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Sample records for accurate transcript normalization

  1. Evaluation of new reference genes in papaya for accurate transcript normalization under different experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyang; Li, Xueping; Chen, Weixin; Chen, Jianye; Lu, Wangjin; Chen, Lei; Fu, Danwen

    2012-01-01

    Real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) is a preferred method for rapid and accurate quantification of gene expression studies. Appropriate application of RT-qPCR requires accurate normalization though the use of reference genes. As no single reference gene is universally suitable for all experiments, thus reference gene(s) validation under different experimental conditions is crucial for RT-qPCR analysis. To date, only a few studies on reference genes have been done in other plants but none in papaya. In the present work, we selected 21 candidate reference genes, and evaluated their expression stability in 246 papaya fruit samples using three algorithms, geNorm, NormFinder and RefFinder. The samples consisted of 13 sets collected under different experimental conditions, including various tissues, different storage temperatures, different cultivars, developmental stages, postharvest ripening, modified atmosphere packaging, 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) treatment, hot water treatment, biotic stress and hormone treatment. Our results demonstrated that expression stability varied greatly between reference genes and that different suitable reference gene(s) or combination of reference genes for normalization should be validated according to the experimental conditions. In general, the internal reference genes EIF (Eukaryotic initiation factor 4A), TBP1 (TATA binding protein 1) and TBP2 (TATA binding protein 2) genes had a good performance under most experimental conditions, whereas the most widely present used reference genes, ACTIN (Actin 2), 18S rRNA (18S ribosomal RNA) and GAPDH (Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) were not suitable in many experimental conditions. In addition, two commonly used programs, geNorm and Normfinder, were proved sufficient for the validation. This work provides the first systematic analysis for the selection of superior reference genes for accurate transcript normalization in papaya under different experimental conditions.

  2. Identification and Evaluation of Reference Genes for Accurate Transcription Normalization in Safflower under Different Experimental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Dandan; Hu, Bo; Wang, Qing; Liu, Hongchang; Pan, Feng; Wu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) has received a significant amount of attention as a medicinal plant and oilseed crop. Gene expression studies provide a theoretical molecular biology foundation for improving new traits and developing new cultivars. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) has become a crucial approach for gene expression analysis. In addition, appropriate reference genes (RGs) are essential for accurate and rapid relative quantification analysis of gene expression. In this study, fifteen candidate RGs involved in multiple metabolic pathways of plants were finally selected and validated under different experimental treatments, at different seed development stages and in different cultivars and tissues for real-time PCR experiments. These genes were ABCS, 60SRPL10, RANBP1, UBCL, MFC, UBCE2, EIF5A, COA, EF1-β, EF1, GAPDH, ATPS, MBF1, GTPB and GST. The suitability evaluation was executed by the geNorm and NormFinder programs. Overall, EF1, UBCE2, EIF5A, ATPS and 60SRPL10 were the most stable genes, and MBF1, as well as MFC, were the most unstable genes by geNorm and NormFinder software in all experimental samples. To verify the validation of RGs selected by the two programs, the expression analysis of 7 CtFAD2 genes in safflower seeds at different developmental stages under cold stress was executed using different RGs in RT-qPCR experiments for normalization. The results showed similar expression patterns when the most stable RGs selected by geNorm or NormFinder software were used. However, the differences were detected using the most unstable reference genes. The most stable combination of genes selected in this study will help to achieve more accurate and reliable results in a wide variety of samples in safflower.

  3. Identification and Evaluation of Reference Genes for Accurate Transcription Normalization in Safflower under Different Experimental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dandan; Hu, Bo; Wang, Qing; Liu, Hongchang; Pan, Feng; Wu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) has received a significant amount of attention as a medicinal plant and oilseed crop. Gene expression studies provide a theoretical molecular biology foundation for improving new traits and developing new cultivars. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) has become a crucial approach for gene expression analysis. In addition, appropriate reference genes (RGs) are essential for accurate and rapid relative quantification analysis of gene expression. In this study, fifteen candidate RGs involved in multiple metabolic pathways of plants were finally selected and validated under different experimental treatments, at different seed development stages and in different cultivars and tissues for real-time PCR experiments. These genes were ABCS, 60SRPL10, RANBP1, UBCL, MFC, UBCE2, EIF5A, COA, EF1-β, EF1, GAPDH, ATPS, MBF1, GTPB and GST. The suitability evaluation was executed by the geNorm and NormFinder programs. Overall, EF1, UBCE2, EIF5A, ATPS and 60SRPL10 were the most stable genes, and MBF1, as well as MFC, were the most unstable genes by geNorm and NormFinder software in all experimental samples. To verify the validation of RGs selected by the two programs, the expression analysis of 7 CtFAD2 genes in safflower seeds at different developmental stages under cold stress was executed using different RGs in RT-qPCR experiments for normalization. The results showed similar expression patterns when the most stable RGs selected by geNorm or NormFinder software were used. However, the differences were detected using the most unstable reference genes. The most stable combination of genes selected in this study will help to achieve more accurate and reliable results in a wide variety of samples in safflower. PMID:26457898

  4. Identification and Evaluation of Reference Genes for Accurate Transcription Normalization in Safflower under Different Experimental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Dandan; Hu, Bo; Wang, Qing; Liu, Hongchang; Pan, Feng; Wu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) has received a significant amount of attention as a medicinal plant and oilseed crop. Gene expression studies provide a theoretical molecular biology foundation for improving new traits and developing new cultivars. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) has become a crucial approach for gene expression analysis. In addition, appropriate reference genes (RGs) are essential for accurate and rapid relative quantification analysis of gene expression. In this study, fifteen candidate RGs involved in multiple metabolic pathways of plants were finally selected and validated under different experimental treatments, at different seed development stages and in different cultivars and tissues for real-time PCR experiments. These genes were ABCS, 60SRPL10, RANBP1, UBCL, MFC, UBCE2, EIF5A, COA, EF1-β, EF1, GAPDH, ATPS, MBF1, GTPB and GST. The suitability evaluation was executed by the geNorm and NormFinder programs. Overall, EF1, UBCE2, EIF5A, ATPS and 60SRPL10 were the most stable genes, and MBF1, as well as MFC, were the most unstable genes by geNorm and NormFinder software in all experimental samples. To verify the validation of RGs selected by the two programs, the expression analysis of 7 CtFAD2 genes in safflower seeds at different developmental stages under cold stress was executed using different RGs in RT-qPCR experiments for normalization. The results showed similar expression patterns when the most stable RGs selected by geNorm or NormFinder software were used. However, the differences were detected using the most unstable reference genes. The most stable combination of genes selected in this study will help to achieve more accurate and reliable results in a wide variety of samples in safflower. PMID:26457898

  5. Accurate Thermal Stresses for Beams: Normal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Pilkey, Walter D.

    2003-01-01

    Formulations for a general theory of thermoelasticity to generate accurate thermal stresses for structural members of aeronautical vehicles were developed in 1954 by Boley. The formulation also provides three normal stresses and a shear stress along the entire length of the beam. The Poisson effect of the lateral and transverse normal stresses on a thermally loaded beam is taken into account in this theory by employing an Airy stress function. The Airy stress function enables the reduction of the three-dimensional thermal stress problem to a two-dimensional one. Numerical results from the general theory of thermoelasticity are compared to those obtained from strength of materials. It is concluded that the theory of thermoelasticity for prismatic beams proposed in this paper can be used instead of strength of materials when precise stress results are desired.

  6. Accurate Thermal Stresses for Beams: Normal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Pilkey, Walter D.

    2002-01-01

    Formulations for a general theory of thermoelasticity to generate accurate thermal stresses for structural members of aeronautical vehicles were developed in 1954 by Boley. The formulation also provides three normal stresses and a shear stress along the entire length of the beam. The Poisson effect of the lateral and transverse normal stresses on a thermally loaded beam is taken into account in this theory by employing an Airy stress function. The Airy stress function enables the reduction of the three-dimensional thermal stress problem to a two-dimensional one. Numerical results from the general theory of thermoelasticity are compared to those obtained from strength of materials. It is concluded that the theory of thermoelasticity for prismatic beams proposed in this paper can be used instead of strength of materials when precise stress results are desired.

  7. What's Normal? Accurately and Efficiently Assessing Menstrual Function.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Darcie M; Beharry, Meera S

    2015-09-01

    Many young women are unsure of what constitutes normal menses. By asking focused questions, pediatric providers can quickly and accurately assess menstrual function and dispel anxiety and myths. In this article, we review signs and symptoms of normal versus pathologic menstrual functioning and provide suggestions to improve menstrual history taking.

  8. Accurate transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II in a soluble extract from isolated mammalian nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Dignam, J D; Lebovitz, R M; Roeder, R G

    1983-01-01

    We have developed a procedure for preparing extracts from nuclei of human tissue culture cells that directs accurate transcription initiation in vitro from class II promoters. Conditions of extraction and assay have been optimized for maximum activity using the major late promoter of adenovirus 2. The extract also directs accurate transcription initiation from other adenovirus promoters and cellular promoters. The extract also directs accurate transcription initiation from class III promoters (tRNA and Ad 2 VA). Images PMID:6828386

  9. In vitro transcription accurately predicts lac repressor phenotype in vivo in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A multitude of studies have looked at the in vivo and in vitro behavior of the lac repressor binding to DNA and effector molecules in order to study transcriptional repression, however these studies are not always reconcilable. Here we use in vitro transcription to directly mimic the in vivo system in order to build a self consistent set of experiments to directly compare in vivo and in vitro genetic repression. A thermodynamic model of the lac repressor binding to operator DNA and effector is used to link DNA occupancy to either normalized in vitro mRNA product or normalized in vivo fluorescence of a regulated gene, YFP. An accurate measurement of repressor, DNA and effector concentrations were made both in vivo and in vitro allowing for direct modeling of the entire thermodynamic equilibrium. In vivo repression profiles are accurately predicted from the given in vitro parameters when molecular crowding is considered. Interestingly, our measured repressor–operator DNA affinity differs significantly from previous in vitro measurements. The literature values are unable to replicate in vivo binding data. We therefore conclude that the repressor-DNA affinity is much weaker than previously thought. This finding would suggest that in vitro techniques that are specifically designed to mimic the in vivo process may be necessary to replicate the native system. PMID:25097824

  10. The transcription factor Mef2 is required for normal circadian behavior in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Florence J.; Collins, Ben; Cyran, Shawn A.; Hancock, Daniel H.; Taylor, Michael V.; Blau, Justin

    2010-01-01

    The transcription factor Mef2 has well-established roles in muscle development in Drosophila and in the differentiation of many cell types in mammals, including neurons. Here, we describe a role for Mef2 in the Drosophila pacemaker neurons that regulate circadian behavioral rhythms. We found that Mef2 is normally produced in all adult clock neurons and that Mef2 over-expression in clock neurons leads to long period and complex rhythms of adult locomotor behavior. Knocking down Mef2 expression via RNAi or expressing a repressor form of Mef2 caused flies to lose circadian behavioral rhythms. These behavioral changes are correlated with altered molecular clocks in pacemaker neurons: Mef2 over-expression causes the oscillations in individual pacemaker neurons to become desynchronized, while Mef2 knockdown strongly dampens molecular rhythms. Thus, a normal level of Mef2 activity is required in clock neurons to maintain robust and accurate circadian behavioral rhythms. PMID:20427646

  11. Fast and accurate approximate inference of transcript expression from RNA-seq data

    PubMed Central

    Hensman, James; Papastamoulis, Panagiotis; Glaus, Peter; Honkela, Antti; Rattray, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Assigning RNA-seq reads to their transcript of origin is a fundamental task in transcript expression estimation. Where ambiguities in assignments exist due to transcripts sharing sequence, e.g. alternative isoforms or alleles, the problem can be solved through probabilistic inference. Bayesian methods have been shown to provide accurate transcript abundance estimates compared with competing methods. However, exact Bayesian inference is intractable and approximate methods such as Markov chain Monte Carlo and Variational Bayes (VB) are typically used. While providing a high degree of accuracy and modelling flexibility, standard implementations can be prohibitively slow for large datasets and complex transcriptome annotations. Results: We propose a novel approximate inference scheme based on VB and apply it to an existing model of transcript expression inference from RNA-seq data. Recent advances in VB algorithmics are used to improve the convergence of the algorithm beyond the standard Variational Bayes Expectation Maximization algorithm. We apply our algorithm to simulated and biological datasets, demonstrating a significant increase in speed with only very small loss in accuracy of expression level estimation. We carry out a comparative study against seven popular alternative methods and demonstrate that our new algorithm provides excellent accuracy and inter-replicate consistency while remaining competitive in computation time. Availability and implementation: The methods were implemented in R and C++, and are available as part of the BitSeq project at github.com/BitSeq. The method is also available through the BitSeq Bioconductor package. The source code to reproduce all simulation results can be accessed via github.com/BitSeq/BitSeqVB_benchmarking. Contact: james.hensman@sheffield.ac.uk or panagiotis.papastamoulis@manchester.ac.uk or Magnus.Rattray@manchester.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online

  12. Accurate Gene Expression-Based Biodosimetry Using a Minimal Set of Human Gene Transcripts

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, James D.; Joiner, Michael C.; Thomas, Robert A.; Grever, William E.; Bakhmutsky, Marina V.; Chinkhota, Chantelle N.; Smolinski, Joseph M.; Divine, George W.; Auner, Gregory W.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Rapid and reliable methods for conducting biological dosimetry are a necessity in the event of a large-scale nuclear event. Conventional biodosimetry methods lack the speed, portability, ease of use, and low cost required for triaging numerous victims. Here we address this need by showing that polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on a small number of gene transcripts can provide accurate and rapid dosimetry. The low cost and relative ease of PCR compared with existing dosimetry methods suggest that this approach may be useful in mass-casualty triage situations. Methods and Materials: Human peripheral blood from 60 adult donors was acutely exposed to cobalt-60 gamma rays at doses of 0 (control) to 10 Gy. mRNA expression levels of 121 selected genes were obtained 0.5, 1, and 2 days after exposure by reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR. Optimal dosimetry at each time point was obtained by stepwise regression of dose received against individual gene transcript expression levels. Results: Only 3 to 4 different gene transcripts, ASTN2, CDKN1A, GDF15, and ATM, are needed to explain ≥0.87 of the variance (R{sup 2}). Receiver-operator characteristics, a measure of sensitivity and specificity, of 0.98 for these statistical models were achieved at each time point. Conclusions: The actual and predicted radiation doses agree very closely up to 6 Gy. Dosimetry at 8 and 10 Gy shows some effect of saturation, thereby slightly diminishing the ability to quantify higher exposures. Analyses of these gene transcripts may be advantageous for use in a field-portable device designed to assess exposures in mass casualty situations or in clinical radiation emergencies.

  13. AtRTD - a comprehensive reference transcript dataset resource for accurate quantification of transcript-specific expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Runxuan; Calixto, Cristiane P G; Tzioutziou, Nikoleta A; James, Allan B; Simpson, Craig G; Guo, Wenbin; Marquez, Yamile; Kalyna, Maria; Patro, Rob; Eyras, Eduardo; Barta, Andrea; Nimmo, Hugh G; Brown, John W S

    2015-10-01

    RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) allows global gene expression analysis at the individual transcript level. Accurate quantification of transcript variants generated by alternative splicing (AS) remains a challenge. We have developed a comprehensive, nonredundant Arabidopsis reference transcript dataset (AtRTD) containing over 74 000 transcripts for use with algorithms to quantify AS transcript isoforms in RNA-seq. The AtRTD was formed by merging transcripts from TAIR10 and novel transcripts identified in an AS discovery project. We have estimated transcript abundance in RNA-seq data using the transcriptome-based alignment-free programmes Sailfish and Salmon and have validated quantification of splicing ratios from RNA-seq by high resolution reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (HR RT-PCR). Good correlations between splicing ratios from RNA-seq and HR RT-PCR were obtained demonstrating the accuracy of abundances calculated for individual transcripts in RNA-seq. The AtRTD is a resource that will have immediate utility in analysing Arabidopsis RNA-seq data to quantify differential transcript abundance and expression.

  14. Identification and validation of reference genes for transcript normalization in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) defense responses.

    PubMed

    Amil-Ruiz, Francisco; Garrido-Gala, José; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Folta, Kevin M; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L

    2013-01-01

    Strawberry (Fragaria spp) is an emerging model for the development of basic genomics and recombinant DNA studies among rosaceous crops. Functional genomic and molecular studies involve relative quantification of gene expression under experimental conditions of interest. Accuracy and reliability are dependent upon the choice of an optimal reference control transcript. There is no information available on validated endogenous reference genes for use in studies testing strawberry-pathogen interactions. Thirteen potential pre-selected strawberry reference genes were tested against different tissues, strawberry cultivars, biotic stresses, ripening and senescent conditions, and SA/JA treatments. Evaluation of reference candidate's suitability was analyzed by five different methodologies, and information was merged to identify best reference transcripts. A combination of all five methods was used for selective classification of reference genes. The resulting superior reference genes, FaRIB413, FaACTIN, FaEF1α and FaGAPDH2 are strongly recommended as control genes for relative quantification of gene expression in strawberry. This report constitutes the first systematic study to identify and validate optimal reference genes for accurate normalization of gene expression in strawberry plant defense response studies.

  15. Prostaglandin synthesis genes are differentially transcripted in normal and pyometra endometria of bitches.

    PubMed

    Silva, E; Leitão, S; Ferreira-Dias, G; Lopes da Costa, L; Mateus, L

    2009-07-01

    Pro-inflammatory stimuli, such as endotoxins released by Gram-negative bacteria, are potent stimulators of prostaglandin (PG) synthesis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the gene transcription pattern of PG synthesis enzymes in normal (anestrous, n = 6 and diestrous, n = 8) and pyometra (n = 7) endometria of bitches. Uteri were collected during routine ovariohysterectomy, processed for histopathological evaluation and uterine contents cultured. Gene transcription of COX-1, COX-2, mPGES-1 and PGF-synthase (PGFS) were evaluated by relative real-time PCR and normalized with the ribosomal protein L27 (RPL27) housekeeping gene. Normal uteri had no histological abnormalities and were negative for bacteriology. All pyometra uteri were hyperplasic and Escherichia coli was the only isolated bacterium. Except for COX-1, gene transcription was significantly higher in pyometra than in normal endometria. No significant differences in gene transcription were observed between normal diestrous and anestrous endometria. COX-2 gene transcription was 19 and 69 times higher in pyometra than in diestrous and anestrous endometria (p < 0.001), while PGFS gene transcription had a 3- and 600-fold increase in pyometra endometria compared to normal diestrous and anestrous endometria (p < 0.001). Gene transcription of mPGES-1 was 9 times higher in pyometra than in normal uteri (p < 0.01). Based on these results, we suggest that pyometra-associated E. coli endotoxin release stimulates the up-regulation of COX-2 PGFS and mPGES-1 gene transcription in the endometrium. PMID:19754568

  16. COSMOS: accurate detection of somatic structural variations through asymmetric comparison between tumor and normal samples.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Koichi; Yamanishi, Ayako; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji; Sese, Jun

    2016-05-01

    An important challenge in cancer genomics is precise detection of structural variations (SVs) by high-throughput short-read sequencing, which is hampered by the high false discovery rates of existing analysis tools. Here, we propose an accurate SV detection method named COSMOS, which compares the statistics of the mapped read pairs in tumor samples with isogenic normal control samples in a distinct asymmetric manner. COSMOS also prioritizes the candidate SVs using strand-specific read-depth information. Performance tests on modeled tumor genomes revealed that COSMOS outperformed existing methods in terms of F-measure. We also applied COSMOS to an experimental mouse cell-based model, in which SVs were induced by genome engineering and gamma-ray irradiation, followed by polymerase chain reaction-based confirmation. The precision of COSMOS was 84.5%, while the next best existing method was 70.4%. Moreover, the sensitivity of COSMOS was the highest, indicating that COSMOS has great potential for cancer genome analysis.

  17. COSMOS: accurate detection of somatic structural variations through asymmetric comparison between tumor and normal samples

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, Koichi; Yamanishi, Ayako; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji; Sese, Jun

    2016-01-01

    An important challenge in cancer genomics is precise detection of structural variations (SVs) by high-throughput short-read sequencing, which is hampered by the high false discovery rates of existing analysis tools. Here, we propose an accurate SV detection method named COSMOS, which compares the statistics of the mapped read pairs in tumor samples with isogenic normal control samples in a distinct asymmetric manner. COSMOS also prioritizes the candidate SVs using strand-specific read-depth information. Performance tests on modeled tumor genomes revealed that COSMOS outperformed existing methods in terms of F-measure. We also applied COSMOS to an experimental mouse cell-based model, in which SVs were induced by genome engineering and gamma-ray irradiation, followed by polymerase chain reaction-based confirmation. The precision of COSMOS was 84.5%, while the next best existing method was 70.4%. Moreover, the sensitivity of COSMOS was the highest, indicating that COSMOS has great potential for cancer genome analysis. PMID:26833260

  18. Transcriptional analysis of normal human fibroblast responses to microgravity stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongqing; Wang, Eugenia

    2008-03-01

    To understand the molecular mechanism(s) of how spaceflight affects cellular signaling pathways, quiescent normal human WI-38 fibroblasts were flown on the STS-93 space shuttle mission. Subsequently, RNA samples from the space-flown and ground-control cells were used to construct two cDNA libraries, which were then processed for suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) to identify spaceflight-specific gene expression. The SSH data show that key genes related to oxidative stress, DNA repair, and fatty acid oxidation are activated by spaceflight, suggesting the induction of cellular oxidative stress. This is further substantiated by the up-regulation of neuregulin 1 and the calcium-binding protein calmodulin 2. Another obvious stress sign is that spaceflight evokes the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase signaling pathways, along with up-regulating several G1-phase cell cycle traverse genes. Other genes showing up-regulation of expression are involved in protein synthesis and pro-apoptosis, as well as pro-survival. Interactome analysis of functionally related genes shows that c-Myc is the "hub" for those genes showing significant changes. Hence, our results suggest that microgravity travel may impact changes in gene expression mostly associated with cellular stress signaling, directing cells to either apoptotic death or premature senescence.

  19. Read-through transcripts in normal human lung parenchyma are down-regulated in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cotroneo, Chiara E.; Galvan, Antonella; Noci, Sara; Piazza, Rocco; Pirola, Alessandra; Spinelli, Roberta; Incarbone, Matteo; Palleschi, Alessandro; Rosso, Lorenzo; Santambrogio, Luigi; Dragani, Tommaso A.; Colombo, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Read-through transcripts result from the continuous transcription of adjacent, similarly oriented genes, with the splicing out of the intergenic region. They have been found in several neoplastic and normal tissues, but their pathophysiological significance is unclear. We used high-throughput sequencing of cDNA fragments (RNA-Seq) to identify read-through transcripts in the non-involved lung tissue of 64 surgically treated lung adenocarcinoma patients. A total of 52 distinct read-through species was identified, with 24 patients having at least one read-through event, up to a maximum of 17 such transcripts in one patient. Sanger sequencing validated 28 of these transcripts and identified an additional 15, for a total of 43 distinct read-through events involving 35 gene pairs. Expression levels of 10 validated read-through transcripts were measured by quantitative PCR in pairs of matched non-involved lung tissue and lung adenocarcinoma tissue from 45 patients. Higher expression levels were observed in normal lung tissue than in the tumor counterpart, with median relative quantification ratios between normal and tumor varying from 1.90 to 7.78; the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001, Wilcoxon's signed-rank test for paired samples) for eight transcripts: ELAVL1–TIMM44, FAM162B–ZUFSP, IFNAR2–IL10RB, INMT–FAM188B, KIAA1841–C2orf74, NFATC3–PLA2G15, SIRPB1–SIRPD, and SHANK3–ACR. This report documents the presence of read-through transcripts in apparently normal lung tissue, with inter-individual differences in patterns and abundance. It also shows their down-regulation in tumors, suggesting that these chimeric transcripts may function as tumor suppressors in lung tissue. PMID:27058892

  20. Accurate transcription of simian virus 40 chromatin in a HeLa cell extract.

    PubMed Central

    Brady, J N; Radonovich, M; Salzman, N P

    1982-01-01

    During simian virus 40 viral maturation, a series of modifications occur which alter the composition of viral nucleoprotein complexes. As a consequence, the chromatin that is extracted from extracellular simian virus 40 virions exhibits properties that are similar to those of transcriptionally active eucaryotic chromatin. The influence of this chromatin structure on specific RNA initiation by RNA polymerase II was examined by using the in vitro HeLa cell extract of Manley et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77:3855-3859, 1980). The 5' ends of RNA transcripts were positioned by the "run-off" assay, in which transcripts extend from the initiation site to termination sites created by restriction cleavage and by S1 nuclease analysis, using DNA probes labeled at their 5' termini. Two major early RNA transcripts, which originated at map positions 5,240 +/- 10 and 5,145 +/- 10, and two major late RNA transcripts, which originated at map positions 325 +/- 10 and 185 +/- 10, were identified. Transcripts were initiated with comparable relative efficiencies at the same 5' site when either purified DNA or chromatin was used as the template. Our results suggest that extracellular simian virus 40 virion chromatin modifications do not regulate simian virus 40 promoter selection but function to increase the accessibility of RNA promoter sequences to RNA polymerase II and allow efficient elongation of the RNA chain after the initiation event. Images PMID:6294328

  1. Signaling Proteins and Transcription Factors in Normal and Malignant Early B Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Vera, Patricia; Reyes-León, Adriana; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2011-01-01

    B cell development starts in bone marrow with the commitment of hematopoietic progenitors to the B cell lineage. In murine models, the IL-7 and preBCR receptors, and the signaling pathways and transcription factors that they regulate, control commitment and maintenance along the B cell pathway. E2A, EBF1, PAX5, and Ikaros are among the most important transcription factors controlling early development and thereby conditioning mice homeostatic B cell lymphopoiesis. Importantly, their gain or loss of function often results in malignant development in humans, supporting conserved roles for these transcription factors. B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common cause of pediatric cancer, and it is characterized by unpaired early B cell development resulting from genetic lesions in these critical signaling pathways and transcription factors. Fine mapping of these genetic abnormalities is allowing more specific treatments, more accurately predicting risk profiles for this disease, and improving survival rates. PMID:22046564

  2. Signaling proteins and transcription factors in normal and malignant early B cell development.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vera, Patricia; Reyes-León, Adriana; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M

    2011-01-01

    B cell development starts in bone marrow with the commitment of hematopoietic progenitors to the B cell lineage. In murine models, the IL-7 and preBCR receptors, and the signaling pathways and transcription factors that they regulate, control commitment and maintenance along the B cell pathway. E2A, EBF1, PAX5, and Ikaros are among the most important transcription factors controlling early development and thereby conditioning mice homeostatic B cell lymphopoiesis. Importantly, their gain or loss of function often results in malignant development in humans, supporting conserved roles for these transcription factors. B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common cause of pediatric cancer, and it is characterized by unpaired early B cell development resulting from genetic lesions in these critical signaling pathways and transcription factors. Fine mapping of these genetic abnormalities is allowing more specific treatments, more accurately predicting risk profiles for this disease, and improving survival rates.

  3. Selection of reference genes for reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR normalization in black rockfish (Sebastes schlegeli).

    PubMed

    Liman, Ma; Wenji, Wang; Conghui, Liu; Haiyang, Yu; Zhigang, Wang; Xubo, Wang; Jie, Qi; Quanqi, Zhang

    2013-09-01

    Reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a technique widely used for quantification of mRNA transcription. Data normalization is an indispensable process for RT-qPCR and reference genes are most commonly used to normalize RT-qPCR and to reduce possible errors generated in the quantification of genes among several proposed methods. To date, RT-qPCR has been used in terms of gene expression studies in black rockfish (Sebastes schlegeli) but the majority of published RT-qPCR studies still lack proper validation of the reference genes. In the present study, mRNA transcription profiles of eight putative reference genes (18S rRNA, ACTB, GAPDH, TUBA, RPL17, EF1A, HPRT, and B2M) were examined using RT-qPCR in different tissues and larvae developmental stages of black rockfish. Three common statistical algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper) were used to assess expression stability and select the most stable genes for gene normalization. Two reference genes, RPL17 and EF1A showed high stability in black rockfish tissue analysis, while GAPDH was the least stable gene. During larvae developmental stages, EF1A, RPL17 and ACTB were identified as the optimal reference genes for data normalization, whereas B2M appeared unsuitable as the reference gene. In summary, our results could provide a useful guideline for reference gene selection and enable more accurate normalization of gene expression data in gene expression studies of black rockfish.

  4. Transcription factor access is mediated by accurately positioned nucleosomes on the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, T K; Cordingley, M G; Wolford, R G; Hager, G L

    1991-01-01

    A fragment of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter was reconstituted from pure histones into a dinucleosome with uniquely positioned octamer cores. Core boundaries for the in vitro-assembled dinucleosome corresponded to the observed in vivo phasing pattern for long terminal repeat nucleosomes A and B. Nuclear factor 1 (NF1), a constituent of the MMTV transcription initiation complex, was excluded from the assembled dinucleosome, whereas the glucocorticoid receptor was able to bind. During transcription of MMTV in vivo, displacement of nucleosome B was necessary to permit assembly of the initiation complex. These results indicate that the nucleoprotein structure of the promoter can provide differential access to sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins and that active chromatin remodeling can occur during transcription activation. Images PMID:1846670

  5. Occupancy by key transcription factors is a more accurate predictor of enhancer activity than histone modifications or chromatin accessibility

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Nergiz; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christapher S.; Chen, Kuan-Bei; Stonestrom, Aaron; Long, Maria; Keller, Cheryl A.; Cheng, Yong; Jain, Deepti; Visel, Axel; Pennacchio, Len A.; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Blobel, Gerd A.; Hardison, Ross C.

    2015-04-23

    Regulated gene expression controls organismal development, and variation in regulatory patterns has been implicated in complex traits. Thus accurate prediction of enhancers is important for further understanding of these processes. Genome-wide measurement of epigenetic features, such as histone modifications and occupancy by transcription factors, is improving enhancer predictions, but the contribution of these features to prediction accuracy is not known. Given the importance of the hematopoietic transcription factor TAL1 for erythroid gene activation, we predicted candidate enhancers based on genomic occupancy by TAL1 and measured their activity. Contributions of multiple features to enhancer prediction were evaluated based on the results of these and other studies. Results: TAL1-bound DNA segments were active enhancers at a high rate both in transient transfections of cultured cells (39 of 79, or 56%) and transgenic mice (43 of 66, or 65%). The level of binding signal for TAL1 or GATA1 did not help distinguish TAL1-bound DNA segments as active versus inactive enhancers, nor did the density of regulation-related histone modifications. A meta-analysis of results from this and other studies (273 tested predicted enhancers) showed that the presence of TAL1, GATA1, EP300, SMAD1, H3K4 methylation, H3K27ac, and CAGE tags at DNase hypersensitive sites gave the most accurate predictors of enhancer activity, with a success rate over 80% and a median threefold increase in activity. Chromatin accessibility assays and the histone modifications H3K4me1 and H3K27ac were sensitive for finding enhancers, but they have high false positive rates unless transcription factor occupancy is also included. Conclusions: Occupancy by key transcription factors such as TAL1, GATA1, SMAD1, and EP300, along with evidence of transcription, improves the accuracy of enhancer predictions based on epigenetic features.

  6. Occupancy by key transcription factors is a more accurate predictor of enhancer activity than histone modifications or chromatin accessibility

    DOE PAGES

    Dogan, Nergiz; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christapher S.; Chen, Kuan-Bei; Stonestrom, Aaron; Long, Maria; Keller, Cheryl A.; Cheng, Yong; Jain, Deepti; Visel, Axel; et al

    2015-04-23

    Regulated gene expression controls organismal development, and variation in regulatory patterns has been implicated in complex traits. Thus accurate prediction of enhancers is important for further understanding of these processes. Genome-wide measurement of epigenetic features, such as histone modifications and occupancy by transcription factors, is improving enhancer predictions, but the contribution of these features to prediction accuracy is not known. Given the importance of the hematopoietic transcription factor TAL1 for erythroid gene activation, we predicted candidate enhancers based on genomic occupancy by TAL1 and measured their activity. Contributions of multiple features to enhancer prediction were evaluated based on the resultsmore » of these and other studies. Results: TAL1-bound DNA segments were active enhancers at a high rate both in transient transfections of cultured cells (39 of 79, or 56%) and transgenic mice (43 of 66, or 65%). The level of binding signal for TAL1 or GATA1 did not help distinguish TAL1-bound DNA segments as active versus inactive enhancers, nor did the density of regulation-related histone modifications. A meta-analysis of results from this and other studies (273 tested predicted enhancers) showed that the presence of TAL1, GATA1, EP300, SMAD1, H3K4 methylation, H3K27ac, and CAGE tags at DNase hypersensitive sites gave the most accurate predictors of enhancer activity, with a success rate over 80% and a median threefold increase in activity. Chromatin accessibility assays and the histone modifications H3K4me1 and H3K27ac were sensitive for finding enhancers, but they have high false positive rates unless transcription factor occupancy is also included. Conclusions: Occupancy by key transcription factors such as TAL1, GATA1, SMAD1, and EP300, along with evidence of transcription, improves the accuracy of enhancer predictions based on epigenetic features.« less

  7. Normal Approximations to the Distributions of the Wilcoxon Statistics: Accurate to What "N"? Graphical Insights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellera, Carine A.; Julien, Marilyse; Hanley, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The Wilcoxon statistics are usually taught as nonparametric alternatives for the 1- and 2-sample Student-"t" statistics in situations where the data appear to arise from non-normal distributions, or where sample sizes are so small that we cannot check whether they do. In the past, critical values, based on exact tail areas, were presented in…

  8. A review of the kinetic detail required for accurate predictions of normal shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muntz, E. P.; Erwin, Daniel A.; Pham-Van-diep, Gerald C.

    1991-01-01

    Several aspects of the kinetic models used in the collision phase of Monte Carlo direct simulations have been studied. Accurate molecular velocity distribution function predictions require a significantly increased number of computational cells in one maximum slope shock thickness, compared to predictions of macroscopic properties. The shape of the highly repulsive portion of the interatomic potential for argon is not well modeled by conventional interatomic potentials; this portion of the potential controls high Mach number shock thickness predictions, indicating that the specification of the energetic repulsive portion of interatomic or intermolecular potentials must be chosen with care for correct modeling of nonequilibrium flows at high temperatures. It has been shown for inverse power potentials that the assumption of variable hard sphere scattering provides accurate predictions of the macroscopic properties in shock waves, by comparison with simulations in which differential scattering is employed in the collision phase. On the other hand, velocity distribution functions are not well predicted by the variable hard sphere scattering model for softer potentials at higher Mach numbers.

  9. Accurate calibration and uncertainty estimation of the normal spring constant of various AFM cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Song, Yunpeng; Wu, Sen; Xu, Linyan; Fu, Xing

    2015-03-10

    Measurement of force on a micro- or nano-Newton scale is important when exploring the mechanical properties of materials in the biophysics and nanomechanical fields. The atomic force microscope (AFM) is widely used in microforce measurement. The cantilever probe works as an AFM force sensor, and the spring constant of the cantilever is of great significance to the accuracy of the measurement results. This paper presents a normal spring constant calibration method with the combined use of an electromagnetic balance and a homemade AFM head. When the cantilever presses the balance, its deflection is detected through an optical lever integrated in the AFM head. Meanwhile, the corresponding bending force is recorded by the balance. Then the spring constant can be simply calculated using Hooke's law. During the calibration, a feedback loop is applied to control the deflection of the cantilever. Errors that may affect the stability of the cantilever could be compensated rapidly. Five types of commercial cantilevers with different shapes, stiffness, and operating modes were chosen to evaluate the performance of our system. Based on the uncertainty analysis, the expanded relative standard uncertainties of the normal spring constant of most measured cantilevers are believed to be better than 2%.

  10. Extraction of accurate structure-factor amplitudes from Laue data: wavelength normalization with wiggler and undulator X-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Srajer, V; Crosson, S; Schmidt, M; Key, J; Schotte, F; Anderson, S; Perman, B; Ren, Z; Teng, T Y; Bourgeois, D; Wulff, M; Moffat, K

    2000-07-01

    Wavelength normalization is an essential part of processing of Laue X-ray diffraction data and is critically important for deriving accurate structure-factor amplitudes. The results of wavelength normalization for Laue data obtained in nanosecond time-resolved experiments at the ID09 beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France, are presented. Several wiggler and undulator insertion devices with complex spectra were used. The results show that even in the most challenging cases, such as wiggler/undulator tandems or single-line undulators, accurate wavelength normalization does not require unusually redundant Laue data and can be accomplished using typical Laue data sets. Single-line undulator spectra derived from Laue data compare well with the measured incident X-ray spectra. Successful wavelength normalization of the undulator data was also confirmed by the observed signal in nanosecond time-resolved experiments. Single-line undulators, which are attractive for time-resolved experiments due to their high peak intensity and low polychromatic background, are compared with wigglers, based on data obtained on the same crystal. PMID:16609201

  11. Stable, accurate and efficient computation of normal modes for horizontal stratified models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bo; Chen, Xiaofei

    2016-06-01

    We propose an adaptive root-determining strategy that is very useful when dealing with trapped modes or Stoneley modes whose energies become very insignificant on the free surface in the presence of low-velocity layers or fluid layers in the model. Loss of modes in these cases or inaccuracy in the calculation of these modes may then be easily avoided. Built upon the generalized reflection/transmission coefficients, the concept of "family of secular functions" that we herein call "adaptive mode observers", is thus naturally introduced to implement this strategy, the underlying idea of which has been distinctly noted for the first time and may be generalized to other applications such as free oscillations or applied to other methods in use when these cases are encountered. Additionally, we have made further improvements upon the generalized reflection/transmission coefficient method; mode observers associated with only the free surface and low-velocity layers (and the fluid/solid interface if the model contains fluid layers) are adequate to guarantee no loss and high precision at the same time of any physically existent modes without excessive calculations. Finally, the conventional definition of the fundamental mode is reconsidered, which is entailed in the cases under study. Some computational aspects are remarked on. With the additional help afforded by our superior root-searching scheme and the possibility of speeding calculation using a less number of layers aided by the concept of "turning point", our algorithm is remarkably efficient as well as stable and accurate and can be used as a powerful tool for widely related applications.

  12. Stable, accurate and efficient computation of normal modes for horizontal stratified models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bo; Chen, Xiaofei

    2016-08-01

    We propose an adaptive root-determining strategy that is very useful when dealing with trapped modes or Stoneley modes whose energies become very insignificant on the free surface in the presence of low-velocity layers or fluid layers in the model. Loss of modes in these cases or inaccuracy in the calculation of these modes may then be easily avoided. Built upon the generalized reflection/transmission coefficients, the concept of `family of secular functions' that we herein call `adaptive mode observers' is thus naturally introduced to implement this strategy, the underlying idea of which has been distinctly noted for the first time and may be generalized to other applications such as free oscillations or applied to other methods in use when these cases are encountered. Additionally, we have made further improvements upon the generalized reflection/transmission coefficient method; mode observers associated with only the free surface and low-velocity layers (and the fluid/solid interface if the model contains fluid layers) are adequate to guarantee no loss and high precision at the same time of any physically existent modes without excessive calculations. Finally, the conventional definition of the fundamental mode is reconsidered, which is entailed in the cases under study. Some computational aspects are remarked on. With the additional help afforded by our superior root-searching scheme and the possibility of speeding calculation using a less number of layers aided by the concept of `turning point', our algorithm is remarkably efficient as well as stable and accurate and can be used as a powerful tool for widely related applications.

  13. Accurate Accumulation of Dose for Improved Understanding of Radiation Effects in Normal Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffray, David A.; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Brock, Kristy K.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Tome, W.A.

    2010-03-01

    The actual distribution of radiation dose accumulated in normal tissues over the complete course of radiation therapy is, in general, poorly quantified. Differences in the patient anatomy between planning and treatment can occur gradually (e.g., tumor regression, resolution of edema) or relatively rapidly (e.g., bladder filling, breathing motion) and these undermine the accuracy of the planned dose distribution. Current efforts to maximize the therapeutic ratio require models that relate the true accumulated dose to clinical outcome. The needed accuracy can only be achieved through the development of robust methods that track the accumulation of dose within the various tissues in the body. Specific needs include the development of segmentation methods, tissue-mapping algorithms, uncertainty estimation, optimal schedules for image-based monitoring, and the development of informatics tools to support subsequent analysis. These developments will not only improve radiation outcomes modeling but will address the technical demands of the adaptive radiotherapy paradigm. The next 5 years need to see academia and industry bring these tools into the hands of the clinician and the clinical scientist.

  14. Accurate elevation and normal moveout corrections of seismic reflection data on rugged topography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, J.; Xia, J.; Chen, C.; Zhang, G.

    2005-01-01

    The application of the seismic reflection method is often limited in areas of complex terrain. The problem is the incorrect correction of time shifts caused by topography. To apply normal moveout (NMO) correction to reflection data correctly, static corrections are necessary to be applied in advance for the compensation of the time distortions of topography and the time delays from near-surface weathered layers. For environment and engineering investigation, weathered layers are our targets, so that the static correction mainly serves the adjustment of time shifts due to an undulating surface. In practice, seismic reflected raypaths are assumed to be almost vertical through the near-surface layers because they have much lower velocities than layers below. This assumption is acceptable in most cases since it results in little residual error for small elevation changes and small offsets in reflection events. Although static algorithms based on choosing a floating datum related to common midpoint gathers or residual surface-consistent functions are available and effective, errors caused by the assumption of vertical raypaths often generate pseudo-indications of structures. This paper presents the comparison of applying corrections based on the vertical raypaths and bias (non-vertical) raypaths. It also provides an approach of combining elevation and NMO corrections. The advantages of the approach are demonstrated by synthetic and real-world examples of multi-coverage seismic reflection surveys on rough topography. ?? The Royal Society of New Zealand 2005.

  15. Transcriptional repression in normal human keratinocytes by wild-type and mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Salas, L M; Velazquez, A; Lopez-Bayghen, E; Woodworth, C D; Garrido, E; Gariglio, P; DiPaolo, J A

    1995-05-01

    Wild-type p53 is a nuclear phosphoprotein that inhibits cell proliferation and represses transcriptionally most TATA box-containing promoters in transformed or tumor-derived cell lines. This study demonstrates that p53 alters transcription of the long control region (LCR) of human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18). Wild-type and mutant p53 143Val to Ala repressed the HPV-18 LCR promoter in normal human keratinocytes, the natural host cell for HPV infections. Repression by wild-type p53 was also observed in C-33A cells and in an HPV-16-immortalized cell line with an inducible wild-type p53. However, when C-33A cells were cotransfected with the HPV-18 LCR and mutant 143Val to Ala, repression did not occur. Mutant p53 135Cys to Ser did not induce repression in either normal human keratinocytes or in the C-33A line; although like 143Val to Ala, it is thought to affect the DNA binding activity of the wild-type protein. The ability of mutant p53 143Val to Ala to inactivate the HPV early promoter in normal cells (by approximately 60% reduction) suggests that this mutant may be able to associate with wild-type p53 and interact with TATA box-binding proteins. Therefore, these results demonstrate that the transcriptional activities of p53 mutants may be dependent upon the cell type assayed and the form of its endogenous p53. Furthermore, normal human keratinocytes represent an alternative model for determining the activities of p53 mutants.

  16. Assessment of RT-qPCR normalization strategies for accurate quantification of extracellular microRNAs in murine serum.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Thomas C; Coenen-Stass, Anna M L; Wood, Matthew J A

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular microRNAs (miRNAs) are under investigation as minimally-invasive biomarkers for a wide range of disease conditions. We have recently shown in a mouse model of the progressive muscle-wasting condition Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) that a set of highly elevated serum miRNAs reflects the regenerative status of muscle. These miRNAs are promising biomarkers for monitoring DMD disease progression and the response to experimental therapies. The gold standard miRNA detection methodology is Reverse Transcriptase-quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-qPCR), which typically exhibits high sensitivity and wide dynamic range. Accurate determination of miRNA levels is affected by RT-qPCR normalization method and therefore selection of the optimal strategy is of critical importance. Serum miRNA abundance was measured by RT-qPCR array in 14 week old mice, and by individual RT-qPCR assays in a time course experiment spanning 48 weeks. Here we utilize these two datasets to assess the validity of three miRNA normalization strategies (a) normalization to the average of all Cq values from array experiments, (b) normalization to a stably expressed endogenous reference miRNA, and (c) normalization to an external spike-in synthetic oligonucleotide. Normalization approaches based on endogenous control miRNAs result in an under-estimation of miRNA levels by a factor of ∼2. An increase in total RNA and total miRNA was observed in dystrophic serum which may account for this systematic bias. We conclude that the optimal strategy for this model system is to normalize to a synthetic spike-in control oligonucleotide.

  17. Selection of suitable reference genes for accurate normalization of gene expression profile studies in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Silvia, Saviozzi; Francesca, Cordero; Marco, Lo Iacono; Silvia, Novello; Giorgio V, Scagliotti; Raffaele, Calogero A

    2006-01-01

    Background In real-time RT quantitative PCR (qPCR) the accuracy of normalized data is highly dependent on the reliability of the reference genes (RGs). Failure to use an appropriate control gene for normalization of qPCR data may result in biased gene expression profiles, as well as low precision, so that only gross changes in expression level are declared statistically significant or patterns of expression are erroneously characterized. Therefore, it is essential to determine whether potential RGs are appropriate for specific experimental purposes. Aim of this study was to identify and validate RGs for use in the differentiation of normal and tumor lung expression profiles. Methods A meta-analysis of lung cancer transcription profiles generated with the GeneChip technology was used to identify five putative RGs. Their consistency and that of seven commonly used RGs was tested by using Taqman probes on 18 paired normal-tumor lung snap-frozen specimens obtained from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients during primary curative resection. Results The 12 RGs displayed showed a wide range of Ct values: except for rRNA18S (mean 9.8), the mean values of all the commercial RGs and ESD ranged from 19 to 26, whereas those of the microarray-selected RGs (BTF-3, YAP1, HIST1H2BC, RPL30) exceeded 26. RG expression stability within sample populations and under the experimental conditions (tumour versus normal lung specimens) was evaluated by: (1) descriptive statistic; (2) equivalence test; (3) GeNorm applet. All these approaches indicated that the most stable RGs were POLR2A, rRNA18S, YAP1 and ESD. Conclusion These data suggest that POLR2A, rRNA18S, YAP1 and ESD are the most suitable RGs for gene expression profile studies in NSCLC. Furthermore, they highlight the limitations of commercial RGs and indicate that meta-data analysis of genome-wide transcription profiling studies may identify new RGs. PMID:16872493

  18. Normalization of Reverse Transcription Quantitative PCR Data During Ageing in Distinct Cerebral Structures.

    PubMed

    Bruckert, G; Vivien, D; Docagne, F; Roussel, B D

    2016-04-01

    Reverse transcription quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) has become a routine method in many laboratories. Normalization of data from experimental conditions is critical for data processing and is usually achieved by the use of a single reference gene. Nevertheless, as pointed by the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) guidelines, several reference genes should be used for reliable normalization. Ageing is a physiological process that results in a decline of many expressed genes. Reliable normalization of RT-qPCR data becomes crucial when studying ageing. Here, we propose a RT-qPCR study from four mouse brain regions (cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum) at different ages (from 8 weeks to 22 months) in which we studied the expression of nine commonly used reference genes. With the use of two different algorithms, we found that all brain structures need at least two genes for a good normalization step. We propose specific pairs of gene for efficient data normalization in the four brain regions studied. These results underline the importance of reliable reference genes for specific brain regions in ageing.

  19. Accurate Proteome-wide Label-free Quantification by Delayed Normalization and Maximal Peptide Ratio Extraction, Termed MaxLFQ *

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jürgen; Hein, Marco Y.; Luber, Christian A.; Paron, Igor; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Mann, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Protein quantification without isotopic labels has been a long-standing interest in the proteomics field. However, accurate and robust proteome-wide quantification with label-free approaches remains a challenge. We developed a new intensity determination and normalization procedure called MaxLFQ that is fully compatible with any peptide or protein separation prior to LC-MS analysis. Protein abundance profiles are assembled using the maximum possible information from MS signals, given that the presence of quantifiable peptides varies from sample to sample. For a benchmark dataset with two proteomes mixed at known ratios, we accurately detected the mixing ratio over the entire protein expression range, with greater precision for abundant proteins. The significance of individual label-free quantifications was obtained via a t test approach. For a second benchmark dataset, we accurately quantify fold changes over several orders of magnitude, a task that is challenging with label-based methods. MaxLFQ is a generic label-free quantification technology that is readily applicable to many biological questions; it is compatible with standard statistical analysis workflows, and it has been validated in many and diverse biological projects. Our algorithms can handle very large experiments of 500+ samples in a manageable computing time. It is implemented in the freely available MaxQuant computational proteomics platform and works completely seamlessly at the click of a button. PMID:24942700

  20. Normal Dendrite Growth in Drosophila Motor Neurons Requires the AP-1 Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Cortnie L.; Worrell, Jason; Levine, Richard B.; Ramaswami, Mani; Sanyal, Subhabrata

    2009-01-01

    During learning and memory formation, information flow through networks is regulated significantly through structural alterations in neurons. Dendrites, sites of signal integration, are key targets of activity-mediated modifications. Although local mechanisms of dendritic growth ensure synapse-specific changes, global mechanisms linking neural activity to nuclear gene expression may have profound influences on neural function. Fos, being an immediate-early gene, is ideally suited to be an initial transducer of neural activity, but a precise role for the AP-1 transcription factor in dendrite growth remains to be elucidated. Here we measure changes in the dendritic fields of identified Drosophila motor neurons in vivo and in primary culture to investigate the role of the immediate-early transcription factor AP-1 in regulating endogenous and activity-induced dendrite growth. Our data indicate that (a) increased neural excitability or depolarization stimulates dendrite growth, (b) AP-1 (a Fos, Jun heterodimer) is required for normal motor neuron dendritic growth during development and in response to activity induction, and (c) neuronal Fos protein levels are rapidly but transiently induced in motor neurons following neural activity. Taken together, these results show that AP-1 mediated transcription is important for dendrite growth, and that neural activity influences global dendritic growth through a gene-expression dependent mechanism gated by AP-1. PMID:18548486

  1. Chronic venlafaxine treatment fails to alter the levels of galanin system transcripts in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Petschner, Peter; Juhasz, Gabriella; Tamasi, Viola; Adori, Csaba; Tothfalusi, Laszlo; Hökfelt, Tomas; Bagdy, Gyorgy

    2016-06-01

    It is widely accepted that efficacy and speed of current antidepressants' therapeutic effect are far from optimal. Thus, there is a need for the development of antidepressants with new mechanisms of action. The neuropeptide galanin and its receptors (GalR1, GalR2 and GalR3) are among the promising targets. However, it is not clear whether or not the galanin system is involved in the antidepressant effect exerted by the currently much used inhibitors of the reuptake of serotonin and/or noradrenaline. To answer this question we administered the selective serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) venlafaxine (40mg/kg/day via osmotic minipumps) to normal rats and examined the levels of the transcripts for galanin and GalR1-3 after a 3-week venlafaxine treatment in the dorsal raphe, hippocampus and frontal cortex. These areas are known to be involved in the effects of antidepressants and in depression itself. Venlafaxine failed to alter the expression of any of the galanin system genes in these areas. Our results show that one of the most efficient, currently used SNRIs does not alter transcript levels of galanin or its three receptors in normal rats. These findings suggest that the pro- and antidepressive-like effects of galanin reported in animal experiments may employ a novel mechanism(s).

  2. Neoplasms with schwannian differentiation express transcription factors known to regulate normal schwann cell development.

    PubMed

    Pytel, Peter; Karrison, Theodore; Can Gong; Tonsgard, James H; Krausz, Thomas; Montag, Anthony G

    2010-12-01

    A number of transcription factors have been identified as important in guiding normal Schwann cell development. This study used immunohistochemistry on tissue arrays to assess the expression of some of these transcription factors (Sox5, Sox9, Sox10, AP-2α, Pax7, and FoxD3) on 76 schwannomas, 105 neurofibromas, and 34 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). Sox9 and Sox10 were found to be widely expressed in all tumor types. FoxD3 reactivity was stronger and more frequently found in schwannomas and MPNSTs than neurofibromas. AP-2α was positive in 31% to 49% of all tumors, but strong reactivity was limited to MPNSTs and schwannomas. Pax7 and Sox5 expression was restricted to subsets of MPNSTs. Statistical analysis showed significant differences between the 3 tumor types in the expression of these markers. No differences were found in the analyzed tumor subgroups, including schwannomas of different sites, schwannomas with or without NF2 association, neurofibromas of different types, or sporadic versus NF1-associated MPNSTs. These results suggest that the transcription factors that guide normal Schwann cell development also play a role in the biology of neoplastic cells with Schwannian differentiation. FoxD3, AP-2α, Pax7, and Sox5 are upregulated in MPNSTs compared with neurofibromas and may be markers of malignant transformation. Screening the expression of FoxD3, Sox9, and Sox10 on 23 cases of other spindle-cell proliferations that may be considered in the differential diagnosis of MPNST, including synovial sarcoma and spindle cell melanoma, suggests that these 3 are helpful markers of Schwannian differentiation in the context of diagnosing MPNSTs.

  3. Transcription analysis of class II human leukocyte antigen genes from normal and immunodeficient B lymphocytes, using polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Bull, M; van Hoef, A; Gorski, J

    1990-01-01

    The RNA transcript levels of all human leukocyte antigen class II loci were determined from class II congenital immunodeficient B cells by polymerase chain reaction amplification of cDNA. No mRNA was observed under conditions in which 0.01% normal levels could be visualized. Pre-mRNA could be amplified from normal B cells but not from immunodeficient B cells, indicating a transcription defect. Images PMID:2113177

  4. MGSA/GRO transcription is differentially regulated in normal retinal pigment epithelial and melanoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shattuck, R L; Wood, L D; Jaffe, G J; Richmond, A

    1994-01-01

    We have characterized constitutive and cytokine-regulated MGSA/GRO alpha, -beta, and -gamma gene expression in normal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and a malignant melanoma cell line (Hs294T) to discern the mechanism for MGSA/GRO constitutive expression in melanoma. In RPE cells, constitutive MGSA/GRO alpha, -beta, and -gamma mRNAs are not detected by Northern (RNA) blot analysis although nuclear runoff experiments show that all three genes are transcribed. In Hs294T cells, constitutive MGSA/GRO alpha expression is detectable by Northern blot analysis, and the level of basal MGSA/GRO alpha transcription is 8- to 30-fold higher than in RPE cells. In contrast, in Hs294T cells, basal MGSA/GRO beta and -gamma transcription is only twofold higher than in RPE cells and no beta or gamma mRNA is detected by Northern blot. These data suggest that the constitutive MGSA/GRO alpha mRNA in Hs294T cells is due to increased basal MGSA/GRO alpha gene transcription. The cytokines interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) significantly increase the mRNA levels for all three MGSA/GRO isoforms in Hs294T and RPE cells, and both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms are operational. Nuclear runoff assays indicate that in RPE cells, a 1-h IL-1 treatment induces a 10- to 20-fold increase in transcription of MGSA/GRO alpha, -beta and -gamma but only a 2-fold increase in Hs294T cells. Similarly, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene analysis using the MGSA/GRO alpha, -beta, and -gamma promoter regions demonstrates that IL-1 treatment induces an 8- to 14-fold increase in CAT activity in RPE cells but only a 2-fold increase in Hs294T cells. The effect of deletion or mutation of the MGSA/GRO alpha NF-kappa B element, combined with data from gel mobility shift analyses, indicates that the NF-kappa B p50/p65 heterodimer in RPE cells plays an important role in IL-1- and TNF alpha-enhanced gene transcription. In Hs294T cells, gel shift

  5. Normal stroma suppresses cancer cell proliferation via mechanosensitive regulation of JMJD1a-mediated transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kaukonen, Riina; Mai, Anja; Georgiadou, Maria; Saari, Markku; De Franceschi, Nicola; Betz, Timo; Sihto, Harri; Ventelä, Sami; Elo, Laura; Jokitalo, Eija; Westermarck, Jukka; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Joensuu, Heikki; Grenman, Reidar; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis is dependent on the controlled localization of specific cell types and the correct composition of the extracellular stroma. While the role of the cancer stroma in tumour progression has been well characterized, the specific contribution of the matrix itself is unknown. Furthermore, the mechanisms enabling normal—not cancer—stroma to provide tumour-suppressive signals and act as an antitumorigenic barrier are poorly understood. Here we show that extracellular matrix (ECM) generated by normal fibroblasts (NFs) is softer than the CAF matrix, and its physical and structural features regulate cancer cell proliferation. We find that normal ECM triggers downregulation and nuclear exit of the histone demethylase JMJD1a resulting in the epigenetic growth restriction of carcinoma cells. Interestingly, JMJD1a positively regulates transcription of many target genes, including YAP/TAZ (WWTR1), and therefore gene expression in a stiffness-dependent manner. Thus, normal stromal restricts cancer cell proliferation through JMJD1a-dependent modulation of gene expression. PMID:27488962

  6. Expression profile of undifferentiated cell transcription factor 1 in normal and cancerous human epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Mouallif, Mustapha; Albert, Adelin; Zeddou, Mustapha; Ennaji, My Mustapha; Delvenne, Philippe; Guenin, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Undifferentiated cell Transcription Factor 1 (UTF1) is a chromatin-bound protein involved in stem cell differentiation. It was initially reported to be restricted to stem cells or germinal tissues. However, recent work suggests that UTF1 is also expressed in somatic cells and that its expression may increase during carcinogenesis. To further clarify the expression profile of UTF1, we evaluated UTF1 expression levels immunohistochemically in eight normal human epithelia (from breast, prostate, endometrium, bladder, colon, oesophagus, lung and kidney) and their corresponding tumours as well as in several epithelial cell lines. We showed UTF1 staining in normal and tumour epithelial tissues, but with varying intensities according to the tissue location. In vitro analyses also revealed that UTF1 is expressed in somatic epithelial cell lines even in the absence of Oct4A and Sox2, its two main known regulators. The comparison of UTF1 levels in normal and tumoral tissues revealed significant overexpression in endometrial and prostatic adenocarcinomas, whereas lower intensity of the staining was observed in renal and colic tumours, suggesting a potential tissue-specific function of UTF1. Altogether, these results highlight a potential dual role for UTF1, acting either as an oncogene or as a tumour suppressor depending on the tissue. These findings also question its role as a specific marker for stem cells. PMID:24738751

  7. Validation of Reference Genes for Accurate Normalization of Gene Expression in Lilium davidii var. unicolor for Real Time Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A.; Wang, ChunXia; Sun, HongMei

    2015-01-01

    Lilium is an important commercial market flower bulb. qRT-PCR is an extremely important technique to track gene expression levels. The requirement of suitable reference genes for normalization has become increasingly significant and exigent. The expression of internal control genes in living organisms varies considerably under different experimental conditions. For economically important Lilium, only a limited number of reference genes applied in qRT-PCR have been reported to date. In this study, the expression stability of 12 candidate genes including α-TUB, β-TUB, ACT, eIF, GAPDH, UBQ, UBC, 18S, 60S, AP4, FP, and RH2, in a diverse set of 29 samples representing different developmental processes, three stress treatments (cold, heat, and salt) and different organs, has been evaluated. For different organs, the combination of ACT, GAPDH, and UBQ is appropriate whereas ACT together with AP4, or ACT along with GAPDH is suitable for normalization of leaves and scales at different developmental stages, respectively. In leaves, scales and roots under stress treatments, FP, ACT and AP4, respectively showed the most stable expression. This study provides a guide for the selection of a reference gene under different experimental conditions, and will benefit future research on more accurate gene expression studies in a wide variety of Lilium genotypes. PMID:26509446

  8. Validation of Reference Genes for Accurate Normalization of Gene Expression in Lilium davidii var. unicolor for Real Time Quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Li, XueYan; Cheng, JinYun; Zhang, Jing; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Wang, ChunXia; Sun, HongMei

    2015-01-01

    Lilium is an important commercial market flower bulb. qRT-PCR is an extremely important technique to track gene expression levels. The requirement of suitable reference genes for normalization has become increasingly significant and exigent. The expression of internal control genes in living organisms varies considerably under different experimental conditions. For economically important Lilium, only a limited number of reference genes applied in qRT-PCR have been reported to date. In this study, the expression stability of 12 candidate genes including α-TUB, β-TUB, ACT, eIF, GAPDH, UBQ, UBC, 18S, 60S, AP4, FP, and RH2, in a diverse set of 29 samples representing different developmental processes, three stress treatments (cold, heat, and salt) and different organs, has been evaluated. For different organs, the combination of ACT, GAPDH, and UBQ is appropriate whereas ACT together with AP4, or ACT along with GAPDH is suitable for normalization of leaves and scales at different developmental stages, respectively. In leaves, scales and roots under stress treatments, FP, ACT and AP4, respectively showed the most stable expression. This study provides a guide for the selection of a reference gene under different experimental conditions, and will benefit future research on more accurate gene expression studies in a wide variety of Lilium genotypes. PMID:26509446

  9. The transcriptional activator ZNF143 is essential for normal development in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background ZNF143 is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein that stimulates transcription of both small RNA genes by RNA polymerase II or III, or protein-coding genes by RNA polymerase II, using separable activating domains. We describe phenotypic effects following knockdown of this protein in developing Danio rerio (zebrafish) embryos by injection of morpholino antisense oligonucleotides that target znf143 mRNA. Results The loss of function phenotype is pleiotropic and includes a broad array of abnormalities including defects in heart, blood, ear and midbrain hindbrain boundary. Defects are rescued by coinjection of synthetic mRNA encoding full-length ZNF143 protein, but not by protein lacking the amino-terminal activation domains. Accordingly, expression of several marker genes is affected following knockdown, including GATA-binding protein 1 (gata1), cardiac myosin light chain 2 (cmlc2) and paired box gene 2a (pax2a). The zebrafish pax2a gene proximal promoter contains two binding sites for ZNF143, and reporter gene transcription driven by this promoter in transfected cells is activated by this protein. Conclusions Normal development of zebrafish embryos requires ZNF143. Furthermore, the pax2a gene is probably one example of many protein-coding gene targets of ZNF143 during zebrafish development. PMID:22268977

  10. Validation of reference genes for accurate normalization of gene expression for real time-quantitative PCR in strawberry fruits using different cultivars and osmotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Galli, Vanessa; Borowski, Joyce Moura; Perin, Ellen Cristina; Messias, Rafael da Silva; Labonde, Julia; Pereira, Ivan dos Santos; Silva, Sérgio Delmar Dos Anjos; Rombaldi, Cesar Valmor

    2015-01-10

    The increasing demand of strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa Duch) fruits is associated mainly with their sensorial characteristics and the content of antioxidant compounds. Nevertheless, the strawberry production has been hampered due to its sensitivity to abiotic stresses. Therefore, to understand the molecular mechanisms highlighting stress response is of great importance to enable genetic engineering approaches aiming to improve strawberry tolerance. However, the study of expression of genes in strawberry requires the use of suitable reference genes. In the present study, seven traditional and novel candidate reference genes were evaluated for transcript normalization in fruits of ten strawberry cultivars and two abiotic stresses, using RefFinder, which integrates the four major currently available software programs: geNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper and the comparative delta-Ct method. The results indicate that the expression stability is dependent on the experimental conditions. The candidate reference gene DBP (DNA binding protein) was considered the most suitable to normalize expression data in samples of strawberry cultivars and under drought stress condition, and the candidate reference gene HISTH4 (histone H4) was the most stable under osmotic stresses and salt stress. The traditional genes GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) and 18S (18S ribosomal RNA) were considered the most unstable genes in all conditions. The expression of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and 9-cis epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED1) genes were used to further confirm the validated candidate reference genes, showing that the use of an inappropriate reference gene may induce erroneous results. This study is the first survey on the stability of reference genes in strawberry cultivars and osmotic stresses and provides guidelines to obtain more accurate RT-qPCR results for future breeding efforts.

  11. Selection of reference genes for quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction normalization in Brassica napus under various stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Chen, Yu; Fang, Hedi; Shi, Haifeng; Chen, Keping; Zhang, Zhiyan; Tan, Xiaoli

    2014-10-01

    Data normalization is essential for reliable output of quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays, as the unsuitable choice of reference gene(s), whose expression might be influenced by exogenous treatments in plant tissues, could cause misinterpretation of results. To date, no systematic studies on reference genes have been performed in stressed Brassica napus. In this study, we investigated the expression variations of nine candidate reference genes in 40 samples of B. napus leaves subjected to various exogenous treatments. Parallel analyses by geNorm and NormFinder revealed that optimal reference genes differed across the different sets of samples. The best-ranked reference genes were PP2A and TIP41 for salt stress, TIP41 and ACT7 for heavy metal (Cr(6+)) stress, PP2A and UBC21 for drought stress, F-box and SAND for cold stress, F-box and ZNF for salicylic acid stress, TIP41, ACT7, and PP2A for methyl jasmonate stress, TIP41 and ACT7 for abscisic acid stress, and TIP41, UBC21, and PP2A for Sclerotinia sclerotiorum stress. Two newly employed reference genes, TIP41 and PP2A, showed better performances, suggesting their suitability in multiple conditions. To further validate the suitability of the reference genes, the expression patterns of BnWRKY40 and BnMKS1 were studied in parallel. This study is the first systematic analysis of reference gene selection for qRT-PCR normalization in B. napus, an agriculturally important crop, under different stress conditions. The results will contribute toward more accurate and widespread use of qRT-PCR in gene analysis of the genus Brassica. PMID:24770781

  12. The forkhead transcription factor, FOXP3, is required for normal pituitary gonadotropin expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Jung, Deborah O; Jasurda, Jake S; Egashira, Noboru; Ellsworth, Buffy S

    2012-05-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is central to normal reproductive function. This pathway begins with the release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone in systematic pulses by the hypothalamus. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone is bound by receptors on gonadotroph cells in the anterior pituitary gland and stimulates the synthesis and secretion of luteinizing hormone and, to some extent, follicle-stimulating hormone. Once stimulated by these glycoprotein hormones, the gonads begin gametogenesis and the synthesis of sex hormones. In humans, mutations of the forkhead transcription factor, FOXP3, lead to an autoimmune disorder known as immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, and enteropathy, X-linked syndrome. Mice with a mutation in the Foxp3 gene have a similar autoimmune syndrome and are infertile. To understand why FOXP3 is required for reproductive function, we are investigating the reproductive phenotype of Foxp3 mutant mice (Foxp3(sf/Y)). Although the gonadotroph cells appear to be intact in Foxp3(sf/Y) mice, luteinizing hormone beta (Lhb) and follicle-stimulating hormone beta (Fshb) expression are significantly decreased, demonstrating that these mice exhibit a hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Hypothalamic expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone is not significantly decreased in Foxp3(sf/Y) males. Treatment of Foxp3(sf/Y) males with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor agonist does not rescue expression of Lhb or Fshb. Interestingly, we do not detect Foxp3 expression in the pituitary or hypothalamus, suggesting that the infertility seen in Foxp3(sf/Y) males is a secondary effect, possibly due to loss of FOXP3 in immune cells. Pituitary expression of glycoprotein hormone alpha (Cga) and prolactin (Prl) are significantly reduced in Foxp3(sf/Y) males, whereas the precursor for adrenocorticotropic hormone, pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc), is increased. Human patients diagnosed with IPEX often exhibit thyroiditis due to destruction of the thyroid gland by

  13. Reference genes selection for transcript normalization in kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) under salinity and drought stress.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaoping; Qi, Jianmin; Chen, Meixia; Zhang, Gaoyang; Tao, Aifen; Fang, Pingping; Xu, Jiantang; Onyedinma, Sandra A; Su, Jianguang

    2015-01-01

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) is an economic and ecological fiber crop but suffers severe losses in fiber yield and quality under the stressful conditions of excess salinity and drought. To explore the mechanisms by which kenaf responds to excess salinity and drought, gene expression was performed at the transcriptomic level using RNA-seq. Thus, it is crucial to have a suitable set of reference genes to normalize target gene expression in kenaf under different conditions using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). In this study, we selected 10 candidate reference genes from the kenaf transcriptome and assessed their expression stabilities by qRT-PCR in 14 NaCl- and PEG-treated samples using geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper. The results indicated that TUBα and 18S rRNA were the optimum reference genes under conditions of excess salinity and drought in kenaf. Moreover, TUBα and 18S rRNA were used singly or in combination as reference genes to validate the expression levels of WRKY28 and WRKY32 in NaCl- and PEG-treated samples by qRT-PCR. The results further proved the reliability of the two selected reference genes. This work will benefit future studies on gene expression and lead to a better understanding of responses to excess salinity and drought in kenaf. PMID:26644967

  14. A simple analytical and experimental procedure for selection of reference genes for reverse-transcription quantitative PCR normalization data.

    PubMed

    Manjarin, R; Trottier, N L; Weber, P S; Liesman, J S; Taylor, N P; Steibel, J P

    2011-10-01

    Variation in cellular activity in a tissue induces changes in RNA concentration, which affects the validity of gene mRNA abundance analyzed by reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). A common way of accounting for such variation consists of the use of reference genes for normalization. Programs such as geNorm may be used to select suitable reference genes, although a large set of genes that are not co-regulated must be analyzed to obtain accurate results. The objective of this study was to propose an alternative experimental and analytical protocol to assess the invariance of reference genes in porcine mammary tissue using mammary RNA and DNA concentrations as correction factors. Mammary glands were biopsied from 4 sows on d 110 of gestation (prepartum), on d 5 (early) and 17 (peak) of lactation, and on d 5 after weaning (postweaning). Relative expression of 7 potential reference genes, API5, MRPL39, VAPB, ACTB, GAPDH, RPS23, and MTG1, and one candidate gene, SLC7A1, was quantified by RT-qPCR using a relative standard curve approach. Variation in gene expression levels, measured as cycles to threshold at each stage of mammary physiological activity, was tested using a linear mixed model fitting RNA and DNA concentrations as covariates. Results were compared with those obtained with geNorm analysis, and genes selected by each method were used to normalize SLC7A1. Quantified relative mRNA abundance of GAPDH and MRPL39 remained unchanged across stages of mammary physiological activity after accounting for changes in tissue RNA and DNA concentration. In contrast, geNorm analysis selected MTG1, MRPL39, and VAPB as the best reference genes. However, when target gene SLC7A1 was normalized with genes selected either based on our proposed protocol or by geNorm, fold changes in mRNA abundance did not differ. In conclusion, the proposed analytical protocol assesses expression invariance of potential reference genes by accounting for variation in tissue RNA and DNA

  15. Normalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuevas, Eduardo J.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses cornerstone of Montessori theory, normalization, which asserts that if a child is placed in an optimum prepared environment where inner impulses match external opportunities, the undeviated self emerges, a being totally in harmony with its surroundings. Makes distinctions regarding normalization, normalized, and normality, indicating how…

  16. Normal transcription of the beta-hexosaminidase alpha-chain gene in the Ashkenazi Tay-Sachs mutation.

    PubMed

    Paw, B H; Neufeld, E F

    1988-02-25

    Tay-Sachs disease is a biochemically heterogeneous lysosomal storage disorder caused by lack of the A isoenzyme of beta-hexosaminidase; the underlying defect is a mutation in the gene encoding the alpha-chain. It has been shown that fibroblasts isolated from Tay-Sachs patients of Ashkenazi Jewish origin contain no alpha-chain mRNA detectable on Northern blots. We now have compared run-on transcription in nuclei isolated from three strains of Ashkenazi Tay-Sachs fibroblasts and from a strain of normal (IMR90) cells. Using alpha-chain and beta-chain cDNAs as probes, we found no difference in the relative amount of [32P]ribonucleotide added to nascent transcripts; the average ratio of alpha/beta hybridizable radioactivity was 1.3 and 1.4 for mutant and normal cells, respectively. The identity of the Tay-Sachs alpha-chain transcript was confirmed by competition hybridization with excess alpha-chain mRNA. The results indicate that the Ashkenazi Tay-Sachs mutation permits a normal level of transcription of the alpha-chain gene and points to a posttranscriptional defect, such as RNA processing, transport, or stability.

  17. Differential control of Notch1 gene transcription by Klf4 and Sp3 transcription factors in normal versus cancer-derived keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Lambertini, Chiara; Pantano, Serafino; Dotto, G Paolo

    2010-04-28

    In specific cell types like keratinocytes, Notch signaling plays an important pro-differentiation and tumor suppressing function, with down-modulation of the Notch1 gene being associated with cancer development. Besides being controlled by p53, little else is known on regulation of Notch1 gene expression in this context. We report here that transcription of this gene is driven by a TATA-less "sharp peak" promoter and that the minimal functional region of this promoter, which extends from the -342 bp position to the initiation codon, is differentially active in normal versus cancer cells. This GC rich region lacks p53 binding sites, but binds Klf4 and Sp3. This finding is likely to be of biological significance, as Klf4 and, to a lesser extent, Sp3 are up-regulated in a number of cancer cells where Notch1 expression is down-modulated, and Klf4 over-expression in normal cells is sufficient to down-modulate Notch1 gene transcription. The combined knock-down of Klf4 and Sp3 was necessary for the reverse effect of increasing Notch1 transcription, consistent with the two factors exerting an overlapping repressor function through their binding to the Notch1 promoter.

  18. Oncogene transcription in normal human IMR-90 fibroblasts: induction by serum and tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, E.A.; Kaji, H.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report studies of oncogene transcription induced by the addition of serum to quiescent cultures of human IMR-90 fibroblasts. Oncogene messenger RNAs for c-myc, c-erbB and c-ras were increased in a specific temporal sequence after the addition of serum. Compounds that are proposed to exert their actions by the stimulation of cell growth were tested for their effect on oncogene transcription in IMR-90 fibroblasts. The tumor promoter tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA) was found to selectively induce the transcription of c-myc without observable effect on the transcription of the other oncogenes studied, and without inducing cell division. The inactive analog, phorbol didecanoate (PDD), and two complete carcinogens dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) and 4-nitro quinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) were without effect on the transcription of the genes studied. These results suggest that the complete ordered sequence of gene transcription is necessary to achieve the physiologic response of cell division, and that classical promoters and complete carcinogens achieve their effects through different pathways.

  19. Deactivation of the GATA Transcription Factor ELT-2 Is a Major Driver of Normal Aging in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Frederick G.; Van Nostrand, Eric L.; Friedland, Ari E.; Liu, Xiao; Kim, Stuart K.

    2016-01-01

    To understand the molecular processes underlying aging, we screened modENCODE ChIP-seq data to identify transcription factors that bind to age-regulated genes in C. elegans. The most significant hit was the GATA transcription factor encoded by elt-2, which is responsible for inducing expression of intestinal genes during embryogenesis. Expression of ELT-2 decreases during aging, beginning in middle age. We identified genes regulated by ELT-2 in the intestine during embryogenesis, and then showed that these developmental genes markedly decrease in expression as worms grow old. Overexpression of elt-2 extends lifespan and slows the rate of gene expression changes that occur during normal aging. Thus, our results identify the developmental regulator ELT-2 as a major driver of normal aging in C. elegans. PMID:27070429

  20. Identification and validation of reference genes for accurate normalization of real-time quantitative PCR data in kiwifruit.

    PubMed

    Ferradás, Yolanda; Rey, Laura; Martínez, Óscar; Rey, Manuel; González, Ma Victoria

    2016-05-01

    Identification and validation of reference genes are required for the normalization of qPCR data. We studied the expression stability produced by eight primer pairs amplifying four common genes used as references for normalization. Samples representing different tissues, organs and developmental stages in kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis var. deliciosa (A. Chev.) A. Chev.) were used. A total of 117 kiwifruit samples were divided into five sample sets (mature leaves, axillary buds, stigmatic arms, fruit flesh and seeds). All samples were also analysed as a single set. The expression stability of the candidate primer pairs was tested using three algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper). The minimum number of reference genes necessary for normalization was also determined. A unique primer pair was selected for amplifying the 18S rRNA gene. The primer pair selected for amplifying the ACTIN gene was different depending on the sample set. 18S 2 and ACT 2 were the candidate primer pairs selected for normalization in the three sample sets (mature leaves, fruit flesh and stigmatic arms). 18S 2 and ACT 3 were the primer pairs selected for normalization in axillary buds. No primer pair could be selected for use as the reference for the seed sample set. The analysis of all samples in a single set did not produce the selection of any stably expressing primer pair. Considering data previously reported in the literature, we validated the selected primer pairs amplifying the FLOWERING LOCUS T gene for use in the normalization of gene expression in kiwifruit.

  1. Identification and validation of reference genes for accurate normalization of real-time quantitative PCR data in kiwifruit.

    PubMed

    Ferradás, Yolanda; Rey, Laura; Martínez, Óscar; Rey, Manuel; González, Ma Victoria

    2016-05-01

    Identification and validation of reference genes are required for the normalization of qPCR data. We studied the expression stability produced by eight primer pairs amplifying four common genes used as references for normalization. Samples representing different tissues, organs and developmental stages in kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis var. deliciosa (A. Chev.) A. Chev.) were used. A total of 117 kiwifruit samples were divided into five sample sets (mature leaves, axillary buds, stigmatic arms, fruit flesh and seeds). All samples were also analysed as a single set. The expression stability of the candidate primer pairs was tested using three algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper). The minimum number of reference genes necessary for normalization was also determined. A unique primer pair was selected for amplifying the 18S rRNA gene. The primer pair selected for amplifying the ACTIN gene was different depending on the sample set. 18S 2 and ACT 2 were the candidate primer pairs selected for normalization in the three sample sets (mature leaves, fruit flesh and stigmatic arms). 18S 2 and ACT 3 were the primer pairs selected for normalization in axillary buds. No primer pair could be selected for use as the reference for the seed sample set. The analysis of all samples in a single set did not produce the selection of any stably expressing primer pair. Considering data previously reported in the literature, we validated the selected primer pairs amplifying the FLOWERING LOCUS T gene for use in the normalization of gene expression in kiwifruit. PMID:26897117

  2. Cellular localization of type I III and IV procollagen gene transcripts in normal and fibrotic human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Milani, S.; Herbst, H.; Schuppan, D.; Surrenti, C.; Riecken, E. O.; Stein, H.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have determined the cell types producing alpha 1 (I), alpha 2 (I), alpha 1 (III), and alpha 1 (IV) procollagen gene transcripts in adult human liver by in situ hybridization with [35S]-labeled RNA probes. The liver specimens comprised a total of 20 biopsies with normal histology and biopsies with fibrosis or cirrhosis at different clinical stages and of heterogeneous origins. In normal liver, procollagen type I, III, and IV transcripts were detected in stromal and vascular mesenchymal cells of portal tracts and central veins, as well as in some perisinusoidal cells of the lobule. In fibrotic liver, increased levels of these procollagen mRNAs were observed in the same locations, and particularly enhanced in stromal cells of fibrotic septa and portal tracts, as well as in perisinusoidal cells. Expression of alpha 1 (IV) procollagen RNA was additionally found in some vascular endothelial and bile duct epithelial cells. Although previously suggested as the major source of liver collagens, hepatocytes showed no significant procollagen transcript levels in any of our samples. Thus, procollagen synthesis does not appear to be a function of hepatocytes, but rather of mesenchymal, endothelial, and bile duct epithelial cells in adult human liver. These findings may have implications for the development of specifically targeted antifibrotic therapies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:2372043

  3. The two small introns of the Drosophila affinidisjuncta Adh gene are required for normal transcription.

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, R W; Brennan, M D

    1996-01-01

    All Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) genes sequenced to date contain two small introns within the coding region. These are conserved in location and, to some extent, in sequence between the various species analyzed. To determine if these introns play a role in Adh gene expression, derivatives of the Drosophila affinidisjuncta Adh gene lacking one or both introns were constructed and analyzed by germline and transient transformation of Drosophila melanogaster. Removal of both introns lowered expression, whether measured by enzyme activity or by RNA levels. The decrease was seen in both germline transformed and transiently transformed larvae, with the effect being larger for germline transformants. Similar decreases (averaging 5-fold) were also seen at the embryonic and adult stages for germline transformants. Nuclear run-off transcription with nuclei from germline transformed embryos indicated that the reduction in RNA levels is due to decreased transcription. However, LacZ fusion constructs designed to test for the presence of a classical enhancer in the introns provided no evidence for such a mechanism. Removal of each intron individually resulted in more complex phenotypes. The introns have smaller, additive effects on expression in adults. In larvae, removal of the upstream intron significantly increases RNA levels but modestly decreases enzyme activity. Removal of the downstream intron lowers expression in both germline and transiently transformed larvae, but also increases position effects in germline transformants. Therefore, the small introns are clearly needed for optimal transcription of this Adh gene, but multiple mechanisms are involved. PMID:8836194

  4. Continuous Histone Replacement by Hira Is Essential for Normal Transcriptional Regulation and De Novo DNA Methylation during Mouse Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nashun, Buhe; Hill, Peter W.S.; Smallwood, Sebastien A.; Dharmalingam, Gopuraja; Amouroux, Rachel; Clark, Stephen J.; Sharma, Vineet; Ndjetehe, Elodie; Pelczar, Pawel; Festenstein, Richard J.; Kelsey, Gavin; Hajkova, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Summary The integrity of chromatin, which provides a dynamic template for all DNA-related processes in eukaryotes, is maintained through replication-dependent and -independent assembly pathways. To address the role of histone deposition in the absence of DNA replication, we deleted the H3.3 chaperone Hira in developing mouse oocytes. We show that chromatin of non-replicative developing oocytes is dynamic and that lack of continuous H3.3/H4 deposition alters chromatin structure, resulting in increased DNase I sensitivity, the accumulation of DNA damage, and a severe fertility phenotype. On the molecular level, abnormal chromatin structure leads to a dramatic decrease in the dynamic range of gene expression, the appearance of spurious transcripts, and inefficient de novo DNA methylation. Our study thus unequivocally shows the importance of continuous histone replacement and chromatin homeostasis for transcriptional regulation and normal developmental progression in a non-replicative system in vivo. PMID:26549683

  5. On the accurate direct computation of the isothermal compressibility for normal quantum simple fluids: application to quantum hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Sesé, Luis M

    2012-06-28

    A systematic study of the direct computation of the isothermal compressibility of normal quantum fluids is presented by analyzing the solving of the Ornstein-Zernike integral (OZ2) equation for the pair correlations between the path-integral necklace centroids. A number of issues related to the accuracy that can be achieved via this sort of procedure have been addressed, paying particular attention to the finite-N effects and to the definition of significant error bars for the estimates of isothermal compressibilities. Extensive path-integral Monte Carlo computations for the quantum hard-sphere fluid (QHS) have been performed in the (N, V, T) ensemble under temperature and density conditions for which dispersion effects dominate the quantum behavior. These computations have served to obtain the centroid correlations, which have been processed further via the numerical solving of the OZ2 equation. To do so, Baxter-Dixon-Hutchinson's variational procedure, complemented with Baumketner-Hiwatari's grand-canonical corrections, has been used. The virial equation of state has also been obtained and several comparisons between different versions of the QHS equation of state have been made. The results show the reliability of the procedure based on isothermal compressibilities discussed herein, which can then be regarded as a useful and quick means of obtaining the equation of state for fluids under quantum conditions involving strong repulsive interactions.

  6. Accurate discrimination of Alzheimer's disease from other dementia and/or normal subjects using SPECT specific volume analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyatomi, Hitoshi; Hashimoto, Jun; Yoshii, Fumuhito; Kazama, Toshiki; Kawada, Shuichi; Imai, Yutaka

    2014-03-01

    Discrimination between Alzheimer's disease and other dementia is clinically significant, however it is often difficult. In this study, we developed classification models among Alzheimer's disease (AD), other dementia (OD) and/or normal subjects (NC) using patient factors and indices obtained by brain perfusion SPECT. SPECT is commonly used to assess cerebral blood flow (CBF) and allows the evaluation of the severity of hypoperfusion by introducing statistical parametric mapping (SPM). We investigated a total of 150 cases (50 cases each for AD, OD, and NC) from Tokai University Hospital, Japan. In each case, we obtained a total of 127 candidate parameters from: (A) 2 patient factors (age and sex), (B) 12 CBF parameters and 113 SPM parameters including (C) 3 from specific volume analysis (SVA), and (D) 110 from voxel-based analysis stereotactic extraction estimation (vbSEE). We built linear classifiers with a statistical stepwise feature selection and evaluated the performance with the leave-one-out cross validation strategy. Our classifiers achieved very high classification performances with reasonable number of selected parameters. In the most significant discrimination in clinical, namely those of AD from OD, our classifier achieved both sensitivity (SE) and specificity (SP) of 96%. In a similar way, our classifiers achieved a SE of 90% and a SP of 98% in AD from NC, as well as a SE of 88% and a SP of 86% in AD from OD and NC cases. Introducing SPM indices such as SVA and vbSEE, classification performances improved around 7-15%. We confirmed that these SPM factors are quite important for diagnosing Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Transcriptional regulation by normal epithelium of premalignant to malignant progression in Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jia; Kelbauskas, Laimonas; Rezaie, Aida; Lee, Kristen; Ueberroth, Benjamin; Gao, Weimin; Derkach, Dmitry; Tran, Thai; Smith, Dean; Bussey, Kimberly J.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2016-01-01

    In carcinogenesis, intercellular interactions within and between cell types are critical but remain poorly understood. We present a study on intercellular interactions between normal and premalignant epithelial cells and their functional relevance in the context of premalignant to malignant progression in Barrett’s esophagus. Using whole transcriptome profiling we found that in the presence of normal epithelial cells, dysplastic cells but not normal cells, exhibit marked down-regulation of a number of key signaling pathways, including the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) and epithelial growth factor (EGF). Functional assays revealed both cell types showed repressed proliferation and significant changes in motility (speed, displacement and directionality) as a result of interactions between the two cell types. Cellular interactions appear to be mediated through both direct cell-cell contact and secreted ligands. The findings of this study are important in that they reveal, for the first time, the effects of cellular communication on gene expression and cellular function between premalignant (dysplastic) epithelial cells and their normal counterparts. PMID:27731371

  8. A putative APSES transcription factor is necessary for normal growth and development of Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Lee-Han; Kim, Ha-Eun; Park, Jae-Sin; Han, Kap-Hoon; Han, Dong-Min

    2013-12-01

    The nsdD gene encoding a GATA type transcription factor positively controls sexual development in Aspergillus nidulans. According to microarray data, 20 genes that were upregulated by deleting nsdD during various life cycle stages were randomly selected and deleted for functional analysis. None of the mutants showed apparent changes in growth or development compared with those of the wild-type except the AN3154 gene that encodes a putative APSES transcription factor and is an ortholog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae swi4. Deleting AN3154 resulted in retarded growth and development, and the gene was named rgdA (retared growth and development). The rgdA deletion mutant developed a reduced number of conidia even under favorable conditions for asexual development. The retarded growth and development was partially suppressed by the veA1 mutation. The conidial heads of the mutant aborted, showing reduced and irregular shaped phialides. Fruiting body development was delayed compared with that in the wild-type. The mutant did not respond to various nutritional or environmental factors that affected the development patterns. The rgdA gene was expressed at low levels throughout the life cycle and was not significantly affected by several regulators of sexual and asexual development such as nsdD, veA, stuA, or brlA. However, the rgdA gene affected brlA and abaA expression, which function as key regulators of asexual sporulation, suggesting that rgdA functions upstream of those genes.

  9. Probabilistic Inference on Multiple Normalized Signal Profiles from Next Generation Sequencing: Transcription Factor Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Peng, Chengbin; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    With the prevalence of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with sequencing (ChIP-Seq) technology, massive ChIP-Seq data has been accumulated. The ChIP-Seq technology measures the genome-wide occupancy of DNA-binding proteins in vivo. It is well-known that different DNA-binding protein occupancies may result in a gene being regulated in different conditions (e.g. different cell types). To fully understand a gene's function, it is essential to develop probabilistic models on multiple ChIP-Seq profiles for deciphering the gene transcription causalities. In this work, we propose and describe two probabilistic models. Assuming the conditional independence of different DNA-binding proteins' occupancies, the first method (SignalRanker) is developed as an intuitive method for ChIP-Seq genome-wide signal profile inference. Unfortunately, such an assumption may not always hold in some gene regulation cases. Thus, we propose and describe another method (FullSignalRanker) which does not make the conditional independence assumption. The proposed methods are compared with other existing methods on ENCODE ChIP-Seq datasets, demonstrating its regression and classification ability. The results suggest that FullSignalRanker is the best-performing method for recovering the signal ranks on the promoter and enhancer regions. In addition, FullSignalRanker is also the best-performing method for peak sequence classification. We envision that SignalRanker and FullSignalRanker will become important in the era of next generation sequencing. FullSignalRanker program is available on the following website: http://www.cs.toronto.edu/~wkc/FullSignalRanker/.

  10. Probabilistic Inference on Multiple Normalized Signal Profiles from Next Generation Sequencing: Transcription Factor Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Peng, Chengbin; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    With the prevalence of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with sequencing (ChIP-Seq) technology, massive ChIP-Seq data has been accumulated. The ChIP-Seq technology measures the genome-wide occupancy of DNA-binding proteins in vivo. It is well-known that different DNA-binding protein occupancies may result in a gene being regulated in different conditions (e.g. different cell types). To fully understand a gene's function, it is essential to develop probabilistic models on multiple ChIP-Seq profiles for deciphering the gene transcription causalities. In this work, we propose and describe two probabilistic models. Assuming the conditional independence of different DNA-binding proteins' occupancies, the first method (SignalRanker) is developed as an intuitive method for ChIP-Seq genome-wide signal profile inference. Unfortunately, such an assumption may not always hold in some gene regulation cases. Thus, we propose and describe another method (FullSignalRanker) which does not make the conditional independence assumption. The proposed methods are compared with other existing methods on ENCODE ChIP-Seq datasets, demonstrating its regression and classification ability. The results suggest that FullSignalRanker is the best-performing method for recovering the signal ranks on the promoter and enhancer regions. In addition, FullSignalRanker is also the best-performing method for peak sequence classification. We envision that SignalRanker and FullSignalRanker will become important in the era of next generation sequencing. FullSignalRanker program is available on the following website: http://www.cs.toronto.edu/~wkc/FullSignalRanker/. PMID:26671811

  11. Statistical thermodynamics of transcription profiles in normal development and tumorigeneses in cohorts of patients.

    PubMed

    Remacle, F; Levine, R D

    2015-12-01

    Experimental biology is providing the distribution of numerous different biological molecules inside cells and in body fluids of patients. Statistical methods of analysis have very successfully examined these rather large databases. We seek to use a thermodynamic analysis to provide a physical understanding and quantitative characterization of human cancers and other pathologies within a molecule-centered approach. The key technical development is the introduction of a Lagrangian. By imposing constraints the minimal value of the Lagrangian defines a thermodynamically stable state of the cellular system. The minimization also allows using experimental data measured at a number of different conditions to evaluate the steady-state distribution of biomolecules such as messenger RNAs. Thereby the number of effectively accessible quantum states of biomolecules is determined from the experimentally measured expression levels. With the increased resolution provided by the minimization of the Lagrangian one can differentiate between normal and diseased patients and further between disease subtypes. Each such refinement corresponds to imposing an additional constraint of biological origin. The constraints are the unbalanced ongoing biological processes in the system. MicroRNA expression level data for control and diseased lung cancer patients are analyzed as an example.

  12. Haplotype and diplotype analyses of variation in ERCC5 transcription cis-regulation in normal bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Crawford, Erin L; Blomquist, Thomas M; Khuder, Sadik A; Yeo, Jiyoun; Levin, Albert M; Willey, James C

    2016-07-01

    Excision repair cross-complementation group 5 (ERCC5) gene plays an important role in nucleotide excision repair, and dysregulation of ERCC5 is associated with increased lung cancer risk. Haplotype and diplotype analyses were conducted in normal bronchial epithelial cells (NBEC) to better understand mechanisms responsible for interindividual variation in transcript abundance regulation of ERCC5 We determined genotypes at putative ERCC5 cis-regulatory SNPs (cis-rSNP) rs751402 and rs2296147, and marker SNPs rs1047768 and rs17655. ERCC5 allele-specific transcript abundance was assessed by a recently developed targeted sequencing method. Syntenic relationships among alleles at rs751402, rs2296147, and rs1047768 were assessed by allele-specific PCR followed by Sanger sequencing. We then assessed association of ERCC5 allele-specific expression at rs1047768 with haplotype and diplotype structure at cis-rSNPs rs751402 and rs2296147. Genotype analysis revealed significantly (P < 0.005) higher interindividual variation in allelic ratios in cDNA samples relative to matched gDNA samples at both rs1047768 and rs17655. By diplotype analysis, mean expression was higher at the rs1047768 alleles syntenic with rs2296147 T allele compared with rs2296147 C allele. Furthermore, mean expression was lower at rs17655 C allele, which is syntenic with G allele at a linked SNP rs873601 (D' = 0.95). These data support the conclusions that in NBEC, T allele at SNP rs2296147 upregulates ERCC5, variation at rs751402 does not alter ERCC5 regulation, and that C allele at SNP rs17655 downregulates ERCC5 Variation in ERCC5 transcript abundance associated with allelic variation at these SNPs could result in variation in NER function in NBEC and lung cancer risk. PMID:27235448

  13. Selection and validation of reference genes for transcript normalization in gene expression studies in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Pollier, Jacob; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Rischer, Heiko; Goossens, Alain

    2014-10-01

    Quantitative Real-Time PCR (qPCR), a sensitive and commonly used technique for gene expression analysis, requires stably expressed reference genes for normalization of gene expression. Up to now, only one reference gene for qPCR analysis, corresponding to 40S Ribosomal protein S9 (RPS9), was available for the medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus, the only source of the commercial anticancer drugs vinblastine and vincristine. Here, we screened for additional reference genes for this plant species by mining C. roseus RNA-Seq data for orthologs of 22 genes known to be stably expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana and qualified as superior reference genes for this model plant species. Based on this, eight candidate C. roseus reference genes were identified and, together with RPS9, evaluated by performing qPCR on a series of different C. roseus explants and tissue cultures. NormFinder, geNorm and BestKeeper analyses of the resulting qPCR data revealed that the orthologs of At2g28390 (SAND family protein, SAND), At2g32170 (N2227-like family protein, N2227) and At4g26410 (Expressed protein, EXP) had the highest expression stability across the different C. roseus samples and are superior as reference genes as compared to the traditionally used RPS9. Analysis of publicly available C. roseus RNA-Seq data confirmed the expression stability of SAND and N2227, underscoring their value as reference genes for C. roseus qPCR analysis.

  14. Selection of internal reference genes for normalization of quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis in the canine brain and other organs.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Je; Huh, Jae-Won; Kim, Young-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Rae; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Sun-Uk; Kim, Heui-Soo; Kim, Min Kyu; Chang, Kyu-Tae

    2013-05-01

    Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is a specific and sensitive technique for quantifying gene expression. To analyze qRT-PCR data accurately, suitable reference genes that show consistent expression patterns across different tissues and experimental conditions should be selected. The objective of this study was to obtain the most stable reference genes in dogs, using samples from 13 different brain tissues and 10 other organs. 16 well-known candidate reference genes were analyzed by the geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper programs. Brain tissues were derived from several different anatomical regions, including the forebrain, cerebrum, diencephalon, hindbrain, and metencephalon, and grouped accordingly. Combination of the three different analyses clearly indicated that the ideal reference genes are ribosomal protien S5 (RPS5) in whole brain, RPL8 and RPS5 in whole body tissues, RPS5 and RPS19 in the forebrain and cerebrum, RPL32 and RPS19 in the diencephalon, GAPDH and RPS19 in the hindbrain, and MRPS7 and RPL13A in the metencephalon. These genes were identified as ideal for the normalization of qRT-PCR results in the respective tissues. These findings indicate more suitable and stable reference genes for future studies of canine gene expression.

  15. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of the human cell cycle identifies genes differentially regulated in normal and cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Joseph, Ziv; Siegfried, Zahava; Brandeis, Michael; Brors, Benedikt; Lu, Yong; Eils, Roland; Dynlacht, Brian D.; Simon, Itamar

    2008-01-01

    Characterization of the transcriptional regulatory network of the normal cell cycle is essential for understanding the perturbations that lead to cancer. However, the complete set of cycling genes in primary cells has not yet been identified. Here, we report the results of genome-wide expression profiling experiments on synchronized primary human foreskin fibroblasts across the cell cycle. Using a combined experimental and computational approach to deconvolve measured expression values into “single-cell” expression profiles, we were able to overcome the limitations inherent in synchronizing nontransformed mammalian cells. This allowed us to identify 480 periodically expressed genes in primary human foreskin fibroblasts. Analysis of the reconstructed primary cell profiles and comparison with published expression datasets from synchronized transformed cells reveals a large number of genes that cycle exclusively in primary cells. This conclusion was supported by both bioinformatic analysis and experiments performed on other cell types. We suggest that this approach will help pinpoint genetic elements contributing to normal cell growth and cellular transformation. PMID:18195366

  16. Transcription Dynamics in Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Moore, John W.; Loake, Gary J.; Spoel, Steven H.

    2011-01-01

    Plant cells maintain sophisticated gene transcription programs to regulate their development, communication, and response to the environment. Environmental stress cues, such as pathogen encounter, lead to dramatic reprogramming of transcription to favor stress responses over normal cellular functions. Transcription reprogramming is conferred by the concerted action of myriad transcription (co)factors that function directly or indirectly to recruit or release RNA Polymerase II. To establish an effective defense response, cells require transcription (co)factors to deploy their activity rapidly, transiently, spatially, and hierarchically. Recent findings suggest that in plant immunity these requirements are met by posttranslational modifications that accurately regulate transcription (co)factor activity as well as by sequential pulse activation of specific gene transcription programs that provide feedback and feedforward properties to the defense gene network. Here, we integrate these recent findings from plant defense studies into the emerging field of transcription dynamics in eukaryotes. PMID:21841124

  17. Analysis of Matched Tumor and Normal Profiles Reveals Common Transcriptional and Epigenetic Signals Shared across Cancer Types

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Andrew M.; Kreisberg, Jason F.; Ideker, Trey

    2015-01-01

    To identify the transcriptional regulatory changes that are most widespread in solid tumors, we performed a pan-cancer analysis using over 600 pairs of tumors and adjacent normal tissues profiled in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Frequency of upregulation was calculated across mRNA expression levels, microRNA expression levels and CpG methylation sites and is provided here as a resource. Frequent tumor-associated alterations were identified using a simple statistical approach. Many of the identified changes were consistent with the increased rate of cell division in cancer, such as the overexpression of cell cycle genes and hypermethylation of PRC2 binding sites. However, we also identified proliferation-independent alterations, which highlight novel pathways essential to tumor formation. Nearly all of the GABA receptors are frequently downregulated, with the gene encoding the delta subunit (GABRD) strongly upregulated as the notable exception. Metabolic genes are also frequently downregulated, particularly alcohol dehydrogenases and others consistent with the decreased role of oxidative phosphorylation in cancerous cells. Alterations in the composition of GABA receptors and metabolism may play a key role in the differentiation of cancer cells, independent of proliferation. PMID:26555223

  18. NCLscan: accurate identification of non-co-linear transcripts (fusion, trans-splicing and circular RNA) with a good balance between sensitivity and precision

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Trees-Juen; Wu, Chan-Shuo; Chen, Chia-Ying; Hung, Li-Yuan; Chiang, Tai-Wei; Yang, Min-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of RNA-seq data often detects numerous ‘non-co-linear’ (NCL) transcripts, which comprised sequence segments that are topologically inconsistent with their corresponding DNA sequences in the reference genome. However, detection of NCL transcripts involves two major challenges: removal of false positives arising from alignment artifacts and discrimination between different types of NCL transcripts (trans-spliced, circular or fusion transcripts). Here, we developed a new NCL-transcript-detecting method (‘NCLscan’), which utilized a stepwise alignment strategy to almost completely eliminate false calls (>98% precision) without sacrificing true positives, enabling NCLscan outperform 18 other publicly-available tools (including fusion- and circular-RNA-detecting tools) in terms of sensitivity and precision, regardless of the generation strategy of simulated dataset, type of intragenic or intergenic NCL event, read depth of coverage, read length or expression level of NCL transcript. With the high accuracy, NCLscan was applied to distinguishing between trans-spliced, circular and fusion transcripts on the basis of poly(A)- and nonpoly(A)-selected RNA-seq data. We showed that circular RNAs were expressed more ubiquitously, more abundantly and less cell type-specifically than trans-spliced and fusion transcripts. Our study thus describes a robust pipeline for the discovery of NCL transcripts, and sheds light on the fundamental biology of these non-canonical RNA events in human transcriptome. PMID:26442529

  19. Semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of mRNA for growth factors and growth factor receptors from normal and healing rabbit medial collateral ligament tissue.

    PubMed

    Sciore, P; Boykiw, R; Hart, D A

    1998-07-01

    Growth factors and their receptors play an essential role in the development, maturation, and response to injury of all tissues. A number of studies have explored the possibility of improving ligament healing with exogenous growth factors. However, limited data is available regarding the endogenous growth factor network in ligaments on which any exogenous growth factors must impact. The purpose of this study was to assess the endogenous growth factor network with molecular techniques. By the sensitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction technique, transcripts for a number of growth factors and receptors were detected with RNA isolated from normal and healing rabbit medial collateral ligament tissues. These include transforming growth factor-beta1, insulin-like growth factors I and II, basic fibroblast growth factor, endothelin-1, and the receptors for insulin and insulin-like growth factor II. Semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of RNA from normal and scar tissues from the medial collateral ligament revealed that the levels of several transcripts were elevated in the scar tissue. It was not possible to confirm biological activity because of the hypocellularity of the tissues; however, the results obtained indicate that the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction approach to defining the endogenous growth factor-receptor phenotype is feasible, and further definition should contribute to the development of rational approaches to exogenous therapy to improve healing.

  20. Lesion Explorer: a video-guided, standardized protocol for accurate and reliable MRI-derived volumetrics in Alzheimer's disease and normal elderly.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Joel; Scott, Christopher J M; McNeely, Alicia A; Berezuk, Courtney; Gao, Fuqiang; Szilagyi, Gregory M; Black, Sandra E

    2014-04-14

    Obtaining in vivo human brain tissue volumetrics from MRI is often complicated by various technical and biological issues. These challenges are exacerbated when significant brain atrophy and age-related white matter changes (e.g. Leukoaraiosis) are present. Lesion Explorer (LE) is an accurate and reliable neuroimaging pipeline specifically developed to address such issues commonly observed on MRI of Alzheimer's disease and normal elderly. The pipeline is a complex set of semi-automatic procedures which has been previously validated in a series of internal and external reliability tests(1,2). However, LE's accuracy and reliability is highly dependent on properly trained manual operators to execute commands, identify distinct anatomical landmarks, and manually edit/verify various computer-generated segmentation outputs. LE can be divided into 3 main components, each requiring a set of commands and manual operations: 1) Brain-Sizer, 2) SABRE, and 3) Lesion-Seg. Brain-Sizer's manual operations involve editing of the automatic skull-stripped total intracranial vault (TIV) extraction mask, designation of ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (vCSF), and removal of subtentorial structures. The SABRE component requires checking of image alignment along the anterior and posterior commissure (ACPC) plane, and identification of several anatomical landmarks required for regional parcellation. Finally, the Lesion-Seg component involves manual checking of the automatic lesion segmentation of subcortical hyperintensities (SH) for false positive errors. While on-site training of the LE pipeline is preferable, readily available visual teaching tools with interactive training images are a viable alternative. Developed to ensure a high degree of accuracy and reliability, the following is a step-by-step, video-guided, standardized protocol for LE's manual procedures.

  1. Lesion Explorer: a video-guided, standardized protocol for accurate and reliable MRI-derived volumetrics in Alzheimer's disease and normal elderly.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Joel; Scott, Christopher J M; McNeely, Alicia A; Berezuk, Courtney; Gao, Fuqiang; Szilagyi, Gregory M; Black, Sandra E

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining in vivo human brain tissue volumetrics from MRI is often complicated by various technical and biological issues. These challenges are exacerbated when significant brain atrophy and age-related white matter changes (e.g. Leukoaraiosis) are present. Lesion Explorer (LE) is an accurate and reliable neuroimaging pipeline specifically developed to address such issues commonly observed on MRI of Alzheimer's disease and normal elderly. The pipeline is a complex set of semi-automatic procedures which has been previously validated in a series of internal and external reliability tests(1,2). However, LE's accuracy and reliability is highly dependent on properly trained manual operators to execute commands, identify distinct anatomical landmarks, and manually edit/verify various computer-generated segmentation outputs. LE can be divided into 3 main components, each requiring a set of commands and manual operations: 1) Brain-Sizer, 2) SABRE, and 3) Lesion-Seg. Brain-Sizer's manual operations involve editing of the automatic skull-stripped total intracranial vault (TIV) extraction mask, designation of ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (vCSF), and removal of subtentorial structures. The SABRE component requires checking of image alignment along the anterior and posterior commissure (ACPC) plane, and identification of several anatomical landmarks required for regional parcellation. Finally, the Lesion-Seg component involves manual checking of the automatic lesion segmentation of subcortical hyperintensities (SH) for false positive errors. While on-site training of the LE pipeline is preferable, readily available visual teaching tools with interactive training images are a viable alternative. Developed to ensure a high degree of accuracy and reliability, the following is a step-by-step, video-guided, standardized protocol for LE's manual procedures. PMID:24797507

  2. Variations of transcript profiles between sea otters Enhydra lutris from Prince William Sound, Alaska, and clinically normal reference otters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miles, A. Keith; Bowen, Lizabeth; Ballachey, Brenda E.; Bodkin, James L.; Murray, M.; Estes, J.L.; Keister, Robin A.; Stott, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    Development of blood leukocyte gene transcript profiles has the potential to expand condition assessments beyond those currently available to evaluate wildlife health, including sea otters Enhydra lutris, both individually and as populations. The 10 genes targeted in our study represent multiple physiological systems that play a role in immuno-modulation, inflammation, cell protection, tumor suppression, cellular stress-response, xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, and antioxidant enzymes. These genes can be modified by biological, physical, or anthropogenic impacts and consequently provide information on the general type of stressors present in a given environment. We compared gene transcript profiles of sea otters sampled in 2008 among areas within Prince William Sound impacted to varying degrees by the 1989 ‘Exxon Valdez’ oil spill with those of captive and wild reference sea otters. Profiles of sea otters from Prince William Sound showed elevated transcription in genes associated with tumor formation, cell death, organic exposure, inflammation, and viral exposure when compared to the reference sea otter group, indicating possible recent and chronic exposure to organic contaminants. Sea otters from historically designated oiled areas within Prince William Sound 19 yr after the oil spill had higher transcription of genes associated with tumor formation, cell death, heat shock, and inflammation than those from areas designated as less impacted by the spill.

  3. Identification of novel breast cancer-associated transcripts by UniGene database mining and gene expression analysis in normal and malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Laversin, Stéphanie A-S; Phatak, Vinaya M; Powe, Des G; Li, Geng; Miles, Amanda K; Hughes, David C; Ball, Graham R; Ellis, Ian O; Gritzapis, Angelos D; Missitzis, Ioannis; McArdle, Stéphanie E B; Rees, Robert C

    2013-03-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous and complex disease. Although the use of tumor biomarkers has improved individualized breast cancer care, i.e., assessment of risk, diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction of treatment outcome, new markers are required to further improve patient clinical management. In the present study, a search for novel breast cancer-associated genes was performed by mining the UniGene database for expressed sequence tags (ESTs) originating from human normal breast, breast cancer tissue, or breast cancer cell lines. Two hundred and twenty-eight distinct breast-associated UniGene Clusters (BUC1-228) matched the search criteria. Four BUC ESTs (BUC6, BUC9, BUC10, and BUC11) were subsequently selected for extensive in silico database searches, and in vitro analyses through sequencing and RT-PCR based assays on well-characterized cell lines and tissues of normal and cancerous origin. BUC6, BUC9, BUC10, and BUC11 are clustered on 10p11.21-12.1 and showed no homology to any known RNAs. Overall, expression of the four BUC transcripts was high in normal breast and testis tissue, and in some breast cancers; in contrast, BUC was low in other normal tissues, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and other cancer cell lines. Results to-date suggest that BUC11 and BUC9 translate to protein and BUC11 cytoplasmic and nuclear protein expression was detected in a large cohort of breast cancer samples using immunohistochemistry. This study demonstrates the discovery and expression analysis of a tissue-restricted novel transcript set which is strongly expressed in breast tissue and their application as clinical cancer biomarkers clearly warrants further investigation.

  4. Evaluation of reference genes for accurate normalization of gene expression for real time-quantitative PCR in Pyrus pyrifolia using different tissue samples and seasonal conditions.

    PubMed

    Imai, Tsuyoshi; Ubi, Benjamin E; Saito, Takanori; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2014-01-01

    We have evaluated suitable reference genes for real time (RT)-quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis in Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia). We tested most frequently used genes in the literature such as β-Tubulin, Histone H3, Actin, Elongation factor-1α, Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, together with newly added genes Annexin, SAND and TIP41. A total of 17 primer combinations for these eight genes were evaluated using cDNAs synthesized from 16 tissue samples from four groups, namely: flower bud, flower organ, fruit flesh and fruit skin. Gene expression stabilities were analyzed using geNorm and NormFinder software packages or by ΔCt method. geNorm analysis indicated three best performing genes as being sufficient for reliable normalization of RT-qPCR data. Suitable reference genes were different among sample groups, suggesting the importance of validation of gene expression stability of reference genes in the samples of interest. Ranking of stability was basically similar between geNorm and NormFinder, suggesting usefulness of these programs based on different algorithms. ΔCt method suggested somewhat different results in some groups such as flower organ or fruit skin; though the overall results were in good correlation with geNorm or NormFinder. Gene expression of two cold-inducible genes PpCBF2 and PpCBF4 were quantified using the three most and the three least stable reference genes suggested by geNorm. Although normalized quantities were different between them, the relative quantities within a group of samples were similar even when the least stable reference genes were used. Our data suggested that using the geometric mean value of three reference genes for normalization is quite a reliable approach to evaluating gene expression by RT-qPCR. We propose that the initial evaluation of gene expression stability by ΔCt method, and subsequent evaluation by geNorm or NormFinder for limited number of superior gene candidates will be a practical way of finding out

  5. Myc post-transcriptionally induces HIF1 protein and target gene expression in normal and cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Doe, Megan R.; Ascano, Janice; Kaur, Mandeep; Cole, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    c-Myc is frequently overexpressed in tumors and plays an important role in the regulation of cancer metabolism. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF1), the master regulator of the hypoxic response, enhances tumorigenesis and influences metabolism via upregulation of the glycolytic pathway and suppression of mitochondrial respiration. Together, deregulated Myc and HIF1 cooperate to lend metabolic advantages to proliferating cancer cells and contribute to the Warburg Effect. Here we show that overexpression of Myc significantly stabilizes the alpha subunit of HIF1 (HIF1alpha) under normoxic conditions and enhances HIF1alpha accumulation under hypoxic conditions in cells. Post-transcriptional regulation of HIF1α by Myc led to the induction of HIF1α gene targets. Normoxic HIF1α protein expression was also dependent on Myc. Functionally; HIF1α expression was required for Myc-induced anchorage-independent growth and cell proliferation. Myc-dependent stabilization of HIF1α involved either disruption of binding to the VHL complex or post-translational protein modifications. Taken together, our findings uncover a previously uncharacterized regulatory relationship between Myc and HIF1 that has important implications for cancer metabolism and development. PMID:22186139

  6. Normal Tissue Complication Probability Estimation by the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman Method Does Not Accurately Predict Spinal Cord Tolerance to Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Megan E.; Luxton, Gary; Choi, Clara Y.H.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Chang, Steven D.; Adler, John R.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) analyses of the human spinal cord by use of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model, supplemented by linear-quadratic modeling to account for the effect of fractionation, predict the risk of myelopathy from stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: From November 2001 to July 2008, 24 spinal hemangioblastomas in 17 patients were treated with SRS. Of the tumors, 17 received 1 fraction with a median dose of 20 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy) and 7 received 20 to 25 Gy in 2 or 3 sessions, with cord maximum doses of 22.7 Gy (range, 17.8-30.9 Gy) and 22.0 Gy (range, 20.2-26.6 Gy), respectively. By use of conventional values for {alpha}/{beta}, volume parameter n, 50% complication probability dose TD{sub 50}, and inverse slope parameter m, a computationally simplified implementation of the LKB model was used to calculate the biologically equivalent uniform dose and NTCP for each treatment. Exploratory calculations were performed with alternate values of {alpha}/{beta} and n. Results: In this study 1 case (4%) of myelopathy occurred. The LKB model using radiobiological parameters from Emami and the logistic model with parameters from Schultheiss overestimated complication rates, predicting 13 complications (54%) and 18 complications (75%), respectively. An increase in the volume parameter (n), to assume greater parallel organization, improved the predictive value of the models. Maximum-likelihood LKB fitting of {alpha}/{beta} and n yielded better predictions (0.7 complications), with n = 0.023 and {alpha}/{beta} = 17.8 Gy. Conclusions: The spinal cord tolerance to the dosimetry of SRS is higher than predicted by the LKB model using any set of accepted parameters. Only a high {alpha}/{beta} value in the LKB model and only a large volume effect in the logistic model with Schultheiss data could explain the low number of complications observed. This finding emphasizes that radiobiological models

  7. mRNA decay factor AUF1 maintains normal aging, telomere maintenance and suppression of senescence by activation of telomerase transcription

    PubMed Central

    Pont, Adam R.; Sadri, Navid; Hsiao, Susan J.; Smith, Susan; Schneider, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Inflammation is associated with DNA damage, cellular senescence and aging. Cessation of the inflammatory cytokine response is mediated in part through cytokine mRNA degradation facilitated by RNA binding proteins, including AUF1. We report a major unrecognized function of AUF1 – it activates telomerase expression, suppresses cellular senescence and maintains normal aging. AUF1 deficient mice undergo striking telomere erosion, markedly increased DNA damage responses at telomere ends, pronounced cellular senescence and rapid premature aging that increases with successive generations, which can be rescued in AUF1 knockout mice and their cultured cells by resupplying AUF1 expression. AUF1 binds and strongly activates the transcription promoter for telomerase catalytic subunit Tert. In addition to directing inflammatory cytokine mRNA decay, AUF1 destabilizes cell cycle checkpoint mRNAs, preventing cellular senescence. Thus, a single gene, AUF1, links maintenance of telomere length and normal aging to attenuation of inflammatory cytokine expression and inhibition of cellular senescence. PMID:22633954

  8. Microdissected double-minute DNA detects variable patterns of chromosomal localizations and multiple abundantly expressed transcripts in normal and leukemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, S.; Zhou, Hongyi; Stass, S.A.; Sen, P. ); Mulac-Jericevic, B.; Pirrotta, V. )

    1994-02-01

    Double-minute (dm) chromosomes are cytogenetically resolvable DNA amplification-mediating acentric extrachromosomal structures that are commonly seen in primary tumors, tumor cell lines, and drug-resistant cells grown in vitro. Selective isolation of dm DNAs with standard molecular biological techniques is difficult, and thus, detailed studies to elucidate their structure, site of chromosomal origin, and chromosomal reintegration patterns have been limited. In those instances in which a gene has been localized on dms, characterization of the remainder of the DNA, which far exceeds the size of the gene identified, has remained inconclusive. dms seen in the acute myeloid leukemia cell line HL-60 have been shown to harbor the c-myc protooncogene. In this paper, the authors report the successful isolation of the dm-specific DNAs from these cells by the microdissection/polymerase chain reaction technique and demonstrate that the dm DNAs derived from a single discrete normal chromosome segment 8q24.1-q24.2 reintegrate at various specific locations in the leukemic cells. The microdissected dm DNA detects multiple abundantly expressed transcripts distinct from c-myc mRNA on Northern blots. By devising a [open quotes]transcript selection[close quotes] strategy, they cloned the partial genomic sequence of a gene from the microdissected DNA that encodes two of these RNAs. This strategy will be generally applicable for rapid cloning of unknown amplified genes harbored on dms. With DNA from 20 microdissected dms, they constructed a genomic library of about 20,000 recombinant microclones with an average insert size of about 450 bp. The microclones should help in isolating corresponding yeast artificial chromosome clones for high-resolution physical mapping of dms in HL-60 cells. Furthermore, application of the microdissection technique appears to be an extremely feasible approach to characterization of dms in other cell types. 42 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Transcription profiling using RNA-Seq demonstrates expression differences in the body walls of juvenile albino and normal sea cucumbers Apostichopus japonicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Deyou; Yang, Hongsheng; Sun, Lina; Chen, Muyan

    2014-01-01

    Sea cucumbers Apostichopus japonicus are one of the most important aquaculture species in China. Their normal body color is black to fit their surroundings. Wild albinos are rare and hard to breed. To understand the differences between albino and normal (control) sea cucumbers at the transcriptional level, we sequenced the transcriptomes in their body-wall tissues using RNA-Seq high-throughput sequencing. Approximately 4.876 million (M) and 4.884 M 200-nucleotide-long cDNA reads were produced in the cDNA libraries derived from the body walls of albino and control samples, respectively. A total of 9 561 (46.89%) putative genes were identified from among the RNA-Seq reads in both libraries. After filtering, 837 significantly differentially regulated genes were identified in the albino library compared with in the control library, and 3.6% of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found to have changed those more than five-fold. The expression levels of 10 DEGs were checked by real-time PCR and the results were in full accord with the RNA-Seq expression trends, although the amplitude of the differences in expression levels was lower in all cases. A series of pathways were significantly enriched for the DEGs. These pathways were closely related to phagocytosis, the complement and coagulation cascades, apoptosis-related diseases, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, and cell adhesion. The differences in gene expression and enriched pathways between the albino and control sea cucumbers offer control targets for cultivating excellent albino A. japonicus strains in the future.

  10. Identification of stem cell transcriptional programs normally expressed in embryonic and neural stem cells in alloreactive CD8+ T cells mediating graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Koji; Cui, Shuaiying; Kuick, Rork; Mineishi, Shin; Hexner, Elizabeth; Ferrara, James LM; Emerson, Stephen G.; Zhang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    A hallmark of graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD), a life-threatening complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, is the cytopathic injury of host tissues mediated by persistent alloreactive effector T cells (TE). However, the mechanisms that regulate the persistence of alloreactive TE during GVHD remain largely unknown. Using mouse GVHD models, we demonstrate that alloreactive CD8+ TE rapidly diminished in vivo when adoptively transferred into irradiated secondary congenic recipient mice. In contrast, although alloreactive CD8+ TE underwent massive apoptosis upon chronic exposure to alloantigens, they proliferated in vivo in secondary allogeneic recipients, persisted and caused severe GVHD. Thus, the continuous proliferation of alloreactive CD8+ TE, which is mediated by alloantigenic stimuli rather than homeostatic factors, is critical to maintaining their persistence. Gene expression profile analysis revealed that while alloreactive CD8+ TE increased the expression of genes associated with cell death, they activated a group of stem cell genes normally expressed in embryonic and neural stem cells. Most of these stem cell genes are associated with cell cycle regulation, DNA replication, chromatin modification and transcription. One of these genes, Ezh2, which encodes a chromatin modifying enzyme, was abundantly expressed in CD8+ TE. Silencing Ezh2 significantly reduced the proliferation of alloantigen-activated CD8+ T cells. Thus, these findings identify that a group of stem cell genes could play important roles in sustaining terminally differentiated alloreactive CD8+ TE and may be therapeutic targets for controlling GVHD. PMID:20116439

  11. Accurate quantification of sphingosine-1-phosphate in normal and Fabry disease plasma, cells and tissues by LC-MS/MS with (13)C-encoded natural S1P as internal standard.

    PubMed

    Mirzaian, Mina; Wisse, Patrick; Ferraz, Maria J; Marques, André R A; Gabriel, Tanit L; van Roomen, Cindy P A A; Ottenhoff, Roelof; van Eijk, Marco; Codée, Jeroen D C; van der Marel, Gijsbert A; Overkleeft, Herman S; Aerts, Johannes M

    2016-08-01

    We developed a mass spectrometric procedure to quantify sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in biological materials. The use of newly synthesized (13)C5 C18-S1P and commercial C17-S1P as internal standards rendered very similar results with respect to linearity, limit of detection and limit of quantitation. Caution is warranted with determination of plasma S1P levels. Earlier it was reported that S1P is elevated in plasma of Fabry disease patients. We investigated this with the improved quantification. No clear conclusion could be drawn for patient plasma samples given the lack of uniformity of blood collection and plasma preparation. To still obtain insight, plasma and tissues were identically collected from α-galactosidase A deficient Fabry mice and matched control animals. No significant difference was observed in plasma S1P levels. A significant 2.3 fold increase was observed in kidney of Fabry mice, but not in liver and heart. Comparative analysis of S1P in cultured fibroblasts from normal subjects and classically affected Fabry disease males revealed no significant difference. In conclusion, accurate quantification of S1P in biological materials is feasible by mass spectrometry using the internal standards (13)C5 C18-S1P or C17-S1P. Significant local increases of S1P in the kidney might occur in Fabry disease as suggested by the mouse model. PMID:27221202

  12. Correlation between CYP1A1 transcript, protein level, enzyme activity and DNA adduct formation in normal human mammary epithelial cell strains exposed to benzo[a]pyrene

    PubMed Central

    Divi, Rao L.; Einem Lindeman, Tracey L.; Shockley, Marie E.; Keshava, Channa; Weston, Ainsley; Poirier, Miriam C.

    2014-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) benzo(a)pyrene (BP) is thought to bind covalently to DNA, through metabolism by cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and CYP1B1, and other enzymes, to form r7, t8, t9-trihydroxy-c-10-(N 2-deoxyguanosyl)-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-benzo[a]-pyrene (BPdG). Evaluation of RNA expression data, to understand the contribution of different metabolic enzymes to BPdG formation, is typically presented as fold-change observed upon BP exposure, leaving the actual number of RNA transcripts unknown. Here, we have quantified RNA copies/ng cDNA (RNA cpn) for CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, as well as NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), which may reduce formation of BPdG adducts, using primary normal human mammary epithelial cell (NHMEC) strains, and the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. In unexposed NHMECs, basal RNA cpn values were 58–836 for CYP1A1, 336–5587 for CYP1B1 and 5943–40112 for NQO1. In cells exposed to 4.0 µM BP for 12h, RNA cpn values were 251–13234 for CYP1A1, 4133–57078 for CYP1B1 and 4456–55887 for NQO1. There were 3.5 (mean, range 0.2–15.8) BPdG adducts/108 nucleotides in the NHMECs (n = 16), and 790 in the MCF-7s. In the NHMECs, BP-induced CYP1A1 RNA cpn was highly associated with BPdG (P = 0.002), but CYP1B1 and NQO1 were not. Western blots of four NHMEC strains, chosen for different levels of BPdG adducts, showed a linear correlation between BPdG and CYP1A1, but not CYP1B1 or NQO1. Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, which measures CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 together, correlated with BPdG, but NQO1 activity did not. Despite more numerous levels of CYP1B1 and NQO1 RNA cpn in unexposed and BP-exposed NHMECs and MCF-7cells, BPdG formation was only correlated with induction of CYP1A1 RNA cpn. The higher level of BPdG in MCF-7 cells, compared to NHMECs, may have been due to a much increased induction of CYP1A1 and EROD. Overall, BPdG correlation was observed with CYP1A1 protein and CYP1A1/1B1 enzyme activity, but not with CYP1B1 or NQO

  13. Teaching normal birth, normally.

    PubMed

    Hotelling, Barbara A

    2009-01-01

    Teaching normal-birth Lamaze classes normally involves considering the qualities that make birth normal and structuring classes to embrace those qualities. In this column, teaching strategies are suggested for classes that unfold naturally, free from unnecessary interventions. PMID:19436595

  14. Frizzled-4 C-terminus Distal to KTXXXW Motif is Essential for Normal Dishevelled Recruitment and Norrin-stimulated Activation of Lef/Tcf-dependent Transcriptional Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pau, Milly S.; Gao, Shujuan; Malbon, Craig C.; Wang, Hsien-yu

    2016-01-01

    The carboxy (C)-termini of G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) dictate essential functions. The KTXXXW motif C-terminus of Frizzleds (FZD) has been implicated in recruitment of Dishevelled (DVL). Through study of FZD4 and its associated ligand Norrin, we report that a minimum of three residues distal to the KTXXXW motif in the C-terminal tail of Frizzled-4 are essential for DVL recruitment and robust Lef/Tcf-dependent transcriptional activation in response to Norrin. PMID:27096005

  15. Frizzled-4 C-terminus Distal to KTXXXW Motif is Essential for Normal Dishevelled Recruitment and Norrin-stimulated Activation of Lef/Tcf-dependent Transcriptional Activation.

    PubMed

    Bertalovitz, Alexander C; Pau, Milly S; Gao, Shujuan; Malbon, Craig C; Wang, Hsien-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The carboxy (C)-termini of G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) dictate essential functions. The KTXXXW motif C-terminus of Frizzleds (FZD) has been implicated in recruitment of Dishevelled (DVL). Through study of FZD4 and its associated ligand Norrin, we report that a minimum of three residues distal to the KTXXXW motif in the C-terminal tail of Frizzled-4 are essential for DVL recruitment and robust Lef/Tcf-dependent transcriptional activation in response to Norrin. PMID:27096005

  16. Berry Phenolic Compounds Increase Expression of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-1α (HNF-1α) in Caco-2 and Normal Colon Cells Due to High Affinities with Transcription and Dimerization Domains of HNF-1α.

    PubMed

    Real Hernandez, Luis M; Fan, Junfeng; Johnson, Michelle H; Gonzalez de Mejia, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α (HNF-1α) is found in the kidneys, spleen, thymus, testis, skin, and throughout the digestive organs. It has been found to promote the transcription of various proteins involved in the management of type II diabetes, including dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV). Phenolic compounds from berries and citrus fruits are known to inhibit DPP-IV, but have not been tested for their interactions with wild-type HNF-1α. By studying the interactions of compounds from berries and citrus fruits have with HNF-1α, pre-transcriptional mechanisms that inhibit the expression of proteins such as DPP-IV may be elucidated. In this study, the interactions of berry phenolic compounds and citrus flavonoids with the dimerization and transcriptional domains of HNF-1α were characterized using the molecular docking program AutoDock Vina. The anthocyanin delphinidin-3-O-arabinoside had the highest binding affinity for the dimerization domain as a homodimer (-7.2 kcal/mol) and transcription domain (-8.3 kcal/mol) of HNF-1α. Anthocyanins and anthocyanidins had relatively higher affinities than resveratrol and citrus flavonoids for both, the transcription domain and the dimerization domain as a homodimer. The flavonoid flavone had the highest affinity for a single unit of the dimerization domain (-6.5 kcal/mol). Nuclear expression of HNF-1α was measured in Caco-2 and human normal colon cells treated with blueberry and blackberry anthocyanin extracts. All extracts tested increased significantly (P < 0.05) the nuclear expression of HNF-1α in Caco-2 cells by 85.2 to 260% compared to a control. The extracts tested increased significantly (P < 0.02) the nuclear expression of HNF-1α in normal colon cells by 48.6 to 243%. It was confirmed that delphinidin-3-O-glucoside increased by 3-fold nuclear HNF-1α expression in Caco-2 cells (P < 0.05). Anthocyanins significantly increased nuclear HNF-1α expression, suggesting that these compounds might regulate the genes HNF-1

  17. Establishment and characterization of A novel Philadelphia-chromosome positive chronic myeloid leukemia cell line, TCC-S, expressing P210 and P190 BCR/ABL transcripts but missing normal ABL gene.

    PubMed

    Van, Phan Nguyen Thanh; Xinh, Phan Thi; Kano, Yasuhiko; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Sato, Yuko

    2005-03-01

    A novel Philadelphia-chromosome positive (Ph+) cell line, TCC-S, has been established from a patient with Ph+ chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the blastic crisis. TCC-S cells were shown to express both P210 and P190 BCR/ABL transcripts by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), although quantitative-PCR revealed that TCC-S cells mainly expressed P210 BCR/ABL transcript. Karyotype analysis revealed several triploid clones which constantly harbored two der(9)del(9) (p12)t(9;22) (q34;qll)s and two del(9) (q21)s. The der(9)del(9) (p12)t(9;22) (q34;q11) is rarely found in other CML cell lines. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, del(9) (q21) resulting in missing of a restrict region including normal ABL gene has not been found among CML cell lines previously described. Thus, TCC-S cells with only BCR/ABL gene and no normal ABL gene may be a useful tool for functional study of ABL in Ph+ CML.

  18. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 as a key signaling pathway in normal mammary gland developmental biology and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Furth, Priscilla A; Nakles, Rebecca E; Millman, Sarah; Diaz-Cruz, Edgar S; Cabrera, M Carla

    2011-10-12

    STAT5 consists of two proteins, STAT5A/B, that impact mammary cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival. In normal development, STAT5 expression and activity are regulated by prolactin signaling with JAK2/ELF5, EGF signaling networks that include c-Src, and growth hormone, insulin growth factor, estrogen, and progesterone signaling pathways. In cancer, erythropoietin signaling can also regulate STAT5. Activation levels are influenced by AKT, caveolin, PIKE-A, Pak1, c-Myb, Brk, beta-integrin, dystroglycan, other STATs, and STAT pathway molecules JAK1, Shp2, and SOCS. TGF-β and PTPN9 can downregulate prolactin- and EGF-mediated STAT5 activation, respectively. IGF, AKT, RANKL, cyclin D1, BCL6, and HSP90A lie downstream of STAT5.

  19. Laminin alpha 5, a major transcript of normal and malignant rat liver epithelial cells, is differentially expressed in developing and adult liver.

    PubMed

    Seebacher, T; Medina, J L; Bade, E G

    1997-11-25

    The laminin family of extracellular matrix glycoproteins plays a major role in cell migration and differentiation and in tumor cell invasion. As previously shown, the laminin deposited by normal and malignant rat liver epithelial cells in their extracellular matrix (ECM) and into their ECM migration tracks does not contain a typical (EHS-like) alpha 1 heavy chain. By RT-PCR screening we have now identified two alpha chains among a total of five additional laminin chains produced by these cells. Three of the newly identified chains were not previously known for the rat. Their sequences have been deposited in the EMBL nucleotide sequence data bank. The alpha 5 chain now identified is expressed at comparably high levels by both the normal and the malignant liver epithelial cells. The chain is also expressed in fetal liver together with the alpha 2 and beta 2 chains, but it is only vestigially expressed in the mature organ as shown by RT-PCR. These results suggest for alpha 5 a role in development and production of the chain by only a small subset of cells in adult liver. At the level of detection used, no changes were observed in regenerating liver after partial hepatectomy. In addition to the alpha 5 chain, the cultured cells express the beta 1 and beta 2 light chains, indicating the expression of more than one laminin isoform by the same cell line. The expression of the alpha 5 chain and of the other new non-EHS isoform chains was also analyzed in various tissues. The malignant liver epithelial cells, but not their nontumorigenic parental cells, also express, in addition to the alpha 5 chain the alpha 2 chain, which is expressed at high level by the NBT II bladder carcinoma cell line, suggesting a relationship with malignancy. PMID:9417868

  20. A phosphatase activity present in peripheral blood myeloid cells of chronic myelogenous leukemia patients but not normal individuals alters nuclear protein binding to transcriptional enhancers of interferon-inducible genes.

    PubMed Central

    Seong, D C; Sims, S; Johnson, E; Howard, O M; Reiter, B; Hester, J; Talpaz, M; Kantarjian, H; Deisseroth, A

    1990-01-01

    Cytoplasmic protein from peripheral blood myeloid cells of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients altered the electrophoretic mobility of complexes formed between nuclear proteins and interferon-inducible transcriptional enhancers. Immature myeloid marrow cells (blasts and promyelocytes) have a higher level of this activity than do mature myeloid marrow cells (bands and polys). This activity, which is not detectable in the peripheral blood cells of normal individuals, is at least 50-fold higher in CML marrow blasts and promyelocytes than that found in marrow blasts and promyelocytes of normal individuals. This activity was inhibited by in vivo incubation of immature myeloid cells with the phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate (0.2 mM), and by adding orthovanadate (20 mM) directly to cytoplasmic proteins of myeloid cells. Interferon-alpha (1,000 U/ml) reduced the effects of the CML myeloid cell cytoplasmic protein on the electrophoretic mobility of nuclear protein-DNA complexes. These data suggest that a unique phosphatase may be involved in the abnormalities in CML which are modulated by interferon-alpha. Images PMID:2243138

  1. iPhone 4s Photoplethysmography: Which Light Color Yields the Most Accurate Heart Rate and Normalized Pulse Volume Using the iPhysioMeter Application in the Presence of Motion Artifact?

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Kenta; Rolfe, Peter; Lee, Jihyoung; Yamakoshi, Takehiro

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in information and communication technologies has made it possible to measure heart rate (HR) and normalized pulse volume (NPV), which are important physiological indices, using only a smartphone. This has been achieved with reflection mode photoplethysmography (PPG), by using a smartphone’s embedded flash as a light source and the camera as a light sensor. Despite its widespread use, the method of PPG is susceptible to motion artifacts as physical displacements influence photon propagation phenomena and, thereby, the effective optical path length. Further, it is known that the wavelength of light used for PPG influences the photon penetration depth and we therefore hypothesized that influences of motion artifact could be wavelength-dependant. To test this hypothesis, we made measurements in 12 healthy volunteers of HR and NPV derived from reflection mode plethysmograms recorded simultaneously at three different spectral regions (red, green and blue) at the same physical location with a smartphone. We then assessed the accuracy of the HR and NPV measurements under the influence of motion artifacts. The analyses revealed that the accuracy of HR was acceptably high with all three wavelengths (all rs > 0.996, fixed biases: −0.12 to 0.10 beats per minute, proportional biases: r = −0.29 to 0.03), but that of NPV was the best with green light (r = 0.791, fixed biases: −0.01 arbitrary units, proportional bias: r = 0.11). Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio obtained with green and blue light PPG was higher than that of red light PPG. These findings suggest that green is the most suitable color for measuring HR and NPV from the reflection mode photoplethysmogram under motion artifact conditions. We conclude that the use of green light PPG could be of particular benefit in ambulatory monitoring where motion artifacts are a significant issue. PMID:24618594

  2. iPhone 4s photoplethysmography: which light color yields the most accurate heart rate and normalized pulse volume using the iPhysioMeter Application in the presence of motion artifact?

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Kenta; Rolfe, Peter; Lee, Jihyoung; Yamakoshi, Takehiro

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in information and communication technologies has made it possible to measure heart rate (HR) and normalized pulse volume (NPV), which are important physiological indices, using only a smartphone. This has been achieved with reflection mode photoplethysmography (PPG), by using a smartphone's embedded flash as a light source and the camera as a light sensor. Despite its widespread use, the method of PPG is susceptible to motion artifacts as physical displacements influence photon propagation phenomena and, thereby, the effective optical path length. Further, it is known that the wavelength of light used for PPG influences the photon penetration depth and we therefore hypothesized that influences of motion artifact could be wavelength-dependant. To test this hypothesis, we made measurements in 12 healthy volunteers of HR and NPV derived from reflection mode plethysmograms recorded simultaneously at three different spectral regions (red, green and blue) at the same physical location with a smartphone. We then assessed the accuracy of the HR and NPV measurements under the influence of motion artifacts. The analyses revealed that the accuracy of HR was acceptably high with all three wavelengths (all rs > 0.996, fixed biases: -0.12 to 0.10 beats per minute, proportional biases: r =  -0.29 to 0.03), but that of NPV was the best with green light (r = 0.791, fixed biases: -0.01 arbitrary units, proportional bias: r = 0.11). Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio obtained with green and blue light PPG was higher than that of red light PPG. These findings suggest that green is the most suitable color for measuring HR and NPV from the reflection mode photoplethysmogram under motion artifact conditions. We conclude that the use of green light PPG could be of particular benefit in ambulatory monitoring where motion artifacts are a significant issue.

  3. iPhone 4s photoplethysmography: which light color yields the most accurate heart rate and normalized pulse volume using the iPhysioMeter Application in the presence of motion artifact?

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Kenta; Rolfe, Peter; Lee, Jihyoung; Yamakoshi, Takehiro

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in information and communication technologies has made it possible to measure heart rate (HR) and normalized pulse volume (NPV), which are important physiological indices, using only a smartphone. This has been achieved with reflection mode photoplethysmography (PPG), by using a smartphone's embedded flash as a light source and the camera as a light sensor. Despite its widespread use, the method of PPG is susceptible to motion artifacts as physical displacements influence photon propagation phenomena and, thereby, the effective optical path length. Further, it is known that the wavelength of light used for PPG influences the photon penetration depth and we therefore hypothesized that influences of motion artifact could be wavelength-dependant. To test this hypothesis, we made measurements in 12 healthy volunteers of HR and NPV derived from reflection mode plethysmograms recorded simultaneously at three different spectral regions (red, green and blue) at the same physical location with a smartphone. We then assessed the accuracy of the HR and NPV measurements under the influence of motion artifacts. The analyses revealed that the accuracy of HR was acceptably high with all three wavelengths (all rs > 0.996, fixed biases: -0.12 to 0.10 beats per minute, proportional biases: r =  -0.29 to 0.03), but that of NPV was the best with green light (r = 0.791, fixed biases: -0.01 arbitrary units, proportional bias: r = 0.11). Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio obtained with green and blue light PPG was higher than that of red light PPG. These findings suggest that green is the most suitable color for measuring HR and NPV from the reflection mode photoplethysmogram under motion artifact conditions. We conclude that the use of green light PPG could be of particular benefit in ambulatory monitoring where motion artifacts are a significant issue. PMID:24618594

  4. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  5. Accurate Guitar Tuning by Cochlear Implant Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  6. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task.

  7. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  8. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  9. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  10. Accurate Optical Reference Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, N.

    2006-08-01

    Current and near future all-sky astrometric catalogs on the ICRF are reviewed with the emphasis on reference star data at optical wavelengths for user applications. The standard error of a Hipparcos Catalogue star position is now about 15 mas per coordinate. For the Tycho-2 data it is typically 20 to 100 mas, depending on magnitude. The USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC) observing program was completed in 2004 and reductions toward the final UCAC3 release are in progress. This all-sky reference catalogue will have positional errors of 15 to 70 mas for stars in the 10 to 16 mag range, with a high degree of completeness. Proper motions for the about 60 million UCAC stars will be derived by combining UCAC astrometry with available early epoch data, including yet unpublished scans of the complete set of AGK2, Hamburg Zone astrograph and USNO Black Birch programs. Accurate positional and proper motion data are combined in the Naval Observatory Merged Astrometric Dataset (NOMAD) which includes Hipparcos, Tycho-2, UCAC2, USNO-B1, NPM+SPM plate scan data for astrometry, and is supplemented by multi-band optical photometry as well as 2MASS near infrared photometry. The Milli-Arcsecond Pathfinder Survey (MAPS) mission is currently being planned at USNO. This is a micro-satellite to obtain 1 mas positions, parallaxes, and 1 mas/yr proper motions for all bright stars down to about 15th magnitude. This program will be supplemented by a ground-based program to reach 18th magnitude on the 5 mas level.

  11. Runaway transcription

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A newly demonstrated defect in RNA polymerase II termination caused by 7SK snRNA knockdown may have revealed a novel mechanism uncoupling RNA processing from transcription. Please see related Research article, http://genomebiology.com/2013/14/9/R98 PMID:24079702

  12. Triple-layer dissection of the lung adenocarcinoma transcriptome: regulation at the gene, transcript, and exon levels.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Min-Kung; Wu, I-Ching; Cheng, Ching-Chia; Su, Jen-Liang; Hsieh, Chang-Huain; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Chen, Feng-Chi

    2015-10-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma is one of the most deadly human diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease, particularly RNA splicing, have remained underexplored. Here, we report a triple-level (gene-, transcript-, and exon-level) analysis of lung adenocarcinoma transcriptomes from 77 paired tumor and normal tissues, as well as an analysis pipeline to overcome genetic variability for accurate differentiation between tumor and normal tissues. We report three major results. First, more than 5,000 differentially expressed transcripts/exonic regions occur repeatedly in lung adenocarcinoma patients. These transcripts/exonic regions are enriched in nicotine metabolism and ribosomal functions in addition to the pathways enriched for differentially expressed genes (cell cycle, extracellular matrix receptor interaction, and axon guidance). Second, classification models based on rationally selected transcripts or exonic regions can reach accuracies of 0.93 to 1.00 in differentiating tumor from normal tissues. Of the 28 selected exonic regions, 26 regions correspond to alternative exons located in such regulators as tumor suppressor (GDF10), signal receptor (LYVE1), vascular-specific regulator (RASIP1), ubiquitination mediator (RNF5), and transcriptional repressor (TRIM27). Third, classification systems based on 13 to 14 differentially expressed genes yield accuracies near 100%. Genes selected by both detection methods include C16orf59, DAP3, ETV4, GABARAPL1, PPAR, RADIL, RSPO1, SERTM1, SRPK1, ST6GALNAC6, and TNXB. Our findings imply a multilayered lung adenocarcinoma regulome in which transcript-/exon-level regulation may be dissociated from gene-level regulation. Our described method may be used to identify potentially important genes/transcripts/exonic regions for the tumorigenesis of lung adenocarcinoma and to construct accurate tumor vs. normal classification systems for this disease.

  13. Systematic validation of candidate reference genes for qRT-PCR normalization under iron deficiency in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Han, Bin; Yang, Zheng; Samma, Muhammad Kaleem; Wang, Ren; Shen, Wenbiao

    2013-06-01

    A reliable result obtained by qRT-PCR highly depends on accurate transcript normalization using stably expressed reference genes. However, the transcript levels of traditional reference genes are not always stable. Also, the inaccurate normalization could easily lead to the false conclusions. In this report, by using geNorm and NormFinder algorithms, 12 candidate reference genes were evaluated in Arabidopsis under iron deficiency. Our results revealed that three novel reference genes (SAND, YLS8 and TIP41-like) were identified and validated as suitable reference genes for qRT-PCR normalization in both iron deprivation (the addition of Ferrozine to the medium) and starvation (withdrawal of iron from the medium) conditions. This conclusion was also confirmed by publicly available microarray data. In addition, when using SAND, YLS8 and TIP41-like as multiple reference genes, the expression patterns of FIT1 and IRT1, two iron deficiency marker genes, were approximately similar with that reported previously. However, a weaker inducible response was obtained from qRT-PCR by normalizating EF-1α alone. Together, we proposed that the combination of SAND, YLS8 and TIP41-like can be used for accurate normalization of gene expression in iron deficiency research. These results provide a valuable evidence for the importance of adequate reference genes in qRT-PCR normalization, insisting on the use of appropriate reference gene validation in all transcriptional analyses.

  14. Multivariate normality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crutcher, H. L.; Falls, L. W.

    1976-01-01

    Sets of experimentally determined or routinely observed data provide information about the past, present and, hopefully, future sets of similarly produced data. An infinite set of statistical models exists which may be used to describe the data sets. The normal distribution is one model. If it serves at all, it serves well. If a data set, or a transformation of the set, representative of a larger population can be described by the normal distribution, then valid statistical inferences can be drawn. There are several tests which may be applied to a data set to determine whether the univariate normal model adequately describes the set. The chi-square test based on Pearson's work in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries is often used. Like all tests, it has some weaknesses which are discussed in elementary texts. Extension of the chi-square test to the multivariate normal model is provided. Tables and graphs permit easier application of the test in the higher dimensions. Several examples, using recorded data, illustrate the procedures. Tests of maximum absolute differences, mean sum of squares of residuals, runs and changes of sign are included in these tests. Dimensions one through five with selected sample sizes 11 to 101 are used to illustrate the statistical tests developed.

  15. WMAP normalization of inflationary cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Liddle, Andrew R.; Parkinson, David; Mukherjee, Pia; Leach, Samuel M.

    2006-10-15

    We use the three-year WMAP observations to determine the normalization of the matter power spectrum in inflationary cosmologies. In this context, the quantity of interest is not the normalization marginalized over all parameters, but rather the normalization as a function of the inflationary parameters n{sub S} and r with marginalization over the remaining cosmological parameters. We compute this normalization and provide an accurate fitting function. The statistical uncertainty in the normalization is 3%, roughly half that achieved by COBE. We use the k-l relation for the standard cosmological model to identify the pivot scale for the WMAP normalization. We also quote the inflationary energy scale corresponding to the WMAP normalization.

  16. Normalizing Rejection.

    PubMed

    Conn, Vicki S; Zerwic, Julie; Jefferson, Urmeka; Anderson, Cindy M; Killion, Cheryl M; Smith, Carol E; Cohen, Marlene Z; Fahrenwald, Nancy L; Herrick, Linda; Topp, Robert; Benefield, Lazelle E; Loya, Julio

    2016-02-01

    Getting turned down for grant funding or having a manuscript rejected is an uncomfortable but not unusual occurrence during the course of a nurse researcher's professional life. Rejection can evoke an emotional response akin to the grieving process that can slow or even undermine productivity. Only by "normalizing" rejection, that is, by accepting it as an integral part of the scientific process, can researchers more quickly overcome negative emotions and instead use rejection to refine and advance their scientific programs. This article provides practical advice for coming to emotional terms with rejection and delineates methods for working constructively to address reviewer comments. PMID:26041785

  17. Genome-wide identification and characterization of reference genes with different transcript abundances for Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shanshan; Wang, Weishan; Li, Xiao; Fan, Keqiang; Yang, Keqian

    2015-01-01

    The lack of reliable reference genes (RGs) in the genus Streptomyces hampers effort to obtain the precise data of transcript levels. To address this issue, we aimed to identify reliable RGs in the model organism Streptomyces coelicolor. A pool of potential RGs containing 1,471 genes was first identified by determining the intersection of genes with stable transcript levels from four time-series transcriptome microarray datasets of S. coelicolor M145 cultivated in different conditions. Then, following a strict rational selection scheme including homology analysis, disturbance analysis, function analysis and transcript abundance analysis, 13 candidates were selected from the 1,471 genes. Based on real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR assays, SCO0710, SCO6185, SCO1544, SCO3183 and SCO4758 were identified as the top five genes with the most stable transcript levels among the 13 candidates. Further analyses showed these five genes also maintained stable transcript levels in different S. coelicolor strains, as well as in Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680 and Streptomyces clavuligerus NRRL 3585, suggesting they could fulfill the requirements of accurate data normalization in streptomycetes. Moreover, the systematic strategy employed in this work could be used for reference in other microorganism to select reliable RGs. PMID:26527303

  18. NNLOPS accurate associated HW production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astill, William; Bizon, Wojciech; Re, Emanuele; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2016-06-01

    We present a next-to-next-to-leading order accurate description of associated HW production consistently matched to a parton shower. The method is based on reweighting events obtained with the HW plus one jet NLO accurate calculation implemented in POWHEG, extended with the MiNLO procedure, to reproduce NNLO accurate Born distributions. Since the Born kinematics is more complex than the cases treated before, we use a parametrization of the Collins-Soper angles to reduce the number of variables required for the reweighting. We present phenomenological results at 13 TeV, with cuts suggested by the Higgs Cross section Working Group.

  19. Normal development.

    PubMed

    Girard, Nadine; Koob, Meriam; Brunel, Herv

    2016-01-01

    Numerous events are involved in brain development, some of which are detected by neuroimaging. Major changes in brain morphology are depicted by brain imaging during the fetal period while changes in brain composition can be demonstrated in both pre- and postnatal periods. Although ultrasonography and computed tomography can show changes in brain morphology, these techniques are insensitive to myelination that is one of the most important events occurring during brain maturation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is therefore the method of choice to evaluate brain maturation. MRI also gives insight into the microstructure of brain tissue through diffusion-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Metabolic changes are also part of brain maturation and are assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Understanding and knowledge of the different steps in brain development are required to be able to detect morphologic and structural changes on neuroimaging. Consequently alterations in normal development can be depicted. PMID:27430460

  20. Normal-reflection image

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Fehler, Michael C.

    2003-01-01

    Common-angle wave-equation migration using the double-square-root is generally less accurate than the common-shot migration because the wavefield continuation equation for thc former involves additional approximations compared to that for the latter. We present a common-angle wave-equation migration that has the same accuracy as common-shot wave-equation migration. An image obtained from common-angle migration is a four- to five-dimensional output volume for 3D cases. We propose a normal-reflection imaging condition for common-angle migration to produce a 3D output volume for 3D migration. The image is closely related to the normal-reflection coefficients at interfaces. This imaging condition will allow amplitude-preserving migration to generate an image with clear physical meaning.

  1. Activation of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Transcription Factor X Box-Binding Protein-1 Occurs in a Subset of Normal Germinal-Center B Cells and in Aggressive B-Cell Lymphomas with Prognostic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Balague, Olga; Mozos, Ana; Martinez, Daniel; Hernandez, Luis; Colomo, Lluis; Mate, Jose Luis; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Lin, Oscar; Campo, Elias; Lopez-Guillermo, Armando; Martinez, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    X box-binding protein 1 (Xbp-1) is a transcription factor that is required for the terminal differentiation of B lymphocytes into plasma cells. The Xbp-1 gene is activated in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress signals, which generate a 50-kDa nuclear protein that acts as a potent transactivator and regulates the expression of genes related to the unfolded protein response. Activated Xbp-1 is essential for cell survival in plasma-cell tumors but its role in B-cell lymphomas is unknown. We analyzed the expression of activated Xbp-1 in reactive lymphoid tissues, 411 lymphomas and plasma-cell neoplasms, and 24 B-cell lines. In reactive tissues, Xbp-1 was only found in nuclear extracts. Nuclear expression of Xbp-1 was observed in occasional reactive plasma cells and in a subpopulation of Irf-4+/Bcl-6−/Pax-5− B cells in the light zones of reactive germinal centers, probably representing cells committed to plasma-cell differentiation. None of the low-grade lymphomas showed evidence of Xbp-1 activation; however, Xbp-1 activation was found in 28% of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, independent of germinal or postgerminal center phenotype, as well as in 48% of plasmablastic lymphomas and 69% of plasma-cell neoplasms. Diffuse large B-cell lymphomas with nuclear Xbp-1 expression had a significantly worse response to therapy and shorter overall survival compared with negative tumors. These findings suggest that Xbp-1 activation may play a role in the pathogenesis of aggressive B-cell lymphomas. PMID:19389935

  2. Prognostic Importance of MN1 Transcript Levels, and Biologic Insights From MN1-Associated Gene and MicroRNA Expression Signatures in Cytogenetically Normal Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Cancer and Leukemia Group B Study

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Christian; Marcucci, Guido; Holland, Kelsi B.; Radmacher, Michael D.; Maharry, Kati; Paschka, Peter; Whitman, Susan P.; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Baldus, Claudia D.; Vij, Ravi; Powell, Bayard L.; Carroll, Andrew J.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Larson, Richard A.; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prognostic importance of the meningioma 1 (MN1) gene expression levels in the context of other predictive molecular markers, and to derive MN1 associated gene– and microRNA–expression profiles in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML). Patients and Methods MN1 expression was measured in 119 untreated primary CN-AML adults younger than 60 years by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Patients were also tested for FLT3, NPM1, CEBPA, and WT1 mutations, MLL partial tandem duplications, and BAALC and ERG expression. Gene- and microRNA-expression profiles were attained by performing genome-wide microarray assays. Patients were intensively treated on two first-line Cancer and Leukemia Group B clinical trials. Results Higher MN1 expression associated with NPM1 wild-type (P < .001), increased BAALC expression (P = .004), and less extramedullary involvement (P = .01). In multivariable analyses, higher MN1 expression associated with a lower complete remission rate (P = .005) after adjustment for WBC; shorter disease-free survival (P = .01) after adjustment for WT1 mutations, FLT3 internal tandem duplications (FLT3-ITD), and high ERG expression; and shorter survival (P = .04) after adjustment for WT1 and NPM1 mutations, FLT3-ITD, and WBC. Gene- and microRNA-expression profiles suggested that high MN1 expressers share features with high BAALC expressers and patients with wild-type NPM1. Higher MN1 expression also appears to be associated with genes and microRNAs that are active in aberrant macrophage/monocytoid function and differentiation. Conclusion MN1 expression independently predicts outcome in CN-AML patients. The MN1 gene- and microRNA-expression signatures suggest biologic features that could be exploited as therapeutic targets. PMID:19451432

  3. Note-accurate audio segmentation based on MPEG-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellhausen, Jens

    2003-12-01

    Segmenting audio data into the smallest musical components is the basis for many further meta data extraction algorithms. For example, an automatic music transcription system needs to know where the exact boundaries of each tone are. In this paper a note accurate audio segmentation algorithm based on MPEG-7 low level descriptors is introduced. For a reliable detection of different notes, both features in the time and the frequency domain are used. Because of this, polyphonic instrument mixes and even melodies characterized by human voices can be examined with this alogrithm. For testing and verification of the note accurate segmentation, a simple music transcription system was implemented. The dominant frequency within each segment is used to build a MIDI file representing the processed audio data.

  4. Heritable Change Caused by Transient Transcription Errors

    PubMed Central

    Halliday, Jennifer A.; Herman, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Transmission of cellular identity relies on the faithful transfer of information from the mother to the daughter cell. This process includes accurate replication of the DNA, but also the correct propagation of regulatory programs responsible for cellular identity. Errors in DNA replication (mutations) and protein conformation (prions) can trigger stable phenotypic changes and cause human disease, yet the ability of transient transcriptional errors to produce heritable phenotypic change (‘epimutations’) remains an open question. Here, we demonstrate that transcriptional errors made specifically in the mRNA encoding a transcription factor can promote heritable phenotypic change by reprogramming a transcriptional network, without altering DNA. We have harnessed the classical bistable switch in the lac operon, a memory-module, to capture the consequences of transient transcription errors in living Escherichia coli cells. We engineered an error-prone transcription sequence (A9 run) in the gene encoding the lac repressor and show that this ‘slippery’ sequence directly increases epigenetic switching, not mutation in the cell population. Therefore, one altered transcript within a multi-generational series of many error-free transcripts can cause long-term phenotypic consequences. Thus, like DNA mutations, transcriptional epimutations can instigate heritable changes that increase phenotypic diversity, which drives both evolution and disease. PMID:23825966

  5. Chromatin States Accurately Classify Cell Differentiation Stages

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Jessica L.; Yuan, Guo-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression is controlled by the concerted interactions between transcription factors and chromatin regulators. While recent studies have identified global chromatin state changes across cell-types, it remains unclear to what extent these changes are co-regulated during cell-differentiation. Here we present a comprehensive computational analysis by assembling a large dataset containing genome-wide occupancy information of 5 histone modifications in 27 human cell lines (including 24 normal and 3 cancer cell lines) obtained from the public domain, followed by independent analysis at three different representations. We classified the differentiation stage of a cell-type based on its genome-wide pattern of chromatin states, and found that our method was able to identify normal cell lines with nearly 100% accuracy. We then applied our model to classify the cancer cell lines and found that each can be unequivocally classified as differentiated cells. The differences can be in part explained by the differential activities of three regulatory modules associated with embryonic stem cells. We also found that the “hotspot” genes, whose chromatin states change dynamically in accordance to the differentiation stage, are not randomly distributed across the genome but tend to be embedded in multi-gene chromatin domains, and that specialized gene clusters tend to be embedded in stably occupied domains. PMID:22363642

  6. Profitable capitation requires accurate costing.

    PubMed

    West, D A; Hicks, L L; Balas, E A; West, T D

    1996-01-01

    In the name of costing accuracy, nurses are asked to track inventory use on per treatment basis when more significant costs, such as general overhead and nursing salaries, are usually allocated to patients or treatments on an average cost basis. Accurate treatment costing and financial viability require analysis of all resources actually consumed in treatment delivery, including nursing services and inventory. More precise costing information enables more profitable decisions as is demonstrated by comparing the ratio-of-cost-to-treatment method (aggregate costing) with alternative activity-based costing methods (ABC). Nurses must participate in this costing process to assure that capitation bids are based upon accurate costs rather than simple averages. PMID:8788799

  7. Accurate documentation and wound measurement.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Sylvie

    This article, part 4 in a series on wound management, addresses the sometimes routine yet crucial task of documentation. Clear and accurate records of a wound enable its progress to be determined so the appropriate treatment can be applied. Thorough records mean any practitioner picking up a patient's notes will know when the wound was last checked, how it looked and what dressing and/or treatment was applied, ensuring continuity of care. Documenting every assessment also has legal implications, demonstrating due consideration and care of the patient and the rationale for any treatment carried out. Part 5 in the series discusses wound dressing characteristics and selection.

  8. CrossNorm: a novel normalization strategy for microarray data in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lixin; Lo, Leung-Yau; Tang, Nelson L. S.; Wang, Dong; Leung, Kwong-Sak

    2016-01-01

    Normalization is essential to get rid of biases in microarray data for their accurate analysis. Existing normalization methods for microarray gene expression data commonly assume a similar global expression pattern among samples being studied. However, scenarios of global shifts in gene expressions are dominant in cancers, making the assumption invalid. To alleviate the problem, here we propose and develop a novel normalization strategy, Cross Normalization (CrossNorm), for microarray data with unbalanced transcript levels among samples. Conventional procedures, such as RMA and LOESS, arbitrarily flatten the difference between case and control groups leading to biased gene expression estimates. Noticeably, applying these methods under the strategy of CrossNorm, which makes use of the overall statistics of the original signals, the results showed significantly improved robustness and accuracy in estimating transcript level dynamics for a series of publicly available datasets, including titration experiment, simulated data, spike-in data and several real-life microarray datasets across various types of cancers. The results have important implications for the past and the future cancer studies based on microarray samples with non-negligible difference. Moreover, the strategy can also be applied to other sorts of high-throughput data as long as the experiments have global expression variations between conditions. PMID:26732145

  9. A minimum variance method for genome-wide data-driven normalization of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction expression data.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Benjamin; Walter, Nicholas D; Dolganov, Gregory; Coram, Marc; Davis, J Lucian; Schoolnik, Gary K; Strong, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Advances in multiplex qRT-PCR have enabled increasingly accurate and robust quantification of RNA, even at lower concentrations, facilitating RNA expression profiling in clinical and environmental samples. Here we describe a data-driven qRT-PCR normalization method, the minimum variance method, and evaluate it on clinically derived Mycobacterium tuberculosis samples with variable transcript detection percentages. For moderate to significant amounts of nondetection (∼50%), our minimum variance method consistently produces the lowest false discovery rates compared to commonly used data-driven normalization methods.

  10. SPLASH: Accurate OH maser positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Andrew; Gomez, Jose F.; Jones, Paul; Cunningham, Maria; Green, James; Dawson, Joanne; Ellingsen, Simon; Breen, Shari; Imai, Hiroshi; Lowe, Vicki; Jones, Courtney

    2013-10-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) 18 cm lines are powerful and versatile probes of diffuse molecular gas, that may trace a largely unstudied component of the Galactic ISM. SPLASH (the Southern Parkes Large Area Survey in Hydroxyl) is a large, unbiased and fully-sampled survey of OH emission, absorption and masers in the Galactic Plane that will achieve sensitivities an order of magnitude better than previous work. In this proposal, we request ATCA time to follow up OH maser candidates. This will give us accurate (~10") positions of the masers, which can be compared to other maser positions from HOPS, MMB and MALT-45 and will provide full polarisation measurements towards a sample of OH masers that have not been observed in MAGMO.

  11. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Cameron J.; Slattery, Ashley D.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Gibson, Christopher T.

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  12. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Cameron J; Slattery, Ashley D; Stapleton, Andrew J; Shapter, Joseph G; Gibson, Christopher T

    2016-03-29

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  13. Nuclear sequestration of COL1A1 mRNA transcript associated with type I osteogenesis imperfecta (OI)

    SciTech Connect

    Primorac, D.; Stover, M.L.; McKinstry, M.B.

    1994-09-01

    Previously we identified an OI type I patient with a splice donor mutation that resulted in intron 26 retention instead of exon skipping and sequestration of normal levels of the mutant transcript in the nuclear compartment. Intron retention was consistent with the exon definition hypothesis for splice site selection since the size of the exon-intron-exon unit was less than 300 bp. Furthermore, the retained intron contained in-frame stop codons which is thought to cause the mutant RNA to remain within the nucleus rather than appearing in the cytoplasm. To test these hypotheses, genomic fragments containing the normal sequence or the donor mutation were cloned into a collagen minigene and expressed in stably tansfected NIH 3T3 cells. None of the modifications to the normal intron altered the level of RNA that accumulated in the cytoplasm, as expected. However none of the modifications to the mutant intron allowed accumulation of normal levels of mRNA in the cytoplasm. Moreover, in contrast to our findings in the patient`s cells only low levels of mutant transcript were found in the nucleus; a fraction of the transcript did appear in the cytoplasm which had spliced the mutant donor site correctly. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated equal levels of transcription from each transgene. Expression of another donor mutation known to cause in-frame exon skipping in OI type IV was accurately reproduced in the minigene in transfected 3T3 cells. Our experience suggests that either mechanism can lead to formation of a null allele possibly related to the type of splicing events surrounding the potential stop codons. Understanding the rules governing inactivation of a collagen RNA transcript may be important in designing a strategy to inactivate a dominate negative mutation associated with the more severe forms of OI.

  14. Transcription in archaea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyrpides, N. C.; Ouzounis, C. A.; Woese, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Using the sequences of all the known transcription-associated proteins from Bacteria and Eucarya (a total of 4,147), we have identified their homologous counterparts in the four complete archaeal genomes. Through extensive sequence comparisons, we establish the presence of 280 predicted transcription factors or transcription-associated proteins in the four archaeal genomes, of which 168 have homologs only in Bacteria, 51 have homologs only in Eucarya, and the remaining 61 have homologs in both phylogenetic domains. Although bacterial and eukaryotic transcription have very few factors in common, each exclusively shares a significantly greater number with the Archaea, especially the Bacteria. This last fact contrasts with the obvious close relationship between the archaeal and eukaryotic transcription mechanisms per se, and in particular, basic transcription initiation. We interpret these results to mean that the archaeal transcription system has retained more ancestral characteristics than have the transcription mechanisms in either of the other two domains.

  15. Evaluation of Appropriate Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization during Watermelon Fruit Development

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Qiusheng; Yuan, Jingxian; Gao, Lingyun; Zhao, Liqiang; Cheng, Fei; Huang, Yuan; Bie, Zhilong

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression analysis in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) fruit has drawn considerable attention with the availability of genome sequences to understand the regulatory mechanism of fruit development and to improve its quality. Real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is a routine technique for gene expression analysis. However, appropriate reference genes for transcript normalization in watermelon fruits have not been well characterized. The aim of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness of 12 genes for their potential use as reference genes in watermelon fruits. Expression variations of these genes were measured in 48 samples obtained from 12 successive developmental stages of parthenocarpic and fertilized fruits of two watermelon genotypes by using qRT-PCR analysis. Considering the effects of genotype, fruit setting method, and developmental stage, geNorm determined clathrin adaptor complex subunit (ClCAC), β-actin (ClACT), and alpha tubulin 5 (ClTUA5) as the multiple reference genes in watermelon fruit. Furthermore, ClCAC alone or together with SAND family protein (ClSAND) was ranked as the single or two best reference genes by NormFinder. By using the top-ranked reference genes to normalize the transcript abundance of phytoene synthase (ClPSY1), a good correlation between lycopene accumulation and ClPSY1 expression pattern was observed in ripening watermelon fruit. These validated reference genes will facilitate the accurate measurement of gene expression in the studies on watermelon fruit biology. PMID:26110539

  16. Evaluation of Appropriate Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization during Watermelon Fruit Development.

    PubMed

    Kong, Qiusheng; Yuan, Jingxian; Gao, Lingyun; Zhao, Liqiang; Cheng, Fei; Huang, Yuan; Bie, Zhilong

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression analysis in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) fruit has drawn considerable attention with the availability of genome sequences to understand the regulatory mechanism of fruit development and to improve its quality. Real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is a routine technique for gene expression analysis. However, appropriate reference genes for transcript normalization in watermelon fruits have not been well characterized. The aim of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness of 12 genes for their potential use as reference genes in watermelon fruits. Expression variations of these genes were measured in 48 samples obtained from 12 successive developmental stages of parthenocarpic and fertilized fruits of two watermelon genotypes by using qRT-PCR analysis. Considering the effects of genotype, fruit setting method, and developmental stage, geNorm determined clathrin adaptor complex subunit (ClCAC), β-actin (ClACT), and alpha tubulin 5 (ClTUA5) as the multiple reference genes in watermelon fruit. Furthermore, ClCAC alone or together with SAND family protein (ClSAND) was ranked as the single or two best reference genes by NormFinder. By using the top-ranked reference genes to normalize the transcript abundance of phytoene synthase (ClPSY1), a good correlation between lycopene accumulation and ClPSY1 expression pattern was observed in ripening watermelon fruit. These validated reference genes will facilitate the accurate measurement of gene expression in the studies on watermelon fruit biology. PMID:26110539

  17. Evaluation of Appropriate Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization during Watermelon Fruit Development.

    PubMed

    Kong, Qiusheng; Yuan, Jingxian; Gao, Lingyun; Zhao, Liqiang; Cheng, Fei; Huang, Yuan; Bie, Zhilong

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression analysis in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) fruit has drawn considerable attention with the availability of genome sequences to understand the regulatory mechanism of fruit development and to improve its quality. Real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is a routine technique for gene expression analysis. However, appropriate reference genes for transcript normalization in watermelon fruits have not been well characterized. The aim of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness of 12 genes for their potential use as reference genes in watermelon fruits. Expression variations of these genes were measured in 48 samples obtained from 12 successive developmental stages of parthenocarpic and fertilized fruits of two watermelon genotypes by using qRT-PCR analysis. Considering the effects of genotype, fruit setting method, and developmental stage, geNorm determined clathrin adaptor complex subunit (ClCAC), β-actin (ClACT), and alpha tubulin 5 (ClTUA5) as the multiple reference genes in watermelon fruit. Furthermore, ClCAC alone or together with SAND family protein (ClSAND) was ranked as the single or two best reference genes by NormFinder. By using the top-ranked reference genes to normalize the transcript abundance of phytoene synthase (ClPSY1), a good correlation between lycopene accumulation and ClPSY1 expression pattern was observed in ripening watermelon fruit. These validated reference genes will facilitate the accurate measurement of gene expression in the studies on watermelon fruit biology.

  18. On schemes of combinatorial transcription logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchler, Nicolas E.; Gerland, Ulrich; Hwa, Terence

    2003-04-01

    Cells receive a wide variety of cellular and environmental signals, which are often processed combinatorially to generate specific genetic responses. Here we explore theoretically the potentials and limitations of combinatorial signal integration at the level of cis-regulatory transcription control. Our analysis suggests that many complex transcription-control functions of the type encountered in higher eukaryotes are already implementable within the much simpler bacterial transcription system. Using a quantitative model of bacterial transcription and invoking only specific protein-DNA interaction and weak glue-like interaction between regulatory proteins, we show explicit schemes to implement regulatory logic functions of increasing complexity by appropriately selecting the strengths and arranging the relative positions of the relevant protein-binding DNA sequences in the cis-regulatory region. The architectures that emerge are naturally modular and evolvable. Our results suggest that the transcription regulatory apparatus is a "programmable" computing machine, belonging formally to the class of Boltzmann machines. Crucial to our results is the ability to regulate gene expression at a distance. In bacteria, this can be achieved for isolated genes via DNA looping controlled by the dimerization of DNA-bound proteins. However, if adopted extensively in the genome, long-distance interaction can cause unintentional intergenic cross talk, a detrimental side effect difficult to overcome by the known bacterial transcription-regulation systems. This may be a key factor limiting the genome-wide adoption of complex transcription control in bacteria. Implications of our findings for combinatorial transcription control in eukaryotes are discussed. Abbreviations: TF, transcription factor RNAP, RNA polymerase DNF, disjunctive normal form CNF, conjunctive normal form

  19. RNA polymerase II transcriptional fidelity control and its functional interplay with DNA modifications

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Wang, Wei; Chong, Jenny; Shin, Ji Hyun; Xu, Jun; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Accurate genetic information transfer is essential for life. As a key enzyme involved in the first step of gene expression, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) must maintain high transcriptional fidelity while it reads along DNA template and synthesizes RNA transcript in a stepwise manner during transcription elongation. DNA lesions or modifications may lead to significant changes in transcriptional fidelity or transcription elongation dynamics. In this review, we will summarize recent progress towards understanding the molecular basis of RNA Pol II transcriptional fidelity control and impacts of DNA lesions and modifications on Pol II transcription elongation. PMID:26392149

  20. WRKY transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Paul J; Somssich, Imre E; Ringler, Patricia; Shen, Qingxi J

    2010-05-01

    WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants and form integral parts of signalling webs that modulate many plant processes. Here, we review recent significant progress in WRKY transcription factor research. New findings illustrate that WRKY proteins often act as repressors as well as activators, and that members of the family play roles in both the repression and de-repression of important plant processes. Furthermore, it is becoming clear that a single WRKY transcription factor might be involved in regulating several seemingly disparate processes. Mechanisms of signalling and transcriptional regulation are being dissected, uncovering WRKY protein functions via interactions with a diverse array of protein partners, including MAP kinases, MAP kinase kinases, 14-3-3 proteins, calmodulin, histone deacetylases, resistance proteins and other WRKY transcription factors. WRKY genes exhibit extensive autoregulation and cross-regulation that facilitates transcriptional reprogramming in a dynamic web with built-in redundancy.

  1. Accurate stress resultants equations for laminated composite deep thick shells

    SciTech Connect

    Qatu, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    This paper derives accurate equations for the normal and shear force as well as bending and twisting moment resultants for laminated composite deep, thick shells. The stress resultant equations for laminated composite thick shells are shown to be different from those of plates. This is due to the fact the stresses over the thickness of the shell have to be integrated on a trapezoidal-like shell element to obtain the stress resultants. Numerical results are obtained and showed that accurate stress resultants are needed for laminated composite deep thick shells, especially if the curvature is not spherical.

  2. Library preparation for highly accurate population sequencing of RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Ashley; Andino, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Circular resequencing (CirSeq) is a novel technique for efficient and highly accurate next-generation sequencing (NGS) of RNA virus populations. The foundation of this approach is the circularization of fragmented viral RNAs, which are then redundantly encoded into tandem repeats by ‘rolling-circle’ reverse transcription. When sequenced, the redundant copies within each read are aligned to derive a consensus sequence of their initial RNA template. This process yields sequencing data with error rates far below the variant frequencies observed for RNA viruses, facilitating ultra-rare variant detection and accurate measurement of low-frequency variants. Although library preparation takes ~5 d, the high-quality data generated by CirSeq simplifies downstream data analysis, making this approach substantially more tractable for experimentalists. PMID:24967624

  3. Direct competition assay for transcription fidelity.

    PubMed

    Lubkowska, Lucyna; Kireeva, Maria L

    2015-01-01

    Accurate transcription is essential for faithful information flow from DNA to RNA and to the protein. Mechanisms of cognate substrate selection by RNA polymerases are currently elucidated by structural, genetic, and biochemical approaches. Here, we describe a fast and reliable approach to quantitative analyses of transcription fidelity, applicable to analyses of RNA polymerase selectivity against misincorporation, incorporation of dNMPs, and chemically modified rNMP analogues. The method is based on different electrophoretic mobility of RNA oligomers of the same length but differing in sequence.

  4. Transcriptional mutagenesis: causes and involvement in tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Brégeon, Damien; Doetsch, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of normal cells in a human do not multiply continuously but are quiescent and devote most of their energy to gene transcription. When DNA damages in the transcribed strand of an active gene are bypassed by an RNA polymerase, they can miscode at the damaged site and produce mutant transcripts. This process known as transcriptional mutagenesis can lead to the production of mutant proteins that could be important in tumor development. PMID:21346784

  5. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  6. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  7. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  8. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  9. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  10. Transcript initiation and 5'-end modifications are separable events during vesicular stomatitis virus transcription.

    PubMed

    Stillman, E A; Whitt, M A

    1999-09-01

    properly modified at the 5' end, indicating the transcripts either were not capped or were not methylated. This is the first demonstration that transcript initiation and capping/methylation are separable events during VSV transcription. A model is proposed in which polymerase processivity is linked to proper 5'-end modification. The model suggests that a proofreading mechanism exists for VSV and possibly other nonsegmented minus-strand RNA viruses, whereby if some transcripts do not become capped during transcription in a normal infection, a signal is transduced such that the polymerase undergoes abortive elongation and the defective transcript is terminated prematurely and subsequently degraded. PMID:10438807

  11. Morphology of nuclear transcription.

    PubMed

    Weipoltshammer, Klara; Schöfer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Gene expression control is a fundamental determinant of cellular life with transcription being the most important step. The spatial nuclear arrangement of the transcription process driven by RNA polymerases II and III is nonrandomly organized in foci, which is believed to add another regulatory layer on gene expression control. RNA polymerase I transcription takes place within a specialized organelle, the nucleolus. Transcription of ribosomal RNA directly responds to metabolic requirements, which in turn is reflected in the architecture of nucleoli. It differs from that of the other polymerases with respect to the gene template organization, transcription rate, and epigenetic expression control, whereas other features are shared like the formation of DNA loops bringing genes and components of the transcription machinery in close proximity. In recent years, significant advances have been made in the understanding of the structural prerequisites of nuclear transcription, of the arrangement in the nuclear volume, and of the dynamics of these entities. Here, we compare ribosomal RNA and mRNA transcription side by side and review the current understanding focusing on structural aspects of transcription foci, of their constituents, and of the dynamical behavior of these components with respect to foci formation, disassembly, and cell cycle. PMID:26847177

  12. A Nonnatural Transcriptional Coactivator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyanguile, Origene; Uesugi, Motonari; Austin, David J.; Verdine, Gregory L.

    1997-12-01

    In eukaryotes, sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins activate gene expression by recruiting the transcriptional apparatus and chromatin remodeling proteins to the promoter through protein-protein contacts. In many instances, the connection between DNA-binding proteins and the transcriptional apparatus is established through the intermediacy of adapter proteins known as coactivators. Here we describe synthetic molecules with low molecular weight that act as transcriptional coactivators. We demonstrate that a completely nonnatural activation domain in one such molecule is capable of stimulating transcription in vitro and in vivo. The present strategy provides a means of gaining external control over gene activation through intervention using small molecules.

  13. Nascent RNA sequencing reveals distinct features in plant transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hetzel, Jonathan; Duttke, Sascha H.; Benner, Christopher; Chory, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of gene expression is a major mechanism used by plants to confer phenotypic plasticity, and yet compared with other eukaryotes or bacteria, little is known about the design principles. We generated an extensive catalog of nascent and steady-state transcripts in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings using global nuclear run-on sequencing (GRO-seq), 5′GRO-seq, and RNA-seq and reanalyzed published maize data to capture characteristics of plant transcription. De novo annotation of nascent transcripts accurately mapped start sites and unstable transcripts. Examining the promoters of coding and noncoding transcripts identified comparable chromatin signatures, a conserved “TGT” core promoter motif and unreported transcription factor-binding sites. Mapping of engaged RNA polymerases showed a lack of enhancer RNAs, promoter-proximal pausing, and divergent transcription in Arabidopsis seedlings and maize, which are commonly present in yeast and humans. In contrast, Arabidopsis and maize genes accumulate RNA polymerases in proximity of the polyadenylation site, a trend that coincided with longer genes and CpG hypomethylation. Lack of promoter-proximal pausing and a higher correlation of nascent and steady-state transcripts indicate Arabidopsis may regulate transcription predominantly at the level of initiation. Our findings provide insight into plant transcription and eukaryotic gene expression as a whole. PMID:27729530

  14. Normalization of human RNA-seq experiments using chimpanzee RNA as a spike-in standard

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hannah; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Park, Sang-Ryoul; Chung, Sun-Ku; Jeong, Sangkyun; Yang, Inchul

    2016-01-01

    Normalization of human RNA-seq experiments employing chimpanzee RNA as a spike-in standard is reported. Human and chimpanzee RNAs exhibit single nucleotide variations (SNVs) in average 210-bp intervals. Spike-in chimpanzee RNA would behave the same as the human counterparts during the whole NGS procedures owing to the high sequence similarity. After discrimination of species origins of the NGS reads based on SNVs, the chimpanzee reads were used to read-by-read normalize biases and variations of human reads. By this approach, as many as 10,119 transcripts were simultaneously normalized for the entire NGS procedures leading to accurate and reproducible quantification of differential gene expression. In addition, incomparable data sets from different in-process degradations or from different library preparation methods were made well comparable by the normalization. Based on these results, we expect that the normalization approaches using near neighbor genomes as internal standards could be employed as a standard protocol, which will improve both accuracy and comparability of NGS results across different sample batches, laboratories and NGS platforms. PMID:27554056

  15. Normalization of human RNA-seq experiments using chimpanzee RNA as a spike-in standard.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hannah; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Park, Sang-Ryoul; Chung, Sun-Ku; Jeong, Sangkyun; Yang, Inchul

    2016-01-01

    Normalization of human RNA-seq experiments employing chimpanzee RNA as a spike-in standard is reported. Human and chimpanzee RNAs exhibit single nucleotide variations (SNVs) in average 210-bp intervals. Spike-in chimpanzee RNA would behave the same as the human counterparts during the whole NGS procedures owing to the high sequence similarity. After discrimination of species origins of the NGS reads based on SNVs, the chimpanzee reads were used to read-by-read normalize biases and variations of human reads. By this approach, as many as 10,119 transcripts were simultaneously normalized for the entire NGS procedures leading to accurate and reproducible quantification of differential gene expression. In addition, incomparable data sets from different in-process degradations or from different library preparation methods were made well comparable by the normalization. Based on these results, we expect that the normalization approaches using near neighbor genomes as internal standards could be employed as a standard protocol, which will improve both accuracy and comparability of NGS results across different sample batches, laboratories and NGS platforms. PMID:27554056

  16. Accurate masses for dispersion-supported galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Joe; Martinez, Gregory D.; Bullock, James S.; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Geha, Marla; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Simon, Joshua D.; Avedo, Frank F.

    2010-08-01

    We derive an accurate mass estimator for dispersion-supported stellar systems and demonstrate its validity by analysing resolved line-of-sight velocity data for globular clusters, dwarf galaxies and elliptical galaxies. Specifically, by manipulating the spherical Jeans equation we show that the mass enclosed within the 3D deprojected half-light radius r1/2 can be determined with only mild assumptions about the spatial variation of the stellar velocity dispersion anisotropy as long as the projected velocity dispersion profile is fairly flat near the half-light radius, as is typically observed. We find M1/2 = 3 G-1< σ2los > r1/2 ~= 4 G-1< σ2los > Re, where < σ2los > is the luminosity-weighted square of the line-of-sight velocity dispersion and Re is the 2D projected half-light radius. While deceptively familiar in form, this formula is not the virial theorem, which cannot be used to determine accurate masses unless the radial profile of the total mass is known a priori. We utilize this finding to show that all of the Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies (MW dSphs) are consistent with having formed within a halo of a mass of approximately 3 × 109 Msolar, assuming a Λ cold dark matter cosmology. The faintest MW dSphs seem to have formed in dark matter haloes that are at least as massive as those of the brightest MW dSphs, despite the almost five orders of magnitude spread in luminosity between them. We expand our analysis to the full range of observed dispersion-supported stellar systems and examine their dynamical I-band mass-to-light ratios ΥI1/2. The ΥI1/2 versus M1/2 relation for dispersion-supported galaxies follows a U shape, with a broad minimum near ΥI1/2 ~= 3 that spans dwarf elliptical galaxies to normal ellipticals, a steep rise to ΥI1/2 ~= 3200 for ultra-faint dSphs and a more shallow rise to ΥI1/2 ~= 800 for galaxy cluster spheroids.

  17. The fidelity of transcription: RPB1 (RPO21) mutations that increase transcriptional slippage in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Strathern, Jeffrey; Malagon, Francisco; Irvin, Jordan; Gotte, Deanna; Shafer, Brenda; Kireeva, Maria; Lubkowska, Lucyna; Jin, Ding Jun; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2013-01-25

    The fidelity of RNA synthesis depends on both accurate template-mediated nucleotide selection and proper maintenance of register between template and RNA. Loss of register, or transcriptional slippage, is particularly likely on homopolymeric runs in the template. Transcriptional slippage can alter the coding capacity of mRNAs and is used as a regulatory mechanism. Here we describe mutations in the largest subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II that substantially increase the level of transcriptional slippage. Alleles of RPB1 (RPO21) with elevated slippage rates were identified among 6-azauracil-sensitive mutants and were also isolated using a slippage-dependent reporter gene. Biochemical characterization of polymerase II isolated from these mutants confirms elevated levels of transcriptional slippage. PMID:23223234

  18. Transcriptional regulation by CHIP/LDB complexes.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, Revital; Levkovitz, Liron; Yosef, Nir; Yanku, Michaela; Ruppin, Eytan; Sharan, Roded; Westphal, Heiner; Oliver, Brian; Segal, Daniel

    2010-08-12

    It is increasingly clear that transcription factors play versatile roles in turning genes "on" or "off" depending on cellular context via the various transcription complexes they form. This poses a major challenge in unraveling combinatorial transcription complex codes. Here we use the powerful genetics of Drosophila combined with microarray and bioinformatics analyses to tackle this challenge. The nuclear adaptor CHIP/LDB is a major developmental regulator capable of forming tissue-specific transcription complexes with various types of transcription factors and cofactors, making it a valuable model to study the intricacies of gene regulation. To date only few CHIP/LDB complexes target genes have been identified, and possible tissue-dependent crosstalk between these complexes has not been rigorously explored. SSDP proteins protect CHIP/LDB complexes from proteasome dependent degradation and are rate-limiting cofactors for these complexes. By using mutations in SSDP, we identified 189 down-stream targets of CHIP/LDB and show that these genes are enriched for the binding sites of APTEROUS (AP) and PANNIER (PNR), two well studied transcription factors associated with CHIP/LDB complexes. We performed extensive genetic screens and identified target genes that genetically interact with components of CHIP/LDB complexes in directing the development of the wings (28 genes) and thoracic bristles (23 genes). Moreover, by in vivo RNAi silencing we uncovered novel roles for two of the target genes, xbp1 and Gs-alpha, in early development of these structures. Taken together, our results suggest that loss of SSDP disrupts the normal balance between the CHIP-AP and the CHIP-PNR transcription complexes, resulting in down-regulation of CHIP-AP target genes and the concomitant up-regulation of CHIP-PNR target genes. Understanding the combinatorial nature of transcription complexes as presented here is crucial to the study of transcription regulation of gene batteries required for

  19. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Information Page Synonym(s): Hydrocephalus - Normal Pressure Table ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus? Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is an abnormal ...

  20. Classification and automatic transcription of primate calls.

    PubMed

    Versteegh, Maarten; Kuhn, Jeremy; Synnaeve, Gabriel; Ravaux, Lucie; Chemla, Emmanuel; Cäsar, Cristiane; Fuller, James; Murphy, Derek; Schel, Anne; Dunbar, Ewan

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports on an automated and openly available tool for automatic acoustic analysis and transcription of primate calls, which takes raw field recordings and outputs call labels time-aligned with the audio. The system's output predicts a majority of the start times of calls accurately within 200 milliseconds. The tools do not require any manual acoustic analysis or selection of spectral features by the researcher.

  1. Classification and automatic transcription of primate calls.

    PubMed

    Versteegh, Maarten; Kuhn, Jeremy; Synnaeve, Gabriel; Ravaux, Lucie; Chemla, Emmanuel; Cäsar, Cristiane; Fuller, James; Murphy, Derek; Schel, Anne; Dunbar, Ewan

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports on an automated and openly available tool for automatic acoustic analysis and transcription of primate calls, which takes raw field recordings and outputs call labels time-aligned with the audio. The system's output predicts a majority of the start times of calls accurately within 200 milliseconds. The tools do not require any manual acoustic analysis or selection of spectral features by the researcher. PMID:27475207

  2. Emotion Recognition in Disturbed and Normal Children: A Research Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Elaine

    1981-01-01

    The identification of facial expressions of emotion was studied in normal and psychiatrically disturbed children. Schizophrenic children were significantly less accurate than other children in emotion identification. Anxious-depressed children made more errors than unsocialized-aggressive and normal children. Normal and unsocialized-aggressive…

  3. What Is Normal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Barbara

    1983-01-01

    The mother of two children with congenital myopathy characterized by weak muscles recounts her experiences in obtaining an accurate diagnosis, finding opportunities for socialization, and encouraging independence. (CL)

  4. ASTP Onboard Voice Transcription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The transcription is presented of the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project voice communications as recorded on the command module data storage equipment. Data from this recorder are telemetered (dumped) to Space Tracking and Data Network sites for retransmission to the Johnson Space Center. The transcript is divided into three columns -- time, speaker, and text. The Greenwich mean time column consists of three two-digit numbers representing hours, minutes, and seconds (e.g., 22 34 14) for the Julian dates shown at the top of the page on which a new day begins. The speaker column indicates the source of a transmission; the text column contains the verbatim transcript of the communications.

  5. Accurate estimation of normal incidence absorption coefficients with confidence intervals using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuye, Cedric; Vanlanduit, Steve; Guillaume, Patrick

    2009-06-01

    When using optical measurements of the sound fields inside a glass tube, near the material under test, to estimate the reflection and absorption coefficients, not only these acoustical parameters but also confidence intervals can be determined. The sound fields are visualized using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV). In this paper the influence of different test signals on the quality of the results, obtained with this technique, is examined. The amount of data gathered during one measurement scan makes a thorough statistical analysis possible leading to the knowledge of confidence intervals. The use of a multi-sine, constructed on the resonance frequencies of the test tube, shows to be a very good alternative for the traditional periodic chirp. This signal offers the ability to obtain data for multiple frequencies in one measurement, without the danger of a low signal-to-noise ratio. The variability analysis in this paper clearly shows the advantages of the proposed multi-sine compared to the periodic chirp. The measurement procedure and the statistical analysis are validated by measuring the reflection ratio at a closed end and comparing the results with the theoretical value. Results of the testing of two building materials (an acoustic ceiling tile and linoleum) are presented and compared to supplier data.

  6. A comprehensive library of fluorescent transcriptional reporters for Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zaslaver, Alon; Bren, Anat; Ronen, Michal; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Kikoin, Ilya; Shavit, Seagull; Liebermeister, Wolfram; Surette, Michael G; Alon, Uri

    2006-08-01

    E. coli is widely used for systems biology research; there exists a need, however, for tools that can be used to accurately and comprehensively measure expression dynamics in individual living cells. To address this we present a library of transcriptional fusions of gfp to each of about 2,000 different promoters in E. coli K12, covering the great majority of the promoters in the organism. Each promoter fusion is expressed from a low-copy plasmid. We demonstrate that this library can be used to obtain highly accurate dynamic measurements of promoter activity on a genomic scale, in a glucose-lactose diauxic shift experiment. The library allowed detection of about 80 previously uncharacterized transcription units in E. coli, including putative internal promoters within previously known operons, such as the lac operon. This library can serve as a tool for accurate, high-resolution analysis of transcription networks in living E. coli cells.

  7. A comprehensive library of fluorescent transcriptional reporters for Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zaslaver, Alon; Bren, Anat; Ronen, Michal; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Kikoin, Ilya; Shavit, Seagull; Liebermeister, Wolfram; Surette, Michael G; Alon, Uri

    2006-08-01

    E. coli is widely used for systems biology research; there exists a need, however, for tools that can be used to accurately and comprehensively measure expression dynamics in individual living cells. To address this we present a library of transcriptional fusions of gfp to each of about 2,000 different promoters in E. coli K12, covering the great majority of the promoters in the organism. Each promoter fusion is expressed from a low-copy plasmid. We demonstrate that this library can be used to obtain highly accurate dynamic measurements of promoter activity on a genomic scale, in a glucose-lactose diauxic shift experiment. The library allowed detection of about 80 previously uncharacterized transcription units in E. coli, including putative internal promoters within previously known operons, such as the lac operon. This library can serve as a tool for accurate, high-resolution analysis of transcription networks in living E. coli cells. PMID:16862137

  8. Defining ETS transcription regulatory networks and their contribution to breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Turner, David P; Findlay, Victoria J; Moussa, Omar; Watson, Dennis K

    2007-10-15

    ETS factors are members of one of the largest families of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors, regulating critical functions in normal cell homeostasis, that when perturbed contribute to tumor progression. The well documented alterations in ETS factor expression and function during breast cancer progression result in pleiotropic effects manifested by the downstream effect on their target genes. Multiple ETS factors bind to the same regulatory sites present on target genes, suggesting redundant or competitive functions. Furthermore, additional events contribute to, or may be necessary for, target gene regulation. In order to advance our understanding of the ETS-dependent regulation of breast cancer progression and metastasis, this prospect article puts forward a model for examining the effects of simultaneous expression of multiple transcription factors on the transcriptome of non-metastatic and metastatic breast cancer. Compared to existing RNA profiles defined following expression of individual transcription factors, the anti- and pro-metastatic signatures obtained by examining specific ETS regulatory networks will significantly improve our ability to accurately predict tumor progression and advance our understanding of gene regulation in cancer. Coordination of multiple ETS gene functions also mediates interactions between tumor and stromal cells and thus contributes to the cancer phenotype. As such, these new insights may provide a novel view of the ETS gene family as well as a focal point for studying the complex biological control involved in tumor progression.

  9. Quantification of Yeast and Bacterial Gene Transcripts in Retail Cheeses by Reverse Transcription-Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Cécile; Castellote, Jessie; Onesime, Djamila; Bonnarme, Pascal; Irlinger, Françoise

    2013-01-01

    The cheese microbiota contributes to a large extent to the development of the typical color, flavor, and texture of the final product. Its composition is not well defined in most cases and varies from one cheese to another. The aim of the present study was to establish procedures for gene transcript quantification in cheeses by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Total RNA was extracted from five smear-ripened cheeses purchased on the retail market, using a method that does not involve prior separation of microbial cells. 16S rRNA and malate:quinone oxidoreductase gene transcripts of Corynebacterium casei, Brevibacterium aurantiacum, and Arthrobacter arilaitensis and 26S rRNA and beta tubulin gene transcripts of Geotrichum candidum and Debaryomyces hansenii could be detected and quantified in most of the samples. Three types of normalization were applied: against total RNA, against the amount of cheese, and against a reference gene. For the first two types of normalization, differences of reverse transcription efficiencies from one sample to another were taken into account by analysis of exogenous control mRNA. No good correlation was found between the abundances of target mRNA or rRNA transcripts and the viable cell concentration of the corresponding species. However, in most cases, no mRNA transcripts were detected for species that did not belong to the dominant species. The applications of gene expression measurement in cheeses containing an undefined microbiota, as well as issues concerning the strategy of normalization and the assessment of amplification specificity, are discussed. PMID:23124230

  10. Selection of best-performing reference gene products for investigating transcriptional regulation across silvering in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla).

    PubMed

    Franzellitti, Silvia; Kiwan, Alisar; Valbonesi, Paola; Fabbri, Elena

    2015-11-23

    The focus of the present study was to set a methodological approach for evaluating molecular mechanisms underlying silvering transformation in the European eel, Anguilla anguilla. Silvering is a tightly controlled process during which eels undergo significant morphological, physiological and behavioral changes, pre-adapting for the oceanic spawning migration. Female eels showing different silver indexes were caught in different seasons in the Comacchio Lagoon (North Adriatic Sea, Italy). Isolated hepatocytes from these eels were selected as the experimental model given the relevant role of these cells in metabolic functions potentially altered during silvering. Expression profiles of 7 candidate reference transcripts were analyzed seeking the most viable and robust strategies for accurate qPCR data normalization during silvering. Stability analysis and further statistical validation identified transcripts encoding the ribosomal proteins L13 and ARP as the appropriate reference genes in studies on A. anguilla through silvering. The identified reference transcripts were further used to evaluate expression profiles of target transcripts encoding the thyroid hormone receptor β (THRβ) and vitellogenin (vtg), known to be involved in silvering processes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study comparing THRβ expression in European eels across silvering.

  11. Selection of best-performing reference gene products for investigating transcriptional regulation across silvering in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla)

    PubMed Central

    Franzellitti, Silvia; Kiwan, Alisar; Valbonesi, Paola; Fabbri, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The focus of the present study was to set a methodological approach for evaluating molecular mechanisms underlying silvering transformation in the European eel, Anguilla anguilla. Silvering is a tightly controlled process during which eels undergo significant morphological, physiological and behavioral changes, pre-adapting for the oceanic spawning migration. Female eels showing different silver indexes were caught in different seasons in the Comacchio Lagoon (North Adriatic Sea, Italy). Isolated hepatocytes from these eels were selected as the experimental model given the relevant role of these cells in metabolic functions potentially altered during silvering. Expression profiles of 7 candidate reference transcripts were analyzed seeking the most viable and robust strategies for accurate qPCR data normalization during silvering. Stability analysis and further statistical validation identified transcripts encoding the ribosomal proteins L13 and ARP as the appropriate reference genes in studies on A. anguilla through silvering. The identified reference transcripts were further used to evaluate expression profiles of target transcripts encoding the thyroid hormone receptor β (THRβ) and vitellogenin (vtg), known to be involved in silvering processes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study comparing THRβ expression in European eels across silvering. PMID:26593703

  12. Selection of best-performing reference gene products for investigating transcriptional regulation across silvering in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla).

    PubMed

    Franzellitti, Silvia; Kiwan, Alisar; Valbonesi, Paola; Fabbri, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The focus of the present study was to set a methodological approach for evaluating molecular mechanisms underlying silvering transformation in the European eel, Anguilla anguilla. Silvering is a tightly controlled process during which eels undergo significant morphological, physiological and behavioral changes, pre-adapting for the oceanic spawning migration. Female eels showing different silver indexes were caught in different seasons in the Comacchio Lagoon (North Adriatic Sea, Italy). Isolated hepatocytes from these eels were selected as the experimental model given the relevant role of these cells in metabolic functions potentially altered during silvering. Expression profiles of 7 candidate reference transcripts were analyzed seeking the most viable and robust strategies for accurate qPCR data normalization during silvering. Stability analysis and further statistical validation identified transcripts encoding the ribosomal proteins L13 and ARP as the appropriate reference genes in studies on A. anguilla through silvering. The identified reference transcripts were further used to evaluate expression profiles of target transcripts encoding the thyroid hormone receptor β (THRβ) and vitellogenin (vtg), known to be involved in silvering processes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study comparing THRβ expression in European eels across silvering. PMID:26593703

  13. LOX-1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Hermonat, Paul L; Zhu, Hongqing; Cao, Maohua; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2011-10-01

    The importance of the lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1) gene in cardiovascular and other diseases is slowly being revealed. LOX-1 gene expression appears to be a "canary in a coal mine" for atherogenesis, being strongly up-regulated early on in a number of cell types when they are activated, and predicting the sites of future disease. From this early time point the LOX-1 protein often participates in the disease process itself. While gene/protein expression can be regulated on a multiplicity of levels, the most basic and important mode of regulation is usually transcriptional. There are very few studies on the transcriptional regulation of the human LOX-1 promoter; fewer still on definitive mapping of the transcription factors involved. It is known that a wide variety of stimuli up-regulate LOX-1, usually/probably on the transcriptional level. Angiotensin II (Ang II) is one important regulator of renin-angiotensin system and stimulator LOX-1. Ang II is known to up-regulate LOX-1 transcription through an NF-kB motif located at nt -2158. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is another important cardiovascular regulator, particularly of atherosclerotic disease, and a strong stimulator of LOX-1. Ox-LDL is known to up-regulate LOX-1 transcription through an Oct-1 motif located at nt -1556. The subsequent enhanced LOX-1 receptor numbers and their binding by ox-LDL ligand triggers a positive feedback loop, increasing further LOX-1 expression, with a presently unknown regulatory governor. The Oct-1 gene also has its own Oct-1-driven positive feedback loop, which likely also contributes to LOX-1 up-regulation. There is also data which suggests the involvement of the transcription factor AP-1 during stimulation with Phorbol 12-myristate acetate. While the importance of NF-κB as a transcriptional regulator of cardiovascular-relevant genes is well known, the importance of Oct-1 is not. Data suggests that Oct-1-mediated up-regulation of transcription is an early

  14. Groundtruth approach to accurate quantitation of fluorescence microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Mascio-Kegelmeyer, L; Tomascik-Cheeseman, L; Burnett, M S; van Hummelen, P; Wyrobek, A J

    2000-12-01

    To more accurately measure fluorescent signals from microarrays, we calibrated our acquisition and analysis systems by using groundtruth samples comprised of known quantities of red and green gene-specific DNA probes hybridized to cDNA targets. We imaged the slides with a full-field, white light CCD imager and analyzed them with our custom analysis software. Here we compare, for multiple genes, results obtained with and without preprocessing (alignment, color crosstalk compensation, dark field subtraction, and integration time). We also evaluate the accuracy of various image processing and analysis techniques (background subtraction, segmentation, quantitation and normalization). This methodology calibrates and validates our system for accurate quantitative measurement of microarrays. Specifically, we show that preprocessing the images produces results significantly closer to the known ground-truth for these samples.

  15. Aligning transcript of historical documents using dynamic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaev, Irina; Cohen, Rafi; El-Sana, Jihad; Kedem, Klara

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple and accurate approach for aligning historical documents with their corresponding transcription. First, a representative of each letter in the historical document is cropped. Then, the transcription is transformed to synthetic word images by representing the letters in the transcription by the cropped letters. These synthetic word images are aligned to groups of connected components in the original text, along each line, using dynamic programming. For measuring image similarities we experimented with a variety of feature extraction and matching methods. The presented alignment algorithm was tested on two historical datasets and provided excellent results.

  16. Transcriptional directionality of the human insulin-degrading enzyme promoter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lang; Wang, Pan; Ding, Qingyang; Wang, Zhao

    2013-10-01

    Unidirectional promoters dominate among mammalian genomes. However, the mechanism through which the transcriptional directionality of promoters is accomplished remains to be clarified. Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a ubiquitously expressed zinc metalloprotease, whose promoter contains a CpG island. We previously showed that the basal promoter region of mouse IDE has bidirectional transcriptional activity, but an upstream promoter element blocks its antisense transcription. Therefore, we wonder whether the human IDE promoter contains an analogous element. Similarly, the basal promoter region of human IDE (-102 ~ +173 and -196 ~ +173 relative to the transcription start site) showed bidirectional transcriptional activity. However, the region from -348 to +173 could only be transcribed from the normal orientation, implying that an upstream promoter element between -348 and -196 blocks the antisense transcription of the human IDE promoter. Through promoter deletion and mutagenesis analysis, we mapped this element precisely and found that the upstream promoter element locates between -318 and -304. Furthermore, the transcription-blocking elements in the mouse and human IDE promoters inhibited the transcription of the SV40 promoter when put downstream of it. In conclusion, we identify an upstream promoter element which blocks the antisense transcription of the human IDE promoter. Our studies are helpful to clarify the transcriptional directionality of promoters.

  17. Cutting the chain of command: specific inhibitors of transcription.

    PubMed

    Holt, J T

    1991-01-01

    Cell growth and differentiation are regulated (at least in part) by changes in gene transcription. The cloning and characterization of transcription factors has revealed that these factors coordinately regulate the transcription of specific genetic programs; for example, a number of phorbol ester-induced genes are activated by binding of the transcription factors Fos and Jun to specific DNA sequences. Clearly, inhibition of either the production or function of specific transcription factors would alter complete genetic programs, changing the expression of a great number of genes (analogous to cutting the chain of military command and affecting an entire brigade or division). Our laboratory and others have employed genetic methods to specifically inhibit transcription by two distinct methods: (1) antisense inhibition of the production of transcription factors; and (2) introduction of target DNA sequences to "soak up"or quench transcription factors. In this report, we present data showing that serum-stimulated induction of the c-fos gene may be reduced more than 90% by introduction of target DNA sequences containing the serum response element (SRE); identical amounts of mutant SRE sequences have no effect on gene induction. These studies demonstrate that specific inhibitors of transcription can have significant effects on cellular gene expression. The challenge is to modulate transcriptional programs without deleterious effects on normal cells.

  18. Accurate energy levels for singly ionized platinum (Pt II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reader, Joseph; Acquista, Nicolo; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Engleman, Rolf, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    New observations of the spectrum of Pt II have been made with hollow-cathode lamps. The region from 1032 to 4101 A was observed photographically with a 10.7-m normal-incidence spectrograph. The region from 2245 to 5223 A was observed with a Fourier-transform spectrometer. Wavelength measurements were made for 558 lines. The uncertainties vary from 0.0005 to 0.004 A. From these measurements and three parity-forbidden transitions in the infrared, accurate values were determined for 28 even and 72 odd energy levels of Pt II.

  19. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C.; Côté, Maxime C.; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors. PMID:27739523

  20. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C.; Côté, Maxime C.; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-10-01

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors.

  1. Mill profiler machines soft materials accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Mill profiler machines bevels, slots, and grooves in soft materials, such as styrofoam phenolic-filled cores, to any desired thickness. A single operator can accurately control cutting depths in contour or straight line work.

  2. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe. PMID:22458515

  3. The transcription factor encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T D; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Ramos, Oscar H P; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S C; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma D C; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W Z; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe.

  4. The Normalized Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Futrell, Kathleen H.

    1997-01-01

    Describes characteristics of the normalized child, the ultimate goal of Montessori education. First outlines children's basic needs, then describes traits of the normalized child, including love of order, work, silence and working alone; mutual aid and cooperation; profound spontaneous concentration; obedience; independence and initiative;…

  5. Simple, rapid and accurate molecular diagnosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia by loop mediated amplification technology.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Orietta; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Rigo, Francesca; Zanghì, Pamela; D'Agostini, Elena; Amicarelli, Giulia; Colotta, Francesco; Divona, Mariadomenica; Ciardi, Claudia; Coco, Francesco Lo; Minnucci, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    The diagnostic work-up of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) includes the cytogenetic demonstration of the t(15;17) translocation and/or the PML-RARA chimeric transcript by RQ-PCR or RT-PCR. This latter assays provide suitable results in 3-6 hours. We describe here two new, rapid and specific assays that detect PML-RARA transcripts, based on the RT-QLAMP (Reverse Transcription-Quenching Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification) technology in which RNA retrotranscription and cDNA amplification are carried out in a single tube with one enzyme at one temperature, in fluorescence and real time format. A single tube triplex assay detects bcr1 and bcr3 PML-RARA transcripts along with GUS housekeeping gene. A single tube duplex assay detects bcr2 and GUSB. In 73 APL cases, these assays detected in 16 minutes bcr1, bcr2 and bcr3 transcripts. All 81 non-APL samples were negative by RT-QLAMP for chimeric transcripts whereas GUSB was detectable. In 11 APL patients in which RT-PCR yielded equivocal breakpoint type results, RT-QLAMP assays unequivocally and accurately defined the breakpoint type (as confirmed by sequencing). Furthermore, RT-QLAMP could amplify two bcr2 transcripts with particularly extended PML exon 6 deletions not amplified by RQ-PCR. RT-QLAMP reproducible sensitivity is 10(-3) for bcr1 and bcr3 and 10(-)2 for bcr2 thus making this assay particularly attractive at diagnosis and leaving RQ-PCR for the molecular monitoring of minimal residual disease during the follow up. In conclusion, PML-RARA RT-QLAMP compared to RT-PCR or RQ-PCR is a valid improvement to perform rapid, simple and accurate molecular diagnosis of APL. PMID:25815362

  6. Simple, rapid and accurate molecular diagnosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia by loop mediated amplification technology

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Orietta; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Rigo, Francesca; Zanghì, Pamela; D'Agostini, Elena; Amicarelli, Giulia; Colotta, Francesco; Divona, Mariadomenica; Ciardi, Claudia; Coco, Francesco Lo; Minnucci, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    The diagnostic work-up of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) includes the cytogenetic demonstration of the t(15;17) translocation and/or the PML-RARA chimeric transcript by RQ-PCR or RT-PCR. This latter assays provide suitable results in 3-6 hours. We describe here two new, rapid and specific assays that detect PML-RARA transcripts, based on the RT-QLAMP (Reverse Transcription-Quenching Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification) technology in which RNA retrotranscription and cDNA amplification are carried out in a single tube with one enzyme at one temperature, in fluorescence and real time format. A single tube triplex assay detects bcr1 and bcr3 PML-RARA transcripts along with GUS housekeeping gene. A single tube duplex assay detects bcr2 and GUSB. In 73 APL cases, these assays detected in 16 minutes bcr1, bcr2 and bcr3 transcripts. All 81 non-APL samples were negative by RT-QLAMP for chimeric transcripts whereas GUSB was detectable. In 11 APL patients in which RT-PCR yielded equivocal breakpoint type results, RT-QLAMP assays unequivocally and accurately defined the breakpoint type (as confirmed by sequencing). Furthermore, RT-QLAMP could amplify two bcr2 transcripts with particularly extended PML exon 6 deletions not amplified by RQ-PCR. RT-QLAMP reproducible sensitivity is 10−3 for bcr1 and bcr3 and 10−2 for bcr2 thus making this assay particularly attractive at diagnosis and leaving RQ-PCR for the molecular monitoring of minimal residual disease during the follow up. In conclusion, PML-RARA RT-QLAMP compared to RT-PCR or RQ-PCR is a valid improvement to perform rapid, simple and accurate molecular diagnosis of APL. PMID:25815362

  7. Improving accuracy of transcripts in qualitative research.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Lynne M; Meyer, Mechthild; Estable, Alma

    2004-01-01

    Everyone who has worked with qualitative interview data has run into problems with transcription error, even if they do the transcribing themselves. A thoughtful, accurate, reliable, multilingual transcriptionist with a quick turnaround time is worth her or his weight in gold. In this article, the authors examine some transcription circumstances that seem to bring about their own consistent set of problems. Based on their experiences, the authors examine the following issues: use of voice recognition systems; notation choices; processing and active listening versus touch typing; transcriptionist effect; emotionally loaded audiotaped material; class and/or cultural differences among interviewee, interviewer, and transcriptionist; and some errors that arise when working in a second language. The authors offer suggestions for working with transcriptionists as part of the qualitative research team.

  8. Transcript CONTU Meeting #10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on New Technological Uses of Copyrighted Works, Washington, DC.

    Testimony on the copyrightability of computer software was heard at the 10th Commission meeting held at the New York Public Library in November 1976. This transcript of the meeting also includes reports of the Commission subcommittees on photocopying, software, networks, and data bases. (Author/AP)

  9. Automatic Music Transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapuri, Anssi; Virtanen, Tuomas

    Written musical notation describes music in a symbolic form that is suitable for performing a piece using the available musical instruments. Traditionally, musical notation indicates the pitch, target instrument, timing, and duration of each sound to be played. The aim of music transcription either by humans or by a machine is to infer these musical parameters, given only the acoustic recording of a performance.

  10. Transcription Dynamics in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Lenstra, Tineke L; Rodriguez, Joseph; Chen, Huimin; Larson, Daniel R

    2016-07-01

    The transcription cycle can be roughly divided into three stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. Understanding the molecular events that regulate all these stages requires a dynamic view of the underlying processes. The development of techniques to visualize and quantify transcription in single living cells has been essential in revealing the transcription kinetics. They have revealed that (a) transcription is heterogeneous between cells and (b) transcription can be discontinuous within a cell. In this review, we discuss the progress in our quantitative understanding of transcription dynamics in living cells, focusing on all parts of the transcription cycle. We present the techniques allowing for single-cell transcription measurements, review evidence from different organisms, and discuss how these experiments have broadened our mechanistic understanding of transcription regulation.

  11. Accurate and occlusion-robust multi-view stereo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhaokun; Stamatopoulos, Christos; Fraser, Clive S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes an accurate multi-view stereo method for image-based 3D reconstruction that features robustness in the presence of occlusions. The new method offers improvements in dealing with two fundamental image matching problems. The first concerns the selection of the support window model, while the second centers upon accurate visibility estimation for each pixel. The support window model is based on an approximate 3D support plane described by a depth and two per-pixel depth offsets. For the visibility estimation, the multi-view constraint is initially relaxed by generating separate support plane maps for each support image using a modified PatchMatch algorithm. Then the most likely visible support image, which represents the minimum visibility of each pixel, is extracted via a discrete Markov Random Field model and it is further augmented by parameter clustering. Once the visibility is estimated, multi-view optimization taking into account all redundant observations is conducted to achieve optimal accuracy in the 3D surface generation for both depth and surface normal estimates. Finally, multi-view consistency is utilized to eliminate any remaining observational outliers. The proposed method is experimentally evaluated using well-known Middlebury datasets, and results obtained demonstrate that it is amongst the most accurate of the methods thus far reported via the Middlebury MVS website. Moreover, the new method exhibits a high completeness rate.

  12. Videometric terminal guidance method and system for UAV accurate landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiang; Lei, Zhihui; Yu, Qifeng; Zhang, Hongliang; Shang, Yang; Du, Jing; Gui, Yang; Guo, Pengyu

    2012-06-01

    We present a videometric method and system to implement terminal guidance for Unmanned Aerial Vehicle(UAV) accurate landing. In the videometric system, two calibrated cameras attached to the ground are used, and a calibration method in which at least 5 control points are applied is developed to calibrate the inner and exterior parameters of the cameras. Cameras with 850nm spectral filter are used to recognize a 850nm LED target fixed on the UAV which can highlight itself in images with complicated background. NNLOG (normalized negative laplacian of gaussian) operator is developed for automatic target detection and tracking. Finally, 3-D position of the UAV with high accuracy can be calculated and transfered to control system to direct UAV accurate landing. The videometric system can work in the rate of 50Hz. Many real flight and static accuracy experiments demonstrate the correctness and veracity of the method proposed in this paper, and they also indicate the reliability and robustness of the system proposed in this paper. The static accuracy experiment results show that the deviation is less-than 10cm when target is far from the cameras and lessthan 2cm in 100m region. The real flight experiment results show that the deviation from DGPS is less-than 20cm. The system implement in this paper won the first prize in the AVIC Cup-International UAV Innovation Grand Prix, and it is the only one that achieved UAV accurate landing without GPS or DGPS.

  13. Narrative Transcription Accuracy and Reliability in Two Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilmann, John; Miller, Jon F.; Iglesias, Aquiles; Fabiano-Smith, Leah; Nockerts, Ann; Andriacchi, Karen Digney

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the issues of accuracy and reliability for transcription and analysis of oral narratives from Spanish-English bilingual children. Findings reveal that oral narrative data from ELL children can be accurately transcribed and the narrative measures are stable over time.

  14. Elucidating MicroRNA Regulatory Networks Using Transcriptional, Post-transcriptional, and Histone Modification Measurements.

    PubMed

    Gosline, Sara J C; Gurtan, Allan M; JnBaptiste, Courtney K; Bosson, Andrew; Milani, Pamela; Dalin, Simona; Matthews, Bryan J; Yap, Yoon S; Sharp, Phillip A; Fraenkel, Ernest

    2016-01-12

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate diverse biological processes by repressing mRNAs, but their modest effects on direct targets, together with their participation in larger regulatory networks, make it challenging to delineate miRNA-mediated effects. Here, we describe an approach to characterizing miRNA-regulatory networks by systematically profiling transcriptional, post-transcriptional and epigenetic activity in a pair of isogenic murine fibroblast cell lines with and without Dicer expression. By RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and CLIP (crosslinking followed by immunoprecipitation) sequencing (CLIP-seq), we found that most of the changes induced by global miRNA loss occur at the level of transcription. We then introduced a network modeling approach that integrated these data with epigenetic data to identify specific miRNA-regulated transcription factors that explain the impact of miRNA perturbation on gene expression. In total, we demonstrate that combining multiple genome-wide datasets spanning diverse regulatory modes enables accurate delineation of the downstream miRNA-regulated transcriptional network and establishes a model for studying similar networks in other systems. PMID:26748710

  15. TALE-mediated modulation of transcriptional enhancers in vivo.

    PubMed

    Crocker, Justin; Stern, David L

    2013-08-01

    We tested whether transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) could mediate repression and activation of endogenous enhancers in the Drosophila genome. TALE repressors (TALERs) targeting each of the five even-skipped (eve) stripe enhancers generated repression specifically of the focal stripes. TALE activators (TALEAs) targeting the eve promoter or enhancers caused increased expression primarily in cells normally activated by the promoter or targeted enhancer, respectively. This effect supports the view that repression acts in a dominant fashion on transcriptional activators and that the activity state of an enhancer influences TALE binding or the ability of the VP16 domain to enhance transcription. In these assays, the Hairy repression domain did not exhibit previously described long-range transcriptional repression activity. The phenotypic effects of TALER and TALEA expression in larvae and adults are consistent with the observed modulations of eve expression. TALEs thus provide a novel tool for detection and functional modulation of transcriptional enhancers in their native genomic context.

  16. Somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes is linked to transcription initiation.

    PubMed

    Peters, A; Storb, U

    1996-01-01

    To identify DNA sequences that target the somatic hypermutation process, the immunoglobulin gene promoter located upstream of the variable (V) region was duplicated upstream of the constant (C) region of a kappa transgene. Normally, kappa genes are somatically mutated only in the VJ region, but not in the C region. In B cell hybridomas from mice with this kappa transgene (P5'C), both the VJ region and the C region, but not the region between them, were mutated at similar frequencies, suggesting that the mutation mechanism is related to transcription. The downstream promoter was not occluded by transcripts from the upstream promoter. In fact, the levels of transcripts originating from the two promoters were similar, supporting a mutation model based on initiation of transcripts. Several "hot-spots" of somatic mutation were noted, further demonstrating that this transgene has the hallmarks of somatic mutation of endogenous immunoglobulin genes. A model linking somatic mutation to transcription-coupled DNA repair is proposed.

  17. The KRAKEN normal mode program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, M. B.

    1992-05-01

    In the late 1970's, several normal-mode models existed which were widely used for predicting acoustic transmission-loss in the ocean; however, each had its own problems. Typical difficulties included numerical instabilities for certain types of sound-speed profiles and failures to compute a complete set of ocean modes. In short, there was a need for a model that was robust, accurate, and efficient. In order to resolve these problems, a new algorithm was developed forming the basis for the KRAKEN normal mode model. Over subsequent years, KRAKEN was greatly extended, with options for modeling ocean environments that are range-independent, range-dependent, or fully 3-dimensional. The current version offers the specialist a vast number of options for treating ocean-acoustics problems (or more generally acousto-elastic waveguides). On the other hand, it is easy for a less sophisticated user to learn the small subset of tools needed for the common problem of transmission-loss modeling in range-independent ocean environments. This report addresses the need for a more complete user's guide to supplement the on-line help files. The first chapters give a fairly technical description of the mathematical and numerical basis of the model. Additional chapters give a simpler description of its use and installation in a manner that is accessible to less scientifically-oriented readers.

  18. Modified chemiluminescent NO analyzer accurately measures NOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Installation of molybdenum nitric oxide (NO)-to-higher oxides of nitrogen (NOx) converter in chemiluminescent gas analyzer and use of air purge allow accurate measurements of NOx in exhaust gases containing as much as thirty percent carbon monoxide (CO). Measurements using conventional analyzer are highly inaccurate for NOx if as little as five percent CO is present. In modified analyzer, molybdenum has high tolerance to CO, and air purge substantially quenches NOx destruction. In test, modified chemiluminescent analyzer accurately measured NO and NOx concentrations for over 4 months with no denegration in performance.

  19. Reference gene selection for quantitative real-time PCR normalization in Quercus suber.

    PubMed

    Marum, Liliana; Miguel, Andreia; Ricardo, Cândido P; Miguel, Célia

    2012-01-01

    The use of reverse transcription quantitative PCR technology to assess gene expression levels requires an accurate normalization of data in order to avoid misinterpretation of experimental results and erroneous analyses. Despite being the focus of several transcriptomics projects, oaks, and particularly cork oak (Quercus suber), have not been investigated regarding the identification of reference genes suitable for the normalization of real-time quantitative PCR data. In this study, ten candidate reference genes (Act, CACs, EF-1α, GAPDH, His3, PsaH, Sand, PP2A, ß-Tub and Ubq) were evaluated to determine the most stable internal reference for quantitative PCR normalization in cork oak. The transcript abundance of these genes was analysed in several tissues of cork oak, including leaves, reproduction cork, and periderm from branches at different developmental stages (1-, 2-, and 3-year old) or collected in different dates (active growth period versus dormancy). The three statistical methods (geNorm, NormFinder, and CV method) used in the evaluation of the most suitable combination of reference genes identified Act and CACs as the most stable candidates when all the samples were analysed together, while ß-Tub and PsaH showed the lowest expression stability. However, when different tissues, developmental stages, and collection dates were analysed separately, the reference genes exhibited some variation in their expression levels. In this study, and for the first time, we have identified and validated reference genes in cork oak that can be used for quantification of target gene expression in different tissues and experimental conditions and will be useful as a starting point for gene expression studies in other oaks.

  20. SVD identifies transcript length distribution functions from DNA microarray data and reveals evolutionary forces globally affecting GBM metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bertagnolli, Nicolas M; Drake, Justin A; Tennessen, Jason M; Alter, Orly

    2013-01-01

    To search for evolutionary forces that might act upon transcript length, we use the singular value decomposition (SVD) to identify the length distribution functions of sets and subsets of human and yeast transcripts from profiles of mRNA abundance levels across gel electrophoresis migration distances that were previously measured by DNA microarrays. We show that the SVD identifies the transcript length distribution functions as "asymmetric generalized coherent states" from the DNA microarray data and with no a-priori assumptions. Comparing subsets of human and yeast transcripts of the same gene ontology annotations, we find that in both disparate eukaryotes, transcripts involved in protein synthesis or mitochondrial metabolism are significantly shorter than typical, and in particular, significantly shorter than those involved in glucose metabolism. Comparing the subsets of human transcripts that are overexpressed in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) or normal brain tissue samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas, we find that GBM maintains normal brain overexpression of significantly short transcripts, enriched in transcripts that are involved in protein synthesis or mitochondrial metabolism, but suppresses normal overexpression of significantly longer transcripts, enriched in transcripts that are involved in glucose metabolism and brain activity. These global relations among transcript length, cellular metabolism and tumor development suggest a previously unrecognized physical mode for tumor and normal cells to differentially regulate metabolism in a transcript length-dependent manner. The identified distribution functions support a previous hypothesis from mathematical modeling of evolutionary forces that act upon transcript length in the manner of the restoring force of the harmonic oscillator.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of IL-2 in health and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Crispín, José C.; Tsokos, George C.

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of IL-2 production is central to our understanding of the immune system. Key during T cell activation, it also plays an essential role in the regulation of the immune response. This review discusses the function of recently described factors that modulate transcription and chromatin remodeling at the IL2 promoter. Also, it addresses the role of FoxP3 as a transcriptional regulator in conventional T cells and regulatory T cells, and the mechanisms whereby CD28 stabilizes IL2 transcription and translation. Finally, the alterations that prevent T cells from SLE patients from producing normal amounts of IL-2 upon stimulation are described. PMID:18723131

  2. Normality in analytical psychology.

    PubMed

    Myers, Steve

    2013-12-01

    Although C.G. Jung's interest in normality wavered throughout his career, it was one of the areas he identified in later life as worthy of further research. He began his career using a definition of normality which would have been the target of Foucault's criticism, had Foucault chosen to review Jung's work. However, Jung then evolved his thinking to a standpoint that was more aligned to Foucault's own. Thereafter, the post Jungian concept of normality has remained relatively undeveloped by comparison with psychoanalysis and mainstream psychology. Jung's disjecta membra on the subject suggest that, in contemporary analytical psychology, too much focus is placed on the process of individuation to the neglect of applications that consider collective processes. Also, there is potential for useful research and development into the nature of conflict between individuals and societies, and how normal people typically develop in relation to the spectrum between individuation and collectivity.

  3. Normal Functioning Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Normal Functioning Family Page Content Article Body Is there any way ...

  4. Normal pressure hydrocephalus

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrocephalus - occult; Hydrocephalus - idiopathic; Hydrocephalus - adult; Hydrocephalus - communicating; Dementia - hydrocephalus; NPH ... Ferri FF. Normal pressure hydrocephalus. In: Ferri FF, ed. ... Elsevier; 2016:chap 648. Rosenberg GA. Brain edema and disorders ...

  5. Normality in Analytical Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Although C.G. Jung’s interest in normality wavered throughout his career, it was one of the areas he identified in later life as worthy of further research. He began his career using a definition of normality which would have been the target of Foucault’s criticism, had Foucault chosen to review Jung’s work. However, Jung then evolved his thinking to a standpoint that was more aligned to Foucault’s own. Thereafter, the post Jungian concept of normality has remained relatively undeveloped by comparison with psychoanalysis and mainstream psychology. Jung’s disjecta membra on the subject suggest that, in contemporary analytical psychology, too much focus is placed on the process of individuation to the neglect of applications that consider collective processes. Also, there is potential for useful research and development into the nature of conflict between individuals and societies, and how normal people typically develop in relation to the spectrum between individuation and collectivity. PMID:25379262

  6. Normal Variants in Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Daniel R; Bryg, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    Echocardiography is a powerful and convenient tool used routinely in the cardiac evaluation of many patients. Improved resolution and visualization of cardiac anatomy has led to the discovery of many normal variant structures that have no known pathologic consequence. Importantly, these findings may masquerade as pathology prompting unnecessary further evaluation at the expense of anxiety, cost, or potential harm. This review provides an updated and comprehensive collection of normal anatomic variants on both transthoracic and transesophageal imaging. PMID:27612473

  7. The AACRAO 2003 Academic Record and Transcript Guide. AACRAO Professional Development & Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, Washington, DC.

    This guide is a source of information on a wide range of issues involving student records and transcripts. It focuses on the necessity of reconciling the need to provide accurate information promptly to various constituencies and the need to safeguard privacy. Recommendations are provided for database and transcript elements, and current issues…

  8. Can Appraisers Rate Work Performance Accurately?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedge, Jerry W.; Laue, Frances J.

    The ability of individuals to make accurate judgments about others is examined and literature on this subject is reviewed. A wide variety of situational factors affects the appraisal of performance. It is generally accepted that the purpose of the appraisal influences the accuracy of the appraiser. The instrumentation, or tools, available to the…

  9. Accurate pointing of tungsten welding electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegelmeier, P.

    1971-01-01

    Thoriated-tungsten is pointed accurately and quickly by using sodium nitrite. Point produced is smooth and no effort is necessary to hold the tungsten rod concentric. The chemically produced point can be used several times longer than ground points. This method reduces time and cost of preparing tungsten electrodes.

  10. A method for normalization of X-ray absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, T.-C.; Waldo, G.S.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.

    2010-07-20

    Accurate normalization of X-ray absorption data is essential for quantitative analysis of near-edge features. A method, implemented as the program MBACK, to normalize X-ray absorption data to tabulated mass absorption coefficients is described. Comparison of conventional normalization methods with MBACK demonstrates that the new normalization method is not sensitive to the shape of the background function, thus allowing accurate comparison of data collected in transmission mode with data collected using fluorescence ion chambers or solid-state fluorescence detectors. The new method is shown to have better reliability and consistency and smaller errors than conventional normalization methods. The sensitivity of the new normalization method is illustrated by analysis of data collected during an equilibrium titration.

  11. Genetic and epigenetic control of RKIP transcription.

    PubMed

    Datar, Ila; Tegegne, Hanna; Qin, Kevin; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Bitar, Milad S; Trumbly, Robert J; Yeung, Kam C

    2014-01-01

    Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) is known to modulate key signaling cascades and regulate normal physiological processes such as cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The expression of RKIP is found to be downregulated in several cancer metastases and the repressed RKIP expression can be reactivated on treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. RKIP is a proven tumor metastasis suppressor gene and investigating the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of RKIP is therefore of immense clinical importance. In this review, we discuss the basal expression of RKIP in various tissues and the genetic aspects of the RKIP chromosomal locus including the structure of the RKIP promoter as well as gene regulatory elements such as enhancers. We also review the genetic and epigenetic modulation of RKIP transcription through EZH2, a component of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and sequence specific transcription factors (TFs) BACH1 and Snail. Emerging experimental evidence supports a unifying model in which both these TFs repress RKIP transcription in cancers by recruiting the EZH2 containing repressive complex to the proximal RKIP promoter. Finally, we review the known mechanisms employed by different types of chemotherapeutic agents to activate RKIP expression in cancer cells.

  12. Transcriptional control of cardiac fibroblast plasticity.

    PubMed

    Lighthouse, Janet K; Small, Eric M

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts help maintain the normal architecture of the healthy heart and are responsible for scar formation and the healing response to pathological insults. Various genetic, biomechanical, or humoral factors stimulate fibroblasts to become contractile smooth muscle-like cells called myofibroblasts that secrete large amounts of extracellular matrix. Unfortunately, unchecked myofibroblast activation in heart disease leads to pathological fibrosis, which is a major risk factor for the development of cardiac arrhythmias and heart failure. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control fibroblast plasticity and myofibroblast activation is essential to develop novel strategies to specifically target pathological cardiac fibrosis without disrupting the adaptive healing response. This review highlights the major transcriptional mediators of fibroblast origin and function in development and disease. The contribution of the fetal epicardial gene program will be discussed in the context of fibroblast origin in development and following injury, primarily focusing on Tcf21 and C/EBP. We will also highlight the major transcriptional regulatory axes that control fibroblast plasticity in the adult heart, including transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)/Smad signaling, the Rho/myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF)/serum response factor (SRF) axis, and Calcineurin/transient receptor potential channel (TRP)/nuclear factor of activated T-Cell (NFAT) signaling. Finally, we will discuss recent strategies to divert the fibroblast transcriptional program in an effort to promote cardiomyocyte regeneration. This article is a part of a Special Issue entitled "Fibrosis and Myocardial Remodeling". PMID:26721596

  13. Machine Transcription--Practically Speaking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clippinger, Dorinda A.

    1984-01-01

    Draws transcription teaching principles from Gagne's theories about learning. Recommends 12-16 weeks of instruction, pre-transcription development of related skills, frequent feedback, and use of teaching materials that are arranged to take advantage of learning cycles. (SK)

  14. Untangling the brain's neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative transcriptional responses

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Karpagam; Friedman, Brad A.; Larson, Jessica L.; Lauffer, Benjamin E.; Goldstein, Leonard D.; Appling, Laurie L.; Borneo, Jovencio; Poon, Chungkee; Ho, Terence; Cai, Fang; Steiner, Pascal; van der Brug, Marcel P.; Modrusan, Zora; Kaminker, Joshua S.; Hansen, David V.

    2016-01-01

    A common approach to understanding neurodegenerative disease is comparing gene expression in diseased versus healthy tissues. We illustrate that expression profiles derived from whole tissue RNA highly reflect the degenerating tissues' altered cellular composition, not necessarily transcriptional regulation. To accurately understand transcriptional changes that accompany neuropathology, we acutely purify neurons, astrocytes and microglia from single adult mouse brains and analyse their transcriptomes by RNA sequencing. Using peripheral endotoxemia to establish the method, we reveal highly specific transcriptional responses and altered RNA processing in each cell type, with Tnfr1 required for the astrocytic response. Extending the method to an Alzheimer's disease model, we confirm that transcriptomic changes observed in whole tissue are driven primarily by cell type composition, not transcriptional regulation, and identify hundreds of cell type-specific changes undetected in whole tissue RNA. Applying similar methods to additional models and patient tissues will transform our understanding of aberrant gene expression in neurological disease. PMID:27097852

  15. Validation of reference transcripts in strawberry (Fragaria spp.).

    PubMed

    Clancy, Maureen A; Rosli, Hernan G; Chamala, Srikar; Barbazuk, W Brad; Civello, P Marcos; Folta, Kevin M

    2013-12-01

    Contemporary methods to assay gene expression depend on a stable set of reference transcripts for accurate quantitation. A lack of well-tested reference genes slows progress in characterizing gene expression in high-value specialty crops. In this study, a set of strawberry (Fragaria spp.) constitutively expressed reference genes has been identified by merging digital gene expression data with expression profiling. Constitutive reference candidates were validated using quantitative PCR and hybridization. Several transcripts have been identified that show improved stability across tissues relative to traditional reference transcripts. Results are similar between commercial octoploid strawberry and the diploid model. Our findings also show that while some never-before-used references are appropriate for most applications, even the most stable reference transcripts require careful assessment across the diverse tissues and fruit developmental states before being adopted as controls.

  16. Untangling the brain's neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative transcriptional responses.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Karpagam; Friedman, Brad A; Larson, Jessica L; Lauffer, Benjamin E; Goldstein, Leonard D; Appling, Laurie L; Borneo, Jovencio; Poon, Chungkee; Ho, Terence; Cai, Fang; Steiner, Pascal; van der Brug, Marcel P; Modrusan, Zora; Kaminker, Joshua S; Hansen, David V

    2016-01-01

    A common approach to understanding neurodegenerative disease is comparing gene expression in diseased versus healthy tissues. We illustrate that expression profiles derived from whole tissue RNA highly reflect the degenerating tissues' altered cellular composition, not necessarily transcriptional regulation. To accurately understand transcriptional changes that accompany neuropathology, we acutely purify neurons, astrocytes and microglia from single adult mouse brains and analyse their transcriptomes by RNA sequencing. Using peripheral endotoxemia to establish the method, we reveal highly specific transcriptional responses and altered RNA processing in each cell type, with Tnfr1 required for the astrocytic response. Extending the method to an Alzheimer's disease model, we confirm that transcriptomic changes observed in whole tissue are driven primarily by cell type composition, not transcriptional regulation, and identify hundreds of cell type-specific changes undetected in whole tissue RNA. Applying similar methods to additional models and patient tissues will transform our understanding of aberrant gene expression in neurological disease. PMID:27097852

  17. Force normalization in paraplegics.

    PubMed

    Serra-Añó, P; García-Massó, X; Pellicer, M; González, L-M; López-Pascual, J; Giner-Pascual, M; Toca-Herrera, J L

    2012-06-01

    The principal aim of our study was the determination of the effectiveness of a standardized ratio, allometric scaling model and a gamma function model in normalizing the isometric torque data of spinal cord patients and healthy subjects. For this purpose we studied a sample of 21 healthy males and 23 spinal cord injury males. The experiment consisted of the measurement of the force of the upper limb movement executed by all the subjects. We also determined anthropometric variables with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. The experimental data were analyzed with 3 force normalization methods. Our results indicate that the most important confounding variable was the fat free mass of the dominant upper limb (r>0.36, p<0.05). With the standardization by body mass and allometric scaling model, the normalized torque was influenced by body size variables. However, the normalized torque by the gamma function model was independent of body size measures. Paraplegics were weaker (p<0.05) in extension movements when the data were normalized by the gamma function model. In summary, this study shows that the gamma function model with fat free mass of the dominant upper limb was more effective than the standardized ratio in removing the influence of body size variables. PMID:22377940

  18. Feedback about More Accurate versus Less Accurate Trials: Differential Effects on Self-Confidence and Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected by feedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On Day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of…

  19. Transcriptional and enzymatic profiling of Pleurotus ostreatus laccase genes in submerged and solid-state fermentation cultures.

    PubMed

    Castanera, Raúl; Pérez, Gúmer; Omarini, Alejandra; Alfaro, Manuel; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Faraco, Vincenza; Amore, Antonella; Ramírez, Lucía

    2012-06-01

    The genome of the white rot basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus includes 12 phenol oxidase (laccase) genes. In this study, we examined their expression profiles in different fungal strains under different culture conditions (submerged and solid cultures) and in the presence of a wheat straw extract, which was used as an inducer of the laccase gene family. We used a reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR)-based approach and focused on determining the reaction parameters (in particular, the reference gene set for the normalization and reaction efficiency determinations) used to achieve an accurate estimation of the relative gene expression values. The results suggested that (i) laccase gene transcription is upregulated in the induced submerged fermentation (iSmF) cultures but downregulated in the solid fermentation (SSF) cultures, (ii) the Lacc2 and Lacc10 genes are the main sources of laccase activity in the iSmF cultures upon induction with water-soluble wheat straw extracts, and (iii) an additional, as-yet-uncharacterized activity (Unk1) is specifically induced in SSF cultures that complements the activity of Lacc2 and Lacc10. Moreover, both the enzymatic laccase activities and the Lacc gene family transcription profiles greatly differ between closely related strains. These differences can be targeted for biotechnological breeding programs for enzyme production in submerged fermentation reactors. PMID:22467498

  20. Epigenetic silencing of RNA polymerase I transcription: a role for DNA methylation and histone modification in nucleolar dominance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z J; Pikaard, C S

    1997-08-15

    Nucleolar dominance is an epigenetic phenomenon that describes nucleolus formation around rRNA genes inherited from only one progenitor of an interspecific hybrid or allopolyploid. The phenomenon is widespread, occurring in plants, insects, amphibians, and mammals, yet its molecular basis remains unclear. We have demonstrated nucleolar dominance in three allotetraploids of the plant genus Brassica. In Brassica napus, accurately initiated pre-rRNA transcripts from one progenitor, Brassica rapa are detected readily, whereas transcripts from the approximately 3000 rRNA genes inherited from the other progenitor, Brassica oleracea, are undetectable. Nuclear run-on confirmed that dominance is controlled at the level of transcription. Growth of B. napus seedlings on 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine to inhibit cytosine methylation caused the normally silent, under-dominant B. oleracea rRNA genes to become expressed to high levels. The histone deacetylase inhibitors sodium butyrate and trichostatin A also derepressed silent rRNA genes. These results reveal an enforcement mechanism for nucleolar dominance in which DNA methylation and histone modifications combine to regulate rRNA gene loci spanning tens of megabase pairs of DNA.

  1. Epigenetic silencing of RNA polymerase I transcription: a role for DNA methylation and histone modification in nucleolar dominance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z. Jeffrey; Pikaard, Craig S.

    1997-01-01

    Nucleolar dominance is an epigenetic phenomenon that describes nucleolus formation around rRNA genes inherited from only one progenitor of an interspecific hybrid or allopolyploid. The phenomenon is widespread, occurring in plants, insects, amphibians, and mammals, yet its molecular basis remains unclear. We have demonstrated nucleolar dominance in three allotetraploids of the plant genus Brassica. In Brassica napus, accurately initiated pre-rRNA transcripts from one progenitor, Brassica rapa are detected readily, whereas transcripts from the ∼3000 rRNA genes inherited from the other progenitor, Brassica oleracea, are undetectable. Nuclear run-on confirmed that dominance is controlled at the level of transcription. Growth of B. napus seedlings on 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine to inhibit cytosine methylation caused the normally silent, under-dominant B. oleracea rRNA genes to become expressed to high levels. The histone deacetylase inhibitors sodium butyrate and trichostatin A also de-epressed silent rRNA genes. These results reveal an enforcement mechanism for nucleolar dominance in which DNA methylation and histone modifications combine to regulate rRNA gene loci spanning tens of megabase pairs of DNA. PMID:9284051

  2. Nascent transcription affected by RNA polymerase IV in Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Erhard, Karl F; Talbot, Joy-El R B; Deans, Natalie C; McClish, Allison E; Hollick, Jay B

    2015-04-01

    All eukaryotes use three DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RNAPs) to create cellular RNAs from DNA templates. Plants have additional RNAPs related to Pol II, but their evolutionary role(s) remain largely unknown. Zea mays (maize) RNA polymerase D1 (RPD1), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), is required for normal plant development, paramutation, transcriptional repression of certain transposable elements (TEs), and transcriptional regulation of specific alleles. Here, we define the nascent transcriptomes of rpd1 mutant and wild-type (WT) seedlings using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to identify the broader targets of RPD1-based regulation. Comparisons of WT and rpd1 mutant GRO-seq profiles indicate that Pol IV globally affects transcription at both transcriptional start sites and immediately downstream of polyadenylation addition sites. We found no evidence of divergent transcription from gene promoters as seen in mammalian GRO-seq profiles. Statistical comparisons identify genes and TEs whose transcription is affected by RPD1. Most examples of significant increases in genic antisense transcription appear to be initiated by 3'-proximal long terminal repeat retrotransposons. These results indicate that maize Pol IV specifies Pol II-based transcriptional regulation for specific regions of the maize genome including genes having developmental significance.

  3. Nascent Transcription Affected by RNA Polymerase IV in Zea mays

    PubMed Central

    Erhard, Karl F.; Talbot, Joy-El R. B.; Deans, Natalie C.; McClish, Allison E.; Hollick, Jay B.

    2015-01-01

    All eukaryotes use three DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RNAPs) to create cellular RNAs from DNA templates. Plants have additional RNAPs related to Pol II, but their evolutionary role(s) remain largely unknown. Zea mays (maize) RNA polymerase D1 (RPD1), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), is required for normal plant development, paramutation, transcriptional repression of certain transposable elements (TEs), and transcriptional regulation of specific alleles. Here, we define the nascent transcriptomes of rpd1 mutant and wild-type (WT) seedlings using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to identify the broader targets of RPD1-based regulation. Comparisons of WT and rpd1 mutant GRO-seq profiles indicate that Pol IV globally affects transcription at both transcriptional start sites and immediately downstream of polyadenylation addition sites. We found no evidence of divergent transcription from gene promoters as seen in mammalian GRO-seq profiles. Statistical comparisons identify genes and TEs whose transcription is affected by RPD1. Most examples of significant increases in genic antisense transcription appear to be initiated by 3ʹ-proximal long terminal repeat retrotransposons. These results indicate that maize Pol IV specifies Pol II-based transcriptional regulation for specific regions of the maize genome including genes having developmental significance. PMID:25653306

  4. Feedback about more accurate versus less accurate trials: differential effects on self-confidence and activation.

    PubMed

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-06-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected byfeedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of two conditions: one group received feedback on the most accurate trials, whereas another group received feedback on the least accurate trials. On day 2, participants completed an anxiety questionnaire and performed a retention test. Shin conductance level, as a measure of arousal, was determined. The results indicated that feedback about more accurate trials resulted in more effective learning as well as increased self-confidence. Also, activation was a predictor of performance. PMID:22808705

  5. Jade data transcription system final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, R.; Iskra, M.; McLean, J. . Advanced Technology Div.)

    1990-07-25

    The OWL sensor, which is used in conjunction with the Jade program, generates a tremendous volume of data during normal field operations. Historically, the dissemination of this data to analysts has been slowed by difficulties in transcribing to a widely readable media and format. TRW, under contract from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, was tasked by Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) with finding an improved method of transcribing the Jade experimental data. During the period of performance on this contract TRW helped to guide the development and operation of an improved transcription system. This final report summarizes the work performed, and provides a written record of information which may be helpful to future users of the newly developed data transcription system. 4 figs.

  6. Two highly accurate methods for pitch calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniel, K.; Härtig, F.; Osawa, S.; Sato, O.

    2009-11-01

    Among profiles, helix and tooth thickness pitch is one of the most important parameters of an involute gear measurement evaluation. In principle, coordinate measuring machines (CMM) and CNC-controlled gear measuring machines as a variant of a CMM are suited for these kinds of gear measurements. Now the Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (NMIJ/AIST) and the German national metrology institute the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have each developed independently highly accurate pitch calibration methods applicable to CMM or gear measuring machines. Both calibration methods are based on the so-called closure technique which allows the separation of the systematic errors of the measurement device and the errors of the gear. For the verification of both calibration methods, NMIJ/AIST and PTB performed measurements on a specially designed pitch artifact. The comparison of the results shows that both methods can be used for highly accurate calibrations of pitch standards.

  7. Preparation and accurate measurement of pure ozone.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Christof; Simone, Daniela; Guinet, Mickaël

    2011-03-01

    Preparation of high purity ozone as well as precise and accurate measurement of its pressure are metrological requirements that are difficult to meet due to ozone decomposition occurring in pressure sensors. The most stable and precise transducer heads are heated and, therefore, prone to accelerated ozone decomposition, limiting measurement accuracy and compromising purity. Here, we describe a vacuum system and a method for ozone production, suitable to accurately determine the pressure of pure ozone by avoiding the problem of decomposition. We use an inert gas in a particularly designed buffer volume and can thus achieve high measurement accuracy and negligible degradation of ozone with purities of 99.8% or better. The high degree of purity is ensured by comprehensive compositional analyses of ozone samples. The method may also be applied to other reactive gases. PMID:21456766

  8. Accurate modeling of parallel scientific computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Townsend, James C.

    1988-01-01

    Scientific codes are usually parallelized by partitioning a grid among processors. To achieve top performance it is necessary to partition the grid so as to balance workload and minimize communication/synchronization costs. This problem is particularly acute when the grid is irregular, changes over the course of the computation, and is not known until load time. Critical mapping and remapping decisions rest on the ability to accurately predict performance, given a description of a grid and its partition. This paper discusses one approach to this problem, and illustrates its use on a one-dimensional fluids code. The models constructed are shown to be accurate, and are used to find optimal remapping schedules.

  9. Line gas sampling system ensures accurate analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    Tremendous changes in the natural gas business have resulted in new approaches to the way natural gas is measured. Electronic flow measurement has altered the business forever, with developments in instrumentation and a new sensitivity to the importance of proper natural gas sampling techniques. This paper reports that YZ Industries Inc., Snyder, Texas, combined its 40 years of sampling experience with the latest in microprocessor-based technology to develop the KynaPak 2000 series, the first on-line natural gas sampling system that is both compact and extremely accurate. This means the composition of the sampled gas must be representative of the whole and related to flow. If so, relative measurement and sampling techniques are married, gas volumes are accurately accounted for and adjustments to composition can be made.

  10. Accurate mask model for advanced nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zine El Abidine, Nacer; Sundermann, Frank; Yesilada, Emek; Ndiaye, El Hadji Omar; Mishra, Kushlendra; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Bork, Ingo; Buck, Peter; Toublan, Olivier; Schanen, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    Standard OPC models consist of a physical optical model and an empirical resist model. The resist model compensates the optical model imprecision on top of modeling resist development. The optical model imprecision may result from mask topography effects and real mask information including mask ebeam writing and mask process contributions. For advanced technology nodes, significant progress has been made to model mask topography to improve optical model accuracy. However, mask information is difficult to decorrelate from standard OPC model. Our goal is to establish an accurate mask model through a dedicated calibration exercise. In this paper, we present a flow to calibrate an accurate mask enabling its implementation. The study covers the different effects that should be embedded in the mask model as well as the experiment required to model them.

  11. Accurate maser positions for MALT-45

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Christopher; Bains, Indra; Voronkov, Maxim; Lo, Nadia; Jones, Paul; Muller, Erik; Cunningham, Maria; Burton, Michael; Brooks, Kate; Green, James; Fuller, Gary; Barnes, Peter; Ellingsen, Simon; Urquhart, James; Morgan, Larry; Rowell, Gavin; Walsh, Andrew; Loenen, Edo; Baan, Willem; Hill, Tracey; Purcell, Cormac; Breen, Shari; Peretto, Nicolas; Jackson, James; Lowe, Vicki; Longmore, Steven

    2013-10-01

    MALT-45 is an untargeted survey, mapping the Galactic plane in CS (1-0), Class I methanol masers, SiO masers and thermal emission, and high frequency continuum emission. After obtaining images from the survey, a number of masers were detected, but without accurate positions. This project seeks to resolve each maser and its environment, with the ultimate goal of placing the Class I methanol maser into a timeline of high mass star formation.

  12. Accurate maser positions for MALT-45

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Christopher; Bains, Indra; Voronkov, Maxim; Lo, Nadia; Jones, Paul; Muller, Erik; Cunningham, Maria; Burton, Michael; Brooks, Kate; Green, James; Fuller, Gary; Barnes, Peter; Ellingsen, Simon; Urquhart, James; Morgan, Larry; Rowell, Gavin; Walsh, Andrew; Loenen, Edo; Baan, Willem; Hill, Tracey; Purcell, Cormac; Breen, Shari; Peretto, Nicolas; Jackson, James; Lowe, Vicki; Longmore, Steven

    2013-04-01

    MALT-45 is an untargeted survey, mapping the Galactic plane in CS (1-0), Class I methanol masers, SiO masers and thermal emission, and high frequency continuum emission. After obtaining images from the survey, a number of masers were detected, but without accurate positions. This project seeks to resolve each maser and its environment, with the ultimate goal of placing the Class I methanol maser into a timeline of high mass star formation.

  13. Accurate Molecular Polarizabilities Based on Continuum Electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Truchon, Jean-François; Nicholls, Anthony; Iftimie, Radu I.; Roux, Benoît; Bayly, Christopher I.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach for representing the intramolecular polarizability as a continuum dielectric is introduced to account for molecular electronic polarization. It is shown, using a finite-difference solution to the Poisson equation, that the Electronic Polarization from Internal Continuum (EPIC) model yields accurate gas-phase molecular polarizability tensors for a test set of 98 challenging molecules composed of heteroaromatics, alkanes and diatomics. The electronic polarization originates from a high intramolecular dielectric that produces polarizabilities consistent with B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ and experimental values when surrounded by vacuum dielectric. In contrast to other approaches to model electronic polarization, this simple model avoids the polarizability catastrophe and accurately calculates molecular anisotropy with the use of very few fitted parameters and without resorting to auxiliary sites or anisotropic atomic centers. On average, the unsigned error in the average polarizability and anisotropy compared to B3LYP are 2% and 5%, respectively. The correlation between the polarizability components from B3LYP and this approach lead to a R2 of 0.990 and a slope of 0.999. Even the F2 anisotropy, shown to be a difficult case for existing polarizability models, can be reproduced within 2% error. In addition to providing new parameters for a rapid method directly applicable to the calculation of polarizabilities, this work extends the widely used Poisson equation to areas where accurate molecular polarizabilities matter. PMID:23646034

  14. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R; Holmes, William M

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models. PMID:27111139

  15. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R.; Holmes, William M.

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models.

  16. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R; Holmes, William M

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models.

  17. CT of Normal Developmental and Variant Anatomy of the Pediatric Skull: Distinguishing Trauma from Normality.

    PubMed

    Idriz, Sanjin; Patel, Jaymin H; Ameli Renani, Seyed; Allan, Rosemary; Vlahos, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) in clinical practice has been increasing rapidly, with the number of CT examinations performed in adults and children rising by 10% per year in England. Because the radiology community strives to reduce the radiation dose associated with pediatric examinations, external factors, including guidelines for pediatric head injury, are raising expectations for use of cranial CT in the pediatric population. Thus, radiologists are increasingly likely to encounter pediatric head CT examinations in daily practice. The variable appearance of cranial sutures at different ages can be confusing for inexperienced readers of radiologic images. The evolution of multidetector CT with thin-section acquisition increases the clarity of some of these sutures, which may be misinterpreted as fractures. Familiarity with the normal anatomy of the pediatric skull, how it changes with age, and normal variants can assist in translating the increased resolution of multidetector CT into more accurate detection of fractures and confident determination of normality, thereby reducing prolonged hospitalization of children with normal developmental structures that have been misinterpreted as fractures. More important, the potential morbidity and mortality related to false-negative interpretation of fractures as normal sutures may be avoided. The authors describe the normal anatomy of all standard pediatric sutures, common variants, and sutural mimics, thereby providing an accurate and safe framework for CT evaluation of skull trauma in pediatric patients.

  18. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  19. Black hole normal modes - A semianalytic approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, B. F.; Will, C. M.

    1985-01-01

    A new semianalytic technique for determining the complex normal mode frequencies of black holes is presented. The method is based on the WKB approximation. It yields a simple analytic formula that gives the real and imaginary parts of the frequency in terms of the parameters of the black hole and of the field whose perturbation is under study, and in terms of the quantity (n + 1/2), where n = 0, 1, 2,... and labels the fundamental mode, first overtone mode, and so on. In the case of the fundamental gravitational normal modes of the Schwarzschild black hole, the WKB estimates agree with numerical results to better than 7 percent in the real part of the frequency and 0.7 percent in the imaginary part, with the relative agreement improving with increasing angular harmonic. Carried to higher order the method may provide an accurate and systematic means to study black hole normal modes.

  20. Normals to a Parabola

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, V. K.

    2013-01-01

    Given a parabola in the standard form y[superscript 2] = 4ax, corresponding to three points on the parabola, such that the normals at these three points P, Q, R concur at a point M = (h, k), the equation of the circumscribing circle through the three points P, Q, and R provides a tremendous opportunity to illustrate "The Art of Algebraic…

  1. Normal Psychosexual Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutter, Michael

    1971-01-01

    Normal sexual development is reviewed with respect to physical maturation, sexual interests, sex drive", psychosexual competence and maturity, gender role, object choice, children's concepts of sexual differences, sex role preference and standards, and psychosexual stages. Biologic, psychoanalytic and psychosocial theories are briefly considered.…

  2. Normal Birth Crossword Puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Hotelling, Barbara A.

    2006-01-01

    In this column, readers are introduced to Dawn Kersula and a crossword puzzle she designed to refresh and empower Lamaze childbirth education class participants with normal-birth information. The column's author goes on to demonstrate several ways crossword puzzles can be used in Lamaze classes. PMID:17322944

  3. Epigenetic hereditary transcription profiles II, aging revisited

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Johannes WIM

    2007-01-01

    Background Previously, we have shown that deviations from the average transcription profile of a group of functionally related genes can be epigenetically transmitted to daughter cells, thereby implicating nuclear programming as the cause. As a first step in further characterizing this phenomenon it was necessary to determine to what extent such deviations occur in non-tumorigenic tissues derived from normal individuals. To this end, a microarray database derived from 90 human donors aged between 22 to 87 years was used to study deviations from the average transcription profile of the proteasome genes. Results Increase in donor age was found to correlate with a decrease in deviations from the general transcription profile with this decline being gender-specific. The age-related index declined at a faster rate for males although it started from a higher level. Additionally, transcription profiles from similar tissues were more alike than those from different tissues, indicating that deviations arise during differentiation. Conclusion These findings suggest that aging and differentiation are related to epigenetic changes that alter the transcription profile of proteasomal genes. Since alterations in the structure and function of the proteasome are unlikely, such changes appear to occur without concomitant change in gene function. These findings, if confirmed, may have a significant impact on our understanding of the aging process. Open peer review This article was reviewed by Nathan Bowen (nominated by I. King Jordan), Timothy E. Reddy (nominated by Charles DeLisi) and by Martijn Huynen. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers'comments section. PMID:18163906

  4. Accurate 12D dipole moment surfaces of ethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delahaye, Thibault; Nikitin, Andrei V.; Rey, Michael; Szalay, Péter G.; Tyuterev, Vladimir G.

    2015-10-01

    Accurate ab initio full-dimensional dipole moment surfaces of ethylene are computed using coupled-cluster approach and its explicitly correlated counterpart CCSD(T)-F12 combined respectively with cc-pVQZ and cc-pVTZ-F12 basis sets. Their analytical representations are provided through 4th order normal mode expansions. First-principles prediction of the line intensities using variational method up to J = 30 are in excellent agreement with the experimental data in the range of 0-3200 cm-1. Errors of 0.25-6.75% in integrated intensities for fundamental bands are comparable with experimental uncertainties. Overall calculated C2H4 opacity in 600-3300 cm-1 range agrees with experimental determination better than to 0.5%.

  5. [Evaluation of reference genes for quantitative real-time PCR normalization in cotton bollworm, Helicoverna armigera].

    PubMed

    Chandra, G Sharath; Asokan, R; Manamohan, M; Kumar, N K K; Sita, T

    2014-01-01

    Reverse-transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR), a sensitive technique is being extensively employed in quantification of gene expression. However this requires normalization with suitable reference gene (RG) which is crucial in minimizing inter sample variations. Information regarding suitable RG is scarce in general and more so in insects, including the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, an economically important pest. In management of this pest RNA interference (RNAi), is perceived as a potential tool, which is achieved by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) delivery. These studies demand accurate quantification of gene silencing. In this study we assessed the suitability of five RGs viz. β-actin (ACTB), 18S rRNA (18S), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), β-tubulin (TUB) and elongation fator-1-alfa (EF1-α) for gene expression studies in dsRNA treatment and across different developmental stages of H. armigera and ranked using geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper software programs. Data analysis revealed that best ranked RGs were varied in dsRNA treatment and in developmental stages. Under dsRNA treatment, 18S and GAPDH were more stable whereas, TUB and GAPDH were more stable across developmental stages. We also demonstrate that inappropriate selection of RG led to erroneous estimation of the target gene, chymotrypsin, expression. These results facilitate accurate quantification of gene expression in H. armigera.

  6. Learning fast accurate movements requires intact frontostriatal circuits

    PubMed Central

    Shabbott, Britne; Ravindran, Roshni; Schumacher, Joseph W.; Wasserman, Paula B.; Marder, Karen S.; Mazzoni, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    The basal ganglia are known to play a crucial role in movement execution, but their importance for motor skill learning remains unclear. Obstacles to our understanding include the lack of a universally accepted definition of motor skill learning (definition confound), and difficulties in distinguishing learning deficits from execution impairments (performance confound). We studied how healthy subjects and subjects with a basal ganglia disorder learn fast accurate reaching movements. We addressed the definition and performance confounds by: (1) focusing on an operationally defined core element of motor skill learning (speed-accuracy learning), and (2) using normal variation in initial performance to separate movement execution impairment from motor learning abnormalities. We measured motor skill learning as performance improvement in a reaching task with a speed-accuracy trade-off. We compared the performance of subjects with Huntington's disease (HD), a neurodegenerative basal ganglia disorder, to that of premanifest carriers of the HD mutation and of control subjects. The initial movements of HD subjects were less skilled (slower and/or less accurate) than those of control subjects. To factor out these differences in initial execution, we modeled the relationship between learning and baseline performance in control subjects. Subjects with HD exhibited a clear learning impairment that was not explained by differences in initial performance. These results support a role for the basal ganglia in both movement execution and motor skill learning. PMID:24312037

  7. Detection of Off-normal Images for NIF Automatic Alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V; Awwal, A S; McClay, W A; Ferguson, S W; Burkhart, S C

    2005-07-11

    One of the major purposes of National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is to accurately focus 192 high energy laser beams on a nanoscale (mm) fusion target at the precise location and time. The automatic alignment system developed for NIF is used to align the beams in order to achieve the required focusing effect. However, if a distorted image is inadvertently created by a faulty camera shutter or some other opto-mechanical malfunction, the resulting image termed ''off-normal'' must be detected and rejected before further alignment processing occurs. Thus the off-normal processor acts as a preprocessor to automatic alignment image processing. In this work, we discuss the development of an ''off-normal'' pre-processor capable of rapidly detecting the off-normal images and performing the rejection. Wide variety of off-normal images for each loop is used to develop the criterion for rejections accurately.

  8. Accurately Mapping M31's Microlensing Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, Arlin

    2004-07-01

    We propose to augment an existing microlensing survey of M31 with source identifications provided by a modest amount of ACS {and WFPC2 parallel} observations to yield an accurate measurement of the masses responsible for microlensing in M31, and presumably much of its dark matter. The main benefit of these data is the determination of the physical {or "einstein"} timescale of each microlensing event, rather than an effective {"FWHM"} timescale, allowing masses to be determined more than twice as accurately as without HST data. The einstein timescale is the ratio of the lensing cross-sectional radius and relative velocities. Velocities are known from kinematics, and the cross-section is directly proportional to the {unknown} lensing mass. We cannot easily measure these quantities without knowing the amplification, hence the baseline magnitude, which requires the resolution of HST to find the source star. This makes a crucial difference because M31 lens m ass determinations can be more accurate than those towards the Magellanic Clouds through our Galaxy's halo {for the same number of microlensing events} due to the better constrained geometry in the M31 microlensing situation. Furthermore, our larger survey, just completed, should yield at least 100 M31 microlensing events, more than any Magellanic survey. A small amount of ACS+WFPC2 imaging will deliver the potential of this large database {about 350 nights}. For the whole survey {and a delta-function mass distribution} the mass error should approach only about 15%, or about 6% error in slope for a power-law distribution. These results will better allow us to pinpoint the lens halo fraction, and the shape of the halo lens spatial distribution, and allow generalization/comparison of the nature of halo dark matter in spiral galaxies. In addition, we will be able to establish the baseline magnitude for about 50, 000 variable stars, as well as measure an unprecedentedly deta iled color-magnitude diagram and luminosity

  9. Accurate upwind methods for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1993-01-01

    A new class of piecewise linear methods for the numerical solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations of gas dynamics is presented. These methods are uniformly second-order accurate, and can be considered as extensions of Godunov's scheme. With an appropriate definition of monotonicity preservation for the case of linear convection, it can be shown that they preserve monotonicity. Similar to Van Leer's MUSCL scheme, they consist of two key steps: a reconstruction step followed by an upwind step. For the reconstruction step, a monotonicity constraint that preserves uniform second-order accuracy is introduced. Computational efficiency is enhanced by devising a criterion that detects the 'smooth' part of the data where the constraint is redundant. The concept and coding of the constraint are simplified by the use of the median function. A slope steepening technique, which has no effect at smooth regions and can resolve a contact discontinuity in four cells, is described. As for the upwind step, existing and new methods are applied in a manner slightly different from those in the literature. These methods are derived by approximating the Euler equations via linearization and diagonalization. At a 'smooth' interface, Harten, Lax, and Van Leer's one intermediate state model is employed. A modification for this model that can resolve contact discontinuities is presented. Near a discontinuity, either this modified model or a more accurate one, namely, Roe's flux-difference splitting. is used. The current presentation of Roe's method, via the conceptually simple flux-vector splitting, not only establishes a connection between the two splittings, but also leads to an admissibility correction with no conditional statement, and an efficient approximation to Osher's approximate Riemann solver. These reconstruction and upwind steps result in schemes that are uniformly second-order accurate and economical at smooth regions, and yield high resolution at discontinuities.

  10. Accurate measurement of unsteady state fluid temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, two accurate methods for determining the transient fluid temperature were presented. Measurements were conducted for boiling water since its temperature is known. At the beginning the thermometers are at the ambient temperature and next they are immediately immersed into saturated water. The measurements were carried out with two thermometers of different construction but with the same housing outer diameter equal to 15 mm. One of them is a K-type industrial thermometer widely available commercially. The temperature indicated by the thermometer was corrected considering the thermometers as the first or second order inertia devices. The new design of a thermometer was proposed and also used to measure the temperature of boiling water. Its characteristic feature is a cylinder-shaped housing with the sheath thermocouple located in its center. The temperature of the fluid was determined based on measurements taken in the axis of the solid cylindrical element (housing) using the inverse space marching method. Measurements of the transient temperature of the air flowing through the wind tunnel using the same thermometers were also carried out. The proposed measurement technique provides more accurate results compared with measurements using industrial thermometers in conjunction with simple temperature correction using the inertial thermometer model of the first or second order. By comparing the results, it was demonstrated that the new thermometer allows obtaining the fluid temperature much faster and with higher accuracy in comparison to the industrial thermometer. Accurate measurements of the fast changing fluid temperature are possible due to the low inertia thermometer and fast space marching method applied for solving the inverse heat conduction problem.

  11. Selection of Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn under Abiotic Stresses, Hormone Treatments and Different Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yucheng; Luo, Jun; Xu, Sheng; Wang, Wei; Liu, Tingting; Han, Chao; Chen, Yijun; Kong, Lingyi

    2016-01-01

    Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn is one of the main traditional Chinese medicines producing coumarins and plenty of literatures are focused on the biosynthesis of coumarins. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is a widely used method in studying the biosynthesis pathway and the selection of reference genes plays a crucial role in accurate normalization. To facilitate biosynthesis study of coumarins, twelve candidate reference genes were selected from the transcriptome database of P. praeruptorum according to previous studies. Then, BestKeeper, geNoFrm and NormFinder were used for selecting stably expressed reference genes in different tissues and under various stress treatments. The results indicated that, among the twelve candidate reference genes, the SAND family protein (SAND), actin 2 (ACT2), ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (UBC9), protein phosphatase 2A gene (PP2A) and polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTBP1) were the most stable reference genes under different experimental treatments, while glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and tubulin beta-6 (TUB6) were the least stable genes. In addition, the suitability of SAND, TIP41-like protein (TIP41), UBC9, ACT2, TUB6 and their combination as reference genes were confirmed by normalizing the expression of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO) in different treatments. This work is the first survey of the stability of reference genes in P. praeruptorum and provides guidelines to obtain more accurate qRT-PCR results in P. praeruptorum and other plant species. PMID:27022972

  12. Selection of Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn under Abiotic Stresses, Hormone Treatments and Different Tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yucheng; Luo, Jun; Xu, Sheng; Wang, Wei; Liu, Tingting; Han, Chao; Chen, Yijun; Kong, Lingyi

    2016-01-01

    Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn is one of the main traditional Chinese medicines producing coumarins and plenty of literatures are focused on the biosynthesis of coumarins. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is a widely used method in studying the biosynthesis pathway and the selection of reference genes plays a crucial role in accurate normalization. To facilitate biosynthesis study of coumarins, twelve candidate reference genes were selected from the transcriptome database of P. praeruptorum according to previous studies. Then, BestKeeper, geNoFrm and NormFinder were used for selecting stably expressed reference genes in different tissues and under various stress treatments. The results indicated that, among the twelve candidate reference genes, the SAND family protein (SAND), actin 2 (ACT2), ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (UBC9), protein phosphatase 2A gene (PP2A) and polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTBP1) were the most stable reference genes under different experimental treatments, while glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and tubulin beta-6 (TUB6) were the least stable genes. In addition, the suitability of SAND, TIP41-like protein (TIP41), UBC9, ACT2, TUB6 and their combination as reference genes were confirmed by normalizing the expression of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO) in different treatments. This work is the first survey of the stability of reference genes in P. praeruptorum and provides guidelines to obtain more accurate qRT-PCR results in P. praeruptorum and other plant species.

  13. The first accurate description of an aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    2006-12-01

    As technology has advanced, the scientific study of auroral phenomena has increased by leaps and bounds. A look back at the earliest descriptions of aurorae offers an interesting look into how medieval scholars viewed the subjects that we study.Although there are earlier fragmentary references in the literature, the first accurate description of the aurora borealis appears to be that published by the German Catholic scholar Konrad von Megenberg (1309-1374) in his book Das Buch der Natur (The Book of Nature). The book was written between 1349 and 1350.

  14. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material.

  15. Accurate density functional thermochemistry for larger molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavachari, K.; Stefanov, B. B.; Curtiss, L. A.; Lucent Tech.

    1997-06-20

    Density functional methods are combined with isodesmic bond separation reaction energies to yield accurate thermochemistry for larger molecules. Seven different density functionals are assessed for the evaluation of heats of formation, Delta H 0 (298 K), for a test set of 40 molecules composed of H, C, O and N. The use of bond separation energies results in a dramatic improvement in the accuracy of all the density functionals. The B3-LYP functional has the smallest mean absolute deviation from experiment (1.5 kcal mol/f).

  16. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material. PMID:11366835

  17. Universality: Accurate Checks in Dyson's Hierarchical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godina, J. J.; Meurice, Y.; Oktay, M. B.

    2003-06-01

    In this talk we present high-accuracy calculations of the susceptibility near βc for Dyson's hierarchical model in D = 3. Using linear fitting, we estimate the leading (γ) and subleading (Δ) exponents. Independent estimates are obtained by calculating the first two eigenvalues of the linearized renormalization group transformation. We found γ = 1.29914073 ± 10 -8 and, Δ = 0.4259469 ± 10-7 independently of the choice of local integration measure (Ising or Landau-Ginzburg). After a suitable rescaling, the approximate fixed points for a large class of local measure coincide accurately with a fixed point constructed by Koch and Wittwer.

  18. Recurrent read-through fusion transcripts in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Varley, Katherine E; Gertz, Jason; Roberts, Brian S; Davis, Nicholas S; Bowling, Kevin M; Kirby, Marie K; Nesmith, Amy S; Oliver, Patsy G; Grizzle, William E; Forero, Andres; Buchsbaum, Donald J; LoBuglio, Albert F; Myers, Richard M

    2014-07-01

    Read-through fusion transcripts that result from the splicing of two adjacent genes in the same coding orientation are a recently discovered type of chimeric RNA. We sought to determine if read-through fusion transcripts exist in breast cancer. We performed paired-end RNA-seq of 168 breast samples, including 28 breast cancer cell lines, 42 triple negative breast cancer primary tumors, 42 estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer primary tumors, and 56 non-malignant breast tissue samples. We analyzed the sequencing data to identify breast cancer associated read-through fusion transcripts. We discovered two recurrent read-through fusion transcripts that were identified in breast cancer cell lines, confirmed across breast cancer primary tumors, and were not detected in normal tissues (SCNN1A-TNFRSF1A and CTSD-IFITM10). Both fusion transcripts use canonical splice sites to join the last splice donor of the 5' gene to the first splice acceptor of the 3' gene, creating an in-frame fusion transcript. Western blots indicated that the fusion transcripts are translated into fusion proteins in breast cancer cells. Custom small interfering RNAs targeting the CTSD-IFITM10 fusion junction reduced expression of the fusion transcript and reduced breast cancer cell proliferation. Read-through fusion transcripts between adjacent genes with different biochemical functions represent a new type of recurrent molecular defect in breast cancer that warrant further investigation as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Both breast cancer associated fusion transcripts identified in this study involve membrane proteins (SCNN1A-TNFRSF1A and CTSD-IFITM10), which raises the possibility that they could be breast cancer-specific cell surface markers. PMID:24929677

  19. Advancing Normal Birth

    PubMed Central

    Lothian, Judith

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this column, the associate editor of The Journal of Perinatal Education provides an overview of research on the benefits of promoting and protecting the normal, physiologic processes of childbirth and the risks of interfering with those processes without clear medical indication. The associate editor also describes the contents of this issue, which offer a broad range of resources, research, and inspiration for childbirth educators in their efforts to promote, support, and protect natural, safe, and healthy birth.

  20. Teaching Normal Birth Interactively

    PubMed Central

    Hotelling, Barbara A.

    2004-01-01

    In this column, the author provides examples of teaching strategies that childbirth educators may utilize to illustrate each of the six care practices supported by Lamaze International to promote normal birth: labor begins on its own, freedom of movement throughout labor, continuous labor support, no routine interventions, non-supine (e.g., upright or side-lying) positions for birth, and no separation of mother and baby with unlimited opportunity for breastfeeding. PMID:17273389

  1. A Complete Set of Nascent Transcription Rates for Yeast Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pelechano, Vicent; Chávez, Sebastián; Pérez-Ortín, José E.

    2010-01-01

    The amount of mRNA in a cell is the result of two opposite reactions: transcription and mRNA degradation. These reactions are governed by kinetics laws, and the most regulated step for many genes is the transcription rate. The transcription rate, which is assumed to be exercised mainly at the RNA polymerase recruitment level, can be calculated using the RNA polymerase densities determined either by run-on or immunoprecipitation using specific antibodies. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the ideal model organism to generate a complete set of nascent transcription rates that will prove useful for many gene regulation studies. By combining genomic data from both the GRO (Genomic Run-on) and the RNA pol ChIP-on-chip methods we generated a new, more accurate nascent transcription rate dataset. By comparing this dataset with the indirect ones obtained from the mRNA stabilities and mRNA amount datasets, we are able to obtain biological information about posttranscriptional regulation processes and a genomic snapshot of the location of the active transcriptional machinery. We have obtained nascent transcription rates for 4,670 yeast genes. The median RNA polymerase II density in the genes is 0.078 molecules/kb, which corresponds to an average of 0.096 molecules/gene. Most genes have transcription rates of between 2 and 30 mRNAs/hour and less than 1% of yeast genes have >1 RNA polymerase molecule/gene. Histone and ribosomal protein genes are the highest transcribed groups of genes and other than these exceptions the transcription of genes is an infrequent phenomenon in a yeast cell. PMID:21103382

  2. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  3. Accurate basis set truncation for wavefunction embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Taylor A.; Goodpaster, Jason D.; Manby, Frederick R.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) provides a formally exact framework for performing embedded subsystem electronic structure calculations, including DFT-in-DFT and wavefunction theory-in-DFT descriptions. In the interest of efficiency, it is desirable to truncate the atomic orbital basis set in which the subsystem calculation is performed, thus avoiding high-order scaling with respect to the size of the MO virtual space. In this study, we extend a recently introduced projection-based embedding method [F. R. Manby, M. Stella, J. D. Goodpaster, and T. F. Miller III, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2564 (2012)], 10.1021/ct300544e to allow for the systematic and accurate truncation of the embedded subsystem basis set. The approach is applied to both covalently and non-covalently bound test cases, including water clusters and polypeptide chains, and it is demonstrated that errors associated with basis set truncation are controllable to well within chemical accuracy. Furthermore, we show that this approach allows for switching between accurate projection-based embedding and DFT embedding with approximate kinetic energy (KE) functionals; in this sense, the approach provides a means of systematically improving upon the use of approximate KE functionals in DFT embedding.

  4. Accurate determination of characteristic relative permeability curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Michael H.; Benson, Sally M.

    2015-09-01

    A recently developed technique to accurately characterize sub-core scale heterogeneity is applied to investigate the factors responsible for flowrate-dependent effective relative permeability curves measured on core samples in the laboratory. The dependency of laboratory measured relative permeability on flowrate has long been both supported and challenged by a number of investigators. Studies have shown that this apparent flowrate dependency is a result of both sub-core scale heterogeneity and outlet boundary effects. However this has only been demonstrated numerically for highly simplified models of porous media. In this paper, flowrate dependency of effective relative permeability is demonstrated using two rock cores, a Berea Sandstone and a heterogeneous sandstone from the Otway Basin Pilot Project in Australia. Numerical simulations of steady-state coreflooding experiments are conducted at a number of injection rates using a single set of input characteristic relative permeability curves. Effective relative permeability is then calculated from the simulation data using standard interpretation methods for calculating relative permeability from steady-state tests. Results show that simplified approaches may be used to determine flowrate-independent characteristic relative permeability provided flow rate is sufficiently high, and the core heterogeneity is relatively low. It is also shown that characteristic relative permeability can be determined at any typical flowrate, and even for geologically complex models, when using accurate three-dimensional models.

  5. How Accurately can we Calculate Thermal Systems?

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D; Blomquist, R N; Dean, C; Heinrichs, D; Kalugin, M A; Lee, M; Lee, Y; MacFarlan, R; Nagaya, Y; Trkov, A

    2004-04-20

    I would like to determine how accurately a variety of neutron transport code packages (code and cross section libraries) can calculate simple integral parameters, such as K{sub eff}, for systems that are sensitive to thermal neutron scattering. Since we will only consider theoretical systems, we cannot really determine absolute accuracy compared to any real system. Therefore rather than accuracy, it would be more precise to say that I would like to determine the spread in answers that we obtain from a variety of code packages. This spread should serve as an excellent indicator of how accurately we can really model and calculate such systems today. Hopefully, eventually this will lead to improvements in both our codes and the thermal scattering models that they use in the future. In order to accomplish this I propose a number of extremely simple systems that involve thermal neutron scattering that can be easily modeled and calculated by a variety of neutron transport codes. These are theoretical systems designed to emphasize the effects of thermal scattering, since that is what we are interested in studying. I have attempted to keep these systems very simple, and yet at the same time they include most, if not all, of the important thermal scattering effects encountered in a large, water-moderated, uranium fueled thermal system, i.e., our typical thermal reactors.

  6. Accurate Stellar Parameters for Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, John Michael; Fischer, Debra; Basu, Sarbani; Valenti, Jeff A.

    2015-01-01

    A large impedement to our understanding of planet formation is obtaining a clear picture of planet radii and densities. Although determining precise ratios between planet and stellar host are relatively easy, determining accurate stellar parameters is still a difficult and costly undertaking. High resolution spectral analysis has traditionally yielded precise values for some stellar parameters but stars in common between catalogs from different authors or analyzed using different techniques often show offsets far in excess of their uncertainties. Most analyses now use some external constraint, when available, to break observed degeneracies between surface gravity, effective temperature, and metallicity which can otherwise lead to correlated errors in results. However, these external constraints are impossible to obtain for all stars and can require more costly observations than the initial high resolution spectra. We demonstrate that these discrepencies can be mitigated by use of a larger line list that has carefully tuned atomic line data. We use an iterative modeling technique that does not require external constraints. We compare the surface gravity obtained with our spectral synthesis modeling to asteroseismically determined values for 42 Kepler stars. Our analysis agrees well with only a 0.048 dex offset and an rms scatter of 0.05 dex. Such accurate stellar gravities can reduce the primary source of uncertainty in radii by almost an order of magnitude over unconstrained spectral analysis.

  7. Novel Cortical Thickness Pattern for Accurate Detection of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weihao; Yao, Zhijun; Hu, Bin; Gao, Xiang; Cai, Hanshu; Moore, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Brain network occupies an important position in representing abnormalities in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Currently, most studies only focused on morphological features of regions of interest without exploring the interregional alterations. In order to investigate the potential discriminative power of a morphological network in AD diagnosis and to provide supportive evidence on the feasibility of an individual structural network study, we propose a novel approach of extracting the correlative features from magnetic resonance imaging, which consists of a two-step approach for constructing an individual thickness network with low computational complexity. Firstly, multi-distance combination is utilized for accurate evaluation of between-region dissimilarity; and then the dissimilarity is transformed to connectivity via calculation of correlation function. An evaluation of the proposed approach has been conducted with 189 normal controls, 198 MCI subjects, and 163 AD patients using machine learning techniques. Results show that the observed correlative feature suggests significant promotion in classification performance compared with cortical thickness, with accuracy of 89.88% and area of 0.9588 under receiver operating characteristic curve. We further improved the performance by integrating both thickness and apolipoprotein E ɛ4 allele information with correlative features. New achieved accuracies are 92.11% and 79.37% in separating AD from normal controls and AD converters from non-converters, respectively. Differences between using diverse distance measurements and various correlation transformation functions are also discussed to explore an optimal way for network establishment. PMID:26444768

  8. Precise and accurate isotopic measurements using multiple-collector ICPMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarède, F.; Telouk, Philippe; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Boyet, Maud; Agranier, Arnaud; Nelson, Bruce

    2004-06-01

    New techniques of isotopic measurements by a new generation of mass spectrometers equipped with an inductively-coupled-plasma source, a magnetic mass filter, and multiple collection (MC-ICPMS) are quickly developing. These techniques are valuable because of (1) the ability of ICP sources to ionize virtually every element in the periodic table, and (2) the large sample throughout. However, because of the complex trajectories of multiple ion beams produced in the plasma source whether from the same or different elements, the acquisition of precise and accurate isotopic data with this type of instrument still requires a good understanding of instrumental fractionation processes, both mass-dependent and mass-independent. Although physical processes responsible for the instrumental mass bias are still to be understood more fully, we here present a theoretical framework that allows for most of the analytical limitations to high precision and accuracy to be overcome. After a presentation of unifying phenomenological theory for mass-dependent fractionation in mass spectrometers, we show how this theory accounts for the techniques of standard bracketing and of isotopic normalization by a ratio of either the same or a different element, such as the use of Tl to correct mass bias on Pb. Accuracy is discussed with reference to the concept of cup efficiencies. Although these can be simply calibrated by analyzing standards, we derive a straightforward, very general method to calculate accurate isotopic ratios from dynamic measurements. In this study, we successfully applied the dynamic method to Nd and Pb as examples. We confirm that the assumption of identical mass bias for neighboring elements (notably Pb and Tl, and Yb and Lu) is both unnecessary and incorrect. We further discuss the dangers of straightforward standard-sample bracketing when chemical purification of the element to be analyzed is imperfect. Pooling runs to improve precision is acceptable provided the pooled

  9. Transcriptional Regulation: a Genomic Overview

    PubMed Central

    Riechmann, José Luis

    2002-01-01

    The availability of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence allows a comprehensive analysis of transcriptional regulation in plants using novel genomic approaches and methodologies. Such a genomic view of transcription first necessitates the compilation of lists of elements. Transcription factors are the most numerous of the different types of proteins involved in transcription in eukaryotes, and the Arabidopsis genome codes for more than 1,500 of them, or approximately 6% of its total number of genes. A genome-wide comparison of transcription factors across the three eukaryotic kingdoms reveals the evolutionary generation of diversity in the components of the regulatory machinery of transcription. However, as illustrated by Arabidopsis, transcription in plants follows similar basic principles and logic to those in animals and fungi. A global view and understanding of transcription at a cellular and organismal level requires the characterization of the Arabidopsis transcriptome and promoterome, as well as of the interactome, the localizome, and the phenome of the proteins involved in transcription. PMID:22303220

  10. Antioxidant-induced changes of the AP-1 transcription complex are paralleled by a selective suppression of human papillomavirus transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Rösl, F; Das, B C; Lengert, M; Geletneky, K; zur Hausen, H

    1997-01-01

    Considering the involvement of a redox-regulatory pathway in the expression of human papillomaviruses (HPVs), HPV type 16 (HPV-16)-immortalized human keratinocytes were treated with the antioxidant pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate (PDTC). PDTC induces elevated binding of the transcription factor AP-1 to its cognate recognition site within the viral regulatory region. Despite of increased AP-1 binding, normally indispensable for efficient HPV-16 transcription, viral gene expression was selectively suppressed at the level of initiation of transcription. Electrophoretic mobility supershift assays showed that the composition of the AP-1 complex, predominantly consisting of Jun homodimers in untreated cells, was altered. Irrespective of enhanced c-fos expression, c-jun was phosphorylated and became primarily heterodimerized with fra-1, which was also induced after PDTC incubation. Additionally, there was also an increased complex formation between c-jun and junB. Because both fra-1 and junB overexpression negatively interferes with c-jun/c-fos trans-activation of AP-1-responsive genes, our results suggest that the observed block in viral transcription is mainly the consequence of an antioxidant-induced reconstitution of the AP-1 transcription complex. Since expression of the c-jun/c-fos gene family is tightly regulated during cellular differentiation, defined reorganization of a central viral transcription factor may represent a novel mechanism controlling the transcription of pathogenic HPVs during keratinocyte differentiation and in the progression to cervical cancer. PMID:8985358

  11. Highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-12-30

    Disclosed is a highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine, comprising a revolute joint, comprising a circular encoder wheel, having an axis of rotation; a plurality of marks disposed around at least a portion of the circumference of the encoder wheel; bearing means for supporting the encoder wheel, while permitting free rotation of the encoder wheel about the wheel's axis of rotation; and a sensor, rigidly attached to the bearing means, for detecting the motion of at least some of the marks as the encoder wheel rotates; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the encoder wheel, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the sensor, for converting the output of the sensor into a set of cylindrical coordinates representing the position of the probe tip relative to a reference cylindrical coordinate system.

  12. Practical aspects of spatially high accurate methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Andrew G.; Mitchell, Curtis R.; Walters, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    The computational qualities of high order spatially accurate methods for the finite volume solution of the Euler equations are presented. Two dimensional essentially non-oscillatory (ENO), k-exact, and 'dimension by dimension' ENO reconstruction operators are discussed and compared in terms of reconstruction and solution accuracy, computational cost and oscillatory behavior in supersonic flows with shocks. Inherent steady state convergence difficulties are demonstrated for adaptive stencil algorithms. An exact solution to the heat equation is used to determine reconstruction error, and the computational intensity is reflected in operation counts. Standard MUSCL differencing is included for comparison. Numerical experiments presented include the Ringleb flow for numerical accuracy and a shock reflection problem. A vortex-shock interaction demonstrates the ability of the ENO scheme to excel in simulating unsteady high-frequency flow physics.

  13. Toward Accurate and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S

    2016-08-25

    Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable accurate comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. PMID:27565341

  14. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperaes in the range of about 1800.degree. to 2700.degree. C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  15. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, D.D.

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperatures in the range of about 1800/sup 0/ to 2700/sup 0/C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  16. Micron Accurate Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron accurate measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.

  17. Accurate metacognition for visual sensory memory representations.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Annelinde R E; Sligte, Ilja G; Barrett, Adam B; Seth, Anil K; Fahrenfort, Johannes J; Lamme, Victor A F

    2014-04-01

    The capacity to attend to multiple objects in the visual field is limited. However, introspectively, people feel that they see the whole visual world at once. Some scholars suggest that this introspective feeling is based on short-lived sensory memory representations, whereas others argue that the feeling of seeing more than can be attended to is illusory. Here, we investigated this phenomenon by combining objective memory performance with subjective confidence ratings during a change-detection task. This allowed us to compute a measure of metacognition--the degree of knowledge that subjects have about the correctness of their decisions--for different stages of memory. We show that subjects store more objects in sensory memory than they can attend to but, at the same time, have similar metacognition for sensory memory and working memory representations. This suggests that these subjective impressions are not an illusion but accurate reflections of the richness of visual perception.

  18. Accurate metacognition for visual sensory memory representations.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Annelinde R E; Sligte, Ilja G; Barrett, Adam B; Seth, Anil K; Fahrenfort, Johannes J; Lamme, Victor A F

    2014-04-01

    The capacity to attend to multiple objects in the visual field is limited. However, introspectively, people feel that they see the whole visual world at once. Some scholars suggest that this introspective feeling is based on short-lived sensory memory representations, whereas others argue that the feeling of seeing more than can be attended to is illusory. Here, we investigated this phenomenon by combining objective memory performance with subjective confidence ratings during a change-detection task. This allowed us to compute a measure of metacognition--the degree of knowledge that subjects have about the correctness of their decisions--for different stages of memory. We show that subjects store more objects in sensory memory than they can attend to but, at the same time, have similar metacognition for sensory memory and working memory representations. This suggests that these subjective impressions are not an illusion but accurate reflections of the richness of visual perception. PMID:24549293

  19. Accurate Telescope Mount Positioning with MEMS Accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, L.; Jaskó, A.; Pál, A.; Csépány, G.

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes the advantages and challenges of applying microelectromechanical accelerometer systems (MEMS accelerometers) in order to attain precise, accurate, and stateless positioning of telescope mounts. This provides a completely independent method from other forms of electronic, optical, mechanical or magnetic feedback or real-time astrometry. Our goal is to reach the subarcminute range which is considerably smaller than the field-of-view of conventional imaging telescope systems. Here we present how this subarcminute accuracy can be achieved with very cheap MEMS sensors and we also detail how our procedures can be extended in order to attain even finer measurements. In addition, our paper discusses how can a complete system design be implemented in order to be a part of a telescope control system.

  20. Toward Accurate and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S.

    2016-01-01

    Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable accurate comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. PMID:27565341

  1. DISJUNCTIVE NORMAL SHAPE MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Nisha; Mesadi, Fitsum; Cetin, Mujdat; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2016-01-01

    A novel implicit parametric shape model is proposed for segmentation and analysis of medical images. Functions representing the shape of an object can be approximated as a union of N polytopes. Each polytope is obtained by the intersection of M half-spaces. The shape function can be approximated as a disjunction of conjunctions, using the disjunctive normal form. The shape model is initialized using seed points defined by the user. We define a cost function based on the Chan-Vese energy functional. The model is differentiable, hence, gradient based optimization algorithms are used to find the model parameters. PMID:27403233

  2. The importance of accurate atmospheric modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Dylan; Schroeder, John; Liang, Pang

    2014-11-01

    This paper will focus on the effect of atmospheric conditions on EO sensor performance using computer models. We have shown the importance of accurately modeling atmospheric effects for predicting the performance of an EO sensor. A simple example will demonstrated how real conditions for several sites in China will significantly impact on image correction, hyperspectral imaging, and remote sensing. The current state-of-the-art model for computing atmospheric transmission and radiance is, MODTRAN® 5, developed by the US Air Force Research Laboratory and Spectral Science, Inc. Research by the US Air Force, Navy and Army resulted in the public release of LOWTRAN 2 in the early 1970's. Subsequent releases of LOWTRAN and MODTRAN® have continued until the present. Please verify that (1) all pages are present, (2) all figures are correct, (3) all fonts and special characters are correct, and (4) all text and figures fit within the red margin lines shown on this review document. Complete formatting information is available at http://SPIE.org/manuscripts Return to the Manage Active Submissions page at http://spie.org/submissions/tasks.aspx and approve or disapprove this submission. Your manuscript will not be published without this approval. Please contact author_help@spie.org with any questions or concerns. The paper will demonstrate the importance of using validated models and local measured meteorological, atmospheric and aerosol conditions to accurately simulate the atmospheric transmission and radiance. Frequently default conditions are used which can produce errors of as much as 75% in these values. This can have significant impact on remote sensing applications.

  3. Accurate Weather Forecasting for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddalena, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    The NRAO Green Bank Telescope routinely observes at wavelengths from 3 mm to 1 m. As with all mm-wave telescopes, observing conditions depend upon the variable atmospheric water content. The site provides over 100 days/yr when opacities are low enough for good observing at 3 mm, but winds on the open-air structure reduce the time suitable for 3-mm observing where pointing is critical. Thus, to maximum productivity the observing wavelength needs to match weather conditions. For 6 years the telescope has used a dynamic scheduling system (recently upgraded; www.gb.nrao.edu/DSS) that requires accurate multi-day forecasts for winds and opacities. Since opacity forecasts are not provided by the National Weather Services (NWS), I have developed an automated system that takes available forecasts, derives forecasted opacities, and deploys the results on the web in user-friendly graphical overviews (www.gb.nrao.edu/ rmaddale/Weather). The system relies on the "North American Mesoscale" models, which are updated by the NWS every 6 hrs, have a 12 km horizontal resolution, 1 hr temporal resolution, run to 84 hrs, and have 60 vertical layers that extend to 20 km. Each forecast consists of a time series of ground conditions, cloud coverage, etc, and, most importantly, temperature, pressure, humidity as a function of height. I use the Liebe's MWP model (Radio Science, 20, 1069, 1985) to determine the absorption in each layer for each hour for 30 observing wavelengths. Radiative transfer provides, for each hour and wavelength, the total opacity and the radio brightness of the atmosphere, which contributes substantially at some wavelengths to Tsys and the observational noise. Comparisons of measured and forecasted Tsys at 22.2 and 44 GHz imply that the forecasted opacities are good to about 0.01 Nepers, which is sufficient for forecasting and accurate calibration. Reliability is high out to 2 days and degrades slowly for longer-range forecasts.

  4. The high cost of accurate knowledge.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Kathleen M; Weber, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    Many business thinkers believe it's the role of senior managers to scan the external environment to monitor contingencies and constraints, and to use that precise knowledge to modify the company's strategy and design. As these thinkers see it, managers need accurate and abundant information to carry out that role. According to that logic, it makes sense to invest heavily in systems for collecting and organizing competitive information. Another school of pundits contends that, since today's complex information often isn't precise anyway, it's not worth going overboard with such investments. In other words, it's not the accuracy and abundance of information that should matter most to top executives--rather, it's how that information is interpreted. After all, the role of senior managers isn't just to make decisions; it's to set direction and motivate others in the face of ambiguities and conflicting demands. Top executives must interpret information and communicate those interpretations--they must manage meaning more than they must manage information. So which of these competing views is the right one? Research conducted by academics Sutcliffe and Weber found that how accurate senior executives are about their competitive environments is indeed less important for strategy and corresponding organizational changes than the way in which they interpret information about their environments. Investments in shaping those interpretations, therefore, may create a more durable competitive advantage than investments in obtaining and organizing more information. And what kinds of interpretations are most closely linked with high performance? Their research suggests that high performers respond positively to opportunities, yet they aren't overconfident in their abilities to take advantage of those opportunities.

  5. Gene expression profiling in Werner syndrome closely resembles that of normal aging.

    PubMed

    Kyng, Kasper J; May, Alfred; Kølvraa, Steen; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2003-10-14

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder, displaying defects in DNA replication, recombination, repair, and transcription. It has been hypothesized that several WS phenotypes are secondary consequences of aberrant gene expression and that a transcription defect may be crucial to the development of the syndrome. We used cDNA microarrays to characterize the expression of 6,912 genes and ESTs across a panel of 15 primary human fibroblast cell lines derived from young donors, old donors, and WS patients. Of the analyzed genes, 6.3% displayed significant differences in expression when either WS or old donor cells were compared with young donor cells. This result demonstrates that the WS transcription defect is specific to certain genes. Transcription alterations in WS were strikingly similar to those in normal aging: 91% of annotated genes displayed similar expression changes in WS and in normal aging, 3% were unique to WS, and 6% were unique to normal aging. We propose that a defect in the transcription of the genes as identified in this study could produce many of the complex clinical features of WS. The remarkable similarity between WS and normal aging suggests that WS causes the acceleration of a normal aging mechanism. This finding supports the use of WS as an aging model and implies that the transcription alterations common to WS and normal aging represent general events in the aging process.

  6. [Normal and disordered sleep].

    PubMed

    Arnulf, I

    2007-07-01

    Normal sleep is a complex and reversible state of brain functioning, including reduced inputs and outputs, blunted reflexes, and metabolic and cognitive changes. Evidence supports a role for sleep in the consolidation of an array of learning and memory tasks. Sleep deprivation and fragmentation result in executive dysfunction, increased appetite/weight and cellular stress. Sleep is a vital, complex but plastic function that can be modulated depending on individual heritage and motivation. The major role of sleep in attention and memory raises about concern the reduction in sleep duration recently pointed in teenagers and young adults. Sleep disorders are numerous and various. Their mechanism is not always identified, but may result from a central dysfunction in sleep-wake (e.g. narcolepsy) or circadian (e.g. advanced sleep phase syndrome) systems, from the sleep-related loss of compensation of reflexes normally effective during wakefulness (breathing is the most vulnerable function during sleep), or from other diseases preventing sleep (e.g. psychiatric insomnia, restless legs syndrome). PMID:17652992

  7. Approaching system equilibrium with accurate or not accurate feedback information in a two-route system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-mei; Xie, Dong-fan; Li, Qi

    2015-02-01

    With the development of intelligent transport system, advanced information feedback strategies have been developed to reduce traffic congestion and enhance the capacity. However, previous strategies provide accurate information to travelers and our simulation results show that accurate information brings negative effects, especially in delay case. Because travelers prefer to the best condition route with accurate information, and delayed information cannot reflect current traffic condition but past. Then travelers make wrong routing decisions, causing the decrease of the capacity and the increase of oscillations and the system deviating from the equilibrium. To avoid the negative effect, bounded rationality is taken into account by introducing a boundedly rational threshold BR. When difference between two routes is less than the BR, routes have equal probability to be chosen. The bounded rationality is helpful to improve the efficiency in terms of capacity, oscillation and the gap deviating from the system equilibrium.

  8. Is actin a transcription initiation factor for RNA polymerase B?

    PubMed Central

    Egly, J M; Miyamoto, N G; Moncollin, V; Chambon, P

    1984-01-01

    We have previously reported that two fractions derived from HeLa cell S100 extracts, the heparin flow-through and the heparin 0.6 M KCl eluate are required in vitro for efficient and accurate transcription by RNA polymerase class B (II). We have further purified a factor present in the heparin flow-through fraction, which markedly stimulates specific transcription catalyzed by the heparin 0.6 M KCl eluate. We report here that some of the properties of the stimulatory factor present in our most purified fractions are strikingly similar to those of actin. We demonstrate also that this factor acts at the pre-initiation level of the transcription reaction. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. Fig. 12. Fig. 13. PMID:6499833

  9. Coupling transcriptional and post-transcriptional miRNA regulation in the control of cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Shalgi, Reut; Brosh, Ran; Oren, Moshe; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Rotter, Varda

    2009-01-01

    miRNAs function as a critical regulatory layer in development, differentiation, and the maintenance of cell fate. Depletion of miRNAs from embryonic stem cells impairs their differentiation capacity. Total elimination of miRNAs leads to premature senescence in normal cells and tissues through activation of the DNA-damage checkpoint, whereas ablation of miRNAs in cancer cell lines results in an opposite effect, enhancing their tumorigenic potential. Here we compile evidence from the literature that point at miRNAs as key players in the maintenance of genomic integrity and proper cell fate. There is an apparent gap between our understanding of the subtle way by which miRNAs modulate protein levels, and their profound impact on cell fate. We propose that examining miRNAs in the context of the regulatory transcriptional and post-transcriptional networks they are embedded in may provide a broader view of their role in controlling cell fate. PMID:20157565

  10. Assigning numbers to the arrows: Parameterizing a gene regulation network by using accurate expression kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronen, Michal; Rosenberg, Revital; Shraiman, Boris I.; Alon, Uri

    2002-08-01

    A basic challenge in systems biology is to understand the dynamical behavior of gene regulation networks. Current approaches aim at determining the network structure based on genomic-scale data. However, the network connectivity alone is not sufficient to define its dynamics; one needs to also specify the kinetic parameters for the regulation reactions. Here, we ask whether effective kinetic parameters can be assigned to a transcriptional network based on expression data. We present a combined experimental and theoretical approach based on accurate high temporal-resolution measurement of promoter activities from living cells by using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter plasmids. We present algorithms that use these data to assign effective kinetic parameters within a mathematical model of the network. To demonstrate this, we employ a well defined network, the SOS DNA repair system of Escherichia coli. We find a strikingly detailed temporal program of expression that correlates with the functional role of the SOS genes and is driven by a hierarchy of effective kinetic parameter strengths for the various promoters. The calculated parameters can be used to determine the kinetics of all SOS genes given the expression profile of just one representative, allowing a significant reduction in complexity. The concentration profile of the master SOS transcriptional repressor can be calculated, demonstrating that relative protein levels may be determined from purely transcriptional data. This finding opens the possibility of assigning kinetic parameters to transcriptional networks on a genomic scale.

  11. Pornography, normalization, and empowerment.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Martin S; Williams, Colin J; Kleiner, Sibyl; Irizarry, Yasmiyn

    2010-12-01

    Opponents and proponents of erotic representations (referred to hereafter as "pornography") have described the effects of pornography from their perspective. Little, however, has been done in the way of research to investigate these claims from the consumer's point of view. This especially has been so regarding the positive impact of such consumption on a person's sex life. Using a study group of 245 college students, we examined this question in a framework of scripting theory. We wanted to see whether viewing pornography appeared to expand sexual horizons through normalization and facilitate a willingness to explore new sexual behaviors and sexual relationships through empowerment. The data supported this viewpoint and further showed the effects to be mediated by gender and sexual preference identity. They suggested, however, that established scripts were extended rather than abandoned. We conclude with connections between our findings and the widespread viewing of pornography in contemporary society. PMID:20127507

  12. Normal Untreated Jurkat Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. The objective of the research was to define a way to differentiate between effects due to microgravity and those due to possible stress from non-optimal spaceflight conditions. These Jurkat cells, a human acute T-cell leukemia was obtained to evaluate three types of potential experimental stressors: a) Temperature elevation; b) Serum starvation; and c) Centrifugal force. The data from previous spaceflight experiments showed that actin filaments and cell shape are significantly different for the control. These normal cells serve as the baseline for future spaceflight experiments.

  13. Structural basis of transcription activation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yu; Zhang, Yu; Ebright, Richard H

    2016-06-10

    Class II transcription activators function by binding to a DNA site overlapping a core promoter and stimulating isomerization of an initial RNA polymerase (RNAP)-promoter closed complex into a catalytically competent RNAP-promoter open complex. Here, we report a 4.4 angstrom crystal structure of an intact bacterial class II transcription activation complex. The structure comprises Thermus thermophilus transcription activator protein TTHB099 (TAP) [homolog of Escherichia coli catabolite activator protein (CAP)], T. thermophilus RNAP σ(A) holoenzyme, a class II TAP-dependent promoter, and a ribotetranucleotide primer. The structure reveals the interactions between RNAP holoenzyme and DNA responsible for transcription initiation and reveals the interactions between TAP and RNAP holoenzyme responsible for transcription activation. The structure indicates that TAP stimulates isomerization through simple, adhesive, stabilizing protein-protein interactions with RNAP holoenzyme. PMID:27284196

  14. Accurate lineshape spectroscopy and the Boltzmann constant

    PubMed Central

    Truong, G.-W.; Anstie, J. D.; May, E. F.; Stace, T. M.; Luiten, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy has an illustrious history delivering serendipitous discoveries and providing a stringent testbed for new physical predictions, including applications from trace materials detection, to understanding the atmospheres of stars and planets, and even constraining cosmological models. Reaching fundamental-noise limits permits optimal extraction of spectroscopic information from an absorption measurement. Here, we demonstrate a quantum-limited spectrometer that delivers high-precision measurements of the absorption lineshape. These measurements yield a very accurate measurement of the excited-state (6P1/2) hyperfine splitting in Cs, and reveals a breakdown in the well-known Voigt spectral profile. We develop a theoretical model that accounts for this breakdown, explaining the observations to within the shot-noise limit. Our model enables us to infer the thermal velocity dispersion of the Cs vapour with an uncertainty of 35 p.p.m. within an hour. This allows us to determine a value for Boltzmann's constant with a precision of 6 p.p.m., and an uncertainty of 71 p.p.m. PMID:26465085

  15. Accurate free energy calculation along optimized paths.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changjun; Xiao, Yi

    2010-05-01

    The path-based methods of free energy calculation, such as thermodynamic integration and free energy perturbation, are simple in theory, but difficult in practice because in most cases smooth paths do not exist, especially for large molecules. In this article, we present a novel method to build the transition path of a peptide. We use harmonic potentials to restrain its nonhydrogen atom dihedrals in the initial state and set the equilibrium angles of the potentials as those in the final state. Through a series of steps of geometrical optimization, we can construct a smooth and short path from the initial state to the final state. This path can be used to calculate free energy difference. To validate this method, we apply it to a small 10-ALA peptide and find that the calculated free energy changes in helix-helix and helix-hairpin transitions are both self-convergent and cross-convergent. We also calculate the free energy differences between different stable states of beta-hairpin trpzip2, and the results show that this method is more efficient than the conventional molecular dynamics method in accurate free energy calculation.

  16. Accurate SHAPE-directed RNA structure determination

    PubMed Central

    Deigan, Katherine E.; Li, Tian W.; Mathews, David H.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2009-01-01

    Almost all RNAs can fold to form extensive base-paired secondary structures. Many of these structures then modulate numerous fundamental elements of gene expression. Deducing these structure–function relationships requires that it be possible to predict RNA secondary structures accurately. However, RNA secondary structure prediction for large RNAs, such that a single predicted structure for a single sequence reliably represents the correct structure, has remained an unsolved problem. Here, we demonstrate that quantitative, nucleotide-resolution information from a SHAPE experiment can be interpreted as a pseudo-free energy change term and used to determine RNA secondary structure with high accuracy. Free energy minimization, by using SHAPE pseudo-free energies, in conjunction with nearest neighbor parameters, predicts the secondary structure of deproteinized Escherichia coli 16S rRNA (>1,300 nt) and a set of smaller RNAs (75–155 nt) with accuracies of up to 96–100%, which are comparable to the best accuracies achievable by comparative sequence analysis. PMID:19109441

  17. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10-12 at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H2, HD, HT, D2, DT, and T2 has been determined. For the ground state of H2 the estimated precision is 3 × 10-7 cm-1, which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels.

  18. Fast and Provably Accurate Bilateral Filtering.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Kunal N; Dabhade, Swapnil D

    2016-06-01

    The bilateral filter is a non-linear filter that uses a range filter along with a spatial filter to perform edge-preserving smoothing of images. A direct computation of the bilateral filter requires O(S) operations per pixel, where S is the size of the support of the spatial filter. In this paper, we present a fast and provably accurate algorithm for approximating the bilateral filter when the range kernel is Gaussian. In particular, for box and Gaussian spatial filters, the proposed algorithm can cut down the complexity to O(1) per pixel for any arbitrary S . The algorithm has a simple implementation involving N+1 spatial filterings, where N is the approximation order. We give a detailed analysis of the filtering accuracy that can be achieved by the proposed approximation in relation to the target bilateral filter. This allows us to estimate the order N required to obtain a given accuracy. We also present comprehensive numerical results to demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is competitive with the state-of-the-art methods in terms of speed and accuracy. PMID:27093722

  19. Accurate, reliable prototype earth horizon sensor head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F.; Cohen, H.

    1973-01-01

    The design and performance is described of an accurate and reliable prototype earth sensor head (ARPESH). The ARPESH employs a detection logic 'locator' concept and horizon sensor mechanization which should lead to high accuracy horizon sensing that is minimally degraded by spatial or temporal variations in sensing attitude from a satellite in orbit around the earth at altitudes in the 500 km environ 1,2. An accuracy of horizon location to within 0.7 km has been predicted, independent of meteorological conditions. This corresponds to an error of 0.015 deg-at 500 km altitude. Laboratory evaluation of the sensor indicates that this accuracy is achieved. First, the basic operating principles of ARPESH are described; next, detailed design and construction data is presented and then performance of the sensor under laboratory conditions in which the sensor is installed in a simulator that permits it to scan over a blackbody source against background representing the earth space interface for various equivalent plant temperatures.

  20. Fast and Accurate Exhaled Breath Ammonia Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Solga, Steven F.; Mudalel, Matthew L.; Spacek, Lisa A.; Risby, Terence H.

    2014-01-01

    This exhaled breath ammonia method uses a fast and highly sensitive spectroscopic method known as quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) that uses a quantum cascade based laser. The monitor is coupled to a sampler that measures mouth pressure and carbon dioxide. The system is temperature controlled and specifically designed to address the reactivity of this compound. The sampler provides immediate feedback to the subject and the technician on the quality of the breath effort. Together with the quick response time of the monitor, this system is capable of accurately measuring exhaled breath ammonia representative of deep lung systemic levels. Because the system is easy to use and produces real time results, it has enabled experiments to identify factors that influence measurements. For example, mouth rinse and oral pH reproducibly and significantly affect results and therefore must be controlled. Temperature and mode of breathing are other examples. As our understanding of these factors evolves, error is reduced, and clinical studies become more meaningful. This system is very reliable and individual measurements are inexpensive. The sampler is relatively inexpensive and quite portable, but the monitor is neither. This limits options for some clinical studies and provides rational for future innovations. PMID:24962141

  1. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-14

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10{sup −12} at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H{sub 2}, HD, HT, D{sub 2}, DT, and T{sub 2} has been determined. For the ground state of H{sub 2} the estimated precision is 3 × 10{sup −7} cm{sup −1}, which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels.

  2. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule.

    PubMed

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-14

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10(-12) at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H2, HD, HT, D2, DT, and T2 has been determined. For the ground state of H2 the estimated precision is 3 × 10(-7) cm(-1), which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels. PMID:25494728

  3. MEMS accelerometers in accurate mount positioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, László; Pál, András.; Jaskó, Attila

    2014-07-01

    In order to attain precise, accurate and stateless positioning of telescope mounts we apply microelectromechanical accelerometer systems (also known as MEMS accelerometers). In common practice, feedback from the mount position is provided by electronic, optical or magneto-mechanical systems or via real-time astrometric solution based on the acquired images. Hence, MEMS-based systems are completely independent from these mechanisms. Our goal is to investigate the advantages and challenges of applying such devices and to reach the sub-arcminute range { that is well smaller than the field-of-view of conventional imaging telescope systems. We present how this sub-arcminute accuracy can be achieved with very cheap MEMS sensors. Basically, these sensors yield raw output within an accuracy of a few degrees. We show what kind of calibration procedures could exploit spherical and cylindrical constraints between accelerometer output channels in order to achieve the previously mentioned accuracy level. We also demonstrate how can our implementation be inserted in a telescope control system. Although this attainable precision is less than both the resolution of telescope mount drive mechanics and the accuracy of astrometric solutions, the independent nature of attitude determination could significantly increase the reliability of autonomous or remotely operated astronomical observations.

  4. RNA polymerase and the regulation of transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Reznikoff, W.S.; Gross, C.A.; Burgess, R.R.; Record, M.T.; Dahlberg, J.E.; Wickens, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of eight sections, each containing several papers. The section titles are: RNA Polymerases; Transcription Initiation - Bacterial; Regulation of Bacterial Transcription Initiation; Stable RNA Synthesis in Eukaryotes: Chromatin Structure; Promoters; Enhancers; and the Global Control of Eukaryotic Transcription; Specific Eukaryotic Transcription Factors; Termination of Transcription; and Short Communications.

  5. Sample normalization methods in quantitative metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiman; Li, Liang

    2016-01-22

    To reveal metabolomic changes caused by a biological event in quantitative metabolomics, it is critical to use an analytical tool that can perform accurate and precise quantification to examine the true concentration differences of individual metabolites found in different samples. A number of steps are involved in metabolomic analysis including pre-analytical work (e.g., sample collection and storage), analytical work (e.g., sample analysis) and data analysis (e.g., feature extraction and quantification). Each one of them can influence the quantitative results significantly and thus should be performed with great care. Among them, the total sample amount or concentration of metabolites can be significantly different from one sample to another. Thus, it is critical to reduce or eliminate the effect of total sample amount variation on quantification of individual metabolites. In this review, we describe the importance of sample normalization in the analytical workflow with a focus on mass spectrometry (MS)-based platforms, discuss a number of methods recently reported in the literature and comment on their applicability in real world metabolomics applications. Sample normalization has been sometimes ignored in metabolomics, partially due to the lack of a convenient means of performing sample normalization. We show that several methods are now available and sample normalization should be performed in quantitative metabolomics where the analyzed samples have significant variations in total sample amounts.

  6. ETS transcription factors in hematopoietic stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Ciau-Uitz, Aldo; Wang, Lu; Patient, Roger; Liu, Feng

    2013-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are essential for the maintenance of the hematopoietic system. However, these cells cannot be maintained or created in vitro, and very little is known about their generation during embryogenesis. Many transcription factors and signaling pathways play essential roles at various stages of HSC development. Members of the ETS ('E twenty-six') family of transcription factors are recognized as key regulators within the gene regulatory networks governing hematopoiesis, including the ontogeny of HSCs. Remarkably, although all ETS transcription factors bind the same DNA consensus sequence and overlapping tissue expression is observed, individual ETS transcription factors play unique roles in the development of HSCs. Also, these transcription factors are recurrently used throughout development and their functions are context-dependent, increasing the challenge of studying their mechanism of action. Critically, ETS factors also play roles under pathological conditions, such as leukemia and, therefore, deciphering their mechanism of action will not only enhance our knowledge of normal hematopoiesis, but also inform protocols for their creation in vitro from pluripotent stem cells and the design of new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of malignant blood cell diseases. In this review, we summarize the key findings on the roles of ETS transcription factors in HSC development and discuss novel mechanisms by which they could control hematopoiesis.

  7. Towards Accurate Application Characterization for Exascale (APEX)

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Simon David

    2015-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has been engaged in hardware and software codesign activities for a number of years, indeed, it might be argued that prototyping of clusters as far back as the CPLANT machines and many large capability resources including ASCI Red and RedStorm were examples of codesigned solutions. As the research supporting our codesign activities has moved closer to investigating on-node runtime behavior a nature hunger has grown for detailed analysis of both hardware and algorithm performance from the perspective of low-level operations. The Application Characterization for Exascale (APEX) LDRD was a project concieved of addressing some of these concerns. Primarily the research was to intended to focus on generating accurate and reproducible low-level performance metrics using tools that could scale to production-class code bases. Along side this research was an advocacy and analysis role associated with evaluating tools for production use, working with leading industry vendors to develop and refine solutions required by our code teams and to directly engage with production code developers to form a context for the application analysis and a bridge to the research community within Sandia. On each of these accounts significant progress has been made, particularly, as this report will cover, in the low-level analysis of operations for important classes of algorithms. This report summarizes the development of a collection of tools under the APEX research program and leaves to other SAND and L2 milestone reports the description of codesign progress with Sandia’s production users/developers.

  8. Accurate paleointensities - the multi-method approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    The accuracy of models describing rapid changes in the geomagnetic field over the past millennia critically depends on the availability of reliable paleointensity estimates. Over the past decade methods to derive paleointensities from lavas (the only recorder of the geomagnetic field that is available all over the globe and through geologic times) have seen significant improvements and various alternative techniques were proposed. The 'classical' Thellier-style approach was optimized and selection criteria were defined in the 'Standard Paleointensity Definitions' (Paterson et al, 2014). The Multispecimen approach was validated and the importance of additional tests and criteria to assess Multispecimen results must be emphasized. Recently, a non-heating, relative paleointensity technique was proposed -the pseudo-Thellier protocol- which shows great potential in both accuracy and efficiency, but currently lacks a solid theoretical underpinning. Here I present work using all three of the aforementioned paleointensity methods on suites of young lavas taken from the volcanic islands of Hawaii, La Palma, Gran Canaria, Tenerife, and Terceira. Many of the sampled cooling units are <100 years old, the actual field strength at the time of cooling is therefore reasonably well known. Rather intuitively, flows that produce coherent results from two or more different paleointensity methods yield the most accurate estimates of the paleofield. Furthermore, the results for some flows pass the selection criteria for one method, but fail in other techniques. Scrutinizing and combing all acceptable results yielded reliable paleointensity estimates for 60-70% of all sampled cooling units - an exceptionally high success rate. This 'multi-method paleointensity approach' therefore has high potential to provide the much-needed paleointensities to improve geomagnetic field models for the Holocene.

  9. Important Nearby Galaxies without Accurate Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, Kristen

    2014-10-01

    The Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) and its offspring programs (e.g., THINGS, HERACLES, KINGFISH) have resulted in a fundamental change in our view of star formation and the ISM in galaxies, and together they represent the most complete multi-wavelength data set yet assembled for a large sample of nearby galaxies. These great investments of observing time have been dedicated to the goal of understanding the interstellar medium, the star formation process, and, more generally, galactic evolution at the present epoch. Nearby galaxies provide the basis for which we interpret the distant universe, and the SINGS sample represents the best studied nearby galaxies.Accurate distances are fundamental to interpreting observations of galaxies. Surprisingly, many of the SINGS spiral galaxies have numerous distance estimates resulting in confusion. We can rectify this situation for 8 of the SINGS spiral galaxies within 10 Mpc at a very low cost through measurements of the tip of the red giant branch. The proposed observations will provide an accuracy of better than 0.1 in distance modulus. Our sample includes such well known galaxies as M51 (the Whirlpool), M63 (the Sunflower), M104 (the Sombrero), and M74 (the archetypal grand design spiral).We are also proposing coordinated parallel WFC3 UV observations of the central regions of the galaxies, rich with high-mass UV-bright stars. As a secondary science goal we will compare the resolved UV stellar populations with integrated UV emission measurements used in calibrating star formation rates. Our observations will complement the growing HST UV atlas of high resolution images of nearby galaxies.

  10. Accurate Thermal Conductivities from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbogno, Christian

    2015-03-01

    In spite of significant research efforts, a first-principles determination of the thermal conductivity at high temperatures has remained elusive. On the one hand, Boltzmann transport techniques that include anharmonic effects in the nuclear dynamics only perturbatively become inaccurate or inapplicable under such conditions. On the other hand, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) methods suffer from enormous finite-size artifacts in the computationally feasible supercells, which prevent an accurate extrapolation to the bulk limit of the thermal conductivity. In this work, we overcome this limitation by performing ab initio MD simulations in thermodynamic equilibrium that account for all orders of anharmonicity. The thermal conductivity is then assessed from the auto-correlation function of the heat flux using the Green-Kubo formalism. Foremost, we discuss the fundamental theory underlying a first-principles definition of the heat flux using the virial theorem. We validate our approach and in particular the techniques developed to overcome finite time and size effects, e.g., by inspecting silicon, the thermal conductivity of which is particularly challenging to converge. Furthermore, we use this framework to investigate the thermal conductivity of ZrO2, which is known for its high degree of anharmonicity. Our calculations shed light on the heat resistance mechanism active in this material, which eventually allows us to discuss how the thermal conductivity can be controlled by doping and co-doping. This work has been performed in collaboration with R. Ramprasad (University of Connecticut), C. G. Levi and C. G. Van de Walle (University of California Santa Barbara).

  11. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Battum, L. J.; Huizenga, H.; Verdaasdonk, R. M.; Heukelom, S.

    2016-01-01

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2-2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner’s transmission mode, with red-green-blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner’s optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film.

  12. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry.

    PubMed

    van Battum, L J; Huizenga, H; Verdaasdonk, R M; Heukelom, S

    2016-01-21

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2-2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner's transmission mode, with red-green-blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner's optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film.

  13. Transcription of Trypanosoma brucei maxicircles

    SciTech Connect

    Michelotti, E.F.; Hajduk, S.L.

    1987-05-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite which developmentally regulates mitochondrial activity. In the mammal T. brucei produces ATP entirely by glycolysis while cytochrome mediated respiration resumes in the life-stage in the midgut of the insect vector. Using quantitative S1 nuclease protection assays two types of regulation of the steady state levels of the mitochondrial transcripts were found. Transcription of cytochrome b, cytochrome oxidase, and the rRNA genes is repressed in early bloodstream developmental stages, undergoes dramatic activation in later bloodstream stages, and finally a lesser activation in the insect developmental stage. Transcription of NADH dehydrogenase genes, however, is unregulated. Mitochondrial transcripts with a 5' triphosphate terminus, representing the site of transcription initiation, were capped using guanylyl transferase. The in vitro capped RNA hybridized to only one of eight mitochondrial restriction fragments on a Southern blot, however, hybridization of Southern blots with RNA from ..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P-UTP pulsed mitochondria labelled all restriction fragments equally. These results suggest that each DNA strand has a single promoter which directs the transcription of a full-length RNA which is subsequently processed. Different mitochondrial genes, despite being expressed on the same precursor RNA molecule, are independently regulated by both transcription initiation and RNA processing.

  14. Adolescence. What is normal?

    PubMed

    Offer, D; Ostrov, E; Howard, K I

    1989-06-01

    We present in some detail what constitutes normal behavior, or mental health, among teenagers. Our data are based on the results of a specially devised psychological questionnaire by one of us (D.O.). This questionnaire has been shown to reliably distinguish mentally healthy from psychiatrically disturbed populations. Results are presented across three decades (1960s, 1970s, and 1980s), across genders, and across the high school years. A conceptual framework is presented to help the clinician working with adolescents to understand the fluctuation in psychopathology among youth. Adolescent density in the total population is shown to be a significant factor in determining the rate of disturbance among teenagers. Our research findings demonstrate that the rate of behavioral disturbance among adolescents is the same as in other parts of the life cycle. The clinician working with adolescents tends to underestimate the severity of adolescent problems because of the near-universal belief that all adolescents undergo "adolescent turmoil." We have found that adolescents who are experiencing turmoil need professional help.

  15. Brain spatial normalization.

    PubMed

    Bug, William; Gustafson, Carl; Shahar, Allon; Gefen, Smadar; Fan, Yingli; Bertrand, Louise; Nissanov, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Neuroanatomical informatics, a subspecialty of neuroinformatics, focuses on technological solutions to neuroimage database access. Its current main goal is an image-based query system that is able to retrieve imagery based on anatomical location. Here, we describe a set of tools that collectively form such a solution for sectional material and that are available to investigators to use on their own data sets. The system accepts slide images as input and yields a matrix of transformation parameters that map each point on the input image to a standardized 3D brain atlas. In essence, this spatial normalization makes the atlas a spatial indexer from which queries can be issued simply by specifying a location on the reference atlas. Our objective here is to familiarize potential users of the system with the steps required of them as well as steps that take place behind the scene. We detail the capabilities and the limitations of the current implementation and briefly describe the enhancements planned for the near future.

  16. [Normal aging and cognition].

    PubMed

    Ska, Bernadette; Joanette, Yves

    2006-03-01

    It is now well documented that normal aging modifies the cognitive functioning and most observations suggest that cognition evolves in the direction of deterioration. The more frequently impaired functions are memory, attention and visual-spatial abilities. On the other hand, some abilities seem to increase, such as vocabulary. Considering the aging effect on cognition, questions remain regarding directionality, universality and reversibility. A great variability in aged related impacts is observed among subjects and among cognitive domains. Some individuals evolved more rapidly than others. Some cognitive functions are more affected by aging than others. General and specific factors are hypothesized to explain the aged related cognitive decline. Among them, educational level, health, cognitive style, life style, personality, are likely to modulate the aged related cognitive evolution by influencing attentional resources and cerebral plasticity. Cognitive resources are essential to develop adaptative strategies. During the life span, resources are activated and increased by learning and training. Considering the role of cognitive resources, successful aging is dependent on several conditions : absence of disease leading to a loss of autonomy, maintenance of cognitive and physical activities, and active and social engaged lifestyle. PMID:16527210

  17. The normal antireflux mechanism.

    PubMed

    Paterson, W G

    2001-08-01

    The normal antireflux mechanism consists of several components, any one of which may malfunction and render an individual prone to the development of GERD. The LES is clearly the most important component because gastroesophageal reflux almost always occurs when the sphincter pressure equals that of the stomach. Usually, an LES pressure of just 2 to 3 mm Hg above intragastric pressure is sufficient to prevent reflux. Other factors certainly play significant ancillary roles in preventing reflux. In the absence of a hiatal hernia, the crural fibers of the diaphragm serve as an "extrinsic" sphincter. Furthermore, the unique anatomy of the proximal stomach (e.g., the angle of His, mucosal flap valve, posterolateral location of the fundus) serves to keep gastric contents away from the gastroesophageal junction, making it less likely for reflux to occur when the LES relaxes. When a hiatal hernia is present, these factors are lost, and the hernia sac provides a reservoir for gastric juices with ready access to the LES. Finally, some degree of reflux occurs in all individuals, but esophageal clearance and acid neutralization provide an important last line of defense.

  18. AthaMap, integrating transcriptional and post-transcriptional data

    PubMed Central

    Bülow, Lorenz; Engelmann, Stefan; Schindler, Martin; Hehl, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    The AthaMap database generates a map of predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) for the whole Arabidopsis thaliana genome. AthaMap has now been extended to include data on post-transcriptional regulation. A total of 403 173 genomic positions of small RNAs have been mapped in the A. thaliana genome. These identify 5772 putative post-transcriptionally regulated target genes. AthaMap tools have been modified to improve the identification of common TFBS in co-regulated genes by subtracting post-transcriptionally regulated genes from such analyses. Furthermore, AthaMap was updated to the TAIR7 genome annotation, a graphic display of gene analysis results was implemented, and the TFBS data content was increased. AthaMap is freely available at http://www.athamap.de/. PMID:18842622

  19. AthaMap, integrating transcriptional and post-transcriptional data.

    PubMed

    Bülow, Lorenz; Engelmann, Stefan; Schindler, Martin; Hehl, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    The AthaMap database generates a map of predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) for the whole Arabidopsis thaliana genome. AthaMap has now been extended to include data on post-transcriptional regulation. A total of 403,173 genomic positions of small RNAs have been mapped in the A. thaliana genome. These identify 5772 putative post-transcriptionally regulated target genes. AthaMap tools have been modified to improve the identification of common TFBS in co-regulated genes by subtracting post-transcriptionally regulated genes from such analyses. Furthermore, AthaMap was updated to the TAIR7 genome annotation, a graphic display of gene analysis results was implemented, and the TFBS data content was increased. AthaMap is freely available at http://www.athamap.de/. PMID:18842622

  20. Highly accurate fast lung CT registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, Jan; Heldmann, Stefan; Kipshagen, Till; Fischer, Bernd

    2013-03-01

    Lung registration in thoracic CT scans has received much attention in the medical imaging community. Possible applications range from follow-up analysis, motion correction for radiation therapy, monitoring of air flow and pulmonary function to lung elasticity analysis. In a clinical environment, runtime is always a critical issue, ruling out quite a few excellent registration approaches. In this paper, a highly efficient variational lung registration method based on minimizing the normalized gradient fields distance measure with curvature regularization is presented. The method ensures diffeomorphic deformations by an additional volume regularization. Supplemental user knowledge, like a segmentation of the lungs, may be incorporated as well. The accuracy of our method was evaluated on 40 test cases from clinical routine. In the EMPIRE10 lung registration challenge, our scheme ranks third, with respect to various validation criteria, out of 28 algorithms with an average landmark distance of 0.72 mm. The average runtime is about 1:50 min on a standard PC, making it by far the fastest approach of the top-ranking algorithms. Additionally, the ten publicly available DIR-Lab inhale-exhale scan pairs were registered to subvoxel accuracy at computation times of only 20 seconds. Our method thus combines very attractive runtimes with state-of-the-art accuracy in a unique way.

  1. Institutionalizing Normal: Rethinking Composition's Precedence in Normal Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinnell, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Composition historians have recently worked to recover histories of composition in normal schools. This essay argues, however, that historians have inadvertently misconstrued the role of normal schools in American education by inaccurately comparing rhetorical education in normal schools to rhetorical education in colleges and universities.…

  2. Sigma Factors for Cyanobacterial Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Sousuke; Asayama, Munehiko

    2009-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthesizing microorganisms that can be used as a model for analyzing gene expression. The expression of genes involves transcription and translation. Transcription is performed by the RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme, comprising a core enzyme and a sigma (σ) factor which confers promoter selectivity. The unique structure, expression, and function of cyanobacterial σ factors (and RNAP core subunits) are summarized here based on studies, reported previously. The types of promoter recognized by the σ factors are also discussed with regard to transcriptional regulation. PMID:19838335

  3. Reference genes for the normalization of gene expression in eucalyptus species.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Luisa Abruzzi; Breton, Michèle Claire; Bastolla, Fernanda Macedo; Camargo, Sandro da Silva; Margis, Rogério; Frazzon, Jeverson; Pasquali, Giancarlo

    2012-02-01

    Gene expression analysis is increasingly important in biological research, with reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) becoming the method of choice for high-throughput and accurate expression profiling of selected genes. Considering the increased sensitivity, reproducibility and large dynamic range of this method, the requirements for proper internal reference gene(s) for relative expression normalization have become much more stringent. Given the increasing interest in the functional genomics of Eucalyptus, we sought to identify and experimentally verify suitable reference genes for the normalization of gene expression associated with the flower, leaf and xylem of six species of the genus. We selected 50 genes that exhibited the least variation in microarrays of E. grandis leaves and xylem, and E. globulus xylem. We further performed the experimental analysis using RT-qPCR for six Eucalyptus species and three different organs/tissues. Employing algorithms geNorm and NormFinder, we assessed the gene expression stability of eight candidate new reference genes. Classic housekeeping genes were also included in the analysis. The stability profiles of candidate genes were in very good agreement. PCR results proved that the expression of novel Eucons04, Eucons08 and Eucons21 genes was the most stable in all Eucalyptus organs/tissues and species studied. We showed that the combination of these genes as references when measuring the expression of a test gene results in more reliable patterns of expression than traditional housekeeping genes. Hence, novel Eucons04, Eucons08 and Eucons21 genes are the best suitable references for the normalization of expression studies in the Eucalyptus genus. PMID:22197885

  4. Accurate theoretical chemistry with coupled pair models.

    PubMed

    Neese, Frank; Hansen, Andreas; Wennmohs, Frank; Grimme, Stefan

    2009-05-19

    Quantum chemistry has found its way into the everyday work of many experimental chemists. Calculations can predict the outcome of chemical reactions, afford insight into reaction mechanisms, and be used to interpret structure and bonding in molecules. Thus, contemporary theory offers tremendous opportunities in experimental chemical research. However, even with present-day computers and algorithms, we cannot solve the many particle Schrodinger equation exactly; inevitably some error is introduced in approximating the solutions of this equation. Thus, the accuracy of quantum chemical calculations is of critical importance. The affordable accuracy depends on molecular size and particularly on the total number of atoms: for orientation, ethanol has 9 atoms, aspirin 21 atoms, morphine 40 atoms, sildenafil 63 atoms, paclitaxel 113 atoms, insulin nearly 800 atoms, and quaternary hemoglobin almost 12,000 atoms. Currently, molecules with up to approximately 10 atoms can be very accurately studied by coupled cluster (CC) theory, approximately 100 atoms with second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), approximately 1000 atoms with density functional theory (DFT), and beyond that number with semiempirical quantum chemistry and force-field methods. The overwhelming majority of present-day calculations in the 100-atom range use DFT. Although these methods have been very successful in quantum chemistry, they do not offer a well-defined hierarchy of calculations that allows one to systematically converge to the correct answer. Recently a number of rather spectacular failures of DFT methods have been found-even for seemingly simple systems such as hydrocarbons, fueling renewed interest in wave function-based methods that incorporate the relevant physics of electron correlation in a more systematic way. Thus, it would be highly desirable to fill the gap between 10 and 100 atoms with highly correlated ab initio methods. We have found that one of the earliest (and now

  5. Reinitiation enhances reliable transcriptional responses in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Chen, Luonan

    2014-08-01

    Gene transcription is a noisy process carried out by the transcription machinery recruited to the promoter. Noise reduction is a fundamental requirement for reliable transcriptional responses which in turn are crucial for signal transduction. Compared with the relatively simple transcription initiation in prokaryotes, eukaryotic transcription is more complex partially owing to its additional reinitiation mechanism. By theoretical analysis, we showed that reinitiation reduces noise in eukaryotic transcription independent of the transcription level. Besides, a higher reinitiation rate enables a stable scaffold complex an advantage in noise reduction. Finally, we showed that the coupling between scaffold formation and transcription can further reduce transcription noise independent of the transcription level. Furthermore, compared with the reinitiation mechanism, the noise reduction effect of the coupling can be of more significance in the case that the transcription level is low and the intrinsic noise dominates. Our results uncover a mechanistic route which eukaryotes may use to facilitate a more reliable response in the noisy transcription process. PMID:24850905

  6. Accurate Reading with Sequential Presentation of Single Letters

    PubMed Central

    Price, Nicholas S. C.; Edwards, Gemma L.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid, accurate reading is possible when isolated, single words from a sentence are sequentially presented at a fixed spatial location. We investigated if reading of words and sentences is possible when single letters are rapidly presented at the fovea under user-controlled or automatically controlled rates. When tested with complete sentences, trained participants achieved reading rates of over 60 wpm and accuracies of over 90% with the single letter reading (SLR) method and naive participants achieved average reading rates over 30 wpm with greater than 90% accuracy. Accuracy declined as individual letters were presented for shorter periods of time, even when the overall reading rate was maintained by increasing the duration of spaces between words. Words in the lexicon that occur more frequently were identified with higher accuracy and more quickly, demonstrating that trained participants have lexical access. In combination, our data strongly suggest that comprehension is possible and that SLR is a practicable form of reading under conditions in which normal scanning of text is not possible, or for scenarios with limited spatial and temporal resolution such as patients with low vision or prostheses. PMID:23115548

  7. HOW ACCURATE IS OUR KNOWLEDGE OF THE GALAXY BIAS?

    SciTech Connect

    More, Surhud

    2011-11-01

    Observations of the clustering of galaxies can provide useful information about the distribution of dark matter in the universe. In order to extract accurate cosmological parameters from galaxy surveys, it is important to understand how the distribution of galaxies is biased with respect to the matter distribution. The large-scale bias of galaxies can be quantified either by directly measuring the large-scale ({lambda} {approx}> 60 h{sup -1} Mpc) power spectrum of galaxies or by modeling the halo occupation distribution of galaxies using their clustering on small scales ({lambda} {approx}< 30 h{sup -1} Mpc). We compare the luminosity dependence of the galaxy bias (both the shape and the normalization) obtained by these methods and check for consistency. Our comparison reveals that the bias of galaxies obtained by the small-scale clustering measurements is systematically larger than that obtained from the large-scale power spectrum methods. We also find systematic discrepancies in the shape of the galaxy-bias-luminosity relation. We comment on the origin and possible consequences of these discrepancies which had remained unnoticed thus far.

  8. Surface-normal cascaded planar interconnection with easy alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakizaki, Sunao; Horan, Paul; Hegarty, John

    1995-11-01

    A robust scheme for the surface-normal optical interconnection of arrays of optoelectronic devices is demonstrated. Allowing for inversion, the optical system maintains registration between input and image planes in one direction and full registration between every second plane, thus making for stable and accurate interconnection between elements of arrays.

  9. Transcriptional Regulation of Hepatic Lipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhui; Viscarra, Jose; Kim, Sun-Joong; Sul, Hei Sook

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid and fat synthesis in liver is a highly regulated metabolic pathway critical for energy distribution. Having common features at their promoter regions, lipogenic genes are coordinately regulated at the transcription level. Transcription factors, such as USF, SREBP-1c, LXR and ChREBP play critical roles in this process. Recently, insights have been gained into how various signaling pathways regulate these transcription factors. After feeding, high blood glucose and insulin induce lipogenic genes through several pathways, including DNA-PK, aPKC and Akt-mTOR. Various transcription factors and coregulators undergo specific modifications, such as phosphorylation, acetylation, or ubiquitination, which affect their function, stability, or localization. Dysregulation of lipogenesis can contribute to hepatosteatosis, which is associated with obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:26490400

  10. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  11. Transcriptional Control of Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Smale, Stephen T.; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory response requires the activation of a complex transcriptional program that is both cell-type- and stimulus-specific and involves the dynamic regulation of hundreds of genes. In the context of an inflamed tissue, extensive changes in gene expression occur in both parenchymal cells and infiltrating cells of the immune system. Recently, basic transcriptional mechanisms that control inflammation have been clarified at a genome scale, particularly in macrophages and conventional dendritic cells. The regulatory logic of distinct groups of inflammatory genes can be explained to some extent by identifiable sequence-encoded features of their chromatin organization, which impact on transcription factor (TF) accessibility and impose different requirements for gene activation. Moreover, it has become apparent that the interplay between TFs activated by inflammatory stimuli and master regulators exerts a crucial role in controlling cell-type-specific transcriptional outputs. PMID:25213094

  12. The transcriptional foundation of pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Ian; Tomlinson, Simon R

    2009-07-01

    A fundamental goal in biology is to understand the molecular basis of cell identity. Pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cell identity is governed by a set of transcription factors centred on the triumvirate of Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog. These proteins often bind to closely localised genomic sites. Recent studies have identified additional transcriptional modulators that bind to chromatin near sites occupied by Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog. This suggests that the combinatorial control of gene transcription might be fundamental to the ES cell state. Here we discuss how these observations advance our understanding of the transcription factor network that controls pluripotent identity and highlight unresolved issues that arise from these studies. PMID:19542351

  13. Exploring Ribosome Positioning on Translating Transcripts with Ribosome Profiling.

    PubMed

    Spealman, Pieter; Wang, Hao; May, Gemma; Kingsford, Carl; McManus, C Joel

    2016-01-01

    Recent technological advances (e.g., microarrays and massively parallel sequencing) have facilitated genome-wide measurement of many aspects of gene regulation. Ribosome profiling is a high-throughput sequencing method used to measure gene expression at the level of translation. This is accomplished by quantifying both the number of translating ribosomes and their locations on mRNA transcripts. The inventors of this approach have published several methods papers detailing its implementation and addressing the basics of ribosome profiling data analysis. Here we describe our lab's procedure, which differs in some respects from those published previously. In addition, we describe a data analysis pipeline, Ribomap, for ribosome profiling data. Ribomap allocates sequence reads to alternative mRNA isoforms, normalizes sequencing bias along transcripts using RNA-seq data, and outputs count vectors of per-codon ribosome occupancy for each transcript.

  14. Synthetic enhancement of a TFIIB defect by a mutation in SSU72, an essential yeast gene encoding a novel protein that affects transcription start site selection in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Z W; Hampsey, M

    1996-01-01

    An ssu72 mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was identified as an enhancer of a TFIIB defect (sua7-1) that confers both a cold-sensitive growth defect and a downstream shift in transcription start site selection. The ssu72-1 allele did not affect cold sensitivity but, in combination with sua7-1, created a heat-sensitive phenotype. Moreover, start site selection at the ADH1 gene was dramatically shifted further downstream of the normal sites. Both of these effects could be rescued by either SUA7 or SSU72, thereby defining a functional relationship between the two genes. SSU72 is a single-copy, essential gene encoding a novel protein of 206 amino acids. The ssu72-1 allele is the result of a 30-bp duplication creating a sequence encoding a Cys-X2-Cys-X6-Cys-X2-Cys zinc binding motif near the N terminus of Ssu72p. Mutational analysis demonstrated that the N terminus of Ssu72p is essential for function and that cysteine residues in both the normal and mutant proteins are critical. We discuss the possibility that the potential zinc binding motif of Ssu72 facilitates assembly of the transcription preinitiation complex and that this effect is important for accurate start site selection in vivo. PMID:8657130

  15. Transcription factor repertoire of homeostatic eosinophilopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Bouffi, Carine; Kartashov, Andrey V.; Schollaert, Kaila L.; Chen, Xiaoting; Bacon, W. Clark; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Barski, Artem; Fulkerson, Patricia C.

    2015-01-01

    The production of mature eosinophils is a tightly orchestrated process with the aim to sustain normal eosinophil levels in tissues while also maintaining low numbers of these complex and sensitive cells in the blood. To identify regulators of homeostatic eosinophilopoiesis in mice, we took a global approach to identify genome-wide transcriptome and epigenome changes that occur during homeostasis at critical developmental stages, including eosinophil-lineage commitment and lineage maturation. Our analyses revealed a markedly greater number of transcriptome alterations associated with eosinophil maturation (1199 genes) than with eosinophil-lineage commitment (490 genes), highlighting the greater transcriptional investment necessary for differentiation. Eosinophil progenitors (EoPs) were noted to express high levels of granule proteins and contain granules with an ultrastructure distinct from that of mature resting eosinophils. Our analyses also delineated a 976-gene eosinophil-lineage transcriptome that included a repertoire of 56 transcription factors, many of which have never previously been associated with eosinophils. EoPs and eosinophils, but not granulocyte-monocyte progenitors (GMPs) or neutrophils, expressed Helios and Aiolos, members of the Ikaros family of transcription factors, which regulate gene expression via modulation of chromatin structure and DNA accessibility. Epigenetic studies revealed a distinct distribution of active chromatin marks between genes induced with lineage commitment and genes induced with cell maturation during eosinophil development. In addition, Aiolos and Helios binding sites were significantly enriched in genes expressed by EoPs and eosinophils with active chromatin, highlighting a potential novel role for Helios and Aiolos in regulating gene expression during eosinophil development. PMID:26268651

  16. 77 FR 3800 - Accurate NDE & Inspection, LLC; Confirmatory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... COMMISSION Accurate NDE & Inspection, LLC; Confirmatory Order In the Matter of Accurate NDE & Docket: 150... request ADR with the NRC in an attempt to resolve issues associated with this matter. In response, on August 9, 2011, Accurate NDE requested ADR to resolve this matter with the NRC. On September 28,...

  17. Transcriptional control of pancreatic endocrine cell development.

    PubMed

    Gasa, Rosa

    2005-11-01

    In diabetes mellitus, insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas are lost (type 1) or dysfunctional (type 2). Cell replacement therapy has emerged as a promising alternative to insulin injection for treatment of diabetic patients. Given the scarcity and difficulty in obtaining pancreatic beta cells from cadaveric donors, current research is aiming at the generation of functional beta cells from non-beta-cell sources or from pluripotent progenitors such as adult or embryonic stem cells. However, to achieve this, we first need to understand how beta cells are formed during normal development. Knowledge of the molecular and genetic pathways that direct cells along their differentiation pathway will be instrumental if we aim to engineer new beta cells for clinical use. This article reviews pancreatic development from a gene expression point of view and discusses our current understanding of the transcription factors that rule pancreatic morphogenesis during ontogeny.

  18. Peroxide-Sensing Transcriptional Regulators in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2012-01-01

    The ability to maintain intracellular concentrations of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) within safe limits is essential for all aerobic life forms. In bacteria, as well as other organisms, ROS are produced during the normal course of aerobic metabolism, necessitating the constitutive expression of ROS scavenging systems. However, bacteria can also experience transient high-level exposure to ROS derived either from external sources, such as the host defense response, or as a secondary effect of other seemingly unrelated environmental stresses. Consequently, transcriptional regulators have evolved to sense the levels of ROS and coordinate the appropriate oxidative stress response. Three well-studied examples of these are the peroxide responsive regulators OxyR, PerR, and OhrR. OxyR and PerR are sensors of primarily H2O2, while OhrR senses organic peroxide (ROOH) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). OxyR and OhrR sense oxidants by means of the reversible oxidation of specific cysteine residues. In contrast, PerR senses H2O2 via the Fe-catalyzed oxidation of histidine residues. These transcription regulators also influence complex biological phenomena, such as biofilm formation, the evasion of host immune responses, and antibiotic resistance via the direct regulation of specific proteins. PMID:22797754

  19. The use of normal forms for analysing nonlinear mechanical vibrations

    PubMed Central

    Neild, Simon A.; Champneys, Alan R.; Wagg, David J.; Hill, Thomas L.; Cammarano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    A historical introduction is given of the theory of normal forms for simplifying nonlinear dynamical systems close to resonances or bifurcation points. The specific focus is on mechanical vibration problems, described by finite degree-of-freedom second-order-in-time differential equations. A recent variant of the normal form method, that respects the specific structure of such models, is recalled. It is shown how this method can be placed within the context of the general theory of normal forms provided the damping and forcing terms are treated as unfolding parameters. The approach is contrasted to the alternative theory of nonlinear normal modes (NNMs) which is argued to be problematic in the presence of damping. The efficacy of the normal form method is illustrated on a model of the vibration of a taut cable, which is geometrically nonlinear. It is shown how the method is able to accurately predict NNM shapes and their bifurcations. PMID:26303917

  20. Polyallelic structural variants can provide accurate, highly informative genetic markers focused on diagnosis and therapeutic targets: Accuracy vs. Precision.

    PubMed

    Roses, A D

    2016-02-01

    Structural variants (SVs) include all insertions, deletions, and rearrangements in the genome, with several common types of nucleotide repeats including single sequence repeats, short tandem repeats, and insertion-deletion length variants. Polyallelic SVs provide highly informative markers for association studies with well-phenotyped cohorts. SVs can influence gene regulation by affecting epigenetics, transcription, splicing, and/or translation. Accurate assays of polyallelic SV loci are required to define the range and allele frequency of variable length alleles. PMID:26517180

  1. Snail Family Transcription Factors Are Implicated in Thyroid Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Robert G.; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; González-Herrero, Ines; Anderson, Catriona; Flores, Teresa; Hughes, Sharon; Tselepis, Chris; Ross, James A.; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2007-01-01

    E-Cadherin (CDH1) expression is reduced in thyroid carcinomas by primarily unknown mechanisms. In several tissues, SNAIL (SNAI1) and SLUG (SNAI2) induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition by altering target gene transcription, including CDH1 repression, but these transcription factors have not been studied in thyroid carcinoma. Recently, our group has provided direct evidence that ectopic SNAI1 expression induces epithelial and mesenchymal mouse tumors. SNAI1, SNAI2, and CDH1 expression were analyzed in thyroid-derived cell lines and samples of human follicular and papillary thyroid carcinoma by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. The effect of SNAI1 expression on CDH1 transcription was analyzed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting in ori-3 cells. Thyroid carcinoma development was analyzed in CombitTA-Snail mice, in which SNAI1 levels are up-regulated. SNAI1 and SNAI2 were not expressed in cells derived from normal thyroid tissue, or in normal human thyroid samples, but were highly expressed in cell lines derived from thyroid carcinomas, in human thyroid carcinoma samples, and their metastases. SNAI1 expression in ori-3 cells repressed CDH1 transcription. Combi-TA mice developed papillary thyroid carcinomas, the incidence of which was increased by concomitant radiotherapy. In conclusion, SNAI1 and SNAI2 are ectopically expressed in thyroid carcinomas, and aberrant expression in mice is associated with papillary carcinoma development. PMID:17724139

  2. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-10-29

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson's ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers.

  3. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-01-01

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson’s ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers. PMID:26510769

  4. A Novel Method for Accurate Operon Predictions in All SequencedProkaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Morgan N.; Huang, Katherine H.; Alm, Eric J.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2004-12-01

    We combine comparative genomic measures and the distance separating adjacent genes to predict operons in 124 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes. Our method automatically tailors itself to each genome using sequence information alone, and thus can be applied to any prokaryote. For Escherichia coli K12 and Bacillus subtilis, our method is 85 and 83% accurate, respectively, which is similar to the accuracy of methods that use the same features but are trained on experimentally characterized transcripts. In Halobacterium NRC-1 and in Helicobacterpylori, our method correctly infers that genes in operons are separated by shorter distances than they are in E.coli, and its predictions using distance alone are more accurate than distance-only predictions trained on a database of E.coli transcripts. We use microarray data from sixphylogenetically diverse prokaryotes to show that combining intergenic distance with comparative genomic measures further improves accuracy and that our method is broadly effective. Finally, we survey operon structure across 124 genomes, and find several surprises: H.pylori has many operons, contrary to previous reports; Bacillus anthracis has an unusual number of pseudogenes within conserved operons; and Synechocystis PCC6803 has many operons even though it has unusually wide spacings between conserved adjacent genes.

  5. Accurate measurement of the relative abundance of different DNA species in complex DNA mixtures.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sangkyun; Yu, Hyunjoo; Pfeifer, Karl

    2012-06-01

    A molecular tool that can compare the abundances of different DNA sequences is necessary for comparing intergenic or interspecific gene expression. We devised and verified such a tool using a quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction approach. For this approach, we adapted a competitor array, an artificially made plasmid DNA in which all the competitor templates for the target DNAs are arranged with a defined ratio, and melting analysis for allele quantitation for accurate quantitation of the fractional ratios of competitively amplified DNAs. Assays on two sets of DNA mixtures with explicitly known compositional structures of the test sequences were performed. The resultant average relative errors of 0.059 and 0.021 emphasize the highly accurate nature of this method. Furthermore, the method's capability of obtaining biological data is demonstrated by the fact that it can illustrate the tissue-specific quantitative expression signatures of the three housekeeping genes G6pdx, Ubc, and Rps27 by using the forms of the relative abundances of their transcripts, and the differential preferences of Igf2 enhancers for each of the multiple Igf2 promoters for the transcription.

  6. Accurate Measurement of the Relative Abundance of Different DNA Species in Complex DNA Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Sangkyun; Yu, Hyunjoo; Pfeifer, Karl

    2012-01-01

    A molecular tool that can compare the abundances of different DNA sequences is necessary for comparing intergenic or interspecific gene expression. We devised and verified such a tool using a quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction approach. For this approach, we adapted a competitor array, an artificially made plasmid DNA in which all the competitor templates for the target DNAs are arranged with a defined ratio, and melting analysis for allele quantitation for accurate quantitation of the fractional ratios of competitively amplified DNAs. Assays on two sets of DNA mixtures with explicitly known compositional structures of the test sequences were performed. The resultant average relative errors of 0.059 and 0.021 emphasize the highly accurate nature of this method. Furthermore, the method's capability of obtaining biological data is demonstrated by the fact that it can illustrate the tissue-specific quantitative expression signatures of the three housekeeping genes G6pdx, Ubc, and Rps27 by using the forms of the relative abundances of their transcripts, and the differential preferences of Igf2 enhancers for each of the multiple Igf2 promoters for the transcription. PMID:22334570

  7. RNASequel: accurate and repeat tolerant realignment of RNA-seq reads.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Gavin W; Stein, Lincoln D

    2015-10-15

    RNA-seq is a key technology for understanding the biology of the cell because of its ability to profile transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation at single nucleotide resolutions. Compared to DNA sequencing alignment algorithms, RNA-seq alignment algorithms have a diminished ability to accurately detect and map base pair substitutions, gaps, discordant pairs and repetitive regions. These shortcomings adversely affect experiments that require a high degree of accuracy, notably the ability to detect RNA editing. We have developed RNASequel, a software package that runs as a post-processing step in conjunction with an RNA-seq aligner and systematically corrects common alignment artifacts. Its key innovations are a two-pass splice junction alignment system that includes de novo splice junctions and the use of an empirically determined estimate of the fragment size distribution when resolving read pairs. We demonstrate that RNASequel produces improved alignments when used in conjunction with STAR or Tophat2 using two simulated datasets. We then show that RNASequel improves the identification of adenosine to inosine RNA editing sites on biological datasets. This software will be useful in applications requiring the accurate identification of variants in RNA sequencing data, the discovery of RNA editing sites and the analysis of alternative splicing.

  8. CLASS2: accurate and efficient splice variant annotation from RNA-seq reads

    PubMed Central

    Song, Li; Sabunciyan, Sarven; Florea, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing of cellular RNA is making it possible to characterize genes and alternative splicing in unprecedented detail. However, designing bioinformatics tools to accurately capture splicing variation has proven difficult. Current programs can find major isoforms of a gene but miss lower abundance variants, or are sensitive but imprecise. CLASS2 is a novel open source tool for accurate genome-guided transcriptome assembly from RNA-seq reads based on the model of splice graph. An extension of our program CLASS, CLASS2 jointly optimizes read patterns and the number of supporting reads to score and prioritize transcripts, implemented in a novel, scalable and efficient dynamic programming algorithm. When compared against reference programs, CLASS2 had the best overall accuracy and could detect up to twice as many splicing events with precision similar to the best reference program. Notably, it was the only tool to produce consistently reliable transcript models for a wide range of applications and sequencing strategies, including ribosomal RNA-depleted samples. Lightweight and multi-threaded, CLASS2 requires <3GB RAM and can analyze a 350 million read set within hours, and can be widely applied to transcriptomics studies ranging from clinical RNA sequencing, to alternative splicing analyses, and to the annotation of new genomes. PMID:26975657

  9. Osteogenic transcription factors and proto-oncogene regulate bone sialoprotein gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Takai, Hideki; Mezawa, Masaru; Choe, Jin; Nakayama, Yohei; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2013-09-01

    Runt homeodomain protein 2 (Runx2), distalless 5 (Dlx5) and Smad1 are transcription factors that play critical roles in controlling the differentiation of osteoblasts and mineralization of bone. Proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase, Src, is an enzyme encoded by the Src gene. The normal cellular gene is called cellular-Src (c-Src). Bone sialoprotein (BSP), a protein implicated in the initial mineralization of newly formed bone, is an early phenotypic marker of differentiated osteoblasts. In this study, we used overexpression plasmids with Runx2, Dlx5, Smad1 or c-Src inserts to search for the effects of these transcription factors and proto-oncogene on BSP gene expression using rat osteoblast-like ROS 17/2.8. When we used Runx2, Dlx5 or c-Src overexpression plasmids for the transfection, BSP and Runx2 mRNA levels were increased in ROS 17/2.8 cells. However, overexpression of Smad1 did not induce BSP and Runx2 mRNA. Transient transfection analyses were performed using chimeric constructs of the rat BSP gene promoter linked to a luciferase reporter gene. Transfection of ROS 17/2.8 cells with Runx2, Dlx5 or c-Src overexpression plasmid increased the luciferase activities of the constructs, pLUC3 (-116 to +60), pLUC4 (-425 to +60) and pLUC5 (-801 to +60). However, Smad1 overexpression had no effect on the luciferase activities. These results demonstrate that overexpression of Runx2, Dlx5 or c-Src stimulates BSP transcription, and suggest that Runx2, Dlx5 and c-Src might be crucial transcriptional regulators of mineralization and bone formation.

  10. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase gene by protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, S; Faucon Biguet, N; Mallet, J

    1990-01-01

    The role played by protein kinase C (PKC) in TH gene regulation was investigated at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels using PC12 cells. The cells were treated with the phorbol ester TPA, which not only activates PKC but also causes down-regulation. PKC levels were monitored by [3H]PDBU binding assay and by using an anti-PKC antibody that detected intact PKC (79 kd) as well as its catalytic and regulatory domains. The [3H]PDBU binding to the membrane-associated PKC increased within 15-30 min of TPA treatment; thereafter total cellular [3H]PDBU binding decreased to a minimum of 20% of the control at 8 h. The rate of decrease in binding was greater than the decrease in the intensity of the staining of PKC holo enzyme visualized by anti-PKC antibody. TH mRNA levels, measured over the same time period, rose within 15 min of TPA treatment to peak at 4 h and subsequently declined below control level, paralleling the depletion of PKC. If cells depleted of PKC were reincubated in the normal medium, a recovery in PKC level was seen and, in parallel, TH mRNA levels increased to above control level. Furthermore, if down-regulation of PKC was prevented by incubating the cells with the protease inhibitor leupeptin, a decrease beyond control level in TH mRNA was not observed. TPA rapidly induced TH gene transcription; a maximal increase of two-fold was observed at 15 min, but the transcriptional rate then declined although it did not decrease beyond control values after 8 and 24 h of TPA treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig.2 Fig.3 Fig.6 PMID:1976513

  11. Reduced RNA polymerase II transcription in intact and permeabilized Cockayne syndrome group B cells.

    PubMed

    Balajee, A S; May, A; Dianov, G L; Friedberg, E C; Bohr, V A

    1997-04-29

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is characterized by increased photosensitivity, growth retardation, and neurological and skeletal abnormalities. The recovery of RNA synthesis is abnormally delayed in CS cells after exposure to UV radiation. Gene-specific repair studies have shown a defect in the transcription-coupled repair (TCR) of active genes in CS cells from genetic complementation groups A and B (CS-A and CS-B). We have analyzed transcription in vivo in intact and permeabilized CS-B cells. Uridine pulse labeling in intact CS-B fibroblasts and lymphoblasts shows a reduction of approximately 50% compared with various normal cells and with cells from a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group A. In permeabilized CS-B cells transcription in chromatin isolated under physiological conditions is reduced to about 50% of that in normal chromatin and there is a marked reduction in fluorescence intensity in transcription sites in interphase nuclei. Transcription in CS-B cells is sensitive to alpha-amanitin, suggesting that it is RNA polymerase II-dependent. The reduced transcription in CS-B cells is complemented in chromatin by the addition of normal cell extract, and in intact cells by transfection with the CSB gene. CS-B may be a primary transcription deficiency. PMID:9113985

  12. Accurate assessment of early gestational age in normal and diabetic women by serum human placental lactogen concentration.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, P G; Aspillaga, M O; Lind, T

    1983-08-01

    Serum human placental lactogen (hPL) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) were assayed and fetal crown-rump length (CRL) was determined by sonar in three groups of pregnant women--35 with uncomplicated pregnancies, 13 with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and 21 who represented a general pregnancy population. Each patient had a regular cycle and recorded last menstrual period, ovulated spontaneously, and was delivered of a single live baby. Serum hPL concentrations within the range 0.01-0.80 microU/ml in patients in the first group gave estimates of gestation with an SD of 6.3 days which was the same as the SD derived from CRL measurements. When the hPL regression equation was applied to the diabetic mothers the difference between the gestational age estimated from hPL and that estimated from LMP had a mean value of - 0.9 days with an SD of 6.2 days; this difference was not significantly different from zero. The third group of patients had a mean difference between hPL and LMP derived gestational age of 0.7 days (+/- 6.7 SD). Serum hPL offers a method of estimating gestation sufficiently precise to be used as a practical alternative to sonar measurements of CRL.

  13. The genetics of normal platelet reactivity.

    PubMed

    Kunicki, Thomas J; Nugent, Diane J

    2010-10-14

    Genetic and environmental factors contribute to a substantial variation in platelet function seen among normal persons. Candidate gene association studies represent a valiant effort to define the genetic component in an era where genetic tools were limited, but the single nucleotide polymorphisms identified in those studies need to be validated by more objective, comprehensive approaches, such as genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of quantitative functional traits in much larger cohorts of more carefully selected normal subjects. During the past year, platelet count and mean platelet volume, which indirectly affect platelet function, were the subjects of GWAS. The majority of the GWAS signals were located to noncoding regions, a consistent outcome of all GWAS to date, suggesting a major role for mechanisms that alter phenotype at the level of transcription or posttranscriptional modifications. Of 15 quantitative trait loci associated with mean platelet volume and platelet count, one located at 12q24 is also a risk locus for coronary artery disease. In most cases, the effect sizes of individual quantitative trait loci are admittedly small, but the results of these studies have led to new insight into regulators of hematopoiesis and megakaryopoiesis that would otherwise be unapparent and difficult to define. PMID:20610812

  14. Resetting the transcription factor network reverses terminal chronic hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Taichiro; Bell, Aaron; Brooks, Jenna M; Setoyama, Kentaro; Melis, Marta; Han, Bing; Fukumitsu, Ken; Handa, Kan; Tian, Jianmin; Kaestner, Klaus H; Vodovotz, Yoram; Locker, Joseph; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Fox, Ira J

    2015-04-01

    The cause of organ failure is enigmatic for many degenerative diseases, including end-stage liver disease. Here, using a CCl4-induced rat model of irreversible and fatal hepatic failure, which also exhibits terminal changes in the extracellular matrix, we demonstrated that chronic injury stably reprograms the critical balance of transcription factors and that diseased and dedifferentiated cells can be returned to normal function by re-expression of critical transcription factors, a process similar to the type of reprogramming that induces somatic cells to become pluripotent or to change their cell lineage. Forced re-expression of the transcription factor HNF4α induced expression of the other hepatocyte-expressed transcription factors; restored functionality in terminally diseased hepatocytes isolated from CCl4-treated rats; and rapidly reversed fatal liver failure in CCl4-treated animals by restoring diseased hepatocytes rather than replacing them with new hepatocytes or stem cells. Together, the results of our study indicate that disruption of the transcription factor network and cellular dedifferentiation likely mediate terminal liver failure and suggest reinstatement of this network has therapeutic potential for correcting organ failure without cell replacement.

  15. MafG Sumoylation Is Required for Active Transcriptional Repression

    PubMed Central

    Motohashi, Hozumi; Katsuoka, Fumiki; Miyoshi, Chika; Uchimura, Yasuhiro; Saitoh, Hisato; Francastel, Claire; Engel, James Douglas; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2006-01-01

    A straightforward mechanism for eliciting transcriptional repression would be to simply block the DNA binding site for activators. Such passive repression is often mediated by transcription factors that lack an intrinsic repressor activity. MafG is a bidirectional regulator of transcription, a repressor in its homodimeric state but an activator when heterodimerized with p45. Here, we report that MafG is conjugated to SUMO-2/3 in vivo. To clarify the possible physiological role(s) for sumoylation in regulating MafG activity, we evaluated mutant and wild-type MafG in transgenic mice and cultured cells. Whereas sumoylation-deficient MafG activated p45-dependent transcription normally and did not affect heterodimer activity, repression by the sumoylation-deficient MafG mutant was severely compromised in vivo. Furthermore, the SUMO-dependent repression activity of MafG was sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibition. Thus, repression by MafG is not achieved through simple passive repression by competing for the activator binding site but requires sumoylation, which then mediates transcriptional repression through recruitment of a repressor complex containing histone deacetylase activity. PMID:16738329

  16. Activating Transcription Factor 3 and the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, David; Raivich, Gennadij; Anderson, Patrick Norval

    2012-01-01

    Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) belongs to the ATF/cyclic AMP responsive element binding family of transcription factors and is often described as an adaptive response gene whose activity is usually regulated by stressful stimuli. Although expressed in a number of splice variants and generally recognized as a transcriptional repressor, ATF3 has the ability to interact with a number of other transcription factors including c-Jun to form complexes which not only repress, but can also activate various genes. ATF3 expression is modulated mainly at the transcriptional level and has markedly different effects in different types of cell. The levels of ATF3 mRNA and protein are normally very low in neurons and glia but their expression is rapidly upregulated in response to injury. ATF3 expression in neurons is closely linked to their survival and the regeneration of their axons following axotomy, and that in peripheral nerves correlates with the generation of a Schwann cell phenotype that is conducive to axonal regeneration. ATF3 is also induced by Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands but acts as a negative regulator of TLR signaling, suppressing the innate immune response which is involved in immuno-surveillance and can enhance or reduce the survival of injured neurons and promote the regeneration of their axons. PMID:22347845

  17. Phylogenetic and Transcription Analysis of Chrysanthemum WRKY Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Song, Aiping; Li, Peiling; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei; Li, Huiyun; Zeng, Jun; Shao, Yafeng; Zhu, Lu; Zhang, Zhaohe; Chen, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors are known to function in a number of plant processes. Here we have characterized 15 WRKY family genes of the important ornamental species chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium). A total of 15 distinct sequences were isolated; initially internal fragments were amplified based on transcriptomic sequence, and then the full length cDNAs were obtained using RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) PCR. The transcription of these 15 genes in response to a variety of phytohormone treatments and both biotic and abiotic stresses was characterized. Some of the genes behaved as would be predicted based on their homology with Arabidopsis thaliana WRKY genes, but others showed divergent behavior. PMID:25196345

  18. 39 CFR 957.19 - Transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... matter may be excluded from the transcript by order of the Judicial Officer. A copy of the transcript... librarian of the Postal Service or the Recorder. (b) Changes in the official transcript may be made only... changes shall be made in or upon the official transcript, or copies thereof, which have been filed...

  19. 39 CFR 957.19 - Transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... matter may be excluded from the transcript by order of the Judicial Officer. A copy of the transcript... librarian of the Postal Service or the Recorder. (b) Changes in the official transcript may be made only... changes shall be made in or upon the official transcript, or copies thereof, which have been filed...

  20. 39 CFR 957.19 - Transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... matter may be excluded from the transcript by order of the Judicial Officer. A copy of the transcript... librarian of the Postal Service or the Recorder. (b) Changes in the official transcript may be made only... changes shall be made in or upon the official transcript, or copies thereof, which have been filed...

  1. 46 CFR 502.165 - Official transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... incremental cost of transcription above the regular copy transcription cost borne by the Commission, in... full cost of transcription being borne by the Commission. (B) In the event a request for daily copy is... of transcription over and above that borne by the Commission, i.e., the incremental cost between...

  2. Cytokine mRNA quantification in histologically normal canine duodenal mucosa by real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Peters, I R; Helps, C R; Calvert, E L; Hall, E J; Day, M J

    2005-01-10

    CD4(+) T helper cells are important for the regulation of immune responses in the intestinal mucosa and they exert their effects through the secretion of pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory cytokines. Human patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis have alterations in the normal intestinal cytokine profile. These cytokine abnormalities have been shown at both the protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) level. The role that mucosal cytokines play in the pathogenesis of canine IBD has only been investigated using semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of gut tissue, as cytokine antisera are not available for this species. Real-time RT-PCR has been recognised to be a more accurate and sensitive method of quantifying mRNA transcripts, so in this study TaqMan real-time RT-PCR assays for the quantification of mRNA encoding IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-18, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and TGF-beta in canine intestinal mucosa were developed. The amount of these templates was quantified in normal canine duodenal mucosa (n = 8). IL-18, TGF-beta and TNF-alpha were found to be the most abundant transcripts, with IL-10 and IFN-gamma present at levels approximately 10-fold less. IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6 and IL-12 were the least abundant templates, with some RNA samples having no detectable mRNA copies. The methods developed in this study will form the basis of further work investigating the expression of mRNA encoding cytokines in mucosa from dogs with chronic enteropathies. In addition, these real-time PCR assays can also be used for the quantification of canine cytokine mRNA in other diseases.

  3. Measurement of Fracture Geometry for Accurate Computation of Hydraulic Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, B.; Ichikawa, Y.; Kim, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Fluid flow in rock mass is controlled by geometry of fractures which is mainly characterized by roughness, aperture and orientation. Fracture roughness and aperture was observed by a new confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM; Olympus OLS1100). The wavelength of laser is 488nm, and the laser scanning is managed by a light polarization method using two galvano-meter scanner mirrors. The system improves resolution in the light axis (namely z) direction because of the confocal optics. The sampling is managed in a spacing 2.5 μ m along x and y directions. The highest measurement resolution of z direction is 0.05 μ m, which is the more accurate than other methods. For the roughness measurements, core specimens of coarse and fine grained granites were provided. Measurements were performed along three scan lines on each fracture surface. The measured data were represented as 2-D and 3-D digital images showing detailed features of roughness. Spectral analyses by the fast Fourier transform (FFT) were performed to characterize on the roughness data quantitatively and to identify influential frequency of roughness. The FFT results showed that components of low frequencies were dominant in the fracture roughness. This study also verifies that spectral analysis is a good approach to understand complicate characteristics of fracture roughness. For the aperture measurements, digital images of the aperture were acquired under applying five stages of uniaxial normal stresses. This method can characterize the response of aperture directly using the same specimen. Results of measurements show that reduction values of aperture are different at each part due to rough geometry of fracture walls. Laboratory permeability tests were also conducted to evaluate changes of hydraulic conductivities related to aperture variation due to different stress levels. The results showed non-uniform reduction of hydraulic conductivity under increase of the normal stress and different values of

  4. Longitudinal evaluation of leukocyte transcripts in killer whales (Orcinus Orca)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sitt, Tatjana; Bowen, Lizabeth; Lee, Chia-Shan; Blanchard, Myra; McBain, James; Dold, Christopher; Stott, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Early identification of illness and/or presence of environmental and/or social stressors in free-ranging and domestic cetaceans is a priority for marine mammal health care professionals. Incorporation of leukocyte gene transcript analysis into the diagnostic tool kit has the potential to augment classical diagnostics based upon ease of sample storage and shipment, inducible nature and well-defined roles of transcription and associated downstream actions. Development of biomarkers that could serve to identify “insults” and potentially differentiate disease etiology would be of great diagnostic value. To this end, a modest number of peripheral blood leukocyte gene transcripts were selected for application to a domestic killer whale population with a focus on broad representation of inducible immunologically relevant genes. Normalized leukocyte transcript values, longitudinally acquired from 232 blood samples derived from 26 clinically healthy whales, were not visibly influenced temporally nor by sex or the specific Park in which they resided. Stability in leukocyte transcript number during periods of health enhances their potential use in diagnostics through identification of outliers. Transcript levels of two cytokine genes, IL-4 and IL-17, were highly variable within the group as compared to the other transcripts. IL-4 transcripts were typically absent. Analysis of transcript levels on the other genes of interest, on an individual animal basis, identified more outliers than were visible when analyzed in the context of the entire population. The majority of outliers (9 samples) were low, though elevated transcripts were identified for IL-17 from 2 animals and one each for Cox-2 and IL-10. The low number of outliers was not unexpected as sample selection was intentionally directed towards animals that were clinically healthy at the time of collection. Outliers may reflect animals experiencing subclinical disease that is transient and self-limiting. The

  5. Longitudinal evaluation of leukocyte transcripts in killer whales (Orcinus Orca).

    PubMed

    Sitt, Tatjana; Bowen, Lizabeth; Lee, Chia-Shan; Blanchard, Myra T; McBain, James; Dold, Christopher; Stott, Jeffrey L

    2016-07-01

    Early identification of illness and/or presence of environmental and/or social stressors in free-ranging and domestic cetaceans is a priority for marine mammal health care professionals. Incorporation of leukocyte gene transcript analysis into the diagnostic tool kit has the potential to augment classical diagnostics based upon ease of sample storage and shipment, inducible nature and well-defined roles of transcription and associated downstream actions. Development of biomarkers that could serve to identify "insults" and potentially differentiate disease etiology would be of great diagnostic value. To this end, a modest number of peripheral blood leukocyte gene transcripts were selected for application to a domestic killer whale population with a focus on broad representation of inducible immunologically relevant genes. Normalized leukocyte transcript values, longitudinally acquired from 232 blood samples derived from 26 clinically healthy whales, were not visibly influenced temporally nor by sex or the specific Park in which they resided. Stability in leukocyte transcript number during periods of health enhances their potential use in diagnostics through identification of outliers. Transcript levels of two cytokine genes, IL-4 and IL-17, were highly variable within the group as compared to the other transcripts. IL-4 transcripts were typically absent. Analysis of transcript levels on the other genes of interest, on an individual animal basis, identified more outliers than were visible when analyzed in the context of the entire population. The majority of outliers (9 samples) were low, though elevated transcripts were identified for IL-17 from 2 animals and one each for Cox-2 and IL-10. The low number of outliers was not unexpected as sample selection was intentionally directed towards animals that were clinically healthy at the time of collection. Outliers may reflect animals experiencing subclinical disease that is transient and self-limiting. The immunologic

  6. Longitudinal evaluation of leukocyte transcripts in killer whales (Orcinus Orca).

    PubMed

    Sitt, Tatjana; Bowen, Lizabeth; Lee, Chia-Shan; Blanchard, Myra T; McBain, James; Dold, Christopher; Stott, Jeffrey L

    2016-07-01

    Early identification of illness and/or presence of environmental and/or social stressors in free-ranging and domestic cetaceans is a priority for marine mammal health care professionals. Incorporation of leukocyte gene transcript analysis into the diagnostic tool kit has the potential to augment classical diagnostics based upon ease of sample storage and shipment, inducible nature and well-defined roles of transcription and associated downstream actions. Development of biomarkers that could serve to identify "insults" and potentially differentiate disease etiology would be of great diagnostic value. To this end, a modest number of peripheral blood leukocyte gene transcripts were selected for application to a domestic killer whale population with a focus on broad representation of inducible immunologically relevant genes. Normalized leukocyte transcript values, longitudinally acquired from 232 blood samples derived from 26 clinically healthy whales, were not visibly influenced temporally nor by sex or the specific Park in which they resided. Stability in leukocyte transcript number during periods of health enhances their potential use in diagnostics through identification of outliers. Transcript levels of two cytokine genes, IL-4 and IL-17, were highly variable within the group as compared to the other transcripts. IL-4 transcripts were typically absent. Analysis of transcript levels on the other genes of interest, on an individual animal basis, identified more outliers than were visible when analyzed in the context of the entire population. The majority of outliers (9 samples) were low, though elevated transcripts were identified for IL-17 from 2 animals and one each for Cox-2 and IL-10. The low number of outliers was not unexpected as sample selection was intentionally directed towards animals that were clinically healthy at the time of collection. Outliers may reflect animals experiencing subclinical disease that is transient and self-limiting. The immunologic

  7. Pervasive transcription: detecting functional RNAs in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lybecker, Meghan; Bilusic, Ivana; Raghavan, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Pervasive, or genome-wide, transcription has been reported in all domains of life. In bacteria, most pervasive transcription occurs antisense to protein-coding transcripts, although recently a new class of pervasive RNAs was identified that originates from within annotated genes. Initially considered to be non-functional transcriptional noise, pervasive transcription is increasingly being recognized as important in regulating gene expression. The function of pervasive transcription is an extensively debated question in the field of transcriptomics and regulatory RNA biology. Here, we highlight the most recent contributions addressing the purpose of pervasive transcription in bacteria and discuss their implications.

  8. High-resolution imaging of normal anatomy, and neural and adrenal malformations in mouse embryos using magnetic resonance microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Jürgen E; Bamforth, Simon D; Farthing, Cassandra R; Clarke, Kieran; Neubauer, Stefan; Bhattacharya, Shoumo

    2003-01-01

    An efficient investigation of the effects of genetic or environmental manipulation on mouse development relies on the rapid and accurate screening of a substantial number of embryos for congenital malformations. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to examine normal organ development and identify malformations in mouse embryos by magnetic resonance microscopy in a substantially shorter time than by conventional histology. We imaged embryos in overnight runs of under 9 h, with an operator time of less than 1 h. In normal embryos we visualized the brain, spinal cord, ganglia, eyes, inner ear, pituitary, thyroid, thymus, trachea, bronchi, lungs, heart, kidneys, gonads, adrenals, oesophagus, stomach, intestines, spleen, liver and pancreas. Examination of the brain in embryos lacking the transcriptional coactivator Cited2 showed cerebellar and midbrain roof agenesis, in addition to exencephaly. In these embryos we were also able to detect agenesis of the adrenal gland. We confirmed all malformations by histological sectioning. Thus magnetic resonance microscopy can be used to rapidly identify developmental and organ malformations in mutant mouse embryos generated by transgenic techniques, in high-throughput mutagenesis screens, or in screens to identify teratogenic compounds and environmental factors contributing to developmental malformations. PMID:12647873

  9. [Transcriptional control of ciliary genes].

    PubMed

    Vieillard, Jennifer; Jerber, Julie; Durand, Bénédicte

    2014-11-01

    Cilia are found in many eukaryotic species and share a common microtubule architecture that can nonetheless show very diverse features within one animal. The genesis of cilia and their diversity require the expression of different specific genes. At least two classes of transcription factors are involved in ciliogenesis: the RFX family, essential for the assembly of most cilia and the FOXJ1 transcription factors that are key regulators of motile cilia assembly. These two different families of transcription factors have both specific and common target genes and they can also cooperate for the formation of cilia. In collaboration with cell type specific factors, they also contribute to the specialisation of cilia. As a consequence, the identification of RFX and FOXJ1 target genes has emerged as an efficient strategy to identify novel ciliary genes, and in particular genes potentially implicated in ciliopathies.

  10. Circadian Control of Global Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shujing; Zhang, Luoying

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms exist in most if not all organisms on the Earth and manifest in various aspects of physiology and behavior. These rhythmic processes are believed to be driven by endogenous molecular clocks that regulate rhythmic expression of clock-controlled genes (CCGs). CCGs consist of a significant portion of the genome and are involved in diverse biological pathways. The transcription of CCGs is tuned by rhythmic actions of transcription factors and circadian alterations in chromatin. Here, we review the circadian control of CCG transcription in five model organisms that are widely used, including cyanobacterium, fungus, plant, fruit fly, and mouse. Comparing the similarity and differences in the five organisms could help us better understand the function of the circadian clock, as well as its output mechanisms adapted to meet the demands of diverse environmental conditions. PMID:26682214

  11. High-resolution mapping of transcription factor binding sites on native chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Kasinathan, Sivakanthan; Orsi, Guillermo A.; Zentner, Gabriel E.; Ahmad, Kami; Henikoff, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins including transcription factors (TFs) are key determinants of gene regulation and chromatin architecture. Formaldehyde cross-linking and sonication followed by Chromatin ImmunoPrecipitation (X-ChIP) is widely used for profiling of TF binding, but is limited by low resolution and poor specificity and sensitivity. We present a simple protocol that starts with micrococcal nuclease-digested uncross-linked chromatin and is followed by affinity purification of TFs and paired-end sequencing. The resulting ORGANIC (Occupied Regions of Genomes from Affinity-purified Naturally Isolated Chromatin) profiles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Abf1 and Reb1 provide highly accurate base-pair resolution maps that are not biased toward accessible chromatin, and do not require input normalization. We also demonstrate the high specificity of our method when applied to larger genomes by profiling Drosophila melanogaster GAGA Factor and Pipsqueak. Our results suggest that ORGANIC profiling is a widely applicable high-resolution method for sensitive and specific profiling of direct protein-DNA interactions. PMID:24336359

  12. Transcription rates in DNA brushes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Safran, S A

    2015-04-21

    We theoretically predict the rate of transcription (TX) in DNA brushes by introducing the concept of TX dipoles that takes into account the unidirectional motion of enzymes (RNAP) along DNA during transcription as correlated pairs of sources and sinks in the relevant diffusion equation. Our theory predicts that the TX rates dramatically change upon the inversion of the orientation of the TX dipoles relative to the substrate because TX dipoles modulate the concentrations of RNAP in the solution. Comparing our theory with experiments suggests that, in some cases, DNA chain segments are relatively uniformly distributed in the brush, in contrast to the parabolic profile expected for flexible polymer brushes.

  13. Making Sense of Transcription Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sorrells, Trevor R; Johnson, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    When transcription regulatory networks are compared among distantly related eukaryotes, a number of striking similarities are observed: a larger-than-expected number of genes, extensive overlapping connections, and an apparently high degree of functional redundancy. It is often assumed that the complexity of these networks represents optimized solutions, precisely sculpted by natural selection; their common features are often asserted to be adaptive. Here, we discuss support for an alternative hypothesis: the common structural features of transcription networks arise from evolutionary trajectories of “least resistance,” that is, the relative ease by which certain types of network structures are formed during their evolution. PMID:25957680

  14. LOCATION OF BODY FAT AMONG WOMEN WHO ACCURATELY OR INACCURATELY PERCEIVE THEIR WEIGHT STATUS.

    PubMed

    Rote, Aubrianne E; Klos, Lori A; Swartz, Ann M

    2015-10-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated location of body fat, with specific focus on abdominal fat, among normal weight and overweight women who accurately or inaccurately perceived their weight status. Young, adult women (N = 120; M age = 19.5 yr., SD = 1.2) were asked to classify their weight status using the Self-Classified Weight subscale from the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire. Actual weight status was operationalized via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Overweight women who thought they were normal weight had an average of 19 pounds more fat than normal weight women with 1.5 pounds of excess abdominal fat. Interventions to raise awareness among overweight women unaware of their fat level are warranted. However, these interventions should balance consideration of potential detriments to body image among these women. PMID:26474442

  15. Simultaneous Profiling of 194 Distinct Receptor Transcripts in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Byong H.; Jensen, Karin J.; Hatch, Jaime A.; Janes, Kevin A.

    2013-01-01

    Many signal transduction cascades are initiated by transmembrane receptors with the presence or absence and abundance of receptors dictating cellular responsiveness. Here, we provide a validated array of quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) reagents for high-throughput profiling of the presence and relative abundance of transcripts for 194 transmembrane receptors in the human genome. We found that the qRT-PCR array had greater sensitivity and specificity for the detected receptor transcript profiles compared to conventional oligonucleotide microarrays or exon microarrays. The qRT-PCR array also distinguished functional receptor presence versus absence more accurately than deep sequencing of adenylated RNA species, RNA-seq. By applying qRT-PCR-based receptor transcript profiling to 40 human cell lines representing four main tissues (pancreas, skin, breast, and colon), we identified clusters of cell lines with enhanced signaling capabilities and revealed a role for receptor silencing in defining tissue lineage. Ectopic expression of the interleukin 10 (IL-10) receptor encoding gene IL10RA in melanoma cells engaged an IL-10 autocrine loop not otherwise present in this cell type, which altered signaling, gene expression, and cellular responses to proinflammatory stimuli. Our array provides a rapid, inexpensive, and convenient means for assigning a receptor signature to any human cell or tissue type. PMID:23921087

  16. Uncovering ancient transcription systems with a novel evolutionary indicator

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Naruhiko; Senda, Toshiya; Horikoshi, Masami

    2016-01-01

    TBP and TFIIB are evolutionarily conserved transcription initiation factors in archaea and eukaryotes. Information about their ancestral genes would be expected to provide insight into the origin of the RNA polymerase II-type transcription apparatus. In obtaining such information, the nucleotide sequences of current genes of both archaea and eukaryotes should be included in the analysis. However, the present methods of evolutionary analysis require that a subset of the genes should be excluded as an outer group. To overcome this limitation, we propose an innovative concept for evolutionary analysis that does not require an outer group. This approach utilizes the similarity in intramolecular direct repeats present in TBP and TFIIB as an evolutionary measure revealing the degree of similarity between the present offspring genes and their ancestors. Information on the properties of the ancestors and the order of emergence of TBP and TFIIB was also revealed. These findings imply that, for evolutionarily early transcription systems billions of years ago, interaction of RNA polymerase II with transcription initiation factors and the regulation of its enzymatic activity was required prior to the accurate positioning of the enzyme. Our approach provides a new way to discuss mechanistic and system evolution in a quantitative manner. PMID:27307191

  17. Accurate quantification of episomal HIV-1 two-long terminal repeat circles by use of optimized DNA isolation and droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Malatinkova, Eva; Kiselinova, Maja; Bonczkowski, Pawel; Trypsteen, Wim; Messiaen, Peter; Vermeire, Jolien; Verhasselt, Bruno; Vervisch, Karen; Vandekerckhove, Linos; De Spiegelaere, Ward

    2015-02-01

    Episomal HIV-1 two-long terminal repeat (2-LTR) circles are considered markers for ongoing viral replication. Two sample processing procedures were compared to accurately quantify 2-LTR in patients by using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Here, we show that plasmid isolation with a spiked non-HIV plasmid for normalization enables more accurate 2-LTR quantification than genomic DNA isolation.

  18. Normalizing Catastrophe: An Educational Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jickling, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Processes of normalizing assumptions and values have been the subjects of theoretical framing and critique for several decades now. Critique has often been tied to issues of environmental sustainability and social justice. Now, in an era of global warming, there is a rising concern that the results of normalizing of present values could be…

  19. Rational Normalization of Concentration Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonckaert, P.; Egghe, L.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses normalization features of good concentration measures and extends the range of values of concentration measures that are population-size-independent. Rational normalization is described, and mathematical formulas for the coefficient of variation, Pratt's measure, the Gini index, Theil's measure, and Atkinson's indices are explained. (14…

  20. Deformation associated with continental normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resor, Phillip G.

    Deformation associated with normal fault earthquakes and geologic structures provide insights into the seismic cycle as it unfolds over time scales from seconds to millions of years. Improved understanding of normal faulting will lead to more accurate seismic hazard assessments and prediction of associated structures. High-precision aftershock locations for the 1995 Kozani-Grevena earthquake (Mw 6.5), Greece image a segmented master fault and antithetic faults. This three-dimensional fault geometry is typical of normal fault systems mapped from outcrop or interpreted from reflection seismic data and illustrates the importance of incorporating three-dimensional fault geometry in mechanical models. Subsurface fault slip associated with the Kozani-Grevena and 1999 Hector Mine (Mw 7.1) earthquakes is modeled using a new method for slip inversion on three-dimensional fault surfaces. Incorporation of three-dimensional fault geometry improves the fit to the geodetic data while honoring aftershock distributions and surface ruptures. GPS Surveying of deformed bedding surfaces associated with normal faulting in the western Grand Canyon reveals patterns of deformation that are similar to those observed by interferometric satellite radar interferometry (InSAR) for the Kozani Grevena earthquake with a prominent down-warp in the hanging wall and a lesser up-warp in the footwall. However, deformation associated with the Kozani-Grevena earthquake extends ˜20 km from the fault surface trace, while the folds in the western Grand Canyon only extend 500 m into the footwall and 1500 m into the hanging wall. A comparison of mechanical and kinematic models illustrates advantages of mechanical models in exploring normal faulting processes including incorporation of both deformation and causative forces, and the opportunity to incorporate more complex fault geometry and constitutive properties. Elastic models with antithetic or synthetic faults or joints in association with a master

  1. Managing incontinence: women's normalizing strategies.

    PubMed

    Skoner, M M; Haylor, M J

    1993-01-01

    Women's strategies for managing urinary incontinence were examined in a grounded-theory study. The women's basic social concern was dealing with incontinence in a manner that enabled them to feel normal. Feeling normal meant being able to do what they wanted to do and needed to do to have a normal life-style as they perceived it. This goal was accomplished by normalizing incontinence and its management. Normalization was achieved by directing its course through self-management, accounting for it in terms of personal history and life experiences, and delaying medical counsel. These strategies are described. The findings provide fresh insights about women's response to incontinence and their practice of self-managing its consequences. PMID:8138472

  2. Dependence of Enhancer-Mediated Transcription of the Immunoglobulin μ Gene on Nuclear Matrix Attachment Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrester, William C.; van Genderen, Courtney; Jenuwein, Thomas; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    1994-08-01

    Transcription of the immunoglobulin μ heavy chain locus is regulated by an intronic enhancer that is flanked on both sides by nuclear matrix attachment regions (MARs). These MARs have now been shown to be essential for transcription of a rearranged μ gene in transgenic B lymphocytes, but they were not required in stably transfected tissue culture cells. Normal rates of transcriptional initiation at a variable region promoter and the formation of an extended deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I)-sensitive chromatin domain were dependent on MARs, although DNase I hypersensitivity at the enhancer was detected in the absence of MARs. Thus, transcriptional activation of the μ gene during normal lymphoid development requires a synergistic collaboration between the enhancer and flanking MARs.

  3. Accurate description of calcium solvation in concentrated aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Kohagen, Miriam; Mason, Philip E; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-07-17

    Calcium is one of the biologically most important ions; however, its accurate description by classical molecular dynamics simulations is complicated by strong electrostatic and polarization interactions with surroundings due to its divalent nature. Here, we explore the recently suggested approach for effectively accounting for polarization effects via ionic charge rescaling and develop a new and accurate parametrization of the calcium dication. Comparison to neutron scattering and viscosity measurements demonstrates that our model allows for an accurate description of concentrated aqueous calcium chloride solutions. The present model should find broad use in efficient and accurate modeling of calcium in aqueous environments, such as those encountered in biological and technological applications.

  4. Genomewide Identification of Genes Under Directional Selection: Gene Transcription QST Scan in Diverging Atlantic Salmon Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Roberge, C.; Guderley, H.; Bernatchez, L.

    2007-01-01

    Evolutionary genomics has benefited from methods that allow identifying evolutionarily important genomic regions on a genomewide scale, including genome scans and QTL mapping. Recently, genomewide scanning by means of microarrays has permitted assessing gene transcription differences among species or populations. However, the identification of differentially transcribed genes does not in itself suffice to measure the role of selection in driving evolutionary changes in gene transcription. Here, we propose and apply a “transcriptome scan” approach to investigating the role of selection in shaping differential profiles of gene transcription among populations. We compared the genomewide transcription levels between two Atlantic salmon subpopulations that have been diverging for only six generations. Following assessment of normality and unimodality on a gene-per-gene basis, the additive genetic basis of gene transcription was estimated using the animal model. Gene transcription h2 estimates were significant for 1044 (16%) of all detected cDNA clones. In an approach analogous to that of genome scans, we used the distribution of the QST values estimated from intra- and intersubpopulation additive genetic components of the transcription profiles to identify 16 outlier genes (average QST estimate = 0.11) whose transcription levels are likely to have evolved under the influence of directional selection within six generations only. Overall, this study contributes both empirically and methodologically to the quantitative genetic exploration of gene transcription data. PMID:17720934

  5. Transcription factor-based biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, Jeffrey A; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

  6. Transcriptional networks in plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Kenichi; Somssich, Imre E

    2015-05-01

    Next to numerous abiotic stresses, plants are constantly exposed to a variety of pathogens within their environment. Thus, their ability to survive and prosper during the course of evolution was strongly dependent on adapting efficient strategies to perceive and to respond to such potential threats. It is therefore not surprising that modern plants have a highly sophisticated immune repertoire consisting of diverse signal perception and intracellular signaling pathways. This signaling network is intricate and deeply interconnected, probably reflecting the diverse lifestyles and infection strategies used by the multitude of invading phytopathogens. Moreover it allows signal communication between developmental and defense programs thereby ensuring that plant growth and fitness are not significantly retarded. How plants integrate and prioritize the incoming signals and how this information is transduced to enable appropriate immune responses is currently a major research area. An important finding has been that pathogen-triggered cellular responses involve massive transcriptional reprogramming within the host. Additional key observations emerging from such studies are that transcription factors (TFs) are often sites of signal convergence and that signal-regulated TFs act in concert with other context-specific TFs and transcriptional co-regulators to establish sensory transcription regulatory networks required for plant immunity.

  7. Epigenetic differences in normal colon mucosa of cancer patients suggest altered dietary metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Silviera, Matthew L; Smith, Brian P; Powell, Jasmine; Sapienza, Carmen

    2012-03-01

    We have compared DNA methylation in normal colon mucosa between patients with colon cancer and patients without cancer. We identified significant differences in methylation between the two groups at 114 to 874 genes. The majority of the differences are in pathways involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids. We also compared transcript levels of genes in the insulin signaling pathway. We found that the mucosa of patients with cancer had significantly higher transcript levels of several hormones regulating glucose metabolism and significantly lower transcript levels of a glycolytic enzyme and a key regulator of glucose and lipid homeostasis. These differences suggest that the normal colon mucosa of patients with cancer metabolizes dietary components differently than the colon mucosa of controls. Because the differences identified are present in morphologically normal tissue, they may be diagnostic of colon cancer and/or prognostic of colon cancer susceptibility.

  8. 47 CFR 0.607 - Transcript, recording or minutes; availability to the public.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... minutes shall fully and clearly describe all matters discussed and shall provide a full and accurate... that file if, after the meeting, the responsible Bureau or Office Chief determines, in light of the... information concerning the matters discussed no longer pertains. Transcripts placed in the public file...

  9. MLX Is a Transcriptional Repressor of the Mammalian Golgi Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Mai; Sasaki-Osugi, Kanae; Oku, Masaya; Sawaguchi, Shogo; Tanakura, Soichiro; Kawai, Yumeto; Wakabayashi, Sadao; Yoshida, Hiderou

    2016-07-30

    The Golgi stress response is a homeostatic mechanism that controls the capacity of the Golgi apparatus in accordance with cellular demands. When the capacity of the Golgi apparatus becomes insufficient (Golgi stress), transcription levels of Golgi-related genes encoding glycosylation enzymes, a Golgi structural protein, and components of vesicular transport are upregulated through a common cis-acting enhancer-the Golgi apparatus stress response element (GASE). Here, we identified the transcription factor MLX as a GASE-binding protein. MLX resides in the cytoplasm and does not bind to GASE in normal growth conditions, whereas MLX translocates into the nucleus and specifically binds to GASE in response to Golgi stress. Suppression of MLX expression increased transcriptional induction of target genes of the Golgi stress response, whereas overexpression of MLX reduced GASE-binding of TFE3 as well as transcriptional induction from GASE, suggesting that MLX is a transcriptional repressor of the mammalian Golgi stress response.

  10. A Simple yet Accurate Method for Students to Determine Asteroid Rotation Periods from Fragmented Light Curve Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beare, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    Professional astronomers use specialized software not normally available to students to determine the rotation periods of asteroids from fragmented light curve data. This paper describes a simple yet accurate method based on Microsoft Excel[R] that enables students to find periods in asteroid light curve and other discontinuous time series data of…

  11. Investigating transcription reinitiation through in vitro approaches.

    PubMed

    Dieci, Giorgio; Fermi, Beatrice; Bosio, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    By influencing the number of RNA molecules repeatedly synthesized from the same gene, the control of transcription reinitiation has the potential to shape the transcriptome. Transcription reinitiation mechanisms have been mainly addressed in vitro, through approaches based on both crude and reconstituted systems. These studies support the notion that transcription reinitiation and its regulation rely on dedicated networks of molecular interactions within transcription machineries. At the same time, comparison with in vivo transcription rates suggests that additional mechanisms, factors and conditions must exist in the nucleus, whose biochemical elucidation is a fascinating challenge for future in vitro transcription studies.

  12. Transcription Blockage Leads to New Beginnings

    PubMed Central

    Andrade-Lima, Leonardo C.; Veloso, Artur; Ljungman, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Environmental agents are constantly challenging cells by damaging DNA, leading to the blockage of transcription elongation. How do cells deal with transcription-blockage and how is transcription restarted after the blocking lesions are removed? Here we review the processes responsible for the removal of transcription-blocking lesions, as well as mechanisms of transcription restart. We also discuss recent data suggesting that blocked RNA polymerases may not resume transcription from the site of the lesion following its removal but, rather, are forced to start over from the beginning of genes. PMID:26197343

  13. [Transcripts of satellite DNA in blood plasma: probable markers of tumor growth].

    PubMed

    Kondratova, V N; Botezatu, I V; Shelepov, V P; Likhtenshtein, A V

    2014-01-01

    A recent study of human normal and tumor tissues revealed a high transcriptional activity of pericentromeric satellite DNA repeats (they produce half of all transcripts in tumor cells that is many times higher than in normal ones). It was found also that the two subtypes of satellite DNA (HSATII and GSATII) are transcribed reciprocally, i.e. there is a sharp prevalence of HSATII transcription in tumors, while GSATII transcription prevails in the corresponding normal tissues. As different RNAs are present in blood plasma, and some of them serve as effectivetumor markers, we attempted for the first time to evaluate satellite HSATII and GSATII RNAs in the blood plasma of healthy donors and cancer patients. The RT-PCR protocol designed for this purpose allowed us to detect transcripts of both HSATII and GSATII repeats. As it has been shown, HSATII transcripts are more abundant than GSATII ones in plasma of healthy donors and vice versa in plasma of cancer patients; these ratios being diametrically opposed to those that exist within the cells. Some suggestions concerning origins of circulating satellite RNAs and their probable role as tumor markers are discussed.

  14. Tube dimpling tool assures accurate dip-brazed joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Heisman, R. M.

    1968-01-01

    Portable, hand-held dimpling tool assures accurate brazed joints between tubes of different diameters. Prior to brazing, the tool performs precise dimpling and nipple forming and also provides control and accurate measuring of the height of nipples and depth of dimples so formed.

  15. 31 CFR 205.24 - How are accurate estimates maintained?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are accurate estimates maintained... Treasury-State Agreement § 205.24 How are accurate estimates maintained? (a) If a State has knowledge that an estimate does not reasonably correspond to the State's cash needs for a Federal assistance...

  16. 78 FR 34604 - Submitting Complete and Accurate Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 50 Submitting Complete and Accurate Information AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... accurate information as would a licensee or an applicant for a license.'' DATES: Submit comments by August... may submit comments by any of the following methods (unless this document describes a different...

  17. Suitable models for face geometry normalization in facial expression recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Hamid; Raie, Abolghasem A.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, facial expression recognition has attracted much attention in machine vision research because of its various applications. Accordingly, many facial expression recognition systems have been proposed. However, the majority of existing systems suffer from a critical problem: geometric variability. It directly affects the performance of geometric feature-based facial expression recognition approaches. Furthermore, it is a crucial challenge in appearance feature-based techniques. This variability appears in both neutral faces and facial expressions. Appropriate face geometry normalization can improve the accuracy of each facial expression recognition system. Therefore, this paper proposes different geometric models or shapes for normalization. Face geometry normalization removes geometric variability of facial images and consequently, appearance feature extraction methods can be accurately utilized to represent facial images. Thus, some expression-based geometric models are proposed for facial image normalization. Next, local binary patterns and local phase quantization are used for appearance feature extraction. A combination of an effective geometric normalization with accurate appearance representations results in more than a 4% accuracy improvement compared to several state-of-the-arts in facial expression recognition. Moreover, utilizing the model of facial expressions which have larger mouth and eye region sizes gives higher accuracy due to the importance of these regions in facial expression.

  18. Frequency of fragile X chromosome in normal females.

    PubMed

    Abuelo, D; Castree, K; Pueschel, S; Padre-Mendoza, T; Zolnierz, K

    1985-08-01

    Because of the ambiguities in diagnosing carriers of the fragile X syndrome, we studied thirty-six normal females to determine whether the fragile site at Xq27 can be seen in noncarrier females and at what frequency. A fragile site at Xq27 was identified in one out of thirty-six females, occurring at a frequency of 0.5% in her peripheral lymphocytes. We conclude that the fragile Xq27 site occurs only rarely in noncarrier females and that each laboratory should determine its own baseline frequencies of fragile X in order to most accurately distinguish between normal and carrier women.

  19. Steroid Receptor Coactivator-2 Is a Dual Regulator of Cardiac Transcription Factor Function*

    PubMed Central

    Reineke, Erin L.; Benham, Ashley; Soibam, Benjamin; Stashi, Erin; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Entman, Mark L.; Schwartz, Robert J.; O'Malley, Bert W.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated the potential role of steroid receptor coactivator-2 (SRC-2) as a co-regulator in the transcription of critical molecules modulating cardiac function and metabolism in normal and stressed hearts. The present study seeks to extend the previous information by demonstrating SRC-2 fulfills this role by serving as a critical coactivator for the transcription and activity of critical transcription factors known to control cardiac growth and metabolism as well as in their downstream signaling. This knowledge broadens our understanding of the mechanism by which SRC-2 acts in normal and stressed hearts and allows further investigation of the transcriptional modifications mediating different types and degrees of cardiac stress. Moreover, the genetic manipulation of SRC-2 in this study is specific for the heart and thereby eliminating potential indirect effects of SRC-2 deletion in other organs. We have shown that SRC-2 is critical to transcriptional control modulated by MEF2, GATA-4, and Tbx5, thereby enhancing gene expression associated with cardiac growth. Additionally, we describe SRC-2 as a novel regulator of PPARα expression, thus controlling critical steps in metabolic gene expression. We conclude that through regulation of cardiac transcription factor expression and activity, SRC-2 is a critical transcriptional regulator of genes important for cardiac growth, structure, and metabolism, three of the main pathways altered during the cardiac stress response. PMID:24811170

  20. Steroid receptor coactivator-2 is a dual regulator of cardiac transcription factor function.

    PubMed

    Reineke, Erin L; Benham, Ashley; Soibam, Benjamin; Stashi, Erin; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Entman, Mark L; Schwartz, Robert J; O'Malley, Bert W

    2014-06-20

    We have previously demonstrated the potential role of steroid receptor coactivator-2 (SRC-2) as a co-regulator in the transcription of critical molecules modulating cardiac function and metabolism in normal and stressed hearts. The present study seeks to extend the previous information by demonstrating SRC-2 fulfills this role by serving as a critical coactivator for the transcription and activity of critical transcription factors known to control cardiac growth and metabolism as well as in their downstream signaling. This knowledge broadens our understanding of the mechanism by which SRC-2 acts in normal and stressed hearts and allows further investigation of the transcriptional modifications mediating different types and degrees of cardiac stress. Moreover, the genetic manipulation of SRC-2 in this study is specific for the heart and thereby eliminating potential indirect effects of SRC-2 deletion in other organs. We have shown that SRC-2 is critical to transcriptional control modulated by MEF2, GATA-4, and Tbx5, thereby enhancing gene expression associated with cardiac growth. Additionally, we describe SRC-2 as a novel regulator of PPARα expression, thus controlling critical steps in metabolic gene expression. We conclude that through regulation of cardiac transcription factor expression and activity, SRC-2 is a critical transcriptional regulator of genes important for cardiac growth, structure, and metabolism, three of the main pathways altered during the cardiac stress response. PMID:24811170

  1. Normal, nearsightedness, and farsightedness (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... it. A person with normal vision can see objects clearly near and faraway. Nearsightedness results in blurred ... or contact lenses. A nearsighted person sees near objects clearly, while objects in the distance are blurred. ...

  2. Retinoic acid receptors and GATA transcription factors activate the transcription of the human lecithin:retinol acyltransferase gene

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Kun; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2008-01-01

    Lecithin retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) catalyzes the esterification of retinol (vitamin A). Retinyl esters and LRAT protein levels are reduced in many types of cancer cells. We present data that both the LRAT and retinoic acid receptor β2 (RARβ2) mRNA levels in the human prostate cancer cell line PC-3 are lower than those in cultured normal human prostate epithelial cells (PrEC). The activity of the human LRAT promoter (2.0 kb) driving a luciferase reporter gene in PC-3 cells is less than 40% of that in PrEC cells. Retinoic acid (RA) treatment increased this LRAT promoter-luciferase activity in PrEC cells, but not in PC-3 cells. Deletion of various regions of the human LRAT promoter demonstrated that a 172-bp proximal promoter region is essential for LRAT transcription and confers RA responsiveness in PrEC cells. This 172-bp region, contained within the 186 bp pLRAT/luciferase construct, has five putative GATA binding sites. Co-transfection of RARβ2 or RARγ and the transcription factor GATA-4 increased LRAT (pLRAT186) promoter activity in both PrEC and PC-3 cells. In addition, we found that both retinoic acid and retinol induced transcripts for the STRA6 gene, which encodes a membrane receptor involved in retinol (vitamin A) uptake, in PrEC cells but not in PC-3 cells. In summary, our data show that the transcriptional regulation of the human LRAT gene is aberrant in human prostate cancer cells and that GATA transcription factors are involved in the transcriptional activation of LRAT in PrEC cells. PMID:18652909

  3. The Transcriptional Cascade in the Heat Stress Response of Arabidopsis Is Strictly Regulated at the Level of Transcription Factor Expression.

    PubMed

    Ohama, Naohiko; Kusakabe, Kazuya; Mizoi, Junya; Zhao, Huimei; Kidokoro, Satoshi; Koizumi, Shinya; Takahashi, Fuminori; Ishida, Tetsuya; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2016-01-01

    Group A1 heat shock transcription factors (HsfA1s) are the master regulators of the heat stress response (HSR) in plants. Upon heat shock, HsfA1s trigger a transcriptional cascade that is composed of many transcription factors. Despite the importance of HsfA1s and their downstream transcriptional cascade in the acquisition of thermotolerance in plants, the molecular basis of their activation remains poorly understood. Here, domain analysis of HsfA1d, one of several HsfA1s in Arabidopsis thaliana, demonstrated that the central region of HsfA1d is a key regulatory domain that represses HsfA1d transactivation activity through interaction with HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN70 (HSP70) and HSP90. We designated this region as the temperature-dependent repression (TDR) domain. We found that HSP70 dissociates from HsfA1d in response to heat shock and that the dissociation is likely regulated by an as yet unknown activation mechanism, such as HsfA1d phosphorylation. Overexpression of constitutively active HsfA1d that lacked the TDR domain induced expression of heat shock proteins in the absence of heat stress, thereby conferring potent thermotolerance on the overexpressors. However, transcriptome analysis of the overexpressors demonstrated that the constitutively active HsfA1d could not trigger the complete transcriptional cascade under normal conditions, thereby indicating that other factors are necessary to fully induce the HSR. These complex regulatory mechanisms related to the transcriptional cascade may enable plants to respond resiliently to various heat stress conditions. PMID:26715648

  4. PyVCI: A flexible open-source code for calculating accurate molecular infrared spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibaev, Marat; Crittenden, Deborah L.

    2016-06-01

    The PyVCI program package is a general purpose open-source code for simulating accurate molecular spectra, based upon force field expansions of the potential energy surface in normal mode coordinates. It includes harmonic normal coordinate analysis and vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) algorithms, implemented primarily in Python for accessibility but with time-consuming routines written in C. Coriolis coupling terms may be optionally included in the vibrational Hamiltonian. Non-negligible VCI matrix elements are stored in sparse matrix format to alleviate the diagonalization problem. CPU and memory requirements may be further controlled by algorithmic choices and/or numerical screening procedures, and recommended values are established by benchmarking using a test set of 44 molecules for which accurate analytical potential energy surfaces are available. Force fields in normal mode coordinates are obtained from the PyPES library of high quality analytical potential energy surfaces (to 6th order) or by numerical differentiation of analytic second derivatives generated using the GAMESS quantum chemical program package (to 4th order).

  5. Fast and accurate line scanner based on white light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambelet, Patrick; Moosburger, Rudolf

    2013-04-01

    White-light interferometry is a highly accurate technology for 3D measurements. The principle is widely utilized in surface metrology instruments but rarely adopted for in-line inspection systems. The main challenges for rolling out inspection systems based on white-light interferometry to the production floor are its sensitivity to environmental vibrations and relatively long measurement times: a large quantity of data needs to be acquired and processed in order to obtain a single topographic measurement. Heliotis developed a smart-pixel CMOS camera (lock-in camera) which is specially suited for white-light interferometry. The demodulation of the interference signal is treated at the level of the pixel which typically reduces the acquisition data by one orders of magnitude. Along with the high bandwidth of the dedicated lock-in camera, vertical scan-speeds of more than 40mm/s are reachable. The high scan speed allows for the realization of inspection systems that are rugged against external vibrations as present on the production floor. For many industrial applications such as the inspection of wafer-bumps, surface of mechanical parts and solar-panel, large areas need to be measured. In this case either the instrument or the sample are displaced laterally and several measurements are stitched together. The cycle time of such a system is mostly limited by the stepping time for multiple lateral displacements. A line-scanner based on white light interferometry would eliminate most of the stepping time while maintaining robustness and accuracy. A. Olszak proposed a simple geometry to realize such a lateral scanning interferometer. We demonstrate that such inclined interferometers can benefit significantly from the fast in-pixel demodulation capabilities of the lock-in camera. One drawback of an inclined observation perspective is that its application is limited to objects with scattering surfaces. We therefore propose an alternate geometry where the incident light is

  6. Functionality of Intergenic Transcription: An Evolutionary Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Visagie, Johann; Giger, Thomas; Joerchel, Sabrina; Petzold, Ekkehard; Green, Richard E; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante

    2006-01-01

    Although a large proportion of human transcription occurs outside the boundaries of known genes, the functional significance of this transcription remains unknown. We have compared the expression patterns of known genes as well as intergenic transcripts within the ENCODE regions between humans and chimpanzees in brain, heart, testis, and lymphoblastoid cell lines. We find that intergenic transcripts show patterns of tissue-specific conservation of their expression, which are comparable to exonic transcripts of known genes. This suggests that intergenic transcripts are subject to functional constraints that restrict their rate of evolutionary change as well as putative positive selection to an extent comparable to that of classical protein-coding genes. In brain and testis, we find that part of this intergenic transcription is caused by widespread use of alternative promoters. Further, we find that about half of the expression differences between humans and chimpanzees are due to intergenic transcripts. PMID:17040132

  7. Mechanism of Transcriptional Bursting in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Shasha; Chen, Chongyi; Ge, Hao; Xie, X. Sunney

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Transcription of highly expressed genes has been shown to occur in stochastic bursts. But the origin of such ubiquitous phenomenon has not been understood. Here we present the mechanism in bacteria. We developed a high-throughput in vitro single-molecule assay to follow transcription on individual DNA templates in real time. We showed that positive supercoiling buildup on a DNA segment by transcription slows down transcription elongation and eventually stops transcription initiation. Transcription can be resumed upon gyrase binding to the DNA segment. Furthermore, using single-cell mRNA counting fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we found the extent of transcriptional bursting depends on the intracellular gyrase concentration. Together, these findings prove that transcriptional bursting of highly expressed genes in bacteria is primarily caused by reversible gyrase dissociation from and rebinding to a DNA segment, changing the supercoiling level of the segment. PMID:25036631

  8. Recommendations for Accurate Resolution of Gene and Isoform Allele-Specific Expression in RNA-Seq Data

    PubMed Central

    Wood, David L. A.; Nones, Katia; Steptoe, Anita; Christ, Angelika; Harliwong, Ivon; Newell, Felicity; Bruxner, Timothy J. C.; Miller, David; Cloonan, Nicole; Grimmond, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation modulates gene expression transcriptionally or post-transcriptionally, and can profoundly alter an individual’s phenotype. Measuring allelic differential expression at heterozygous loci within an individual, a phenomenon called allele-specific expression (ASE), can assist in identifying such factors. Massively parallel DNA and RNA sequencing and advances in bioinformatic methodologies provide an outstanding opportunity to measure ASE genome-wide. In this study, matched DNA and RNA sequencing, genotyping arrays and computationally phased haplotypes were integrated to comprehensively and conservatively quantify ASE in a single human brain and liver tissue sample. We describe a methodological evaluation and assessment of common bioinformatic steps for ASE quantification, and recommend a robust approach to accurately measure SNP, gene and isoform ASE through the use of personalized haplotype genome alignment, strict alignment quality control and intragenic SNP aggregation. Our results indicate that accurate ASE quantification requires careful bioinformatic analyses and is adversely affected by sample specific alignment confounders and random sampling even at moderate sequence depths. We identified multiple known and several novel ASE genes in liver, including WDR72, DSP and UBD, as well as genes that contained ASE SNPs with imbalance direction discordant with haplotype phase, explainable by annotated transcript structure, suggesting isoform derived ASE. The methods evaluated in this study will be of use to researchers performing highly conservative quantification of ASE, and the genes and isoforms identified as ASE of interest to researchers studying those loci. PMID:25965996

  9. A multi-radar wireless system for respiratory gating and accurate tumor tracking in lung cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gu, Changzhan; Li, Ruijiang; Jiang, Steve B; Li, Changzhi

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory gating and tumor tracking are two promising motion-adaptive lung cancer treatments, minimizing incidence and severity of normal tissues and precisely delivering radiation dose to the tumor. Accurate respiration measurement is important in respiratory-gated radiotherapy. Conventional gating techniques are either invasive to the body or bring insufficient accuracy and discomfort to the patients. In this paper, we present an accurate noncontact means of measuring respiration for the use in gated lung cancer radiotherapy. We also present an accurate tumor tracking technique for dynamical beam tracking radiotherapy. Two 2.4 GHz miniature radars were used to monitor the chest wall and abdominal movements simultaneously to get high resolution and enhanced parameter identification. Ray tracing technique was used to investigate the impact of antenna size in clinical practice. It is shown that our multiple radar system can reliably measure respiration signals for respiratory gating and accurate tumor tracking in motion-adaptive lung cancer radiotherapy.

  10. Production of the 2400 kb Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene transcript; transcription time and cotranscriptional splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, C.N.; Worton, R.G.

    1994-09-01

    The largest known gene in any organism is the human DMD gene which has 79 exons that span 2400 kb. The extreme nature of the DMD gene raises questions concerning the time required for transcription and whether splicing begins before transcription is complete. DMD gene transcription is induced as cultured human myoblasts differentiate to form multinucleated myotubes, providing a system for studying the kinetics of transcription and splicing. Using quantitative RT-PCR, transcript accumulation was monitored from four different regions within the gene following induction of expression. By comparing the accumulation of transcripts from the 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends of the gene we have shown that approximately 12 hours are required to transcribe 1770 kb of the gene, extrapolating to a time of 16 hours for the transcription unit expressed in muscle. Comparison of accumulation profiles for spliced and total transcript demonstrated that transcripts are spliced at the 5{prime} end before transcription is complete, providing strong evidence for cotranscriptional splicing of DMD gene transcripts. Finally, the rate of transcript accumulation was reduced at the 3{prime} end of the gene relative to the 5{prime} end, perhaps due to premature termination of transcription complexes as they traverse this enormous transcription unit. The lag between transcription initiation and the appearance of complete transcripts could be important in limiting transcript production in dividing cells and to the timing of mRNA appearance in differentiating muscle.

  11. An accurate scheme to solve cluster dynamics equations using a Fokker-Planck approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, T.; Stoltz, G.; Legoll, F.; Monasse, L.

    2016-10-01

    We present a numerical method to accurately simulate particle size distributions within the formalism of rate equation cluster dynamics. This method is based on a discretization of the associated Fokker-Planck equation. We show that particular care has to be taken to discretize the advection part of the Fokker-Planck equation, in order to avoid distortions of the distribution due to numerical diffusion. For this purpose we use the Kurganov-Noelle-Petrova scheme coupled with the monotonicity-preserving reconstruction MP5, which leads to very accurate results. The interest of the method is highlighted in the case of loop coarsening in aluminum. We show that the choice of the models to describe the energetics of loops does not significantly change the normalized loop distribution, while the choice of the models for the absorption coefficients seems to have a significant impact on it.

  12. Reproduction of Hip Offset and Leg Length in Navigated Total Hip Arthroplasty: How Accurate Are We?

    PubMed

    Ellapparadja, Pregash; Mahajan, Vivek; Deakin, Angela H; Deep, Kamal

    2015-06-01

    This study assesses how accurately we can restore hip offset and leg length in navigated total hip arthroplasty (THA). 152 consecutive patients with navigated THA formed the study group. The contra-lateral hip formed control for measuring hip offset and leg length. All radiological measurements were made using Orthoview digital software. In the normal hip offset group, the mean is 75.73 (SD- 8.61). In the reconstructed hip offset group, the mean is 75.35 (SD - 7.48). 95.39% had hip offset within 6 mm of opposite side while 96.04% had leg length restored within 6 mm of contra-lateral side. Equivalence test revealed that the two groups of hip offsets were essentially the same. We conclude that computer navigation can successfully reproduce hip offset and leg length accurately.

  13. Switching on sex: transcriptional regulation of the testis-determining gene Sry

    PubMed Central

    Larney, Christian; Bailey, Timothy L.; Koopman, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian sex determination hinges on the development of ovaries or testes, with testis fate being triggered by the expression of the transcription factor sex-determining region Y (Sry). Reduced or delayed Sry expression impairs testis development, highlighting the importance of its accurate spatiotemporal regulation and implying a potential role for SRY dysregulation in human intersex disorders. Several epigenetic modifiers, transcription factors and kinases are implicated in regulating Sry transcription, but it remains unclear whether or how this farrago of factors acts co-ordinately. Here we review our current understanding of Sry regulation and provide a model that assembles all known regulators into three modules, each converging on a single transcription factor that binds to the Sry promoter. We also discuss potential future avenues for discovering the cis-elements and trans-factors required for Sry regulation. PMID:24866114

  14. Hybridization Histochemistry of Neural Transcripts.

    PubMed

    Young, W Scott; Song, June; Mezey, Éva

    2016-01-01

    Expression of genes is manifested by the production of RNA transcripts within cells. Hybridization histochemistry (or in situ hybridization) permits localization of these transcripts with cellular resolution or better. Furthermore, the relative amounts of transcripts detected in different tissues or in the same tissues in different states (e.g., physiological or developmental) may be quantified. This unit describes hybridization histochemical techniques using either oligodeoxynucleotide probes (see Basic Protocols 1 and 2, Alternate Protocol 1) or RNA probes (riboprobes; see Basic Protocols 3 and 5). These methods include a more recent approach using commercially available sets of oligodeoxynucleotide pairs for colorimetric and fluorescent detection (see Basic Protocol 2), as well as a method for detection of the Y chromosome using either mouse or human riboprobes (see Basic Protocol 5). Additional methods include colorimetric detection (see Basic Protocol 4) and tyramide signal amplification (TSA) of digoxigenin-labeled probes (see Alternate Protocol 2), and autoradiographic detection of radiolabeled probes (see Basic Protocol 6). Finally, methods are provided for labeling oligodeoxynucleotide (see Support Protocol 1) and RNA (see Support Protocol 2) probes, and verifying the probes by northern analysis (see Support Protocol 3). PMID:27063785

  15. Mutual interdependence of splicing and transcription elongation.

    PubMed

    Brzyżek, Grzegorz; Świeżewski, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    Transcription and splicing are intrinsically linked, as splicing needs a pre-mRNA substrate to commence. The more nuanced view is that the rate of transcription contributes to splicing regulation. On the other hand there is accumulating evidence that splicing has an active role in controlling transcription elongation by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). We briefly review those mechanisms and propose a unifying model where splicing controls transcription elongation to provide an optimal timing for successive rounds of splicing.

  16. Single-site transcription rates through fitting of ensemble-averaged data from fluorescence recovery after photobleaching: A fat-tailed distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Liat; Kepten, Eldad; Yunger, Sharon; Shav-Tal, Yaron; Garini, Yuval

    2015-09-01

    The stochastic process of gene expression is commonly controlled at the level of RNA transcription. The synthesis of messenger RNA (mRNA) is a multistep process, performed by RNA polymerase II and controlled by many transcription factors. Although mRNA transcription is intensively studied, real-time in vivo dynamic rates of a single transcribing polymerase are still not available. A popular method for examining transcription kinetics is the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) approach followed by kinetic modeling. Such analysis has yielded a surprisingly broad range of transcription rates. As transcription depends on many variables such as the chromatin state, binding and unbinding of transcription factors, and cell phase, transcription rates are stochastic variables. Thus, the distribution of rates is expected to follow Poissonian statistics, which does not coincide with the wide range of transcription rate results. Here we present an approach for analyzing FRAP data for single-gene transcription. We find that the transcription dynamics of a single gene can be described with a constant rate for all transcribing polymerases, while cell population transcription rates follow a fat-tailed distribution. This distribution suggests a larger probability for extreme rates than would be implied by normal distribution. Our analysis supports experimental results of transcription from two different promoters, and it explains the puzzling observation of extreme average rate values of transcription.

  17. Cell proliferation in normal epidermis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, G.D.; McCullough, J.L.; Ross, P.

    1984-06-01

    A detailed examination of cell proliferation kinetics in normal human epidermis is presented. Using tritiated thymidine with autoradiographic techniques, proliferative and differentiated cell kinetics are defined and interrelated. The proliferative compartment of normal epidermis has a cell cycle duration (Tc) of 311 h derived from 3 components: the germinative labeling index (LI), the duration of DNA synthesis (ts), and the growth fraction (GF). The germinative LI is 2.7% +/- 1.2 and ts is 14 h, the latter obtained from a composite fraction of labeled mitoses curve obtained from 11 normal subjects. The GF obtained from the literature and from human skin xenografts to nude mice is estimated to be 60%. Normal-appearing epidermis from patients with psoriasis appears to have a higher proliferation rate. The mean LI is 4.2% +/- 0.9, approximately 50% greater than in normal epidermis. Absolute cell kinetic values for this tissue, however, cannot yet be calculated for lack of other information on ts and GF. A kinetic model for epidermal cell renewal in normal epidermis is described that interrelates the rate of birth/entry, transit, and/or loss of keratinocytes in the 3 epidermal compartments: proliferative, viable differentiated (stratum malpighii), and stratum corneum. Expected kinetic homeostasis in the epidermis is confirmed by the very similar ''turnover'' rates in each of the compartments that are, respectively, 1246, 1417, and 1490 cells/day/mm2 surface area. The mean epidermal turnover time of the entire tissue is 39 days. The Tc of 311 h in normal cells in 8-fold longer than the psoriatic Tc of 36 h and is necessary for understanding the hyperproliferative pathophysiologic process in psoriasis.

  18. Normalization of energy-dependent gamma survey data.

    PubMed

    Whicker, Randy; Chambers, Douglas

    2015-05-01

    Instruments and methods for normalization of energy-dependent gamma radiation survey data to a less energy-dependent basis of measurement are evaluated based on relevant field data collected at 15 different sites across the western United States along with a site in Mongolia. Normalization performance is assessed relative to measurements with a high-pressure ionization chamber (HPIC) due to its "flat" energy response and accurate measurement of the true exposure rate from both cosmic and terrestrial radiation. While analytically ideal for normalization applications, cost and practicality disadvantages have increased demand for alternatives to the HPIC. Regression analysis on paired measurements between energy-dependent sodium iodide (NaI) scintillation detectors (5-cm by 5-cm crystal dimensions) and the HPIC revealed highly consistent relationships among sites not previously impacted by radiological contamination (natural sites). A resulting generalized data normalization factor based on the average sensitivity of NaI detectors to naturally occurring terrestrial radiation (0.56 nGy hHPIC per nGy hNaI), combined with the calculated site-specific estimate of cosmic radiation, produced reasonably accurate predictions of HPIC readings at natural sites. Normalization against two to potential alternative instruments (a tissue-equivalent plastic scintillator and energy-compensated NaI detector) did not perform better than the sensitivity adjustment approach at natural sites. Each approach produced unreliable estimates of HPIC readings at radiologically impacted sites, though normalization against the plastic scintillator or energy-compensated NaI detector can address incompatibilities between different energy-dependent instruments with respect to estimation of soil radionuclide levels. The appropriate data normalization method depends on the nature of the site, expected duration of the project, survey objectives, and considerations of cost and practicality.

  19. Accurate calculation of diffraction-limited encircled and ensquared energy.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Torben B

    2015-09-01

    Mathematical properties of the encircled and ensquared energy functions for the diffraction-limited point-spread function (PSF) are presented. These include power series and a set of linear differential equations that facilitate the accurate calculation of these functions. Asymptotic expressions are derived that provide very accurate estimates for the relative amount of energy in the diffraction PSF that fall outside a square or rectangular large detector. Tables with accurate values of the encircled and ensquared energy functions are also presented. PMID:26368873

  20. Interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription elongation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling has been shown to be an important regulator of transcription that is broadly present in the cell. Here we review experimental work which shows that RNA polymerase is a powerful torsional motor that can alter DNA topology and structure, and DNA supercoiling in turn directly affects transcription elongation.

  1. TAF7: traffic controller in transcription initiation.

    PubMed

    Gegonne, Anne; Devaiah, Ballachanda N; Singer, Dinah S

    2013-01-01

    TAF7, a component of the TFIID complex, controls the first steps of transcription. It interacts with and regulates the enzymatic activities of transcription factors that regulate RNA polymerase II progression. Its diverse functions in transcription initiation are consistent with its essential role in cell proliferation.

  2. The great repression: chromatin and cryptic transcription.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Bianca P; Fischer, Tamás

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic chromatin structure is essential in correctly defining transcription units. Impairing this structure can activate cryptic promoters, and lead to the accumulation of aberrant RNA transcripts. Here we discuss critical pathways that are responsible for the repression of cryptic transcription and the maintenance of genome integrity.

  3. Electronic Transcripts: Past, Present, and Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Sarah; Hannah, Andrew; Stones, Dave; Morley, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Electronic transcripts are no longer a concept awaiting definition. They are here to stay. Although paper transcripts remain the standard--at least in terms of volume--an ever-increasing number and eventual majority of students and alumni will expect if not require electronic transcripts. College registrars and admissions officers' obligation to…

  4. Transcriptional Regulation and its Misregulation in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tong Ihn; Young, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    The gene expression programs that establish and maintain specific cell states in humans are controlled by thousands of transcription factors, cofactors and chromatin regulators. Misregulation of these gene expression programs can cause a broad range of diseases. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of transcriptional regulation and discuss how these have provided new insights into transcriptional misregulation in disease. PMID:23498934

  5. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  6. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  7. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  8. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  9. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  10. Evaluation of Suitable Reference Genes for Normalization of qPCR Gene Expression Studies in Brinjal (Solanum melongena L.) During Fruit Developmental Stages.

    PubMed

    Kanakachari, Mogilicherla; Solanke, Amolkumar U; Prabhakaran, Narayanasamy; Ahmad, Israr; Dhandapani, Gurusamy; Jayabalan, Narayanasamy; Kumar, Polumetla Ananda

    2016-02-01

    Brinjal/eggplant/aubergine is one of the major solanaceous vegetable crops. Recent availability of genome information greatly facilitates the fundamental research on brinjal. Gene expression patterns during different stages of fruit development can provide clues towards the understanding of its biological functions. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) has become one of the most widely used methods for rapid and accurate quantification of gene expression. However, its success depends on the use of a suitable reference gene for data normalization. For qPCR analysis, a single reference gene is not universally suitable for all experiments. Therefore, reference gene validation is a crucial step. Suitable reference genes for qPCR analysis of brinjal fruit development have not been investigated so far. In this study, we have selected 21 candidate reference genes from the Brinjal (Solanum melongena) Plant Gene Indices database (compbio.dfci.harvard.edu/tgi/plant.html) and studied their expression profiles by qPCR during six different fruit developmental stages (0, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 days post anthesis) along with leaf samples of the Pusa Purple Long (PPL) variety. To evaluate the stability of gene expression, geNorm and NormFinder analytical softwares were used. geNorm identified SAND (SAND family protein) and TBP (TATA binding protein) as the best pairs of reference genes in brinjal fruit development. The results showed that for brinjal fruit development, individual or a combination of reference genes should be selected for data normalization. NormFinder identified Expressed gene (expressed sequence) as the best single reference gene in brinjal fruit development. In this study, we have identified and validated for the first time reference genes to provide accurate transcript normalization and quantification at various fruit developmental stages of brinjal which can also be useful for gene expression studies in other Solanaceae plant species.

  11. Evaluation of Suitable Reference Genes for Normalization of qPCR Gene Expression Studies in Brinjal (Solanum melongena L.) During Fruit Developmental Stages.

    PubMed

    Kanakachari, Mogilicherla; Solanke, Amolkumar U; Prabhakaran, Narayanasamy; Ahmad, Israr; Dhandapani, Gurusamy; Jayabalan, Narayanasamy; Kumar, Polumetla Ananda

    2016-02-01

    Brinjal/eggplant/aubergine is one of the major solanaceous vegetable crops. Recent availability of genome information greatly facilitates the fundamental research on brinjal. Gene expression patterns during different stages of fruit development can provide clues towards the understanding of its biological functions. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) has become one of the most widely used methods for rapid and accurate quantification of gene expression. However, its success depends on the use of a suitable reference gene for data normalization. For qPCR analysis, a single reference gene is not universally suitable for all experiments. Therefore, reference gene validation is a crucial step. Suitable reference genes for qPCR analysis of brinjal fruit development have not been investigated so far. In this study, we have selected 21 candidate reference genes from the Brinjal (Solanum melongena) Plant Gene Indices database (compbio.dfci.harvard.edu/tgi/plant.html) and studied their expression profiles by qPCR during six different fruit developmental stages (0, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 days post anthesis) along with leaf samples of the Pusa Purple Long (PPL) variety. To evaluate the stability of gene expression, geNorm and NormFinder analytical softwares were used. geNorm identified SAND (SAND family protein) and TBP (TATA binding protein) as the best pairs of reference genes in brinjal fruit development. The results showed that for brinjal fruit development, individual or a combination of reference genes should be selected for data normalization. NormFinder identified Expressed gene (expressed sequence) as the best single reference gene in brinjal fruit development. In this study, we have identified and validated for the first time reference genes to provide accurate transcript normalization and quantification at various fruit developmental stages of brinjal which can also be useful for gene expression studies in other Solanaceae plant species. PMID:26472671

  12. Detection of tumor cell-specific mRNA in the peripheral blood of patients with breast cancer—evaluation of several markers with real-time reverse transcription-PCR.

    PubMed

    Andergassen, Ulrich; Hofmann, Simone; Kölbl, Alexandra C; Schindlbeck, Christian; Neugebauer, Julia; Hutter, Stefan; Engelstädter, Verena; Ilmer, Matthias; Friese, Klaus; Jeschke, Udo

    2013-01-08

    It is widely known that cells from epithelial tumors, e.g., breast cancer, detach from their primary tissue and enter blood circulation. We show that the presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in samples of patients with primary and metastatic breast cancer can be detected with an array of selected tumor-marker-genes by reverse transcription real-time PCR. The focus of the presented work is on detecting differences in gene expression between healthy individuals and adjuvant and metastatic breast cancer patients, not an accurate quantification of these differences. Therefore, total RNA was isolated from blood samples of healthy donors and patients with primary or metastatic breast cancer after enrichment of mononuclear cells by density gradient centrifugation. After reverse transcription real-time PCR was carried out with a set of marker genes (BCSP, CK8, Her2, MGL, CK18, CK19). B2M and GAPDH were used as reference genes. Blood samples from patients with metastatic disease revealed increased cytokine gene levels in comparison to normal blood samples. Detection of a single gene was not sufficient to detect CTCs by reverse transcription real-time PCR. Markers used here were selected based on a recent study detecting cancer cells on different protein levels. The combination of such a marker array leads to higher and more specific discovery rates, predominantly in metastatic patients. Identification of CTCs by PCR methods may lead to better diagnosis and prognosis and could help to choose an adequate therapy.

  13. Transcriptional analysis of the 5'-noncoding region of the human involucrin gene.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Bayghen, E; Vega, A; Cadena, A; Granados, S E; Jave, L F; Gariglio, P; Alvarez-Salas, L M

    1996-01-01

    Human involucrin whose gene transcription is directed by a 2456-nucleotide (nt) 5'-noncoding region is a structural component of the epithelial cornified layer. Transient transfection assays demonstrated that this region is transcriptionally active in multiplying keratinocytes and is enhanced by 2 mM CaCl2 treatment. Calcium-independent transcriptional activity and the interaction with the AP-1 transcriptional factor was located on the proximal part (nt -159 to -1) of the 5'-noncoding region. However, CaCl2 responsiveness was mapped to a distal 1185-nt fragment (nt -2456 to -1272). Moreover, this fragment potentiated the Herpes simplex thymidine kinase promoter in normal keratinocytes and is responsive to calcium treatment in a cell type-specific manner. Interestingly, the absence of a 491-nt fragment located between the two enhancer domains (nt -651 to -160) resulted in transcriptional activation in multiplying keratinocytes. This fragment interacts with AP-1 and the YY1 transcriptional silencer. It is concluded that human involucrin 5'-noncoding region contains at least three regulatory domains, a distal CaCl2-responsive enhancer, a putative transcriptional silencer (that interacts with AP-1 and YY1), and a proximal enhancer/promoter (that interacts with AP-1). Thus, this study demonstrates the presence of particular transcriptional factors can potentially regulate the human involucrin expression.

  14. Increased expression of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome truncated lamin A transcript during cell aging.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Sofia; Coppedè, Fabio; Sagelius, Hanna; Eriksson, Maria

    2009-07-01

    Most cases of the segmental progeroid syndrome, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), are caused by a de novo dominant mutation within a single codon of the LMNA gene. This mutation leads to the increased usage of an internal splice site that generates an alternative lamin A transcript with an internal deletion of 150 nucleotides, called lamin A Delta 150. The LMNA gene encodes two major proteins of the inner nuclear lamina, lamins A and C, but not much is known about their expression levels. Determination of the overall expression levels of the LMNA gene transcripts is an important step to further the understanding of the HGPS. In this study, we have performed absolute quantification of the lamins A, C and A Delta 150 transcripts in primary dermal fibroblasts from HGPS patients and unaffected age-matched and parent controls. We show that the lamin A Delta 150 transcript is present in unaffected controls but its expression is >160-fold lower than that in samples from HGPS patients. Analysis of transcript expression during in vitro aging shows that although the levels of lamin A and lamin C transcripts remain unchanged, the lamin A Delta 150 transcript increases in late passage cells from HGPS patients and parental controls. This study provides a new method for LMNA transcript analysis and insights into the expression of the LMNA gene in HGPS and normal cells.

  15. Normal probability plots with confidence.

    PubMed

    Chantarangsi, Wanpen; Liu, Wei; Bretz, Frank; Kiatsupaibul, Seksan; Hayter, Anthony J; Wan, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Normal probability plots are widely used as a statistical tool for assessing whether an observed simple random sample is drawn from a normally distributed population. The users, however, have to judge subjectively, if no objective rule is provided, whether the plotted points fall close to a straight line. In this paper, we focus on how a normal probability plot can be augmented by intervals for all the points so that, if the population distribution is normal, then all the points should fall into the corresponding intervals simultaneously with probability 1-α. These simultaneous 1-α probability intervals provide therefore an objective mean to judge whether the plotted points fall close to the straight line: the plotted points fall close to the straight line if and only if all the points fall into the corresponding intervals. The powers of several normal probability plot based (graphical) tests and the most popular nongraphical Anderson-Darling and Shapiro-Wilk tests are compared by simulation. Based on this comparison, recommendations are given in Section 3 on which graphical tests should be used in what circumstances. An example is provided to illustrate the methods.

  16. Developmental-stage-dependent transcriptional response to leukaemic oncogene expression

    PubMed Central

    Regha, Kakkad; Assi, Salam A.; Tsoulaki, Olga; Gilmour, Jane; Lacaud, Georges; Bonifer, Constanze

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is characterized by a block in myeloid differentiation the stage of which is dependent on the nature of the transforming oncogene and the developmental stage of the oncogenic hit. This is also true for the t(8;21) translocation that gives rise to the RUNX1-ETO fusion protein and initiates the most common form of human AML. Here we study the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells expressing an inducible RUNX1-ETO gene into blood cells as a model, combined with genome-wide analyses of transcription factor binding and gene expression. RUNX1-ETO interferes with both the activating and repressive function of its normal counterpart, RUNX1, at early and late stages of blood cell development. However, the response of the transcriptional network to RUNX1-ETO expression is developmental stage specific, highlighting the molecular mechanisms determining specific target cell expansion after an oncogenic hit. PMID:26018585

  17. Roles of transcriptional network during the formation of lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Watabe, Tetsuro

    2012-09-01

    The lymphatic vascular system, also known as the second vascular system in vertebrates, plays crucial roles in various physiological and pathological processes. It participates in the maintenance of normal tissue fluid balance, trafficking of the immune cells and absorption of fatty acids in the gut. Furthermore, lymphatic system is associated with the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, including lymphedema, inflammatory diseases and tumour metastasis. Lymphatic vessels are comprised of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), which are differentiated from blood vascular endothelial cells. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the transcriptional control of LEC fate determination and reflects on efforts to understand the roles of transcriptional networks during this discrete developmental process.

  18. Pathologically Relevant Prelamin A Interactions with Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Infante, Arantza; Rodríguez, Clara I

    2016-01-01

    LMNA-linked laminopathies are a group of rare human diseases caused by mutations in LMNA or by disrupted posttranslational processing of its largest encoded isoform, prelamin A. The accumulation of mutated or immature forms of farnesylated prelamin A, named progerin or prelamin A, respectively, dominantly disrupts nuclear lamina structure with toxic effects in cells. One hypothesis is that aberrant lamin filament networks disrupt or "trap" proteins such as transcription factors, thereby interfering with their normal activity. Since laminopathies mainly affect tissues of mesenchymal origin, we tested this hypothesis by generating an experimental model of laminopathy by inducing prelamin A accumulation in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). We provide detailed protocols for inducing and detecting prelamin A accumulation in hMSCs, and describe the bioinformatic analysis and in vitro assays of transcription factors potentially affected by prelamin A accumulation.

  19. Transcriptional regulator Id2 mediates CD8+ T cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Cannarile, Michael A; Lind, Nicholas A; Rivera, Richard; Sheridan, Alison D; Camfield, Kristin A; Wu, Bei Bei; Cheung, Kitty P; Ding, Zhaoqing; Goldrath, Ananda W

    2006-12-01

    Transcriptional programs that initiate and sustain the proliferation, differentiation and survival of CD8(+) T cells during immune responses are not completely understood. Here we show that inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (Id2), an antagonist of E protein transcription factors, was upregulated in CD8(+) T cells during infection and that expression of Id2 was maintained in memory CD8(+) T cells. Although Id2-deficient naive CD8(+) T cells recognized antigen and proliferated normally early after infection, effector CD8(+) T cells did not accumulate because the cells were highly susceptible to apoptosis. Id2-deficient CD8(+) T cells responding to infection had changes in the expression of genes that influence survival and had altered memory formation. Our data emphasize the importance of Id2 in regulating gene expression by CD8(+) T cells and the magnitude of effector responses, suggesting a mechanism involving Id protein- and E protein-mediated survival and differentiation of mature T cells.

  20. Normalization for Relative Quantification of mRNA and microRNA in Soybean Exposed to Various Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yonggang; Chen, Huan; Dong, Yuanyuan; Wang, Nan; Li, Xiaowei; Jameel, Aysha; Yang, He; Zhang, Min; Chen, Kai; Wang, Fawei; Li, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Plant microRNAs are small non-coding, endogenic RNA molecule (containing 20–24 nucleotides) produced from miRNA precursors (pri-miRNA and pre-miRNA). Evidence suggests that up and down regulation of the miRNA targets the mRNA genes involved in resistance against biotic and abiotic stresses. Reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a powerful technique to analyze variations in mRNA levels. Normalizing the data using reference genes is essential for the analysis of reliable RT-qPCR data. In this study, two groups of candidate reference mRNAs and miRNAs in soybean leaves and roots treated with various abiotic stresses (PEG-simulated drought, salinity, alkalinity, salinity+alkalinity, and abscisic acid) were analyzed by RT-qPCR. We analyzed the most appropriate reference mRNA/miRNAs using the geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper algorithms. According to the results, Act and EF1b were the most suitable reference mRNAs in leaf and root samples, for mRNA and miRNA precursor data normalization. The most suitable reference miRNAs found in leaf and root samples were 166a and 167a for mature miRNA data normalization. Hence the best combinations of reference mRNAs for mRNA and miRNA precursor data normalization were EF1a + Act or EF1b + Act in leaf samples, and EF1a + EF1b or 60s + EF1b in root samples. For mature miRNA data normalization, the most suitable combinations of reference miRNAs were 166a + 167d in leaf samples, and 171a + 156a or 167a + 171a in root samples. We identified potential reference mRNA/miRNAs for accurate RT-qPCR data normalization for mature miRNA, miRNA precursors, and their targeted mRNAs. Our results promote miRNA-based studies on soybean plants exposed to abiotic stress conditions. PMID:27176476

  1. Normalization for Relative Quantification of mRNA and microRNA in Soybean Exposed to Various Abiotic Stresses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weican; Deng, Yu; Zhou, Yonggang; Chen, Huan; Dong, Yuanyuan; Wang, Nan; Li, Xiaowei; Jameel, Aysha; Yang, He; Zhang, Min; Chen, Kai; Wang, Fawei; Li, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Plant microRNAs are small non-coding, endogenic RNA molecule (containing 20-24 nucleotides) produced from miRNA precursors (pri-miRNA and pre-miRNA). Evidence suggests that up and down regulation of the miRNA targets the mRNA genes involved in resistance against biotic and abiotic stresses. Reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a powerful technique to analyze variations in mRNA levels. Normalizing the data using reference genes is essential for the analysis of reliable RT-qPCR data. In this study, two groups of candidate reference mRNAs and miRNAs in soybean leaves and roots treated with various abiotic stresses (PEG-simulated drought, salinity, alkalinity, salinity+alkalinity, and abscisic acid) were analyzed by RT-qPCR. We analyzed the most appropriate reference mRNA/miRNAs using the geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper algorithms. According to the results, Act and EF1b were the most suitable reference mRNAs in leaf and root samples, for mRNA and miRNA precursor data normalization. The most suitable reference miRNAs found in leaf and root samples were 166a and 167a for mature miRNA data normalization. Hence the best combinations of reference mRNAs for mRNA and miRNA precursor data normalization were EF1a + Act or EF1b + Act in leaf samples, and EF1a + EF1b or 60s + EF1b in root samples. For mature miRNA data normalization, the most suitable combinations of reference miRNAs were 166a + 167d in leaf samples, and 171a + 156a or 167a + 171a in root samples. We identified potential reference mRNA/miRNAs for accurate RT-qPCR data normalization for mature miRNA, miRNA precursors, and their targeted mRNAs. Our results promote miRNA-based studies on soybean plants exposed to abiotic stress conditions. PMID:27176476

  2. A Genome-wide Screen for Neurospora crassa Transcription Factors Regulating Glycogen Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Rodrigo Duarte; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Luchessi, Augusto Ducati; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors play a key role in transcription regulation as they recognize and directly bind to defined sites in promoter regions of target genes, and thus modulate differential expression. The overall process is extremely dynamic, as they have to move through the nucleus and transiently bind to chromatin in order to regulate gene transcription. To identify transcription factors that affect glycogen accumulation in Neurospora crassa, we performed a systematic screen of a deletion strains set generated by the Neurospora Knockout Project and available at the Fungal Genetics Stock Center. In a wild-type strain of N. crassa, glycogen content reaches a maximal level at the end of the exponential growth phase, but upon heat stress the glycogen content rapidly drops. The gene encoding glycogen synthase (gsn) is transcriptionally down-regulated when the mycelium is exposed to the same stress condition. We identified 17 deleted strains having glycogen accumulation profiles different from that of the wild-type strain under both normal growth and heat stress conditions. Most of the transcription factors identified were annotated as hypothetical protein, however some of them, such as the PacC, XlnR, and NIT2 proteins, were biochemically well-characterized either in N. crassa or in other fungi. The identification of some of the transcription factors was coincident with the presence of DNA-binding motifs specific for the transcription factors in the gsn 5′-flanking region, and some of these DNA-binding motifs were demonstrated to be functional by Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) experiments. Strains knocked-out in these transcription factors presented impairment in the regulation of gsn expression, suggesting that the transcription factors regulate glycogen accumulation by directly regulating gsn gene expression. Five selected mutant strains showed defects in cell cycle progression, and two transcription factors were light-regulated. The results indicate

  3. Accurate Splicing of HDAC6 Pre-mRNA Requires SON

    PubMed Central

    Battini, Vishnu Priya; Bubulya, Athanasios; Bubulya, Paula A.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing requires proper splice site selection mediated by many factors including snRNPs and serine-arginine rich (SR) splicing factors. Our lab previously reported that the SR-like protein SON maintains organization of pre-mRNA splicing factors in nuclear speckles as well as splicing of many human transcripts including mRNAs coding for the chromatin-modifying enzymes HDAC6, ADA and SETD8. However, the mechanism by which SON maintains accurate splicing is unknown. To build tools for understanding SON-dependent pre-mRNA splicing, we constructed a minigene reporter plasmid driving expression of the genomic sequence spanning exons 26 through 29 of HDAC6. Following SON depletion, we observed altered splicing of HDAC6 reporter transcripts that showed exclusion of exons 27 and 28, reflecting the splicing patterns of endogenous HDAC6 mRNA. Importantly, loss of HDAC6 biological function was also observed, as indicated by truncated HDAC6 protein and corresponding absence of aggresome assembly activities of HDAC6 binding-of-ubiquitin zinc finger (BUZ) domain. We therefore propose that SON-mediated splicing regulation of HDAC6 is essential for supporting protein degradation pathways that prevent human disease. PMID:25782155

  4. RAP: Accurate and Fast Motif Finding Based on Protein-Binding Microarray Data

    PubMed Central

    Orenstein, Yaron; Mick, Eran

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The novel high-throughput technology of protein-binding microarrays (PBMs) measures binding intensity of a transcription factor to thousands of DNA probe sequences. Several algorithms have been developed to extract binding-site motifs from these data. Such motifs are commonly represented by positional weight matrices. Previous studies have shown that the motifs produced by these algorithms are either accurate in predicting in vitro binding or similar to previously published motifs, but not both. In this work, we present a new simple algorithm to infer binding-site motifs from PBM data. It outperforms prior art both in predicting in vitro binding and in producing motifs similar to literature motifs. Our results challenge previous claims that motifs with lower information content are better models for transcription-factor binding specificity. Moreover, we tested the effect of motif length and side positions flanking the “core” motif in the binding site. We show that side positions have a significant effect and should not be removed, as commonly done. A large drop in the results quality of all methods is observed between in vitro and in vivo binding prediction. The software is available on acgt.cs.tau.ac.il/rap. PMID:23464877

  5. 3j Symbols: To Normalize or Not to Normalize?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Veenendaal, Michel

    2011-01-01

    The systematic use of alternative normalization constants for 3j symbols can lead to a more natural expression of quantities, such as vector products and spherical tensor operators. The redefined coupling constants directly equate tensor products to the inner and outer products without any additional square roots. The approach is extended to…

  6. Conductivity Modulation in a gated Normal-CDW-Normal configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Saumya; Lake, Roger

    There is considerable interest in switching by exploiting a voltage controlled phase transition, and one such phase is the charge density wave phase that occurs in a number of quasi one dimensional and two dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides. Voltage controlled switching of the charge density wave transition in 1T-TaS2 has recently been demonstrated. We consider a transistor geometry with normal metal contacts and a channel of CDW material. The interaction is modeled with a negative U Hubbard term. Normal-CDW-temperature-U phase diagrams show the regime of the CDW in the ideal lattice. The wavelength of the CDW in the transistor channel is determined by both the conditions of Fermi surface nesting and also the condition of commensurability with the channel length between the two normal leads. Moving the Fermi level of the channel first results in phase boundaries within the CDW as the conditions of commensurability and Fermi surface nesting become incompatible. Moving the Fermi level from half filling by few tens of meV causes a collapsing of the CDW gap and an effective CDW-normal transition, leaving vestiges of the CDW in the channel. The transition is accompanied by one to two orders of magnitude increase in the conductivity. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Grant No. 1124733 and the Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) Nanoelectronic Research Initiative as a part of the Nanoelectronics for 2020 and Beyond (NEB-2020) program.

  7. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of a NAC1 transcription factor in Medicago truncatula roots.

    PubMed

    D'haeseleer, Katrien; Den Herder, Griet; Laffont, Carole; Plet, Julie; Mortier, Virginie; Lelandais-Brière, Christine; De Bodt, Stefanie; De Keyser, Annick; Crespi, Martin; Holsters, Marcelle; Frugier, Florian; Goormachtig, Sofie

    2011-08-01

    • Legume roots develop two types of lateral organs, lateral roots and nodules. Nodules develop as a result of a symbiotic interaction with rhizobia and provide a niche for the bacteria to fix atmospheric nitrogen for the plant. • The Arabidopsis NAC1 transcription factor is involved in lateral root formation, and is regulated post-transcriptionally by miRNA164 and by SINAT5-dependent ubiquitination. We analyzed in Medicago truncatula the role of the closest NAC1 homolog in lateral root formation and in nodulation. • MtNAC1 shows a different expression pattern in response to auxin than its Arabidopsis homolog and no changes in lateral root number or nodulation were observed in plants affected in MtNAC1 expression. In addition, no interaction was found with SINA E3 ligases, suggesting that post-translational regulation of MtNAC1 does not occur in M. truncatula. Similar to what was found in Arabidopsis, a conserved miR164 target site was retrieved in MtNAC1, which reduced protein accumulation of a GFP-miR164 sensor. Furthermore, miR164 and MtNAC1 show an overlapping expression pattern in symbiotic nodules, and overexpression of this miRNA led to a reduction in nodule number. • This work suggests that regulatory pathways controlling a conserved transcription factor are complex and divergent between M. truncatula and Arabidopsis.

  8. Accurate Alignment of Plasma Channels Based on Laser Centroid Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Lin, Chen; Osterhoff, Jens; Shiraishi, Satomi; Schroeder, Carl; Geddes, Cameron; Toth, Csaba; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2011-03-23

    A technique has been developed to accurately align a laser beam through a plasma channel by minimizing the shift in laser centroid and angle at the channel outptut. If only the shift in centroid or angle is measured, then accurate alignment is provided by minimizing laser centroid motion at the channel exit as the channel properties are scanned. The improvement in alignment accuracy provided by this technique is important for minimizing electron beam pointing errors in laser plasma accelerators.

  9. Characterization of proopiomelanocortin transcripts in human nonpituitary tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Lacaze-Masmonteil, T.; De Keyzer, Y.; Luton, J.P.; Kahn, A.; Bertagna, X.

    1987-10-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC), the precursor to adrenocorticotropic hormone and other related peptides, was originally identified in the corticotropic cell. Recent evidence shows that POMC products are also normally present in a variety of nonpituitary tissues. To investigate this phenomenon in humans the authors looked for the presence and characteristics of POMC transcripts in various adult tissues. Blot hybridization analysis of normal adrenal, thymus, and testis RNAs revealed a small RNA species approximately 400 nucleotides shorter than the 1200-nucleotide pituitary species. Primer extension and S1 nuclease mapping studies showed that this small RNA lacked exon 1 and exon 2 of the gene, and it corresponded to a set of at least six molecules starting 41 to 162 nucleotides downstream from the 5' end of exon 3. These RNAs appear to result from heterogeneous transcription initiation sites presumably under the control of GC box promoter sequences located in the 3' end of intron 2. They cannot encode a complete POMC molecule, and the only truncated POMC molecules that could be translated would lack a signal peptide necessary for membrane translocation and precursor processing. The use of highly sensitive S1 nuclease mapping techniques with uniformly labeled single-stranded DNA probes allowed the detection of a small but definite amount of the normal, 1200-nucleotide, mRNA species. It is suggested that it is this POMC mRNA that is responsible for the local production of all the POMC peptides.

  10. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1997-06-10

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3{prime} noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

  11. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Soares, Marcelo B.; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    1997-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  12. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription.

    PubMed

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription. PMID:24406346

  13. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription

    PubMed Central

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription. PMID:25764111

  14. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription.

    PubMed

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription. PMID:25764111

  15. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription.

    PubMed

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription.

  16. Switch Transcripts in Immunoglobulin Class Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Matthias; Jung, Steffen; Radbruch, Andreas

    1995-03-01

    B cells can exchange gene segments for the constant region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain, altering the class and effector function of the antibodies that they produce. Class switching is directed to distinct classes by cytokines, which induce transcription of the targeted DNA sequences. These transcripts are processed, resulting in spliced "switch" transcripts. Switch recombination can be directed to immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) by the heterologous human metallothionein II_A promoter in mutant mice. Induction of the structurally conserved, spliced switch transcripts is sufficient to target switch recombination to IgG1, whereas transcription alone is not.

  17. Contribution of transcription to animal early development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbin; Davis, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    In mature gametes and during the oocyte-to-embryo transition, transcription is generally silenced and gene expression is post-transcriptionally regulated. However, we recently discovered that major transcription can occur immediately after fertilization, prior to pronuclear fusion, and in the first cell division of the oocyte-to-embryo transition in the nematode Ascaris suum. We postulate that the balance between transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation during the oocyte-to-embryo transition may largely be determined by cell cycle length and thus the time available for the genome to be transcribed.

  18. Transcriptional Regulation of Heart Development in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fei; Langenbacher, Adam D.; Chen, Jau-Nian

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac transcription factors orchestrate the complex cellular and molecular events required to produce a functioning heart. Misregulation of the cardiac transcription program leads to embryonic developmental defects and is associated with human congenital heart diseases. Recent studies have expanded our understanding of the regulation of cardiac gene expression at an additional layer, involving the coordination of epigenetic and transcriptional regulators. In this review, we highlight and discuss discoveries made possible by the genetic and embryological tools available in the zebrafish model organism, with a focus on the novel functions of cardiac transcription factors and epigenetic and transcriptional regulatory proteins during cardiogenesis. PMID:27148546

  19. Transcriptional coregulators: fine-tuning metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mouchiroud, Laurent; Eichner, Lillian J.; Shaw, Reuben; Auwerx, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis requires that cellular energy levels are adapted to environmental cues. This adaptation is largely regulated at the transcriptional level, through the interaction between transcription factors, coregulators, and the basal transcriptional machinery. Coregulators, which function both as metabolic sensors and transcriptional effectors, are ideally positioned to synchronize metabolic pathways to environmental stimuli. The balance between inhibitory actions of corepressors and stimulatory effects of coactivators enables the fine-tuning of metabolic processes. The tight regulation opens therapeutic opportunities to manage metabolic dysfunction, by directing the activity of cofactors towards specific transcription factors, pathways, or cells/tissues, thereby restoring whole body metabolic homeostasis. PMID:24794975

  20. A transcriptional sketch of a primary human breast cancer by 454 deep sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Guffanti, Alessandro; Iacono, Michele; Pelucchi, Paride; Kim, Namshin; Soldà, Giulia; Croft, Larry J; Taft, Ryan J; Rizzi, Ermanno; Askarian-Amiri, Marjan; Bonnal, Raoul J; Callari, Maurizio; Mignone, Flavio; Pesole, Graziano; Bertalot, Giovanni; Bernardi, Luigi Rossi; Albertini, Alberto; Lee, Christopher; Mattick, John S; Zucchi, Ileana; De Bellis, Gianluca

    2009-01-01

    Background The cancer transcriptome is difficult to explore due to the heterogeneity of quantitative and qualitative changes in gene expression linked to the disease status. An increasing number of "unconventional" transcripts, such as novel isoforms, non-coding RNAs, somatic gene fusions and deletions have been associated with the tumoral state. Massively parallel sequencing techniques provide a framework for exploring the transcriptional complexity inherent to cancer with a limited laboratory and financial effort. We developed a deep sequencing and bioinformatics analysis protocol to investigate the molecular composition of a breast cancer poly(A)+ transcriptome. This method utilizes a cDNA library normalization step to diminish the representation of highly expressed transcripts and biology-oriented bioinformatic analyses to facilitate detection of rare and novel transcripts. Results We analyzed over 132,000 Roche 454 high-confidence deep sequencing reads from a primary human lobular breast cancer tissue specimen, and detected a range of unusual transcriptional events that were subsequently validated by RT-PCR in additional eight primary human breast cancer samples. We identified and validated one deletion, two novel ncRNAs (one intergenic and one intragenic), ten previously unknown or rare transcript isoforms and a novel gene fusion specific to a single primary tissue sample. We also explored the non-protein-coding portion of the breast cancer transcriptome, identifying thousands of novel non-coding transcripts and more than three hundred reads corresponding to the non-coding RNA MALAT1, which is highly expressed in many human carcinomas. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that combining 454 deep sequencing with a normalization step and careful bioinformatic analysis facilitates the discovery and quantification of rare transcripts or ncRNAs, and can be used as a qualitative tool to characterize transcriptome complexity, revealing many hitherto unknown

  1. Expression of cytokine mRNA transcripts in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Olive, C; Cheung, C; Nicol, D; Falk, M C

    1998-08-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a solid tumour of the kidney and is the most common renal neoplasm. Despite the presence of tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in RCC, these tumours continue to progress in vivo suggesting a poor host immune response to the tumour, and the suppression of TIL effector function. Cytokines are key molecules that modulate the function of T cells. The possibility is investigated that the local production of cytokines in RCC contributes to immunosuppression of TIL. The expression of pro-inflammatory (IFN-gamma/IL-2) and immunosuppressive (IL-10/TGF-beta) cytokine mRNA transcripts was determined in RCC, normal kidney and peripheral blood of RCC patients using a semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with cytokine-specific primers. Following Southern blot hybridization of the PCR products with internal radiolabelled oligonucleotide probes, cytokine transcript levels were measured by densitometry and expressed relative to the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase densitometry score. With the exception of IL-10, there were no differences in expression of cytokine mRNA transcripts between the peripheral blood of patients and normal healthy individuals. It was found that TGF-beta transcripts were well represented in normal kidney and RCC. In contrast, the expression of IFN-gamma transcripts, while low in the majority of samples, was significantly increased in RCC when compared to normal kidney (P=0.05). The IL-2 and IL-10 transcripts showed a more variable expression in normal kidney and RCC, with no significant differences in expression between the sample groups. The data demonstrating pro-inflammatory and immunosuppressive cytokine expression in RCC do not support a prominent immunosuppressive cytokine profile in these tumours. PMID:9723777

  2. Model-based redesign of global transcription regulation

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Javier; Rodrigo, Guillermo; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic biology aims to the design or redesign of biological systems. In particular, one possible goal could be the rewiring of the transcription regulation network by exchanging the endogenous promoters. To achieve this objective, we have adapted current methods to the inference of a model based on ordinary differential equations that is able to predict the network response after a major change in its topology. Our procedure utilizes microarray data for training. We have experimentally validated our inferred global regulatory model in Escherichia coli by predicting transcriptomic profiles under new perturbations. We have also tested our methodology in silico by providing accurate predictions of the underlying networks from expression data generated with artificial genomes. In addition, we have shown the predictive power of our methodology by obtaining the gene profile in experimental redesigns of the E. coli genome, where rewiring the transcriptional network by means of knockouts of master regulators or by upregulating transcription factors controlled by different promoters. Our approach is compatible with most network inference methods, allowing to explore computationally future genome-wide redesign experiments in synthetic biology. PMID:19188257

  3. Smad4 transcriptional pathways and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schwarte-Waldhoff, Irmgard; Schmiegel, Wolff

    2002-01-01

    Smad4/DPC4 is a tumor suppressor gene frequently inactivated in gastrointestinal carcinomas. Smad4 encodes a key intracellular transmitter for signals of the TGF-beta superfamily of cytokines. TGF-beta potently inhibits the growth of normal epithelial cells but tumor cells are frequently resistant; thus, it has been assumed that loss of Smad4 during tumor progression relieves this inhibition. Mediating TGF-beta responses is only one of the many putative functions of Smad4 as a signaling molecule. Smad proteins are versatile transcriptional co-modulators whose activities depend on the genetic makeup of a cell. We have used restoration of Smad4 in deficient cancer cells as an unbiased approach to decipher Smad4's tumor suppressor functions. Stable reexpression of Smad4 in human colon and pancreatic cancer cells potently suppressed tumor growth in vivo in nude mice. Surprisingly, it was not adequate to suppress tumor cell growth in vitro, nor did it restore TGF-beta responsiveness. Rather, Smad4 restoration influenced angiogenesis, decreasing expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and increasing expression of thrombospondin-1. These findings suggest that the acquisition of TGF-beta resistance and loss of Smad4 may be independent consecutive events in the tumorigenic process. They define the control of an angiogenic switch as a novel alternative mechanism of tumor suppression for Smad4.

  4. Fast Monte Carlo Electron-Photon Transport Method and Application in Accurate Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lijuan; Sun, Guangyao; Zheng, Huaqing; Song, Jing; Chen, Zhenping; Li, Gui

    2014-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method is the most accurate computational method for dose calculation, but its wide application on clinical accurate radiotherapy is hindered due to its poor speed of converging and long computation time. In the MC dose calculation research, the main task is to speed up computation while high precision is maintained. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the calculation speed of MC method for electron-photon transport with high precision and ultimately to reduce the accurate radiotherapy dose calculation time based on normal computer to the level of several hours, which meets the requirement of clinical dose verification. Based on the existing Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program (SuperMC), developed by FDS Team, a fast MC method for electron-photon coupled transport was presented with focus on two aspects: firstly, through simplifying and optimizing the physical model of the electron-photon transport, the calculation speed was increased with slightly reduction of calculation accuracy; secondly, using a variety of MC calculation acceleration methods, for example, taking use of obtained information in previous calculations to avoid repeat simulation of particles with identical history; applying proper variance reduction techniques to accelerate MC method convergence rate, etc. The fast MC method was tested by a lot of simple physical models and clinical cases included nasopharyngeal carcinoma, peripheral lung tumor, cervical carcinoma, etc. The result shows that the fast MC method for electron-photon transport was fast enough to meet the requirement of clinical accurate radiotherapy dose verification. Later, the method will be applied to the Accurate/Advanced Radiation Therapy System ARTS as a MC dose verification module.

  5. RNA Polymerase Pausing during Initial Transcription.

    PubMed

    Duchi, Diego; Bauer, David L V; Fernandez, Laurent; Evans, Geraint; Robb, Nicole; Hwang, Ling Chin; Gryte, Kristofer; Tomescu, Alexandra; Zawadzki, Pawel; Morichaud, Zakia; Brodolin, Konstantin; Kapanidis, Achillefs N

    2016-09-15

    In bacteria, RNA polymerase (RNAP) initiates transcription by synthesizing short transcripts that are either released or extended to allow RNAP to escape from the promoter. The mechanism of initial transcription is unclear due to the presence of transient intermediates and molecular heterogeneity. Here, we studied initial transcription on a lac promoter using single-molecule fluorescence observations of DNA scrunching on immobilized transcription complexes. Our work revealed a long pause ("initiation pause," ∼20 s) after synthesis of a 6-mer RNA; such pauses can serve as regulatory checkpoints. Region sigma 3.2, which contains a loop blocking the RNA exit channel, was a major pausing determinant. We also obtained evidence for RNA backtracking during abortive initial transcription and for additional pausing prior to escape. We summarized our work in a model for initial transcription, in which pausing is controlled by a complex set of determinants that modulate the transition from a 6- to a 7-nt RNA. PMID:27618490

  6. Mammalian Transcription-Coupled Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Wim; Fousteri, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional arrest caused by DNA damage is detrimental for cells and organisms as it impinges on gene expression and thereby on cell growth and survival. To alleviate transcriptional arrest, cells trigger a transcription-dependent genome surveillance pathway, termed transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) that ensures rapid removal of such transcription-impeding DNA lesions and prevents persistent stalling of transcription. Defective TC-NER is causatively linked to Cockayne syndrome, a rare severe genetic disorder with multisystem abnormalities that results in patients’ death in early adulthood. Here we review recent data on how damage-arrested transcription is actively coupled to TC-NER in mammals and discuss new emerging models concerning the role of TC-NER-specific factors in this process. PMID:23906714

  7. RNA Polymerase Pausing during Initial Transcription.

    PubMed

    Duchi, Diego; Bauer, David L V; Fernandez, Laurent; Evans, Geraint; Robb, Nicole; Hwang, Ling Chin; Gryte, Kristofer; Tomescu, Alexandra; Zawadzki, Pawel; Morichaud, Zakia; Brodolin, Konstantin; Kapanidis, Achillefs N

    2016-09-15

    In bacteria, RNA polymerase (RNAP) initiates transcription by synthesizing short transcripts that are either released or extended to allow RNAP to escape from the promoter. The mechanism of initial transcription is unclear due to the presence of transient intermediates and molecular heterogeneity. Here, we studied initial transcription on a lac promoter using single-molecule fluorescence observations of DNA scrunching on immobilized transcription complexes. Our work revealed a long pause ("initiation pause," ∼20 s) after synthesis of a 6-mer RNA; such pauses can serve as regulatory checkpoints. Region sigma 3.2, which contains a loop blocking the RNA exit channel, was a major pausing determinant. We also obtained evidence for RNA backtracking during abortive initial transcription and for additional pausing prior to escape. We summarized our work in a model for initial transcription, in which pausing is controlled by a complex set of determinants that modulate the transition from a 6- to a 7-nt RNA.

  8. Thyroid-specific transcription factors control Hex promoter activity

    PubMed Central

    Puppin, Cinzia; D'Elia, Angela V.; Pellizzari, Lucia; Russo, Diego; Arturi, Franco; Presta, Ivan; Filetti, Sebastiano; Bogue, Clifford W.; Denson, Lee A.; Damante, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    The homeobox-containing gene Hex is expressed in several cell types, including thyroid follicular cells, in which it regulates the transcription of tissue- specific genes. In this study the regulation of Hex promoter activity was investigated. Using co- transfection experiments, we demonstrated that the transcriptional activity of the Hex gene promoter in rat thyroid FRTL-5 cells is ∼10-fold greater than that observed in HeLa and NIH 3T3 cell lines (which do not normally express the Hex gene). To identify the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences, we evaluated the effect of the thyroid- specific transcription factor TTF-1 on the Hex promoter activity. TTF-1 produced 3–4-fold increases in the Hex promoter activity. Gel- retardation assays and mutagenesis experiments revealed the presence of functionally relevant TTF-1 binding sites in the Hex promoter region. These in vitro data may also have functional relevance in vivo, since a positive correlation between TTF-1 and Hex mRNAs was demonstrated in human thyroid tissues by means of RT–PCR analysis. The TTF-1 effect, however, is not sufficient to explain the difference in Hex promoter activity between FRTL-5 and cells that do not express the Hex gene. For this reason, we tested whether Hex protein is able to activate the Hex promoter. Indeed, co-transfection experiments indicate that Hex protein is able to increase the activity of its own promoter in HeLa cells ∼4-fold. TTF-1 and Hex effects are additive: when transfected together in HeLa cells, the Hex promoter activity is increased 6–7-fold. Thus, the contemporary presence of both TTF-1 and Hex could be sufficient to explain the higher transcriptional activity of the Hex promoter in thyroid cells with respect to cell lines that do not express the Hex gene. These findings demonstrate the existence of direct cross-regulation between thyroid-specific transcription factors. PMID:12655000

  9. Retroviral recombination during reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, D W; Duesberg, P H

    1990-03-01

    After mixed infection, up to half of related retroviruses are recombinants. During infection, retroviral RNA genomes are first converted to complementary DNA (cDNA) and then to double-stranded DNA. Thus recombination could occur during reverse transcription, by RNA template switching, or after reverse transcription, by breakage and reunion of DNA. It has not been possible to distinguish between these two potential mechanisms of recombination because both single-stranded cDNA and double-stranded proviral DNA exist in infected cells during the eclipse period. Therefore we have analyzed for recombinant molecules among cDNA products transcribed in vitro from RNA of disrupted virions. Since recombinants from allelic parents can only be distinguished from parental genomes by point mutations, we have examined the cDNAs from virions with distinct genetic structures for recombinant-specific size and sequence markers. The parents share a common internal allele that allows homology-directed recombination, but each contains specific flanking sequences. One parent is a synthetically altered Harvey murine sarcoma virus RNA that lacks a retroviral 3' terminus but carries a Moloney murine retrovirus-derived envelope gene (env) fragment 3' of its transforming ras gene. The other parent is intact Moloney virus. Using a Harvey-specific 5' primer and a Moloney-specific 3' primer, we have found recombinant cDNAs with the polymerase chain reaction, proving directly that retroviruses can recombine during reverse transcription unassisted by cellular enzymes, probably by template switching during cDNA synthesis. The recombinants that were obtained in vitro were identical with those obtained in parallel experiments in vivo.

  10. Normalizing Catastrophe: Sustainability and Scientism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnett, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Making an adequate response to our deteriorating environmental situation is a matter of ever increasing urgency. It is argued that a central obstacle to achieving this is the way that scientism has become normalized in our thinking about environmental issues. This is taken to reflect on an underlying "metaphysics of mastery" that vitiates proper…

  11. Normalized Elution Time Prediction Utility

    2011-02-17

    This program is used to compute the predicted normalized elution time (NET) for a list of peptide sequences. It includes the Kangas/Petritis neural network trained model, the Krokhin hydrophobicity model, and the Mant hydrophobicity model. In addition, it can compute the predicted strong cation exchange (SCX) fraction (on a 0 to 1 scale) in which a given peptide will appear.

  12. Complete normal ordering 1: Foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, John; Mavromatos, Nick E.; Skliros, Dimitri P.

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a new prescription for quantising scalar field theories (in generic spacetime dimension and background) perturbatively around a true minimum of the full quantum effective action, which is to 'complete normal order' the bare action of interest. When the true vacuum of the theory is located at zero field value, the key property of this prescription is the automatic cancellation, to any finite order in perturbation theory, of all tadpole and, more generally, all 'cephalopod' Feynman diagrams. The latter are connected diagrams that can be disconnected into two pieces by cutting one internal vertex, with either one or both pieces free from external lines. In addition, this procedure of 'complete normal ordering' (which is an extension of the standard field theory definition of normal ordering) reduces by a substantial factor the number of Feynman diagrams to be calculated at any given loop order. We illustrate explicitly the complete normal ordering procedure and the cancellation of cephalopod diagrams in scalar field theories with non-derivative interactions, and by using a point splitting 'trick' we extend this result to theories with derivative interactions, such as those appearing as non-linear σ-models in the world-sheet formulation of string theory. We focus here on theories with trivial vacua, generalising the discussion to non-trivial vacua in a follow-up paper.

  13. The conserved carboxy-terminal domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae TFIID is sufficient to support normal cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Poon, D; Schroeder, S; Wang, C K; Yamamoto, T; Horikoshi, M; Roeder, R G; Weil, P A

    1991-01-01

    We have examined the structure-function relationships of TFIID through in vivo complementation tests. A yeast strain was constructed which lacked the chromosomal copy of SPT15, the gene encoding TFIID, and was therefore dependent on a functional plasmid-borne wild-type copy of this gene for viability. By using the plasmid shuffle technique, the plasmid-borne wild-type TFIID gene was replaced with a family of plasmids containing a series of systematically mutated TFIID genes. These various forms of TFIID were expressed from three different promoter contexts of different strengths, and the ability of each mutant form of TFIID to complement our chromosomal TFIID null allele was assessed. We found that the first 61 amino acid residues of TFIID are totally dispensable for vegetative cell growth, since yeast strains containing this deleted form of TFIID grow at wild-type rates. Amino-terminally deleted TFIID was further shown to be able to function normally in vivo by virtue of its ability both to promote accurate transcription initiation from a large number of different genes and to interact efficiently with the Gal4 protein to activate transcription of GAL1 with essentially wild-type kinetics. Any deletion removing sequences from within the conserved carboxy-terminal region of S. cerevisiae TFIID was lethal. Further, the exact sequence of the conserved carboxy-terminal portion of the molecule is critical for function, since of several heterologous TFIID homologs tested, only the highly related Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene could complement our S. cerevisiae TFIID null mutant. Taken together, these data indicate that all important functional domains of TFIID appear to lie in its carboxy-terminal 179 amino acid residues. The significance of these findings regarding TFIID function are discussed. Images PMID:1922021

  14. An efficient RNA isolation procedure and identification of reference genes for normalization of gene expression in blueberry.

    PubMed

    Vashisth, Tripti; Johnson, Lisa Klima; Malladi, Anish

    2011-12-01

    Application of transcriptomics approaches can greatly enhance our understanding of blueberry physiology. The success of transcriptomics approaches is dependent on the extraction of high-quality RNA which is complicated by the abundance of polyphenolics and polysaccharides in blueberry. Additionally, transcriptomics requires the accurate quantification of transcript abundance. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is a robust method to determine transcript abundance. Normalization of gene expression using stably expressed reference genes is essential in qRT-PCR. An evaluation of the stability of expression of reference genes has not yet been reported in blueberry. The objectives of this study were to develop an effective procedure for extracting RNA from different organs and to evaluate potential reference genes for qRT-PCR analyses in blueberry. RNA of high quality and yield was extracted from eight and six organs of rabbiteye and southern highbush blueberry, respectively, using a modified cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide-based method. The expression stability of 12 reference genes was evaluated. UBIQUITIN-CONJUGATING ENZYME (UBC28), RNA HELICASE-LIKE (RH8), CLATHRIN ADAPTER COMPLEXES MEDIUM SUBUNIT FAMILY PROTEIN (CACSa), and POLYUBIQUITIN (UBQ3b) were the most stably expressed genes across multiple organs in both blueberry species. Further, the expression stability of the reference genes in the branch abscission zone following treatment with fruit abscission-inducing compounds was analyzed. CACSa, RH8, and UBC28 were the most stably expressed genes in the abscission zone under abscission-inducing conditions. We suggest a preliminary evaluation of UBC28, CACSa, RH8, and UBQ3b to identify the most suitable reference genes for the experimental conditions under consideration in blueberry.

  15. 3'READS+, a sensitive and accurate method for 3' end sequencing of polyadenylated RNA.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dinghai; Liu, Xiaochuan; Tian, Bin

    2016-10-01

    Sequencing of the 3' end of poly(A)(+) RNA identifies cleavage and polyadenylation sites (pAs) and measures transcript expression. We previously developed a method, 3' region extraction and deep sequencing (3'READS), to address mispriming issues that often plague 3' end sequencing. Here we report a new version, named 3'READS+, which has vastly improved accuracy and sensitivity. Using a special locked nucleic acid oligo to capture poly(A)(+) RNA and to remove the bulk of the poly(A) tail, 3'READS+ generates RNA fragments with an optimal number of terminal A's that balance data quality and detection of genuine pAs. With improved RNA ligation steps for efficiency, the method shows much higher sensitivity (over two orders of magnitude) compared to the previous version. Using 3'READS+, we have uncovered a sizable fraction of previously overlooked pAs located next to or within a stretch of adenylate residues in human genes and more accurately assessed the frequency of alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) in HeLa cells (∼50%). 3'READS+ will be a useful tool to accurately study APA and to analyze gene expression by 3' end counting, especially when the amount of input total RNA is limited. PMID:27512124

  16. 3'READS+, a sensitive and accurate method for 3' end sequencing of polyadenylated RNA.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dinghai; Liu, Xiaochuan; Tian, Bin

    2016-10-01

    Sequencing of the 3' end of poly(A)(+) RNA identifies cleavage and polyadenylation sites (pAs) and measures transcript expression. We previously developed a method, 3' region extraction and deep sequencing (3'READS), to address mispriming issues that often plague 3' end sequencing. Here we report a new version, named 3'READS+, which has vastly improved accuracy and sensitivity. Using a special locked nucleic acid oligo to capture poly(A)(+) RNA and to remove the bulk of the poly(A) tail, 3'READS+ generates RNA fragments with an optimal number of terminal A's that balance data quality and detection of genuine pAs. With improved RNA ligation steps for efficiency, the method shows much higher sensitivity (over two orders of magnitude) compared to the previous version. Using 3'READS+, we have uncovered a sizable fraction of previously overlooked pAs located next to or within a stretch of adenylate residues in human genes and more accurately assessed the frequency of alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) in HeLa cells (∼50%). 3'READS+ will be a useful tool to accurately study APA and to analyze gene expression by 3' end counting, especially when the amount of input total RNA is limited.

  17. An accurate assay for HCV based on real-time fluorescence detection of isothermal RNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuping; Wang, Jianfang; Song, Jinyun; Li, Jiayan; Yang, Yongfeng

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the common reasons of liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Early, rapid and accurate HCV RNA detection is important to prevent and control liver disease. A simultaneous amplification and testing (SAT) assay, which is based on isothermal amplification of RNA and real-time fluorescence detection, was designed to optimize routine HCV RNA detection. In this study, HCV RNA and an internal control (IC) were amplified and analyzed simultaneously by SAT assay and detection of fluorescence using routine real-time PCR equipment. The assay detected as few as 10 copies of HCV RNA transcripts. We tested 705 serum samples with SAT, among which 96.4% (680/705) showed consistent results compared with routine real-time PCR. About 92% (23/25) discordant samples were confirmed to be same results as SAT-HCV by using a second real-time PCR. The sensitivity and specificity of SAT-HCV assay were 99.6% (461/463) and 100% (242/242), respectively. In conclusion, the SAT assay is an accurate test with a high specificity and sensitivity which may increase the detection rate of HCV. It is therefore a promising tool to diagnose HCV infection. PMID:27283884

  18. An accurate assay for HCV based on real-time fluorescence detection of isothermal RNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuping; Wang, Jianfang; Song, Jinyun; Li, Jiayan; Yang, Yongfeng

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the common reasons of liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Early, rapid and accurate HCV RNA detection is important to prevent and control liver disease. A simultaneous amplification and testing (SAT) assay, which is based on isothermal amplification of RNA and real-time fluorescence detection, was designed to optimize routine HCV RNA detection. In this study, HCV RNA and an internal control (IC) were amplified and analyzed simultaneously by SAT assay and detection of fluorescence using routine real-time PCR equipment. The assay detected as few as 10 copies of HCV RNA transcripts. We tested 705 serum samples with SAT, among which 96.4% (680/705) showed consistent results compared with routine real-time PCR. About 92% (23/25) discordant samples were confirmed to be same results as SAT-HCV by using a second real-time PCR. The sensitivity and specificity of SAT-HCV assay were 99.6% (461/463) and 100% (242/242), respectively. In conclusion, the SAT assay is an accurate test with a high specificity and sensitivity which may increase the detection rate of HCV. It is therefore a promising tool to diagnose HCV infection.

  19. Accurate genetic switch in Escherichia coli: novel mechanism of regulation by co-repressor.

    PubMed

    Tabaka, Marcin; Cybulski, Olgierd; Hołyst, Robert

    2008-04-01

    Understanding a biological module involves recognition of its structure and the dynamics of its principal components. In this report we present an analysis of the dynamics of the repression module within the regulation of the trp operon in Escherichia coli. We combine biochemical data for reaction rate constants for the trp repressor binding to trp operator and in vivo data of a number of tryptophan repressors (TrpRs) that bind to the operator. The model of repression presented in this report greatly differs from previous mathematical models. One, two or three TrpRs can bind to the operator and repress the transcription. Moreover, reaction rates for detachment of TrpRs from the operator strongly depend on tryptophan (Trp) concentration, since Trp can also bind to the repressor-operator complex and stabilize it. From the mathematical modeling and analysis of reaction rates and equilibrium constants emerges a high-quality, accurate and effective module of trp repression. This genetic switch responds accurately to fast consumption of Trp from the interior of a cell. It switches with minimal dispersion when the concentration of Trp drops below a thousand molecules per cell. PMID:18313075

  20. Accurately measuring MPI broadcasts in a computational grid

    SciTech Connect

    Karonis N T; de Supinski, B R

    1999-05-06

    An MPI library's implementation of broadcast communication can significantly affect the performance of applications built with that library. In order to choose between similar implementations or to evaluate available libraries, accurate measurements of broadcast performance are required. As we demonstrate, existing methods for measuring broadcast performance are either inaccurate or inadequate. Fortunately, we have designed an accurate method for measuring broadcast performance, even in a challenging grid environment. Measuring broadcast performance is not easy. Simply sending one broadcast after another allows them to proceed through the network concurrently, thus resulting in inaccurate per broadcast timings. Existing methods either fail to eliminate this pipelining effect or eliminate it by introducing overheads that are as difficult to measure as the performance of the broadcast itself. This problem becomes even more challenging in grid environments. Latencies a long different links can vary significantly. Thus, an algorithm's performance is difficult to predict from it's communication pattern. Even when accurate pre-diction is possible, the pattern is often unknown. Our method introduces a measurable overhead to eliminate the pipelining effect, regardless of variations in link latencies. choose between different available implementations. Also, accurate and complete measurements could guide use of a given implementation to improve application performance. These choices will become even more important as grid-enabled MPI libraries [6, 7] become more common since bad choices are likely to cost significantly more in grid environments. In short, the distributed processing community needs accurate, succinct and complete measurements of collective communications performance. Since successive collective communications can often proceed concurrently, accurately measuring them is difficult. Some benchmarks use knowledge of the communication algorithm to predict the

  1. Expression of splice variants of mts1 gene in normal and neoplastic human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Ambartsumyan, N.S. |; Grigorian, M.S.; Lukanidin, E.M.

    1995-09-01

    Data on cloning of cDNA corresponding to human mts1 gene transcripts are presented. By comparing nucleotide sequences of the genomic DNA clone and cDNA of mts1, it was shown that human osteosarcoma OHS cells contain two alternative splice variants of mts1 transcripts. Alternative splicing occurs in the 5{prime}-untranslated region of the mts1 pre-mRNA. Both splice variants, hu-mts1 and hu-mts1(var), demonstrate similar stability in the cells, and each contains one open reading frame for the MTS1 protein. However, the two types of transcripts are translated with different effectiveness. The level of transcription of mts1 splice variants in different normal and neoplastic tissues and cell lines varies significantly. The role of alternative splicing as the mechanism responsible for posttranscriptional regulation of mts1 gene expression is discussed. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  2. A novel, non-radioactive eukaryotic in vitro transcription assay for sensitive quantification of RNA polymerase II activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many studies of the eukaryotic transcription mechanism and its regulation rely on in vitro assays. Conventional RNA polymerase II transcription assays are based on radioactive labelling of the newly synthesized RNA. Due to the inefficient in vitro transcription, the detection of the RNA involving purification and gel electrophoresis is laborious and not always quantitative. Results Herein, we describe a new, non-radioactive, robust and reproducible eukaryotic in vitro transcription assay that has been established in our laboratory. Upon transcription, the newly synthesized RNA is directly detected and quantified using the QuantiGene assay. Alternatively, the RNA can be purified and a primer extension followed by PCR detection or qPCR quantification can be performed. When applied to assess the activity of RNA polymerase II inhibitors, this new method allowed an accurate estimation of their relative potency. Conclusions Our novel assay provides a non-radioactive alternative to a standard in vitro transcription assay that allows for sensitive detection and precise quantification of the newly transcribed, unlabelled RNA and is particularly useful for quantification of strong transcriptional inhibitors like α-amanitin. Moreover, the method can be easily adapted to quantify the reaction yield and the transcription efficiency of other eukaryotic in vitro systems, thus providing a complementary tool for the field of transcriptional research. PMID:24694320

  3. Modular composition of gene transcription networks.

    PubMed

    Gyorgy, Andras; Del Vecchio, Domitilla

    2014-03-01

    Predicting the dynamic behavior of a large network from that of the composing modules is a central problem in systems and synthetic biology. Yet, this predictive ability is still largely missing because modules display context-dependent behavior. One cause of context-dependence is retroactivity, a phenomenon similar to loading that influences in non-trivial ways the dynamic performance of a module upon connection to other modules. Here, we establish an analysis framework for gene transcription networks that explicitly accounts for retroactivity. Specifically, a module's key properties are encoded by three retroactivity matrices: internal, scaling, and mixing retroactivity. All of them have a physical interpretation and can be computed from macroscopic parameters (dissociation constants and promoter concentrations) and from the modules' topology. The internal retroactivity quantifies the effect of intramodular connections on an isolated module's dynamics. The scaling and mixing retroactivity establish how intermodular connections change the dynamics of connected modules. Based on these matrices and on the dynamics of modules in isolation, we can accurately predict how loading will affect the behavior of an arbitrary interconnection of modules. We illustrate implications of internal, scaling, and mixing retroactivity on the performance of recurrent network motifs, including negative autoregulation, combinatorial regulation, two-gene clocks, the toggle switch, and the single-input motif. We further provide a quantitative metric that determines how robust the dynamic behavior of a module is to interconnection with other modules. This metric can be employed both to evaluate the extent of modularity of natural networks and to establish concrete design guidelines to minimize retroactivity between modules in synthetic systems.

  4. Informational requirements for transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Patrick K; Forder, Robert; Erill, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate transcription by binding to specific sites in promoter regions. Information theory provides a useful mathematical framework to analyze the binding motifs associated with TFs but imposes several assumptions that limit their applicability to specific regulatory scenarios. Explicit simulations of the co-evolution of TFs and their binding motifs allow the study of the evolution of regulatory networks with a high degree of realism. In this work we analyze the impact of differential regulatory demands on the information content of TF-binding motifs by means of evolutionary simulations. We generalize a predictive index based on information theory, and we validate its applicability to regulatory scenarios in which the TF binds significantly to the genomic background. Our results show a logarithmic dependence of the evolved information content on the occupancy of target sites and indicate that TFs may actively exploit pseudo-sites to modulate their occupancy of target sites. In regulatory networks with differentially regulated targets, we observe that information content in TF-binding motifs is dictated primarily by the fraction of total probability mass that the TF assigns to its target sites, and we provide a predictive index to estimate the amount of information associated with arbitrarily complex regulatory systems. We observe that complex regulatory patterns can exert additional demands on evolved information content, but, given a total occupancy for target sites, we do not find conclusive evidence that this effect is because of the range of required binding affinities. PMID:24689750

  5. Gene transcription and electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    Our overall aim is to obtain sufficient information to allow us to ultimately determine whether ELF EM field exposure is an initiating factor in neoplastic transformation and/or if exposure can mimic characteristics of the second-step counterpart in neoplastic disease. This aim is based on our previous findings that levels of some transcripts are increased in cells exposed to EM fields. While the research is basic in nature, the ramifications have bearing on the general safety of exposure to EM fields in industrial and everyday life. A large array of diverse biological effects are reported to occur as the result of exposure to elf EM fields, suggesting that the cell response to EM fields is at a basic level, presumably initiated by molecular and/or biophysical events at the cell membrane. The hypothesized route is a signal transduction pathway involving membrane calcium fluxes. Information flow resulting from signal transduction can mediate the induction of regulatory factors in the cell, and directly affect how transcription is regulated.

  6. Transcriptional enhancers in ascidian development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Christiaen, Lionel

    2012-01-01

    The study of cis-regulatory DNAs that control developmental gene expression is integral to the modeling of comprehensive genomic regulatory networks for embryogenesis. Ascidian embryos provide a unique opportunity for the analysis of cis-regulatory DNAs with cellular resolution in the context of a simple but typical chordate body plan. Here, we review landmark studies that have laid the foundations for the study of transcriptional enhancers, among other cis-regulatory DNAs, and their roles in ascidian development. The studies using ascidians of the Ciona genus have capitalized on a unique electroporation technique that permits the simultaneous transfection of hundreds of fertilized eggs, which develop rapidly and express transgenes with little mosaicism. Current studies using the ascidian embryo benefit from extensively annotated genomic resources to characterize transcript models in silico. The search for functional noncoding sequences can be guided by bioinformatic analyses combining evolutionary conservation, gene coexpression, and combinations of overrepresented short-sequence motifs. The power of the transient transfection assays has allowed thorough dissection of numerous cis-regulatory modules, which provided insights into the functional constraints that shape enhancer architecture and diversification. Future studies will benefit from pioneering stable transgenic lines and the analysis of chromatin states. Whole genome expression, functional and DNA binding data are being integrated into comprehensive genomic regulatory network models of early ascidian cell specification with a single-cell resolution that is unique among chordate model systems.

  7. Accurately measuring dynamic coefficient of friction in ultraform finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Dennis; Echaves, Samantha; Pidgeon, Brendan; Travis, Nathan; Ellis, Jonathan D.

    2013-09-01

    UltraForm Finishing (UFF) is a deterministic sub-aperture computer numerically controlled grinding and polishing platform designed by OptiPro Systems. UFF is used to grind and polish a variety of optics from simple spherical to fully freeform, and numerous materials from glasses to optical ceramics. The UFF system consists of an abrasive belt around a compliant wheel that rotates and contacts the part to remove material. This work aims to accurately measure the dynamic coefficient of friction (μ), how it changes as a function of belt wear, and how this ultimately affects material removal rates. The coefficient of friction has been examined in terms of contact mechanics and Preston's equation to determine accurate material removal rates. By accurately predicting changes in μ, polishing iterations can be more accurately predicted, reducing the total number of iterations required to meet specifications. We have established an experimental apparatus that can accurately measure μ by measuring triaxial forces during translating loading conditions or while manufacturing the removal spots used to calculate material removal rates. Using this system, we will demonstrate μ measurements for UFF belts during different states of their lifecycle and assess the material removal function from spot diagrams as a function of wear. Ultimately, we will use this system for qualifying belt-wheel-material combinations to develop a spot-morphing model to better predict instantaneous material removal functions.

  8. Genome-wide analysis of alternative transcripts in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ji; Toomer, Kevin H.

    2016-01-01

    Transcript variants play a critical role in diversifying gene expression. Alternative splicing is a major mechanism for generating transcript variants. A number of genes have been implicated in breast cancer pathogenesis with their aberrant expression of alternative transcripts. In this study, we performed genome-wide analyses of transcript variant expression in breast cancer. With RNA-Seq data from 105 patients, we characterized the transcriptome of breast tumors, by pairwise comparison of gene expression in the breast tumor versus matched healthy tissue from each patient. We identified 2839 genes, ~10 % of protein-coding genes in the human genome, that had differential expression of transcript variants between tumors and healthy tissues. The validity of the computational analysis was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR assessment of transcript variant expression from four top candidate genes. The alternative transcript profiling led to classification of breast cancer into two subgroups and yielded a novel molecular signature that could be prognostic of patients’ tumor burden and survival. We uncovered nine splicing factors (FOX2, MBNL1, QKI, PTBP1, ELAVL1, HNRNPC, KHDRBS1, SFRS2, and TIAR) that were involved in aberrant splicing in breast cancer. Network analyses for the coordinative patterns of transcript variant expression identified twelve “hub” genes that differentiated the cancerous and normal transcriptomes. Dysregulated expression of alternative transcripts may reveal novel biomarkers for tumor development. It may also suggest new therapeutic targets, such as the “hub” genes identified through the network analyses of transcript variant expression, or splicing factors implicated in the formation of the tumor transcriptome. PMID:25913416

  9. Quantification of co-transcriptional splicing from RNA-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Herzel, Lydia; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2015-09-01

    During gene expression, protein-coding transcripts are shaped by multiple processing events: 5' end capping, pre-mRNA splicing, RNA editing, and 3' end cleavage and polyadenylation. These events are required to produce mature mRNA, which can be subsequently translated. Nearly all of these RNA processing steps occur during transcription, while the nascent RNA is still attached to the DNA template by RNA polymerase II (i.e. co-transcriptionally). Polyadenylation occurs after 3' end cleavage or post-transcriptionally. Pre-mRNA splicing - the removal of introns and ligation of exons - can be initiated and concluded co-transcriptionally, although this is not strictly required. Recently, a number of studies using global methods have shown that the majority of splicing is co-transcriptional, yet not all published studies agree in their conclusions. Short read sequencing of RNA (RNA-Seq) is the prevailing approach to measuring splicing levels in nascent RNA, mRNA or total RNA. Here, we compare four different strategies for analyzing and quantifying co-transcriptional splicing. To do so, we reanalyze two nascent RNA-Seq datasets of the same species, but different cell type and RNA isolation procedure. Average co-transcriptional splicing values calculated on a per intron basis are similar, independent of the strategy used. We emphasize the technical requirements for identifying co-transcriptional splicing events with high confidence, e.g. how to calculate co-transcriptional splicing from nascent RNA- versus mRNA-Seq data, the number of biological replicates needed, depletion of polyA+RNA, and appropriate normalization. Finally, we present guidelines for planning a nascent RNA-Seq experiment.

  10. Mitotic Transcriptional Activation: Clearance of Actively Engaged Pol II via Transcriptional Elongation Control in Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kaiwei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Rickels, Ryan A; Gao, Xin; Haug, Jeffrey S; Jaspersen, Sue L; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Although it is established that some general transcription factors are inactivated at mitosis, many details of mitotic transcription inhibition (MTI) and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified mitotic transcriptional activation (MTA) as a key regulatory step to control transcription in mitosis for genes with transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to activate and transcribe until the end of the gene to clear Pol II from mitotic chromatin, followed by global impairment of transcription reinitiation through MTI. Global nascent RNA sequencing and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrate the existence of transcriptionally engaged Pol II in early mitosis. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of P-TEFb in mitosis lead to delays in the progression of cell division. Together, our study reveals a mechanism for MTA and MTI whereby transcriptionally engaged Pol II can progress into productive elongation and finish transcription to allow proper cellular division.

  11. The transcriptional programme of the androgen receptor (AR) in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Alastair D; Massie, Charlie E; Neal, David E

    2014-03-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is essential for normal prostate and prostate cancer cell growth. AR transcriptional activity is almost always maintained even in hormone relapsed prostate cancer (HRPC) in the absence of normal levels of circulating testosterone. Current molecular techniques, such as chromatin-immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq), have permitted identification of direct AR-binding sites in cell lines and human tissue with a distinct coordinate network evident in HRPC. The effectiveness of novel agents, such as abiraterone acetate (suppresses adrenal androgens) or enzalutamide (MDV3100, potent AR antagonist), in treating advanced prostate cancer underlines the on-going critical role of the AR throughout all stages of the disease. Persistent AR activity in advanced disease regulates cell cycle activity, steroid biosynthesis and anabolic metabolism in conjunction with regulatory co-factors, such as the E2F family, c-Myc and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) transcription factors. Further treatment approaches must target these other factors.

  12. Normalization method for video images

    SciTech Connect

    Donohoe, G.W.; Hush, D.R.

    1992-12-31

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for automatically and adaptively normalizing analog signals representative of video images in object detection systems. Such normalization maximizes the average information content of the video images and, thereby, provides optimal digitized images for object detection and identification. The present invention manipulates two system control signals -- gain control signal and offset control signal -- to convert an analog image signal into a transformed analog image signal, such that the corresponding digitized image contains the maximum amount of information achievable with a conventional object detection system. In some embodiments of the present invention, information content is measured using parameters selected from image entropy, image mean, and image variance.

  13. Pressure test in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, M; Kodama, A; Ozawa, H; Izukura, H

    1994-01-01

    The application of pressure to the middle ear changes the normal inner ear pressure in animal experiments. In this study we tested the effect of exposure to under- or overpressure on hearing in a total of 78 normal ears (40 subjects) in a soundproof pressure chamber. [After exposure to underpressure, a 10 dB or more gain in 3 ears and loss in 2 ears for at least one of the test frequencies was observed in 38 ears. After exposure to overpressure, a 10 dB or more gain in 5 ears and loss in 1 ear for at least one of the test frequencies was observed in 40 ears.] The characteristics of transferred inner ear pressure during a series of exposures to underpressure seemed to be similar to those during exposures to overpressure.

  14. Heparinised saline or normal saline?

    PubMed

    Kannan, Anand

    2008-10-01

    Using heparinised saline as a flush to maintain the patency of arterial and central venous lines is a well-known practice. A literature search was undertaken but found no evidence to support the use of heparinised saline over normal saline. In addition, the use of heparinised saline may be associated with adverse effects. The literature search strategy utilised Ovid CINAHL and Medline databases, as well as hand-searching bibliographies of clinical and research articles from the University of Cambridge Medical Library. Keywords and phrases included 'heparin', 'normal saline', 'arterial', 'haemodynamic lines' and 'catheters'. All types of evidence from each of these resources were examined to identify major themes, areas of agreement and disagreement across clinical practice, changesin the concept over time and emerging trends. PMID:18983067

  15. The utility of accurate mass and LC elution time information in the analysis of complex proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Norbeck, Angela D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Daly, Don S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-08-01

    Theoretical tryptic digests of all predicted proteins from the genomes of three organisms of varying complexity were evaluated for specificity and possible utility of combined peptide accurate mass and predicted LC normalized elution time (NET) information. The uniqueness of each peptide was evaluated using its combined mass (+/- 5 ppm and 1 ppm) and NET value (no constraint, +/- 0.05 and 0.01 on a 0-1 NET scale). The set of peptides both underestimates actual biological complexity due to the lack of specific modifications, and overestimates the expected complexity since many proteins will not be present in the sample or observable on the mass spectrometer because of dynamic range limitations. Once a peptide is identified from an LCMS/MS experiment, its mass and elution time is representative of a unique fingerprint for that peptide. The uniqueness of that fingerprint in comparison to that for the other peptides present is indicative of the ability to confidently identify that peptide based on accurate mass and NET measurements. These measurements can be made using HPLC coupled with high resolution MS in a high-throughput manner. Results show that for organisms with comparatively small proteomes, such as Deinococcus radiodurans, modest mass and elution time accuracies are generally adequate for peptide identifications. For more complex proteomes, increasingly accurate easurements are required. However, the majority of proteins should be uniquely identifiable by using LC-MS with mass accuracies within +/- 1 ppm and elution time easurements within +/- 0.01 NET.

  16. The GnRH promoter: target of transcription factors, hormones, and signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Nelson, S B; Eraly, S A; Mellon, P L

    1998-05-25

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is essential for normal reproductive maturation and function. We present a review of the known mechanisms of hypothalamic GnRH transcriptional control through the conserved GnRH promoter. Understanding this promoter region will allow us to comprehend better the complexities of the hypothalamic pituitary-gonadal axis.

  17. Tackling Long Delays in Transcript and Certificate Production in Higher Education: A Case Study from Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Angela Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Provision of transcripts and certificates at the time of graduation, a normal expectation in higher education in developed countries, was a challenge in the case-study university, which risked affecting stakeholder satisfaction and student enrollment. A group problem-solving method was used to identify the scope of the problem, the goal, and to…

  18. Validation and Comparison of Reference Genes for qPCR Normalization of Celery (Apium graveolens) at Different Development Stages

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng-Yao; Wang, Feng; Jiang, Qian; Wang, Guan-Long; Tian, Chang; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    A suitable reference gene is an important prerequisite for guarantying accurate and reliable results in qPCR analysis. Celery is one of the representative vegetable in Apiaceae and is widely cultivated and consumed in the world. However, no reports have been previously published concerning reference genes in celery. In this study, the expression stabilities of nine candidate reference genes in leaf blade and petiole at different development stages were evaluated using three statistics algorithms geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper. Our results showed that TUB-B, TUB-A, and UBC were the most reference genes among all tested samples. GAPDH represented the maximum stability for most individual sample, while the UBQ displayed the minimum stability. To further validate the stability of reference genes, the expression pattern of AgAP2-2 was calculated by using the selected genes for normalization. In addition, the expression patterns of several development-related genes were studied using the selected reference gene. Our results will be beneficial for further studies on gene transcription in celery. PMID:27014330

  19. Validation and Comparison of Reference Genes for qPCR Normalization of Celery (Apium graveolens) at Different Development Stages.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng-Yao; Wang, Feng; Jiang, Qian; Wang, Guan-Long; Tian, Chang; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    A suitable reference gene is an important prerequisite for guarantying accurate and reliable results in qPCR analysis. Celery is one of the representative vegetable in Apiaceae and is widely cultivated and consumed in the world. However, no reports have been previously published concerning reference genes in celery. In this study, the expression stabilities of nine candidate reference genes in leaf blade and petiole at different development stages were evaluated using three statistics algorithms geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper. Our results showed that TUB-B, TUB-A, and UBC were the most reference genes among all tested samples. GAPDH represented the maximum stability for most individual sample, while the UBQ displayed the minimum stability. To further validate the stability of reference genes, the expression pattern of AgAP2-2 was calculated by using the selected genes for normalization. In addition, the expression patterns of several development-related genes were studied using the selected reference gene. Our results will be beneficial for further studies on gene transcription in celery. PMID:27014330

  20. Validation and Comparison of Reference Genes for qPCR Normalization of Celery (Apium graveolens) at Different Development Stages.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng-Yao; Wang, Feng; Jiang, Qian; Wang, Guan-Long; Tian, Chang; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    A suitable reference gene is an important prerequisite for guarantying accurate and reliable results in qPCR analysis. Celery is one of the representative vegetable in Apiaceae and is widely cultivated and consumed in the world. However, no reports have been previously published concerning reference genes in celery. In this study, the expression stabilities of nine candidate reference genes in leaf blade and petiole at different development stages were evaluated using three statistics algorithms geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper. Our results showed that TUB-B, TUB-A, and UBC were the most reference genes among all tested samples. GAPDH represented the maximum stability for most individual sample, while the UBQ displayed the minimum stability. To further validate the stability of reference genes, the expression pattern of AgAP2-2 was calculated by using the selected genes for normalization. In addition, the expression patterns of several development-related genes were studied using the selected reference gene. Our results will be beneficial for further studies on gene transcription in celery.