the Guarded-Hot-Plate Apparatus." This apparatus can be used to test materials in various gaseous environments from atmospheric pressure to a vacuum. It allows the thermal transmission properties of insulating materials to be measured from just above ambient temperature down to temperatures below liquid hydrogen. However, NIST did not generate data below 77 K temperature for the reference material in question. This paper describes a test method used at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to optimize thermal conductivity measurements during the development of thermal protection systems. The test method extends the usability range of this reference material by generating data at temperatures lower than 77 K. Information provided by this test is discussed, as are the capabilities of the MSFC Hydrogen Test Facility, where advanced methods for materials testing are routinely developed and optimized in support of aerospace applications.

  16. Treating Fibrous Insulation to Reduce Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinn, Alfred; Tarkanian, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    A chemical treatment reduces the convective and radiative contributions to the effective thermal conductivity of porous fibrous thermal-insulation tile. The net effect of the treatment is to coat the surfaces of fibers with a mixture of transition-metal oxides (TMOs) without filling the pores. The TMO coats reduce the cross-sectional areas available for convection while absorbing and scattering thermal radiation in the pores, thereby rendering the tile largely opaque to thermal radiation. The treatment involves a sol-gel process: A solution containing a mixture of transition-metal-oxide-precursor salts plus a gelling agent (e.g., tetraethylorthosilicate) is partially cured, then, before it visibly gels, is used to impregnate the tile. The solution in the tile is gelled, then dried, and then the tile is fired to convert the precursor salts to the desired mixed TMO phases. The amounts of the various TMOs ultimately incorporated into the tile can be tailored via the concentrations of salts in the solution, and the impregnation depth can be tailored via the viscosity of the solution and/or the volume of the solution relative to that of the tile. The amounts of the TMOs determine the absorption and scattering spectra.

  17. Numerical Investigation of the Thermal Conductivity of Graphite Nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakak Khadem, Masoud

    The thermal conductivity of graphite nano-fibers (GNFs) with different styles is predicted computationally. GNFs are formed as basal planes of graphene stacked based on the catalytic configuration. The large GNF thermal conductivity relative to a base phase change material (PCM) may lead to improved PCM performance when embedded with GNFs. Three different types of GNFs are modeled: platelet, ribbon, and herringbone. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used in this study as a means to predict the thermal conductivity tensor based on atomic behavior. The in-house MD code, Molecular Dynamics in Arbitrary Geometries (MDAG), was updated with the features required to create the predictions. To model both interlayer van-der Waals and intralayer covalent bonding of carbon atoms in GNFs, a combination of the optimized Tersoff potential function for atoms within the layers and a pairwise Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential function to model the interactions between the layers was used. Tests of energy conservation in the NVE ensemble have been performed to validate the employed potential model. Nose-Hoover, Andersen, and Berendsen thermostats were also incorporated into MDAG to enable MD simulations in NVT ensembles, where the volume, number of atoms, and temperature of the system are conserved. Equilibrium MD with Green-Kubo (GK) relations was then employed to extract the thermal conductivity tensor for symmetric GNFs (platelet and ribbon). The thermal conductivity of solid argon at different temperatures was calculated and compared to other studies to validate the GK implementation. Different heat current formulations, as a result of using the three-body Tersoff potential, were considered and the discrepancy in the calculated thermal conductivity values of graphene using each formula was resolved by employing a novel comparative technique that identifies the most accurate formulation. The effect of stacking configuration on the thermal conductivity of platelet and ribbon GNFs

  18. Determining in-situ thermal conductivity of coarse textured materials through numerical analysis of thermal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, H.; Hamamoto, S.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2013-12-01

    Ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems use ground or groundwater as a heat/cooling source, typically by circulating anti-freezing solution inside a vertically installed closed-loop tube known as a U-tube to transfer heat to/from the ground. Since GSHP systems are based on renewable energy and can achieve much higher coefficient of performance (COP) than conventional air source heat pump systems, use of GSHP systems has been rapidly increasing worldwide. However, environmental impacts by GSHP systems including thermal effects on subsurface physical-chemical and microbiological properties have not been fully investigated. To rigorously assess GSHP impact on the subsurface environment, ground thermal properties including thermal conductivity and heat capacity need to be accurately characterized. Ground thermal properties were investigated at two experimental sites at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TAT) and Saitama University (SA), both located in the Kanto area of Japan. Thermal properties were evaluated both by thermal probe measurements on boring core samples and by performing in-situ Thermal Response Tests (TRT) in 50-80 m deep U-tubes. At both TAT and SU sites, heat-pulse probe measurements gave unrealistic low thermal conductivities for coarse textured materials (dominated by particles > 75 micrometers). Such underestimation can be partly due to poor contact between probe and porous material and partly to markedly decreasing sample water content during drilling, carrying, and storing sandy/gravelly samples. A more reliable approach for estimating in-situ thermal conductivity of coarse textured materials is therefore needed, and may be based on the commonly used TRT test. However, analyses of TRT data is typically based on Kelvin's line source model and provides an average (effective) thermal property for the whole soil profile around the U-tube but not for each geological layer. The main objective of this study was therefore to develop a method

  19. Electronic thermal conductivity of suspended graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Begum, K. Rizwana Sankeshwar, N. S.

    2014-04-24

    Electronic thermal conductivity, κ{sub e}, of suspended graphene is studied for 20K 100K, becoming dominant for T > 250K. Good agreement with recent experimental data is obtained.

  20. Effective thermal conductivity in thermoelectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Baranowski, LL; Snyder, GJ; Toberer, ES

    2013-05-28

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are solid state heat engines that generate electricity from a temperature gradient. Optimizing these devices for maximum power production can be difficult due to the many heat transport mechanisms occurring simultaneously within the TEG. In this paper, we develop a model for heat transport in thermoelectric materials in which an "effective thermal conductivity" (kappa(eff)) encompasses both the one dimensional steady-state Fourier conduction and the heat generation/consumption due to secondary thermoelectric effects. This model is especially powerful in that the value of kappa(eff) does not depend upon the operating conditions of the TEG but rather on the transport properties of the TE materials themselves. We analyze a variety of thermoelectric materials and generator designs using this concept and demonstrate that kappa(eff) predicts the heat fluxes within these devices to 5% of the exact value. (C) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  1. Effective thermal conductivity in thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranowski, Lauryn L.; Jeffrey Snyder, G.; Toberer, Eric S.

    2013-05-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are solid state heat engines that generate electricity from a temperature gradient. Optimizing these devices for maximum power production can be difficult due to the many heat transport mechanisms occurring simultaneously within the TEG. In this paper, we develop a model for heat transport in thermoelectric materials in which an "effective thermal conductivity" (κeff) encompasses both the one dimensional steady-state Fourier conduction and the heat generation/consumption due to secondary thermoelectric effects. This model is especially powerful in that the value of κeff does not depend upon the operating conditions of the TEG but rather on the transport properties of the TE materials themselves. We analyze a variety of thermoelectric materials and generator designs using this concept and demonstrate that κeff predicts the heat fluxes within these devices to 5% of the exact value.

  2. Thermal conductance of metallic interface in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Mortazavi, P.; Shu, D.

    1985-01-01

    In most heat transfer applications, the deposited heat is transferred by any of the following classical methods: conduction, convection, radiation, or any combinations of these three. Depending on how critical the nature is of the designed equipment, the response time must be short enough in order to safeguard the proper performance of the devices. For instance, currently at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), various hardware equipment are being designed to intercept or to stop intense radiation beams induced by insertion devices such as wiggler and undulators. Due to the nature of some of these designs, the deposited high flux thermal load must be transferred across unbonded contact surfaces. Since any miscalculation would result in the disintegration of exposed material and therefore cause substantial problems, a true actual conductance measurement of the material in question is highly desirable. In the following three sections, background summary, the method of measurement, and the obtained results are discussed.

  3. Ballistic thermal conductance of graphene ribbons.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Enrique; Lu, Jianxin; Yakobson, Boris I

    2010-05-12

    An elastic-shell-based theory for calculating the thermal conductance of graphene ribbons of arbitrary width w is presented. The analysis of vibrational modes of a continuum thin plate leads to a general equation for ballistic conductance sigma. At low temperature, it yields a power law sigma approximately T(beta), where the exponent beta varies with the ribbon width w from beta = 1 for a narrow ribbon (sigma approximately T, as a four-channel quantum wire) to beta = (3)/(2) (sigma approximately wT(3/2)) in the limit of wider graphene sheets. The ballistic results can be augmented by the phenomenological value of a phonon mean free path to account for scattering and agree well with the reported experimental observations. PMID:20402531

  4. Experimental and numerical study of the effective thermal conductivity of silica nanocomposites with thermal boundary resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, Rushabh M; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Wang, Hsin

    2013-01-01

    The thermal interface resistance at the macro scale is mainly described by the physical gap between two interfaces and constriction resistance due to this gap. The small gaps between the two material faces makes up the majority of thermal interface resistance at the macro scale. So, most of the studies have been focused on characterizing effect of surface geometry and material properties to thermal interface resistance. This resistance is more widely known as thermal contact resistance, represented with Rc. There are various models to predict thermal contact resistance at macro scale. These models predict thermal resistance Rc for given two materials by utilizing their bulk thermomechanical properties. Although, Rc represents thermal resistance accurately for macro size contacts between two metals, it is not suitable to describe interface resistance of particles in modern TIMs, aka particulate composites. The particles inside recently available TIMs are micron size and with effort to further increase surface area this particle size is approaching nano scale. At this small scale, Rc does not accurately predict thermal interface, as it is very difficult to characterize the surface topography. The thermal discontinuity at perfectly bonded interface of two dissimilar materials is termed as thermal boundary resistance (Rb) or Kapitza resistance. The macroscopic assumptions that thermal discontinuity only exists due to gaps and surface geometry leads to substantial error in determining interface thermal properties at micron and nano scale. The phenomenon of thermal boundary resistance is an inherent material property and arises due to fundamental mechanism of thermal transport. For metal-matrix particulate composites, Rb plays more important role than Rc. The free flowing nature of the polymer would eliminate most of the gaps between the two materials at their interface. This means almost all of the thermal resistance at particle/matrix interface would occur due to Rb

  5. Thermally unstable perturbations in stratified conducting atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, Fabio; Serio, Salvatore; Peres, Giovanni

    1994-10-01

    We investigate the thermal stability of isobaric perturbations in a stratified isothermal background atmosphere with solar abundances, as resulting from the competition of optically thin plasma radiative cooling and of heating conducted from the surrounding atmosphere. We have analyzed the threshold line between stable and unstable perturbations, in the plane of the two important control parameters: the initial size of the perturbation and the temperature of the unperturbed medium; this line changes with the pressure of the unperturbed atmosphere. We have extended the results of linear perturbation analysis by means of numerical calculations of the evolution of spherical isobaric perturbations, using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic code including Spitzer heat conduction. We explore a wide range of the parameters appropriate to the solar and stellar upper atmospheres: the background uniform temperature is between 105 K and 107 K, the initial pressure betweeen 0.1 and 10 dyn/sq cm, and the perturbation size between 105 and 1010 cm. The numerical results are in substantial agreement with the linear analysis. We discuss possible implications of our results also in terms of observable effects, especially concerning plasma downflows, and propose thermal instability as a possible candidate to explain the observed redshifts in solar and stellar transition region lines.

  6. Multifunctional Lattices with Low Thermal Expansion and Low Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hang; Liu, Lu; Pasini, Damiano

    Systems in space are vulnerable to large temperature changes when travelling into and out of the Earth's shadow. Variations in temperature can lead to undesired geometric changes in susceptible applications requiring very fine precision. In addition, temperature-sensitive electronic equipment hosted in a satellite needs adequate thermal-control to guarantee a moderate ambient temperature. To address these specifications, materials with low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and low coefficient of thermal conductivity (CTC) over a wide range of temperatures are often sought, especially for bearing components in satellites. Besides low CTE and low CTC, these materials should also provide desirable stiffness, strength and extraordinarily low mass. This work presents ultralightweight bi-material lattices with tunable CTE and CTC, besides high stiffness and strength. We show that the compensation of the thermal expansion and joint rotation at the lattice joints can be used as an effective strategy to tailor thermomechanical performance. Proof-of-concept lattices are fabricated from Al and Ti alloy sheets via a simple snap-fit technique and vacuum brazing, and their CTE and CTC are assessed via a combination of experiments and theory. Corresponding Author.

  7. Thermal conductivity measurements of proton-heated warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKelvey, A.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Hua, R.; Kim, J.; King, J.; Sio, H.; McGuffey, C.; Kemp, G. E.; Freeman, R. R.; Beg, F. N.; Shepherd, R.; Ping, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Accurate knowledge of conductivity characteristics in the strongly coupled plasma regime is extremely important for ICF processes such as the onset of hydrodynamic instabilities, thermonuclear burn propagation waves, shell mixing, and efficient x-ray conversion of indirect drive schemes. Recently, an experiment was performed on the Titan laser platform at the Jupiter Laser Facility to measure the thermal conductivity of proton-heated warm dense matter. In the experiment, proton beams generated via target normal sheath acceleration were used to heat bi-layer targets with high-Z front layers and lower-Z back layers. The stopping power of a material is approximately proportional to Z2 so a sharp temperature gradient is established between the two materials. The subsequent thermal conduction from the higher-Z material to the lower-Z was measured with time resolved streaked optical pyrometry (SOP) and Fourier domain interferometry (FDI) of the rear surface. Results will be used to compare predictions from the thermal conduction equation and the Wiedemann-Franz Law in the warm dense matter regime. Data from the time resolved diagnostics for Au/Al and Au/C Targets of 20-200 nm thickness will be presented.

  8. Eliminating Piezoresistivity in Flexible Conducting Polymers for Accurate Temperature Sensing under Dynamic Mechanical Deformations.

    PubMed

    Sezen, Melda; Register, Jeffrey T; Yao, Yao; Glisic, Branko; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2016-06-01

    The polarity and the magnitude of polyaniline's gauge factor are tuned through structural modification. Combining conducting polymers with gauge factors of opposite polarities yields an accurate temperature sensor, even when deployed under dynamic strains. PMID:27061270

  9. Effective thermal conductivity of a thin, randomly oriented composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, P.E.; Niemann, R.C.

    1997-10-01

    The thermal conductivity of a randomly oriented composite material is modeled using a probabilistic approach in order to determine if a size effect exists for the thermal conductivity at small composite thicknesses. The numerical scheme employs a random number generator to position the filler elements, which have a relatively high thermal conductivity, within a matrix having a relative low thermal conductivity. The results indicate that, below some threshold thickness, the composite thermal conductivity is independent of thickness. The threshold thickness increases for increasing filler fraction and increasing k{sub f}/k{sub m}, the ratio between the filler and matrix thermal conductivities.

  10. A transient divided-bar method for simultaneous measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bording, Thue S.; Nielsen, Søren B.; Balling, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Accurate information on thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of materials is of central importance in relation to geoscience and engineering problems involving the transfer of heat. Within the geosciences, this applies to all aspects regarding the determination of terrestrial heat flow and subsurface temperature modelling. Several methods, including the classical divided-bar technique, are available for laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity, and much fewer for thermal diffusivity. We have generalized the divided-bar technique to the transient case, in which thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity, and thereby also thermal diffusivity, are measured simultaneously. As the density of samples is easily determined independently, specific heat capacity may also be determined. Finite element formulation provides a flexible forward solution for heat transfer across the bar and thermal properties are estimated by inverse Monte Carlo modelling. This methodology enables a proper quantification of experimental uncertainties on measured thermal properties. The developed methodology was applied to laboratory measurements of various materials, including a standard ceramic material and different rock samples, and measuring results were compared with results applying traditional steady-state divided-bar and an independent line-source method. All measurements show highly consistent results and with excellent reproducibility and high accuracy. For conductivity, uncertainty is typically 1-3 %, and for diffusivity uncertainty may be reduced to about 3-5 %. The main uncertainty originates from the presence of thermal contact resistance associated with the internal interfaces of the bar. They are not resolved during inversion, and it is highly important that they are minimized by careful sample preparation.

  11. Thermal conductivity and thermal boundary resistance of nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We present a fabrication process of low-cost superlattices and simulations related with the heat dissipation on them. The influence of the interfacial roughness on the thermal conductivity of semiconductor/semiconductor superlattices was studied by equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics and on the Kapitza resistance of superlattice's interfaces by equilibrium molecular dynamics. The non-equilibrium method was the tool used for the prediction of the Kapitza resistance for a binary semiconductor/metal system. Physical explanations are provided for rationalizing the simulation results. PACS 68.65.Cd, 66.70.Df, 81.16.-c, 65.80.-g, 31.12.xv PMID:21711805

  12. Thermally conductive porous element-based recuperators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du, Jian Hua (Inventor); Chow, Louis C (Inventor); Lin, Yeong-Ren (Inventor); Wu, Wei (Inventor); Kapat, Jayanta (Inventor); Notardonato, William U. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A heat exchanger includes at least one hot fluid flow channel comprising a first plurality of open cell porous elements having first gaps there between for flowing a hot fluid in a flow direction and at least one cold fluid flow channel comprising a second plurality of open cell porous elements having second gaps therebetween for flowing a cold fluid in a countercurrent flow direction relative to the flow direction. The thermal conductivity of the porous elements is at least 10 W/mK. A separation member is interposed between the hot and cold flow channels for isolating flow paths associated these flow channels. The first and second plurality of porous elements at least partially overlap one another to form a plurality of heat transfer pairs which transfer heat from respective ones of the first porous elements to respective ones of the second porous elements through the separation member.

  13. Efficient Reformulation of HOTFGM: Heat Conduction with Variable Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, Yi; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Arnold, Steven M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGMs) have become one of the major research topics in the mechanics of materials community during the past fifteen years. FGMs are heterogeneous materials, characterized by spatially variable microstructure, and thus spatially variable macroscopic properties, introduced to enhance material or structural performance. The spatially variable material properties make FGMs challenging to analyze. The review of the various techniques employed to analyze the thermodynamical response of FGMs reveals two distinct and fundamentally different computational strategies, called uncoupled macromechanical and coupled micromechanical approaches by some investigators. The uncoupled macromechanical approaches ignore the effect of microstructural gradation by employing specific spatial variations of material properties, which are either assumed or obtained by local homogenization, thereby resulting in erroneous results under certain circumstances. In contrast, the coupled approaches explicitly account for the micro-macrostructural interaction, albeit at a significantly higher computational cost. The higher-order theory for functionally graded materials (HOTFGM) developed by Aboudi et al. is representative of the coupled approach. However, despite its demonstrated utility in applications where micro-macrostructural coupling effects are important, the theory's full potential is yet to be realized because the original formulation of HOTFGM is computationally intensive. This, in turn, limits the size of problems that can be solved due to the large number of equations required to mimic realistic material microstructures. Therefore, a basis for an efficient reformulation of HOTFGM, referred to as user-friendly formulation, is developed herein, and subsequently employed in the construction of the efficient reformulation using the local/global conductivity matrix approach. In order to extend HOTFGM's range of applicability, spatially variable thermal

  14. Effect of Aggregation and Interfacial Thermal Resistance on Thermal Conductivity of Nanocomposites and Colloidal Nanofluids

    SciTech Connect

    William Evans; Ravi Prasher; Jacob Fish; Paul Meakin; Patrick Phelan; Pawel Keblinski

    2008-03-01

    We analyzed the role of aggregation and interfacial thermal resistance on the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids and nanocomposites. We found that the thermal conductivity of nanofluids and nanocomposites can be significantly enhanced by the aggregation of nanoparticles into clusters. The value of the thermal conductivity enhancement is determined by the cluster morphology, filler conductivity and interfacial thermal resistance. We also compared thermal conductivity enhancement due to aggregation with that associated with high-aspect ratio fillers, including fibers and plates.

  15. On the van der Pauw's method applied to the measurement of low thermal conductivity materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, C.; Flores, E.; Bodega, J.; Leardini, F.; Ferrer, I. J.; Ares, J. R.; Sánchez, C.

    2016-08-01

    The electrical van der Pauw's method has recently been extended to measure the thermal conductivity of different elements and compounds. This technique provides an easy way to determine the sample in-plane thermal conductivity by avoiding the influence of the thermal contact resistances. However, the reported calculated error values appear to be underestimated when dealing with the materials with low thermal conductivity (<5 W/Km) at room temperature. The causes of this underestimation are investigated in this communication and it has been found that they are due to the drastic influence of conduction heat losses through the thermo-resistance wires as well as the resulting modification of the sample temperature map. Both phenomena lead to experimental values of the sample thermal conductivity, which are systematically higher than the tabulated ones. The magnitude of this systematic error is ˜100% dealing with the samples of macroscopic dimensions, and low thermal conductivity indicated that the obtained accurate measurements can be quite challenging.

  16. On the van der Pauw's method applied to the measurement of low thermal conductivity materials.

    PubMed

    Morales, C; Flores, E; Bodega, J; Leardini, F; Ferrer, I J; Ares, J R; Sánchez, C

    2016-08-01

    The electrical van der Pauw's method has recently been extended to measure the thermal conductivity of different elements and compounds. This technique provides an easy way to determine the sample in-plane thermal conductivity by avoiding the influence of the thermal contact resistances. However, the reported calculated error values appear to be underestimated when dealing with the materials with low thermal conductivity (<5 W/Km) at room temperature. The causes of this underestimation are investigated in this communication and it has been found that they are due to the drastic influence of conduction heat losses through the thermo-resistance wires as well as the resulting modification of the sample temperature map. Both phenomena lead to experimental values of the sample thermal conductivity, which are systematically higher than the tabulated ones. The magnitude of this systematic error is ∼100% dealing with the samples of macroscopic dimensions, and low thermal conductivity indicated that the obtained accurate measurements can be quite challenging.

  17. Strain-controlled thermal conductivity in ferroic twinned films

    PubMed Central

    Li, Suzhi; Ding, Xiangdong; Ren, Jie; Moya, Xavier; Li, Ju; Sun, Jun; Salje, Ekhard K. H.

    2014-01-01

    Large reversible changes of thermal conductivity are induced by mechanical stress, and the corresponding device is a key element for phononics applications. We show that the thermal conductivity κ of ferroic twinned thin films can be reversibly controlled by strain. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations reveal that thermal conductivity decreases linearly with the number of twin boundaries perpendicular to the direction of heat flow. Our demonstration of large and reversible changes in thermal conductivity driven by strain may inspire the design of controllable thermal switches for thermal logic gates and all-solid-state cooling devices. PMID:25224749

  18. Thermal Conductivity of Advanced Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings Determined by a Steady-state Laser Heat-flux Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    The development of low conductivity and high temperature capable thermal barrier coatings requires advanced testing techniques that can accurately and effectively evaluate coating thermal conductivity under future high-performance and low-emission engine heat-flux conditions. In this paper, a unique steady-state CO2 laser (wavelength 10.6 microns) heat-flux approach is described for determining the thermal conductivity and conductivity deduced cyclic durability of ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coating systems at very high temperatures (up to 1700 C) under large thermal gradients. The thermal conductivity behavior of advanced thermal and environmental barrier coatings for metallic and Si-based ceramic matrix composite (CMC) component applications has also been investigated using the laser conductivity approach. The relationships between the lattice and radiation conductivities as a function of heat flux and thermal gradient at high temperatures have been examined for the ceramic coating systems. The steady-state laser heat-flux conductivity approach has been demonstrated as a viable means for the development and life prediction of advanced thermal barrier coatings for future turbine engine applications.

  19. Deterioration in effective thermal conductivity of aqueous magnetic nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altan, Cem L.; Gurten, Berna; Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M.; Bucak, Seyda

    2014-12-01

    Common heat transfer fluids have low thermal conductivities, which decrease their efficiency in many applications. On the other hand, solids have much higher thermal conductivity values. Previously, it was shown that the addition of different nanoparticles to various base fluids increases the thermal conductivity of the carrier fluid remarkably. However, there are limited studies that focus on the thermal conductivity of magnetic fluids. In this study, thermal conductivity of magnetic nanofluids composed of magnetite nanoparticles synthesized via co-precipitation and thermal decomposition methods is investigated. Results showed that the addition of magnetite nanoparticles decreased the thermal conductivity of water and ethylene glycol. This decrease was found to increase with increasing particle concentration and to be independent of the synthesis method, the type of surfactant, and the interfacial thermal resistance.

  20. Size effects in thermal conduction by phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Philip B.

    2014-08-01

    Heat transport in nanoscale systems is both hard to measure microscopically, and hard to interpret. Ballistic and diffusive heat flow coexist, adding confusion. This paper looks at a very simple case: a nanoscale crystal repeated periodically. This is a popular model for simulation of bulk heat transport using classical molecular dynamics (MD), and is related to transient thermal grating experiments. Nanoscale effects are seen in perhaps their simplest form. The model is solved by an extension of standard quasiparticle gas theory of bulk solids. Both structure and heat flow are constrained by periodic boundary conditions. Diffusive transport is fully included, while ballistic transport by phonons of a long mean free path is diminished in a specific way. Heat current J (x) and temperature gradient ∇T (x') have a nonlocal relationship, via κ (x-x'), over a distance |x-x'| determined by phonon mean free paths. In MD modeling of bulk conductivity, finite computer resources limit system size. Long mean free paths, comparable to the scale of heating and cooling, cause undesired finite-size effects that have to be removed by extrapolation. The present model allows this extrapolation to be quantified. Calculations based on the Peierls-Boltzmann equation, using a generalized Debye model, show that extrapolation involves fractional powers of 1/L. It is also argued that heating and cooling should be distributed sinusoidally [ė∝cos(2πx/L)] to improve convergence of numerics.

  1. Finite-element technique applied to heat conduction in solids with temperature dependent thermal conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguirre-Ramirez, G.; Oden, J. T.

    1969-01-01

    Finite element method applied to heat conduction in solids with temperature dependent thermal conductivity, using nonlinear constitutive equation for heat ABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGH

  2. Multiscale modeling of thermal conductivity of polycrystalline graphene sheets.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Bohayra; Pötschke, Markus; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2014-03-21

    We developed a multiscale approach to explore the effective thermal conductivity of polycrystalline graphene sheets. By performing equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations, the grain size effect on the thermal conductivity of ultra-fine grained polycrystalline graphene sheets is investigated. Our results reveal that the ultra-fine grained graphene structures have thermal conductivity one order of magnitude smaller than that of pristine graphene. Based on the information provided by the EMD simulations, we constructed finite element models of polycrystalline graphene sheets to probe the thermal conductivity of samples with larger grain sizes. Using the developed multiscale approach, we also investigated the effects of grain size distribution and thermal conductivity of grains on the effective thermal conductivity of polycrystalline graphene. The proposed multiscale approach on the basis of molecular dynamics and finite element methods could be used to evaluate the effective thermal conductivity of polycrystalline graphene and other 2D structures.

  3. High accuracy thermal conductivity measurement of aqueous cryoprotective agents and semi-rigid biological tissues using a microfabricated thermal sensor.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xin M; Sekar, Praveen K; Zhao, Gang; Zhou, Xiaoming; Shu, Zhiquan; Huang, Zhongping; Ding, Weiping; Zhang, Qingchuan; Gao, Dayong

    2015-05-20

    An improved thermal-needle approach for accurate and fast measurement of thermal conductivity of aqueous and soft biomaterials was developed using microfabricated thermal conductivity sensors. This microscopic measuring device was comprehensively characterized at temperatures from 0 °C to 40 °C. Despite the previous belief, system calibration constant was observed to be highly temperature-dependent. Dynamic thermal conductivity response during cooling (40 °C to -40 °C) was observed using the miniaturized single tip sensor for various concentrations of CPAs, i.e., glycerol, ethylene glycol and dimethyl sulfoxide. Chicken breast, chicken skin, porcine limb, and bovine liver were assayed to investigate the effect of anatomical heterogeneity on thermal conductivity using the arrayed multi-tip sensor at 20 °C. Experimental results revealed distinctive differences in localized thermal conductivity, which suggests the use of approximated or constant property values is expected to bring about results with largely inflated uncertainties when investigating bio-heat transfer mechanisms and/or performing sophisticated thermal modeling with complex biological tissues. Overall, the presented micro thermal sensor with automated data analysis algorithm is a promising approach for direct thermal conductivity measurement of aqueous solutions and soft biomaterials and is of great value to cryopreservation of tissues, hyperthermia or cryogenic, and other thermal-based clinical diagnostics and treatments.

  4. High accuracy thermal conductivity measurement of aqueous cryoprotective agents and semi-rigid biological tissues using a microfabricated thermal sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xin M.; Sekar, Praveen K.; Zhao, Gang; Zhou, Xiaoming; Shu, Zhiquan; Huang, Zhongping; Ding, Weiping; Zhang, Qingchuan; Gao, Dayong

    2015-05-01

    An improved thermal-needle approach for accurate and fast measurement of thermal conductivity of aqueous and soft biomaterials was developed using microfabricated thermal conductivity sensors. This microscopic measuring device was comprehensively characterized at temperatures from 0 °C to 40 °C. Despite the previous belief, system calibration constant was observed to be highly temperature-dependent. Dynamic thermal conductivity response during cooling (40 °C to -40 °C) was observed using the miniaturized single tip sensor for various concentrations of CPAs, i.e., glycerol, ethylene glycol and dimethyl sulfoxide. Chicken breast, chicken skin, porcine limb, and bovine liver were assayed to investigate the effect of anatomical heterogeneity on thermal conductivity using the arrayed multi-tip sensor at 20 °C. Experimental results revealed distinctive differences in localized thermal conductivity, which suggests the use of approximated or constant property values is expected to bring about results with largely inflated uncertainties when investigating bio-heat transfer mechanisms and/or performing sophisticated thermal modeling with complex biological tissues. Overall, the presented micro thermal sensor with automated data analysis algorithm is a promising approach for direct thermal conductivity measurement of aqueous solutions and soft biomaterials and is of great value to cryopreservation of tissues, hyperthermia or cryogenic, and other thermal-based clinical diagnostics and treatments.

  5. Origins of ultralow thermal conductivity in bulk [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM).

    PubMed

    Pöhls, Jan-Hendrik; Johnson, Michel B; White, Mary Anne

    2016-01-14

    Bulk PCBM has exceptionally low thermal conductivity, 0.07 W m(-1) K(-1) at room temperature. We show that its ultralow thermal conductivity is an intrinsic property. Based on results for thermal conductivity and heat capacity measurements down to <2 K, along with Raman spectroscopy and dilatometry, a new model for minimum thermal conductivity was developed. In the model the thermal energy is transferred between entities of phonons oscillating in a range of frequencies, and limited by the atomic density and the phonon mean speed. The model accurately represents the low thermal conductivity for both PCBM and C60/C70.

  6. Microfabricated thermal conductivity sensor: a high resolution tool for quantitative thermal property measurement of biomaterials and solutions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xin M; Ding, Weiping; Chen, Hsiu-hung; Shu, Zhiquan; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Hai-feng; Gao, Dayong

    2011-10-01

    Obtaining accurate thermal properties of biomaterials plays an important role in the field of cryobiology. Currently, thermal needle, which is constructed by enclosing a manually winded thin metal wire with an insulation coating in a metallic sheath, is the only available device that is capable of measuring thermal conductivity of biomaterials. Major drawbacks, such as macroscale sensor size, lack of versatile format to accommodate samples with various shapes and sizes, neglected effects of heat transfer inside the probe and thermal contact resistance between the sensing element and the probe body, difficult to mass produce, poor data repeatability and reliability and labor-intense sensor calibration, have significantly reduced their potential to be an essential measurement tool to provide key thermal property information of biological specimens. In this study, we describe the development of an approach to measure thermal conductivity of liquids and soft bio-tissues using a proof-of-concept MEMS based thermal probe. By employing a microfabricated closely-packed gold wire to function as the heater and the thermistor, the presented thermal sensor can be used to measure thermal conductivities of fluids and natural soft biomaterials (particularly, the sensor may be directly inserted into soft tissues in living animal/plant bodies or into tissues isolated from the animal/plant bodies), where other more standard approaches cannot be used. Thermal standard materials have been used to calibrate two randomly selected thermal probes at room temperature. Variation between the obtained system calibration constants is less than 10%. By incorporating the previously obtained system calibration constant, three randomly selected thermal probes have been successfully utilized to measure the thermal conductivities of various solutions and tissue samples under different temperatures. Overall, the measurements are in agreement with the recommended values (percentage error less than 5

  7. Effect of surrogate aggregates on the thermal conductivity of concrete at ambient and elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yun, Tae Sup; Jeong, Yeon Jong; Youm, Kwang-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The accurate assessment of the thermal conductivity of concretes is an important part of building design in terms of thermal efficiency and thermal performance of materials at various temperatures. We present an experimental assessment of the thermal conductivity of five thermally insulated concrete specimens made using lightweight aggregates and glass bubbles in place of normal aggregates. Four different measurement methods are used to assess the reliability of the thermal data and to evaluate the effects of the various sensor types. The concrete specimens are also assessed at every 100 °C during heating to ~800 °C. Normal concrete is shown to have a thermal conductivity of ~2.25 W m(-1) K(-1). The surrogate aggregates effectively reduce the conductivity to ~1.25 W m(-1) K(-1) at room temperature. The aggregate size is shown not to affect thermal conduction: fine and coarse aggregates each lead to similar results. Surface contact methods of assessment tend to underestimate thermal conductivity, presumably owing to high thermal resistance between the transducers and the specimens. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that the stages of mass loss of the cement paste correspond to the evolution of thermal conductivity upon heating.

  8. Effect of Surrogate Aggregates on the Thermal Conductivity of Concrete at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Tae Sup; Jeong, Yeon Jong; Youm, Kwang-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The accurate assessment of the thermal conductivity of concretes is an important part of building design in terms of thermal efficiency and thermal performance of materials at various temperatures. We present an experimental assessment of the thermal conductivity of five thermally insulated concrete specimens made using lightweight aggregates and glass bubbles in place of normal aggregates. Four different measurement methods are used to assess the reliability of the thermal data and to evaluate the effects of the various sensor types. The concrete specimens are also assessed at every 100°C during heating to ~800°C. Normal concrete is shown to have a thermal conductivity of ~2.25 W m−1 K−1. The surrogate aggregates effectively reduce the conductivity to ~1.25 W m−1 K−1 at room temperature. The aggregate size is shown not to affect thermal conduction: fine and coarse aggregates each lead to similar results. Surface contact methods of assessment tend to underestimate thermal conductivity, presumably owing to high thermal resistance between the transducers and the specimens. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that the stages of mass loss of the cement paste correspond to the evolution of thermal conductivity upon heating. PMID:24696666

  9. Effect of surrogate aggregates on the thermal conductivity of concrete at ambient and elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yun, Tae Sup; Jeong, Yeon Jong; Youm, Kwang-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The accurate assessment of the thermal conductivity of concretes is an important part of building design in terms of thermal efficiency and thermal performance of materials at various temperatures. We present an experimental assessment of the thermal conductivity of five thermally insulated concrete specimens made using lightweight aggregates and glass bubbles in place of normal aggregates. Four different measurement methods are used to assess the reliability of the thermal data and to evaluate the effects of the various sensor types. The concrete specimens are also assessed at every 100 °C during heating to ~800 °C. Normal concrete is shown to have a thermal conductivity of ~2.25 W m(-1) K(-1). The surrogate aggregates effectively reduce the conductivity to ~1.25 W m(-1) K(-1) at room temperature. The aggregate size is shown not to affect thermal conduction: fine and coarse aggregates each lead to similar results. Surface contact methods of assessment tend to underestimate thermal conductivity, presumably owing to high thermal resistance between the transducers and the specimens. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that the stages of mass loss of the cement paste correspond to the evolution of thermal conductivity upon heating. PMID:24696666

  10. Transmission function and thermal conductivity of Si phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jung Hyun; Jang, Moon-Gyu; Moon, S. E.; Shin, Mincheol

    2016-10-01

    We investigate phonon transport properties of Si phononic crystals by using an atomistic Green function method. By varying form factors such as thickness, orientation, and pore size of unit cells, mean-free path and associated thermal conductivity of phononic crystals are obtained. We present the empirical formula for thermal conductivity as a function of cell size and, by extrapolating results from it for realistic cell sizes, the thermal conductivity is compared with experimental ones. The formula is found to predict a nearly equal amount of the suppression in thermal conductivity to the experimental values, implying a feasible calculation method for predicting thermal properties of phononic crystals.

  11. Tunable thermal conductivity in silicon twinning superlattice nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Shiyun; Kosevich, Yuriy A.; Sääskilahti, K.; Ni, Yuxiang; Volz, Sebastian

    2014-11-01

    Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamic simulations, the thermal conductivity of a set of Si phononic metamaterial nanowires with a twinning superlattice structure has been investigated. We first show that this latter structural modulation can yield 65% thermal-conductivity reduction compared to the straight wire case at room temperature. Second, a purely geometry-induced minimal thermal conductivity of the phononic metamaterial is observed at a specific period depending on the nanowire diameter. Mode analysis reveals that the the minimal thermal conductivity arises due to the disappearance of favored atom polarization directions. The current thermal-conductivity reduction mechanism can collaborate with the other known reduction mechanisms, such as the one related to coating, to further reduce thermal conductivity of the metamaterial. Current studies reveal that twinning superlattice nanowires could serve as a promising candidate for efficient thermoelectric conversion benefitting from the large suppression in thermal transport and without deterioration of electron-transport properties when the surface atoms are passivated.

  12. Thermal Diffusivity and Thermal Conductivity of Five Different Steel Alloys in the Solid and Liquid Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilthan, B.; Schützenhöfer, W.; Pottlacher, G.

    2015-08-01

    The need for characterization of thermophysical properties of steel and nickel-based alloys was addressed in the FFG-Bridge Project 810999 in cooperation with a partner from industry, Böhler Edelstahl GmbH & Co KG. To optimize numerical simulations of production processes, such as remelting or plastic deformation, additional, and more accurate data were necessary for the alloys under investigation. With a fast ohmic pulse heating circuit system, the temperature-dependent specific electrical resistivity, density, and specific heat capacity for a set of five high alloyed steels were measured. Hence, using the Wiedemann-Franz law with a Lorenz number of , the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity could be calculated for the solid and liquid phases up to temperatures of 2500 K. This experimental approach is limited by the following requirements for the specimens: they have to be electrically conducting, the melting point has to be high enough for the implemented pyrometric temperature measurement, and one has to be able to draw wires of the material. The latter restriction is technologically challenging with some of the materials being very brittle. For all samples, electrical and temperature signals are recorded and a fast shadowgraph method is used to measure the volume expansion. For each material under investigation, a set of data including the chemical composition, the density at room temperature, solidus and liquidus temperatures, and the change of enthalpy, resistivity, density, thermal conductivity, and thermal diffusivity as a function of temperature is reported.

  13. Thermal conductivity and diffusivity of biomaterials measured with self-heated thermistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valvano, J. W.; Cochran, J. R.; Diller, K. R.

    1985-05-01

    This paper presents an experimental method to measure the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of biomaterials. Self-heated thermistor probes, inserted into the tissue of interest, are used to deliver heat as well as to monitor the rate of heat removal. An empirical calibration procedure allows accurate thermal-property measurements over a wide range of tissue temperatures. Operation of the instrument in three media with known thermal properties shows the uncertainty of measurements to be about 2%. The reproducibility is 0.5% for the thermal-conductivity measurements and 2% for the thermal-diffusivity measurements. Thermal properties were measured in dog, pig, rabbit, and human tissues. The tissues included kidney, spleen, liver, brain, heart, lung, pancreas, colon cancer, and breast cancer. Thermal properties were measured for 65 separate tissue samples at 3, 10, 17, 23, 30, 37, and 45°C. The results show that the temperature coefficient of biomaterials approximates that of water.

  14. Flexible Fabrics with High Thermal Conductivity for Advanced Spacesuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis A.; Bue, Grant; Orndoff, Evelyne; Kesterson, Matt; Connel, John W.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Southward, Robin E.; Working, Dennis; Watson, Kent A.; Delozier, Donovan M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the effort and accomplishments for developing flexible fabrics with high thermal conductivity (FFHTC) for spacesuits to improve thermal performance, lower weight and reduce complexity. Commercial and additional space exploration applications that require substantial performance enhancements in removal and transport of heat away from equipment as well as from the human body can benefit from this technology. Improvements in thermal conductivity were achieved through the use of modified polymers containing thermally conductive additives. The objective of the FFHTC effort is to significantly improve the thermal conductivity of the liquid cooled ventilation garment by improving the thermal conductivity of the subcomponents (i.e., fabric and plastic tubes). This paper presents the initial system modeling studies, including a detailed liquid cooling garment model incorporated into the Wissler human thermal regulatory model, to quantify the necessary improvements in thermal conductivity and garment geometries needed to affect system performance. In addition, preliminary results of thermal conductivity improvements of the polymer components of the liquid cooled ventilation garment are presented. By improving thermal garment performance, major technology drivers will be addressed for lightweight, high thermal conductivity, flexible materials for spacesuits that are strategic technical challenges of the Exploration

  15. Revisit to three-dimensional percolation theory: Accurate analysis for highly stretchable conductive composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangwoo; Choi, Seongdae; Oh, Eunho; Byun, Junghwan; Kim, Hyunjong; Lee, Byeongmoon; Lee, Seunghwan; Hong, Yongtaek

    2016-01-01

    A percolation theory based on variation of conductive filler fraction has been widely used to explain the behavior of conductive composite materials under both small and large deformation conditions. However, it typically fails in properly analyzing the materials under the large deformation since the assumption may not be valid in such a case. Therefore, we proposed a new three-dimensional percolation theory by considering three key factors: nonlinear elasticity, precisely measured strain-dependent Poisson’s ratio, and strain-dependent percolation threshold. Digital image correlation (DIC) method was used to determine actual Poisson’s ratios at various strain levels, which were used to accurately estimate variation of conductive filler volume fraction under deformation. We also adopted strain-dependent percolation threshold caused by the filler re-location with deformation. When three key factors were considered, electrical performance change was accurately analyzed for composite materials with both isotropic and anisotropic mechanical properties. PMID:27694856

  16. Thermal conductivity of silicon nanocrystals and polystyrene nanocomposite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagja Juangsa, Firman; Muroya, Yoshiki; Ryu, Meguya; Morikawa, Junko; Nozaki, Tomohiro

    2016-09-01

    Silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) are well known for their size-dependent optical and electronic properties; they also have the potential for low yet controllable thermal properties. As a silicon-based low-thermal conductivity material is required in microdevice applications, SiNCs can be utilized for thermal insulation. In this paper, SiNCs and polymer nanocomposites were produced, and their thermal conductivity, including the density and specific heat, was measured. Measurement results were compared with thermal conductivity models for composite materials, and the comparison shows a decreasing value of the thermal conductivity, indicating the effect of the size and presence of the nanostructure on the thermal conductivity. Moreover, employing silicon inks at room temperature during the fabrication process enables a low cost of fabrication and preserves the unique properties of SiNCs.

  17. Thermal conductivity of diamond nanorods: Molecular simulation and scaling relations.

    PubMed

    Padgett, Clifford W; Shenderova, Olga; Brenner, Donald W

    2006-08-01

    Thermal conductivities of diamond nanorods are estimated from molecular simulations as a function of radius, length, and degree of surface functionalization. While thermal conductivity is predicted to be lower than carbon nanotubes, their thermal properties are less influenced by surface functionalization, making them prime candidates for thermal management where heat transfer is facilitated by cross-links. A scaling relation based on phonon surface scattering is developed that reproduces the simulation results and experimental measurements on silicon nanowires. PMID:16895381

  18. Effective thermal conductivity determination for low-density insulating materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, S. D.; Curry, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    That nonlinear least squares can be used to determine effective thermal conductivity was demonstrated, and a method for assessing the relative error associated with these predicted values was provided. The differences between dynamic and static determination of effective thermal conductivity of low-density materials that transfer heat by a combination of conduction, convection, and radiation were discussed.

  19. Diameter Dependence of Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Study from Ab Initio.

    PubMed

    Yue, Sheng-Ying; Ouyang, Tao; Hu, Ming

    2015-10-22

    The effects of temperature, tube length, defects, and surface functionalization on the thermal conductivity (κ) of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were well documented in literature. However, diameter dependence of thermal conductivity of SWCNTs received less attentions. So far, diverse trends of the diameter dependence have been discussed by different methods and all the previous results were based on empirical interatomic potentials. In this paper, we emphasize to clarify accurate κ values of SWCNTs with different diameters and in-plane κ of graphene. All the studies were under the framework of anharmonic lattice dynamics and Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) based on first principle calculations. We try to infer the right trend of diameter dependent thermal conductivity of SWCNTs. We infer that graphene is the limitation as SWCNT with an infinite diameter. We analyzed the thermal conductivity contributions from each phonon mode in SWCNTs to explain the trend. Meanwhile, we also identify the extremely low thermal conductivity of ultra-thin SWCNTs.

  20. Final Report: Thermal Conductance of Solid-Liquid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cahil, David, G.; Braun, Paul, V.

    2006-05-31

    Research supported by this grant has significantly advanced fundamental understanding of the thermal conductance of solid-liquid interfaces, and the thermal conductivity of nanofluids and nanoscale composite materials. • The thermal conductance of interfaces between carbon nanotubes and a surrounding matrix of organic molecules is exceptionally small and this small value of the interface conductance limits the enhancement in thermal conductivity that can be achieved by loading a fluid or a polymer with nanotubes. • The thermal conductance of interfaces between metal nanoparticles coated with hydrophilic surfactants and water is relatively high and surprisingly independent of the details of the chemical structure of the surfactant. • We extended our experimental methods to enable studies of planar interfaces between surfactant-coated metals and water where the chemical functionalization can be varied between strongly hydrophobic and strongly hydrophilic. The thermal conductance of hydrophobic interfaces establishes an upper-limit of 0.25 nm on the thickness of the vapor-layer that is often proposed to exist at hydrophobic interfaces. • Our high-precision measurements of fluid suspensions show that the thermal conductivity of fluids is not significantly enhanced by loading with a small volume fraction of spherical nanoparticles. These experimental results directly contradict some of the anomalous results in the recent literature and also rule-out proposed mechanisms for the enhanced thermal conductivity of nanofluids that are based on modification of the fluid thermal conductivity by the coupling of fluid motion and the Brownian motion of the nanoparticles.

  1. Thermal conductivity of boron nitride reinforced polyethylene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Wenying Qi Shuhua; An Qunli; Zhao Hongzhen; Liu Nailiang

    2007-10-02

    The thermal conductivity of boron nitride (BN) particulates reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites was investigated under a special dispersion state of BN particles in HDPE, i.e., BN particles surrounding HDPE particles. The effects of BN content, particle size of HDPE and temperature on the thermal conductivity of the composites were discussed. The results indicate that the special dispersion of BN in matrix provides the composites with high thermal conductivity; moreover, the thermal conductivity of composites is higher for the larger size HDPE than for the smaller size one. The thermal conductivity increases with increasing filler content, and significantly deviates the predictions from the theoretic models. It is found also that the combined use of BN particles and alumina short fiber obtains higher thermal conductivity of composites compared to the BN particles used alone.

  2. Tuning thermal conductivity in molybdenum disulfide by electrochemical intercalation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Gaohua; Liu, Jun; Zheng, Qiye; Zhang, Ruigang; Li, Dongyao; Banerjee, Debasish; Cahill, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of two-dimensional (2D) materials is of interest for energy storage, nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. Here, we report that the thermal conductivity of molybdenum disulfide can be modified by electrochemical intercalation. We observe distinct behaviour for thin films with vertically aligned basal planes and natural bulk crystals with basal planes aligned parallel to the surface. The thermal conductivity is measured as a function of the degree of lithiation, using time-domain thermoreflectance. The change of thermal conductivity correlates with the lithiation-induced structural and compositional disorder. We further show that the ratio of the in-plane to through-plane thermal conductivity of bulk crystal is enhanced by the disorder. These results suggest that stacking disorder and mixture of phases is an effective mechanism to modify the anisotropic thermal conductivity of 2D materials. PMID:27767030

  3. Rapid thermal conductivity measurements for combinatorial thin films.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Matthew G; Hill, Ian G

    2013-05-01

    A simple and inexpensive automated method for determining the thermal conductivity of a combinatorial library of thin films is demonstrated by measuring the thermal conductivity of a sputtered silicon dioxide film of varying thickness deposited on single crystal silicon. Using 3ω measurements, two methods for calculating the substrate thermal conductivity and two methods for determining the film thermal conductivity are demonstrated and compared. The substrate thermal conductivity was found to be 139 ± 3 W/m·K. Using the measured variation in film thickness, the film thermal conductivity was found to be 1.11 ± 0.05 W/m·K, in excellent agreement with published values for sputtered SiO2, demonstrating the accuracy of the method.

  4. Thermal conductivity degradation of graphites irradiated at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Burchell, T.D.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this work is to study the thermal conductivity degradation of new, high thermal conductivity graphites and to compare these results to more standard graphites irradiated at low temperatures. Several graphites and graphite composites (C/C`s) have been irradiated near 150{degree}C and at fluences up to a displacement level of 0.24 dpa. The materials ranged in unirradiated room temperature thermal conductivity of these materials varied from 114 W/m-K for H-451 isotropic graphite, to 670 W/m-K for unidirectional FMI-1D C/C composite. At the irradiation temperature a saturation reduction in thermal conductivity was seen to occur at displacement levels of approximately 0.1 dpa. All materials were seen to degrade to approximately 10 to 14 % of their original thermal conductivity after irradiation. The effect of post irradiation annealing on the thermal conductivity was also studied.

  5. Comparison for non-local hydrodynamic thermal conduction models

    SciTech Connect

    Marocchino, A.; Atzeni, S.; Schiavi, A.; Tzoufras, M.; Nicolaie, Ph. D.; Mallet, J.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Feugeas, J.-L.

    2013-02-15

    Inertial confinement fusion and specifically shock ignition involve temperatures and temperature gradients for which the classical Spitzer-Haerm thermal conduction breaks down and a non-local operator is required. In this article, two non-local electron thermal conduction models are tested against kinetic Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations. Both models are shown to reproduce the main features of thermal heat front propagation at kinetic timescales. The reduction of the thermal conductivity as a function of the scalelength of the temperature gradient is also recovered. Comparisons at nanosecond timescales show that the models agree on the propagation velocity of the heat front, but major differences appear in the thermal precursor.

  6. Thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons in noble gaseous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Wei-Rong Xu, Zhi-Cheng; Zheng, Dong-Qin; Ai, Bao-Quan

    2014-02-24

    We investigate the thermal conductivity of suspended graphene nanoribbons in noble gaseous environments using molecular dynamics simulations. It is reported that the thermal conductivity of perfect graphene nanoribbons decreases with the gaseous pressure. The decreasing is more obvious for the noble gas with large atomic number. However, the gaseous pressure cannot change the thermal conductivity of defective graphene nanoribbons apparently. The phonon spectra of graphene nanoribbons are also provided to give corresponding supports.

  7. Thermal Conductivity of Alumina-Toughened Zirconia Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dong-Ming

    2003-01-01

    10-mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (10YSZ)-alumina composites containing 0 to 30 mol% alumina were fabricated by hot pressing at 1500 C in vacuum. Thermal conductivity of the composites, determined at various temperatures using a steady-state laser heat flux technique, increased with increase in alumina content. Composites containing 0, 5, and 10-mol% alumina did not show any change in thermal conductivity with temperature. However, those containing 20 and 30-mol% alumina showed a decrease in thermal conductivity with increase in temperature. The measured values of thermal conductivity were in good agreement with those calculated from simple rule of mixtures.

  8. Thermal conductivity of penta-graphene from molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2015-10-21

    Using classical equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and applying the original Tersoff interatomic potential, we study the thermal transport property of the latest two dimensional carbon allotrope, penta-graphene. It is predicted that its room-temperature thermal conductivity is about 167 W/mK, which is much lower than that of graphene. With normal mode decomposition, the accumulated thermal conductivity with respect to phonon frequency and mean free path is analyzed. It is found that the acoustic phonons make a contribution of about 90% to the thermal conductivity, and phonons with mean free paths larger than 100 nm make a contribution over 50%. We demonstrate that the remarkably lower thermal conductivity of penta-graphene compared with graphene results from the lower phonon group velocities and fewer collective phonon excitations. Our study highlights the importance of structure-property relationship and provides better understanding of thermal transport property and valuable insight into thermal management of penta-graphene.

  9. Effect of wall conductivity on thermal stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, S.S.; Nelson, J.E.B.; Sitharama Rao, T.L. )

    1992-10-01

    The growing desire to find alternate energy sources to meet the ever-increasing energy demands of mankind has led to extensive research in the field of solar energy. Energy devices working on solar energy need energy storage subsystems because of the intermittent nature of solar radiation. Thermal energy storage systems which keep the warm and cold water separated by means of gravitational stratification have been found to be attractive in low and medium temperature thermal storage applications due to their simplicity and low cost. Experimental investigations have been carried out on scaled model storage tanks of various materials and wall thickness to study their effect on the stratification. It has been found that degradation of thermoclines is slower for tanks whose walls have a higher thermal resistance.

  10. Thermal conductivity modeling in variably saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, B.; Daigle, H.

    2015-12-01

    Modeling effective thermal conductivity under variably saturated conditions is essential to study heat transfer in natural sediments, soils, and rocks. The effective thermal conductivity in completely dry and fully saturated porous media is an integrated quantity representing the complex behavior of two conducting phases, i.e., pore fluid (either air or water) and solid matrix. Under partially saturated conditions, however, the effective thermal conductivity becomes even more complicated since three phases (air, water, and solid matrix) conduct heat simultaneously. In this study, we invoke an upscaling treatment called percolation-based effective-medium approximation to model the effective thermal conductivity in fully and partially saturated porous media. Our theoretical porosity- and saturation-dependent models contain endmember properties, such as air, solid matrix, and saturating fluid thermal conductivities, a percolation exponent t, and a percolation threshold. Comparing our theory with 216 porosity-dependent thermal conductivity measurements and 25 saturation-dependent thermal conductivity datasets indicate excellent match between theory and experiments. Our results show that the effective thermal conductivity under fully and partially saturated conditions follows nonuniversal behavior. This means the value of t changes from medium to medium and depends not only on topological and geometrical properties of the medium but also characteristics of the saturating fluid.

  11. Thermal conductance of nanoscale Langmuir-Blodgett films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziade, Elbara; Goni, Miguel; Sato, Toshiyuki; Czubarow, Pawel; Schmidt, Aaron J.

    2015-11-01

    Thermal transport across organic-inorganic interfaces is fundamental to understanding heat transfer in polymer-based composites, microelectronics, and energy conversion systems. We used the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique to deposit nanometer-thick films of poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) on silicon and gold substrates in two distinct states: Liquid condensed (Lc) and Liquid expanded (Le). We used frequency domain thermoreflectance to measure the thermal conductivity of the PVAc film and its thermal interface conductance to the substrate. We found that PVAc films prepared through the LB process have a higher thermal conductivity when compared to bulk. We measured the thermal interface conductance between PVAc and gold to be approximately 90 MW/m2 K for both the Le and Lc states, and the thermal interface conductance between PVAc and silicon to be approximately 70 MW/m2 K for both the Le and Lc states.

  12. Electrochemically tunable thermal conductivity of lithium cobalt oxide.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jiung; Losego, Mark D; Zhang, Hui Gang; Kim, Honggyu; Zuo, Jianmin; Petrov, Ivan; Cahill, David G; Braun, Paul V

    2014-06-03

    Using time-domain thermoreflectance, the thermal conductivity and elastic properties of a sputter deposited LiCoO2 film, a common lithium-ion cathode material, are measured as a function of the degree of lithiation. Here we report that via in situ measurements during cycling, the thermal conductivity of a LiCoO2 cathode reversibly decreases from ~5.4 to 3.7 W m(-1) K(-1), and its elastic modulus decreases from 325 to 225 GPa, as it is delithiated from Li1.0CoO2 to Li0.6CoO2. The dependence of the thermal conductivity on lithiation appears correlated with the lithiation-dependent phase behaviour. The oxidation-state-dependent thermal conductivity of electrolytically active transition metal oxides provides opportunities for dynamic control of thermal conductivity and is important to understand for thermal management in electrochemical energy storage devices.

  13. Anisotropic thermal conductivity of thin polycrystalline oxide samples

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, A.; Boussois, K.; Nait-Ali, B.; Smith, D. S.; Blanchart, P.

    2013-11-15

    This paper reports about the development of a modified laser-flash technique and relation to measure the in-plane thermal diffusivity of thin polycrystalline oxide samples. Thermal conductivity is then calculated with the product of diffusivity, specific heat and density. Design and operating features for evaluating in-plane thermal conductivities are described. The technique is advantageous as thin samples are not glued together to measure in-plane thermal conductivities like earlier methods reported in literature. The approach was employed to study anisotropic thermal conductivity in alumina sheet, textured kaolin ceramics and montmorillonite. Since it is rare to find in-plane thermal conductivity values for such anisotropic thin samples in literature, this technique offers a useful variant to existing techniques.

  14. An apparatus for measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal expansion based on GM cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huiming; Xu, Dong; Xu, Peng; Huang, Rongjin; Xu, Xiangdong; Li, Laifeng; Gong, Linghui

    2012-12-01

    The thermophysical properties of matters are extremely important for engineering and materials science. This paper describes a multifunctional apparatus based on GM cryocooler for measurement of thermal conductivity and thermal expansion via steady-state longitudinal heat flow method and strain gauge technique respectively. The apparatus consists of a removable sample test rod on which bulk samples can easily be mounted and placed in the measurement device. Besides, the sample holder is easy to be replaced so that it suits various needs. All measurements are efficiently and accurately carried out at different temperatures by following a set of stability criteria the setup of the apparatus has been calibrated with sample stainless steel and copper, which gives an error within 6% around the published results in the literatures.

  15. An improved thin film approximation to accurately determine the optical conductivity of graphene from infrared transmittance

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J. W.; Bol, A. A.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de

    2014-07-07

    This work presents an improved thin film approximation to extract the optical conductivity from infrared transmittance in a simple yet accurate way. This approximation takes into account the incoherent reflections from the backside of the substrate. These reflections are shown to have a significant effect on the extracted optical conductivity and hence on derived parameters as carrier mobility and density. By excluding the backside reflections, the error for these parameters for typical chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene on a silicon substrate can be as high as 17% and 45% for the carrier mobility and density, respectively. For the mid- and near-infrared, the approximation can be simplified such that the real part of the optical conductivity is extracted without the need for a parameterization of the optical conductivity. This direct extraction is shown for Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) transmittance measurements of CVD graphene on silicon in the photon energy range of 370–7000 cm{sup −1}. From the real part of the optical conductivity, the carrier density, mobility, and number of graphene layers are determined but also residue, originating from the graphene transfer, is detected. FTIR transmittance analyzed with the improved thin film approximation is shown to be a non-invasive, easy, and accurate measurement and analysis method for assessing the quality of graphene and can be used for other 2-D materials.

  16. Lattice thermal conductivity of a silicon nanowire under surface stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liangruksa, Monrudee; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2011-06-01

    The effects of surface stress on the lattice thermal conductivity are investigated for a silicon nanowire. A phonon dispersion relation is derived based on a continuum approach for a nanowire under surface stress. The phonon Boltzmann equation and the relaxation time are employed to calculate the lattice thermal conductivity. Surface stress, which has a significant influence on the phonon dispersion and thus the Debye temperature, decreases the lattice thermal conductivity. The conductivity varies with changing surface stress, e.g., due to adsorption layers and material coatings. This suggests a phonon engineering approach to tune the conductivity of nanomaterials.

  17. Thermal Conductivity of MWNT-Epoxy Composites by Transient Thermoreflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M.; Jagannadham, K.

    2015-08-01

    Multiwall nanotube composites with epoxy matrix were synthesized by sonication. Thermal conductivity of the composite samples was determined by a transient thermoreflectance method using indium film as a transducer. The thermal conductivity normal to the surface followed percolation behavior. The presence of higher mass fraction of MWNTs near the surface, and the higher purity and the larger aspect ratio of MWNTs were found to be responsible for significant improvement in thermal conductivity of the composites. The barrier to conduction was found to be the width of the epoxy film separating the MWNTs. Modeling analysis showed that the interface thermal conductance between MWNTs is fairly large and is not a limiting factor for the improvement in the thermal conductivity.

  18. A Model for Hydrogen Thermal Conductivity and Viscosity Including the Critical Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Howard A.; Tunc, Gokturk; Bayazitoglu, Yildiz

    2001-01-01

    In order to conduct a thermal analysis of heat transfer to liquid hydrogen near the critical point, an accurate understanding of the thermal transport properties is required. A review of the available literature on hydrogen transport properties identified a lack of useful equations to predict the thermal conductivity and viscosity of liquid hydrogen. The tables published by the National Bureau of Standards were used to perform a series of curve fits to generate the needed correlation equations. These equations give the thermal conductivity and viscosity of hydrogen below 100 K. They agree with the published NBS tables, with less than a 1.5 percent error for temperatures below 100 K and pressures from the triple point to 1000 KPa. These equations also capture the divergence in the thermal conductivity at the critical point

  19. Analytical Fractal Model for Calculating Effective Thermal Conductivity of the Fibrous Porous Materials.

    PubMed

    Kan, An-Kang; Cao, Dan; Zhang, Xue-Lai

    2015-04-01

    Accurately predicting the effective thermal conductivity of the fibrous materials is highly desirable but remains to be a challenging work. In this paper, the microstructure of the porous fiber materials is analyzed, approximated and modeled on basis of the statistical self-similarity of fractal theory. A fractal model is presented to accurately calculate the effective thermal conductivity of fibrous porous materials. Taking the two-phase heat transfer effect into account, the existing statistical microscopic geometrical characteristics are analyzed and the Hertzian Contact solution is introduced to calculate the thermal resistance of contact points. Using the fractal method, the impacts of various factors, including the porosity, fiber orientation, fractal diameter and dimension, rarified air pressure, bulk thermal conductivity coefficient, thickness and environment condition, on the effective thermal conductivity, are analyzed. The calculation results show that the fiber orientation angle caused the material effective thermal conductivity to be anisotropic, and normal distribution is introduced into the mathematic function. The effective thermal conductivity of fibrous material increases with the fiber fractal diameter, fractal dimension and rarefied air pressure within the materials, but decreases with the increase of vacancy porosity.

  20. Minimum thermal conductivity considerations in aerogel thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Patrick E.; Kaehr, Bryan; Piekos, Edward S.; Dunphy, Darren; Jeffrey Brinker, C.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate the use time domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) to measure the thermal conductivity of the solid silica network of aerogel thin-films. TDTR presents a unique experimental capability for measuring the thermal conductivity of porous media due to the nanosecond time domain aspect of the measurement. In short, TDTR is capable of explicitly measuring the change in temperature with time of the solid portion of porous media independently from the pores or effective media. This makes TDTR ideal for determining the thermal transport through the solid network of the aerogel film. We measure the thermal conductivity of the solid silica networks of an aerogel film that is 10% solid, and the thermal conductivity of the same type of film that has been calcined to remove the terminating methyl groups. We find that for similar densities, the thermal conductivity through the silica in the aerogel thin films is similar to that of bulk aerogels. We theoretically describe the thermal transport in the aerogel films with a modified minimum limit to thermal conductivity that accounts for porosity through a reduction in phonon velocity. Our porous minimum limit agrees well with a wide range of experimental data in addition to sound agreement with differential effective medium theory. This porous minimum limit therefore demonstrates an approach to predict the thermal conductivity of porous disordered materials with no a priori knowledge of the corresponding bulk phase, unlike differential effective medium theory.

  1. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY AND OTHER PROPERTIES OF CEMENTITIOUS GROUTS

    SciTech Connect

    ALLAN,M.

    1998-05-01

    The thermal conductivity and other properties cementitious grouts have been investigated in order to determine suitability of these materials for grouting vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pumps. The roles of mix variables such as water/cement ratio, sand/cement ratio and superplasticizer dosage were measured. In addition to thermal conductivity, the cementitious grouts were also tested for bleeding, permeability, bond to HDPE pipe, shrinkage, coefficient of thermal expansion, exotherm, durability and environmental impact. This paper summarizes the results for selected grout mixes. Relatively high thermal conductivities were obtained and this leads to reduction in predicted bore length and installation costs. Improvements in shrinkage resistance and bonding were achieved.

  2. Thermal conductivity and other properties of cementitious grouts

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.

    1998-08-01

    The thermal conductivity and other properties cementitious grouts have been investigated in order to determine suitability of these materials for grouting vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pumps. The roles of mix variables such as water/cement ratio, sand/cement ratio and superplasticizer dosage were measured. In addition to thermal conductivity, the cementitious grouts were also tested for bleeding, permeability, bond to HDPE pipe, shrinkage, coefficient of thermal expansion, exotherm, durability and environmental impact. This paper summarizes the results for selected grout mixes. Relatively high thermal conductivities were obtained and this leads to reduction in predicted bore length and installation costs. Improvements in shrinkage resistance and bonding were achieved.

  3. Superior thermal conductivity in suspended bilayer hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chengru; Guo, Jie; Dong, Lan; Aiyiti, Adili; Xu, Xiangfan; Li, Baowen

    2016-05-01

    We reported the basal-plane thermal conductivity in exfoliated bilayer hexagonal boron nitride h-BN that was measured using suspended prepatterned microstructures. The h-BN sample suitable for thermal measurements was fabricated by dry-transfer method, whose sample quality, due to less polymer residues on surfaces, is believed to be superior to that of PMMA-mediated samples. The measured room temperature thermal conductivity is around 484 Wm‑1K‑1(+141 Wm‑1K‑1/ ‑24 Wm‑1K‑1) which exceeds that in bulk h-BN, providing experimental observation of the thickness-dependent thermal conductivity in suspended few-layer h-BN.

  4. Coherent thermal conductance of 1-D photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschikin, Maria; Ben-Abdallah, Philippe; Biehs, Svend-Age

    2012-10-01

    We present an exact calculation of coherent thermal conductance in 1-D multilayer photonic crystals using the S-matrix method. In particular, we study the thermal conductance in a bilayer structure of Si/vacuum or Al2O3/vacuum slabs by means of the exact radiative heat flux expression. Based on the results obtained for the Al2O3/vacuum structure we show by comparison with previous works that the material losses and (localized) surface modes supported by the inner layers play a fundamental role and cannot be omitted in the definition of thermal conductance. Our results could have significant implications in the conception of efficient thermal barriers.

  5. Interlayer thermal conductivity of rubrene measured by ac-calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Brill, J. W.

    2013-07-01

    We have measured the interlayer thermal conductivity of crystals of the organic semiconductor rubrene, using ac-calorimetry. Since ac-calorimetry is most commonly used for measurements of the heat capacity, we include a discussion of its extension for measurements of the transverse thermal conductivity of thin crystals of poor thermal conductors, including the limitations of the technique. For rubrene, we find that the interlayer thermal conductivity, ≈0.7 mW/cm . K, is several times smaller than the (previously measured) in-layer value, but its temperature dependence indicates that the interlayer mean free path is at least a few layers.

  6. Low-Thermal-Conduction Links For Silicon Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mott, D. Brent

    1991-01-01

    Simple method of texturing surface of silicon reduces thermal conductivities of links in silicon x-ray calorimeters and infrared bolometers. Gives links high density of phonon scattering sites reducing conduction of heat. Links made shorter and more robust. Used in making x-ray calorimeters and infrared bolometers. Applicable to any microelectronic device in which high degree of thermal isolation needed.

  7. Estimation of Phonon and Carrier Thermal Conductivities for Bulk Thermoelectric Materials Using Transport Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Mioko; Homma, Ryoei; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-09-01

    The phonon and carrier thermal conductivities of thermoelectric materials were calculated using the Wiedemann-Franz law, Boltzmann equation, and a method we propose in this study called the Debye specific heat method. We prepared polycrystalline n-type doped bismuth telluride (BiTe) and bismuth antimony (BiSb) bulk alloy samples and measured six parameters (Seebeck coefficient, resistivity, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, magneto-resistivity, and Hall coefficient). The carrier density and mobility were estimated for calculating the carrier thermal conductivity by using the Boltzmann equation. In the Debye specific heat method, the phonon thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity were calculated from the temperature dependence of the effective specific heat by using not only the measured thermal conductivity and Debye model, but also the measured thermal diffusivity. The carrier thermal conductivity was also evaluated from the phonon thermal conductivity by using the specific heat. The ratio of carrier thermal conductivity to thermal conductivity was evaluated for the BiTe and BiSb samples, and the values obtained using the Debye specific heat method at 300 K were 52% for BiTe and <5.5% for BiSb. These values are either considerably larger or smaller than those obtained using other methods. The Dulong-Petit law was applied to validate the Debye specific heat method at 300 K, which is significantly greater than the Debye temperature of the BiTe and BiSb samples, and it was confirmed that the phonon specific heat at 300 K has been accurately reproduced using our proposed method.

  8. Thermal conductivity of vertically aligned boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essedik Belkerk, Boubakeur; Achour, Amine; Zhang, Dongyan; Sahli, Salah; Djouadi, M.-Abdou; Khin Yap, Yoke

    2016-07-01

    For the first time, we report the thermal conductivity of vertically aligned boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) films produced by catalytic chemical vapor deposition. High-quality BNNTs were synthesized at 1200 °C on fused silica substrates precoated with Pt thin-film thermometers. The thermal conductivity of the BNNTs was measured at room temperature by using a pulsed photothermal technique. The apparent thermal conductivity of the BNNT coatings increased from 55 to 170 W m-1 K-1 when the thickness increased from 10 to 28 µm, while the thermal conductivity attained a value as high as 2400 W m-1 K-1. These results suggested that BNNTs, which are highly thermally conductive, but electrically insulating, are promising materials with unique properties.

  9. Size dictated thermal conductivity of GaN

    DOE PAGES

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; McDonald, Anthony E.; Fuller, Elliot James; Talin, Albert Alec; Rost, Christina M.; Maria, Jon -Paul; Gaskins, John T.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2016-04-01

    The thermal conductivity on n- and p-type doped gallium nitride (GaN) epilayers having thickness of 3-4 μm was investigated using time domain thermoreflectance (TDTR). Despite possessing carrier concentrations ranging across 3 decades (1015 – 1018 cm–3), n-type layers exhibit a nearly constant thermal conductivity of 180 W/mK. The thermal conductivity of p-type epilayers, in contrast, reduces from 160 to 110 W/mK with increased doping. These trends–and their overall reduction relative to bulk–are explained leveraging established scattering models where it is shown that size effects play a primary role in limiting thermal conductivity for layers even tens of microns thick. GaNmore » device layers, even of pristine quality, will therefore exhibit thermal conductivities less than the bulk value of 240 W/mK owing to their finite thickness.« less

  10. Anisotropic thermal conductivity in single crystal β-gallium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhi; Verma, Amit; Wu, Xufei; Sun, Fangyuan; Hickman, Austin; Masui, Takekazu; Kuramata, Akito; Higashiwaki, Masataka; Jena, Debdeep; Luo, Tengfei

    2015-03-01

    The thermal conductivities of β-Ga2O3 single crystals along four different crystal directions were measured in the temperature range of 80-495 K using the time domain thermoreflectance method. A large anisotropy was found. At room temperature, the [010] direction has the highest thermal conductivity of 27.0 ± 2.0 W/mK, while that along the [100] direction has the lowest value of 10.9 ± 1.0 W/mK. At high temperatures, the thermal conductivity follows a ˜1/T relationship characteristic of Umklapp phonon scattering, indicating phonon-dominated heat transport in the β-Ga2O3 crystal. The measured experimental thermal conductivity is supported by first-principles calculations, which suggest that the anisotropy in thermal conductivity is due to the differences of the speed of sound along different crystal directions.

  11. Thermal Conductivity of Alumina-reinforced Zirconia Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    2005-01-01

    10-mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (10SZ) - alumina composites containing 0-30 mol% alumina were fabricated by hot pressing at 1500 C in vacuum. Thermal conductivity was determined at various temperatures using a steady-state laser heat flux technique. Thermal conductivity of the composites increased with increase in alumina content. Composites containing 0, 5, and 10-mol% alumina did not show any change in thermal conductivity with temperature. However, those containing 20 and 30-mol% alumina showed a decrease in thermal conductivity with increase in temperature. The measured values of thermal conductivity were in good agreement with those calculated from the Maxwell-Eucken model where one phase is uniformly dispersed within a second major continuous phase.

  12. Origins of thermal conductivity changes in strained crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrish, Kevin D.; Jain, Ankit; Larkin, Jason M.; Saidi, Wissam A.; McGaughey, Alan J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The strain-dependent phonon properties and thermal conductivities of a soft system [Lennard-Jones (LJ) argon] and a stiff system (silicon modeled using first-principles calculations) are predicted using lattice dynamics calculations and the Boltzmann transport equation. As is commonly assumed for materials under isotropic strain, the thermal conductivity of LJ argon decreases monotonically as the system moves from compression into tension. The reduction in thermal conductivity is attributed to decreases in both the phonon lifetimes and group velocities. The thermal conductivity of silicon, however, is constant in compression and only begins to decrease once the system is put in tension. The silicon lifetimes show an anomalous behavior, whereby they increase as the system moves from compression into tension, which is explained by examining the potential energy surface felt by an atom. The results emphasize the need to separately consider the harmonic and anharmonic effects of strain on material stiffness, phonon properties, and thermal conductivity.

  13. Thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires embedded on thermoelectric platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, JinYong; Cho, Kyoungah; Yoon, Dae Sung; Kim, Sangsig

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we propose a simple method for obtaining the thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) embedded on a thermoelectric platform. The approximation of the heat flux in SiNWs with temperature differences enables the determination of thermal conductivity. Using this method, the thermal conductivities of our n- and p-type SiNWs are found to be 18.06  ±  0.12 and 20.29  ±  0.77 W m-1 · K-1, respectively. The atomic weight of arsenic ions in the n-type SiNWs is responsible for a lower thermal conductivity than that of boron ions in the p-type SiNWs. Our results demonstrate that this simple method is capable of measuring the thermal conductivity of thermoelectric nanomaterials embedded on thermoelectric devices.

  14. Thermal Conductivity of Natural Rubber Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Ma, Lian-Xiang; Tang, Yuan-Zheng; Wang, Ze-Peng; Li, Wei; Kukulka, David

    2015-04-01

    Thermal conductivity of natural rubber has been studied by classic molecular dynamics simulations. These simulations are performed on natural rubber models using the adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order (AIREBO) and the Green-Kubo molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Thermal conductivity results are found to be very sensitive to the time step used in the simulations. For a time step of 0.1 fs, the converged thermal conductivity is 0.35 W/mK. Additionally the anisotropic thermal conductivity of a specially-modeled natural rubber model with straight molecular chains was studied and values of thermal conductivity parallel to the molecular chains was found to be 1.71 W/mK and the anisotropy, 2Kz/(Kx + Ky), was 2.67.

  15. Thermal conductivity of vertically aligned boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essedik Belkerk, Boubakeur; Achour, Amine; Zhang, Dongyan; Sahli, Salah; Djouadi, M.-Abdou; Khin Yap, Yoke

    2016-07-01

    For the first time, we report the thermal conductivity of vertically aligned boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) films produced by catalytic chemical vapor deposition. High-quality BNNTs were synthesized at 1200 °C on fused silica substrates precoated with Pt thin-film thermometers. The thermal conductivity of the BNNTs was measured at room temperature by using a pulsed photothermal technique. The apparent thermal conductivity of the BNNT coatings increased from 55 to 170 W m‑1 K‑1 when the thickness increased from 10 to 28 µm, while the thermal conductivity attained a value as high as 2400 W m‑1 K‑1. These results suggested that BNNTs, which are highly thermally conductive, but electrically insulating, are promising materials with unique properties.

  16. Thermal Conductivity of Polyimide/Carbon Nanofiller Blends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delozier, D. M.; Watson, K. A.; Ghose, S.; Working, D. C.; Connell, J. W.; Smith, J. G.; Sun, Y. P.; Lin, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Ultem(TM) was mixed with three different carbon-based nanofillers in efforts to increase the thermal conductivity of the polymer. After initial mixing, the nanocomposites were extruded or processed via the Laboratory Mixing Molder (LMM) process. High resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) revealed significant alignment of the nanofillers in the extruded samples. Thermal conductivity measurements were made both in the direction and perpendicular to the direction of alignment of nanofillers as well as for unaligned samples. It was found that the largest improvement in thermal conductivity was achieved in the case of aligned samples when the measurement was performed in the direction of alignment. Unaligned samples also showed a significant improvement in thermal conductivity and may be useful in applications when it is not possible to align the nanofiller. However the improvements in thermal conductivity did not approach those expected based on a rule of mixtures. This is likely due to poor phonon transfer through the matrix.

  17. Therma1 Conductivity and Durability of Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will play a crucial role in advanced gas turbine engines because of their ability to further increase engine operating temperature and reduce cooling, thus helping to achieve engine emission and efficiency goals. Future TBCs must be designed with increased phase stability, lower thermal conductivity, and improved sintering and thermal stress resistance in order to effectively protect engine hot-section components. Advanced low conductivity TBCs are being developed at NASA by incorporating multi-component oxide dopants into zirconia-yttria or hafnia-yttria to promote the formation of thermodynamically stable defect clusters within the coating structures. This presentation will primarily focus on thermal conductivity and durability of the novel defect cluster thermal barrier coatings for turbine airfoil and combustor applications, determined by a unique CO2 laser heat-flux approach. The laser heat-flux testing approach emphasizes the real-time monitoring and assessment of the coating thermal conductivity under simulated engine temperature and thermal gradient conditions. The conductivity increase due to coating sintering (and/or phase change) and the conductivity decrease due to coating delamination have been determined under steady-state, cyclic, uniform or non-uniform heat-flux conditions. The coating radiation flux resistance has been evaluated by varying coating thermal gradients, and also by using a laser-heated radiative-flux source. Advanced multi-component TBC systems have been shown to have significantly reduced thermal conductivity and improved high temperature stability due to the nano-sized, low mobility defect clusters associated with the paired rare earth dopant additions. The effect of oxide defect cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, thermal stability and furnace cyclic durability will also be discussed. The current low conductivity TBC systems have demonstrated long-term cyclic durability at very high

  18. Nanostructure-thermal conductivity relationships in protic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Thomas; Varela, Luis M; Webber, Grant B; Warr, Gregory G; Atkin, Rob

    2014-10-16

    The thermal conductivities of nine protic ionic liquids (ILs) have been investigated between 293 and 340 K. Within this range, the thermal conductivities are between 0.18 and 0.30 W · m(-1) · K(-1). These values are higher than those typically associated with oils and aprotic ILs, but lower than those of strongly hydrogen bonding solvents like water. Weak linear decreases in thermal conductivity with temperature are noted, with the exception of ethanolammonium nitrate (EtAN) where the thermal conductivity increases with temperature. The dependence of thermal conductivity on IL type is analyzed with use of the Bahe-Varela pseudolattice theory. This theory treats the bulk IL as an array of ordered domains with intervening domains of uncorrelated structure which enable and provide barriers to heat propagation (respectively) via allowed vibrational modes. For the protic ILs investigated, thermal conductivity depends strongly on the IL cation alkyl chain length. This is because the cation alkyl chain controls the dimensions of the IL bulk nanostructure, which consists of charged (ordered domains) and uncharged regions (disordered domains). As the cation alkyl chain controls the dimensions of the disordered domains, it thus limits the thermal conductivity. To test the generality of this interpretation, the thermal conductivities of propylammonium nitrate (PAN) and PAN-octanol mixtures were examined; water selectively swells the PAN charged domain, while octanol swells the uncharged regions. Up to a certain concentration, adding water increases thermal conduction and octanol decreases it, as expected. However, at high solute concentrations the IL nanostructure is broken. When additional solvent is added above this concentration the rate of change in thermal conductivity is greatly reduced. This is because, in the absence of nanostructure, the added solvent only serves to dilute the salt solution.

  19. Measurement of thermal conductivity in proton irradiated silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Marat Khafizov; Clarissa Yablinsky; Todd Allen; David Hurley

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the influence of proton irradiation on thermal conductivity in single crystal silicon. We apply laser based modulated thermoreflectance technique to extract the change in conductivity of the thin layer damaged by proton irradiation. Unlike time domain thermoreflectance techniques that require application of a metal film, we perform our measurement on uncoated samples. This provides greater sensitivity to the change in conductivity of the thin damaged layer. Using sample temperature as a parameter provides a means to deduce the primary defect structures that limit thermal transport. We find that under high temperature irradiation the degradation of thermal conductivity is caused primarily by extended defects.

  20. Measurement of thermal conductivity in proton irradiated silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khafizov, Marat; Yablinsky, Clarissa; Allen, Todd R.; Hurley, David H.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the influence of proton irradiation on thermal conductivity in single crystal silicon. We apply a laser based modulated thermoreflectance technique to measure the change in conductivity of the thin layer damaged by proton irradiation. Unlike time domain thermoreflectance techniques that require application of a metal film, we perform our spatial domain measurement on uncoated samples. This provides greater sensitivity to the change in conductivity of the thin damaged layer. Using sample temperature as a parameter provides a means to deduce the primary defect structures that limit thermal transport. We find that under high temperature irradiation the degradation of thermal conductivity is caused primarily by extended defects.

  1. Thermally Conductive Tape Based on Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashani, Ali

    2011-01-01

    To increase contact conductance between two mating surfaces, a conductive tape has been developed by growing dense arrays of carbon nanotubes (CNTs, graphite layers folded into cylinders) on both sides of a thermally conductive metallic foil. When the two mating surfaces are brought into contact with the conductive tape in between, the CNT arrays will adhere to the mating surface. The van der Waals force between the contacting tubes and the mating surface provides adhesion between the two mating surfaces. Even though the thermal contact conductance of a single tube-to-tube contact is small, the tremendous amount of CNTs on the surface leads to a very large overall contact conductance. Interface contact thermal resistance rises from the microroughness and the macroscopic non-planar quality of mating surfaces. When two surfaces come into contact with each other, the actual contact area may be much less than the total area of the surfaces. The real area of contact depends on the load, the surface roughness, and the elastic and inelastic properties of the surface. This issue is even more important at cryogenic temperatures, where materials become hard and brittle and vacuum is used, which prevents any gas conduction through the interstitial region. A typical approach to increase thermal contact conductance is to use thermally conducting epoxies or greases, which are not always compatible with vacuum conditions. In addition, the thermal conductivities of these compounds are often relatively low. The CNTs used in this approach can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on the folding angle and diameter. The electrical resistivity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been reported. MWCNTs can pass a current density and remain stable at high temperatures in air. The thermal conductivity of a MWCNT at room temperature is measured to be approximately 3,000 W/m-K, which is much larger than that of diamond. At room temperature, the thermal conductance of a 0.3 sq cm

  2. Effect of Aggregation on Thermal Conduction in Colloidal Nanofluids

    SciTech Connect

    R Prasher; W Evans; J Fish; P Meakin; P Phelan; Pawel Keblinski

    2006-08-10

    Using effective medium theory we demonstrate that the thermal conductivity of nanofluids can be significantly enhanced by the aggregation of nanoparticles into clusters. The enhancement is based purely on conduction and does not require a novel mechanism. Predictions of the effective medium theory are in excellent agreement with detailed numerical calculations on model nanofluids involving fractal clusters and show the importance of cluster morphology on thermal conductivity enhancements.

  3. Thermal conductivity of the diamond-paraffin wax composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abyzov, A. M.; Kidalov, S. V.; Shakhov, F. M.

    2011-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of diamond-paraffin wax composites prepared by infiltration of a hydrocarbon binder with the thermal conductivity λ m = 0.2 W m-1 K-1 into a dense bed of diamond particles (λ f ˜ 1500 W m-1 K-1) with sizes of 400 and 180 μm has been investigated. The calculations using universally accepted models considering isolated inclusions in a matrix have demonstrated that the best agreement with the measured values of the thermal conductivity of the composite λ = 10-12 W m-1 K-1 is achieved with the use of the differential effective medium model, the Maxwell mean field scheme gives a very underestimated calculated value of λ, and the effective medium theory leads to a very overestimated value. An agreement between the calculation and the experiment can be provided by constructing thermal conductivity functions. The calculation of the thermal conductivity at the percolation threshold has shown that the experimental thermal conductivity of the composites is higher than this critical value. It has been established that, for the composites with closely packed diamond particles (the volume fraction is ˜0.63 for a monodisperse binder), the use of the isolated particle model (Hasselman-Johnson and differential effective medium models) for calculating the thermal conductivity is not quite correct, because the model does not take into account the percolation component of the thermal conductivity. In particular, this holds true for the calculation of the heat conductance of diamond-matrix interfaces in diamond-metal composites with a high thermal conductivity.

  4. Acoustic transducer apparatus with reduced thermal conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lierke, Ernst G. (Inventor); Leung, Emily W. (Inventor); Bhat, Balakrishna T. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A horn is described for transmitting sound from a transducer to a heated chamber containing an object which is levitated by acoustic energy while it is heated to a molten state, which minimizes heat transfer to thereby minimize heating of the transducer, minimize temperature variation in the chamber, and minimize loss of heat from the chamber. The forward portion of the horn, which is the portion closest to the chamber, has holes that reduce its cross-sectional area to minimize the conduction of heat along the length of the horn, with the entire front portion of the horn being rigid and having an even front face to efficiently transfer high frequency acoustic energy to fluid in the chamber. In one arrangement, the horn has numerous rows of holes extending perpendicular to the length of horn, with alternate rows extending perpendicular to one another to form a sinuous path for the conduction of heat along the length of the horn.

  5. Steady heat conduction-based thermal conductivity measurement of single walled carbon nanotubes thin film using a micropipette thermal sensor

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, R.; Lee, K. M.; Chang, W. S.; Kim, D. S.; Rhee, G. H.; Choi, T. Y.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the thermal conductivity measurement of single-walled carbon nanotubes thin film using a laser point source-based steady state heat conduction method. A high precision micropipette thermal sensor fabricated with a sensing tip size varying from 2 μm to 5 μm and capable of measuring thermal fluctuation with resolution of ±0.01 K was used to measure the temperature gradient across the suspended carbon nanotubes (CNT) film with a thickness of 100 nm. We used a steady heat conduction model to correlate the temperature gradient to the thermal conductivity of the film. We measured the average thermal conductivity of CNT film as 74.3 ± 7.9 W m−1 K−1 at room temperature. PMID:23556837

  6. DESIGN NOTE: The measurement of thermal conductivities of solid fruits and vegetables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xin-Gang; Zhang, Yinping; Ge, Xinshi

    1999-07-01

    A thermal conductivity probe consisting of a heating cell, a thermocouple and a guard tube over the heating cell was developed and is described here. Analyses demonstrate that the guard tube acts as a thermal contact resistance. This resistance does not influence measurements of thermal conductivity significantly, but it must be considered in an accurate measurement of thermal diffusivity, especially when there is a gap between the heater and the guard tube. Calibration of the probe with glycerine in this work exhibits an accuracy of 1.4% for thermal conductivity measurements. The probe was used to measure the thermal conductivities of some solid fruits and vegetables. The sizes of both specimen and probe were analysed and their influences controlled to be under 1.0%. Each measurement was completed within two minutes and the temperature rise was less than under 6 °C. The water content of fruits and vegetables was found to be the dominant factor in determining their thermal conductivities. An empirical relationship between thermal conductivity and mass density is proposed based on the measurements. It is shown that this relation gives a deviation from experimental data of only 11%.

  7. Computer Modeling of the Thermal Conductivity of Cometary Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, Theodore E.; Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of this research was to estimate the thermal conductivity of cometry ices from computer simulations of model amorphous ices. This was divided into four specific tasks: (1) Generating samples of amorphous water ices at different microporosities; (2) Comparing the resulting molecular structures of the ices with experimental results, for those densities where data was available; (3) Calculating the thermal conductivities of liquid water and bulk amorphous ices and comparing these results with experimentally determined thermal conductivities; and (4) Investigating how the thermal conductivity of amorphous ice depends upon the microscopic porosity of the samples. The thermal conductivity was found to be only weakly dependent on the microstructure of the amorphous ice. In general, the amorphous ices were found to have thermal conductivities of the same order of magnitude as liquid water. This is in contradiction to recent experimental estimates of the thermal conductivity of amorphous ice, and it is suggested that the extremely low value obtained experimentally is due to larger-scale defects in the ice, such as cracks, but it is not an intrinsic property of the bulk amorphous ice.

  8. Tuning the thermal conductivity of methylammonium lead halide by the molecular substructure.

    PubMed

    Caddeo, Claudia; Melis, Claudio; Saba, Maria Ilenia; Filippetti, Alessio; Colombo, Luciano; Mattoni, Alessandro

    2016-09-21

    By using state-of-the-art atomistic methods we provide an accurate estimate of thermal conductivity of methylammonium lead halide as a function of sample size and temperature, in agreement with experimental works. We show that the thermal conductivity of methylammonium lead halide is intrinsically low, due to the low sound velocity of the PbI lattice. Furthermore, by selectively analyzing the effect of different molecular degrees of freedom, we clarify the role of the molecular substructure by showing that the internal modes above 150 cm(-1) (in addition to rotations) are effective in reducing the thermal conductivity of hybrid perovskites. This analysis suggests strategies to tailor the thermal conductivity by modifying the internal structure of organic cations. PMID:27531063

  9. Tuning the thermal conductivity of methylammonium lead halide by the molecular substructure.

    PubMed

    Caddeo, Claudia; Melis, Claudio; Saba, Maria Ilenia; Filippetti, Alessio; Colombo, Luciano; Mattoni, Alessandro

    2016-09-21

    By using state-of-the-art atomistic methods we provide an accurate estimate of thermal conductivity of methylammonium lead halide as a function of sample size and temperature, in agreement with experimental works. We show that the thermal conductivity of methylammonium lead halide is intrinsically low, due to the low sound velocity of the PbI lattice. Furthermore, by selectively analyzing the effect of different molecular degrees of freedom, we clarify the role of the molecular substructure by showing that the internal modes above 150 cm(-1) (in addition to rotations) are effective in reducing the thermal conductivity of hybrid perovskites. This analysis suggests strategies to tailor the thermal conductivity by modifying the internal structure of organic cations.

  10. Conductive ink containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide and method a conductive circuit using the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A conductive ink containing a conductive polymer, wherein the conductive polymer contains at least one polymer and a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, and it use in a method for making a conductive circuit.

  11. Identification of the Thermal Conductivity and Heat Capacity in Unsteady Nonlinear Heat Conduction Problems Using the Boundary Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesnic, D.; Elliott, L.; Ingham, D. B.

    1996-07-01

    In this study the inverse problem of the identification of temperature dependent thermal properties of a heat conducting body is investigated. The solution of the corresponding direct problem is obtained using a time marching boundary element method (BEM), which allows, without any need of interpolation and solution domain discretisation, efficient and accurate evaluation of the temperature everywhere inside the space-time dependent domain. Since the inverse problem, which requires the determination of the thermal conductivity and heat capacity from a finite set of temperature measurements taken inside the body, possesses poor uniqueness features, additional information is achieved by assuming that the thermal properties belong to a set of polynomials. Thus the inverse problem reduces to a parameter system estimation problem which is solved using the nonlinear least-squares method. Convergent and stable numerical results are obtained for the finite set of parameters which characterise the thermal properties for various test examples. Once the thermal properties are accurately obtained then the BEM determines automatically the temperature inside the solution domain and the remaining unspecified boundary values and the numerically obtained results show good agreement with the corresponding analytical solutions.

  12. Molecular simulations and lattice dynamics determination of Stillinger-Weber GaN thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Zhi; Jain, Ankit; McGaughey, Alan J. H.; Keblinski, Pawel

    2015-09-28

    The bulk thermal conductivity of Stillinger-Weber (SW) wurtzite GaN in the [0001] direction at a temperature of 300 K is calculated using equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD), non-equilibrium MD (NEMD), and lattice dynamics (LD) methods. While the NEMD method predicts a thermal conductivity of 166 ± 11 W/m·K, both the EMD and LD methods predict thermal conductivities that are an order of magnitude greater. We attribute the discrepancy to significant contributions to thermal conductivity from long-mean free path phonons. We propose that the Grüneisen parameter for low-frequency phonons is a good predictor of the severity of the size effects in NEMD thermal conductivity prediction. For weakly anharmonic crystals characterized by small Grüneisen parameters, accurate determination of thermal conductivity by NEMD is computationally impractical. The simulation results also indicate the GaN SW potential, which was originally developed for studying the atomic-level structure of dislocations, is not suitable for prediction of its thermal conductivity.

  13. Computer Modeling of the Thermal Conductivity of Cometary Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, Theodore E.; Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1998-01-01

    The thermal conductivity was found to be only weakly dependent on the microstructure of the amorphous ice. In general, the amorphous ices were found to have thermal conductivities of the same order of magnitude as liquid water. This is in contradiction to recent experimental estimates of the thermal conductivity of amorphous ice, and it is suggested that the extremely low value obtained experimentally is due to larger-scale defects in the ice, such as cracks, but is not an intrinsic property of the bulk amorphous ice.

  14. Thermal conductivity of hard carbon prepared from C 60 fulleren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smontara, A.; Biljaković, K.; Starešinić, D.; Pajić, D.; Kozlov, M. E.; Hirabayashi, M.; Tokumoto, M.; Ihara, H.

    1996-02-01

    We report measurements of thermal conductivity in 30-350 K range of hard fullerene-based carbon. The material has been prepared from C 60 fullerene under pressure and has an unusual combination of large hardness and relatively high electrical conductivity. Its thermal conductivity is about 5.5 W/mk at room temperature and decreases almost linearly in the investigated temperature range. The data obtained bear resemblance to the thermal properties of amorphous materials. It is consistent with the structural investigation that allows one to suggest the existence of short-range crystalline order in this transformed substance.

  15. A numerical study of transient, thermally-conductive solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, S. M.; Wu, S. T.; Dryer, M.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical analysis of transient solar wind starting at the solar surface and arriving at 1 AU is performed by an implicit numerical method. The model hydrodynamic equations include thermal conduction terms for both steady and unsteady simulations. Simulation results show significant influence of thermal conduction on both steady and time-dependent solar wind. Higher thermal conduction results in higher solar wind speed, higher temperature, but lower plasma density at 1 AU. Higher base temperature at the solar surface gives lower plasma speed, lower temperature, but higher density at 1 AU. Higher base density, on the other hand, gives lower velocity, lower temperature, but higher density at 1 AU.

  16. Low temperature thermal hall conductivity of a nodal chiral superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, Sungkit

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by Sr2RuO4, we consider a chiral superconductor where the gap is strongly suppressed along certain momentum directions. We evaluate the thermal Hall conductivity in the gapless regime, i.e., at low temperature compared with the impurity band width γ, taking the simplest model of isotropic impurity scattering. We find that, under favorable circumstances, this thermal Hall conductivity can be quite significant and is smaller than the diagonal component (the universal thermal conductivity) only by a factor of 1/{ln}(2{{{Δ }}}M/γ ), where {{{Δ }}}M is the maximum gap.

  17. Mechanisms and models of effective thermal conductivities of nanofluids.

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Singh, D.; Timofeeva, E. V.; Smith, D. S.; Routbort, J. L.; Univ. of Illinois

    2010-08-01

    The physical mechanisms and mathematical models of the effective thermal conductivities of nanofluids have long been of interest to the nanofluid research community because the effective thermal conductivities of nanofluids cannot generally be fully explained and predicted by classical effective medium theories. This review article summarizes considerable progress made on this topic. Specifically, the physical mechanisms and mathematical models of the effective thermal conductivities of nanofluids are reviewed, the potential contributions of those physical mechanisms are evaluated, and the comparisons of the theoretical predictions and experimental data are presented along with opportunities for future research.

  18. Thermal conductivity of mechanically joined semiconducting/metal nanomembrane superlattices.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Daniel; Wilson, Richard B; Teshome, Bezuayehu; Gorantla, Sandeep; Rümmeli, Mark H; Bublat, Thomas; Zallo, Eugenio; Li, Guodong; Cahill, David G; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2014-05-14

    The decrease of thermal conductivity is crucial for the development of efficient thermal energy converters. Systems composed of a periodic set of very thin layers show among the smallest thermal conductivities reported to-date. Here, we fabricate in an unconventional but straightforward way hybrid superlattices consisting of a large number of nanomembranes mechanically stacked on top of each other. The superlattices can consist of an arbitrary composition of n- or p-type doped single-crystalline semiconductors and a polycrystalline metal layer. These hybrid multilayered systems are fabricated by taking advantage of the self-rolling technique. First, differentially strained nanomembranes are rolled into three-dimensional microtubes with multiple windings. By applying vertical pressure, the tubes are then compressed and converted into a planar hybrid superlattice. The thermal measurements show a substantial reduction of the cross-sectional heat transport through the nanomembrane superlattice compared to a single nanomembrane layer. Time-domain thermoreflectance measurements yield thermal conductivity values below 2 W m(-1) K(-1). Compared to bulk values, this represents a reduction of 2 orders of magnitude by the incorporation of the mechanically joined interfaces. The scanning thermal atomic force microscopy measurements support the observation of reduced thermal transport on top of the superlattices. In addition, small defects with a spatial resolution of ∼100 nm can be resolved in the thermal maps. The low thermal conductivity reveals the potential of this approach to fabricate miniaturized on-chip solutions for energy harvesters in, e.g., microautonomous systems.

  19. An affordable and accurate conductivity probe for density measurements in stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carminati, Marco; Luzzatto-Fegiz, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    In stratified flow experiments, conductivity (combined with temperature) is often used to measure density. The probes typically used can provide very fine spatial scales, but can be fragile, expensive to replace, and sensitive to environmental noise. A complementary instrument, comprising a low-cost conductivity probe, would prove valuable in a wide range of applications where resolving extremely small spatial scales is not needed. We propose using micro-USB cables as the actual conductivity sensors. By removing the metallic shield from a micro-B connector, 5 gold-plated microelectrodes are exposed and available for 4-wire measurements. These have a cell constant ~550m-1, an intrinsic thermal noise of at most 30pA/Hz1/2, as well as sub-millisecond time response, making them highly suitable for many stratified flow measurements. In addition, we present the design of a custom electronic board (Arduino-based and Matlab-controlled) for simultaneous acquisition from 4 sensors, with resolution (in conductivity, and resulting density) exceeding the performance of typical existing probes. We illustrate the use of our conductivity-measuring system through stratified flow experiments, and describe plans to release simple instructions to construct our complete system for around 200.

  20. Remarkable reduction of thermal conductivity in phosphorene phononic crystal.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Zhang, Gang

    2016-05-01

    Phosphorene has received much attention due to its interesting physical and chemical properties, and its potential applications such as thermoelectricity. In thermoelectric applications, low thermal conductivity is essential for achieving a high figure of merit. In this work, we propose to reduce the thermal conductivity of phosphorene by adopting the phononic crystal structure, phosphorene nanomesh. With equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we find that the thermal conductivity is remarkably reduced in the phononic crystal. Our analysis shows that the reduction is due to the depressed phonon group velocities induced by Brillouin zone folding, and the reduced phonon lifetimes in the phononic crystal. Interestingly, it is found that the anisotropy ratio of thermal conductivity could be tuned by the 'non-square' pores in the phononic crystal, as the phonon group velocities in the direction with larger projection of pores is more severely suppressed, leading to greater reduction of thermal conductivity in this direction. Our work provides deep insight into thermal transport in phononic crystals and proposes a new strategy to reduce the thermal conductivity of monolayer phosphorene. PMID:27033566

  1. Remarkable reduction of thermal conductivity in phosphorene phononic crystal.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Zhang, Gang

    2016-05-01

    Phosphorene has received much attention due to its interesting physical and chemical properties, and its potential applications such as thermoelectricity. In thermoelectric applications, low thermal conductivity is essential for achieving a high figure of merit. In this work, we propose to reduce the thermal conductivity of phosphorene by adopting the phononic crystal structure, phosphorene nanomesh. With equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we find that the thermal conductivity is remarkably reduced in the phononic crystal. Our analysis shows that the reduction is due to the depressed phonon group velocities induced by Brillouin zone folding, and the reduced phonon lifetimes in the phononic crystal. Interestingly, it is found that the anisotropy ratio of thermal conductivity could be tuned by the 'non-square' pores in the phononic crystal, as the phonon group velocities in the direction with larger projection of pores is more severely suppressed, leading to greater reduction of thermal conductivity in this direction. Our work provides deep insight into thermal transport in phononic crystals and proposes a new strategy to reduce the thermal conductivity of monolayer phosphorene.

  2. Remarkable reduction of thermal conductivity in phosphorene phononic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen; Zhang, Gang

    2016-05-01

    Phosphorene has received much attention due to its interesting physical and chemical properties, and its potential applications such as thermoelectricity. In thermoelectric applications, low thermal conductivity is essential for achieving a high figure of merit. In this work, we propose to reduce the thermal conductivity of phosphorene by adopting the phononic crystal structure, phosphorene nanomesh. With equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we find that the thermal conductivity is remarkably reduced in the phononic crystal. Our analysis shows that the reduction is due to the depressed phonon group velocities induced by Brillouin zone folding, and the reduced phonon lifetimes in the phononic crystal. Interestingly, it is found that the anisotropy ratio of thermal conductivity could be tuned by the ‘non-square’ pores in the phononic crystal, as the phonon group velocities in the direction with larger projection of pores is more severely suppressed, leading to greater reduction of thermal conductivity in this direction. Our work provides deep insight into thermal transport in phononic crystals and proposes a new strategy to reduce the thermal conductivity of monolayer phosphorene.

  3. Predicting lattice thermal conductivity with help from ab initio methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broido, David

    2015-03-01

    The lattice thermal conductivity is a fundamental transport parameter that determines the utility a material for specific thermal management applications. Materials with low thermal conductivity find applicability in thermoelectric cooling and energy harvesting. High thermal conductivity materials are urgently needed to help address the ever-growing heat dissipation problem in microelectronic devices. Predictive computational approaches can provide critical guidance in the search and development of new materials for such applications. Ab initio methods for calculating lattice thermal conductivity have demonstrated predictive capability, but while they are becoming increasingly efficient, they are still computationally expensive particularly for complex crystals with large unit cells . In this talk, I will review our work on first principles phonon transport for which the intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity is limited only by phonon-phonon scattering arising from anharmonicity. I will examine use of the phase space for anharmonic phonon scattering and the Grüneisen parameters as measures of the thermal conductivities for a range of materials and compare these to the widely used guidelines stemming from the theory of Liebfried and Schölmann. This research was supported primarily by the NSF under Grant CBET-1402949, and by the S3TEC, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US DOE, office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award No. DE-SC0001299.

  4. Thermal conductivity of unconsolidated sediments with geophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.

    2000-07-01

    A theoretical model for the prediction of the thermal conductivity of unconsolidated granular sediments, with application to sand shale mixtures, is presented. The sediment is modeled as an assemblage of grains of thermal conductivity λS immersed in a pore fluid of thermal conductivity λƒ. In order to take into account for the thermal interactions between the grains a differential effective medium approach is used to provide a relationship between the effective thermal conductivity of the isotropic mixtures of grains saturated by the pore fluid, the porosity, and the thermal conductivities of the grains and pore fluid. The influence of the topology of the interconnected pore space is accounted for through the use of the electrical cementation exponent m, which is related to the electrical formation factor F by F = ϕ-m, where ϕ is the interconnected porosity. The main assumption of the model lies in the small contiguity between the grains. This assumption holds well for unconsolidated sand shale mixture sediments as demonstrated by comparing the model to available experimental data. The model offers the possibility to derive thermal conductivity profiles from downholes measurements of natural radioactivity, electrical resistivity, and bulk density.

  5. Fabrication and Characterization of a Conduction Cooled Thermal Neutron Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Heather Wampler; Adam Gerth; Heng Ban; Donna Post Guillen; Douglas Porter; Cynthia Papesch

    2010-06-01

    Installation of a conduction cooled thermal (low-energy) neutron filter in an existing domestic test reactor would provide the U.S. the capability to test new reactor fuels and materials for advanced fast (high-energy) reactor concepts. A composite consisting of Al3Hf-Al has been proposed for the neutron filter due to both the neutron filtering properties of hafnium and the conducting capabilities of aluminum. Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of the Al3Hf-Al composite is essential for the design of the filtering system. The present objectives are to identify a suitable fabrication technique and to measure the thermophysical properties of the Al3Hf intermetallic, which has not been done previous to this study. A centrifugal casting method was used to prepare samples of Al3Hf. X-ray diffraction and Rietveld analysis were conducted to determine the structural make-up of each of the samples. Thermophysical properties were measured as follows: specific heat by a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), thermal diffusivity by a laser flash thermal diffusivity measuring system, thermal expansion by a dilatometer, and thermal conductivity was calculated based on the previous measurements. All measurements were acquired over a temperature range of 90°C - 375°C with some measurements outside these bounds. The average thermal conductivity of the intermetallic Al3Hf (~7 at.% Hf) was found to be ~ 41 W/m-K for the given temperature range. This information fills a knowledge gap in the thermophysical properties of the intermetallic Al3Hf with the specified percentage of hafnium. A model designed to predict composite properties was used to calculate a thermal conductivity of ~177 W/m-K for an Al3Hf-Al composite with 23 vol% Al3Hf. This calculation was based upon the average thermal conductivity of Al3Hf over the specified temperature range.

  6. Manipulating Steady Heat Conduction by Sensu-shaped Thermal Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tiancheng; Bai, Xue; Liu, Dan; Gao, Dongliang; Li, Baowen; Thong, John T. L.; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2015-05-01

    The ability to design the control of heat flow has innumerable benefits in the design of electronic systems such as thermoelectric energy harvesters, solid-state lighting, and thermal imagers, where the thermal design plays a key role in performance and device reliability. In this work, we employ one identical sensu-unit with facile natural composition to experimentally realize a new class of thermal metamaterials for controlling thermal conduction (e.g., thermal concentrator, focusing/resolving, uniform heating), only resorting to positioning and locating the same unit element of sensu-shape structure. The thermal metamaterial unit and the proper arrangement of multiple identical units are capable of transferring, redistributing and managing thermal energy in a versatile fashion. It is also shown that our sensu-shape unit elements can be used in manipulating dc currents without any change in the layout for the thermal counterpart. These could markedly enhance the capabilities in thermal sensing, thermal imaging, thermal-energy storage, thermal packaging, thermal therapy, and more domains beyond.

  7. Manipulating Steady Heat Conduction by Sensu-shaped Thermal Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Han, Tiancheng; Bai, Xue; Liu, Dan; Gao, Dongliang; Li, Baowen; Thong, John T. L.; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The ability to design the control of heat flow has innumerable benefits in the design of electronic systems such as thermoelectric energy harvesters, solid-state lighting, and thermal imagers, where the thermal design plays a key role in performance and device reliability. In this work, we employ one identical sensu-unit with facile natural composition to experimentally realize a new class of thermal metamaterials for controlling thermal conduction (e.g., thermal concentrator, focusing/resolving, uniform heating), only resorting to positioning and locating the same unit element of sensu-shape structure. The thermal metamaterial unit and the proper arrangement of multiple identical units are capable of transferring, redistributing and managing thermal energy in a versatile fashion. It is also shown that our sensu-shape unit elements can be used in manipulating dc currents without any change in the layout for the thermal counterpart. These could markedly enhance the capabilities in thermal sensing, thermal imaging, thermal-energy storage, thermal packaging, thermal therapy, and more domains beyond. PMID:25974383

  8. Manipulating Steady Heat Conduction by Sensu-shaped Thermal Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Han, Tiancheng; Bai, Xue; Liu, Dan; Gao, Dongliang; Li, Baowen; Thong, John T L; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2015-05-14

    The ability to design the control of heat flow has innumerable benefits in the design of electronic systems such as thermoelectric energy harvesters, solid-state lighting, and thermal imagers, where the thermal design plays a key role in performance and device reliability. In this work, we employ one identical sensu-unit with facile natural composition to experimentally realize a new class of thermal metamaterials for controlling thermal conduction (e.g., thermal concentrator, focusing/resolving, uniform heating), only resorting to positioning and locating the same unit element of sensu-shape structure. The thermal metamaterial unit and the proper arrangement of multiple identical units are capable of transferring, redistributing and managing thermal energy in a versatile fashion. It is also shown that our sensu-shape unit elements can be used in manipulating dc currents without any change in the layout for the thermal counterpart. These could markedly enhance the capabilities in thermal sensing, thermal imaging, thermal-energy storage, thermal packaging, thermal therapy, and more domains beyond.

  9. Ultralow thermal conductivity in highly anion-defective aluminates.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chunlei; Qu, Zhixue; He, Yong; Luan, Dong; Pan, Wei

    2008-08-22

    Ultralow thermal conductivity (1.1 W/m.K, 1000 degrees C) in anion-deficient Ba2RAlO5 (R=Dy, Er, Yb) compounds was reported. The low thermal conductivity was then analyzed by kinetic theory. The highly defective structure of Ba2RAlO5 results in weak atomic bond strength and low sound speeds, and phonon scattering by large concentration of oxygen vacancies reduces the phonon mean free path to the order of interatomic distance. Ba2DyAlO5 exhibits the shortest phonon mean free path and lowest thermal conductivity among the three compositions investigated, which can be attributed to additional phonon scattering by DyO6 octahedron tilting as a result of a low tolerance factor. The Ba2RAlO5 (R=Dy, Er, Yb) compounds have shown great potential in high-temperature thermal insulation applications, particularly as a thermal barrier coating material. PMID:18764638

  10. Ultralow Thermal Conductivity in Highly Anion-Defective Aluminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Chunlei; Qu, Zhixue; He, Yong; Luan, Dong; Pan, Wei

    2008-08-01

    Ultralow thermal conductivity (1.1W/m·K, 1000°C) in anion-deficient Ba2RAlO5 (R=Dy, Er, Yb) compounds was reported. The low thermal conductivity was then analyzed by kinetic theory. The highly defective structure of Ba2RAlO5 results in weak atomic bond strength and low sound speeds, and phonon scattering by large concentration of oxygen vacancies reduces the phonon mean free path to the order of interatomic distance. Ba2DyAlO5 exhibits the shortest phonon mean free path and lowest thermal conductivity among the three compositions investigated, which can be attributed to additional phonon scattering by DyO6 octahedron tilting as a result of a low tolerance factor. The Ba2RAlO5 (R=Dy, Er, Yb) compounds have shown great potential in high-temperature thermal insulation applications, particularly as a thermal barrier coating material.

  11. Thermal conductance modulator based on folded graphene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang, Tao; Chen, Yuanping; Xie, Yuee; Stocks, George Malcolm; Zhong, Jianxin

    2011-01-01

    Based on folded graphene nanoribbons, we report a thermal conductance modulator which performs analogous operations as the rheostat in electronic circuits. This fundamental device can controllably and reversibly modulate the thermal conductance by varying the geometric structures and its tuning range can be up to 40% of the conductance of unfolded nanoribbons ( 1 nm wide and 7 15 nm long). Under this modulation, the conductance shows a linearly dependence on the folded angle, while undergoes a transition with the variation of the inter-layer distance. This primary thermal device may have great potential applications for phononic circuits and nanoscale thermal management. VC2011 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3665184

  12. Thermal Conductivity of Aqueous Sugar Solutions under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, M.; Baars, A.; Werner, F.; Eder, C.; Delgado, A.

    2007-08-01

    Molecular energy transport in aqueous sucrose and glucose solutions of different mass fractions and temperatures is investigated up to 400 MPa, using the transient hot-wire method. The results reveal an increasing thermal conductivity with increasing pressure and decreasing mass fraction of sugar. No significant differences between sucrose and glucose solutions were observed. Different empirical and semi-empirical relations from the literature are discussed to describe and elucidate the behavior of the solutions with pressure. The pressure-induced change of the thermal conductivity of sugar solutions is mainly caused by an increase of the thermal conductivity and the decrease of molar volume of the water fraction. A simple pressure adapted mass fraction model permits an estimation of the thermal conductivity of the investigated solutions within an uncertainty of about 3%.

  13. Lattice thermal conductance of quantum wires with disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyhmeister, Erik; Hershfield, Selman

    We model the lattice thermal conductance in long quantum wires connected to two large heat baths at different temperatures in the harmonic approximation. The thermal conductance is computed with the Landauer formula for phonons, where it is related to the sum over all transmission probabilities for phonons through the wire. The net transmission probability is computed using a recursive Green function technique, which allows one to study long wires efficiently. We consider several different kinds of disorder to reduce the lattice thermal conductivity: periodic rectangular holes of varying sizes and shapes, periodic triangular holes, and narrow bands, averaged over randomness to account for variance in manufacturing. Depending on the model, the thermal conductance was reduced by 80 percent or more from the perfectly ordered wire case. Funded by NSF grant DMR-1461019.

  14. Calculation of Phonon Dispersion and Thermal Conductivity in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Mayank

    2005-03-01

    Many potential applications of carbon nanotubes in nanoelectronic circuits rely on effective removing of excess heat from the device active area. Heat in carbon nanotubes is mostly carried by acoustic phonons. In this work we have calculated phonon dispersion in carbon nanotubes using atomistic approach. The phonon dispersion was then used to calculate phonon density of states, heat capacitance and thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity has been determined using the modified Callaway -- Klemens approach, which accounts for the low-dimensional size effects [1]. The results of our calculations are compared with the experimental Raman spectroscopic study of carbon nanotubes and reported values of the thermal conductivity. The authors acknowledge the support of MARCO and its Functional Engineered Nano Architectonics (FENA) Focus Center. [1] A.A. Balandin, Thermal Conductivity of Semiconductor Nanostructures, in Encyclopedia of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ASP, Los Angeles, 2004) p. 425.

  15. Thermal conductivity of silicon nanowire by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai-chuang; Liang, Xin-gang; Xu, Xiang-hua; Ohara, Taku

    2009-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires was predicted using the nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method using the Stillinger-Weber potential model and the Nose-Hoover thermostat. The dependence of the thermal conductivity on the wire length, cross-sectional area, and temperature was investigated. The surface along the longitudinal direction was set as a free boundary with potential boundaries in the other directions. The cross-sectional areas of the nanowires ranged from about 5 to 19 nm2 with lengths ranging from 6 to 54 nm. The thermal conductivity dependence on temperature agrees well with the experimental results. The reciprocal of the thermal conductivity was found to be linearly related to the nanowire length. These results quantitatively show that decreasing the cross-sectional area reduces the phonon mean free path in nanowires.

  16. Comparative Study of the Thermal Conductivity of Solid Biomass Fuels

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of solid biomass fuels is useful information in the investigation of biomass combustion behavior and the development of modeling especially in the context of large scale power generation. There are little published data on the thermal conductivity of certain types of biomass such as wheat straw, miscanthus, and torrefied woods. Much published data on wood is in the context of bulk materials. A method for determining the thermal conductivities of small particles of biomass fuels has been developed using a custom built test apparatus. Fourteen different samples of various solid biomass fuel were processed to form a homogenized pellet for analysis. The thermal conductivities of the pelletized materials were determined and compared against each other and to existing data. PMID:27041819

  17. Calculation of the lattice thermal conductivity in granular crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kazan, M.; Volz, S.

    2014-02-21

    This paper provides a general model for the lattice thermal conductivity in granular crystals. The key development presented in this model is that the contribution of surface phonons to the thermal conductivity and the interplay between phonon anharmonic scattering and phonon scattering by boundaries are considered explicitly. Exact Boltzmann equation including spatial dependence of phonon distribution function is solved to yield expressions for the rates at which phonons scatter by the grain boundaries in the presence of intrinsic phonon scattering mechanisms. The intrinsic phonon scattering rates are calculated from Fermi's golden rule, and the vibration parameters of the model are derived as functions of temperature and crystallographic directions by using a lattice dynamics approach. The accuracy of the model is demonstrated with reference to experimental measurements regarding the effects of surface orientation and isotope composition on the thermal conductivity in single crystals, and the effect of grains size and shape on the thermal conductivity tensor in granular crystals.

  18. Anisotropic lattice thermal conductivity in chiral tellurium from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Hua; Kioussis, Nicholas; Stewart, Derek A.

    2015-12-21

    Using ab initio based calculations, we have calculated the intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity of chiral tellurium. We show that the interplay between the strong covalent intrachain and weak van der Waals interchain interactions gives rise to the phonon band gap between the lower and higher optical phonon branches. The underlying mechanism of the large anisotropy of the thermal conductivity is the anisotropy of the phonon group velocities and of the anharmonic interatomic force constants (IFCs), where large interchain anharmonic IFCs are associated with the lone electron pairs. We predict that tellurium has a large three-phonon scattering phase space that results in low thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity anisotropy decreases under applied hydrostatic pressure.

  19. Enhanced thermal conductivity through the development of nanofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, J.A.; Choi, U.S.; Li, S.; Thompson, L.J.; Lee, S.

    1996-11-01

    Low thermal conductivity is a primary limitation in the development of energy-efficient heat transfer fluids required in many industrial applications. To overcome this limitation, a new class of heat transfer fluids is being developed by suspending nanocrystalline particles in liquids such as water or oil. The resulting nanofluids possess extremely high thermal conductivities compared to the liquids without dispersed nanocrystalline particles. For example, 5 volume % of nanocrystalline copper oxide particles suspended in water results in an improvement in thermal conductivity of almost 60% compared to water without nanoparticles. Excellent suspension properties are also observed, with no significant settling of nanocrystalline oxide particles occurring in stationary fluids over time periods longer than several days. Direct evaporation of Cu nanoparticles into pump oil results in similar improvements in thermal conductivity compared to oxide-in-water systems, but importantly, requires far smaller concentrations of dispersed nanocrystalline powder.

  20. Thermal Conductivity of Gas Mixtures in Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brokaw, Richard S.

    1960-01-01

    The expression for the thermal conductivity of gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium is presented in a simpler and less restrictive form. This new form is shown to be equivalent to the previous equations.

  1. Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J. C. Y.; Fortini, A.

    1972-01-01

    Process for determining thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous materials is described. Characteristics of materials are identified and used in development of mathematical models. Limitations of method are examined.

  2. Thermal conductance of pressed brass contacts at liquid helium temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.; Brooks, W. F.; Spivak, A. L.; Marks, W. G., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus has been designed and fabricated which will measure the thermal conductance of pressed contacts at liquid helium temperatures as a function of applied force, with surface finish as a parameter. The apparatus is automated and was used to measure thermal conductance at temperatures from 1.5 to 6.5 K at applied forces up to 700 N for brass sample pairs having surface finishes from 0.1 to 1.6 micron rms. The experimental data were found to fit a simple power law where the thermal conductance is given by k = alpha T exp n, where k is the thermal conductance, T is the absolute temperature, and alpha and n are empirically determined constants.

  3. Thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and specific heat of copper-carbon fiber composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuniya, Keiichi; Arakawa, Hideo; Kanai, Tsuneyuki; Chiba, Akio

    1988-01-01

    A new material of copper/carbon fiber composite is developed which retains the properties of copper, i.e., its excellent electrical and thermal conductivity, and the property of carbon, i.e., a small thermal expansion coefficient. These properties of the composite are adjustable within a certain range by changing the volume and/or the orientation of the carbon fibers. The effects of carbon fiber volume and arrangement changes on the thermal and electrical conductivity, and specific heat of the composite are studied. Results obtained are as follows: the thermal and electrical conductivity of the composite decrease as the volume of the carbon fiber increases, and were influenced by the fiber orientation. The results are predictable from a careful application of the rule of mixtures for composites. The specific heat of the composite was dependent, not on fiber orientation, but on fiber volume. In the thermal fatigue tests, no degradation in the electrical conductivity of this composite was observed.

  4. Ultralow thermal conductivity of multilayers with highly dissimilar Debye temperatures.

    PubMed

    Dechaumphai, Edward; Lu, Dylan; Kan, Jimmy J; Moon, Jaeyun; Fullerton, Eric E; Liu, Zhaowei; Chen, Renkun

    2014-05-14

    Thermal transport in multilayers (MLs) has attracted significant interest and shows promising applications. Unlike their single-component counterparts, MLs exhibit a thermal conductivity that can be effectively engineered by both the number density of the layers and the interfacial thermal resistance between layers, with the latter being highly tunable via the contrast of acoustic properties of each layer. In this work, we experimentally demonstrated an ultralow thermal conductivity of 0.33 ± 0.04 W m(-1) K(-1) at room temperature in MLs made of Au and Si with a high interfacial density of ∼0.2 interface nm(-1). The measured thermal conductivity is significantly lower than the amorphous limit of either Si or Au and is also much lower than previously measured MLs with a similar interfacial density. With a Debye temperature ratio of ∼3.9 for Au and Si, the Au/Si MLs represent the highest mismatched system in inorganic MLs measured to date. In addition, we explore the prior theoretical prediction that full phonon dispersion could better model the interfacial thermal resistance involving materials with low Debye temperatures. Our results demonstrate that MLs with highly dissimilar Debye temperatures represent a rational approach to achieve ultralow thermal conductivity in inorganic materials and can also serve as a platform for investigating interfacial thermal transport.

  5. Thermal conductance of pressed contacts at liquid helium temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.; Spivak, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    The thermal contact conductance of a 0.4 micrometer surface finish OFHC copper sample pair has been investigated from 1.6 to 3.8 K for a range of applied contact forces up to 670 N. Experimental data have been fitted to the relation Q = the integral alpha T to the nth power dt by assuming that the thermal contact conductance is a simple power function of the sample temperature. It has been found that the conductance is proportional to T squared and that conductance increases with an increase in applied contact force. These results confirm earlier work.

  6. Identification of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Weizhen; Yi, Fajun; Zhu, Yanwei; Meng, Songhe

    2016-07-01

    A modified Levenberg-Marquardt method (LMM) for the identification of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity is proposed; the experiment and structure of the specimen for identification are also designed. The temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of copper C10200 and brass C28000 are identified to verify the effectiveness of the proposed identification method. The comparison between identified results and the measured data of laser flash diffusivity apparatus indicates the fine consistency and potential usage of the proposed method.

  7. Heat capacity, electrical and thermal conductivity of silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feyzi, Azra; Chegel, Raad

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the electronic heat capacity, electrical and thermal conductivity of monolayer planar and buckled silicon sheets (silicene) through tight binding approximation and Kubo-Greenwood formula. Applying and increasing dopant atoms to the system leads to opening a gap in the band structures and density of states that causes to decrease (increase) the heat capacity before (after) the Schottky anomaly. The electrical and electronic thermal conductivity of doped silicene reduces with increasing impurity strength.

  8. Analysis of effective thermal conductivity of fibrous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Futschik, Michael W.; Witte, Larry C.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research is to gain a better understanding of the various mechanisms of heat transfer through fibrous materials and to gain insight into how fill-gas pressure influences the effective thermal conductivity. By way of first principles and some empiricism, two mathematical models are constructed to correlate experimental data. The data are obtained from a test series measuring the effective thermal conductivity of Nomex using a two-sided guarded hot-plate heater apparatus. Tests are conducted for certain mean temperatures and fill-gases over a range of pressures varying from vacuum to atmospheric conditions. The models are then evaluated to determine their effectiveness in representing the effective thermal conductivity of a fibrous material. The models presented herein predict the effective thermal conductivity of Nomex extremely well. Since the influence of gas conduction is determined to be the most influential component in predicting the effective thermal conductivity of a fibrous material, an improved representation of gas conduction is developed. Finally, some recommendations for extension to other random-oriented fiber materials are made concerning the usefulness of each model depending on their advantages and disadvantages.

  9. EFFECTS OF SURFACE AREA DENSITY OF ALUMINUM FOAMS ON THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF ALUMINUM FOAM-PHASE CHANGE MATERIAL COMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sung-tae; Herling, Darrell R.

    2007-07-01

    The effects of the surface area density of open-cell aluminum foams on the effective thermal conductivity of aluminum foam-phase change material (PCM) composites were investigated. Paraffin was selected as the PCM. The experimental results show that the effective thermal conductivity increases as the temperature increases. The experimental results suggest that the effective thermal conductivities can be different for different surface area densities of foams even though the relative densities of foams are similar. Therefore, for an accurate estimation of the effective thermal conductivity, a correlation including the surface area density effect is needed.

  10. The thermal conductivity of rock under hydrothermal conditions: measurements and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Colin F.; Sass, John H.

    1996-01-24

    The thermal conductivities of most major rock-forming minerals vary with both temperature and confining pressure, leading to substantial changes in the thermal properties of some rocks at the high temperatures characteristic of geothermal systems. In areas with large geothermal gradients, the successful use of near-surface heat flow measurements to predict temperatures at depth depends upon accurate corrections for varying thermal conductivity. Previous measurements of the thermal conductivity of dry rock samples as a function of temperature were inadequate for porous rocks and susceptible to thermal cracking effects in nonporous rocks. We have developed an instrument for measuring the thermal conductivity of water-saturated rocks at temperatures from 20 to 350 °C and confining pressures up to 100 MPa. A transient line-source of heat is applied through a needle probe centered within the rock sample, which in turn is enclosed within a heated pressure vessel with independent controls on pore and confining pressure. Application of this technique to samples of Franciscan graywacke from The Geysers reveals a significant change in thermal conductivity with temperature. At reservoir-equivalent temperatures of 250 °C, the conductivity of the graywacke decreases by approximately 25% relative to the room temperature value. Where heat flow is constant with depth within the caprock overlying the reservoir, this reduction in conductivity with temperature leads to a corresponding increase in the geothermal gradient. Consequently, reservoir temperature are encountered at depths significantly shallower than those predicted by assuming a constant temperature gradient with depth. We have derived general equations for estimating the thermal conductivity of most metamorphic and igneous rocks and some sedimentary rocks at elevated temperature from knowledge of the room temperature thermal conductivity. Application of these equations to geothermal exploration should improve estimates

  11. The thermal conductivity of rock under hydrothermal conditions: Measurements and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.F.; Sass, J.H.

    1996-12-31

    The thermal conductivities of most major rock-forming minerals vary with both temperature and confining pressure, leading to substantial changes in the thermal properties of some rocks at the high temperatures characteristic of geothermal systems. In areas with large geothermal gradients, the successful use of near-surface heat flow measurements to predict temperatures at depth depends upon accurate corrections for varying thermal conductivity. Previous measurements of the thermal conductivity of dry rock samples as a function of temperature were inadequate for porous rocks and susceptible to thermal cracking effects m nonporous rocks. We have developed an instrument for measuring the thermal conductivity of water-saturated rocks at temperatures from 20 to 350{degrees}C and confining pressures up to 100 MPa. A transient line-source of heat is applied through a needle probe centered within the rock sample, which in turn is enclosed within a heated pressure vessel with independent controls on pore and confining pressure. Application of this technique to samples of Franciscan graywacke from The Geysers reveals a significant change in thermal conductivity with temperature. At reservoir-equivalent temperatures of 250{degrees}C, the conductivity of the graywacke decreases by approximately 25 % relative to the room temperature value. Where heat how is constant with depth within the caprock overlying the reservoir, this reduction in conductivity with temperature leads to a corresponding increase in the geothermal gradient. Consequently, reservoir temperatures are encountered at depths significantly shallower than those predicted by assuming a constant temperature gradient with depth. We have derived general equations for estimating the thermal conductivity of most metamorphic and igneous rocks and some sedimentary rocks at elevated temperature from knowledge of the room temperature thermal conductivity.

  12. Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings: Performance and Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and performance will be emphasized. Advanced thermal barrier coatings have been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability and lower conductivity. The coating systems have been demonstrated for high temperature combustor applications. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the toughened thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion, impact and high heat-flux damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be described.

  13. Low-temperature thermal conductivity of terbium-gallium garnet

    SciTech Connect

    Inyushkin, A. V. Taldenkov, A. N.

    2010-11-15

    Thermal conductivity of paramagnetic Tb{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} (TbGG) terbium-gallium garnet single crystals is investigated at temperatures from 0.4 to 300 K in magnetic fields up to 3.25 T. A minimum is observed in the temperature dependence {kappa}(T) of thermal conductivity at T{sub min} = 0.52 K. This and other singularities on the {kappa}(T) dependence are associated with scattering of phonons from terbium ions. The thermal conductivity at T = 5.1 K strongly depends on the magnetic field direction relative to the crystallographic axes of the crystal. Experimental data are considered using the Debye theory of thermal conductivity taking into account resonance scattering of phonons from Tb{sup 3+} ions. Analysis of the temperature and field dependences of the thermal conductivity indicates the existence of a strong spin-phonon interaction in TbGG. The low-temperature behavior of the thermal conductivity (field and angular dependences) is mainly determined by resonance scattering of phonons at the first quasi-doublet of the electron spectrum of Tb{sup 3+} ion.

  14. Thermal Conductivity Changes in Titanium-Graphene Composite upon Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannadham, Kasichainula

    2016-02-01

    Ti-graphene composite films were prepared on polished Ti substrates by deposition of graphene platelets from suspension followed by deposition of Ti by magnetron sputtering. The films were annealed at different temperatures up to 1073 K (800 °C) and different time periods in argon atmosphere. The annealed films were characterized by X-ray diffraction for phase identification, scanning electron microscopy for microstructure, energy-dispersive spectrometry for chemical analysis, atomic force microscopy for surface roughness, and transient thermoreflectance for thermal conductivity and interface thermal conductance. The results showed that the interface between the composite film and Ti substrate remained continuous with the absence of voids. Oxygen concentration in the composite films has increased for higher temperature and time of annealing. TiO2 and TiC phases are formed only in the film annealed at 1073 K (800 °C). The thermal conductivity of the composite film decreased with increasing oxygen concentration. The effective thermal conductance of the film annealed at 1073 K (800 °C) was significantly lower. The interface thermal conductance between the composite film and the Ti substrate is also reduced for higher oxygen concentration. Formation of microscopic TiO2 phase bound by interface boundaries and oxygen incorporation is considered responsible for the lower thermal conductance of the Ti-graphene composite annealed at 1073 K (800 °C).

  15. Anomalous size dependence of the thermal conductivity of graphene ribbons.

    PubMed

    Nika, Denis L; Askerov, Artur S; Balandin, Alexander A

    2012-06-13

    We investigated the thermal conductivity K of graphene ribbons and graphite slabs as the function of their lateral dimensions. Our theoretical model considered the anharmonic three-phonon processes to the second-order and included the angle-dependent phonon scattering from the ribbon edges. It was found that the long mean free path of the long-wavelength acoustic phonons in graphene can lead to an unusual nonmonotonic dependence of the thermal conductivity on the length L of a ribbon. The effect is pronounced for the ribbons with the smooth edges (specularity parameter p > 0.5). Our results also suggest that, contrary to what was previously thought, the bulk-like three-dimensional phonons in graphite make a rather substantial contribution to its in-plane thermal conductivity. The Umklapp-limited thermal conductivity of graphite slabs scales, for L below ∼30 μm, as log(L), while for larger L, the thermal conductivity approaches a finite value following the dependence K(0) - A × L(-1/2), where K(0) and A are parameters independent of the length. Our theoretical results clarify the scaling of the phonon thermal conductivity with the lateral sizes in graphene and graphite. The revealed anomalous dependence K(L) for the micrometer-size graphene ribbons can account for some of the discrepancy in reported experimental data for graphene.

  16. Maneuvering thermal conductivity of magnetic nanofluids by tunable magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Jaykumar; Parekh, Kinnari; Upadhyay, R. V.

    2015-06-01

    We report an experimental investigation of magnetic field dependent thermal conductivity of a transformer oil base magnetic fluid as a function of volume fractions. In the absence of magnetic field, thermal conductivity increases linearly with an increase in volume fraction, and magnitude of thermal conductivity thus obtained is lower than that predicted by Maxwell's theory. This reveals the presence of clusters/oligomers in the system. On application of magnetic field, it exhibits a non-monotonous increase in thermal conductivity. The results are interpreted using the concept of a two-step homogenization method (which is based on differential effective medium theory). The results show a transformation of particle cluster configuration from long chain like prolate shape to the aggregated drop-like structure with increasing concentration as well as a magnetic field. The aggregated drop-like structure for concentrated system is supported by optical microscopic images. This shape change of clusters reduces thermal conductivity enhancement. Moreover, this structure formation is observed as a dynamic phenomenon, and at 226 mT field, the length of the structure extends with time, becomes maximum, and then reduces. This change results in the increase or decrease of thermal conductivity.

  17. Thermal conductivity anisotropy of metasedimentary and igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Michael G.; Chapman, David S.; van Wagoner, Thomas M.; Armstrong, Phillip A.

    2007-05-01

    Thermal conductivity anisotropy was determined for three sets of metasedimentary and igneous rocks from central Utah, USA. Most conductivity measurements were made in transient mode with a half-space, line source instrument oriented in two orthogonal directions on a flat face cut perpendicular to bedding. One orientation of the probe yields thermal conductivity parallel to bedding (kpar) directly, the other orientation of the probe measures a product of conductivities parallel and perpendicular to bedding from which the perpendicular conductivity (kperp) is calculated. Some direct measurements of kpar and kperp were made on oriented cylindrical discs using a conventional divided bar device in steady state mode. Anisotropy is defined as kpar/kperp. Precambrian argillites from Big Cottonwood Canyon have anisotropy values from 0.8 to 2.1 with corresponding conductivity perpendicular to bedding of 2.0 to 6.2 W m-1 K-1. Anisotropy values for Price Canyon sedimentary samples are less than 1.2 with a mean of 1.04 although thermal conductivity perpendicular to bedding for the samples varied from 1.3 to 5.0 W m-1 K-1. The granitic rocks were found to be essentially isotropic with thermal conductivity perpendicular to bedding having a range of 2.2 to 3.2 W m-1 K-1 and a mean of 2.68 W m-1 K-1. The results confirm the observation by Deming [1994] that anisotropy is negligible for rocks having kperp greater than 4.0 W m-1 K-1 and generally increases for low conductivity metamorphic and clay-rich rocks. There is little evidence, however, for his suggestion that thermal conductivity anisotropy of all rocks increases systematically to about 2.5 for low thermal conductivity rocks.

  18. Predicting thermal conductivity of rocks from the Los Azufres geothermal field, Mexico, from easily measurable properties

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Alfonso; Contreras, Enrique; Dominquez, Bernardo A.

    1988-01-01

    A correlation is developed to predict thermal conductivity of drill cores from the Los Azufres geothermal field. Only andesites are included as they are predominant. Thermal conductivity of geothermal rocks is in general scarce and its determination is not simple. Almost all published correlations were developed for sedimentary rocks. Typically, for igneous rocks, chemical or mineral analyses are used for estimating conductivity by using some type of additive rule. This requires specialized analytical techniques and the procedure may not be sufficiently accurate if, for instance, a chemical analysis is to be changed into a mineral analysis. Thus a simple and accurate estimation method would be useful for engineering purposes. The present correlation predicts thermal conductivity from a knowledge of bulk density and total porosity, properties which provide basic rock characterization and are easy to measure. They may be determined from drill cores or cuttings, and the procedures represent a real advantage given the cost and low availability of cores. The multivariate correlation proposed is a quadratic polynomial and represents a useful tool to estimate thermal conductivity of igneous rocks since data on this property is very limited. For porosities between 0% and 25%, thermal conductivity is estimated with a maximum deviation of 22% and a residual mean square deviation of 4.62E-3 n terms of the log{sub 10}(k{rho}{sub b}) variable. The data were determined as part of a project which includes physical, thermal and mechanical properties of drill cores from Los Azufres. For the correlation, sixteen determinations of thermal conductivity, bulk density and total porosity are included. The conductivity data represent the first determinations ever made on these rocks.

  19. 3ω slope comparative method for fluid and powder thermal conductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, X. H.; Qiu, L.; Yue, P.; Wang, G.; Tang, D. W.

    2016-09-01

    By analyzing the relationship among the heat penetration depth, measurement frequency and detector characteristic parameters, a simple and practical 3ω slope comparative method has been proposed. The corresponding measurement system for measuring the thermal properties of fluids and powder materials was established and verified using several specimens with known thermophysical parameters, such as alcohol, distilled water, and air. Compared to the two-dimensional model, the data processing of the method is relatively simple and quick. Due to the elimination of errors introduced by the detector parameter measurement, the measurement accuracy of the method is higher than the conventional one-dimensional model. By using an appropriate frequency range, the new method is time saving and convenient for measuring the thermal conductivity of fluids and powders with low thermal conductivity. Based on the analysis, the effective thermal conductivity of nano-SiO2 powder is accurately determined.

  20. Thermal interaction between an impinging hot jet and a conducting solid surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abeloff, P. A.; Dougherty, F. C.; Van Dalsem, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Powered-lift aircraft may produce severe high-temperature environments which are potentially damaging to a landing surface or the aircraft. The interaction betweean the high temperature flow field and a nonadiabatic landing surface is analyzed with a coupled computational fluid dynamics/solid thermal conduction computer code, HOTJET. The HOTJET code couples time-accurate, implicit, factored solution schemes for the governing fluid dynamics equations (Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations) to the unsteady thermal conduction equation, which governs heat flux within a solid. HOTJET is validated against exact solutions to the thermal conduction and Navier-Stokes equations. First-of-a-kind results are included which show the impact of surface material properties on the fluid physics and the coupled fluid/material thermal fields.

  1. A simplistic analytical unit cell based model for the effective thermal conductivity of high porosity open-cell metal foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. H.; Kuang, J. J.; Lu, T. J.; Han, F. S.; Kim, T.

    2013-06-01

    We present a simplistic yet accurate analytical model for the effective thermal conductivity of high porosity open-cell metal foams saturated in a low conducting fluid (air). The model is derived analytically based on a realistic representative unit cell (a tetrakaidecahedron) under the assumption of one-dimensional heat conduction along highly tortuous-conducting ligaments at high porosity ranges (ε ⩾ 0.9). Good agreement with existing experimental data suggests that heat conduction along highly conducting and tortuous ligaments predominantly defines the effective thermal conductivity of open-cell metal foams with negligible conduction in parallel through the fluid phase.

  2. Reduction of Thermal Conductivity in Wafer-Bonded Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    ZL Liau; LR Danielson; PM Fourspring; L Hu; G Chen; GW Turner

    2006-11-27

    Blocks of silicon up to 3-mm thick have been formed by directly bonding stacks of thin wafer chips. These stacks showed significant reductions in the thermal conductivity in the bonding direction. In each sample, the wafer chips were obtained by polishing a commercial wafer to as thin as 36 {micro}m, followed by dicing. Stacks whose starting wafers were patterned with shallow dots showed greater reductions in thermal conductivity. Diluted-HF treatment of wafer chips prior to bonding led to the largest reduction of the effective thermal conductivity, by approximately a factor of 50. Theoretical modeling based on restricted conduction through the contacting dots and some conduction across the planar nanometer air gaps yielded fair agreement for samples fabricated without the HF treatment.

  3. Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Measurements of CDA 510 Phosphor Bronze

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, James E.; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Many cryogenic systems use electrical cables containing phosphor bronze wire. While phosphor bronze's electrical and thermal conductivity values have been published, there is significant variation among different phosphor bronze formulations. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will use several phosphor bronze wire harnesses containing a specific formulation (CDA 510, annealed temper). The heat conducted into the JWST instrument stage is dominated by these harnesses, and approximately half of the harness conductance is due to the phosphor bronze wires. Since the JWST radiators are expected to just keep the instruments at their operating temperature with limited cooling margin, it is important to know the thermal conductivity of the actual alloy being used. We describe an experiment which measured the electrical and thermal conductivity of this material between 4 and 295 Kelvin.

  4. Spatially resolved determination of thermal conductivity by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoib, B.; Filser, S.; Stötzel, J.; Greppmair, A.; Petermann, N.; Wiggers, H.; Schierning, G.; Stutzmann, M.; Brandt, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    We review the Raman shift method as a non-destructive optical tool to investigate the thermal conductivity and demonstrate the possibility to map this quantity with a micrometer resolution by studying thin film and bulk materials for thermoelectric applications. In this method, a focused laser beam both thermally excites a sample and undergoes Raman scattering at the excitation spot. The temperature dependence of the phonon energies measured is used as a local thermometer. We discuss that the temperature measured is an effective one and describe how the thermal conductivity is deduced from single temperature measurements to full temperature maps, with the help of analytical or numerical treatments of heat diffusion. We validate the method and its analysis on three- and two-dimensional single crystalline samples before applying it to more complex Si-based materials. A suspended thin mesoporous film of phosphorus-doped laser-sintered S{{i}78}G{{e}22} nanoparticles is investigated to extract the in-plane thermal conductivity from the effective temperatures, measured as a function of the distance to the heat sink. Using an iterative multigrid Gauss-Seidel algorithm the experimental data can be modelled yielding a thermal conductivity of 0.1 W/m K after normalizing by the porosity. As a second application we map the surface of a phosphorus-doped three-dimensional bulk-nanocrystalline Si sample which exhibits anisotropic and oxygen-rich precipitates. Thermal conductivities as low as 11 W/m K are found in the regions of the precipitates, significantly lower than the 17 W/m K in the surrounding matrix. The present work serves as a basis to more routinely use the Raman shift method as a versatile tool for thermal conductivity investigations, both for samples with high and low thermal conductivity and in a variety of geometries.

  5. Revisiting the block method for evaluating thermal conductivities of clay and granite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of thermal conductivities of porous media using the contact method is revisited and revalidated with consideration of thermal contact resistance. Problems that limit the accuracy of determination of thermal conductivities of porous media are discussed. Thermal conductivities of granite...

  6. Thermal conductivity measurements of particulate materials under Martian conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presley, M. A.; Christensen, P. R.

    1993-01-01

    The mean particle diameter of surficial units on Mars has been approximated by applying thermal inertia determinations from the Mariner 9 Infrared Radiometer and the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper data together with thermal conductivity measurement. Several studies have used this approximation to characterize surficial units and infer their nature and possible origin. Such interpretations are possible because previous measurements of the thermal conductivity of particulate materials have shown that particle size significantly affects thermal conductivity under martian atmospheric pressures. The transfer of thermal energy due to collisions of gas molecules is the predominant mechanism of thermal conductivity in porous systems for gas pressures above about 0.01 torr. At martian atmospheric pressures the mean free path of the gas molecules becomes greater than the effective distance over which conduction takes place between the particles. Gas particles are then more likely to collide with the solid particles than they are with each other. The average heat transfer distance between particles, which is related to particle size, shape and packing, thus determines how fast heat will flow through a particulate material.The derived one-to-one correspondence of thermal inertia to mean particle diameter implies a certain homogeneity in the materials analyzed. Yet the samples used were often characterized by fairly wide ranges of particle sizes with little information about the possible distribution of sizes within those ranges. Interpretation of thermal inertia data is further limited by the lack of data on other effects on the interparticle spacing relative to particle size, such as particle shape, bimodal or polymodal mixtures of grain sizes and formation of salt cements between grains. To address these limitations and to provide a more comprehensive set of thermal conductivities vs. particle size a linear heat source apparatus, similar to that of Cremers, was assembled to

  7. Thermal radiation and conduction in microscale structures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tien, C.L.

    1998-09-02

    The general objective of the current research program is to achieve a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of thermal radiation and heat conduction in microscale structures commonly encountered in engineering applications. Specifically, the program includes both experimental and analytical investigations of radiative heat transfer in microstructures, conductive heat transfer in micro devices, and short-pulse laser material interactions. Future work is planned to apply the knowledge of microscale heat transfer gained in this project to developing thermal insulating aerogel materials, thermal design schemes for quantum well lasers, and short-pulse laser micro-fabrication techniques. A listing of publications by Chang-Lin Tien is included.

  8. Quasi-ballistic Electronic Thermal Conduction in Metal Inverse Opals.

    PubMed

    Barako, Michael T; Sood, Aditya; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Junjie; Kodama, Takashi; Asheghi, Mehdi; Zheng, Xiaolin; Braun, Paul V; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2016-04-13

    Porous metals are used in interfacial transport applications that leverage the combination of electrical and/or thermal conductivity and the large available surface area. As nanomaterials push toward smaller pore sizes to increase the total surface area and reduce diffusion length scales, electron conduction within the metal scaffold becomes suppressed due to increased surface scattering. Here we observe the transition from diffusive to quasi-ballistic thermal conduction using metal inverse opals (IOs), which are metal films that contain a periodic arrangement of interconnected spherical pores. As the material dimensions are reduced from ∼230 nm to ∼23 nm, the thermal conductivity of copper IOs is reduced by more than 57% due to the increase in surface scattering. In contrast, nickel IOs exhibit diffusive-like conduction and have a constant thermal conductivity over this size regime. The quasi-ballistic nature of electron transport at these length scales is modeled considering the inverse opal geometry, surface scattering, and grain boundaries. Understanding the characteristics of electron conduction at the nanoscale is essential to minimizing the total resistance of porous metals for interfacial transport applications, such as the total electrical resistance of battery electrodes and the total thermal resistance of microscale heat exchangers. PMID:26986050

  9. Quasi-ballistic Electronic Thermal Conduction in Metal Inverse Opals.

    PubMed

    Barako, Michael T; Sood, Aditya; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Junjie; Kodama, Takashi; Asheghi, Mehdi; Zheng, Xiaolin; Braun, Paul V; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2016-04-13

    Porous metals are used in interfacial transport applications that leverage the combination of electrical and/or thermal conductivity and the large available surface area. As nanomaterials push toward smaller pore sizes to increase the total surface area and reduce diffusion length scales, electron conduction within the metal scaffold becomes suppressed due to increased surface scattering. Here we observe the transition from diffusive to quasi-ballistic thermal conduction using metal inverse opals (IOs), which are metal films that contain a periodic arrangement of interconnected spherical pores. As the material dimensions are reduced from ∼230 nm to ∼23 nm, the thermal conductivity of copper IOs is reduced by more than 57% due to the increase in surface scattering. In contrast, nickel IOs exhibit diffusive-like conduction and have a constant thermal conductivity over this size regime. The quasi-ballistic nature of electron transport at these length scales is modeled considering the inverse opal geometry, surface scattering, and grain boundaries. Understanding the characteristics of electron conduction at the nanoscale is essential to minimizing the total resistance of porous metals for interfacial transport applications, such as the total electrical resistance of battery electrodes and the total thermal resistance of microscale heat exchangers.

  10. Voltage tunability of thermal conductivity in ferroelectric materials

    DOEpatents

    Ihlefeld, Jon; Hopkins, Patrick Edward

    2016-02-09

    A method to control thermal energy transport uses mobile coherent interfaces in nanoscale ferroelectric films to scatter phonons. The thermal conductivity can be actively tuned, simply by applying an electrical potential across the ferroelectric material and thereby altering the density of these coherent boundaries to directly impact thermal transport at room temperature and above. The invention eliminates the necessity of using moving components or poor efficiency methods to control heat transfer, enabling a means of thermal energy control at the micro- and nano-scales.

  11. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF NON-REPOSITORY LITHOSTRATIGRAPHIC LAYERS

    SciTech Connect

    R. JONES

    2004-10-22

    This model report addresses activities described in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport Thermal Properties and Analysis Reports Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171708]). The model develops values for thermal conductivity, and its uncertainty, for the nonrepository layers of Yucca Mountain; in addition, the model provides estimates for matrix porosity and dry bulk density for the nonrepository layers. The studied lithostratigraphic units, as identified in the ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM 2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]), are the Timber Mountain Group, the Tiva Canyon Tuff, the Yucca Mountain Tuff, the Pah Canyon Tuff, the Topopah Spring Tuff (excluding the repository layers), the Calico Hills Formation, the Prow Pass Tuff, the Bullfrog Tuff, and the Tram Tuff. The deepest model units of the GFM (Tund and Paleozoic) are excluded from this study because no data suitable for model input are available. The parameter estimates developed in this report are used as input to various models and calculations that simulate heat transport through the rock mass. Specifically, analysis model reports that use product output from this report are: (1) Drift-scale coupled processes (DST and TH seepage) models; (2) Drift degradation analysis; (3) Multiscale thermohydrologic model; and (4) Ventilation model and analysis report. In keeping with the methodology of the thermal conductivity model for the repository layers in ''Thermal Conductivity of the Potential Repository Horizon'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169854]), the Hsu et al. (1995 [DIRS 158073]) three-dimensional (3-D) cubic model (referred to herein as ''the Hsu model'') was used to represent the matrix thermal conductivity as a function of the four parameters (matrix porosity, thermal conductivity of the saturating fluid, thermal conductivity of the solid, and geometric connectivity of the solid). The Hsu model requires input data from each test specimen to meet three specific conditions: (1) Known value for

  12. Thermal Conductivity Based on Modified Laser Flash Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bochuan; Ban, Heng; Li, Chao; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2005-01-01

    The laser flash method is a standard method for thermal diffusivity measurement. It employs single-pulse heating of one side of a thin specimen and measures the temperature response of the other side. The thermal diffusivity of the specimen can be obtained based on a one-dimensional transient heat transfer analysis. This paper reports the development of a theory that includes a transparent reference layer with known thermal property attached to the back of sample. With the inclusion of heat conduction from the sample to the reference layer in the theoretical analysis, the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of sample can be extracted from the temperature response data. Furthermore, a procedure is established to select two points from the data to calculate these properties. The uncertainty analysis indicates that this method can be used with acceptable levels of uncertainty.

  13. Multiscale Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of Polymer/Carbon Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation was used to estimate the interfacial thermal (Kapitza) resistance between nanoparticles and amorphous and crystalline polymer matrices. Bulk thermal conductivities of the nanocomposites were then estimated using an established effective medium approach. To study functionalization, oligomeric ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymers were chemically bonded to a single wall carbon nanotube. The results, in a poly(ethylene-vinyl acetate) matrix, are similar to those obtained previously for grafted linear hydrocarbon chains. To study the effect of noncovalent functionalization, two types of polyethylene matrices. -- aligned (extended-chain crystalline) vs. amorphous (random coils) were modeled. Both matrices produced the same interfacial thermal resistance values. Finally, functionalization of edges and faces of plate-like graphite nanoparticles was found to be only modestly effective in reducing the interfacial thermal resistance and improving the composite thermal conductivity

  14. Atomistic Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy Nanotube Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasanella, Nicholas A.; Sundararaghavan, Veera

    2016-05-01

    The Green-Kubo method was used to investigate the thermal conductivity as a function of temperature for epoxy/single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) nanocomposites. An epoxy network of DGEBA-DDS was built using the `dendrimer' growth approach, and conductivity was computed by taking into account long-range Coulombic forces via a k-space approach. Thermal conductivity was calculated in the direction perpendicular to, and along the SWNT axis for functionalized and pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposites. Inefficient phonon transport at the ends of nanotubes is an important factor in the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites, and for this reason discontinuous nanotubes were modeled in addition to long nanotubes. The thermal conductivity of the long, pristine SWNT/epoxy system is equivalent to that of an isolated SWNT along its axis, but there was a 27% reduction perpendicular to the nanotube axis. The functionalized, long SWNT/epoxy system had a very large increase in thermal conductivity along the nanotube axis (~700%), as well as the directions perpendicular to the nanotube (64%). The discontinuous nanotubes displayed an increased thermal conductivity along the SWNT axis compared to neat epoxy (103-115% for the pristine SWNT/epoxy, and 91-103% for functionalized SWNT/epoxy system). The functionalized system also showed a 42% improvement perpendicular to the nanotube, while the pristine SWNT/epoxy system had no improvement over epoxy. The thermal conductivity tensor is averaged over all possible orientations to see the effects of randomly orientated nanotubes, and allow for experimental comparison. Excellent agreement is seen for the discontinuous, pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposite. These simulations demonstrate there exists a threshold of the SWNT length where the best improvement for a composite system with randomly oriented nanotubes would transition from pristine SWNTs to functionalized SWNTs.

  15. Thermal conductivity of highly asymmetric binary mixtures: how important are heat/mass coupling effects?

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Jeff; Bresme, Fernando

    2014-06-28

    The coupling of mass and heat fluxes is responsible for the Soret effect in fluid mixtures containing particles of dissimilar mass and/or size. We investigate using equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations the relevance of these coupling effects in determining the thermal transport in fluids consisting of binary mixtures where the individual components feature significant mass, 1 : 8, or size, 1 : 3, asymmetries. We quantify the thermal transport by using both boundary driven molecular dynamics simulations (NEMD) and the equilibrium Green-Kubo (GK) approach and investigate the impact of different heat flux definitions, relevant in kinetic theory and experiments, in the quantification of the thermal conductivity. We find that the thermal conductivities obtained from the different definitions agree within numerical accuracy, suggesting that the Soret coefficient does not lead to significant changes in the thermal conduction, even for the large asymmetries considered here, which lead to significant Soret coefficients (∼10(-2) K(-1)). The asymmetry in size and mass introduces large differences in the specific enthalpy of the individual components that must be carefully considered to compute accurate thermal conductivities using the GK approach. Neglecting the enthalpic contributions, results in large overestimations of the thermal conductivity, typically between 20% and 50%. Further, we quantify the time dependent behavior of the internal energy and mass flux correlation functions and propose a microscopic mechanism for the heat transport in these asymmetric mixtures.

  16. Superior thermal conductivity in suspended bilayer hexagonal boron nitride

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chengru; Guo, Jie; Dong, Lan; Aiyiti, Adili; Xu, Xiangfan; Li, Baowen

    2016-01-01

    We reported the basal-plane thermal conductivity in exfoliated bilayer hexagonal boron nitride h-BN that was measured using suspended prepatterned microstructures. The h-BN sample suitable for thermal measurements was fabricated by dry-transfer method, whose sample quality, due to less polymer residues on surfaces, is believed to be superior to that of PMMA-mediated samples. The measured room temperature thermal conductivity is around 484 Wm−1K−1(+141 Wm−1K−1/ −24 Wm−1K−1) which exceeds that in bulk h-BN, providing experimental observation of the thickness-dependent thermal conductivity in suspended few-layer h-BN. PMID:27142571

  17. Thermal Conductivity behavior of MWCNT based PMMA and PC composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Girija; Jindal, Prashant; Bhandari, Rajiv; Dhiman, Neha; Bajaj, Chetan; Jindal, Vijay

    Poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) and Polycarbonate (PC) are low cost polymer materials which can be easily transformed into desired shapes for various applications. However they have poor mechanical, thermal and electrical properties which are required to be enhanced to widen their scope of applications specifically where along with high strength, rapid heat transfer is essential. Multi Walled Carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are excellent new materials having extraordinary mechanical and transport properties. We will report results of fabricating composites of varying compositions of MWCNTs with PMMA and PC and their thermal conductivity behaviour using simple transient heat flow methods. The samples in disk shapes of around 2 cm diameters and 0.2 cm thickness with MWCNT compositions varying up to 10 wt% were fabricated. We found that both PMMA and PC measured high thermal conductivity with increase in the composition of CNTs. The thermal conductivity of 10wt% MWCNT/PMMA composite increased by nearly two times in comparison to pure PMMA.

  18. Theory of the dynamical thermal conductivity of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Pankaj; Kumar, Pradeep; Das, Nabyendu; Singh, Navinder

    2016-09-01

    The Mori's projection method, known as the memory function method, is an important theoretical formalism to study various transport coefficients. In the present work, we calculate the dynamical thermal conductivity in the case of metals using the memory function formalism. We introduce thermal memory functions for the first time and discuss the behavior of thermal conductivity in both the zero frequency limit and in the case of nonzero frequencies. We compare our results for the zero frequency case with the results obtained by the Bloch-Boltzmann kinetic approach and find that both approaches agree with each other. Motivated by some recent experimental advancements, we obtain several new results for the ac or the dynamical thermal conductivity.

  19. A Novel Measurement Method for the Simultaneous Estimation of Specific Heat Capacity and Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Yoichi; Okada, Ryo; Nemoto, Takashi; Ohta, Hiromichi; Takiguchi, Hiroaki

    2012-07-01

    A novel method is proposed for the simultaneous calculation of thermal conductivity κ and specific heat capacity C. The new method is a combination of two established techniques. One is the photopyroelectric method for thermal diffusivity α and the other is the front-heat front-detection photothermoreflectance method for thermal effusivity b. After α, b, and density ρ measurements, C and κ are easily calculated as C = b α -1/2 ρ -1 and κ = α 1/2 b. Test measurements on a commercial Si single-crystal wafer were performed to demonstrate that the method is sufficiently accurate.

  20. Beating the amorphous limit in thermal conductivity by superlattices design

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Mossa, Stefano; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    The value measured in the amorphous structure with the same chemical composition is often considered as a lower bound for the thermal conductivity of any material: the heat carriers are strongly scattered by disorder, and their lifetimes reach the minimum time scale of thermal vibrations. An appropriate design at the nano-scale, however, may allow one to reduce the thermal conductivity even below the amorphous limit. In the present contribution, using molecular-dynamics simulation and the Green-Kubo formulation, we study systematically the thermal conductivity of layered phononic materials (superlattices), by tuning different parameters that can characterize such structures. We have discovered that the key to reach a lower-than-amorphous thermal conductivity is to block almost completely the propagation of the heat carriers, the superlattice phonons. We demonstrate that a large mass difference in the two intercalated layers, or weakened interactions across the interface between layers result in materials with very low thermal conductivity, below the values of the corresponding amorphous counterparts. PMID:26374147

  1. Monodisperse magnetite nanofluids: Synthesis, aggregation, and thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Liqiu

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic nanofluids possess some unique properties that can significantly affect their thermal conductivity. We synthesize monodispersed magnetite (Fe3O4) nanofluids in toluene with the particle size from 4 to 12 nm and obtain aqueous nanofluids by a simple "one-step" phase transfer. Even without the effect of external field, the magnetic-interaction-induced self-assembled aggregation can still be significant in magnetite nanofluids. Investigation of the microstructures of self-assembled aggregation is carried out by the dynamic light scattering, which unveils the variation of aggregated configurations with particle concentration and time. Based on the calculation from the existing models, the aggregates decrease the thermal conductivity of both themselves and the entire system, mainly due to the less solid contents and weaker mobility compared with the single particles as well as the increase in interfacial thermal resistance. As the manifestation of the aggregation-structure variation, the measured thermal conductivity is of a wavelike shape as a function of particle concentration. The particle coating layers are also of importance in cluster formation so that nanofluid thermal conductivity can be manipulated for some nanofluids by changing the stabilizer used and thus controlling the particle aggregated structures. Due to the effects of temperature, viscosity and coating layers, the thermal conductivity for aqueous system varies in a different way as that for the toluene system.

  2. The macroscopic polarization effect on thermal conductivity of binary nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, S. K.; Sahoo, B. K.; Sahoo, S.

    2013-10-01

    We theoretically investigate the effect of macroscopic polarization on phonon thermal conductivity of wurtzite (WZ) binary nitrides (AlN, GaN and InN). Our results show that macroscopic polarization contributes to the effective elastic constant of the wurtzite nitrides and modifies the phonon group velocity, Debye frequency, and Debye temperature. Using revised phonon velocity and Debye temperature, different phonon scattering rates and combined scattering rate are calculated as functions of the phonon frequency at room temperature. We estimate phonon thermal conductivity of binary nitrides using these modified parameters. The theoretical analysis shows that up to a certain temperature (different for AlN, GaN, and InN) the polarization effect acts as ill effect and reduces the thermal conductivity. However, after this temperature, the thermal conductivity is significantly enhanced by the polarization effect. The revised thermal conductivity at room temperature is found to be increased by 12% in GaN, 18% in InN and 20% in case of AlN due to macroscopic polarization, i.e., maximum polarization effect is observed in AlN and minimum in GaN. The method we have developed can be used for calculation of thermal energy in the active region of nitride optoelectronic devices.

  3. Robustly Engineering Thermal Conductivity of Bilayer Graphene by Interlayer Bonding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Gao, Yufei; Chen, Yuli; Hu, Ming

    2016-02-25

    Graphene and its bilayer structure are the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon, whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. Their realistic applications in emerging nanoelectronics usually call for thermal transport manipulation in a controllable and precise manner. In this paper we systematically studied the effect of interlayer covalent bonding, in particular different interlay bonding arrangement, on the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. It is revealed that, the thermal conductivity of randomly bonded bilayer graphene decreases monotonically with the increase of interlayer bonding density, however, for the regularly bonded bilayer graphene structure the thermal conductivity possesses unexpectedly non-monotonic dependence on the interlayer bonding density. The results suggest that the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene depends not only on the interlayer bonding density, but also on the detailed topological configuration of the interlayer bonding. The underlying mechanism for this abnormal phenomenon is identified by means of phonon spectral energy density, participation ratio and mode weight factor analysis. The large tunability of thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene through rational interlayer bonding arrangement paves the way to achieve other desired properties for potential nanoelectronics applications involving graphene layers.

  4. Beating the amorphous limit in thermal conductivity by superlattices design.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Mossa, Stefano; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2015-09-16

    The value measured in the amorphous structure with the same chemical composition is often considered as a lower bound for the thermal conductivity of any material: the heat carriers are strongly scattered by disorder, and their lifetimes reach the minimum time scale of thermal vibrations. An appropriate design at the nano-scale, however, may allow one to reduce the thermal conductivity even below the amorphous limit. In the present contribution, using molecular-dynamics simulation and the Green-Kubo formulation, we study systematically the thermal conductivity of layered phononic materials (superlattices), by tuning different parameters that can characterize such structures. We have discovered that the key to reach a lower-than-amorphous thermal conductivity is to block almost completely the propagation of the heat carriers, the superlattice phonons. We demonstrate that a large mass difference in the two intercalated layers, or weakened interactions across the interface between layers result in materials with very low thermal conductivity, below the values of the corresponding amorphous counterparts.

  5. Robustly Engineering Thermal Conductivity of Bilayer Graphene by Interlayer Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Gao, Yufei; Chen, Yuli; Hu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Graphene and its bilayer structure are the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon, whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. Their realistic applications in emerging nanoelectronics usually call for thermal transport manipulation in a controllable and precise manner. In this paper we systematically studied the effect of interlayer covalent bonding, in particular different interlay bonding arrangement, on the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. It is revealed that, the thermal conductivity of randomly bonded bilayer graphene decreases monotonically with the increase of interlayer bonding density, however, for the regularly bonded bilayer graphene structure the thermal conductivity possesses unexpectedly non-monotonic dependence on the interlayer bonding density. The results suggest that the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene depends not only on the interlayer bonding density, but also on the detailed topological configuration of the interlayer bonding. The underlying mechanism for this abnormal phenomenon is identified by means of phonon spectral energy density, participation ratio and mode weight factor analysis. The large tunability of thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene through rational interlayer bonding arrangement paves the way to achieve other desired properties for potential nanoelectronics applications involving graphene layers. PMID:26911859

  6. Discussion on the thermal conductivity enhancement of nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Increasing interests have been paid to nanofluids because of the intriguing heat transfer enhancement performances presented by this kind of promising heat transfer media. We produced a series of nanofluids and measured their thermal conductivities. In this article, we discussed the measurements and the enhancements of the thermal conductivity of a variety of nanofluids. The base fluids used included those that are most employed heat transfer fluids, such as deionized water (DW), ethylene glycol (EG), glycerol, silicone oil, and the binary mixture of DW and EG. Various nanoparticles (NPs) involving Al2O3 NPs with different sizes, SiC NPs with different shapes, MgO NPs, ZnO NPs, SiO2 NPs, Fe3O4 NPs, TiO2 NPs, diamond NPs, and carbon nanotubes with different pretreatments were used as additives. Our findings demonstrated that the thermal conductivity enhancements of nanofluids could be influenced by multi-faceted factors including the volume fraction of the dispersed NPs, the tested temperature, the thermal conductivity of the base fluid, the size of the dispersed NPs, the pretreatment process, and the additives of the fluids. The thermal transport mechanisms in nanofluids were further discussed, and the promising approaches for optimizing the thermal conductivity of nanofluids have been proposed. PMID:21711638

  7. Thermal conductivity characteristics of dewatered sewage sludge by thermal hydrolysis reaction.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyoung Woon; Park, Keum Joo; Han, Seong Kuk; Jung, Hee Suk

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify the thermal conductivity of sewage sludge related to reaction temperature for the optimal design of a thermal hydrolysis reactor. We continuously quantified the thermal conductivity of dewatered sludge related to the reaction temperature. As the reaction temperature increased, the dewatered sludge is thermally liquefied under high temperature and pressure by the thermal hydrolysis reaction. Therefore, the bound water in the sludge cells comes out as free water, which changes the dewatered sludge from a solid phase to slurry in a liquid phase. As a result, the thermal conductivity of the sludge was more than 2.64 times lower than that of the water at 20. However, above 200, it became 0.704 W/m* degrees C, which is about 4% higher than that of water. As a result, the change in physical properties due to thermal hydrolysis appears to be an important factor for heat transfer efficiency. Implications: The thermal conductivity of dewatered sludge is an important factor the optimal design of a thermal hydrolysis reactor. The dewatered sludge is thermally liquefied under high temperature and pressure by the thermal hydrolysis reaction. The liquid phase slurry has a higher thermal conductivity than pure water.

  8. Thermal conductivity enhancement in thermal grease containing different CuO structures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Zhao, Junchang; Wang, Mingzhu; Hu, Yiheng; Chen, Lifei; Xie, Huaqing

    2015-01-01

    Different cupric oxide (CuO) structures have attracted intensive interest because of their promising applications in various fields. In this study, three kinds of CuO structures, namely, CuO microdisks, CuO nanoblocks, and CuO microspheres, are synthesized by solution-based synthetic methods. The morphologies and crystal structures of these CuO structures are characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffractometer, respectively. They are used as thermal conductive fillers to prepare silicone-based thermal greases, giving rise to great enhancement in thermal conductivity. Compared with pure silicone base, the thermal conductivities of thermal greases with CuO microdisks, CuO nanoblocks, and CuO microspheres are 0.283, 0256, and 0.239 W/mK, respectively, at filler loading of 9 vol.%, which increases 139%, 116%, and 99%, respectively. These thermal greases present a slight descendent tendency in thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. These experimental data are compared with Nan's model prediction, indicating that the shape factor has a great influence on thermal conductivity improvement of thermal greases with different CuO structures. Meanwhile, due to large aspect ratio of CuO microdisks, they can form thermal networks more effectively than the other two structures, resulting in higher thermal conductivity enhancement.

  9. Scanning thermal microscopy with heat conductive nanowire probes.

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, Maria; Bolshakov, Alexey; Tovee, Peter D; Zeze, Dagou A; Dubrovskii, Vladimir G; Kolosov, Oleg V

    2016-03-01

    Scanning thermal microscopy (SThM), which enables measurement of thermal transport and temperature distribution in devices and materials with nanoscale resolution is rapidly becoming a key approach in resolving heat dissipation problems in modern processors and assisting development of new thermoelectric materials. In SThM, the self-heating thermal sensor contacts the sample allowing studying of the temperature distribution and heat transport in nanoscaled materials and devices. The main factors that limit the resolution and sensitivities of SThM measurements are the low efficiency of thermal coupling and the lateral dimensions of the probed area of the surface studied. The thermal conductivity of the sample plays a key role in the sensitivity of SThM measurements. During the SThM measurements of the areas with higher thermal conductivity the heat flux via SThM probe is increased compared to the areas with lower thermal conductivity. For optimal SThM measurements of interfaces between low and high thermal conductivity materials, well defined nanoscale probes with high thermal conductivity at the probe apex are required to achieve a higher quality of the probe-sample thermal contact while preserving the lateral resolution of the system. In this paper, we consider a SThM approach that can help address these complex problems by using high thermal conductivity nanowires (NW) attached to a tip apex. We propose analytical models of such NW-SThM probes and analyse the influence of the contact resistance between the SThM probe and the sample studied. The latter becomes particularly important when both tip and sample surface have high thermal conductivities. These models were complemented by finite element analysis simulations and experimental tests using prototype probe where a multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) is exploited as an excellent example of a high thermal conductivity NW. These results elucidate critical relationships between the performance of the SThM probe on

  10. On the van der Pauw's method applied to the measurement of low thermal conductivity materials.

    PubMed

    Morales, C; Flores, E; Bodega, J; Leardini, F; Ferrer, I J; Ares, J R; Sánchez, C

    2016-08-01

    The electrical van der Pauw's method has recently been extended to measure the thermal conductivity of different elements and compounds. This technique provides an easy way to determine the sample in-plane thermal conductivity by avoiding the influence of the thermal contact resistances. However, the reported calculated error values appear to be underestimated when dealing with the materials with low thermal conductivity (<5 W/Km) at room temperature. The causes of this underestimation are investigated in this communication and it has been found that they are due to the drastic influence of conduction heat losses through the thermo-resistance wires as well as the resulting modification of the sample temperature map. Both phenomena lead to experimental values of the sample thermal conductivity, which are systematically higher than the tabulated ones. The magnitude of this systematic error is ∼100% dealing with the samples of macroscopic dimensions, and low thermal conductivity indicated that the obtained accurate measurements can be quite challenging. PMID:27587145

  11. Thermal conductive and radiative properties of solid foams: Traditional and recent advanced modelling approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randrianalisoa, Jaona; Baillis, Dominique

    2014-10-01

    The current paper presents an overview of traditional and recent models for predicting the thermal properties of solid foams with open- and closed-cells. Their effective thermal conductivity has been determined analytically by empirical or thermal-resistance-network-based models. Radiative properties crucial to obtain the radiative conductivity have been determined analytically by models based on the independent scattering theory. Powerful models combine three-dimensional (3D) foam modelling (by X-ray tomography, Voronoi tessellation method, etc.) and numerical solution of transport equations. The finite-element method (FEM) has been used to compute thermal conductivity due to solid network for which the computation cost remains reasonable. The effective conductivity can be determined from FEM results combined with the conductivity due to the fluid, which can be accurately evaluated by a simple formula for air or weakly conducting gas. The finite volume method seems well appropriate for solving the thermal problem in both the solid and fluid phases. The ray-tracing Monte Carlo method constitutes the powerful model for radiative properties. Finally, 3D image analysis of foams is useful to determine topological information needed to feed analytical thermal and radiative properties models. xml:lang="fr"

  12. Calibration of non-ideal thermal conductivity sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kömle, N. I.; Macher, W.; Kargl, G.; Bentley, M. S.

    2013-04-01

    A popular method for measuring the thermal conductivity of solid materials is the transient hot needle method. It allows the thermal conductivity of a solid or granular material to be evaluated simply by combining a temperature measurement with a well-defined electrical current flowing through a resistance wire enclosed in a long and thin needle. Standard laboratory sensors that are typically used in laboratory work consist of very thin steel needles with a large length-to-diameter ratio. This type of needle is convenient since it is mathematically easy to derive the thermal conductivity of a soft granular material from a simple temperature measurement. However, such a geometry often results in a mechanically weak sensor, which can bend or fail when inserted into a material that is harder than expected. For deploying such a sensor on a planetary surface, with often unknown soil properties, it is necessary to construct more rugged sensors. These requirements can lead to a design which differs substantially from the ideal geometry, and additional care must be taken in the calibration and data analysis. In this paper we present the performance of a prototype thermal conductivity sensor designed for planetary missions. The thermal conductivity of a suite of solid and granular materials was measured both by a standard needle sensor and by several customized sensors with non-ideal geometry. We thus obtained a calibration curve for the non-ideal sensors. The theory describing the temperature response of a sensor with such unfavorable length-to-diameter ratio is complicated and highly nonlinear. However, our measurements reveal that over a wide range of thermal conductivities there is an almost linear relationship between the result obtained by the standard sensor and the result derived from the customized, non-ideal sensors. This allows for the measurement of thermal conductivity values for harder soils, which are not easily accessible when using standard needle sensors.

  13. Calibration of non-ideal thermal conductivity sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kömle, N. I.; Macher, W.; Kargl, G.; Bentley, M. S.

    2012-09-01

    A popular method for measuring the thermal conductivity of solid materials is the transient heated needle method. It allows to evaluate the thermal conductivity of a solid or granular material to be evaluated simply by combining a temperature measurement with a well-defined electrical current flowing through a resistance wire enclosed in a long and thin needle. Standard laboratory sensors that are typically used in laboratory work consist of very thin steel needles with a large length-to-diameter ratio. This type of needles is convenient since it is mathematically easy to derive the thermal conductivity of a soft granular material from a simple temperature measurement. However, such a geometry often results in a mechanically weak sensor, which can bend or fail when inserted into a material that is harder than expected. For deploying such a sensor on a planetary surface, with often unknown soil properties, it is necessary to construct more rugged sensors. These requirements can lead to a design which differs substantially from the ideal geometry, and additional care must be taken in the calibration and data analysis. In this paper we present the performance of a prototype thermal conductivity sensor designed for planetary missions. The thermal conductivity of a suite of solid and granular materials was measured both by a standard needle sensor and by several customized sensors with non-ideal geometry. We thus obtained a calibration curve for the non-ideal sensors. The theory describing the temperature response of a sensor with such unfavorable length-to-diameter ratio is complicated and highly nonlinear. However, our measurements reveal that over a wide range of thermal conductivities there is an almost linear relationship between the result obtained by the standard sensor and the result derived from the customized, non-ideal sensors. This allows to measure thermal conductivity values for harder soils, which are not easily accessible when using standard needle

  14. Process for fabricating composite material having high thermal conductivity

    DOEpatents

    Colella, Nicholas J.; Davidson, Howard L.; Kerns, John A.; Makowiecki, Daniel M.

    2001-01-01

    A process for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost.

  15. The lattice thermal conductivity of a semiconductor nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mei-Jiau; Chong, Wen-Yen; Chang, Tai-Ming

    2006-06-01

    It has been found experimentally as well as theoretically that the lattice thermal conductivity can be largely reduced by the size confinement effect. The significant boundary scattering effect is one of the dominant factors. In most existing lattice thermal conductivity models, an empirical relation is used for this scattering rate. An unconfined or confined phonon distribution obtained based on the phonon Boltzmann equation and the relaxation time approximation is then employed to calculate the lattice thermal conductivity. In this work, we first attempt to derive an analytical form of the boundary scattering rate for phonon conduction in a semiconductor nanowire and then claim two reasonable ways to take it into account correctly. Consistent mathematical models in the sense that the effects of the size confinement on (i) the phonon dispersion relation, (ii) the phonon distribution, (iii) the phonon group and phase velocities, and (iv) the Debye temperature are finally proposed.

  16. Lattice dynamics and lattice thermal conductivity of thorium dicarbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zongmeng; Huai, Ping; Qiu, Wujie; Ke, Xuezhi; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhu, Zhiyuan

    2014-11-01

    The elastic and thermodynamic properties of ThC2 with a monoclinic symmetry have been studied by means of density functional theory and direct force-constant method. The calculated properties including the thermal expansion, the heat capacity and the elastic constants are in a good agreement with experiment. Our results show that the vibrational property of the C2 dimer in ThC2 is similar to that of a free standing C2 dimer. This indicates that the C2 dimer in ThC2 is not strongly bonded to Th atoms. The lattice thermal conductivity for ThC2 was calculated by means of the Debye-Callaway model. As a comparison, the conductivity of ThC was also calculated. Our results show that the ThC and ThC2 contributions of the lattice thermal conductivity to the total conductivity are 29% and 17%, respectively.

  17. Thermal conductivities and conduction mechanisms of Sb-Te Alloys at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Rui; Endo, Rie; Kobayashi, Yoshinao; Susa, Masahiro; Kuwahara, Masashi

    2011-07-15

    Sb-Te alloys have drawn much attention due to its application in phase change memory as well as the unique properties as chalcogenide. In this work, the thermal conductivities of Sb-x mol%Te alloys (x = 14, 25, 44, 60, 70, and 90) have been measured by the hot strip method from room temperature up to temperature just below the respective melting points. For the intermetallic compound Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} (x = 60), the thermal conductivity decreases up to approximately 600 K and then increases. For other Sb-x mol%Te alloys where x > 60, the thermal conductivities of the alloys decrease with increasing temperature. In contrast, for x < 60, the thermal conductivities of the alloys keep roughly constant up to approximately 600 K and then increase with increasing temperature. It is proposed that free electron dominates the heat transport below 600 K, and ambipolar diffusion also contributes to the increase in the thermal conductivity at higher temperatures. The prediction equation from temperature and chemical composition has been proposed for thermal conductivities of Sb-Te alloys.

  18. Lattice thermal conductivity of dense silicate glass at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y. Y.; Hsieh, W. P.

    2015-12-01

    The layered structure of the Earth's interior is generally believed to develop through the magma ocean differentiation in the early Earth. Previous seismic studies revealed the existence of ultra low velocity zones above the core mantle boundary (CMB) which was inferred to be associated with the remnant of a deep magma ocean. The heat flux through the core mantle boundary therefore would strongly depend on the thermal conductivity, both lattice (klat) and radiative (krad) of dense silicate melts and major constituent minerals of the lower mantle. Recent experimental results on the radiative thermal conductivity of dense silicate glasses and lower-mantle minerals suggest that krad of dense silicate glasses could be remarkably lower than krad of the surrounding solid mantle phases. In this case, the dense silicate melts will act as a trap for heat from the Earth's outer core. However, this conclusion remains uncertain because of the lack of direct measurements on lattice thermal conductivities of silicate glasses/melts under lower mantle pressures up to date. Here we report experimental results on lattice thermal conductivities of dense silicate glass with basaltic composition under pressures relevant to the Earth's lower mantle in a diamond-anvil cell using time-domain thermoreflectance method. The study will assist the comprehension of thermal transport properties of silicate melts in the Earth's deep interior and is crucial for understanding the dynamic and thermal evolution of the Earth's internal structure.

  19. Lattice thermal conductivity of freestanding gallium nitride nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jie

    2010-08-01

    We report detailed calculations of the lattice thermal conductivity of freestanding gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires with diameters ranging from 20 to 140 nm. Results are compared with experimental data on GaN nanowires grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Calculations are based on the Boltzmann transport equation and take into account the change in the nonequilibrium phonon distribution in the case of diffuse scattering at the surfaces. Phonon dispersion relation is obtained in the elastic continuum approximation for each given nanowire. For valid comparisons with the experimental data, simulations are performed with a dopant concentration and impurity profile characteristic of thermal CVD GaN nanowires. Our results show that the room-temperature thermal conductivity of the nanowires has very low values, ranging from 6.74 W/m K at 20 nm to 16.4 W/m K at 140 nm. The obtained results are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. We have also demonstrated that in addition to impurity scattering, boundary scattering, and phonon confinement, the change in the nonequilibrium phonon distribution leads to a further reduction in the thermal conductivity of the nanowires and has to be taken into account in the calculations. Our conclusion is different from that of an earlier study which attributed the very low thermal conductivity to the unusually large mass-difference scattering in the nanowires.

  20. Effects of lithium insertion on thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wen; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2015-04-27

    Recently, silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have been applied as high-performance Li battery anodes, since they can overcome the pulverization and mechanical fracture during lithiation. Although thermal stability is one of the most important parameters that determine safety of Li batteries, thermal conductivity of SiNWs with Li insertion remains unclear. In this letter, using molecular dynamics simulations, we study room temperature thermal conductivity of SiNWs with Li insertion. It is found that compared with the pristine SiNW, there is as much as 60% reduction in thermal conductivity with 10% concentration of inserted Li atoms, while under the same impurity concentration the reduction in thermal conductivity of the mass-disordered SiNW is only 30%. With lattice dynamics calculations and normal mode decomposition, it is revealed that the phonon lifetimes in SiNWs decrease greatly due to strong scattering of phonons by vibrational modes of Li atoms, especially for those high frequency phonons. The observed strong phonon scattering phenomenon in Li-inserted SiNWs is similar to the phonon rattling effect. Our study serves as an exploration of thermal properties of SiNWs as Li battery anodes or weakly coupled with impurity atoms.

  1. Development of Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced multi-component, low conductivity oxide thermal barrier coatings have been developed using an approach that emphasizes real-time monitoring of thermal conductivity under conditions that are engine-like in terms of temperatures and heat fluxes. This is in contrast to the traditional approach where coatings are initially optimized in terms of furnace and burner rig durability with subsequent measurement in the as-processed or furnace-sintered condition. The present work establishes a laser high-heat-flux test as the basis for evaluating advanced plasma-sprayed and electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) thermal barrier coatings under the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. The candidate coating materials for this program are novel thermal barrier coatings that are found to have significantly reduced thermal conductivities and improved thermal stability due to an oxide-defect-cluster design. Critical issues for designing advanced low conductivity coatings with improved coating durability are also discussed.

  2. Thermal Conduction in Vertically Aligned Copper Nanowire Arrays and Composites.

    PubMed

    Barako, Michael T; Roy-Panzer, Shilpi; English, Timothy S; Kodama, Takashi; Asheghi, Mehdi; Kenny, Thomas W; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2015-09-01

    The ability to efficiently and reliably transfer heat between sources and sinks is often a bottleneck in the thermal management of modern energy conversion technologies ranging from microelectronics to thermoelectric power generation. These interfaces contribute parasitic thermal resistances that reduce device performance and are subjected to thermomechanical stresses that degrade device lifetime. Dense arrays of vertically aligned metal nanowires (NWs) offer the unique combination of thermal conductance from the constituent metal and mechanical compliance from the high aspect ratio geometry to increase interfacial heat transfer and device reliability. In the present work, we synthesize copper NW arrays directly onto substrates via templated electrodeposition and extend this technique through the use of a sacrificial overplating layer to achieve improved uniformity. Furthermore, we infiltrate the array with an organic phase change material and demonstrate the preservation of thermal properties. We use the 3ω method to measure the axial thermal conductivity of freestanding copper NW arrays to be as high as 70 W m(-1) K(-1), which is more than an order of magnitude larger than most commercial interface materials and enhanced-conductivity nanocomposites reported in the literature. These arrays are highly anisotropic, and the lateral thermal conductivity is found to be only 1-2 W m(-1) K(-1). We use these measured properties to elucidate the governing array-scale transport mechanisms, which include the effects of morphology and energy carrier scattering from size effects and grain boundaries. PMID:26284489

  3. Highly thermally conductive papers with percolative layered boron nitride nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongli; Li, Yuanyuan; Fang, Zhiqiang; Xu, Jiajun; Cao, Fangyu; Wan, Jiayu; Preston, Colin; Yang, Bao; Hu, Liangbing

    2014-04-22

    In this work, we report a dielectric nanocomposite paper with layered boron nitride (BN) nanosheets wired by one-dimensional (1D) nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) that has superior thermal and mechanical properties. These nanocomposite papers are fabricated from a filtration of BN and NFC suspensions, in which NFC is used as a stabilizer to stabilize BN nanosheets. In these nanocomposite papers, two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets form a thermally conductive network, while 1D NFC provides mechanical strength. A high thermal conductivity has been achieved along the BN paper surface (up to 145.7 W/m K for 50 wt % of BN), which is an order of magnitude higher than that in randomly distributed BN nanosheet composites and is even comparable to the thermal conductivity of aluminum alloys. Such a high thermal conductivity is mainly attributed to the structural alignment within the BN nanosheet papers; the effects of the interfacial thermal contact resistance are minimized by the fact that the heat transfer is in the direction parallel to the interface between BN nanosheets and that a large contact area occurs between BN nanosheets.

  4. Thermal Conduction in Vertically Aligned Copper Nanowire Arrays and Composites.

    PubMed

    Barako, Michael T; Roy-Panzer, Shilpi; English, Timothy S; Kodama, Takashi; Asheghi, Mehdi; Kenny, Thomas W; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2015-09-01

    The ability to efficiently and reliably transfer heat between sources and sinks is often a bottleneck in the thermal management of modern energy conversion technologies ranging from microelectronics to thermoelectric power generation. These interfaces contribute parasitic thermal resistances that reduce device performance and are subjected to thermomechanical stresses that degrade device lifetime. Dense arrays of vertically aligned metal nanowires (NWs) offer the unique combination of thermal conductance from the constituent metal and mechanical compliance from the high aspect ratio geometry to increase interfacial heat transfer and device reliability. In the present work, we synthesize copper NW arrays directly onto substrates via templated electrodeposition and extend this technique through the use of a sacrificial overplating layer to achieve improved uniformity. Furthermore, we infiltrate the array with an organic phase change material and demonstrate the preservation of thermal properties. We use the 3ω method to measure the axial thermal conductivity of freestanding copper NW arrays to be as high as 70 W m(-1) K(-1), which is more than an order of magnitude larger than most commercial interface materials and enhanced-conductivity nanocomposites reported in the literature. These arrays are highly anisotropic, and the lateral thermal conductivity is found to be only 1-2 W m(-1) K(-1). We use these measured properties to elucidate the governing array-scale transport mechanisms, which include the effects of morphology and energy carrier scattering from size effects and grain boundaries.

  5. Electric and thermal conductivities of quenched neutron star crusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogata, Shuji; Ichimaru, Setsuo

    1990-01-01

    The electric and thermal conductivities in the outer crustal matter of a neutron star quenched into a solid state by cooling are estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation of freezing transition for dense plasmas. The conductivities are calculated by the precise evaluation of the scattering integrals, using the procedure of Ichimaru et al. (1983) and Iyetomi and Ichimaru (1983). The results predict the conductivities lower, by a factor of about 3, than those with the single-phonon approximation.

  6. Effective Thermal Conductivity of High Porosity Open Cell Nickel Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullins, Alan D.; Daryabeigi, Kamran

    2001-01-01

    The effective thermal conductivity of high-porosity open cell nickel foam samples was measured over a wide range of temperatures and pressures using a standard steady-state technique. The samples, measuring 23.8 mm, 18.7 mm, and 13.6 mm in thickness, were constructed with layers of 1.7 mm thick foam with a porosity of 0.968. Tests were conducted with the specimens subjected to temperature differences of 100 to 1000 K across the thickness and at environmental pressures of 10(exp -4) to 750 mm Hg. All test were conducted in a gaseous nitrogen environment. A one-dimensional finite volume numerical model was developed to model combined radiation/conduction heat transfer in the foam. The radiation heat transfer was modeled using the two-flux approximation. Solid and gas conduction were modeled using standard techniques for high porosity media. A parameter estimation technique was used in conjunction with the measured and predicted thermal conductivities at pressures of 10(exp -4) and 750 mm Hg to determine the extinction coefficient, albedo of scattering, and weighting factors for modeling the conduction thermal conductivity. The measured and predicted conductivities over the intermediate pressure values differed by 13%.

  7. Thermal conductivity of solid monohydroxyl alcohols in polyamorphous states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivchikov, A. I.; Korolyuk, O. A.; Sharapova, I. V.

    2012-01-01

    New measurements of the thermal conductivity of solid ethyl alcohol C2H5OH in the interval from 2 K to the melting temperature are presented. An annealing effect in the thermal conductivity of the orientationally ordered phase of the alcohol has been observed over a wide range of temperatures. This phase was obtained as a result of an irreversible first-order phase transition from an orientationally disordered crystal with a cubic structure at T = 109 K. The thermal conductivity was observed to increase as the monoclinic lattice changed from a less stable phase to a more stable one. The growth may be due to the improved quality of the completely ordered crystal. A comparative analysis of the temperature dependences of the thermal conductivity κ(T) is made for the solid monohydroxyl alcohols CH3OH, C2H5OH, С2D5OD, C3H7OH, and C4H9OH in their disordered orientational and structural states. At low temperatures the thermal conductivity of the series of monohydroxyl structural glasses of the alcohols increases linearly with the mass of the alcohol molecule.

  8. Thermal Conductivity of Nonazeotropic Gaseous Mixtures of Fluorocarbon Refrigerants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Ueno, Hiroshi; Kubota, Hironobu; Makita, Tadashi

    The thermal conductivity of four binary gaseous mixtures of R22 (CHCIF2) with R13(CClF3), R23(CHF3), R12(CCl2F2) and R114(CClF2·CClF2) has been measured at temperatures 298.15 and 323.15K under pressures from atmospheric to saturated pressures by a coaxial cylinder cell. The precision of the thermal conductivity obtained is within 2%. The thermal conductivity of mixtures increases with increasing temperature and pressure at a constant composition. The thermal conductivity in each mixture changes almost linearly with the concentration of R22 at a constant temperature and pressure, although the thermal conductivity at each composition is slightly larger than the calculated values by a simple molefraction average method. The experimental results were correlated with composition and pressure by empirical equations and compared with several kinds of prediction methods. The Brokaw's equation is found to reproduce the experimental data most successfully with a mean deviation of 0.7%.

  9. Size dictated thermal conductivity of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beechem, Thomas E.; McDonald, Anthony E.; Fuller, Elliot J.; Talin, A. Alec; Rost, Christina M.; Maria, Jon-Paul; Gaskins, John T.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2016-09-01

    The thermal conductivity of n- and p-type doped gallium nitride (GaN) epilayers having thicknesses of 3-4 μm was investigated using time domain thermoreflectance. Despite possessing carrier concentrations ranging across 3 decades (1015-1018 cm-3), n-type layers exhibit a nearly constant thermal conductivity of 180 W/mK. The thermal conductivity of p-type epilayers, in contrast, reduces from 160 to 110 W/mK with increased doping. These trends—and their overall reduction relative to bulk—are explained leveraging established scattering models where it is shown that, while the decrease in p-type layers is partly due to the increased impurity levels evolving from its doping, size effects play a primary role in limiting the thermal conductivity of GaN layers tens of microns thick. Device layers, even of pristine quality, will therefore exhibit thermal conductivities less than the bulk value of 240 W/mK owing to their finite thickness.

  10. Thermal interface conductance across metal alloy-dielectric interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Justin P.; Yu, Xiaoxiao; Davis, Robert F.; Gellman, Andrew J.; Malen, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    We present measurements of thermal interface conductance as a function of metal alloy composition. Composition spread alloy films of A uxC u1 -x and A uxP d1 -x solid solutions were deposited on single crystal sapphire substrates via dual electron-beam evaporation. High throughput measurements of thermal interface conductance across the (metal alloy)-sapphire interfaces were made by positional scanning of frequency domain thermoreflectance measurements to sample a continuum of Au atomic fractions (x ˜0 →1 ) . At a temperature of 300 K, the thermal interface conductance at the A uxC u1 -x -sapphire interfaces monotonically decreased from 197 ±39 MW m-2K-1 to 74 ±11 MW m-2K-1 for x =0 →0.95 ±0.02 and at the A uxP d1 -x -sapphire interfaces from 167 ±35 MW m-2K-1 to 60 ±10 MW m-2K-1 for x =0.03 →0.97 ±0.02 . To shed light on the phonon physics at the interface, a Diffuse Mismatch Model for thermal interface conductance with alloys is presented and agrees reasonably with the thermal interface conductance data.

  11. Thermal conductivity of solid thiophene in an incommensurate orientational state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolyuk, O. A.; Krivchikov, A. I.; Vdovichenko, G. A.; Romantsova, O. O.; Horbatenko, Yu. V.

    2016-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of solid thiophene at equilibrium vapor pressure between 2 K < T < 170 K, has been measured in a sequence of incommensurate metastable orientationally disordered phases II, II1, II2, and II2g with different degrees of orientational ordering of the molecules. It is found that in phase states II, II1 and II2 with dynamic orientational disorder of the molecules, the thermal conductivity does not depend on the temperature. It is shown that the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity κ(T) of orientational glass Vg and II2g (incommensurate) does not have any of the anomalies that are typical for amorphous materials and glasses. The temperature dependence κ(T) of the incommensurate state of orientational glass II2g is bell-shaped, which is typical for the thermal conductivity of crystals with long-range orientational order. In the II2g state, as temperature drops from Tg to almost 10 K, the thermal conductivity increases according to κ(T) = A/T + B, where the first term describes the input of the propagating phonons, wherein the average length of their mean free path is greater than half of the phonon wavelength. The B term is associated with the input of localized short-wave, or "diffuse" vibrational modes. At low temperatures T ≤ 7 K, κ(T) ∝ T3 is observed with increasing temperatures, which corresponds to the boundary scattering of phonons.

  12. OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES OF THE CORONAL KINK INSTABILITY WITH THERMAL CONDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Botha, G. J. J.; Arber, T. D.; Srivastava, Abhishek K. E-mail: T.D.Arber@warwick.ac.uk

    2012-01-20

    It is known from numerical simulations that thermal conduction along magnetic field lines plays an important role in the evolution of the kink instability in coronal loops. This study presents the observational signatures of the kink instability in long coronal loops when parallel thermal conduction is included. The three-dimensional nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic equations are solved numerically to simulate the evolution of a coronal loop that is initially in an unstable equilibrium. The loop has length 80 Mm, width 8 Mm, and an initial maximum twist of {Phi} = 11.5{pi}, where {Phi} is a function of the radius. The initial loop parameters are obtained from a highly twisted loop observed in the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) 171 A wave band. Synthetic observables are generated from the data. These observables include spatial and temporal averaging to account for the resolution and exposure times of TRACE images. Parallel thermal conduction reduces the maximum local temperature by up to an order of magnitude. This means that different spectral lines are formed and different internal loop structures are visible with or without the inclusion of thermal conduction. However, the response functions sample a broad range of temperatures. The result is that the inclusion of parallel thermal conductivity does not have as large an impact on observational signatures as the order of magnitude reduction in the maximum temperature would suggest; the net effect is a blurring of internal features of the loop structure.

  13. On the thermal conductivity of gold nanoparticle colloids.

    PubMed

    Shalkevich, Natallia; Escher, Werner; Bürgi, Thomas; Michel, Bruno; Si-Ahmed, Lynda; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2010-01-19

    Nanofluids (colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles) have been reported to display significantly enhanced thermal conductivities relative to those of conventional heat transfer fluids, also at low concentrations well below 1% per volume (Putnam, S. A., et at. J. Appl. Phys. 2006, 99, 084308; Liu, M.-S. L., et al. Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer. 2006, 49; Patel, H. E., et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2003, 83, 2931-2933). The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effect of the particle size, concentration, stabilization method and particle clustering on the thermal conductivity of gold nanofluids. We synthesized spherical gold nanoparticles of different size (from 2 to 45 nm) and prepared stable gold colloids in the range of volume fraction of 0.00025-1%. The colloids were inspected by UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscope (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The thermal conductivity has been measured by the transient hot-wire method (THW) and the steady state parallel plate method (GAP method). Despite a significant search in parameter space no significant anomalous enhancement of thermal conductivity was observed. The highest enhancement in thermal conductivity is 1.4% for 40 nm sized gold particles stabilized by EGMUDE (triethyleneglycolmono-11-mercaptoundecylether) and suspended in water with a particle-concentration of 0.11 vol%.

  14. Low Temperature Thermal Conductivity of Woven Fabric Glass Fibre Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kanagaraj, S.; Pattanayak, S.

    2004-06-28

    Fibre reinforced composites are replacing conventional materials due to its compatible and superior properties at low temperatures. Transverse thermal conductivity of plain fabric E-glass/Epoxy composites with the fibre concentrations of 32.5%, 35.2%, 39.2% and 48.9% has been studied in a GM-refrigerator based experimental setup using guarded hotplate technique. Experiments are carried out with the sets of stability criteria. This paper presents the investigation of the influence of the fibre concentration and temperature on the thermal conductivity of fabric composites from 30 K to 300K. It is observed from the experimental results that thermal conductivity increases with the increase of temperature and also with fibre concentration with different rate in different temperature range. The series model has been used to predict the thermal conductivity and compared with the experimental results. It is observed that below the crossover temperature of the composites, which varies from 150-225K depending upon their fibre concentration, the experimental results are within 10% with that of predicted values. The possible causes of variation are analyzed. The physical phenomenon behind the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity is discussed in detail.

  15. Nanofluids containing multiwalled carbon nanotubes and their enhanced thermal conductivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Huaqing; Lee, Hohyun; Youn, Wonjin; Choi, Mansoo

    2003-10-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as produced are usually entangled and not ready to be dispersed into fluids. We treated CNTs by using a concentrated nitric acid to disentangle CNT aggregates for producing CNT nanofluids. Oxygen-containing functional groups have been introduced on the CNT surfaces and more hydrophilic surfaces have been formed during this treatment, which enabled to make stable and homogeneous CNT nanofluids. Treated CNTs were successfully dispersed into polar liquids like distilled water, ethylene glycol without the need of surfactant and into nonpolar fluid like decene with oleylamine as surfactant. We measured the thermal conductivities of these nanotube suspensions using a transient hot wire apparatus. Nanotube suspensions, containing a small amount of CNTs, have substantially higher thermal conductivities than the base fluids, with the enhancement increasing with the volume fraction of CNTs. For the suspensions with the same loading, the enhanced thermal conductivity ratios are reduced with the increasing thermal conductivity of the base fluid. Comparison between the experimental data and the theoretical model indicates that the thermal conductivities of nanotube suspensions seem to be very dependent on the interfacial layer that exists between the nanotube and the liquid.

  16. Anisotropic thermal conduction with magnetic fields in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arth, Alexander; Dolag, Klaus; Beck, Alexander; Petkova, Margarita; Lesch, Harald

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role for the propagation and diffusion of charged particles, which are responsible for thermal conduction. In this poster, we present an implementation of thermal conduction including the anisotropic effects of magnetic fields for smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). The anisotropic thermal conduction is mainly proceeding parallel to magnetic fields and suppressed perpendicular to the fields. We derive the SPH formalism for the anisotropic heat transport and solve the corresponding equation with an implicit conjugate gradient scheme. We discuss several issues of unphysical heat transport in the cases of extreme ansiotropies or unmagnetized regions and present possible numerical workarounds. We implement our algorithm into the cosmological simulation code GADGET and study its behaviour in several test cases. In general, we reproduce the analytical solutions of our idealised test problems, and obtain good results in cosmological simulations of galaxy cluster formations. Within galaxy clusters, the anisotropic conduction produces a net heat transport similar to an isotropic Spitzer conduction model with low efficiency. In contrast to isotropic conduction our new formalism allows small-scale structure in the temperature distribution to remain stable, because of their decoupling caused by magnetic field lines. Compared to observations, strong isotropic conduction leads to an oversmoothed temperature distribution within clusters, while the results obtained with anisotropic thermal conduction reproduce the observed temperature fluctuations well. A proper treatment of heat transport is crucial especially in the outskirts of clusters and also in high density regions. It's connection to the local dynamical state of the cluster also might contribute to the observed bimodal distribution of cool core and non cool core clusters. Our new scheme significantly advances the modelling of thermal conduction in numerical simulations and overall gives

  17. Enhanced thermal conductance of ORU radiant fin thermal interface using carbon brush materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, Christopher L.; Ellman, Brett M.; Knowles, Timothy R.

    1999-01-01

    ESLI has developed a highly compliant carbon brush thermal interface with good conductive heat transfer during a Phase 2 SBIR contract with NASA JSC. This lightweight brush can be retrofitted to the radiant fin thermal interface (RFTI), baselined as the interface for the International Space Station (ISS) Orbital Replaceable Units (ORU's), without changing the fin structure. Radiant heat transfer is thereby augmented by conductive heat transfer, dramatically increasing total thermal conductance of the interface. ESLI is now addressing critical issues concerning its actual use on the ISS in a Phase 3 program. These issues include carbon fiber debris, mechanical and thermal integrity, mechanical insertion and removal forces, and optimization for best thermal performance. Results thus far are encouraging. In this paper, thermal conductance and insertion/extraction force measurements on prototype specimens are presented.

  18. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of graphite fiber/copper matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.; Mcdanels, David L.

    1991-01-01

    The high specific conductivity of graphite fiber/copper matrix (Gr/Cu) composites offers great potential for high heat flux structures operating at elevated temperatures. To determine the feasibility of applying Gr/Cu composites to high heat flux structures, composite plates were fabricated using unidirectional and cross-plied pitch-based P100 graphite fibers in a pure copper matrix. Thermal conductivity of the composites was measured from room temperature to 1073 K, and thermal expansion was measured from room temperature to 1050 K. The longitudinal thermal conductivity, parallel to the fiber direction, was comparable to pure copper. The transverse thermal conductivity, normal to the fiber direction, was less than that of pure copper and decreased with increasing fiber content. The longitudinal thermal expansion decreased with increasing fiber content. The transverse thermal expansion was greater than pure copper and nearly independent of fiber content.

  19. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of graphite fiber-reinforced copper matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.; Mcdanels, David L.

    1993-01-01

    The high specific conductivity of graphite fiber/copper matrix (Gr/Cu) composites offers great potential for high heat flux structures operating at elevated temperatures. To determine the feasibility of applying Gr/Cu composites to high heat flux structures, composite plates were fabricated using unidirectional and cross-plied pitch-based P100 graphite fibers in a pure copper matrix. Thermal conductivity of the composites was measured from room temperature to 1073 K, and thermal expansion was measured from room temperature to 1050 K. The longitudinal thermal conductivity, parallel to the fiber direction, was comparable to pure copper. The transverse thermal conductivity, normal to the fiber direction, was less than that of pure copper and decreased with increasing fiber content. The longitudinal thermal expansion decreased with increasing fiber content. The transverse thermal expansion was greater than pure copper and nearly independent of fiber content.

  20. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of graphite fiber/copper matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, D.L.; McDanels, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    The high specific conductivity of graphite fiber/copper matrix (Gr/Cu) composites offers great potential for high heat flux structures operating at elevated temperatures. To determine the feasibility of applying Gr/Cu composites to high heat flux structures, composite plates were fabricated using unidirectional and cross-plied pitch-based P100 graphite fibers in a pure copper matrix. Thermal conductivity of the composites was measured from room temperature to 1073 K, and thermal expansion was measured from room temperature to 1050 K. The longitudinal thermal conductivity, parallel to the fiber direction, was comparable to pure copper. The transverse thermal conductivity, normal to the fiber direction, was less than that of pure copper and decreased with increasing fiber content. The longitudinal thermal expansion decreased with increasing fiber content. The transverse thermal expansion was greater than pure copper and nearly independent of fiber content.

  1. A model for including thermal conduction in molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Yue; Friauf, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is introduced for including thermal conduction in molecular dynamics simulations for solids. A model is developed to allow energy flow between the computational cell and the bulk of the solid when periodic boundary conditions cannot be used. Thermal conduction is achieved by scaling the velocities of atoms in a transitional boundary layer. The scaling factor is obtained from the thermal diffusivity, and the results show good agreement with the solution for a continuous medium at long times. The effects of different temperature and size of the system, and of variations in strength parameter, atomic mass, and thermal diffusivity were investigated. In all cases, no significant change in simulation results has been found.

  2. Probing the low thermal conductivity of single-crystalline porous Si nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunshan; Lina Yang Collaboration; Lingyu Kong Collaboration; Baowen Li Collaboration; John T L Thong Collaboration; Kedar Hippalgaonkar Collaboration

    Pore-like structures provide a novel way to reduce the thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires, compared to both smooth-surface VLS nanowires and rough EE nanowires. Because of enhanced phonon scattering with interface and decrease in phonon transport path, the porous nanostructures show reduction in thermal conductance by few orders of magnitude. It proves to be extremely challenging to evaluate porosity accurately in an experimental manner and further understand its effect on thermal transport. In this study, we use the newly developed electron-beam based micro-electrothermal device technique to study the porosity dependent thermal conductivity of mesoporous silicon nanowires that have single-crystalline scaffolding. Based on the Casino simulation, the power absorbed by the nanowire, coming from the loss of travelling electron energy, has a linear relationship with it cross section. The relationship has been verified experimentally as well. Monte Carlo simulation is carried out to theoretically predict the thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires with a specific value of porosity. These single-crystalline porous silicon nanowires show extremely low thermal conductivity, even below the amorphous limit. These structures together with our experimental techniques provide a particularly intriguing platform to understand the phonon transport in nanoscale and aid the performance improvement in future nanowires-based devices.

  3. Generalized Procedure for Improved Accuracy of Thermal Contact Resistance Measurements for Materials With Arbitrary Temperature-Dependent Thermal Conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Sayer, Robert A.

    2014-06-26

    Thermal contact resistance (TCR) is most commonly measured using one-dimensional steady-state calorimetric techniques. In the experimental methods we utilized, a temperature gradient is applied across two contacting beams and the temperature drop at the interface is inferred from the temperature profiles of the rods that are measured at discrete points. During data analysis, thermal conductivity of the beams is typically taken to be an average value over the temperature range imposed during the experiment. Our generalized theory is presented and accounts for temperature-dependent changes in thermal conductivity. The procedure presented enables accurate measurement of TCR for contacting materials whose thermal conductivity is any arbitrary function of temperature. For example, it is shown that the standard technique yields TCR values that are about 15% below the actual value for two specific examples of copper and silicon contacts. Conversely, the generalized technique predicts TCR values that are within 1% of the actual value. The method is exact when thermal conductivity is known exactly and no other errors are introduced to the system.

  4. Pulse accumulation, radial heat conduction, and anisotropic thermal conductivity in pump-probe transient thermoreflectance.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Aaron J; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Chen, Gang

    2008-11-01

    The relationship between pulse accumulation and radial heat conduction in pump-probe transient thermoreflectance (TTR) is explored. The results illustrate how pulse accumulation allows TTR to probe two thermal length scales simultaneously. In addition, the conditions under which radial transport effects are important are described. An analytical solution for anisotropic heat flow in layered structures is given, and a method for measuring both cross-plane and in-plane thermal conductivities of thermally anisotropic thin films is described. As verification, the technique is used to extract the cross-plane and in-plane thermal conductivities of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite. Results are found to be in good agreement with literature values.

  5. Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J. C. Y.; Fortini, A.

    1971-01-01

    Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous materials, including 304L stainless steel Rigimesh, 304L stainless steel sintered spherical powders, and OFHC sintered spherical powders at different porosities and temperatures are reported and correlated. It was found that the thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity can be related to the solid material properties and the porosity of the porous matrix regardless of the matrix structure. It was also found that the Wiedermann-Franz-Lorenz relationship is valid for the porous materials under consideration. For high conductivity materials, the Lorenz constant and the lattice component of conductivity depend on the material and are independent of the porosity. For low conductivity, the lattice component depends on the porosity as well.

  6. Spectral mapping of thermal conductivity through nanoscale ballistic transport.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongjie; Zeng, Lingping; Minnich, Austin J; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Chen, Gang

    2015-08-01

    Controlling thermal properties is central to many applications, such as thermoelectric energy conversion and the thermal management of integrated circuits. Progress has been made over the past decade by structuring materials at different length scales, but a clear relationship between structure size and thermal properties remains to be established. The main challenge comes from the unknown intrinsic spectral distribution of energy among heat carriers. Here, we experimentally measure this spectral distribution by probing quasi-ballistic transport near nanostructured heaters down to 30 nm using ultrafast optical spectroscopy. Our approach allows us to quantify up to 95% of the total spectral contribution to thermal conductivity from all phonon modes. The measurement agrees well with multiscale and first-principles-based simulations. We further demonstrate the direct construction of mean free path distributions. Our results provide a new fundamental understanding of thermal transport and will enable materials design in a rational way to achieve high performance.

  7. Thermal scale modeling of radiation-conduction-convection systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation of thermal scale modeling applied to radiation-conduction-convection systems with particular emphasis on the spacecraft cabin atmosphere/cabin wall thermal interface. The 'modified material preservation,' 'temperature preservation,' 'scaling compromises,' and 'Nusselt number preservation' scale modeling techniques and their inherent limitations and problem areas are described. The compromised scaling techniques of mass flux preservation and heat transfer coefficient preservation show promise of giving adequate thermal similitude while preserving both gas and temperature in the scale model. The use of these compromised scaling techniques was experimentally demonstrated in tests of full scale and 1/4 scale models. Correlation of test results for free and forced convection under various test conditions shows the effectiveness of these scaling techniques. It is concluded that either mass flux or heat transfer coefficient preservation may result in adequate thermal similitude depending on the system to be modeled. Heat transfer coefficient preservation should give good thermal similitude for manned spacecraft scale modeling applications.

  8. Increased Thermal Conductivity in Metal-Organic Heat Carrier Nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Nandasiri, Manjula I; Liu, Jian; McGrail, B Peter; Jenks, Jeromy; Schaef, Herbert T; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Nie, Zimin; Martin, Paul F; Nune, Satish K

    2016-01-01

    Metal-organic heat carriers (MOHCs) are recently developed nanofluids containing metal-organic framework (MOF) nanoparticles dispersed in various base fluids including refrigerants (R245Fa) and methanol. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of MOHCs containing nanoMIL-101(Cr) and graphene oxide (GO) in an effort to improve the thermo-physical properties of various base fluids. MOHC/GO nanocomposites showed enhanced surface area, porosity, and nitrogen adsorption compared with the intrinsic nanoMIL-101(Cr) and the properties depended on the amount of GO added. MIL-101(Cr)/GO in methanol exhibited a significant increase in the thermal conductivity (by approximately 50%) relative to that of the intrinsic nanoMIL-101(Cr) in methanol. The thermal conductivity of the base fluid (methanol) was increased by about 20%. The increase in the thermal conductivity of nanoMIL-101(Cr) MOHCs due to GO functionalization is explained using a classical Maxwell model. PMID:27302196

  9. Lattice thermal conductivity of nanograined half-Heusler solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Huiyuan; Meng, Xianfu; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Jian

    2014-05-01

    We report a phenomenological model of atomic weight, lattice constant, temperature, and grain size to calculate the high-temperature lattice thermal conductivity of nanograined solid solutions. The theoretical treatment developed here is reasonably consistent with the experimental results of n-type MNiSn and p-type MCoSb alloys, where M is the combination of Hf, Zr, and Ti. For disordered half-Heusler alloys with moderated grain sizes, we predict that the reduction in lattice thermal conductivity due to grain boundary scattering is independent of the scattering parameter, which characterizes the phonon scattering cross section of point defects. In addition, the lattice thermal conductivity falls off with temperature as T-1/2 around the Debye temperature.

  10. Lattice thermal conductivity of nanograined half-Heusler solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Huiyuan Meng, Xianfu; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Jian

    2014-05-19

    We report a phenomenological model of atomic weight, lattice constant, temperature, and grain size to calculate the high-temperature lattice thermal conductivity of nanograined solid solutions. The theoretical treatment developed here is reasonably consistent with the experimental results of n-type MNiSn and p-type MCoSb alloys, where M is the combination of Hf, Zr, and Ti. For disordered half-Heusler alloys with moderated grain sizes, we predict that the reduction in lattice thermal conductivity due to grain boundary scattering is independent of the scattering parameter, which characterizes the phonon scattering cross section of point defects. In addition, the lattice thermal conductivity falls off with temperature as T{sup –1∕2} around the Debye temperature.

  11. Increased Thermal Conductivity in Metal-Organic Heat Carrier Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Liu, Jian; McGrail, B. Peter; Jenks, Jeromy; Schaef, Herbert T.; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Nie, Zimin; Martin, Paul F.; Nune, Satish K.

    2016-06-01

    Metal-organic heat carriers (MOHCs) are recently developed nanofluids containing metal-organic framework (MOF) nanoparticles dispersed in various base fluids including refrigerants (R245Fa) and methanol. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of MOHCs containing nanoMIL-101(Cr) and graphene oxide (GO) in an effort to improve the thermo-physical properties of various base fluids. MOHC/GO nanocomposites showed enhanced surface area, porosity, and nitrogen adsorption compared with the intrinsic nanoMIL-101(Cr) and the properties depended on the amount of GO added. MIL-101(Cr)/GO in methanol exhibited a significant increase in the thermal conductivity (by approximately 50%) relative to that of the intrinsic nanoMIL-101(Cr) in methanol. The thermal conductivity of the base fluid (methanol) was increased by about 20%. The increase in the thermal conductivity of nanoMIL-101(Cr) MOHCs due to GO functionalization is explained using a classical Maxwell model.

  12. Increased Thermal Conductivity in Metal-Organic Heat Carrier Nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Liu, Jian; McGrail, B. Peter; Jenks, Jeromy; Schaef, Herbert T.; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Nie, Zimin; Martin, Paul F.; Nune, Satish K.

    2016-01-01

    Metal-organic heat carriers (MOHCs) are recently developed nanofluids containing metal-organic framework (MOF) nanoparticles dispersed in various base fluids including refrigerants (R245Fa) and methanol. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of MOHCs containing nanoMIL-101(Cr) and graphene oxide (GO) in an effort to improve the thermo-physical properties of various base fluids. MOHC/GO nanocomposites showed enhanced surface area, porosity, and nitrogen adsorption compared with the intrinsic nanoMIL-101(Cr) and the properties depended on the amount of GO added. MIL-101(Cr)/GO in methanol exhibited a significant increase in the thermal conductivity (by approximately 50%) relative to that of the intrinsic nanoMIL-101(Cr) in methanol. The thermal conductivity of the base fluid (methanol) was increased by about 20%. The increase in the thermal conductivity of nanoMIL-101(Cr) MOHCs due to GO functionalization is explained using a classical Maxwell model. PMID:27302196

  13. Reduction of thermal conductivity by nanoscale 3D phononic crystal.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lina; Yang, Nuo; Li, Baowen

    2013-01-01

    We studied how the period length and the mass ratio affect the thermal conductivity of isotopic nanoscale three-dimensional (3D) phononic crystal of Si. Simulation results by equilibrium molecular dynamics show isotopic nanoscale 3D phononic crystals can significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of bulk Si at high temperature (1000 K), which leads to a larger ZT than unity. The thermal conductivity decreases as the period length and mass ratio increases. The phonon dispersion curves show an obvious decrease of group velocities in 3D phononic crystals. The phonon's localization and band gap is also clearly observed in spectra of normalized inverse participation ratio in nanoscale 3D phononic crystal.

  14. Experimental investigation of thermal conductivity of magnetic nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, Kinnari; Lee, H. S.

    2012-06-01

    Two different magnetic nanofluids comprising of magnetite and Mn-Zn ferrite particles were synthesized in light hydrocarbon oil using continuous chemical process. Powder XRD and TEM image show single phase spinel structure with size of 10 nm and 6.7 nm, respectively for magnetite and Mn-Zn ferrite. Thermal conductivity of nanofluids has been studied as a function of volume fraction under transverse magnetic field. Magnetite nanofluid shows 17% enhancements in thermal conductivity for 4.7% volume fraction while Mn-Zn ferrite shows 45% enhancement at 10% volume fraction. In presence of transverse magnetic field the magnetite nanofluids shows further enhancement from 17% to 30% while no change in thermal conductivity has been observed for Mn-Zn ferrite. These results are explained considering the dipolar coupling co-efficient which for magnetite particles favors chain structures.

  15. Thermally conductive cementitious grout for geothermal heat pump systems

    DOEpatents

    Allan, Marita

    2001-01-01

    A thermally conductive cement-sand grout for use with a geothermal heat pump system. The cement sand grout contains cement, silica sand, a superplasticizer, water and optionally bentonite. The present invention also includes a method of filling boreholes used for geothermal heat pump systems with the thermally conductive cement-sand grout. The cement-sand grout has improved thermal conductivity over neat cement and bentonite grouts, which allows shallower bore holes to be used to provide an equivalent heat transfer capacity. In addition, the cement-sand grouts of the present invention also provide improved bond strengths and decreased permeabilities. The cement-sand grouts can also contain blast furnace slag, fly ash, a thermoplastic air entraining agent, latex, a shrinkage reducing admixture, calcium oxide and combinations thereof.

  16. Thermal Conductivity of AlN-Ethanol Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Peng; Shan, Wan-Liang; Yu, Fei; Chen, Ze-Shao

    2008-12-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) particles of 20 nm diameter were dispersed into ethanol by a two-step process, first magnetic striation and then ultrasonic agitation. Castor oil was added as a dispersant to improve the stability of the AlN suspension. The thermal conductivities of AlN-ethanol nanofluids were measured by a hot-disk method from 0.5 vol% to 4.0 vol% at temperatures of 273.15 K and 297.15 K. Results show about 20% increase in the thermal conductivity of ethanol with the addition of 4.0 vol% at 273.15 K, and a strong temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity.

  17. Reduction of Thermal Conductivity by Nanoscale 3D Phononic Crystal

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lina; Yang, Nuo; Li, Baowen

    2013-01-01

    We studied how the period length and the mass ratio affect the thermal conductivity of isotopic nanoscale three-dimensional (3D) phononic crystal of Si. Simulation results by equilibrium molecular dynamics show isotopic nanoscale 3D phononic crystals can significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of bulk Si at high temperature (1000 K), which leads to a larger ZT than unity. The thermal conductivity decreases as the period length and mass ratio increases. The phonon dispersion curves show an obvious decrease of group velocities in 3D phononic crystals. The phonon's localization and band gap is also clearly observed in spectra of normalized inverse participation ratio in nanoscale 3D phononic crystal. PMID:23378898

  18. Dynamical thermal conductivity of the spin Lieb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarmohammadi, Mohsen

    2016-05-01

    In the ferromagnetic insulator with the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI), we have theoretically investigated the dynamical thermal conductivity (DTC). In other words, we have investigated the frequency dependence of thermal conductivity, κ, of the Lieb lattice, a face-centered square lattice, subjected to a time dependence temperature gradient. Using linear response theory and Green's function approach, DTC has been obtained in the context of Heisenberg Hamiltonian. At low frequencies, DTC is found to be monotonically increasing with DMI strength (DMIS), temperature and next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) coupling. Also we have found that DTC includes a peak for different values of temperature, DMIS and NNN coupling. Furthermore we study the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of Lieb lattice for different values of DMIS, NNN coupling and external magnetic filed. We witness a decrease in DTC with temperature due to the quantum effects in the system.

  19. Thermal conductivity of rigid foam insulations for aerospace vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, M.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2013-05-01

    The present work describes measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of NCFI 24-124 foam, a spray-on foam insulation used formerly on the Space Shuttle external fuel tank. A novel apparatus to measure the effective thermal conductivity of rigid foam at temperatures ranging from 20 K to 300 K was developed and used to study three samples of NCFI 24-124 foam insulation. In preparation for measurement, the foam samples were either treated with a uniquely designed moisture absorption apparatus or different residual gases to study their impact on the effective thermal conductivity of the foam. The resulting data are compared to other measurements and mathematical models reported in the literature.

  20. The thermal conductivity of methane in the critical region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakonidou, E. P.; van den Berg, H. R.; ten Seldam, C. A.; Sengers, J. V.

    1996-12-01

    We have measured the thermal conductivity of methane at temperatures from 308 K down to 190.585 K, which is just 21 mK above the critical temperature, and at densities up to 14 mol L-1. The data were obtained with an improved guarded parallel-plate cell with a new cryostat that was built especially for measurements in the critical region of methane. The new experimental data have a higher accuracy than those reported previously in the literature and enable us to examine the validity of the currently available theoretical description of the asymptotic and nonasymptotic behavior of the thermal conductivity of fluids in the critical region. Equations for the thermal conductivity of methane in a wide range of temperatures and densities are also presented.

  1. Thermal conductivity at a disordered quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnoll, Sean A.; Ramirez, David M.; Santos, Jorge E.

    2016-04-01

    Strongly disordered and strongly interacting quantum critical points are difficult to access with conventional field theoretic methods. They are, however, both experimentally important and theoretically interesting. In particular, they are expected to realize universal incoherent transport. Such disordered quantum critical theories have recently been constructed holographically by deforming a CFT by marginally relevant disorder. In this paper we find additional disordered fixed points via relevant disordered deformations of a holographic CFT. Using recently developed methods in holographic transport, we characterize the thermal conductivity in both sets of theories in 1+1 dimensions. The thermal conductivity is found to tend to a constant at low temperatures in one class of fixed points, and to scale as T 0.3 in the other. Furthermore, in all cases the thermal conductivity exhibits discrete scale invariance, with logarithmic in temperature oscillations superimposed on the low temperature scaling behavior. At no point do we use the replica trick.

  2. Estimating interfacial thermal conductivity in metamaterials through heat flux mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Canbazoglu, Fatih M.; Vemuri, Krishna P.; Bandaru, Prabhakar R.

    2015-04-06

    The variability of the thickness as well as the thermal conductivity of interfaces in composites may significantly influence thermal transport characteristics and the notion of a metamaterial as an effective medium. The consequent modulations of the heat flux passage are analytically and experimentally examined through a non-contact methodology using radiative imaging, on a model anisotropic thermal metamaterial. It was indicated that a lower Al layer/silver interfacial epoxy ratio of ∼25 compared to that of a Al layer/alumina interfacial epoxy (of ∼39) contributes to a smaller deviation of the heat flux bending angle.

  3. Thermal conductivity of chirality-sorted carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Feifei; Llinas, Juan P.; Li, Zuanyi; Estrada, David; Pop, Eric

    2016-03-01

    The thermal properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are of significant interest, yet their dependence on SWNT chirality has been, until now, not explored experimentally. Here, we used electrical heating and infrared thermal imaging to simultaneously study thermal and electrical transport in chirality-sorted SWNT networks. We examined solution processed 90% semiconducting, 90% metallic, purified unsorted (66% semiconducting), and as-grown HiPco SWNT films. The thermal conductivities of these films range from 80 to 370 W m-1 K-1 but are not controlled by chirality, instead being dependent on the morphology (i.e., mass and junction density, quasi-alignment) of the networks. The upper range of the thermal conductivities measured is comparable to that of the best metals (Cu and Ag), but with over an order of magnitude lower mass density. This study reveals important factors controlling the thermal properties of light-weight chirality-sorted SWNT films, for potential thermal and thermoelectric applications.

  4. Thermal conductivity of packed beds of refractory particles: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Fedina, I.; Litovsky, E.; Shapiro, M.; Shavit, A.

    1997-08-01

    Experimental data on thermal conductivity of packed beds composed from various refractory particles (corundum, silica, magnesia, baddeleyite, yttrium oxide, spinel) obtained in the temperature range 400--2,000 K in various gases are presented. It is found that thermal conductivity of a bed composed from crushed refractory particles may change after the first and subsequent heatings. This occurs as a result of smoothing of particle surfaces and decreasing of contact heat barrier resistances between the granules. The influence of smoothing is most significant for beds composed from particles with sizes below 2 mm. In polydisperse beds, containing micrometer-size particles, sintering processes were found to occur at temperatures above 1,600 K. This led to a sharp increase of the bed thermal conductivity. In regimes where sintering did not take place, decreasing of particle size resulted in a decrease of the effective thermal conductivity. This is attributed to the increased number of contacts between the particles and the scattering of thermal radiation.

  5. Simultaneous specific heat and thermal conductivity measurement of individual nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jianlin; Wingert, Matthew C.; Moon, Jaeyun; Chen, Renkun

    2016-08-01

    Fundamental phonon transport properties in semiconductor nanostructures are important for their applications in energy conversion and storage, such as thermoelectrics and photovoltaics. Thermal conductivity measurements of semiconductor nanostructures have been extensively pursued and have enhanced our understanding of phonon transport physics. Specific heat of individual nanostructures, despite being an important thermophysical parameter that reflects the thermodynamics of solids, has remained difficult to characterize. Prior measurements were limited to ensembles of nanostructures in which coupling and sample inhomogeneity could play a role. Herein we report the first simultaneous specific heat and thermal conductivity measurements of individual rod-like nanostructures such as nanowires and nanofibers. This technique is demonstrated by measuring the specific heat and thermal conductivity of single ˜600-700 nm diameter Nylon-11 nanofibers (NFs). The results show that the thermal conductivity of the NF is increased by 50% over the bulk value, while the specific heat of the NFs exhibits bulk-like behavior. We find that the thermal diffusivity obtained from the measurement, which is related to the phonon mean free path (MFP), decreases with temperature, indicating that the intrinsic phonon Umklapp scattering plays a role in the NFs. This platform can also be applied to one- and two- dimensional semiconductor nanostructures to probe size effects on the phonon spectra and other transport physics.

  6. High thermal conductivity of chain-oriented amorphous polythiophene.

    PubMed

    Singh, Virendra; Bougher, Thomas L; Weathers, Annie; Cai, Ye; Bi, Kedong; Pettes, Michael T; McMenamin, Sally A; Lv, Wei; Resler, Daniel P; Gattuso, Todd R; Altman, David H; Sandhage, Kenneth H; Shi, Li; Henry, Asegun; Cola, Baratunde A

    2014-05-01

    Polymers are usually considered thermal insulators, because the amorphous arrangement of the molecular chains reduces the mean free path of heat-conducting phonons. The most common method to increase thermal conductivity is to draw polymeric fibres, which increases chain alignment and crystallinity, but creates a material that currently has limited thermal applications. Here we show that pure polythiophene nanofibres can have a thermal conductivity up to ∼ 4.4 W m(-1) K(-1) (more than 20 times higher than the bulk polymer value) while remaining amorphous. This enhancement results from significant molecular chain orientation along the fibre axis that is obtained during electropolymerization using nanoscale templates. Thermal conductivity data suggest that, unlike in drawn crystalline fibres, in our fibres the dominant phonon-scattering process at room temperature is still related to structural disorder. Using vertically aligned arrays of nanofibres, we demonstrate effective heat transfer at critical contacts in electronic devices operating under high-power conditions at 200 °C over numerous cycles. PMID:24681778

  7. Controlling thermal conductance through quantum dot roughening at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Patrick E.; Duda, John C.; Petz, Christopher W.; Floro, Jerrold A.

    2011-07-01

    We examine the fundamental phonon mechanisms affecting the interfacial thermal conductance across a single layer of quantum dots (QDs) on a planar substrate. We synthesize a series of GexSi1-x QDs by heteroepitaxial self-assembly on Si surfaces and modify the growth conditions to provide QD layers with different root-mean-square (rms) roughness levels in order to quantify the effects of roughness on thermal transport. We measure the thermal boundary conductance (hK) with time-domain thermoreflectance. The trends in thermal boundary conductance show that the effect of the QDs on hK are more apparent at elevated temperatures, while at low temperatures, the QD patterning does not drastically affect hK. The functional dependence of hK with rms surface roughness reveals a trend that suggests that both vibrational mismatch and changes in the localized phonon transport near the interface contribute to the reduction in hK. We find that QD structures with rms roughnesses greater than 4 nm decrease hK at Si interfaces by a factor of 1.6. We develop an analytical model for phonon transport at rough interfaces based on a diffusive scattering assumption and phonon attenuation that describes the measured trends in hK. This indicates that the observed reduction in thermal conductivity in SiGe quantum dot superlattices is primarily due to the increased physical roughness at the interfaces, which creates additional phonon resistive processes beyond the interfacial vibrational mismatch.

  8. Study on Thermal Conductivities of Aromatic Polyimide Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Feng, Junzong; Wang, Xin; Jiang, Yonggang; Du, Dongxuan; Feng, Jian

    2016-05-25

    Polyimide aerogels for low density thermal insulation materials were produced by 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether and 3,3',4,4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride, cross-linked with 1,3,5-triaminophenoxybenzene. The densities of obtained polyimide aerogels are between 0.081 and 0.141 g cm(-3), and the specific surface areas are between 288 and 322 m(2) g(-1). The thermal conductivities were measured by a Hot Disk thermal constant analyzer. The value of the measured thermal conductivity under carbon dioxide atmosphere is lower than that under nitrogen atmosphere. Under pressure of 5 Pa at -130 °C, the thermal conductivity is the lowest, which is 8.42 mW (m K)(-1). The polyimide aerogels have lower conductivity [30.80 mW (m K)(-1)], compared to the value for other organic foams (polyurethane foam, phenolic foam, and polystyrene foam) with similar apparent densities under ambient pressure at 25 °C. The results indicate that polyimide aerogel is an ideal insulation material for aerospace and other applications.

  9. Simultaneous specific heat and thermal conductivity measurement of individual nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jianlin; Wingert, Matthew C.; Moon, Jaeyun; Chen, Renkun

    2016-08-01

    Fundamental phonon transport properties in semiconductor nanostructures are important for their applications in energy conversion and storage, such as thermoelectrics and photovoltaics. Thermal conductivity measurements of semiconductor nanostructures have been extensively pursued and have enhanced our understanding of phonon transport physics. Specific heat of individual nanostructures, despite being an important thermophysical parameter that reflects the thermodynamics of solids, has remained difficult to characterize. Prior measurements were limited to ensembles of nanostructures in which coupling and sample inhomogeneity could play a role. Herein we report the first simultaneous specific heat and thermal conductivity measurements of individual rod-like nanostructures such as nanowires and nanofibers. This technique is demonstrated by measuring the specific heat and thermal conductivity of single ∼600–700 nm diameter Nylon-11 nanofibers (NFs). The results show that the thermal conductivity of the NF is increased by 50% over the bulk value, while the specific heat of the NFs exhibits bulk-like behavior. We find that the thermal diffusivity obtained from the measurement, which is related to the phonon mean free path (MFP), decreases with temperature, indicating that the intrinsic phonon Umklapp scattering plays a role in the NFs. This platform can also be applied to one- and two- dimensional semiconductor nanostructures to probe size effects on the phonon spectra and other transport physics.

  10. Study on Thermal Conductivities of Aromatic Polyimide Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Feng, Junzong; Wang, Xin; Jiang, Yonggang; Du, Dongxuan; Feng, Jian

    2016-05-25

    Polyimide aerogels for low density thermal insulation materials were produced by 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether and 3,3',4,4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride, cross-linked with 1,3,5-triaminophenoxybenzene. The densities of obtained polyimide aerogels are between 0.081 and 0.141 g cm(-3), and the specific surface areas are between 288 and 322 m(2) g(-1). The thermal conductivities were measured by a Hot Disk thermal constant analyzer. The value of the measured thermal conductivity under carbon dioxide atmosphere is lower than that under nitrogen atmosphere. Under pressure of 5 Pa at -130 °C, the thermal conductivity is the lowest, which is 8.42 mW (m K)(-1). The polyimide aerogels have lower conductivity [30.80 mW (m K)(-1)], compared to the value for other organic foams (polyurethane foam, phenolic foam, and polystyrene foam) with similar apparent densities under ambient pressure at 25 °C. The results indicate that polyimide aerogel is an ideal insulation material for aerospace and other applications. PMID:27149155

  11. PCB glass-fibre laminates: Thermal conductivity measurements and their effect on simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvar, F.; Poole, N. J.; Witting, P. A.

    1990-12-01

    Accurate values of thermal conductivity are required for the simulation of temperature phenomena in electronic circuits. This paper presents the results of measurements carried out to determine the thermal conductivity along and normal to the plane of fibre glass laminates used in the manufacture of printed circuit boards. It has been found that the reinforced fibre-glass substrates used in PCBs are strongly anisotropic with the conductivity normal to the boards being much smaller than tangential to it. The test samples were type FR4 epoxy/glass laminates. An experiment has been designed which determines the thermal conductivity in-the-plane of the laminates by matching the measured temperature distribution along a heated specimen with a finite difference solution. An electrically heated Lees’ disc apparatus is also used to measure the thermal conductivity of these boards in a direction normal to their plane. The samples tested yielded values of 0.343 W/mK and 1.059 W/mK for thermal conductivity through and along the plane of the boards, respectively.

  12. Thermal conductance of InAs nanowire composites.

    PubMed

    Persson, Ann I; Koh, Yee Kan; Cahill, David G; Samuelson, Lars; Linke, Heiner

    2009-12-01

    The ability to measure and understand heat flow in nanowire composites is crucial for applications ranging from high-speed electronics to thermoelectrics. Here we demonstrate the measurement of the thermal conductance of nanowire composites consisting of regular arrays of InAs nanowires embedded in PMMA using time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR). On the basis of a proposed model for heat flow in the composite, we can, as a consistency check, extract the thermal conductivity Lambda of the InAs nanowires and find Lambda(NW) = 5.3 +/- 1.5 W m(-1) K(-1), in good agreement with theory and previous measurements of individual nanowires.

  13. High thermal conductivity lossy dielectric using a multi layer configuration

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Kiggans, Jr., James O.

    2003-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for loss dielectrics. A loss dielectric includes at least one high dielectric loss layer and at least one high thermal conductivity-electrically insulating layer adjacent the at least one high dielectric loss layer. A method of manufacturing a loss dielectric includes providing at least one high dielectric loss layer and providing at least one high thermal conductivity-electrically insulating layer adjacent the at least one high dielectric loss layer. The systems and methods provide advantages because the loss dielectrics are less costly and more environmentally friendly than the available alternatives.

  14. The effective thermal conductivity of an adsorbent - Praseodymium cerium oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Secary, J. J.; Tong, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    The results of an experimental study to determine the effective thermal conductivity of praseodymium cerium oxide are reported. Praseodymium cerium oxide is an adsorbent used in the development of adsorption compressors for spaceborne refrigeration systems. A guarded-hot-plate apparatus was built for this study. Measurements were carried out for mean temperatures ranging from 300 to 600 C under a vacuum of 10 exp -5 torr. For the temperature range studied, the effective thermal conductivity increased from 0.14 to 0.76 W/m per C with increasing temperature, while displaying a cubic temperature dependency.

  15. Viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients of gaseous and liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanley, H. J. M.; Mccarty, R. D.; Sengers, J. V.

    1974-01-01

    Equations and tables are presented for the viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients of gaseous and liquid oxygen at temperatures between 80 K and 400 K for pressures up to 200 atm. and at temperatures between 80 K and 2000 K for the dilute gas. A description of the anomalous behavior of the thermal conductivity in the critical region is included. The tabulated coefficients are reliable to within about 15% except for a region in the immediate vicinity of the critical point. Some possibilities for future improvements of this reliability are discussed.

  16. Measurement of the thermal conductivity of dielectric thin solid films with a thermal comparator

    SciTech Connect

    Amsden, C.A.; Gilman, S.E.; Jacobs, S.D.; Torok, J.S.

    1988-04-01

    Low thermal conductivity has important implications for electric and optical applications, where heat deposited in a thin layer must be dissipated to prevent damage. Models which account for thermal transport in thin film structures may have no predictive value if they employ bulk conductivity data. Most techniques utilized to measure the thermal conductivity of thin solid films are difficult and time consuming. The method we have developed is relatively rapid, nondestructive, and is capable of evaluating the samples in a conventional film on substrate geometry. Our thermal conductivity apparatus consists of a control and readout module, signal processing equipment, and an environmentally isolated sample chamber enclosing a sample stage. The commercial unit was converted into a high precision device by temperature controlling both the samples and the sample stage, and by performing averaging of the output signal. The thermal conductivity values obtained are below those of bulk solids. In addition, the conductivities seem to increase with increasing film thickness. Titania seems to have a higher thermal conductivity when deposited by ion-beam sputtering rather than electron-beam evaporation. Some of the electron-beam films were crazed, indicating high levels of stress. The effect of stress and crazing on thermal conductivity is not readily apparent. 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Thermal Conductivity Anisotropy of Metasedimentary and Igneous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, M. G.; Chapman, D. S.; van Wagoner, T. M.; Armstrong, P. A.

    2005-12-01

    Thermal conductivity anisotropy was determined for two sets of rocks: a series of sandstones, mudstones, and limey shales of Cretaceous age from Price Canyon, Utah, and metasedimentary argillites and quartzites of Precambrian age from the Big Cottonwood Formation in north central Utah. Additional anisotropy measurements were made on granitic rocks from two Tertiary plutons in Little Cottonwood Canyon, north central Utah. Most conductivity measurements were made in transient mode with a half-space, line-source instrument oriented in two orthogonal directions on a flat face cut perpendicular to bedding. One orientation of the probe yields thermal conductivity parallel to bedding (kmax) directly, the other orientation of the probe measures a product of conductivities parallel and perpendicular to bedding from which the perpendicular conductivity (kperp) is calculated. Some direct measurements of kmax and kperp were made on oriented cylindrical discs using a conventional divided bar device in steady-state mode. Anisotropy is defined as kmax/kperp. The Precambrian argillites from Big Cottonwood Canyon have anisotropy values from 0.8 to 2.1 with corresponding conductivity perpendicular to bedding of 2.0 to 6.2 W m-1 K-1. Anisotropy values for the Price Canyon samples are less than 1.2 with a mean of 1.04 although thermal conductivity perpendicular to bedding for the samples varied from 1.3 to 5.0 W m-1 K-1. The granitic rocks were found to be essentially isotropic with thermal conductivity perpendicular to bedding having a range of 2.2 to 3.2 W m-1 K-1 and a mean of 2.68 W m-1 K-1. The results confirm the observation by Deming (1994) that anisotropy is negligible for rocks having kperp greater than 4.0 W m-1 K-1 and generally increases for low conductivity metamorphic and clay-rich rocks. There is little evidence, however, for his suggestion that thermal conductivity anisotropy of all rocks increases systematically to about 2.5 for low thermal conductivity rocks.

  18. Developing a High Thermal Conductivity Fuel with Silicon Carbide Additives

    SciTech Connect

    baney, Ronald; Tulenko, James

    2012-11-20

    The objective of this research is to increase the thermal conductivity of uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) without significantly impacting its neutronic properties. The concept is to incorporate another high thermal conductivity material, silicon carbide (SiC), in the form of whiskers or from nanoparticles of SiC and a SiC polymeric precursor into UO{sub 2}. This is expected to form a percolation pathway lattice for conductive heat transfer out of the fuel pellet. The thermal conductivity of SiC would control the overall fuel pellet thermal conductivity. The challenge is to show the effectiveness of a low temperature sintering process, because of a UO{sub 2}-SiC reaction at 1,377°C, a temperature far below the normal sintering temperature. Researchers will study three strategies to overcome the processing difficulties associated with pore clogging and the chemical reaction of SiC and UO{sub 2} at temperatures above 1,300°C:

  19. Thermal conductivity of silicon nanowire arrays with controlled roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Feser, JP; Sadhu, JS; Azeredo, BP; Hsu, KH; Ma, J; Kim, J; Seong, M; Fang, NX; Li, XL; Ferreira, PM; Sinha, S; Cahill, DG

    2012-12-01

    A two-step metal assisted chemical etching technique is used to systematically vary the sidewall roughness of Si nanowires in vertically aligned arrays. The thermal conductivities of nanowire arrays are studied using time domain thermoreflectance and compared to their high-resolution transmission electron microscopy determined roughness. The thermal conductivity of nanowires with small roughness is close to a theoretical prediction based on an upper limit of the mean-free-paths of phonons given by the nanowire diameter. The thermal conductivity of nanowires with large roughness is found to be significantly below this prediction. Raman spectroscopy reveals that nanowires with large roughness also display significant broadening of the one-phonon peak; the broadening correlates well with the reduction in thermal conductivity. The origin of this broadening is not yet understood, as it is inconsistent with phonon confinement models, but could derive from microstructural changes that affect both the optical phonons observed in Raman scattering and the acoustic phonons that are important for heat conduction. (C) 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4767456

  20. Thermal conductivity of silicon nanowire arrays with controlled roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feser, Joseph P.; Sadhu, Jyothi S.; Azeredo, Bruno P.; Hsu, Keng H.; Ma, Jun; Kim, Junhwan; Seong, Myunghoon; Fang, Nicholas X.; Li, Xiuling; Ferreira, Placid M.; Sinha, Sanjiv; Cahill, David G.

    2012-12-01

    A two-step metal assisted chemical etching technique is used to systematically vary the sidewall roughness of Si nanowires in vertically aligned arrays. The thermal conductivities of nanowire arrays are studied using time domain thermoreflectance and compared to their high-resolution transmission electron microscopy determined roughness. The thermal conductivity of nanowires with small roughness is close to a theoretical prediction based on an upper limit of the mean-free-paths of phonons given by the nanowire diameter. The thermal conductivity of nanowires with large roughness is found to be significantly below this prediction. Raman spectroscopy reveals that nanowires with large roughness also display significant broadening of the one-phonon peak; the broadening correlates well with the reduction in thermal conductivity. The origin of this broadening is not yet understood, as it is inconsistent with phonon confinement models, but could derive from microstructural changes that affect both the optical phonons observed in Raman scattering and the acoustic phonons that are important for heat conduction.

  1. Error and uncertainty in Raman thermal conductivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; Yates, Luke; Graham, Samuel

    2015-04-22

    We investigated error and uncertainty in Raman thermal conductivity measurements via finite element based numerical simulation of two geometries often employed -- Joule-heating of a wire and laser-heating of a suspended wafer. Using this methodology, the accuracy and precision of the Raman-derived thermal conductivity are shown to depend on (1) assumptions within the analytical model used in the deduction of thermal conductivity, (2) uncertainty in the quantification of heat flux and temperature, and (3) the evolution of thermomechanical stress during testing. Apart from the influence of stress, errors of 5% coupled with uncertainties of ±15% are achievable for most materials under conditions typical of Raman thermometry experiments. Error can increase to >20%, however, for materials having highly temperature dependent thermal conductivities or, in some materials, when thermomechanical stress develops concurrent with the heating. A dimensionless parameter -- termed the Raman stress factor -- is derived to identify when stress effects will induce large levels of error. Together, the results compare the utility of Raman based conductivity measurements relative to more established techniques while at the same time identifying situations where its use is most efficacious.

  2. Error and uncertainty in Raman thermal conductivity measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; Yates, Luke; Graham, Samuel

    2015-04-22

    We investigated error and uncertainty in Raman thermal conductivity measurements via finite element based numerical simulation of two geometries often employed -- Joule-heating of a wire and laser-heating of a suspended wafer. Using this methodology, the accuracy and precision of the Raman-derived thermal conductivity are shown to depend on (1) assumptions within the analytical model used in the deduction of thermal conductivity, (2) uncertainty in the quantification of heat flux and temperature, and (3) the evolution of thermomechanical stress during testing. Apart from the influence of stress, errors of 5% coupled with uncertainties of ±15% are achievable for most materialsmore » under conditions typical of Raman thermometry experiments. Error can increase to >20%, however, for materials having highly temperature dependent thermal conductivities or, in some materials, when thermomechanical stress develops concurrent with the heating. A dimensionless parameter -- termed the Raman stress factor -- is derived to identify when stress effects will induce large levels of error. Together, the results compare the utility of Raman based conductivity measurements relative to more established techniques while at the same time identifying situations where its use is most efficacious.« less

  3. High conductivity, low cost aluminum composite for thermal management

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, J.L.

    1997-04-01

    In order to produce an inexpensive packaging material that exhibits high thermal conductivity and low CTE, Technical Research Associates, Inc. (TRA) has shown in Phase I the feasibility of incorporating natural flake graphite in an aluminum matrix. TRA has developed a proprietary coating technique where graphite flakes have been coated with a thin layer of molybdenum/molybdenum carbide (approximately 0.2 microns). This barrier coating can protect the graphite flake from chemical reaction and high temperature degradation in molten aluminum silicon alloys. Methods to successfully vacuum infiltrate coated flake with molten aluminum alloys were developed. The resulted metal matrix composites exhibited lower CTE than aluminum metal. The CTE of the composites were significantly lower than aluminum and its alloys. The CTE can potentially be tailored for specific applications. The in plane thermal conductivity was higher than the aluminum matrix alloy. The thermal conductivity and CTE of the composite may be significantly improved by improving the bond strength of the molybdenum coating on the graphite flake. The flake can potentially be incorporated in the molten aluminum and pressure die cast to align the flakes within the aluminum matrix. By preferentially aligning high conductivity graphite flakes within a plane or direction, the thermal conductivity of the resulting composite will be above pure aluminum in the alignment direction.

  4. Effect of cryogenic treatment on thermal conductivity properties of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadig, D. S.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Sampathkumaran, P.; Prashanth, C. S.

    2012-06-01

    Copper exhibits high thermal conductivity properties and hence it is extensively used in cryogenic applications like cold fingers, heat exchangers, etc. During the realization of such components, copper undergoes various machining operations from the raw material stage to the final component. During these machining processes, stresses are induced within the metal resulting in internal stresses, strains and dislocations. These effects build up resistance paths for the heat carriers which transfer heat from one location to the other. This in turn, results in reduction of thermal conductivity of the conducting metal and as a result the developed component will not perform as per expectations. In the process of cryogenic treatment, the metal samples are exposed to cryogenic temperature for extended duration of time for 24 hours and later tempered. During this process, the internal stresses and strains are reduced with refinement of the atomic structure. These effects are expected to favourably improve thermal conductivity properties of the metal. In this experimental work, OFHC copper samples were cryotreated for 24 hours at 98 K and part of them were tempered at 423K for one hour. Significant enhancement of thermal conductivity values were observed after cryotreating and tempering the copper samples.

  5. Thermal conduction in a mirror-unstable plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, S. V.; Churazov, E. M.; Kunz, M. W.; Schekochihin, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The plasma of galaxy clusters is subject to firehose and mirror instabilities at scales of order the ion Larmor radius. The mirror instability generates fluctuations of magnetic-field strength δB/B ˜ 1. These fluctuations act as magnetic traps for the heat-conducting electrons, suppressing their transport. We calculate the effective parallel thermal conductivity in the ICM in the presence of the mirror fluctuations for different stages of the evolution of the instability. The mirror fluctuations are limited in amplitude by the maximum and minimum values of the field strength, with no large deviations from the mean value. This key property leads to a finite suppression of thermal conduction at large scales. We find suppression down to ≈0.2 of the Spitzer value for the secular phase of the perturbations' growth, and ≈0.3 for their saturated phase. The effect operates in addition to other suppression mechanisms and independently of them. Globally, fluctuations δB/B ˜ 1 can be present on much larger scales, of the order of the scale of turbulent motions. However, we do not expect large suppression of thermal conduction by these, because their scale is considerably larger than the collisional mean free path of the ICM electrons. The obtained suppression of thermal conduction by a factor of ˜5 appears to be characteristic and potentially universal for a weakly collisional mirror-unstable plasma.

  6. Experimental Measurement and Numerical Modeling of the Effective Thermal Conductivity of TRISO Fuel Compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Folsom, Charles; Xing, Changhu; Jensen, Colby; Ban, Heng; Marshall, Douglas W.

    2015-03-01

    Accurate modeling capability of thermal conductivity of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel compacts is important to fuel performance modeling and safety of Generation IV reactors. To date, the effective thermal conductivity (ETC) of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel compacts has not been measured directly. The composite fuel is a complicated structure comprised of layered particles in a graphite matrix. In this work, finite element modeling is used to validate an analytic ETC model for application to the composite fuel material for particle-volume fractions up to 40%. The effect of each individual layer of a TRISO particle is analyzed showing that the overall ETC of the compact is most sensitive to the outer layer constituent. In conjunction with the modeling results, the thermal conductivity of matrix-graphite compacts and the ETC of surrogate TRISO fuel compacts have been successfully measured using a previously developed measurement system. The ETC of the surrogate fuel compacts varies between 50 and 30 W m-1 K-1 over a temperature range of 50-600°C. As a result of the numerical modeling and experimental measurements of the fuel compacts, a new model and approach for analyzing the effect of compact constituent materials on ETC is proposed that can estimate the fuel compact ETC with approximately 15-20% more accuracy than the old method. Using the ETC model with measured thermal conductivity of the graphite matrix-only material indicate that, in the composite form, the matrix material has a much greater thermal conductivity, which is attributed to the high anisotropy of graphite thermal conductivity. Therefore, simpler measurements of individual TRISO compact constituents combined with an analytic ETC model, will not provide accurate predictions of overall ETC of the compacts emphasizing the need for measurements of composite, surrogate compacts.

  7. Development of thermal rectifier using unusual electron thermal conductivity of icosahedral quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Tsunehiro

    2015-03-01

    The bulk thermal rectifiers usable at high temperature were developed using the unusual increase of electron thermal conductivity of icosahedral quasicrystals (ICQ's) at high temperature. Our previously performed analyses in terms of linear response theory suggested that the unusual increase of electron thermal conductivity of ICQ was brought about by the synergy effect of quasiperiodicity and narrow pseudogap at the Fermi level. Since the linear response theory suggests that the unusual increase of electron thermal conductivity is coupled with the small magnitude of Seebeck coefficient, the composition of Al-Cu-Fe ICQ, where the thermal conductivity shows the most significant increase with increasing temperature, was determined with a great help of Seebeck coefficient measurements. Consequently obtained Al61.5Cu26.5Fe12.0 ICQ, which was characterized by the small magnitude of Seebeck coefficient, possessed 9 times larger value of thermal conductivity at 1000 K than that observed at 300 K. The increasing tendency of electron thermal conductivity with increasing temperature was further enhanced by means of small amount of Re substitution for Fe. This substitution definitely reduced the lattice thermal conductivity while the electron thermal conductivity was kept unchanged. The lattice thermal conductivity was reduced by 35 % under the presence of 0.5 at.% Re, and the thermal conductivity at 1000 K consequently became about 11 times larger than that at 300 K. The thermal rectifiers were constructed using our newly developed ICQ (Al61.5Cu26.5Fe12.0 or Al61.0Si0.5Cu26.5Fe11.5Re0.5) together with one of the selected materials (Si, Al2O3, CuGeTe2 or Ag2Te) that possess thermal conductivity decreasing with increasing temperature. The heat current flowing in the rectifiers was confirmed to show significant direction dependence. The consequently obtained TRR =|Jlarge|/ |Jsmall | for the composite consisting of

  8. Thermal Conductivity of Spin-Polarized Liquid {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Sawkey, D.; Puech, L.; Wolf, P.E.

    2006-06-02

    We present the first measurements of the thermal conductivity of spin-polarized normal liquid {sup 3}He. Using the rapid melting technique to produce nuclear polarizations up to 0.7, and a vibrating wire both as a heater and a thermometer, we show that, unlike the viscosity, the conductivity increases much less than predicted for s-wave scattering. We suggest that this might be due to a small probability for head-on collisions between quasiparticles.

  9. The effect of thermal aging on the thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed and EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, R.B.; Beecher, S.C.; Porter, W.D.; Nagaraj, B.A.

    1996-05-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBCs is of primary importance. Electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EV-PVD) and air plasma spraying (APS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The density of the APS coatings was controlled by varying the spray parameters. The low density APS yttria-partially stabilized zirconia (yttria-PSZ) coatings yielded a thermal conductivity that is lower than both the high density APS coatings and the EB-PVD coatings. The thermal aging of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia are compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposure to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the EB-PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, results suggest that they typically have a higher thermal conductivity than APS coatings before thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for plasma sprayed partially stabilized zirconia have been found to be less than for plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia coatings.

  10. Comparison of different methods for measuring thermal conductivities

    SciTech Connect

    Hartung, D.; Gather, F.; Klar, P. J.

    2012-06-26

    Two different methods for the measurement of the thermal conductivity have been applied to a glass (borosilicate) bulk sample. The first method was in the steady-state using an arrangement of gold wires on the sample to create a thermal gradient and to measure the temperatures locally. This allows one to calculate the in-plane thermal conductivity of the sample. The same wire arrangement was also used for a 3{omega}-measurement of the direction-independent bulk thermal conductivity. The 3{omega}-approach is based on periodical heating and a frequency dependent analysis of the temperature response. The results of both methods are in good agreement with each other for this isotropic material, if thermal and radiative losses are accounted for. Our results demonstrate that especially in the case of thin-film measurements, finite element analysis has to be applied to correct for heat losses due to geometry and radiation. In this fashion, the wire positions can be optimized in order to minimize measurement errors.

  11. Boundary scattering effect on the thermal conductivity of nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanguang; Yao, Yagang; Hu, Ming

    2016-07-01

    Tuning the surface boundary structures of crystal nanowires (NWs) is one of the most popular ways to control the thermal conductivity of NWs. In this paper, non-equilibrium molecular dynamic simulations (NEMD) and time domain normal mode analysis (TDNMA) are performed to investigate the thermal transport properties of Ar (length of 52.9 nm, width of 4.23 nm) and Ge (56.5 nm long and 4.52 nm wide) NWs with different surface boundary structures. Results show that both the total and modal thermal conductivity have a dramatic difference among the NWs with the same diameter (the maximal and minimal thermal conductivity of Ar (Ge) NWs are 1.25 (15.3) and 0.60 (5.64) W/mK, respectively), which suggests the efficiency of nanoscale thermoelectric devices and heat dissipation devices can be largely tuned by only changing the boundary orientation. The fundamental mechanism responsible for such a discrepancy is found to mainly originate from different phonon group velocity (combined with phonon relaxation time for Ar NWs). The results are quite helpful for understanding the boundary scattering effect on thermal transport and also facilitating the design of nanoscale devices by tailoring the boundary structures.

  12. Sub-amorphous thermal conductivity in ultrathin crystalline silicon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wingert, Matthew C; Kwon, Soonshin; Hu, Ming; Poulikakos, Dimos; Xiang, Jie; Chen, Renkun

    2015-04-01

    Thermal transport behavior in nanostructures has become increasingly important for understanding and designing next generation electronic and energy devices. This has fueled vibrant research targeting both the causes and ability to induce extraordinary reductions of thermal conductivity in crystalline materials, which has predominantly been achieved by understanding that the phonon mean free path (MFP) is limited by the characteristic size of crystalline nanostructures, known as the boundary scattering or Casimir limit. Herein, by using a highly sensitive measurement system, we show that crystalline Si (c-Si) nanotubes (NTs) with shell thickness as thin as ∼5 nm exhibit a low thermal conductivity of ∼1.1 W m(-1) K(-1). Importantly, this value is lower than the apparent boundary scattering limit and is even about 30% lower than the measured value for amorphous Si (a-Si) NTs with similar geometries. This finding diverges from the prevailing general notion that amorphous materials represent the lower limit of thermal transport but can be explained by the strong elastic softening effect observed in the c-Si NTs, measured as a 6-fold reduction in Young's modulus compared to bulk Si and nearly half that of the a-Si NTs. These results illustrate the potent prospect of employing the elastic softening effect to engineer lower than amorphous, or subamorphous, thermal conductivity in ultrathin crystalline nanostructures.

  13. Thermal conductivity and rectification study of restructured Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Anuj

    Electronics' miniaturization, has led to search for better thermal management techniques and discovery of important transport phenomenon. Thermal rectification, directionally preferential heat transport analogous to electrical diode, is one such technique, garnering tremendous interest. Its possibility has been explored through structural asymmetry, introducing a differential phonon density of states in hot and cold regions. As of now, mass and shape asymmetries have been studied, both experimentally and theoretically. However, strict requirements of material length being shorter than phonon mean free path and phonon coherence preservation at surface, makes connecting two materials with different temperature-dependent thermal conductivities, a more natural approach. To avoid resultant thermal boundary resistance and integration complexities, we achieve the affect in single material, by restructuring a region of Graphene by introducing defects. The asymmetry impedes ballistic phonon transport, modulating temperature dependence of thermal conductivity in the two regions. We perform deviational Monte Carlo simulations based on Energy-based formulation to microscopically investigate phonon transport, possibility and optimal conditions for thermal rectification. The proposed method uses phonon properties obtained from first principle, treat phonon-boundary scattering explicitly with properties drawn from Bose-Einstein Distribution.

  14. Strain- and defect-mediated thermal conductivity in silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kathryn F; Piccione, Brian; Zanjani, Mehdi B; Lukes, Jennifer R; Gianola, Daniel S

    2014-07-01

    The unique thermal transport of insulating nanostructures is attributed to the convergence of material length scales with the mean free paths of quantized lattice vibrations known as phonons, enabling promising next-generation thermal transistors, thermal barriers, and thermoelectrics. Apart from size, strain and defects are also known to drastically affect heat transport when introduced in an otherwise undisturbed crystalline lattice. Here we report the first experimental measurements of the effect of both spatially uniform strain and point defects on thermal conductivity of an individual suspended nanowire using in situ Raman piezothermography. Our results show that whereas phononic transport in undoped Si nanowires with diameters in the range of 170-180 nm is largely unaffected by uniform elastic tensile strain, another means of disturbing a pristine lattice, namely, point defects introduced via ion bombardment, can reduce the thermal conductivity by over 70%. In addition to discerning surface- and core-governed pathways for controlling thermal transport in phonon-dominated insulators and semiconductors, we expect our novel approach to have broad applicability to a wide class of functional one- and two-dimensional nanomaterials. PMID:24885097

  15. Investigation of thermal conductivity and tribological properties of nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gara, Luan

    Nanofluids are engineered by dispersing and stably suspending nanoparticles with typical length on the order of 1--50 nm in traditional fluids. In the past decade, scientists and engineers have made great progresses in finding that a very small amount (< 1 vol %) of dispersed nanoparticles can provide dramatic improvement in the thermal properties of the base fluids. Therefore, numerous mechanisms and models have been proposed to account for the thermal enhancement of nanofluids. The molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has become an important tool in the study of dynamic properties of liquids, molecular solutions, and macromolecules. Therefore, MD simulation is a very helpful tool to model the enhanced thermal conduction and predict thermal conductivities of nanofluids. In recent years, investigations on the tribological properties of nanofluids have also been carried out. Some papers have reported that nanofluids are effective in reducing wear and friction. The mechanisms of friction reduction and anti-wear of nanoparticles in lubricants have been reported as colloidal effect, rolling effect, protective film, and third body. The objective of this research is to study the thermal conductivity and tribological properties of nanofluids. The thermal conductivity of nanofluids was investigated theoretically through MD simulation. Nanodiamond was selected as the nanoparticle and octane as the base oil. The Large-scale Atomic-Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) was used. The effects of the particle size, shape and concentration on the thermal conductivity of nanofluids was investigated. The thermal conductivity of oil based nanofluids with nanodiamond particles was also measured experimentally using transient hot-wire method. The tribological properties of nanofluids were studied through experimental investigation using commercially available nanopowders and nanofluids. Both water based and oil based nanofluids were investigated. A Universal Micro

  16. Thermal Conductivity of Powder Insulations for Cryogenic Storage Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y. S.; Barrios, M. N.; Chang, H. M.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2006-04-01

    The objective of the present work was to develop a precise instrument for measuring the thermal conductivity of powder insulating materials over a temperature range from 20 K to near room temperature. The instrument consists of two concentric copper cylinders with the annular space filled with the insulating material. The outer cylinder is thermally anchored to the coldhead of a single stage Gifford-McMahon cryocooler, while the inner copper cylinder is used for generating uniform heat flux through the insulating material. The temperature of both cylinders is measured at several locations to ensure uniform boundary conditions. The entire apparatus is wrapped in multi-layer insulation and suspended in a vacuum cryostat that provides an insulating environment. For a supplied heat flux, the temperature difference between the two cylinders is measured in steady state, from which the thermal conductivity of powder insulation is calculated and compared with published results.

  17. Analysis of measurements of the thermal conductivity of liquid urania

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.K.; Leibowitz, L.

    1984-09-17

    An analysis was performed of the three existing measurements of the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of molten uranium dioxide. A transient heat transfer code (THTB) was used for this analysis. A much smaller range of values for thermal conductivity than originally reported was found: the original values ranged from 2.4 to 11 W . m/sup -1/ . K/sup -1/, with a mean of 7.3 W . m/sup -1/ . K/sup -1/, whereas the recalculated values ranged from 4.5 to 6.75 W . m/sup -1/ . K/sup -1/, with a mean of 5.6 W . m/sup -1/ . K/sup -1/.

  18. Homogeneous thermal cloak with constant conductivity and tunable heat localization.

    PubMed

    Han, Tiancheng; Yuan, Tao; Li, Baowen; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Invisible cloak has long captivated the popular conjecture and attracted intensive research in various communities of wave dynamics, e.g., optics, electromagnetics, acoustics, etc. However, their inhomogeneous and extreme parameters imposed by transformation-optic method will usually require challenging realization with metamaterials, resulting in narrow bandwidth, loss, polarization-dependence, etc. In this paper, we demonstrate that thermodynamic cloak can be achieved with homogeneous and finite conductivity only employing naturally available materials. It is demonstrated that the thermal localization inside the coating layer can be tuned and controlled robustly by anisotropy, which enables an incomplete cloak to function perfectly. Practical realization of such homogeneous thermal cloak has been suggested by using two naturally occurring conductive materials, which provides an unprecedentedly plausible way to flexibly realize thermal cloak and manipulate heat flow with phonons. PMID:23549139

  19. Homogeneous Thermal Cloak with Constant Conductivity and Tunable Heat Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tiancheng; Yuan, Tao; Li, Baowen; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-04-01

    Invisible cloak has long captivated the popular conjecture and attracted intensive research in various communities of wave dynamics, e.g., optics, electromagnetics, acoustics, etc. However, their inhomogeneous and extreme parameters imposed by transformation-optic method will usually require challenging realization with metamaterials, resulting in narrow bandwidth, loss, polarization-dependence, etc. In this paper, we demonstrate that thermodynamic cloak can be achieved with homogeneous and finite conductivity only employing naturally available materials. It is demonstrated that the thermal localization inside the coating layer can be tuned and controlled robustly by anisotropy, which enables an incomplete cloak to function perfectly. Practical realization of such homogeneous thermal cloak has been suggested by using two naturally occurring conductive materials, which provides an unprecedentedly plausible way to flexibly realize thermal cloak and manipulate heat flow with phonons.

  20. Thermal Conductivity of Polyimide/Carbon Nanofiller Blends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghose, S.; Watson, K. A.; Delozier, D. M.; Working, D. C.; Connell, J. W.; Smith, J. G.; Sun, Y. P.; Lin, Y.

    2007-01-01

    In efforts to improve the thermal conductivity (TC) of Ultem(TM) 1000, it was compounded with three carbon based nano-fillers. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), vapor grown carbon nanofibers (CNF) and expanded graphite (EG) were investigated. Ribbons were extruded to form samples in which the nano-fillers were aligned. Samples were also fabricated by compression molding in which the nano-fillers were randomly oriented. The thermal properties were evaluated by DSC and TGA, and the mechanical properties of the aligned samples were determined by tensile testing. The degree of dispersion and alignment of the nanoparticles were investigated with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. The thermal conductivity of the samples was measured in both the direction of alignment as well as perpendicular to that direction using the Nanoflash technique. The results of this study will be presented.

  1. Boosting magnetic reconnection by viscosity and thermal conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minoshima, Takashi; Miyoshi, Takahiro; Imada, Shinsuke

    2016-07-01

    Nonlinear evolution of magnetic reconnection is investigated by means of magnetohydrodynamic simulations including uniform resistivity, uniform viscosity, and anisotropic thermal conduction. When viscosity exceeds resistivity (the magnetic Prandtl number P r m > 1 ), the viscous dissipation dominates outflow dynamics and leads to the decrease in the plasma density inside a current sheet. The low-density current sheet supports the excitation of the vortex. The thickness of the vortex is broader than that of the current for P r m > 1 . The broader vortex flow more efficiently carries the upstream magnetic flux toward the reconnection region, and consequently, boosts the reconnection. The reconnection rate increases with viscosity provided that thermal conduction is fast enough to take away the thermal energy increased by the viscous dissipation (the fluid Prandtl number Pr < 1). The result suggests the need to control the Prandtl numbers for the reconnection against the conventional resistive model.

  2. Homogeneous Thermal Cloak with Constant Conductivity and Tunable Heat Localization

    PubMed Central

    Han, Tiancheng; Yuan, Tao; Li, Baowen; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Invisible cloak has long captivated the popular conjecture and attracted intensive research in various communities of wave dynamics, e.g., optics, electromagnetics, acoustics, etc. However, their inhomogeneous and extreme parameters imposed by transformation-optic method will usually require challenging realization with metamaterials, resulting in narrow bandwidth, loss, polarization-dependence, etc. In this paper, we demonstrate that thermodynamic cloak can be achieved with homogeneous and finite conductivity only employing naturally available materials. It is demonstrated that the thermal localization inside the coating layer can be tuned and controlled robustly by anisotropy, which enables an incomplete cloak to function perfectly. Practical realization of such homogeneous thermal cloak has been suggested by using two naturally occurring conductive materials, which provides an unprecedentedly plausible way to flexibly realize thermal cloak and manipulate heat flow with phonons. PMID:23549139

  3. Anisotropic intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity of phosphorene from first principles.

    PubMed

    Qin, Guangzhao; Yan, Qing-Bo; Qin, Zhenzhen; Yue, Sheng-Ying; Hu, Ming; Su, Gang

    2015-02-21

    Phosphorene, the single layer counterpart of black phosphorus, is a novel two-dimensional semiconductor with high carrier mobility and a large fundamental direct band gap, which has attracted tremendous interest recently. Its potential applications in nano-electronics and thermoelectrics call for fundamental study of the phonon transport. Here, we calculate the intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity of phosphorene by solving the phonon Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) based on first-principles calculations. The thermal conductivity of phosphorene at 300 K is 30.15 W m(-1) K(-1) (zigzag) and 13.65 W m(-1) K(-1) (armchair), showing an obvious anisotropy along different directions. The calculated thermal conductivity fits perfectly to the inverse relationship with temperature when the temperature is higher than Debye temperature (ΘD = 278.66 K). In comparison to graphene, the minor contribution around 5% of the ZA mode is responsible for the low thermal conductivity of phosphorene. In addition, the representative mean free path (MFP), a critical size for phonon transport, is also obtained.

  4. Thermal conductivity of alternative refrigerants in the liquid phase

    SciTech Connect

    Yata, J.; Hori, M.; Kobayashi, K.; Minamiyama, T.

    1996-05-01

    Measurements of the thermal conductivity of five alternative refrigerants, namely, difluoromethane (HFC-32), pentafluoroethane (HFC-125), 1,1,1-trifluorethane (HFC-143a), and dichloropentafluoropropanes (HCFC-225ca and HCFC-225cb), are carried out in the liquid phase. The range of temperature is 253-324 K for HFC-32, 257-305 K for HFC-125, 268-314 K for HFC-134a, 267-325 K for HCF-225ca, and 286-345 K for HCFC-225cb. The pressure range is from saturation to 30 MPa. The reproducibility of the data is better than 0.5%, and the accuracy of the data is estimated to be of the order of 1%. The experimental results for the thermal conductivity of each substance are correlated by an equation which is a function of temperature and pressure. A short discussion is given to the comparison of the present results with literature values for HFC-125. The saturated liquid thermal conductivity values of HFC-32, HFC-125, and HFC-143a are compared with those of chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22) and tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a) and it is shown that the value of HFC-32 is highest, while that of HFC-125 is lowest, among these substances. The dependence of thermal conductivity on number of fluorine atoms among the refrigerants with the same number of carbon and hydrogen atoms is discussed.

  5. Thermal conductivity of alternative refrigerants in the liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yata, J.; Hori, M.; Kobayashi, K.; Minamiyama, T.

    1996-05-01

    Measurements ofthe thermal conductivity of five alternative refrigerants. namely, difluoromethane HFC-321. pentafluoroethane (HFC-125), 1,1,1-trifluoroethane (HFC-143a), and dichloropentafluoropropanes (HCFC-225ca and HCFC-225cb). are carried out in the liquid phase, The range of temperature is 253 324 K for HFC-32, 257 305 K for HFC-125, 268 314 K for HFC-134a. 267 325 K for HCFC-225ca, and 286 345 K for HCFC-225cb, The pressure rank is from saturation to 30 MPa, The reproducibility of the data is better than 0.5% and the accuracy of the data is estimated to be of the order of 1%. The experimental results for the thermal conductivity ofeach substance are correlated by an equation which is a function of temperature and pressure. A short discussion is given to the comparison of the present results with literature values for HFC-125, The saturated liquid thermal conductivity values of HFC-32. HFC-125, and HFC-143a are compared with those of chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22) and tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a) and it is shown that the value of HFC-32 is highest, while that of HFC-125 is lowest, among these substances, The dependence of thermal conductivity on number of fluorine atoms among the refrigerants with the same number of carbon and hydrogen atoms is discussed.

  6. Thermal conductivity of MoS2 polycrystalline nanomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sledzinska, M.; Graczykowski, B.; Placidi, M.; Saleta Reig, D.; El Sachat, A.; Reparaz, J. S.; Alzina, F.; Mortazavi, B.; Quey, R.; Colombo, L.; Roche, S.; Sotomayor Torres, C. M.

    2016-09-01

    Heat conduction in 2D materials can be effectively engineered by means of controlling nanoscale grain structure. A favorable thermal performance makes these structures excellent candidates for integrated heat management units. Here we show combined experimental and theoretical studies for MoS2 nanosheets in a nanoscale grain-size limit. We report thermal conductivity measurements on 5 nm thick polycrystalline MoS2 by means of 2-laser Raman thermometry. The free-standing, drum-like MoS2 nanomembranes were fabricated using a novel polymer- and residue-free, wet transfer, in which we took advantage of the difference in the surface energies between MoS2 and the growth substrate to transfer the CVD-grown nanosheets. The measurements revealed a strong reduction in the in-plane thermal conductivity down to about 0.73 ± 0.25 {{{W}}{{m}}}-1 {{{K}}}-1. The results are discussed theoretically using finite elements method simulations for a polycrystalline film, and a scaling trend of the thermally conductivity with grain size is proposed.

  7. Thermal conductivity of heterogeneous mixtures and lunar soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vachon, R. I.; Prakouras, A. G.; Crane, R.; Khader, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    The theoretical evaluation of the effective thermal conductivity of granular materials is discussed with emphasis upon the heat transport properties of lunar soil. The following types of models are compared: probabilistic, parallel isotherm, stochastic, lunar, and a model based on nonlinear heat flow system synthesis.

  8. Thermal Conductivity of Tetryl by Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Weese, R K

    2003-07-28

    We investigated the use of the Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimeter to measure thermal conductivity (K) of the explosive, Tetryl, using two different methods, isothermal and nonthermal. A discussion of our methods and a comparison of our measured values to literature values of K for Tetryl, which deviated by as much as 50%, will be presented.

  9. Mode dependent lattice thermal conductivity of single layer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zhiyong; Yang, Juekuan; Bi, Kedong; Chen, Yunfei

    2014-10-21

    Molecular dynamics simulation is performed to extract the phonon dispersion and phonon lifetime of single layer graphene. The mode dependent thermal conductivity is calculated from the phonon kinetic theory. The predicted thermal conductivity at room temperature exhibits important quantum effects due to the high Debye temperature of graphene. But the quantum effects are reduced significantly when the simulated temperature is as high as 1000 K. Our calculations show that out-of-plane modes contribute about 41.1% to the total thermal conductivity at room temperature. The relative contribution of out-of-plane modes has a little decrease with the increase of temperature. Contact with substrate can reduce both the total thermal conductivity of graphene and the relative contribution of out-of-plane modes, in agreement with previous experiments and theories. Increasing the coupling strength between graphene and substrate can further reduce the relative contribution of out-of-plane modes. The present investigations also show that the relative contribution of different mode phonons is not sensitive to the grain size of graphene. The obtained phonon relaxation time provides useful insight for understanding the phonon mean free path and the size effects in graphene.

  10. Metastable Lennard-Jones fluids. II. Thermal conductivity.

    PubMed

    Baidakov, Vladimir G; Protsenko, Sergey P

    2014-06-01

    The method of equilibrium molecular dynamics with the use of the Green-Kubo formalism has been used to calculate the thermal conductivity λ in stable and metastable regions of a Lennard-Jones fluid. Calculations have been made in the range of reduced temperatures 0.4 ≤ T* = k(b)T/ε ≤ 2.0 and densities 0.01 ≤ ρ* = ρσ³ ≤ 1.2 on 15 isotherms for 234 states, 130 of which refer to metastable regions: superheated and supercooled liquids, supersaturated vapor. Equations have been built up which describe the dependence of the regular part of the thermal conductivity on temperature and density, and also on temperature and pressure. It has been found that in (p, T) variables in the region of a liquid-gas phase transition a family of lines of constant value of excess thermal conductivity Δλ = λ - λ0, where λ0 is the thermal conductivity of a dilute gas, has an envelope which coincides with the spinodal. Thus, at the approach to the spinodal of a superheated liquid and supersaturated vapor (∂Δλ/∂p)T → ∞, (∂Δλ/∂T)p → ∞. PMID:24908025

  11. Thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of silicate materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, I.; Wechsler, A. E.

    1968-01-01

    Report on the thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of nonmetallic materials evaluates the mechanisms of heat transfer in evacuated silicate powders and establishes the complex dielectric constant of these materials. Experimental measurements and results are related to postulated lunar surface materials.

  12. Decreasing the Effective Thermal Conductivity in Glass Supported Thermoelectric Layers.

    PubMed

    Bethke, Kevin; Andrei, Virgil; Rademann, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    As thermoelectric devices begin to make their way into commercial applications, the emphasis is put on decreasing the thermal conductivity. In this purely theoretical study, finite element analysis is used to determine the effect of a supporting material on the thermal conductivity of a thermoelectric module. The simulations illustrate the heat transfer along a sample, consisting from Cu, Cu2O and PbTe thermoelectric layers on a 1 mm thick Pyrex glass substrate. The influence of two different types of heating, at a constant temperature and at a constant heat flux, is also investigated. It is revealed that the presence of a supporting material plays an important role on lowering the effective thermal conductivity of the layer-substrate ensemble. By using thinner thermoelectric layers the effective thermal conductivity is further reduced, almost down to the value of the glass substrate. As a result, the temperature gradient becomes steeper for a fixed heating temperature, which allows the production of devices with improved performance under certain conditions. Based on the simulation results, we also propose a model for a robust thin film thermoelectric device. With this suggestion, we invite the thermoelectric community to prove the applicability of the presented concept for practical purposes.

  13. Thermal conduction in single-layer black phosphorus: highly anisotropic?

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jin-Wu

    2015-02-01

    The single-layer black phosphorus is characteristic for its puckered structure, which has led to distinct anisotropy in its optical, electronic, and mechanical properties. We use the non-equilibrium Green's function approach and the first-principles method to investigate the thermal conductance for single-layer black phosphorus in the ballistic transport regime, in which the phonon-phonon scattering is neglected. We find that the anisotropy in the thermal conduction is very weak for the single-layer black phosphorus--the difference between two in-plane directions is less than 4%. Our phonon calculations disclose that the out-of-plane acoustic phonon branch has lower group velocities in the direction perpendicular to the pucker, as the black phosphorus is softer in this direction, leading to a weakening effect for the thermal conductance in the perpendicular direction. However, the longitudinal acoustic phonon branch behaves abnormally; i.e., the group velocity of this phonon branch is higher in the perpendicular direction, although the single-layer black phosphorus is softer in this direction. The abnormal behavior of the longitudinal acoustic phonon branch is closely related to the highly anisotropic Poisson's ratio in the single-layer black phosphorus. As a result of the counteraction between the out-of-plane phonon mode and the in-plane phonon modes, the thermal conductance in the perpendicular direction is weaker than the parallel direction, but the anisotropy is pretty small.

  14. Decreasing the Effective Thermal Conductivity in Glass Supported Thermoelectric Layers

    PubMed Central

    Bethke, Kevin; Andrei, Virgil; Rademann, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    As thermoelectric devices begin to make their way into commercial applications, the emphasis is put on decreasing the thermal conductivity. In this purely theoretical study, finite element analysis is used to determine the effect of a supporting material on the thermal conductivity of a thermoelectric module. The simulations illustrate the heat transfer along a sample, consisting from Cu, Cu2O and PbTe thermoelectric layers on a 1 mm thick Pyrex glass substrate. The influence of two different types of heating, at a constant temperature and at a constant heat flux, is also investigated. It is revealed that the presence of a supporting material plays an important role on lowering the effective thermal conductivity of the layer-substrate ensemble. By using thinner thermoelectric layers the effective thermal conductivity is further reduced, almost down to the value of the glass substrate. As a result, the temperature gradient becomes steeper for a fixed heating temperature, which allows the production of devices with improved performance under certain conditions. Based on the simulation results, we also propose a model for a robust thin film thermoelectric device. With this suggestion, we invite the thermoelectric community to prove the applicability of the presented concept for practical purposes. PMID:26982458

  15. Thermal conductivity and temperature profiles in carbon electrodes for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burheim, Odne S.; Aslan, Mesut; Atchison, Jennifer S.; Presser, Volker

    2014-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of supercapacitor film electrodes composed of activated carbon (AC), AC with 15 mass% multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), AC with 15 mass% onion-like carbon (OLC), and only OLC, all mixed with polymer binder (polytetrafluoroethylene), has been measured. This was done for dry electrodes and after the electrodes have been saturated with an organic electrolyte (1 M tetraethylammonium-tetrafluoroborate in acetonitrile, TEA-BF4). The thermal conductivity data was implemented in a simple model of generation and transport of heat in a cylindrical cell supercapacitor systems. Dry electrodes showed a thermal conductivity in the range of 0.09-0.19 W K-1 m-1 and the electrodes soaked with an organic electrolyte yielded values for the thermal conductivity between 0.42 and 0.47 W K-1 m-1. It was seen that the values related strongly to the porosity of the carbon electrode materials. Modeling of the internal temperature profiles of a supercapacitor under conditions corresponding to extreme cycling demonstrated that only a moderate temperature gradient of several degrees Celsius can be expected and which depends on the ohmic resistance of the cell as well as the wetting of the electrode materials.

  16. Prediction of thermal conductivity of rocks by soft computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, Manoj

    2010-05-01

    The transfer of energy between two adjacent parts of rock mainly depends on its thermal conductivity. Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of rocks is necessary for the calculation of heat flow or for the longtime modeling of geothermal resources. In recent years, considerable effort has been made to develop artificial intelligence techniques to determine these properties. Present study supports the application of artificial neural network (ANN) in the study of thermal conductivity along with other intrinsic properties of rock due to its increasing importance in many areas of rock engineering, agronomy, and geoenvironmental engineering field. In this paper, an attempt has been made to predict the thermal conductivity (TC) of rocks by incorporating uniaxial compressive strength, density, porosity, and P-wave velocity using artificial neural network (ANN) technique. A three-layer feed forward back propagation neural network with 4-7-1 architecture was trained and tested using 107 experimental data sets of various rocks. Twenty new data sets were used for the validation and comparison of the TC by ANN. Multivariate regression analysis (MVRA) has also been done with same data sets of ANN. ANN and MVRA results were compared based on coefficient of determination (CoD) and mean absolute error (MAE) between experimental and predicted values of TC. It was found that CoD between measured and predicted values of TC by ANN and MVRA were 0.984 and 0.914, respectively, whereas MAE was 0.0894 and 0.2085 for ANN and MVRA, respectively.

  17. Diameter Dependence of Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Study from Ab Initio

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Sheng-Ying; Ouyang, Tao; Hu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The effects of temperature, tube length, defects, and surface functionalization on the thermal conductivity (κ) of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were well documented in literature. However, diameter dependence of thermal conductivity of SWCNTs received less attentions. So far, diverse trends of the diameter dependence have been discussed by different methods and all the previous results were based on empirical interatomic potentials. In this paper, we emphasize to clarify accurate κ values of SWCNTs with different diameters and in-plane κ of graphene. All the studies were under the framework of anharmonic lattice dynamics and Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) based on first principle calculations. We try to infer the right trend of diameter dependent thermal conductivity of SWCNTs. We infer that graphene is the limitation as SWCNT with an infinite diameter. We analyzed the thermal conductivity contributions from each phonon mode in SWCNTs to explain the trend. Meanwhile, we also identify the extremely low thermal conductivity of ultra-thin SWCNTs. PMID:26490342

  18. Numerical experiment of thermal conductivity in two-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Shahzad, Aamir; He, Mao-Gang

    2015-12-15

    A newly improved homogenous nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (HNEMDS) method, proposed by the Evans, has been used to compute the thermal conductivity of two-dimensional (2D) strongly coupled complex (dusty) plasma liquids (SCCDPLs), for the first time. The effects of equilibrium external field strength along with different system sizes and plasma states (Γ, κ) on the thermal conductivity of SCCDPLs have been calculated using an enhanced HNEMDS method. A simple analytical temperature representation of Yukawa 2D thermal conductivity with appropriate normalized frequencies (plasma and Einstein) has also been calculated. The new HNEMDS algorithm shows that the present method provides more accurate results with fast convergence and small size effects over a wide range of plasma states. The presented thermal conductivity obtained from HNEMDS method is found to be in very good agreement with that obtained through the previously known numerical simulations and experimental results for 2D Yukawa liquids (SCCDPLs) and with the three-dimensional nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) and equilibrium MDS calculations. It is shown that the HNEMDS algorithm is a powerful tool, making the calculations very efficient and can be used to predict the thermal conductivity in 2D Yukawa liquid systems.

  19. THERMAL DIFFUSIVITY/CONDUCTIVITY OF IRRADIATED MONOLITHIC CVD-SIC

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, Gerald E.; Senor, David J.; Jones, Russell H.

    2003-03-31

    Several thermal diffusivity disc samples of high purity CVD-SiC were neutron-irradiated to equivalent doses of about 5-8 dpa-SiC at temperatures from 252 up to 800 C. For this temperature range, the degradation in the thermal diffusivity ranged from about 95 percent down to 89 percent, respectively. The reciprocal thermal diffusivity method was used to estimate the phonon mean free paths and defect concentrations before and after the irradiations for these materials. Even though the CVD-SiC material is an excellent monitor of certain neutron irradiation effects, the degradation in the thermal diffusivity (conductivity) appears to be more than a factor of two greater than predicted by recent theoretical model simulations.

  20. Thermally Conductive Metal-Tube/Carbon-Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    An improved method of fabricating joints between metal and carbon-fiber-based composite materials in lightweight radiators and heat sinks has been devised. Carbon-fiber-based composite materials have been used in such heat-transfer devices because they offer a combination of high thermal conductivity and low mass density. Metal tubes are typically used to carry heat-transfer fluids to and from such heat-transfer devices. The present fabrication method helps to ensure that the joints between the metal tubes and the composite-material parts in such heat-transfer devices have both (1) the relatively high thermal conductances needed for efficient transfer of heat and (2) the flexibility needed to accommodate differences among thermal expansions of dissimilar materials in operation over wide temperature ranges. Techniques used previously to join metal tubes with carbon-fiber-based composite parts have included press fitting and bonding with epoxy. Both of these prior techniques have been found to yield joints characterized by relatively high thermal resistances. The present method involves the use of a solder (63 percent Sn, 37 percent Pb) to form a highly thermally conductive joint between a metal tube and a carbon-fiber-based composite structure. Ordinarily, the large differences among the coefficients of thermal expansion of the metal tube, solder, and carbon-fiber-based composite would cause the solder to pull away from the composite upon post-fabrication cooldown from the molten state. In the present method, the structure of the solder is modified (see figure) to enable it to deform readily to accommodate the differential thermal expansion.

  1. Nonlinear Effect of Moisture Content on Effective Thermal Conductivity of Building Materials with Different Pore Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanfeng; Ma, Chao; Wang, Dengjia; Wang, Yingying; Liu, Jiaping

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the quantitative relationship between the effective thermal conductivity and the moisture content of a material is required to accurately calculate the envelope heat and mass transfer and, subsequently, the building energy consumption. We experimentally analyzed the pore size distributions and porosities of common building materials and the influence of the moisture content on the effective thermal conductivity of building materials. We determined the quantitative relationship between the effective thermal conductivity and moisture content of building materials. The results showed that a larger porosity led to a more significant effect of the moisture content on the effective thermal conductivity. When the volumetric moisture content reached 10 %, the thermal conductivities of foam concrete and aerated concrete increased by approximately 200 % and 100 %, respectively. The effective thermal conductivity increased rapidly in the low moisture content range and increased slowly in the high moisture content range. The effective thermal conductivity is related to the moisture content of the materials through an approximate power function. As the moisture content in the walls of a new building stabilizes, the effective thermal conductivity of normal concrete varies only slightly, whereas that of aerated concrete varies more significantly. The effective thermal conductivity of the material is proportional to the relative humidity of the environment. This trend is most noticeable when the wall material is aerated concrete.

  2. Generalized Procedure for Improved Accuracy of Thermal Contact Resistance Measurements for Materials With Arbitrary Temperature-Dependent Thermal Conductivity

    DOE PAGES

    Sayer, Robert A.

    2014-06-26

    Thermal contact resistance (TCR) is most commonly measured using one-dimensional steady-state calorimetric techniques. In the experimental methods we utilized, a temperature gradient is applied across two contacting beams and the temperature drop at the interface is inferred from the temperature profiles of the rods that are measured at discrete points. During data analysis, thermal conductivity of the beams is typically taken to be an average value over the temperature range imposed during the experiment. Our generalized theory is presented and accounts for temperature-dependent changes in thermal conductivity. The procedure presented enables accurate measurement of TCR for contacting materials whose thermalmore » conductivity is any arbitrary function of temperature. For example, it is shown that the standard technique yields TCR values that are about 15% below the actual value for two specific examples of copper and silicon contacts. Conversely, the generalized technique predicts TCR values that are within 1% of the actual value. The method is exact when thermal conductivity is known exactly and no other errors are introduced to the system.« less

  3. Minimized thermal conductivity in highly stable thermal barrier W/ZrO2 multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Florian; Major, Anna; Eberl, Christian; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-10-01

    Nanoscale thin-film multilayer materials are of great research interest since their large number of interfaces can strongly hinder phonon propagation and lead to a minimized thermal conductivity. When such materials provide a sufficiently small thermal conductivity and feature in addition also a high thermal stability, they would be possible candidates for high-temperature applications such as thermal barrier coatings. For this article, we have used pulsed laser deposition in order to fabricate thin multilayers out of the thermal barrier material ZrO2 in combination with W, which has both a high melting point and high density. Layer thicknesses were designed such that bulk thermal conductivity is governed by the low value of ZrO2, while ultrathin W blocking layers provide a high number of interfaces. By this phonon scattering, reflection and shortening of mean free path lead to a significant reduction in overall thermal conductivity even below the already low value of ZrO2. In addition to this, X-ray reflectivity measurements were taken showing strong Bragg peaks even after annealing such multilayers at 1300 K. Those results identify W/ZrO2 multilayers as desired thermally stable, low-conductivity materials.

  4. Thermal Conductance of Epitaxial and Transferred CVD-Grown Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin, Huang; Yee Kan, Koh

    2015-03-01

    The knowledge of how heat is carried across graphene-copper interface is crucial for the development of graphene devices with hybrid graphene-copper interconnects. Time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) is used to measure the interfacial thermal conductance of epitaxial grown single layer graphene (SLG) on copper foil and after it is transferred to a deposited copper substrate. It is found out that the thermal conductance of un-annealed transferred SLG on deposited copper is around 20 MW/m2K, much lower than that of SLG grown on copper foil which is approximately 30 MW/m2K. Annealing in forming gas/vacuum causes the thermal conductance of transferred SLG to increase to 31 MW/m2K. X-ray spectroscopy (XPS) and Atomic force microscopy (AFM) are then employed to investigate the various factors, (i.e., copper oxide, polycarbonate (PC) residue, roughness and conformity) that may cause a difference in thermal conductance after the transfer. XPS measurement results show an absence of PC residue, even before annealing. The results also reveal that annealing in forming gas reduces the copper oxide thickness by about 2.5nm, and such a small reduction in oxide thickness is not sufficient to cause a drastic increase of approximately 10MW/m2K in thermal conductance. AFM results show that before annealing, the SLG has elongated ridges-like morphology. This morphology is different from that of copper which has circular-like features. After annealing, the SLG morphology becomes very similar to that of copper - both exhibiting circular-like features. This shows that the SLG can conform better to the copper surface after annealing.

  5. Thermal Conductivity of Standard Sands II. Saturated Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnawski, V. R.; Momose, T.; Leong, W. H.

    2011-05-01

    A non-stationary thermal probe technique was used to measure the thermal conductivity of three saturated standard sands (Ottawa sand C-109, Ottawa sand C-190, and Toyoura sand) in a range of soil porosities ( n) from 0.32 to 0.42, and temperatures ( T) from 25 °C to 70 °C. The sand thermal conductivities at full saturation ( λ sat) increased with decreasing n (increasing compaction, 1 - n). In addition, a declining λ sat( T) n=const trend was observed. The peak λ sat values and highest decreasing rate of λ sat with T were observed at the heaviest compaction and lowest tested T. This trend gradually diminished with increasing T and expanding volume of water (larger n) due to the markedly lower ability of water to conduct heat than quartz. A series-parallel model, containing three parallel paths of heat flow (through continuous solids, continuous fluid, and solids plus fluid in series), was successfully applied to predicted λ dry and λ sat data. The model by de Vries, with new fitted grain shape values, also closely followed measured λ sat data. The corresponding square root of the relative mean squared errors varied from 2.9 % to 3.4 % for C-109, from 1.9 % to 3.0 % for C-190, and from 2.3 % to 2.4 % for Toyoura sand. The use of a weighted geometric mean model also provided good λ sat estimates with errors ranging from 3.1 % to 3.5 % for C-109 and C-190 and 8.3 % for Toyoura sand. This paper also discusses a successful attempt to model λ sat as a product of thermal conductivity of the solid fraction (quartz plus other minerals) and a thermal conductance factor of water.

  6. Effect of Thermal Conduction on Acoustic Waves in Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, T. J.

    2006-05-01

    The influence of classical (Spitzer) thermal conduction on longitudinal acoustic waves in a coronal loop is determined through an idealized but exactly solvable model. The model consists of an isothermal, stratified (constant gravity) atmosphere in which a monochromatic acoustic wave, traveling in the direction of decreasing density, is imposed throughout the lower half of the atmosphere. Based on the linearized equations of motion, the complete steady state (t-->∞) solution is obtained. In addition to the imposed driving wave, the solution also contains reflected and transmitted acoustic and thermal conduction waves. The mode transformation and mixing occurs in the vicinity of the atmospheric layer where the gas pressure passes through a critical value set by the magnitude of the thermal conduction and other model parameters. For 5 minute waves in a million degree loop, this critical pressure is on the order of 8×10-4 in cgs units. Since the apex gas pressure of many coronal loops of current interest is thought to be comfortably in excess of this value, mode mixing and transformation is not likely to be a relevant factor for understanding acoustic waves in these structures. On the other hand, enhanced thermal conductivity as a result of plasma instabilities, for example, could revive the importance of this mechanism for coronal loops. If this mixing layer is present, the calculations show that the pair of thermal conduction waves invariably gains the overwhelming majority of the energy flux of the incoming acoustic wave. This energy is rapidly dissipated in the neighborhood of the mixing layer.

  7. Thermal conductivity and multiferroics of electroactive polymers and polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jiezhu

    Electronically conducting polymers and electromechanical polymers are the two important branches of the cutting-edge electroactive polymers. They have shown significant impact on many modern technologies such as flat panel display, energy transport, energy conversion, sensors and actuators. To utilize conducting polymers in microelectronics, optoelectronics and thermoelectrics, it is necessary to have a comprehensive study of their thermal conductivity since thermal conductivity is a fundamental materials property that is particularly important and sometimes a determining factor of the device performance. For electromechanical polymers, larger piezoelectric effect will contribute to the improvement of magnetoelectric (ME) coupling efficiency in their multiferroic composites. This dissertation is devoted to characterizing electronically conducting polymers for their electrical and thermal conductivity, and developing new classes of electromechanical polymers and strain-mediated electromechanical polymer-based multiferroic ME composites. Conducting polymers opened up new possibilities for devices combining novel electrical and thermal properties, but there has been limited understanding of the length-scale effect of the electrical and thermal conductivity, and the mechanism underlying the electricity and heat transport behavior. In this dissertation, the analytical model and experimental technique are presented to measure the in-plane thermal conductivity of polyaniline thin films. For camphorsulfonic acid doped polyaniline patterned on silicon oxide/silicon substrate using photolithography and reactive ion etching, the thermal conductivity of the film with thickness of 20 nm is measured to be 0.0406 W/m˙K, which significantly deviates from their bulk (> 0.26 W/m˙K). The size effect on thermal conductivity at this scale is attributed to the significant phonon boundary scattering. When the film goes up to 130 nm thick, the thermal conductivity increases to 0.166 W

  8. Enhancing Thermal Conductivity of Hexagonal Boron Nitride Filled Thermoplastics for Thermal Interface Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prindl, John

    Hexagonal Boron Nitride has been shown to enhance thermal conductivity in polymer composites more so than conventional ceramic fillers. However, to see a significant increase in thermal conductivity a high loading level of the advanced ceramic is often needed which can have an adverse effect on the mechanical behavior of the composite part. Applications for thermal management using thermal interface materials (TIM) continue to grow with thermoplastic injection molded parts emerging as an area for market growth. There is a growing need for published technical data in this particular area of application. In the current study, the thermal conductivity and mechanical behavior of hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) loaded thermoplastic composites is investigated. The main objectives of this work is produce a novel data package which illustrates the effects of hBN, loaded at high concentrations, across several different thermoplastic resins with the ultimate goal being to find a desirable formulation for specific thermal management applications. The desired properties for such applications being high thermal conductivity and high electrical resistivity with a minimal decrease in mechanical properties. Hexagonal BN cooling filler agglomerates were compounded into polypropylene (PP), nylon-6 (PA-6), and thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) via twin-screw extruder at 3 different loading levels. Injection molded samples were produced and characterized to show varying degrees of thermal conductivity and mechanical strength. Results from this research showed that in all cases, the thermal conductivity increased with increasing levels of hBN addition. The largest increases in thermal conductivity were seen in the PA-6 and TPE systems with the possible indication of exceeding the percolation threshold in the TPE system. This is hypothesized to occur due to the preferential migration of hBN to form conduction pathways around the elastomeric domains in the TPE matrix. Though TPE produced

  9. Thermal conductance of strongly bonded metal-oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. B.; Apgar, Brent A.; Hsieh, Wen-Pin; Martin, Lane W.; Cahill, David G.

    2015-03-01

    We report the results of time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) measurements of two strongly bonded metal-oxide systems with unusually large thermal conductances. We find that TDTR data for the epitaxial SrRu O3/SrTi O3 interface is consistent with an interface conductance G >0.8 GW m-2K-1 . For an Al /MgO interface at a pressure of 60 GPa, we find G ≈1.1 GW m-2K-1 . Both are within 40% of the maximum possible conductance for these systems, as predicted by simple theory.

  10. Modeling and Extraction of Parasitic Thermal Conductance and Intrinsic Model Parameters of Thermoelectric Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Minseob; Park, Hyunbin; Kim, Shiho

    2015-11-01

    We have presented both modeling and a method for extracting parasitic thermal conductance as well as intrinsic device parameters of a thermoelectric module based on information readily available in vendor datasheets. An equivalent circuit model that is compatible with circuit simulators is derived, followed by a methodology for extracting both intrinsic and parasitic model parameters. For the first time, the effective thermal resistance of the ceramic and copper interconnect layers of the thermoelectric module is extracted using only parameters listed in vendor datasheets. In the experimental condition, including under condition of varying electric current, the parameters extracted from the model accurately reproduce the performance of commercial thermoelectric modules.

  11. Illusion thermal device based on material with constant anisotropic thermal conductivity for location camouflage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Quanwen; Zhao, Xiaopeng; Meng, Tong; Liu, Cunliang

    2016-09-01

    Thermal metamaterials and devices based on transformation thermodynamics often require materials with anisotropic and inhomogeneous thermal conductivities. In this study, still based on the concept of transformation thermodynamics, we designed a planar illusion thermal device, which can delocalize a heat source in the device such that the temperature profile outside the device appears to be produced by a virtual source at another position. This device can be constructed by only one kind of material with constant anisotropic thermal conductivity. The condition which should be satisfied by the device is provided, and the required anisotropic thermal conductivity is then deduced theoretically. This study may be useful for the designs of metamaterials or devices since materials with constant anisotropic parameters have great facility in fabrication. A prototype device has been fabricated based on a composite composed by two naturally occurring materials. The experimental results validate the effectiveness of the device.

  12. The Origin of High Thermal Conductivity and Ultralow Thermal Expansion in Copper-Graphite Composites.

    PubMed

    Firkowska, Izabela; Boden, André; Boerner, Benji; Reich, Stephanie

    2015-07-01

    We developed a nanocomposite with highly aligned graphite platelets in a copper matrix. Spark plasma sintering ensured an excellent copper-graphite interface for transmitting heat and stress. The resulting composite has superior thermal conductivity (500 W m(-1) K(-1), 140% of copper), which is in excellent agreement with modeling based on the effective medium approximation. The thermal expansion perpendicular to the graphite platelets drops dramatically from ∼20 ppm K(-1) for graphite and copper separately to 2 ppm K(-1) for the combined structure. We show that this originates from the layered, highly anisotropic structure of graphite combined with residual stress under ambient conditions, that is, strain-engineering of the thermal expansion. Combining excellent thermal conductivity with ultralow thermal expansion results in ideal materials for heat sinks and other devices for thermal management.

  13. The Origin of High Thermal Conductivity and Ultralow Thermal Expansion in Copper-Graphite Composites.

    PubMed

    Firkowska, Izabela; Boden, André; Boerner, Benji; Reich, Stephanie

    2015-07-01

    We developed a nanocomposite with highly aligned graphite platelets in a copper matrix. Spark plasma sintering ensured an excellent copper-graphite interface for transmitting heat and stress. The resulting composite has superior thermal conductivity (500 W m(-1) K(-1), 140% of copper), which is in excellent agreement with modeling based on the effective medium approximation. The thermal expansion perpendicular to the graphite platelets drops dramatically from ∼20 ppm K(-1) for graphite and copper separately to 2 ppm K(-1) for the combined structure. We show that this originates from the layered, highly anisotropic structure of graphite combined with residual stress under ambient conditions, that is, strain-engineering of the thermal expansion. Combining excellent thermal conductivity with ultralow thermal expansion results in ideal materials for heat sinks and other devices for thermal management. PMID:26083322

  14. Effect of interfacial interactions on the thermal conductivity and interfacial thermal conductance in tungsten–graphene layered structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jagannadham, K.

    2014-09-01

    Graphene film was deposited by microwave plasma assisted deposition on polished oxygen free high conductivity copper foils. Tungsten–graphene layered film was formed by deposition of tungsten film by magnetron sputtering on the graphene covered copper foils. Tungsten film was also deposited directly on copper foil without graphene as the intermediate film. The tungsten–graphene–copper samples were heated at different temperatures up to 900 °C in argon atmosphere to form an interfacial tungsten carbide film. Tungsten film deposited on thicker graphene platelets dispersed on silicon wafer was also heated at 900 °C to identify the formation of tungsten carbide film by reaction of tungsten with graphene platelets. The films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. It was found that tungsten carbide film formed at the interface upon heating only above 650 °C. Transient thermoreflectance signal from the tungsten film surface on the samples was collected and modeled using one-dimensional heat equation. The experimental and modeled results showed that the presence of graphene at the interface reduced the cross-plane effective thermal conductivity and the interfacial thermal conductance of the layer structure. Heating at 650 and 900 °C in argon further reduced the cross-plane thermal conductivity and interface thermal conductance as a result of formation nanocrystalline tungsten carbide at the interface leading to separation and formation of voids. The present results emphasize that interfacial interactions between graphene and carbide forming bcc and hcp elements will reduce the cross-plane effective thermal conductivity in composites.

  15. Investigation of thermal conductivity in silicon nanostructures and gallium nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jie

    . Dislocations play an important role in limiting room-temperature thermal conductivity when their density is high, e.g., ND > 1010cm-2. The experimentally observed linear decrease of the thermal conductivity with logarithm of the carrier concentration can be explained by strongly enhanced phonon relaxation on Si dopants. The developed calculation procedure can be used for accurate simulation of self-heating effects in GaN-based devices.

  16. Monte Carlo Modeling of the Thermal Conductivity of Porous Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prialnik, D.; Shoshany, Y.; Podolak, M.

    1999-12-01

    The thermal conductivity of low temperature ice has been derived both experimentally and by theoretical considerations. The formulae provided by Klinger (1980, 1981) have gained widespread use. But cometary material is highly porous and, although it is certain that porosity lowers the thermal conductivity, it is unclear to what extent, and how does the correction depend on porosity and on the pore size distribution. So far, answers to these questions have been either vague or widely discrepant. Early estimates of the effect of porosity (p) on the thermal conductivity (K) of cometary ice were based on purely geometrical considerations, yielding correction factors of order unity. Later work included the 'Hertz factor', the reduced area of contact between grains, which resulted in a much (orders of magnitude) lower correction factor. Attempts to determine the 'Hertz factor' by fitting laboratory data yielded a rather wide range of values, between 0.1 and 0.001. All these corrections are temperature independent. However, the correction due to porosity should also depend on temperature (T), since heat may be transferred through the pores by radiation. In order to obtain the desired relation K(T,p), we adopt a 3-D Monte Carlo procedure. This procedure has the advantage that, given the bulk conductivities of the constituents, the conductivity of the medium can be modeled as a function of both porosity and temperature. The basic structure assumed is fractal, with the pore size distribution spanning several orders of magnitude. Obviously, in order to model such a structure a very fine 3-D grid would be required, so as to accommodate the smallest and largest voids. Such an approach is impractical (impossible, in fact, in view of computational constraints!). In order to circumvent this difficulty, we adopt a hierarchical procedure. We find that the thermal conductivity is lowered by several orders of magnitude at high porosities; in addition it is strongly dependent on

  17. Determination of BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Assembly Effective Thermal Conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew D. Hinds

    2001-10-17

    The purpose of this calculation is to provide an effective thermal conductivity for use in predicting peak cladding temperatures in boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies with 7x7,8x8, and 9x9 rod arrays. The first objective of this calculation is to describe the development and application of a finite element representation that predicts peak spent nuclear fuel temperatures for BWR assemblies. The second objective is to use the discrete representation to develop a basis for determining an effective thermal conductivity (described later) for a BWR assembly with srneared/homogeneous properties and to investigate the thermal behavior of a spent fuel assembly. The scope of this calculation is limited to a steady-state two-dimensional representation of the waste package interior region. This calculation is subject to procedure AP-3.124, Calculations (Ref. 27) and guided by the applicable technical work plan (Ref. 14). While these evaluations were originally developed for the thermal analysis of conceptual waste package designs emplaced in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, the methodology applies to storage and transportation thermal analyses as well. Note that the waste package sketch in Attachment V depicts a preliminary design, and should not be interpreted otherwise.

  18. Thermal conductivity and combustion properties of wheat gluten foams.

    PubMed

    Blomfeldt, Thomas O J; Nilsson, Fritjof; Holgate, Tim; Xu, Jianxiao; Johansson, Eva; Hedenqvist, Mikael S

    2012-03-01

    Freeze-dried wheat gluten foams were evaluated with respect to their thermal and fire-retardant properties, which are important for insulation applications. The thermal properties were assessed by differential scanning calorimetry, the laser flash method and a hot plate method. The unplasticised foam showed a similar specific heat capacity, a lower thermal diffusivity and a slightly higher thermal conductivity than conventional rigid polystyrene and polyurethane insulation foams. Interestingly, the thermal conductivity was similar to that of closed cell polyethylene and glass-wool insulation materials. Cone calorimetry showed that, compared to a polyurethane foam, both unplasticised and glycerol-plasticised foams had a significantly longer time to ignition, a lower effective heat of combustion and a higher char content. Overall, the unplasticised foam showed better fire-proof properties than the plasticized foam. The UL 94 test revealed that the unplasticised foam did not drip (form droplets of low viscous material) and, although the burning times varied, self-extinguished after flame removal. To conclude both the insulation and fire-retardant properties were very promising for the wheat gluten foam.

  19. Influence of moisture content and temperature on thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of rice flours

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of four types of rice flours and one type of rice protein were determine at temperatures ranging from 4.8 to 36.8 C, bulk densities 535 to 875.8 kg/m3, and moisture contents 2.6 to 16.7 percent (w.b.), using a KD2 Thermal Properties Analyzer. It was ...

  20. Thermal Conductivity of Polymer/Nano-filler Blends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghose, Sayata; Watson, Kent A.; Delozier, Donovan M.; Working, Dennis C.; Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G.; Sun, Y. P.; Lin, Y.

    2006-01-01

    To improve the thermal conductivity of an ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, Elvax 260 was compounded with three carbon based nano-fillers. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), vapor grown carbon nanofibers (CNF) and expanded graphite (EG) were investigated. In an attempt to improve compatibility between the Elvax and nanofillers, MWCNTs and EGs were modified through non covalent and covalent attachment of alkyl groups. Ribbons were extruded to form samples in which the nanofillers were aligned, and samples were also fabricated by compression molding in which the nano-fillers were randomly oriented. The thermal properties were evaluated by DSC and TGA, and mechanical properties of the aligned samples were determined by tensile testing. The degree of dispersion and alignment of the nanoparticles were investigated using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Thermal conductivity measurements were performed using a Nanoflash technique. The thermal conductivity of the samples was measured in both the direction of alignment as well as perpendicular to that direction. The results of this study will be presented.

  1. Thermal conductivity and sound attenuation in dilute atomic Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Braby, Matt; Chao Jingyi; Schaefer, Thomas

    2010-09-15

    We compute the thermal conductivity and sound attenuation length of a dilute atomic Fermi gas in the framework of kinetic theory. Above the critical temperature for superfluidity, T{sub c}, the quasiparticles are fermions, whereas below T{sub c}, the dominant excitations are phonons. We calculate the thermal conductivity in both cases. We find that at unitarity the thermal conductivity {kappa} in the normal phase scales as {kappa}{proportional_to}T{sup 3/2}. In the superfluid phase we find {kappa}{proportional_to}T{sup 2}. At high temperature the Prandtl number, the ratio of the momentum and thermal diffusion constants, is 2/3. The ratio increases as the temperature is lowered. As a consequence we expect sound attenuation in the normal phase just above T{sub c} to be dominated by shear viscosity. We comment on the possibility of extracting the shear viscosity of the dilute Fermi gas at unitarity using measurements of the sound absorption length.

  2. Thermal conductance of thin film YIG determined using Bayesian statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euler, C.; Hołuj, P.; Langner, T.; Kehlberger, A.; Vasyuchka, V. I.; Kläui, M.; Jakob, G.

    2015-09-01

    Thin film YIG (Y3Fe5O12 ) is a prototypical material for experiments on thermally generated pure spin currents and the spin Seebeck effect. The 3 ω method is an established technique to measure the cross-plane thermal conductance of thin films, but cannot be used in YIG/GGG (Ga3Gd5O12 ) systems in its standard form. We use two-dimensional modeling of heat transport and introduce a technique based on Bayesian statistics to evaluate measurement data taken from the 3 ω method. Our analysis method allows us to study material systems that have not been accessible with the conventionally used 3 ω analysis. Temperature-dependent thermal conductance data of thin film YIG are of major importance for experiments in the field of spin caloritronics. Here we show data between room temperature and 10 K for films covering a wide thickness range as well as the magnetic field effect on the thermal conductance between 10 and 50 K.

  3. Copper-based conductive composites with tailored thermal expansion.

    PubMed

    Della Gaspera, Enrico; Tucker, Ryan; Star, Kurt; Lan, Esther H; Ju, Yongho Sungtaek; Dunn, Bruce

    2013-11-13

    We have devised a moderate temperature hot-pressing route for preparing metal-matrix composites which possess tunable thermal expansion coefficients in combination with high electrical and thermal conductivities. The composites are based on incorporating ZrW2O8, a material with a negative coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), within a continuous copper matrix. The ZrW2O8 enables us to tune the CTE in a predictable manner, while the copper phase is responsible for the electrical and thermal conductivity properties. An important consideration in the processing of these materials is to avoid the decomposition of the ZrW2O8 phase. This is accomplished by using relatively mild hot-pressing conditions of 500 °C for 1 h at 40 MPa. To ensure that these conditions enable sintering of the copper, we developed a synthesis route for the preparation of Cu nanoparticles (NPs) based on the reduction of a common copper salt in aqueous solution in the presence of a size control agent. Upon hot pressing these nanoparticles at 500 °C, we are able to achieve 92-93% of the theoretical density of copper. The resulting materials exhibit a CTE which can be tuned between the value of pure copper (16.5 ppm/°C) and less than 1 ppm/°C. Thus, by adjusting the relative amount of the two components, the properties of the composite can be designed so that a material with high electrical conductivity and a CTE that matches the relatively low CTE values of semiconductor or thermoelectric materials can be achieved. This unique combination of electrical and thermal properties enables these Cu-based metal-matrix composites to be used as electrical contacts to a variety of semiconductor and thermoelectric devices which offer stable operation under thermal cycling conditions.

  4. Heat conduction in carbon nanotube materials: Strong effect of intrinsic thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Alexey N.; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2012-07-01

    Computational study of thermal conductivity of interconnected networks of bundles in carbon nanotube (CNT) films reveals a strong effect of the finite thermal conductivity kT of individual nanotubes on the conductivity k of the CNT materials. The physical origin of this effect is explained in a theoretical analysis of systems composed of straight randomly dispersed CNTs. An analytical equation for quantitative description of the effect of finite kT on the value of k is obtained and adopted for continuous networks of bundles characteristic of CNT films and buckypaper. Contrary to the common assumption of the dominant effect of the contact conductance, the contribution of the finite kT is found to control the value of k at material densities and CNT lengths typical for real materials.

  5. Studying the Transient Thermal Contact Conductance Between the Exhaust Valve and Its Seat Using the Inverse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezhad, Mohsen Motahari; Shojaeefard, Mohammad Hassan; Shahraki, Saeid

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the experiments aimed at analyzing thermally the exhaust valve in an air-cooled internal combustion engine and estimating the thermal contact conductance in fixed and periodic contacts. Due to the nature of internal combustion engines, the duration of contact between the valve and its seat is too short, and much time is needed to reach the quasi-steady state in the periodic contact between the exhaust valve and its seat. Using the methods of linear extrapolation and the inverse solution, the surface contact temperatures and the fixed and periodic thermal contact conductance were calculated. The results of linear extrapolation and inverse methods have similar trends, and based on the error analysis, they are accurate enough to estimate the thermal contact conductance. Moreover, due to the error analysis, a linear extrapolation method using inverse ratio is preferred. The effects of pressure, contact frequency, heat flux, and cooling air speed on thermal contact conductance have been investigated. The results show that by increasing the contact pressure the thermal contact conductance increases substantially. In addition, by increasing the engine speed the thermal contact conductance decreases. On the other hand, by boosting the air speed the thermal contact conductance increases, and by raising the heat flux the thermal contact conductance reduces. The average calculated error equals to 12.9 %.

  6. Two-temperature radiative shocks with electron thermal conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Shull, J. Michael; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of electron thermal conduction on radiative shock structure is studied for both one- and two-temperature plasmas. The dimensionless ratio of the conductive length to the cooling length determines whether or not conduction is important, and shock jump conditions with conduction are established for a collisionless shock front. Approximate solutions are obtained, with the assumptions that the ionization state of the gas is constant and the cooling rate is a function of temperature alone. In the absence of magnetic fields, these solutions indicate that conduction noticeably influences normal-abundance interstellar shocks with velocities 50-100 km/s and dramatically affects metal-dominated shocks over a wide range of shock velocities.

  7. Effects of Intergranular Gas Bubbles on Thermal Conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    K. Chockalingam; Paul C. Millett; M. R. Tonks

    2012-11-01

    Model microstructures obtained from phase-field simulations are used to study the effective heat transfer across bicrys- tals with stationary grain boundary bubble populations. We find that the grain boundary coverage, irrespective of the intergranular bubble radii, is the most relevant parameter to the thermal resistance, which we use to derive effec- tive Kapitza resistances that are dependent on the grain boundary coverage and Kaptiza resistance of the intact grain boundary. We propose a model to predict thermal conductivity as a function of porosity, grain-size, Kaptiza resistance of the intact grain boundary, and grain boundary bubble coverage.

  8. Thermal conductivity of one-dimensional Fibonacci quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciá, Enrique

    2000-03-01

    We consider a general Fibonacci quasicrystal (FQC) in which both the masses and the elastic constants are aperiodically arranged. Making use of a suitable decimation scheme, inspired by real-space renormalization-group concepts, we obtain closed analytical expressions for the global transfer matrix and transmission coefficient for several resonant critical normal modes. The fractal structure of the frequency spectrum significantly influences both the cumulative contribution of the different normal modes to the thermal transport and the dependence of the thermal conductivity with the temperature over a wide temperature range. The role of resonant effects in the heat transport through the FQC is numerically and analytically discussed.

  9. Instrument for Measuring Thermal Conductivity of Materials at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James; Sass, Jared; Johnson, Wesley

    2010-01-01

    With the advance of polymer and other non-metallic material sciences, whole new series of polymeric materials and composites are being created. These materials are being optimized for many different applications including cryogenic and low-temperature industrial processes. Engineers need these data to perform detailed system designs and enable new design possibilities for improved control, reliability, and efficiency in specific applications. One main area of interest is cryogenic structural elements and fluid handling components and other parts, films, and coatings for low-temperature application. An important thermal property of these new materials is the apparent thermal conductivity (k-value).

  10. Thermal conductivity modeling of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Cho, Byoung Jin; Sohn, Dong-Seong; Park, Jong Man

    2015-11-01

    A dataset for the thermal conductivity of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel made available by KAERI was reanalyzed. Using this dataset, an analytical model was obtained by expanding the Bruggeman model. The newly developed model incorporates thermal resistances at the interface between the U-Mo particles and the Al matrix and the defects within the Al matrix (grain boundaries, cracks, and dislocations). The interfacial resistances are expressed as functions of U-Mo particle size and Al grain size obtained empirically by fitting to measured data from KAERI. The model was then validated against an independently measured dataset from ANL.

  11. Applications of high thermal conductivity composites to electronics and spacecraft thermal design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, G. Richard; Loftin, Timothy A.

    1990-01-01

    Recently, high thermal conductivity continuous graphite fiber reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC's) have become available that can save much weight over present methods of heat conduction. These materials have two or three times higher thermal conductivity in the fiber direction than the pure metals when compared on a thermal conductivity to weight basis. Use of these materials for heat conduction purposes can result in weight savings of from 50 to 70 percent over structural aluminum. Another significant advantage is that these materials can be used without the plumbing and testing complexities that accompany the use of liquid heat pipes. A spinoff of this research was the development of other MMC's as electronic device heat sinks. These use particulates rather than fibers and are formulated to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of electronic substrates in order to alleviate thermally induced stresses. The development of both types of these materials as viable weight saving substitutes for traditional methods of thermal control for electronics packaging and also for spacecraft thermal control applications are the subject of this report.

  12. Thermal conductivity of a film of single walled carbon nanotubes measured with infrared thermal imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ya; Inoue, Taiki; Xiang, Rong; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo

    Heat dissipation has restricted the modern miniaturization trend with the development of electronic devices. Theoretically proven to be with high axial thermal conductivity, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) have long been expected to cool down the nanoscale world. Even though the tube-tube contact resistance limits the capability of heat transfer of the bulk film, the high intrinsic thermal conductivity of SWNT still glorify the application of films of SWNT network as a thermal interface material. In this work, we proposed a new method to straightly measure the thermal conductivity of SWNT film. We bridged two cantilevered Si thin plate with SWNT film, and kept a steady state heat flow in between. With the infrared camera to record the temperature distribution, the Si plates with known thermal conductivity can work as a reference to calculate the heat flux going through the SWNT film. Further, the thermal conductivity of the SWNT film can be obtained through Fourier's law after deducting the effect of thermal radiation. The sizes of the structure, the heating temperature, the vacuum degree and other crucial impact factors are carefully considered and analyzed. The author Y. F. was supported through the Advanced Integration Science Innovation Education and Research Consortium Program by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology.

  13. Effects of Doping on Thermal Conductivity of Pyrochlore Oxides for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming; Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam

    2006-01-01

    Pyrochlore oxides of general composition, A2B2O7, where A is a 3(+) cation (La to Lu) and B is a 4(+) cation (Zr, Hf, Ti, etc.) have high melting point, relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion, and low thermal conductivity which make them suitable for applications as high-temperature thermal barrier coatings. The effect of doping at the A site on the thermal conductivity of a pyrochlore oxide La2Zr2O7, has been investigated. Oxide powders of various compositions La2Zr2O7, La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 were synthesized by the citric acid sol-gel method. These powders were hot pressed into discs and used for thermal conductivity measurements using a steady-state laser heat flux test technique. The rare earth oxide doped pyrochlores La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 had lower thermal conductivity than the un-doped La2Zr2O7. The Gd2O3 and Yb2O3 co-doped composition showed the lowest thermal conductivity.

  14. Thermal conductivity, viscosity, and electrical conductivity of iron oxide with a cloud fractal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamilpanah, Pouya; Pahlavanzadeh, Hassan; Kheradmand, Amanj

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, nanoscale iron oxide was synthesized using a hydrothermal method; XRD analysis revealed that all the produced crystals are iron oxide. FESEM microscopic imaging showed that particles are on the scale of nano and their morphology is cloud fractal. To study the laboratory properties of thermal conductivity, viscosity, and electrical conductivity of the nanoparticles, they were dispersed in ethylene glycol-based fluid and the nanofluid was in a two-step synthesis during this process. The experiments were carried out with a weight fraction between 0 and 2 % at temperatures between 25 and 45 °C. According to the results of the experiments, increasing the density of nanoparticles in the fluid increases thermal conductivity, as it was predicted in all theoretical models. On the other hand, nano viscosity increases as the weight fraction increases while it decreases as temperature goes up. Electrical conductivity also increases with raising the temperature and weight fraction. Theoretical models were studied to predict Thermal conductivity, viscosity, and electrical conductivity of the nanofluid.

  15. Thermal conductance of metal-diamond interfaces at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Hohensee, Gregory T; Wilson, R B; Cahill, David G

    2015-01-01

    The thermal conductance of interfaces between metals and diamond, which has a comparatively high Debye temperature, is often greater than can be accounted for by two-phonon processes. The high pressures achievable in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) can significantly extend the metal phonon density of states to higher frequencies, and can also suppress extrinsic effects by greatly stiffening interface bonding. Here we report time-domain thermoreflectance measurements of metal-diamond interface thermal conductance up to 50 GPa in the DAC for Pb, Au0.95Pd0.05, Pt and Al films deposited on type 1A natural [100] and type 2A synthetic [110] diamond anvils. In all cases, the thermal conductances increase weakly or saturate to similar values at high pressure. Our results suggest that anharmonic conductance at metal-diamond interfaces is controlled by partial transmission processes, where a diamond phonon that inelastically scatters at the interface absorbs or emits a metal phonon. PMID:25744853

  16. Thermal conductivity in nanocrystalline-SiC/C superlattices

    DOE PAGES

    Habermehl, S.; Serrano, J. R.

    2015-11-17

    We reported the formation of thin film superlattices consisting of alternating layers of nitrogen-doped SiC (SiC:N) and C. Periodically terminating the SiC:N surface with a graphitic C boundary layer and controlling the SiC:N/C thickness ratio yield nanocrystalline SiC grains ranging in size from 365 to 23 nm. Frequency domain thermo-reflectance is employed to determine the thermal conductivity, which is found to vary from 35.5 W m-1 K-1 for monolithic undoped α-SiC films to 1.6 W m-1 K-1 for a SiC:N/C superlattice with a 47 nm period and a SiC:N/C thickness ratio of 11. A series conductance model is employed tomore » explain the dependence of the thermal conductivity on the superlatticestructure. Our results indicate that the thermal conductivity is more dependent on the SiC:N/C thickness ratio than the SiC:N grain size, indicative of strong boundary layerphonon scattering.« less

  17. Thermal conductance of metal-diamond interfaces at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Hohensee, Gregory T; Wilson, R B; Cahill, David G

    2015-03-06

    The thermal conductance of interfaces between metals and diamond, which has a comparatively high Debye temperature, is often greater than can be accounted for by two-phonon processes. The high pressures achievable in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) can significantly extend the metal phonon density of states to higher frequencies, and can also suppress extrinsic effects by greatly stiffening interface bonding. Here we report time-domain thermoreflectance measurements of metal-diamond interface thermal conductance up to 50 GPa in the DAC for Pb, Au0.95Pd0.05, Pt and Al films deposited on type 1A natural [100] and type 2A synthetic [110] diamond anvils. In all cases, the thermal conductances increase weakly or saturate to similar values at high pressure. Our results suggest that anharmonic conductance at metal-diamond interfaces is controlled by partial transmission processes, where a diamond phonon that inelastically scatters at the interface absorbs or emits a metal phonon.

  18. Thermal conductance of metal-diamond interfaces at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohensee, Gregory T.; Wilson, R. B.; Cahill, David G.

    2015-03-01

    The thermal conductance of interfaces between metals and diamond, which has a comparatively high Debye temperature, is often greater than can be accounted for by two-phonon processes. The high pressures achievable in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) can significantly extend the metal phonon density of states to higher frequencies, and can also suppress extrinsic effects by greatly stiffening interface bonding. Here we report time-domain thermoreflectance measurements of metal-diamond interface thermal conductance up to 50 GPa in the DAC for Pb, Au0.95Pd0.05, Pt and Al films deposited on type 1A natural [100] and type 2A synthetic [110] diamond anvils. In all cases, the thermal conductances increase weakly or saturate to similar values at high pressure. Our results suggest that anharmonic conductance at metal-diamond interfaces is controlled by partial transmission processes, where a diamond phonon that inelastically scatters at the interface absorbs or emits a metal phonon.

  19. Thermal conductivity in nanocrystalline-SiC/C superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Habermehl, S.; Serrano, J. R.

    2015-11-17

    We reported the formation of thin film superlattices consisting of alternating layers of nitrogen-doped SiC (SiC:N) and C. Periodically terminating the SiC:N surface with a graphitic C boundary layer and controlling the SiC:N/C thickness ratio yield nanocrystalline SiC grains ranging in size from 365 to 23 nm. Frequency domain thermo-reflectance is employed to determine the thermal conductivity, which is found to vary from 35.5 W m-1 K-1 for monolithic undoped α-SiC films to 1.6 W m-1 K-1 for a SiC:N/C superlattice with a 47 nm period and a SiC:N/C thickness ratio of 11. A series conductance model is employed to explain the dependence of the thermal conductivity on the superlatticestructure. Our results indicate that the thermal conductivity is more dependent on the SiC:N/C thickness ratio than the SiC:N grain size, indicative of strong boundary layerphonon scattering.

  20. VALIDATION OF A THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENT SYSTEM FOR FUEL COMPACTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Phillips; Colby Jensen; Changhu Xing; Heng Ban

    2011-03-01

    A high temperature guarded-comparative-longitudinal heat flow measurement system has been built to measure the thermal conductivity of a composite nuclear fuel compact. It is a steady-state measurement device designed to operate over a temperature range of 300 K to 1200 K. No existing apparatus is currently available for obtaining the thermal conductivity of the composite fuel in a non-destructive manner due to the compact’s unique geometry and composite nature. The current system design has been adapted from ASTM E 1225. As a way to simplify the design and operation of the system, it uses a unique radiative heat sink to conduct heat away from the sample column. A finite element analysis was performed on the measurement system to analyze the associated error for various operating conditions. Optimal operational conditions have been discovered through this analysis and results are presented. Several materials have been measured by the system and results are presented for stainless steel 304, inconel 625, and 99.95% pure iron covering a range of thermal conductivities of 10 W/m*K to 70 W/m*K. A comparison of the results has been made to data from existing literature.

  1. Effective Thermal Conductivity Modeling of Sandstones: SVM Framework Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostami, Alireza; Masoudi, Mohammad; Ghaderi-Ardakani, Alireza; Arabloo, Milad; Amani, Mahmood

    2016-06-01

    Among the most significant physical characteristics of porous media, the effective thermal conductivity (ETC) is used for estimating the thermal enhanced oil recovery process efficiency, hydrocarbon reservoir thermal design, and numerical simulation. This paper reports the implementation of an innovative least square support vector machine (LS-SVM) algorithm for the development of enhanced model capable of predicting the ETCs of dry sandstones. By means of several statistical parameters, the validity of the presented model was evaluated. The prediction of the developed model for determining the ETCs of dry sandstones was in excellent agreement with the reported data with a coefficient of determination value ({R}2) of 0.983 and an average absolute relative deviation of 0.35 %. Results from present research show that the proposed LS-SVM model is robust, reliable, and efficient in calculating the ETCs of sandstones.

  2. Development of Tailorable Electrically Conductive Thermal Control Material Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M. S.; Harada, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The optical characteristics of surfaces on spacecraft are fundamental parameters in controlling its temperature. Passive thermal control coatings with designed solar absorptance and infrared emittance properties have been developed and been in use for some time. In this total space environment, the coating must be stable and maintain its desired optical properties for the course of the mission lifetime. The mission lifetimes are increasing and in our quest to save weight, newer substrates are being integrated which limit electrical grounding schemes. All of this has already added to the existing concerns about spacecraft charging and related spacecraft failures or operational failures. The concern is even greater for thermal control surfaces that are very large. One way of alleviating such concerns is to design new thermal control material systems (TCMS) that can help to mitigate charging via providing charge leakage paths. The object of this program was to develop two types of passive electrically conductive TCMS.

  3. Low conductivity and sintering-resistant thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating composition is provided. The composition has a base oxide, a primary stabilizer, and at least two additional cationic oxide dopants. Preferably, a pair of group A and group B defect cluster-promoting oxides is used in conjunction with the base and primary stabilizer oxides. The new thermal barrier coating is found to have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance. In preferred embodiments, the base oxide is selected from zirconia and hafnia. The group A and group B cluster-promoting oxide dopants preferably are selected such that the group A dopant has a smaller cationic radius than the primary stabilizer oxide, and so that the primary stabilizer oxide has a small cationic radius than that of the group B dopant.

  4. Low conductivity and sintering-resistant thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating composition is provided. The composition has a base oxide, a primary stabilizer, and at least two additional cationic oxide dopants. Preferably, a pair of group A and group B defect cluster-promoting oxides is used in conjunction with the base and primary stabilizer oxides. The new thermal barrier coating is found to have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance. In preferred embodiments, the base oxide is selected from zirconia and hafnia. The group A and group B cluster-promoting oxide dopants preferably are selected such that the group A dopant has a smaller cationic radius than the primary stabilizer oxide, and so that the primary stabilizer oxide has a small cationic radius than that of the group B dopant.

  5. Low conductivity and sintering-resistant thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating composition comprising a base oxide, a primary stabilizer oxide, and at least one dopant oxide is disclosed. Preferably, a pair of group A and group B defect cluster-promoting oxides is used in conjunction with the base and primary stabilizer oxides. The new thermal barrier coating is found to have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance. The base oxide is selected from the group consisting of zirconia and hafnia and combinations thereof. The primary stabilizing oxide is selected from the group consisting of yttria, dysprosia, erbia and combinations thereof. The dopant or group A and group B cluster-promoting oxide dopants are selected from the group consisting of rare earth metal oxides, transitional metal oxides, alkaline earth metal oxides and combinations thereof. The dopant or dopants preferably have ionic radii different from those of the primary stabilizer and/or the base oxides.

  6. Thermal conductance of carbon nanotube contacts: Molecular dynamics simulations and general description of the contact conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salaway, Richard N.; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2016-07-01

    The contact conductance of carbon nanotube (CNT) junctions is the key factor that controls the collective heat transfer through CNT networks or CNT-based materials. An improved understanding of the dependence of the intertube conductance on the contact structure and local environment is needed for predictive computational modeling or theoretical description of the effective thermal conductivity of CNT materials. To investigate the effect of local structure on the thermal conductance across CNT-CNT contact regions, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed for different intertube contact configurations (parallel fully or partially overlapping CNTs and CNTs crossing each other at different angles) and local structural environments characteristic of CNT network materials. The results of MD simulations predict a stronger CNT length dependence present over a broader range of lengths than has been previously reported and suggest that the effect of neighboring junctions on the conductance of CNT-CNT junctions is weak and only present when the CNTs that make up the junctions are within the range of direct van der Waals interaction with each other. A detailed analysis of the results obtained for a diverse range of intertube contact configurations reveals a nonlinear dependence of the conductance on the contact area (or number of interatomic intertube interactions) and suggests larger contributions to the conductance from areas of the contact where the density of interatomic intertube interactions is smaller. An empirical relation accounting for these observations and expressing the conductance of an arbitrary contact configuration through the total number of interatomic intertube interactions and the average number of interatomic intertube interactions per atom in the contact region is proposed. The empirical relation is found to provide a good quantitative description of the contact conductance for various CNT configurations investigated in the MD

  7. Highly thermally conductive and mechanically strong graphene fibers.

    PubMed

    Xin, Guoqing; Yao, Tiankai; Sun, Hongtao; Scott, Spencer Michael; Shao, Dali; Wang, Gongkai; Lian, Jie

    2015-09-01

    Graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms bonded in a hexagonal lattice, is the thinnest, strongest, and stiffest known material and an excellent conductor of heat and electricity. However, these superior properties have yet to be realized for graphene-derived macroscopic structures such as graphene fibers. We report the fabrication of graphene fibers with high thermal and electrical conductivity and enhanced mechanical strength. The inner fiber structure consists of large-sized graphene sheets forming a highly ordered arrangement intercalated with small-sized graphene sheets filling the space and microvoids. The graphene fibers exhibit a submicrometer crystallite domain size through high-temperature treatment, achieving an enhanced thermal conductivity up to 1290 watts per meter per kelvin. The tensile strength of the graphene fiber reaches 1080 megapascals. PMID:26339027

  8. On the effective thermal conductivity of metal foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranut, Paola; Nobile, Enrico

    2014-11-01

    Knowing the effective thermal conductivity is essential in order to design a metal foam heat transfer device. Beside the experimental characterization tests, this quantity can be deduced from empirical correlations and theoretical models. Moreover, CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) and numerical modeling in general, at the pore scale, are becoming a promising alternative, especially when coupled with a realistic description of the foam structure, which can be recovered from X-ray computed microtomography (μ-CT). In this work, a review of the most relevant correlations and models published in the literature, usable for the estimation of the effective thermal conductivity of metal foams, will be outlined. In addition, a validation of the models with the experimental values available in the literature will be presented, for both air and water as working fluids. Furthermore, the results of a strategy based on μ-CT - CFD coupling at the pore level will be illustrated.

  9. Lattice thermal conductivity of filled skutterudites: An anharmonicity perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Huiyuan Meng, Xianfu; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Jian

    2014-10-28

    We report a phenomenological model to calculate the high-temperature lattice thermal conductivity of filled skutterudite antimonides. The model needs no phonon resonant scattering terms. Instead, we assume that umklapp processes dominate the high-temperature phonon scattering. In order to represent the anharmonicity introduced by the filling atom, we introduce a Gaussian term into the relaxation time of the umklapp process. The developed model agrees remarkably well with the experimental results of RE{sub f}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} and RE{sub f}Fe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} (RE = Yb, Ba, and Ca) alloys. To further test the validity of our model, we calculate the lattice thermal conductivity of nanostructured or multi-filled skutterudites. The calculation results are also in good agreement with experiment, increasing our confidence in the developed anharmonicity model.

  10. Highly thermally conductive and mechanically strong graphene fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Guoqing; Yao, Tiankai; Sun, Hongtao; Scott, Spencer Michael; Shao, Dali; Wang, Gongkai; Lian, Jie

    2015-09-01

    Graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms bonded in a hexagonal lattice, is the thinnest, strongest, and stiffest known material and an excellent conductor of heat and electricity. However, these superior properties have yet to be realized for graphene-derived macroscopic structures such as graphene fibers. We report the fabrication of graphene fibers with high thermal and electrical conductivity and enhanced mechanical strength. The inner fiber structure consists of large-sized graphene sheets forming a highly ordered arrangement intercalated with small-sized graphene sheets filling the space and microvoids. The graphene fibers exhibit a submicrometer crystallite domain size through high-temperature treatment, achieving an enhanced thermal conductivity up to 1290 watts per meter per kelvin. The tensile strength of the graphene fiber reaches 1080 megapascals.

  11. Swift heavy ion irradiation reduces porous silicon thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoud, M.; Canut, B.; Newby, P.; Frechette, L.; Chapuis, P. O.; Bluet, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    While the electrical conductivity of semiconductors can be easily changed over order of magnitudes (8 in silicon) by playing on the doping, the thermal conductivity (TC) control is a challenging issue. Nevertheless, numerous applications require TC control in Si down to 1 W m-1 K-1. Among them, there are thermal insulation requirements in MEMS, thermal management issues in 3D packaging or TC reduction for thermoelectric applications. Towards this end, the formation of nanoporous Si by electrochemical anodisation is efficient. Nevertheless, in this case the material is too fragile for MEMS application or even to withstand CMOS technological processes. In this work, we show that ion irradiation in the electronic regime is efficient for reducing TC in meso-porous Si (PSi), which is more mechanically robust than the nanoporous PSi. We have studied three different mass to energy ratios (238U at 110 MeV and 130Xe at 91 MeV and 29 MeV) with fluences ranging from 1012 cm-2 to 7 × 1013 cm-2. The sample properties, after irradiation, have been measured by infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The TC has been measured using scanning thermal microscopy. Although, bulk Si is insensitive to ion interaction in the electronic regime, we have observed the amorphisation of the PSi resulting in a TC reduction even for the low dose and energy. For the highest irradiation dose a very important reduction factor of four was obtained.

  12. Prediction of the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Powder Insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Lingxue; Park, Jiho; Lee, Cheonkyu; Jeong, Sangkwon

    The powder insulation method is widely used in structural and cryogenic systems such as transportation and storage tanks of cryogenic fluids. The powder insulation layer is constructed by small particle powder with light weight and some residual gas with high porosity. So far, many experiments have been carried out to test the thermal performance of various kinds of powder, including expanded perlite, glass microspheres, expanded polystyrene (EPS). However, it is still difficult to predict the thermal performance of powder insulation by calculation due to the complicated geometries, including various particle shapes, wide powder diameter distribution, and various pore sizes. In this paper, the effective thermal conductivity of powder insulation has been predicted based on an effective thermal conductivity calculationmodel of porous packed beds. The calculation methodology was applied to the insulation system with expanded perlite, glass microspheres and EPS beads at cryogenic temperature and various vacuum pressures. The calculation results were compared with previous experimental data. Moreover, additional tests were carried out at cryogenic temperature in this research. The fitting equations of the deformation factor of the area-contact model are presented for various powders. The calculation results show agood agreement with the experimental results.

  13. Thermal rectification and negative differential thermal conductance in harmonic chains with nonlinear system-bath coupling.

    PubMed

    Ming, Yi; Li, Hui-Min; Ding, Ze-Jun

    2016-03-01

    Thermal rectification and negative differential thermal conductance were realized in harmonic chains in this work. We used the generalized Caldeira-Leggett model to study the heat flow. In contrast to most previous studies considering only the linear system-bath coupling, we considered the nonlinear system-bath coupling based on recent experiment [Eichler et al., Nat. Nanotech. 6, 339 (2011)]. When the linear coupling constant is weak, the multiphonon processes induced by the nonlinear coupling allow more phonons transport across the system-bath interface and hence the heat current is enhanced. Consequently, thermal rectification and negative differential thermal conductance are achieved when the nonlinear couplings are asymmetric. However, when the linear coupling constant is strong, the umklapp processes dominate the multiphonon processes. Nonlinear coupling suppresses the heat current. Thermal rectification is also achieved. But the direction of rectification is reversed compared to the results of weak linear coupling constant.

  14. Thermal rectification and negative differential thermal conductance in harmonic chains with nonlinear system-bath coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Yi; Li, Hui-Min; Ding, Ze-Jun

    2016-03-01

    Thermal rectification and negative differential thermal conductance were realized in harmonic chains in this work. We used the generalized Caldeira-Leggett model to study the heat flow. In contrast to most previous studies considering only the linear system-bath coupling, we considered the nonlinear system-bath coupling based on recent experiment [Eichler et al., Nat. Nanotech. 6, 339 (2011), 10.1038/nnano.2011.71]. When the linear coupling constant is weak, the multiphonon processes induced by the nonlinear coupling allow more phonons transport across the system-bath interface and hence the heat current is enhanced. Consequently, thermal rectification and negative differential thermal conductance are achieved when the nonlinear couplings are asymmetric. However, when the linear coupling constant is strong, the umklapp processes dominate the multiphonon processes. Nonlinear coupling suppresses the heat current. Thermal rectification is also achieved. But the direction of rectification is reversed compared to the results of weak linear coupling constant.

  15. Variable thermal properties and thermal relaxation time in hyperbolic heat conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Mcrae, D. Scott

    1989-01-01

    Numerical solutions were obtained for a finite slab with an applied surface heat flux at one boundary using both the hyperbolic (MacCormack's method) and parabolic (Crank-Nicolson method) heat conduction equations. The effects on the temperature distributions of varying density, specific heat, and thermal relaxation time were calculated. Each of these properties had an effect on the thermal front velocity (in the hyperbolic solution) as well as the temperatures in the medium. In the hyperbolic solutions, as the density or specific heat decreased with temperature, both the temperatures within the medium and the thermal front velocity increased. The value taken for the thermal relaxation time was found to determine the 'hyperbolicity' of the heat conduction model. The use of a time dependent relaxation time allowed for solutions where the thermal energy propagated as a high temperature wave initially, but approached a diffusion process more rapidly than was possible with a constant large relaxation time.

  16. Measurement of temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity of alumina and titania thermal oil nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśliński, Janusz T.; Ronewicz, Katarzyna; Smoleń, Sławomir

    2015-12-01

    In this study the results of simultaneous measurements of dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and pH of two nanofluids, i.e., thermal oil/Al2O3 and thermal oil/TiO2 are presented. Thermal oil is selected as a base liquid because of possible application in ORC systems as an intermediate heating agent. Nanoparticles were tested at the concentration of 0.1%, 1%, and 5% by weight within temperature range from 20 °C to 60 °C. Measurement devices were carefully calibrated by comparison obtained results for pure base liquid (thermal oil) with manufacturer's data. The results obtained for tested nanofluids were compared with predictions made by use of existing models for liquid/solid particles mixtures.

  17. Pure-oxygen radiative shocks with electron thermal conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Shull, J. Michael

    1990-01-01

    Steady state radiative shock models in gas composed entirely of oxygen are calculated with the purpose of explaining observations of fast-moving knots in Cas A and other oxygen-rich SNRs. Models with electron thermal conduction differ significantly from models in which conduction is neglected. Conduction reduces postshock electron temperatures by a factor of 7-10 and flattens temperature gradients. The O III ion, whose forbidden emission usually dominates the observed spectra, is present over a wide range of shock velocities, from 100 to 170 km/s. The electron temperature in the O III forbidden line formation region is 30,000 K, in agreement with the 20,000 K derived from observations. All models with conduction have extensive warm (T above 4000 K) photoionization zones, which provides better agreement with observed optical O I line strengths.

  18. Reference Correlations of the Thermal Conductivity of Ethene and Propene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assael, M. J.; Koutian, A.; Huber, M. L.; Perkins, R. A.

    2016-09-01

    New, wide-range reference equations for the thermal conductivity of ethene and propene as a function of temperature and density are presented. The equations are based in part upon a body of experimental data that have been critically assessed for internal consistency and for agreement with theory whenever possible. For ethene, we estimate the uncertainty (at the 95% confidence level) for the thermal conductivity from 110 to 520 K at pressures up to 200 MPa to be 5% for the compressed liquid and supercritical phases. For the low-pressure gas phase (to 0.1 MPa) over the temperature range 270-680 K, the estimated uncertainty is 4%. The correlation is valid from 110 to 680 K and up to 200 MPa, but it behaves in a physically reasonable manner down to the triple point and may be used at pressures up to 300 MPa, although the uncertainty will be larger in regions where experimental data were unavailable. In the case of propene, data are much more limited. We estimate the uncertainty for the thermal conductivity of propene from 180 to 625 K at pressures up to 50 MPa to be 5% for the gas, liquid, and supercritical phases. The correlation is valid from 180 to 625 K and up to 50 MPa, but it behaves in a physically reasonable manner down to the triple point and may be used at pressures up to 100 MPa, although the uncertainty will be larger in regions where experimental data were unavailable. For both fluids, uncertainties in the critical region are much larger, since the thermal conductivity approaches infinity at the critical point and is very sensitive to small changes in density.

  19. Reference Correlations of the Thermal Conductivity of Ethene and Propene

    PubMed Central

    Koutian, A.; Huber, M. L.; Perkins, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    New, wide-range reference equations for the thermal conductivity of ethene and propene as a function of temperature and density are presented. The equations are based in part upon a body of experimental data that has been critically assessed for internal consistency and for agreement with theory whenever possible. For ethene, we estimate the uncertainty (at the 95% confidence level) for the thermal conductivity from 110 K to 520 K at pressures up to 200 MPa to be 5% for the compressed liquid and supercritical phases. For the low-pressure gas phase (to 0.1 MPa) over the temperature range 270 K to 680 K, the estimated uncertainty is 4%. The correlation is valid from 110 K to 680 K and up to 200 MPa, but it behaves in a physically reasonable manner down to the triple point and may be used at pressures up to 300 MPa, although the uncertainty will be larger in regions where experimental data were unavailable. In the case of propene, data are much more limited. We estimate the uncertainty for the thermal conductivity of propene from 180 K to 625 K at pressures up to 50 MPa to be 5% for the gas, liquid, and supercritical phases. The correlation is valid from 180 K to 625 K and up to 50 MPa, but it behaves in a physically reasonable manner down to the triple point and may be used at pressures up to 100 MPa, although the uncertainty will be larger in regions where experimental data were unavailable. For both fluids, uncertainties in the critical region are much larger, since the thermal conductivity approaches infinity at the critical point and is very sensitive to small changes in density.

  20. Thermal Conductivity of the Potential Repository Horizon Model Report

    SciTech Connect

    J. Ramsey

    2002-08-29

    The purpose of this report is to assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of thermal conductivity in the host horizon for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. More specifically, the lithostratigraphic units studied are located within the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) and consist of the upper lithophysal zone (Tptpul), the middle nonlithophysal zone (Tptpmn), the lower lithophysal zone (Tptpll), and the lower nonlithophysal zone (Tptpln). The Tptpul is the layer directly above the repository host layers, which consist of the Tptpmn, Tptpll, and the Tptpln. Current design plans indicate that the largest portion of the repository will be excavated in the Tptpll (Board et al. 2002 [157756]). The main distinguishing characteristic among the lithophysal and nonlithophysal units is the percentage of large scale (cm-m) voids within the rock. The Tptpul and Tptpll, as their names suggest, have a higher percentage of lithophysae than the Tptpmn and the Tptpln. Understanding the influence of the lithophysae is of great importance to understanding bulk thermal conductivity and perhaps repository system performance as well. To assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of thermal conductivity, a model is proposed that is functionally dependent on the volume fraction of lithophysae and the thermal conductivity of the matrix portion of the rock. In this model, void space characterized as lithophysae is assumed to be air-saturated under all conditions, while void space characterized as matrix may be either water- or air-saturated. Lithophysae are assumed to be air-saturated under all conditions since the units being studied are all located above the water table in the region of interest, and the relatively strong capillary forces of the matrix will, under most conditions, preferentially retain any moisture present in the rock.