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Sample records for accurate transition frequencies

  1. Accurate measurements of transition frequencies and isotope shifts of laser-trapped francium.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, S; Calabrese, R; Corradi, L; Dainelli, A; Khanbekyan, A; Mariotti, E; de Mauro, C; Minguzzi, P; Moi, L; Stancari, G; Tomassetti, L; Veronesi, S

    2009-04-01

    An interferometric method is used to improve the accuracy of the 7S-7P transition frequencies of three francium isotopes by 1 order of magnitude. The deduced isotope shifts for 209-211Fr confirm the ISOLDE data. The frequency of the D2 transition of 212Fr--the accepted reference for all Fr isotope shifts--is revised, and a significant difference with the ISOLDE value is found. Our results will be a benchmark for the accuracy of the theory of Fr energy levels, a necessary step to investigate fundamental symmetries.

  2. Highly Accurate and Precise Infrared Transition Frequencies of the H_3^+ Cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Adam J.; Markus, Charles R.; Hodges, James N.; Kocheril, G. Stephen; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-06-01

    Calculation of ab initio potential energy surfaces for molecules to high accuracy is only manageable for a handful of molecular systems. Among them is the simplest polyatomic molecule, the H_3^+ cation. In order to achieve a high degree of accuracy (<1 wn) corrections must be made to the to the traditional Born-Oppenheimer approximation that take into account not only adiabatic and non-adiabatic couplings, but quantum electrodynamic corrections as well. For the lowest rovibrational levels the agreement between theory and experiment is approaching 0.001 wn, whereas the agreement is on the order of 0.01 - 0.1 wn for higher levels which are closely rivaling the uncertainties on the experimental data. As method development for calculating these various corrections progresses it becomes necessary for the uncertainties on the experimental data to be improved in order to properly benchmark the calculations. Previously we have measured 20 rovibrational transitions of H_3^+ with MHz-level precision, all of which have arisen from low lying rotational levels. Here we present new measurements of rovibrational transitions arising from higher rotational and vibrational levels. These transitions not only allow for probing higher energies on the potential energy surface, but through the use of combination differences, will ultimately lead to prediction of the "forbidden" rotational transitions with MHz-level accuracy. L.G. Diniz, J.R. Mohallem, A. Alijah, M. Pavanello, L. Adamowicz, O.L. Polyansky, J. Tennyson Phys. Rev. A (2013), 88, 032506 O.L. Polyansky, A. Alijah, N.F. Zobov, I.I. Mizus, R.I. Ovsyannikov, J. Tennyson, L. Lodi, T. Szidarovszky, A.G. Császár Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A (2012), 370, 5014 J.N. Hodges, A.J. Perry, P.A. Jenkins II, B.M. Siller, B.J. McCall J. Chem. Phys. (2013), 139, 164201 A.J. Perry, J.N. Hodges, C.R. Markus, G.S. Kocheril, B.J. McCall J. Molec. Spectrosc. (2015), 317, 71-73.

  3. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  4. Accurate rubidium atomic fountain frequency standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Yuri; Marra, Giuseppe

    2011-06-01

    The design, operating parameters and the accuracy evaluation of the NPL Rb atomic fountain are described. The atomic fountain employs a double magneto-optical arrangement that allows a large number of 87Rb atoms to be trapped, a water-cooled temperature-stabilized interrogation region and a high quality factor interrogation cavity. From the uncertainties of measured and calculated systematic frequency shifts, the fractional frequency accuracy is estimated to be 3.7 × 10-16. The fractional frequency stability, limited predominantly by noise in the local oscillator, is measured to be 7 × 10-16 after one day of averaging. Based on the proposed quasi-continuous regime of operation of the fountain, the accuracy of the Rb standard of 5 × 10-17 reachable in two days of averaging is predicted.

  5. Accurate frequency referencing for fieldable dual-comb spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Truong, Gar-Wing; Waxman, Eleanor M; Cossel, Kevin C; Baumann, Esther; Klose, Andrew; Giorgetta, Fabrizio R; Swann, William C; Newbury, Nathan R; Coddington, Ian

    2016-12-26

    We describe a dual-comb spectrometer that can operate independently of laboratory-based rf and optical frequency references but is nevertheless capable of ultra-high spectral resolution, high SNR, and frequency-accurate spectral measurements. The instrument is based on a "bootstrapped" frequency referencing scheme in which short-term optical phase coherence between combs is attained by referencing each to a free-running diode laser, whilst high frequency resolution and long-term accuracy is derived from a stable quartz oscillator. The sensitivity, stability and accuracy of this spectrometer were characterized using a multipass cell. We demonstrate comb-resolved spectra spanning from 140 THz (2.14 µm, 4670 cm-1) to 184 THz (1.63 µm, 6140 cm-1) in the near infrared with a frequency sampling of 200 MHz (0.0067 cm-1) and ~1 MHz frequency accuracy. High resolution spectra of water and carbon dioxide transitions at 1.77 µm, 1.96 µm and 2.06 µm show that the molecular transmission acquired with this system operating in the field-mode did not deviate from those measured when it was referenced to a maser and cavity-stabilized laser to within 5.6 × 10-4. When optimized for carbon dioxide quantification at 1.60 µm, a sensitivity of 2.8 ppm-km at 1 s integration time, improving to 0.10 ppm-km at 13 minutes of integration time was achieved.

  6. Improved Oxygenation 24 Hours After Transition to Airway Pressure Release Ventilation or High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation Accurately Discriminates Survival in Immunocompromised Pediatric Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Yehya, Nadir; Topjian, Alexis A.; Thomas, Neal J.; Friess, Stuart H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Children with an immunocompromised condition and requiring invasive mechanical ventilation have high risk of death. Such patients are commonly transitioned to rescue modes of non-conventional ventilation, including airway pressure release ventilation and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, for acute respiratory distress syndrome refractory to conventional ventilation. Our aim was to describe our experience with airway pressure release ventilation and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in children with an immunocompromised condition and acute respiratory distress syndrome refractory to conventional ventilation and to identify factors associated with survival. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Tertiary care, university-affiliated PICU. Patients Sixty pediatric patients with an immunocompromised condition and acute respiratory distress syndrome refractory to conventional ventilation transitioned to either airway pressure release ventilation or high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Demographic data, ventilator settings, arterial blood gases, oxygenation index, and Pao2/Fio2 were recorded before transition to either mode of nonconventional ventilation and at predetermined intervals after transition for up to 5 days. Mortality in the entire cohort was 63% and did not differ between patients transitioned to airway pressure release ventilation and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. For both airway pressure release ventilation and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, improvements in oxygenation index and Pao2/Fio2 at 24 hours expressed as a fraction of pretransition values (oxygenation index24/oxygenation indexpre and Pao2/Fio224/Pao2/FIO2pre) reliably discriminated nonsurvivors from survivors, with receiver operating characteristic areas under the curves between 0.89 and 0.95 (p for all curves < 0.001). Sensitivity-specificity analysis suggested that less than 15% reduction in

  7. Sequence Compaction to Preserve Transition Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Pinar, Ali; Liu, C.L.

    2002-12-12

    Simulation-based power estimation is commonly used for its high accuracy despite excessive computation times. Techniques have been proposed to speed it up by compacting an input sequence while preserving its power-consumption characteristics. We propose a novel method to compact a sequence that preserves transition frequencies. We prove the problem is NP-Complete, and propose a graph model to reduce it to that of finding a heaviest weighted trail on a directed graph, along with a heuristic utilizing this model. We also propose using multiple sequences for better accuracy with even shorter sequences. Experiments showed that power dissipation can be estimated with an error of only 2.3 percent, while simulation times are reduced by 10. Proposed methods effectively preserve transition frequencies and generated solutions that are very close to an optimal. Experiments also showed that multiple sequences granted more accurate results with even shorter sequences.

  8. Accurate frequency referencing for fieldable dual-comb spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Gar-Wing; Waxman, Eleanor M.; Cossel, Kevin C.; Baumann, Esther; Klose, Andrew; Giorgetta, Fabrizio R.; Swann, William C.; Newbury, Nathan R.; Coddington, Ian

    2016-12-01

    A fieldable dual-comb spectrometer is described based on a "bootstrapped" frequency referencing scheme in which short-term optical phase coherence between combs is attained by referencing each to a free-running diode laser, whilst high frequency resolution and long-term accuracy is derived from a stable quartz oscillator. This fieldable dual-comb spectrometer was used to measure spectra with full comb-tooth resolution spanning from 140 THz (2.14 um, 4670 cm^-1) to 184 THz (1.63 um, 6140 cm^-1) in the near infrared with a frequency sampling of 200 MHz (0.0067 cm^-1), ~ 120 kHz frequency resolution, and ~ 1 MHz frequency accuracy. High resolution spectra of water and carbon dioxide transitions at 1.77 um, 1.96 um and 2.06 um show that the molecular transmission acquired with this fieldable system did not deviate from those measured with a laboratory-based system (referenced to a maser and cavity-stabilized laser) to within 5.6x10^-4. Additionally, the fieldable system optimized for carbon dioxide quantification at 1.60 um, demonstrated a sensitivity of 2.8 ppm-km at 1 s integration time, improving to 0.10 ppm-km at 13 minutes of integration time.

  9. Accurate transition rates for intercombination lines of singly ionized nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2011-01-01

    The transition energies and rates for the 2s22p2 3P1,2-2s2p3 5S2o and 2s22p3s-2s22p3p intercombination transitions have been calculated using term-dependent nonorthogonal orbitals in the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock approach. Several sets of spectroscopic and correlation nonorthogonal functions have been chosen to describe adequately term dependence of wave functions and various correlation corrections. Special attention has been focused on the accurate representation of strong interactions between the 2s2p3 1,3P1o and 2s22p3s 1,3P1olevels. The relativistic corrections are included through the one-body mass correction, Darwin, and spin-orbit operators and two-body spin-other-orbit and spin-spin operators in the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. The importance of core-valence correlation effects has been examined. The accuracy of present transition rates is evaluated by the agreement between the length and velocity formulations combined with the agreement between the calculated and measured transition energies. The present results for transition probabilities, branching fraction, and lifetimes have been compared with previous calculations and experiments.

  10. Accurate transition rates for intercombination lines of singly ionized nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Tayal, S. S.

    2011-01-15

    The transition energies and rates for the 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 2} {sup 3}P{sub 1,2}-2s2p{sup 3} {sup 5}S{sub 2}{sup o} and 2s{sup 2}2p3s-2s{sup 2}2p3p intercombination transitions have been calculated using term-dependent nonorthogonal orbitals in the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock approach. Several sets of spectroscopic and correlation nonorthogonal functions have been chosen to describe adequately term dependence of wave functions and various correlation corrections. Special attention has been focused on the accurate representation of strong interactions between the 2s2p{sup 3} {sup 1,3}P{sub 1}{sup o} and 2s{sup 2}2p3s {sup 1,3}P{sub 1}{sup o}levels. The relativistic corrections are included through the one-body mass correction, Darwin, and spin-orbit operators and two-body spin-other-orbit and spin-spin operators in the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. The importance of core-valence correlation effects has been examined. The accuracy of present transition rates is evaluated by the agreement between the length and velocity formulations combined with the agreement between the calculated and measured transition energies. The present results for transition probabilities, branching fraction, and lifetimes have been compared with previous calculations and experiments.

  11. Absolute frequency measurement of rubidium 5S-7S two-photon transitions.

    PubMed

    Morzyński, Piotr; Wcisło, Piotr; Ablewski, Piotr; Gartman, Rafał; Gawlik, Wojciech; Masłowski, Piotr; Nagórny, Bartłomiej; Ozimek, Filip; Radzewicz, Czesław; Witkowski, Marcin; Ciuryło, Roman; Zawada, Michał

    2013-11-15

    We report the absolute frequency measurements of rubidium 5S-7S two-photon transitions with a cw laser digitally locked to an atomic transition and referenced to an optical frequency comb. The narrow, two-photon transition, 5S-7S (760 nm), insensitive to first-order in a magnetic field, is a promising candidate for frequency reference. The performed tests yielded more accurate transition frequencies than previously reported.

  12. Accurate frequency of the 119 micron methanol laser from tunable far-infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inguscio, M.; Zink, L. R.; Evenson, K. M.; Jennings, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    High-accuracy absorption spectroscopy of CH3OH in the far infrared is discussed. In addition to 22 transitions in the ground state, the frequency of the (n, tau, J, K), (0, 1, 16, 8) to (0, 2, 15, 7) transition in the nu5 excited vibrational level, which is responsible for the laser emission at 119 microns, was measured. The measured frequency is 2,522,782.57(10) MHz at zero pressure, with a pressure shift of 6.1(32) kHz/Pa (0.805/420/ MHz/torr). An accurate remeasurement of the laser emission frequency has also been performed, and the results are in good agreement.

  13. Accurate Evaluation of Microwave-Leakage-Induced Frequency Shifts in Fountain Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang; Liu, Kun; Chen, Wei-Liang; Liu, Nian-Feng; Suo, Rui; Li, Tian-Chun

    2014-10-01

    We report theoretical calculations of the transition probability errors introduced by microwave leakage in Cs fountain clocks, which will shift the clock frequency. The results show that the transition probability errors are affected by the Ramsey pulse amplitude, the relative phase between the Ramsey field and the leakage field, and the asymmetry of the leakage fields for the upward and downward passages. This effect is quite different for the leakage fields presenting below the Ramsey cavity and above the Ramsey cavity. The leakage-field-induced frequency shifts of the NIM5 fountain clock in different cases are measured. The results are consistent with the theoretical calculations, and give an accurate evaluation of the leakage-field-induced frequency shifts, as distinguished from other microwave-power-related effects for the first time.

  14. How Accurate Are Transition States from Simulations of Enzymatic Reactions?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The rate expression of traditional transition state theory (TST) assumes no recrossing of the transition state (TS) and thermal quasi-equilibrium between the ground state and the TS. Currently, it is not well understood to what extent these assumptions influence the nature of the activated complex obtained in traditional TST-based simulations of processes in the condensed phase in general and in enzymes in particular. Here we scrutinize these assumptions by characterizing the TSs for hydride transfer catalyzed by the enzyme Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase obtained using various simulation approaches. Specifically, we compare the TSs obtained with common TST-based methods and a dynamics-based method. Using a recently developed accurate hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics potential, we find that the TST-based and dynamics-based methods give considerably different TS ensembles. This discrepancy, which could be due equilibrium solvation effects and the nature of the reaction coordinate employed and its motion, raises major questions about how to interpret the TSs determined by common simulation methods. We conclude that further investigation is needed to characterize the impact of various TST assumptions on the TS phase-space ensemble and on the reaction kinetics. PMID:24860275

  15. Comment on 'Accurate rubidium atomic fountain frequency standard'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruoxin; Gibble, Kurt

    2011-10-01

    We discuss the treatment of distributed cavity phase, microwave lensing and microwave leakage in the paper by Ovchinnikov and Marra (2011 Metrologia 48 87-100). The paper neglects the potential distributed cavity phase shifts from linear phase gradients and quadrupolar phase variations. Only azimuthally symmetric phase variations were analysed and an incorrect model was used for these. The paper also omits an uncertainty due to microwave lensing, which must be included. Finally, we describe additional measurements that could clarify the model used to analyse the frequency shifts due to microwave leakage.

  16. Diborane, dialane, and digallane: Accurate geometries and vibrational frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Magers, D.H.; Hood, R.B.; Leszczynski, J.

    1994-12-31

    Optimum equilibrium geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and infrared intensities within the double harmonic approximation are computed for diborane, B{sub 2}H{sub 6}, dialane, Al{sub 2}H{sub 6}, and digallane, Ga{sub 2}H{sub 6}, at both the SCF level of theory and the second-order perturbation theory [E(2)] using three large basis sets: 6-311G(d,p), 6-311G(2d,2p), and 6-311G(2df,2p). In particular, the results obtained with the latter basis set make this present work the first study to include f-type polarization functions in a systematic investigation of the molecular structure and properties of all three molecules in the series. Because of the good agreement of the present theoretical results with experimental data and with previous theoretical studies which employed a higher treatment of electron correlation, this study serves to show that large basis sets can in part compensate for the lack of a more advanced treatment of electron correlation in these electron-deficient systems. In addition, this study establishes the level of basis set needed for future work on these systems including a thorough description of the total electronic density at a correlated level.

  17. Rotational frequencies of transition metal hydrides for astrophysical searches in the far-infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John M.; Beaton, Stuart P.; Evenson, Kenneth M.

    1993-01-01

    Accurate frequencies for the lowest rotational transitions of five transition metal hydrides (CrH, FeH, CoH, NiH, and CuH) in their ground electronic states are reported to help the identification of these species in astrophysical sources from their far-infrared spectra. Accurate frequencies are determined in two ways: for CuH, by calculation from rotational constants determined from higher J transitions with an accuracy of 190 kHz; for the other species, by extrapolation to zero magnetic field from laser magnetic resonance spectra with an accuracy of 0.7 MHz.

  18. Joint accurate time and stable frequency distribution infrastructure sharing fiber footprint with research network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojtech, Josef; Slapak, Martin; Skoda, Pavel; Radil, Jan; Havlis, Ondrej; Altmann, Michal; Munster, Petr; Smotlacha, Vladimir; Kundrat, Jan; Velc, Radek; Altmannova, Lada; Hula, Miloslav

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present infrastructure for accurate time and stable frequency distribution. It is based on sharing of fibers of research and educational network carrying data traffic. Accurate time and stable frequency transmission uses mainly created dark channels amplified by special bidirectional amplifiers with the same propagation path for both directions. Paper also targets challenges joined with bidirectional transmission, which represents directional non-reciprocities and interaction with parallel data transmissions.

  19. A Novel Multimode Waveguide Coupler for Accurate Power Measurement of Traveling Wave Tube Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler fabricated from two dissimilar waveguides is capable of isolating the power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT). In addition to accurate power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave frequencies.

  20. Absolute frequency measurement of the 674-nm {sup 88}Sr{sup +} clock transition using a femtosecond optical frequency comb

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, H.S.; Huang, G.; Barwood, G.P.; Lea, S.N.; Klein, H.A.; Rowley, W.R.C.; Gill, P.; Windeler, R.S.

    2003-03-01

    The frequency of the 5s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-4d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} electric quadrupole transition at 674 nm in a single, trapped, laser-cooled {sup 88}Sr{sup +} ion has been measured with respect to the Systeme International (SI) second using a femtosecond laser optical frequency comb. The measured frequency of 444 779 044 095.52 kHz, with an estimated standard uncertainty of 0.10 kHz, is more accurate than, and in agreement with, the value previously measured using a conventional frequency chain.

  1. Accurate compensation of the low-frequency components for the FFT-based turbulent phase screen.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jingsong

    2012-01-02

    Standard FFT-based turbulent phase screen generation method has very large errors due to the undersampling of the low frequency components. Subharmonic methods are the main low frequency components compensating methods to improve the accuracy, but the residual errors are still large. In this paper I propose a new low frequency components compensating method, which is based on the correlation matrix phase screen generation methods. Using this method, the low frequency components can be compensated accurately, both of the accuracy and speed are superior to those of the subharmonic methods.

  2. A fast and accurate frequency estimation algorithm for sinusoidal signal with harmonic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinghua; Pan, Mengchun; Zeng, Zhidun; Hu, Jiafei; Chen, Dixiang; Tian, Wugang; Zhao, Jianqiang; Du, Qingfa

    2016-10-01

    Frequency estimation is a fundamental problem in many applications, such as traditional vibration measurement, power system supervision, and microelectromechanical system sensors control. In this paper, a fast and accurate frequency estimation algorithm is proposed to deal with low efficiency problem in traditional methods. The proposed algorithm consists of coarse and fine frequency estimation steps, and we demonstrate that it is more efficient than conventional searching methods to achieve coarse frequency estimation (location peak of FFT amplitude) by applying modified zero-crossing technique. Thus, the proposed estimation algorithm requires less hardware and software sources and can achieve even higher efficiency when the experimental data increase. Experimental results with modulated magnetic signal show that the root mean square error of frequency estimation is below 0.032 Hz with the proposed algorithm, which has lower computational complexity and better global performance than conventional frequency estimation methods.

  3. Investigation of low frequency electrolytic solution behavior with an accurate electrical impedance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Kung-Chu; Su, Vin-Cent; Huang, Da-Yo; Lee, Ming-Lun; Chou, Nai-Kuan; Kuan, Chieh-Hsiung

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the investigation of strong electrolytic solutions operated in low frequency regime through an accurate electrical impedance method realized with a specific microfluidic device and high resolution instruments. Experimental results show the better repeatability and accuracy of the proposed impedance method. Moreover, all electrolytic solutions appear the so-called relaxation frequency at each peak value of dielectric loss due to relaxing total polarization inside the device. The relaxation frequency of concentrated electrolytes becomes higher owing to the stronger total polarization behavior coming from the higher conductivity as well as the lower resistance in the electrolytic solutions.

  4. Robust and accurate fundamental frequency estimation based on dominant harmonic components.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Tomohiro; Irino, Toshio

    2004-12-01

    This paper presents a new method for robust and accurate fundamental frequency (F0) estimation in the presence of background noise and spectral distortion. Degree of dominance and dominance spectrum are defined based on instantaneous frequencies. The degree of dominance allows one to evaluate the magnitude of individual harmonic components of the speech signals relative to background noise while reducing the influence of spectral distortion. The fundamental frequency is more accurately estimated from reliable harmonic components which are easy to select given the dominance spectra. Experiments are performed using white and babble background noise with and without spectral distortion as produced by a SRAEN filter. The results show that the present method is better than previously reported methods in terms of both gross and fine F0 errors.

  5. An Accurate ab initio Quartic Force Field and Vibrational Frequencies for CH4 and Isotopomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Martin, Jan M. L.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1995-01-01

    A very accurate ab initio quartic force field for CH4 and its isotopomers is presented. The quartic force field was determined with the singles and doubles coupled-cluster procedure that includes a quasiperturbative estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), using the correlation consistent polarized valence triple zeta, cc-pVTZ, basis set. Improved quadratic force constants were evaluated with the correlation consistent polarized valence quadruple zeta, cc-pVQZ, basis set. Fundamental vibrational frequencies are determined using second-order perturbation theory anharmonic analyses. All fundamentals of CH4 and isotopomers for which accurate experimental values exist and for which there is not a large Fermi resonance, are predicted to within +/- 6 cm(exp -1). It is thus concluded that our predictions for the harmonic frequencies and the anharmonic constants are the most accurate estimates available. It is also shown that using cubic and quartic force constants determined with the correlation consistent polarized double zeta, cc-pVDZ, basis set in conjunction with the cc-pVQZ quadratic force constants and equilibrium geometry leads to accurate predictions for the fundamental vibrational frequencies of methane, suggesting that this approach may be a viable alternative for larger molecules. Using CCSD(T), core correlation is found to reduce the CH4 r(e), by 0.0015 A. Our best estimate for r, is 1.0862 +/- 0.0005 A.

  6. Multiple-frequency continuous wave ultrasonic system for accurate distance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. F.; Young, M. S.; Li, Y. C.

    1999-02-01

    A highly accurate multiple-frequency continuous wave ultrasonic range-measuring system for use in air is described. The proposed system uses a method heretofore applied to radio frequency distance measurement but not to air-based ultrasonic systems. The method presented here is based upon the comparative phase shifts generated by three continuous ultrasonic waves of different but closely spaced frequencies. In the test embodiment to confirm concept feasibility, two low cost 40 kHz ultrasonic transducers are set face to face and used to transmit and receive ultrasound. Individual frequencies are transmitted serially, each generating its own phase shift. For any given frequency, the transmitter/receiver distance modulates the phase shift between the transmitted and received signals. Comparison of the phase shifts allows a highly accurate evaluation of target distance. A single-chip microcomputer-based multiple-frequency continuous wave generator and phase detector was designed to record and compute the phase shift information and the resulting distance, which is then sent to either a LCD or a PC. The PC is necessary only for calibration of the system, which can be run independently after calibration. Experiments were conducted to test the performance of the whole system. Experimentally, ranging accuracy was found to be within ±0.05 mm, with a range of over 1.5 m. The main advantages of this ultrasonic range measurement system are high resolution, low cost, narrow bandwidth requirements, and ease of implementation.

  7. Tin phase transition in terapascal pressure range described accurately with Quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, Roman; Hood, Randolph; Morales, Miguel

    The accurate prediction of phase transitions is one of the most important research areas in modern materials science. The main workhorse for such calculations, Density functional theory (DFT), employs different forms of approximate exchange-correlation functionals which may lead to overstabilization of one phase compared to another, therefore, predict incorrectly phase transition pressures. A recent example of such deficiency has been demonstrated in Sn: no bcc to hcp phase transition has been observed in Sn when dynamically compressed to 1.2 TPa while DFT predicts a transition to occur at 0.16-0.2 TPa. To overcome the limitations of DFT, we have employed diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) method which treats the many body electron problem directly. In order to get highly accurate results we systematically assess the effect of controllable approximations of DMC such as fixed node approximation, finite-size effects and the use of pseudopotentials. Based on metrologically accurate DMC equation of states we construct the pressure-temperature phase diagram and demonstrate its good agreement with experiment in contrast to DFT calculations.

  8. A fast and accurate algorithm for high-frequency trans-ionospheric path length determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijaya, Dudy D.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a fast and accurate algorithm for high-frequency trans-ionospheric path length determination. The algorithm is merely based on the solution of the Eikonal equation that is solved using the conformal theory of refraction. The main advantages of the algorithm are summarized as follows. First, the algorithm can determine the optical path length without iteratively adjusting both elevation and azimuth angles and, hence, the computational time can be reduced. Second, for the same elevation and azimuth angles, the algorithm can simultaneously determine the phase and group of both ordinary and extra-ordinary optical path lengths for different frequencies. Results from numerical simulations show that the computational time required by the proposed algorithm to accurately determine 8 different optical path lengths is almost 17 times faster than that required by a 3D ionospheric ray-tracing algorithm. It is found that the computational time to determine multiple optical path lengths is the same with that for determining a single optical path length. It is also found that the proposed algorithm is capable of determining the optical path lengths with millimeter level of accuracies, if the magnitude of the squared ratio of the plasma frequency to the transmitted frequency is less than 1.33× 10^{-3}, and hence the proposed algorithm is applicable for geodetic applications.

  9. Distributed fiber sensing system with wide frequency response and accurate location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yi; Feng, Hao; Zeng, Zhoumo

    2016-02-01

    A distributed fiber sensing system merging Mach-Zehnder interferometer and phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometer (Φ-OTDR) is demonstrated for vibration measurement, which requires wide frequency response and accurate location. Two narrow line-width lasers with delicately different wavelengths are used to constitute the interferometer and reflectometer respectively. A narrow band Fiber Bragg Grating is responsible for separating the two wavelengths. In addition, heterodyne detection is applied to maintain the signal to noise rate of the locating signal. Experiment results show that the novel system has a wide frequency from 1 Hz to 50 MHz, limited by the sample frequency of data acquisition card, and a spatial resolution of 20 m, according to 200 ns pulse width, along 2.5 km fiber link.

  10. Relationship between the transition frequency of local fluid flow and the peak frequency of attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Cheng-Hao; Zhang, Hong-Bing; Pan, Yi-Xin; Teng, Xin-Bao

    2016-03-01

    Local fluid flow (LFF) at the mesoscopic scale is the main dissipation mechanism of seismic waves in heterogeneous porous media within the seismic frequency band. LFF is easily influenced by the structure and boundary conditions of the porous media, which leads to different behaviors of the peak frequency of attenuation. The associated transition frequency can provide detailed information about the trend of LFF; therefore, research on the transition frequency of LFF and its relationship with the peak frequency of the corresponding attenuation (i.e., inverse of quality factor) facilitates the detailed understanding of the effect of inner structures and boundary conditions in porous media. In this study, we firstly obtain the transition frequency of fluid flux based on Biot's theory of poroelasticity and the fast Fourier transform algorithm in a sample containing one repeating unit cell (RUC). We then analyze changes of these two frequencies in porous media with different porous properties. Finally, we extend our analysis to the influence of the undrained boundary condition on the transition frequency and peak frequency in porous media with multiple RUCs. This setup can facilitate the understanding of the effect from the undrained boundary condition. Results demonstrate that these two frequencies have the same trend at low water saturation, but amplitude variations differ between the frequencies as the amount of saturation increases. However, for cases of high water saturation, both the trend and the amplitude variation of these two frequencies fit well with each other.

  11. Effective and accurate approach for modeling of commensurate–incommensurate transition in krypton monolayer on graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Ustinov, E. A.

    2014-10-07

    Commensurate–incommensurate (C-IC) transition of krypton molecular layer on graphite received much attention in recent decades in theoretical and experimental researches. However, there still exists a possibility of generalization of the phenomenon from thermodynamic viewpoint on the basis of accurate molecular simulation. Recently, a new technique was developed for analysis of two-dimensional (2D) phase transitions in systems involving a crystalline phase, which is based on accounting for the effect of temperature and the chemical potential on the lattice constant of the 2D layer using the Gibbs–Duhem equation [E. A. Ustinov, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 074706 (2014)]. The technique has allowed for determination of phase diagrams of 2D argon layers on the uniform surface and in slit pores. This paper extends the developed methodology on systems accounting for the periodic modulation of the substrate potential. The main advantage of the developed approach is that it provides highly accurate evaluation of the chemical potential of crystalline layers, which allows reliable determination of temperature and other parameters of various 2D phase transitions. Applicability of the methodology is demonstrated on the krypton–graphite system. Analysis of phase diagram of the krypton molecular layer, thermodynamic functions of coexisting phases, and a method of prediction of adsorption isotherms is considered accounting for a compression of the graphite due to the krypton–carbon interaction. The temperature and heat of C-IC transition has been reliably determined for the gas–solid and solid–solid system.

  12. Effective and accurate approach for modeling of commensurate-incommensurate transition in krypton monolayer on graphite.

    PubMed

    Ustinov, E A

    2014-10-07

    Commensurate-incommensurate (C-IC) transition of krypton molecular layer on graphite received much attention in recent decades in theoretical and experimental researches. However, there still exists a possibility of generalization of the phenomenon from thermodynamic viewpoint on the basis of accurate molecular simulation. Recently, a new technique was developed for analysis of two-dimensional (2D) phase transitions in systems involving a crystalline phase, which is based on accounting for the effect of temperature and the chemical potential on the lattice constant of the 2D layer using the Gibbs-Duhem equation [E. A. Ustinov, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 074706 (2014)]. The technique has allowed for determination of phase diagrams of 2D argon layers on the uniform surface and in slit pores. This paper extends the developed methodology on systems accounting for the periodic modulation of the substrate potential. The main advantage of the developed approach is that it provides highly accurate evaluation of the chemical potential of crystalline layers, which allows reliable determination of temperature and other parameters of various 2D phase transitions. Applicability of the methodology is demonstrated on the krypton-graphite system. Analysis of phase diagram of the krypton molecular layer, thermodynamic functions of coexisting phases, and a method of prediction of adsorption isotherms is considered accounting for a compression of the graphite due to the krypton-carbon interaction. The temperature and heat of C-IC transition has been reliably determined for the gas-solid and solid-solid system.

  13. Switch over to the high frequency rf systems near transition

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.; Wei, J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to point out that since bunch narrowing naturally occurs in the acceleration process in the vicinity of transition, it should be possible to switch over to the high frequency system close to transition when the bunch has narrowed enough to fit directly into the high frequency bucket. The advantage of this approach is the simplicity, no extra components or gymnastics are required of the low frequency system. The disadvantage, of course, is for protons which do not go through transition. But on the other hand, there is no shortage of intensity for protons and so it should be possible to keep the phase space area low for protons, and then matching to the high frequency bucket should be easily accomplished by adiabatic compression. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  14. An Accurate Quartic Force Field and Vibrational Frequencies for HNO and DNO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Lee, Timothy J.; Schwenke, David W.

    1994-01-01

    An accurate ab initio quartic force field for HNO has been determined using the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), in conjunction with the correlation consistent polarized valence triple zeta (cc-pVTZ) basis set. Improved harmonic frequencies were determined with the cc-pVQZ basis set. Fundamental vibrational frequencies were determined using a second-order perturbation theory analysis and also using variational calculations. The N-0 stretch and bending fundamentals are determined well from both vibrational analyses. The H-N stretch, however, is shown to have an unusually large anharmonic correction, and is not well determined using second-order perturbation theory. The H-N fundamental is well determined from the variational calculations, demonstrating the quality of the ab initio quartic force field. The zero-point energy of HNO that should be used in isodesmic reactions is also discussed.

  15. The Calculation of Accurate Harmonic Frequencies of Large Molecules: The Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, a Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities of naphthalene neutral and cation are studied at the self-consistent-field (SCF), second-order Moller-Plesset (MP2), and density functional theory (DFT) levels using a variety of one-particle basis sets. Very accurate frequencies can be obtained at the DFT level in conjunction with large basis sets if they are scaled with two factors, one for the C-H stretches and a second for all other modes. We also find remarkably good agreement at the B3LYP/4-31G level using only one scale factor. Unlike the neutral PAHs where all methods do reasonably well for the intensities, only the DFT results are accurate for the PAH cations. The failure of the SCF and MP2 methods is caused by symmetry breaking and an inability to describe charge delocalization. We present several interesting cases of symmetry breaking in this study. An assessment is made as to whether an ensemble of PAH neutrals or cations could account for the unidentified infrared bands observed in many astronomical sources.

  16. Accurate, explicit formulae for higher harmonic force spectroscopy by frequency modulation-AFM.

    PubMed

    Kuchuk, Kfir; Sivan, Uri

    2015-01-01

    The nonlinear interaction between an AFM tip and a sample gives rise to oscillations of the cantilever at integral multiples (harmonics) of the fundamental resonance frequency. The higher order harmonics have long been recognized to hold invaluable information on short range interactions but their utilization has thus far been relatively limited due to theoretical and experimental complexities. In particular, existing approximations of the interaction force in terms of higher harmonic amplitudes generally require simultaneous measurements of multiple harmonics to achieve satisfactory accuracy. In the present letter we address the mathematical challenge and derive accurate, explicit formulae for both conservative and dissipative forces in terms of an arbitrary single harmonic. Additionally, we show that in frequency modulation-AFM (FM-AFM) each harmonic carries complete information on the force, obviating the need for multi-harmonic analysis. Finally, we show that higher harmonics may indeed be used to reconstruct short range forces more accurately than the fundamental harmonic when the oscillation amplitude is small compared with the interaction range.

  17. Ab Initio Potential Energy Surfaces and the Calculation of Accurate Vibrational Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Martin, Jan M. L.; Taylor, Peter R.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Due to advances in quantum mechanical methods over the last few years, it is now possible to determine ab initio potential energy surfaces in which fundamental vibrational frequencies are accurate to within plus or minus 8 cm(exp -1) on average, and molecular bond distances are accurate to within plus or minus 0.001-0.003 Angstroms, depending on the nature of the bond. That is, the potential energy surfaces have not been scaled or empirically adjusted in any way, showing that theoretical methods have progressed to the point of being useful in analyzing spectra that are not from a tightly controlled laboratory environment, such as vibrational spectra from the interstellar medium. Some recent examples demonstrating this accuracy will be presented and discussed. These include the HNO, CH4, C2H4, and ClCN molecules. The HNO molecule is interesting due to the very large H-N anharmonicity, while ClCN has a very large Fermi resonance. The ab initio studies for the CH4 and C2H4 molecules present the first accurate full quartic force fields of any kind (i.e., whether theoretical or empirical) for a five-atom and six-atom system, respectively.

  18. Amplitude Variation of Bottom Simulating Reflection with Respect to Frequency - Transitional Base or Attenuation?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2007-01-01

    The amplitude of a bottom simulating reflection (BSR), which occurs near the phase boundary between gas hydrate-bearing sediments and underlying gas-filled sediments, strongly depends on the frequency content of a seismic signal, as well as the impedance contrast across the phase boundary. A strong-amplitude BSR, detectable in a conventional seismic profile, is a good indicator of the presence of free gas beneath the phase boundary. However, the BSR as observed in low-frequency multichannel seismic data is generally difficult to identify in high-frequency, single-channel seismic data. To investigate the frequency dependence of BSR amplitudes, single-channel seismic data acquired with an air gun source at Blake Ridge, which is located off the shore of South Carolina, were analyzed in the frequency range of 10-240 Hz. The frequency-dependent impedance contrast caused by the velocity dispersion in partially gas saturated sediments is important to accurately analyze BSR amplitude. Analysis indicates that seismic attenuation of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, velocity dispersion, and a transitional base all contribute to the frequency-dependent BSR amplitude variation in the frequency range of 10-500 Hz. When velocity dispersion is incorporated into the BSR amplitude analysis, the frequency-dependent BSR amplitude at Blake Ridge can be explained with gas hydrate-bearing sediments having a quality factor of about 250 and a transitional base with a thickness of about 1 meter.

  19. Conflict Frequency and Relationship Quality across the Transition to Parenthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kluwer, Esther S.; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2007-01-01

    Longitudinal data from 293 Dutch couples were used to examine the association between conflict frequency and relationship quality across the transition to parenthood, which is known as one of the most challenging events in the early stages of marriage. More frequent conflict during pregnancy was related to lower levels of relationship quality…

  20. Accurate determination of plasmonic fields in molecular junctions by current rectification at optical frequencies.

    PubMed

    Arielly, Rani; Ofarim, Ayelet; Noy, Gilad; Selzer, Yoram

    2011-07-13

    Current rectification, i.e., induction of dc current by oscillating electromagnetic fields, is demonstrated in molecular junctions at an optical frequency. The magnitude of rectification is used to accurately determine the effective oscillating potentials in the junctions induced by the irradiating laser. Since the gap size of the junctions used in this study is precisely determined by the length of the embedded molecules, the oscillating potential can be used to calculate the plasmonic enhancement of the electromagnetic field in the junctions. With a set of junctions based on alkyl thiolated molecules with identical HOMO-LUMO gap and different lengths, an exponential dependence of the plasmonic field enhancement on gap size is observed.

  1. Accurate formula for dissipative interaction in frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Kei; Labuda, Aleksander

    2014-12-08

    Much interest has recently focused on the viscosity of nano-confined liquids. Frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) is a powerful technique that can detect variations in the conservative and dissipative forces between a nanometer-scale tip and a sample surface. We now present an accurate formula to convert the dissipation power of the cantilever measured during the experiment to damping of the tip-sample system. We demonstrated the conversion of the dissipation power versus tip-sample separation curve measured using a colloidal probe cantilever on a mica surface in water to the damping curve, which showed a good agreement with the theoretical curve. Moreover, we obtained the damping curve from the dissipation power curve measured on the hydration layers on the mica surface using a nanometer-scale tip, demonstrating that the formula allows us to quantitatively measure the viscosity of a nano-confined liquid using FM-AFM.

  2. Recommended Rest Frequencies for Observed Interstellar Molecular Microwave Transitions - 2002 Revision

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 116 NIST Recommended Rest Frequencies for Observed Interstellar Molecular Microwave Transitions - 2002 Revision (Web, free access)   Critically evaluated transition frequencies for the molecular transitions detected in interstellar and circumstellar clouds are presented.

  3. Accurate Encoding and Decoding by Single Cells: Amplitude Versus Frequency Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Micali, Gabriele; Aquino, Gerardo; Richards, David M.; Endres, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Cells sense external concentrations and, via biochemical signaling, respond by regulating the expression of target proteins. Both in signaling networks and gene regulation there are two main mechanisms by which the concentration can be encoded internally: amplitude modulation (AM), where the absolute concentration of an internal signaling molecule encodes the stimulus, and frequency modulation (FM), where the period between successive bursts represents the stimulus. Although both mechanisms have been observed in biological systems, the question of when it is beneficial for cells to use either AM or FM is largely unanswered. Here, we first consider a simple model for a single receptor (or ion channel), which can either signal continuously whenever a ligand is bound, or produce a burst in signaling molecule upon receptor binding. We find that bursty signaling is more accurate than continuous signaling only for sufficiently fast dynamics. This suggests that modulation based on bursts may be more common in signaling networks than in gene regulation. We then extend our model to multiple receptors, where continuous and bursty signaling are equivalent to AM and FM respectively, finding that AM is always more accurate. This implies that the reason some cells use FM is related to factors other than accuracy, such as the ability to coordinate expression of multiple genes or to implement threshold crossing mechanisms. PMID:26030820

  4. Accurate Time/Frequency Transfer Method Using Bi-Directional WDM Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imaoka, Atsushi; Kihara, Masami

    1996-01-01

    An accurate time transfer method is proposed using b-directional wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) signal transmission along a single optical fiber. This method will be used in digital telecommunication networks and yield a time synchronization accuracy of better than 1 ns for long transmission lines over several tens of kilometers. The method can accurately measure the difference in delay between two wavelength signals caused by the chromatic dispersion of the fiber in conventional simple bi-directional dual-wavelength frequency transfer methods. We describe the characteristics of this difference in delay and then show that the accuracy of the delay measurements can be obtained below 0.1 ns by transmitting 156 Mb/s times reference signals of 1.31 micrometer and 1.55 micrometers along a 50 km fiber using the proposed method. The sub-nanosecond delay measurement using the simple bi-directional dual-wavelength transmission along a 100 km fiber with a wavelength spacing of 1 nm in the 1.55 micrometer range is also shown.

  5. The 10 Hz Frequency: A Fulcrum For Transitional Brain States

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, E.; D’Onofrio, S.; Luster, B.; Mahaffey, S.; Urbano, F. J.; Phillips, C.

    2016-01-01

    A 10 Hz rhythm is present in the occipital cortex when the eyes are closed (alpha waves), in the precentral cortex at rest (mu rhythm), in the superior and middle temporal lobe (tau rhythm), in the inferior olive (projection to cerebellar cortex), and in physiological tremor (underlying all voluntary movement). These are all considered resting rhythms in the waking brain which are “replaced” by higher frequency activity with sensorimotor stimulation. That is, the 10 Hz frequency fulcrum is replaced on the one hand by lower frequencies during sleep, or on the other hand by higher frequencies during volition and cognition. The 10 Hz frequency fulcrum is proposed as the natural frequency of the brain during quiet waking, but is replaced by higher frequencies capable of permitting more complex functions, or by lower frequencies during sleep and inactivity. At the center of the transition shifts to and from the resting rhythm is the reticular activating system, a phylogenetically preserved area of the brain essential for preconscious awareness. PMID:27547831

  6. nu-2 band of H2 O-16 - Line strengths and transition frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of H2 O-16 were recorded with a Fourier-transform spectrometer covering transitions in the (010)-(000) band from 1066 to 2582/cm. The measured line frequencies were used along with additional data taken from studies at microwave and far-infrared frequencies in an analysis to obtain rotational energies of levels in the (000) and (010) states. Measurements of the line strengths were fitted by least squares to a model in which the dipole moment matrix elements were represented by as many as 19 expansion coefficients. The results produced computed line strength values that are in excellent agreement, on the average, with the 874 experimental transitions included in the analysis. These results provide a more accurate representation of the line positions and strengths for the (010)-(000) band than are currently available on the HITRAN absorption line parameter compilation.

  7. Accurate nonrelativistic ground-state energies of 3d transition metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Scemama, A.; Applencourt, T.; Giner, E.; Caffarel, M.

    2014-12-28

    We present accurate nonrelativistic ground-state energies of the transition metal atoms of the 3d series calculated with Fixed-Node Diffusion Monte Carlo (FN-DMC). Selected multi-determinantal expansions obtained with the CIPSI (Configuration Interaction using a Perturbative Selection made Iteratively) method and including the most prominent determinants of the full configuration interaction expansion are used as trial wavefunctions. Using a maximum of a few tens of thousands determinants, fixed-node errors on total DMC energies are found to be greatly reduced for some atoms with respect to those obtained with Hartree-Fock nodes. To the best of our knowledge, the FN-DMC/(CIPSI nodes) ground-state energies presented here are the lowest variational total energies reported so far. They differ from the recently recommended non-variational values of McCarthy and Thakkar [J. Chem. Phys. 136, 054107 (2012)] only by a few percents of the correlation energy. Thanks to the variational property of FN-DMC total energies, our results provide exact lower bounds for the absolute value of all-electron correlation energies, |E{sub c}|.

  8. Measurement of the muonium 1S-2S transition frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Jungmann, K.; Baird, P.E.G.; Barr, J.R.M.; Berkeland, D.; Boshier, M.G.; Braun, B.; Eaton, G.H.; Ferguson, A.I.; Geerds, H.; Hughes, V.W.; Maas, F.; Matthias, B.E.; Matousek, P.; Persaud, M.; zu Putlitz, G.; Reinhard, I.; Riis, E.; Sandars, P.G.H.; Schwarz, W.; Toner, W.T.; Towrie, M.; Willmann, L.; Woodle, K.A.; Woodman, G.

    1995-04-01

    Resonant ionization spectroscopy has been employed for measuring the 1{sup 2}{ital S}{sub 1/2}{minus}2{sup 2}{ital S}{sub 1/2} frequency difference in the hydrogen-like muonium atom to 2 455 529 002(33)(46) MHz. The 1S-2S two-photon transition was induced Doppler-free using two counter-propagating laser beams. The 2S state was photo-ionized by a third photon from the same laser field. The measurement agrees with QED theory within two standard deviations. The mass of the positive muon can be extracted from the isotope shifts in this transition to hydrogen and deuterium to 105.658 80(29)(43) MeV/c{sup 2}. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  9. Measurement of the muonium 1S-2S transition frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Jungmann, K.; Baird, P. E. G.; Barr, J. R. M.; Berkeland, D.; Boshier, M. G.; Braun, B.; Eaton, G. H.; Ferguson, A. I.; Geerds, H.; Hughes, V. W.; Maas, F.; Matthias, B. E.; Matousek, P.; Persaud, M.; Putlitz, G. zu; Reinhard, I.; Riis, E.; Sandars, P. G. H.; Schwarz, W.; Toner, W. T.

    1995-04-01

    Resonant ionization spectroscopy has been employed for measuring the 1{sup 2}S1/2-2{sup 2}S1/2 frequency difference in the hydrogen-like muonium atom to 2 455 529 002(33)(46) MHz. The 1S-2S two-photon transition was induced Doppler-free using two counter-propagating laser beams. The 2S state was photo-ionized by a third photon from the same laser field. The measurement agrees with QED theory within two standard deviations. The mass of the positive muon can be extracted from the isotope shifts in this transition to hydrogen and deuterium to 105.658 80(29)(43) MeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. Measurements of the frequency spectrum of transition radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, M. L.; Mueller, D.

    1977-01-01

    We report a measurement of the frequency spectrum of X-ray transition radiation. X rays were generated by electrons of 5 and 9 GeV in radiators of multiple polypropylene foils, and detected in the range 4 to 30 keV with a calibrated single-crystal Bragg spectrometer. The experimental results closely reproduce the features of the theoretically predicted spectrum. In particular, the pronounced interference pattern of multifoil radiators and the expected hardening of the radiation with increasing foil thickness are clearly observed. The overall intensity of the radiation is somewhat lower than predicted by calculations.

  11. Direct frequency comb optical frequency standard based on two-photon transitions of thermal atoms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S. Y.; Wu, J. T.; Zhang, Y. L.; Leng, J. X.; Yang, W. P.; Zhang, Z. G.; Zhao, J. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Optical clocks have been the focus of science and technology research areas due to their capability to provide highest frequency accuracy and stability to date. Their superior frequency performance promises significant advances in the fields of fundamental research as well as practical applications including satellite-based navigation and ranging. In traditional optical clocks, ultrastable optical cavities, laser cooling and particle (atoms or a single ion) trapping techniques are employed to guarantee high stability and accuracy. However, on the other hand, they make optical clocks an entire optical tableful of equipment, and cannot work continuously for a long time; as a result, they restrict optical clocks used as very convenient and compact time-keeping clocks. In this article, we proposed, and experimentally demonstrated, a novel scheme of optical frequency standard based on comb-directly-excited atomic two-photon transitions. By taking advantage of the natural properties of the comb and two-photon transitions, this frequency standard achieves a simplified structure, high robustness as well as decent frequency stability, which promise widespread applications in various scenarios. PMID:26459877

  12. Direct frequency comb optical frequency standard based on two-photon transitions of thermal atoms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S Y; Wu, J T; Zhang, Y L; Leng, J X; Yang, W P; Zhang, Z G; Zhao, J Y

    2015-10-13

    Optical clocks have been the focus of science and technology research areas due to their capability to provide highest frequency accuracy and stability to date. Their superior frequency performance promises significant advances in the fields of fundamental research as well as practical applications including satellite-based navigation and ranging. In traditional optical clocks, ultrastable optical cavities, laser cooling and particle (atoms or a single ion) trapping techniques are employed to guarantee high stability and accuracy. However, on the other hand, they make optical clocks an entire optical tableful of equipment, and cannot work continuously for a long time; as a result, they restrict optical clocks used as very convenient and compact time-keeping clocks. In this article, we proposed, and experimentally demonstrated, a novel scheme of optical frequency standard based on comb-directly-excited atomic two-photon transitions. By taking advantage of the natural properties of the comb and two-photon transitions, this frequency standard achieves a simplified structure, high robustness as well as decent frequency stability, which promise widespread applications in various scenarios.

  13. Frequency Comb Assisted IR Measurements of H_3^+, H_2D^+ and D_2H^+ Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusko, Pavol; Asvany, Oskar; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    We present recent measurements of the fundamental transitions of H_3^+, H_2D^+ and D_2H^+ in a 4 K 22-pole trap by action spectroscopic techniques. Either Laser Induced Inhibition of Cluster Growth (He attachment at T≈4 K), endothermic reaction of H_3^+ with O_2, or deuterium exchange has been used as measurement scheme. We used a 3 μm optical parametric oscillator coupled to a frequency comb in order to achieve accuracy generally below 1 MHz. Five transitions of H_3^+, eleven of H_2D^+ and ten of D_2H^+ were recorder in our spectral range. We compare our H_3^+ results with two previous frequency comb assisted works. Moreover, accurate determination of the frequency allows us to predict pure rotational transitions for H_2D^+ and D_2H^+ in the THz range. P. Jusko, C. Konietzko, S. Schlemmer, O. Asvany, J. Mol. Spec. 319 (2016) 55 O. Asvany, S. Brünken, L. Kluge, S. Schlemmer, Appl. Phys. B 114 (2014) 203 O. Asvany, J. Krieg, S. Schlemmer, Rev. Sci. Instr. 83 (2012) 093110 J.N. Hodges, A.J. Perry, P.A. Jenkins, B.M. Siller, B.J. McCall, J. Chem. Phys. 139 (2013) 164201 H.-C. Chen, C.-Y. Hsiao, J.-L. Peng, T. Amano, J.-T. Shy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109 (2012) 263002

  14. THE HYPERFINE STRUCTURE OF THE ROTATIONAL SPECTRUM OF HDO AND ITS EXTENSION TO THE THz REGION: ACCURATE REST FREQUENCIES AND SPECTROSCOPIC PARAMETERS FOR ASTROPHYSICAL OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Lattanzi, Valerio; Puzzarini, Cristina; Alonso, José Luis; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-06-10

    The rotational spectrum of the mono-deuterated isotopologue of water, HD{sup 16}O, has been investigated in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wave frequency regions, up to 1.6 THz. The Lamb-dip technique has been exploited to obtain sub-Doppler resolution and to resolve the hyperfine (hf) structure due to the deuterium and hydrogen nuclei, thus enabling the accurate determination of the corresponding hf parameters. Their experimental determination has been supported by high-level quantum-chemical calculations. The Lamb-dip measurements have been supplemented by Doppler-limited measurements (weak high-J and high-frequency transitions) in order to extend the predictive capability of the available spectroscopic constants. The possibility of resolving hf splittings in astronomical spectra has been discussed.

  15. ACCURATE ESTIMATIONS OF STELLAR AND INTERSTELLAR TRANSITION LINES OF TRIPLY IONIZED GERMANIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Narendra Nath; Majumder, Sonjoy E-mail: sonjoy@gmail.com

    2011-08-10

    In this paper, we report on weighted oscillator strengths of E1 transitions and transition probabilities of E2 transitions among different low-lying states of triply ionized germanium using highly correlated relativistic coupled cluster (RCC) method. Due to the abundance of Ge IV in the solar system, planetary nebulae, white dwarf stars, etc., the study of such transitions is important from an astrophysical point of view. The weighted oscillator strengths of E1 transitions are presented in length and velocity gauge forms to check the accuracy of the calculations. We find excellent agreement between calculated and experimental excitation energies. Oscillator strengths of few transitions, wherever studied in the literature via other theoretical and experimental approaches, are compared with our RCC calculations.

  16. Accurate determination of frequency dependent three element equivalent circuit for symmetric step microstrip discontinuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, M. J.; Easter, B.; Hornsby, J. S.

    1990-02-01

    A three element frequency dependent equivalent circuit which characterizes a symmetric step microstrip discontinuity is determined using the method of lines. This method was applied so as to exploit to the full the processing capabilities of the available Cyber 205 computer, and to obtain results with the highest possible accuracy at frequencies in the range 4-16 GHz. Numerical values of scattering parameters are given for three geometries.

  17. Rogue-wave pattern transition induced by relative frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li-Chen; Xin, Guo-Guo; Yang, Zhan-Ying

    2014-08-01

    We revisit a rogue wave in a two-mode nonlinear fiber whose dynamics is described by two-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations. The relative frequency between two modes can induce different rogue wave patterns transition. In particular, we find a four-petaled flower structure rogue wave can exist in the two-mode coupled system, which possesses an asymmetric spectrum distribution. Furthermore, spectrum analysis is performed on these different type rogue waves, and the spectrum relations between them are discussed. We demonstrate qualitatively that different modulation instability gain distribution can induce different rogue wave excitation patterns. These results would deepen our understanding of rogue wave dynamics in complex systems.

  18. Rogue-wave pattern transition induced by relative frequency.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Chen; Xin, Guo-Guo; Yang, Zhan-Ying

    2014-08-01

    We revisit a rogue wave in a two-mode nonlinear fiber whose dynamics is described by two-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations. The relative frequency between two modes can induce different rogue wave patterns transition. In particular, we find a four-petaled flower structure rogue wave can exist in the two-mode coupled system, which possesses an asymmetric spectrum distribution. Furthermore, spectrum analysis is performed on these different type rogue waves, and the spectrum relations between them are discussed. We demonstrate qualitatively that different modulation instability gain distribution can induce different rogue wave excitation patterns. These results would deepen our understanding of rogue wave dynamics in complex systems.

  19. Coherent Magnetic Response at Optical Frequencies Using Atomic Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Nicholas R.; Buckholtz, Zachary N.; Simmons, Zachary J.; Mueller, Eli A.; Yavuz, Deniz D.

    2017-01-01

    In optics, the interaction of atoms with the magnetic field of light is almost always ignored since its strength is many orders of magnitude weaker compared to the interaction with the electric field. In this article, by using a magnetic-dipole transition within the 4 f shell of europium ions, we show a strong interaction between a green laser and an ensemble of atomic ions. The electrons move coherently between the ground and excited ionic levels (Rabi flopping) by interacting with the magnetic field of the laser. By measuring the Rabi flopping frequency as the laser intensity is varied, we report the first direct measurement of a magnetic-dipole matrix element in the optical region of the spectrum. Using density-matrix simulations of the ensemble, we infer the generation of coherent magnetization with magnitude 5.5 ×10-3 A /m , which is capable of generating left-handed electromagnetic waves of intensity 1 nW /cm2 . These results open up the prospect of constructing left-handed materials using sharp transitions of atoms.

  20. Simultaneous transmission of accurate time and stable frequency through bidirectional channel over telecommunication infrastructure with excessive spans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojtech, Josef; Smotlacha, Vladimir; Skoda, Pavel

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we present simultaneous transmission of accurate time and stable frequency over 306 km long fiber link. The fiber link belongs to the Time and Frequency infrastructure that is being gradually developed and which shares fiber footprint with data network. The link had been originally deployed with wavelength division multiplexing systems for C and L band systems. But it has been recently upgraded to support 800 GHz wide super-channel with single signal path for both directions. This bidirectional super-channel spans over two extensive segments with attenuation of 28 and 25 dB.

  1. An accurate global potential energy surface, dipole moment surface, and rovibrational frequencies for NH(3).

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W; Lee, Timothy J

    2008-12-07

    A global potential energy surface (PES) that includes short and long range terms has been determined for the NH(3) molecule. The singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations and the internally contracted averaged coupled-pair functional electronic structure methods have been used in conjunction with very large correlation-consistent basis sets, including diffuse functions. Extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit was performed and core correlation and scalar relativistic contributions were included directly, while the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction was added. Our best purely ab initio PES, denoted "mixed," is constructed from two PESs which differ in whether the ic-ACPF higher-order correlation correction was added or not. Rovibrational transition energies computed from the mixed PES agree well with experiment and the best previous theoretical studies, but most importantly the quality does not deteriorate even up to 10 300 cm(-1) above the zero-point energy (ZPE). The mixed PES was improved further by empirical refinement using the most reliable J=0-2 rovibrational transitions in the HITRAN 2004 database. Agreement between high-resolution experiment and rovibrational transition energies computed from our refined PES for J=0-6 is excellent. Indeed, the root mean square (rms) error for 13 HITRAN 2004 bands for J=0-2 is 0.023 cm(-1) and that for each band is always transition energies computed with our refined PES should be useful in the assignment of new high-resolution NH(3) spectra and in correcting mistakes in previous assignments. Ideas for further improvements to our refined PES and for extension to other isotopolog are discussed.

  2. Accurate assessment of intragenic recombination frequency within the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene.

    PubMed

    Abbs, S; Roberts, R G; Mathew, C G; Bentley, D R; Bobrow, M

    1990-08-01

    Polymorphic loci that lie at the two extremities of the Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD) gene have been used to estimate intragenic recombination rates. Multipoint linkage analysis of the CEPH panel of families suggests a total intragenic recombination frequency of nearly 0.12 (confidence intervals 0.041-0.226) over the genomic length of approximately 2 Mb.

  3. TTVFast: An efficient and accurate code for transit timing inversion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Deck, Katherine M.; Agol, Eric; Holman, Matthew J.; Nesvorný, David

    2014-06-01

    Transit timing variations (TTVs) have proven to be a powerful technique for confirming Kepler planet candidates, for detecting non-transiting planets, and for constraining the masses and orbital elements of multi-planet systems. These TTV applications often require the numerical integration of orbits for computation of transit times (as well as impact parameters and durations); frequently tens of millions to billions of simulations are required when running statistical analyses of the planetary system properties. We have created a fast code for transit timing computation, TTVFast, which uses a symplectic integrator with a Keplerian interpolator for the calculation of transit times. The speed comes at the expense of accuracy in the calculated times, but the accuracy lost is largely unnecessary, as transit times do not need to be calculated to accuracies significantly smaller than the measurement uncertainties on the times. The time step can be tuned to give sufficient precision for any particular system. We find a speed-up of at least an order of magnitude relative to dynamical integrations with high precision using a Bulirsch-Stoer integrator.

  4. TTVFast: An Efficient and Accurate Code for Transit Timing Inversion Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deck, Katherine M.; Agol, Eric; Holman, Matthew J.; Nesvorný, David

    2014-06-01

    Transit timing variations (TTVs) have proven to be a powerful technique for confirming Kepler planet candidates, for detecting non-transiting planets, and for constraining the masses and orbital elements of multi-planet systems. These TTV applications often require the numerical integration of orbits for computation of transit times (as well as impact parameters and durations); frequently tens of millions to billions of simulations are required when running statistical analyses of the planetary system properties. We have created a fast code for transit timing computation, TTVFast, which uses a symplectic integrator with a Keplerian interpolator for the calculation of transit times. The speed comes at the expense of accuracy in the calculated times, but the accuracy lost is largely unnecessary, as transit times do not need to be calculated to accuracies significantly smaller than the measurement uncertainties on the times. The time step can be tuned to give sufficient precision for any particular system. We find a speed-up of at least an order of magnitude relative to dynamical integrations with high precision using a Bulirsch-Stoer integrator.

  5. WWVB: A Half Century of Delivering Accurate Frequency and Time by Radio

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Michael A; Nelson, Glenn K

    2014-01-01

    In commemoration of its 50th anniversary of broadcasting from Fort Collins, Colorado, this paper provides a history of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) radio station WWVB. The narrative describes the evolution of the station, from its origins as a source of standard frequency, to its current role as the source of time-of-day synchronization for many millions of radio controlled clocks. PMID:26601026

  6. WWVB: A Half Century of Delivering Accurate Frequency and Time by Radio.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Michael A; Nelson, Glenn K

    2014-01-01

    In commemoration of its 50th anniversary of broadcasting from Fort Collins, Colorado, this paper provides a history of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) radio station WWVB. The narrative describes the evolution of the station, from its origins as a source of standard frequency, to its current role as the source of time-of-day synchronization for many millions of radio controlled clocks.

  7. A transition radiation detector for RHIC featuring accurate tracking and dE/dx particle identification

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, E.; Lissauer, D.; McCorkle, S.; Polychronakos, V.; Takai, H.; Chi, C.Y.; Nagamiya, S.; Sippach, W.; Toy, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.F.; Wiggins, C.; Willis, W.; Cherniatin, V.; Dolgoshein, B.; Bennett, M.; Chikanian, A.; Kumar, S.; Mitchell, J.T.; Pope, K.

    1991-12-31

    We describe the results of a test ran involving a Transition Radiation Detector that can both distinguish electrons from pions which momenta greater titan 0.7 GeV/c and simultaneously track particles passing through the detector. The particle identification is accomplished through a combination of the detection of Transition Radiation from the electron and the differences in electron and pion energy loss (dE/dx) in the detector. The dE/dx particle separation is most, efficient below 2 GeV/c while particle ID utilizing Transition Radiation effective above 1.5 GeV/c. Combined, the electron-pion separation is-better than 5 {times} 10{sup 2}. The single-wire, track-position resolution for the TRD is {approximately}230 {mu}m.

  8. Accurate Quartic Force Fields and Vibrational Frequencies for HCN and HNC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Gazdy, Bela; Bowman, Joel M.

    1993-01-01

    The quartic force fields of HCN and HNC are determined using atomic natural orbital one-particle basis sets of spdf/spd and spdfg/spdf quality in conjunction with the CCSD(T) electron correlation method (singles and doubles coupled-cluster theory plus a perturbation estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations). The HCN force field is in good agreement with a recent experimentally derived force field and also with the force field recently computed by Wong and Bacskay. On the basis of the good agreement obtained for HCN, it is argued that the ab initio quartic force field for HNC is superior to a prior force field derived from experiment. The harmonic frequencies of HNC are predicted to be 3822 +/- 10, 472 +/- 5, and 2051 +/- 10 cm(exp -1) for omega(sub 1), omega(sub 2), and omega(sub 3), respectively; the experimentally derived values are above these values and fall outside the estimated uncertainties. Using the quartic force field, spectroscopic constants are predicted for HNC based on a vibrational second-order perturbation theory analysis. It is also asserted that the gas-phase fundamental nu(sub 3) for HNC is slightly lower than the matrix isolation value. The range of validity of the quartic force fields is investigated by comparison of variational vibrational energies computed with the quartic force fields to those obtained from our recently reported global HCN/HNC potential energy surface and also to experimental data.

  9. Accurate Quartic Force Fields and Vibrational Frequencies for HCN and HNC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Gazdy, Bela; Bowman, Joel M.

    1993-01-01

    The quartic force fields of HCN and HNC are determined using atomic natural orbital one-particle basis sets of spdf/spd and spdfg/spdf quality in conjunction with the CCSD(T) electron correlation method (singles and doubles coupled-cluster theory plus a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations). The HCN force field is in good agreement with a recent experimentally derived force field and also with the force field recently computed by Wong and Bacskay. On the basis of the good agreement obtained for HCN, it is argued that the ab initio quartic force field for HNC is superior to a prior force field derived from experiment. The harmonic frequencies of HNC are predicted to be 3822 +/- 10,472 +/- 5, and 2051 +/-10/cm for omega1, omega2, and omega3, respectively; the experimentally derived values are above these values and fall outside the estimated uncertainties. Using the quartic force field, spectroscopic constants are predicted for HNC based on a vibrational second-order perturbation theory analysis. It is also asserted that the gas-phase fundamental v(sub 3) for HNC is slightly lower than the matrix isolation value. The range of validity of the quartic force fields is investigated by comparison of variational vibrational energies computed with the quartic force fields to those obtained from our recently reported global HCN/HNC potential energy surface and also to experimental data.

  10. Accurate transition probabilities from large-scale multiconfiguration calculations - A tribute to Charlotte Froese Fischer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jönsson, Per; Godefroid, Michel; Gaigalas, Gediminas; Bieroń, Jacek; Brage, Tomas

    2013-07-01

    The development of multiconfiguration computer packages for atomic structure calculations is reviewed with special attention to the work of Charlotte Froese Fischer. The underlying theory is described along with methodologies to choose basis expansions of configuration state functions. Calculations of energies and transitions rates are presented and the accuracy of the results is assessed. Limitations of multiconfiguration methods are discussed and it is shown how these limitations can be circumvented by a division of the original large-scale computational problem into a number of smaller problems.

  11. Extensive and accurate energy levels and transition rates for Al-like Zn XVIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, R.; Zhang, C. Y.; Liu, Y. W.; Chen, Z. B.; Guo, X. L.; Li, S.; Yan, J.; Chen, C. Y.; Wang, K.

    2017-03-01

    Energy levels and transition rates for electric-dipole (E1), electric-quadrupole (E2), magnetic-dipole (M1), and magnetic-quadrupole (M2) transitions of the lowest 393 levels arising from the 3l3 (0 ≤ l ⩽ 2), 3s2 4 l (0 ≤ l ⩽ 3), 3 s 3 p 4 l (0 ≤ l ⩽ 3), 3p2 4 l (0 ≤ l ⩽ 2), 3 s 3 d 4 l (0 ≤ l ⩽ 1), and 3s2 5 l (0 ≤ l ⩽ 4) configurations in Al-like Zn are calculated through the multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock (MCDHF) method and second-order many-body perturbation theory (MBPT). In the MCDHF calculation, valence-valence and core-valence correlations with the 2 p and 2 s electrons are taken into account. The effect of Breit interaction and quantum electrodynamics corrections on excitation level energies and level lifetimes are assessed though the MCDHF and MBPT calculations. The two sets of level energies are in excellent agreement of better than 0.1%, while the level lifetimes mostly agree to within 2%. Comparisons are also made with experimental measurements and other theoretical results to assess the accuracy of our calculations.

  12. Self-referenced, accurate and sensitive optical frequency comb spectroscopy with a virtually imaged phased array spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Kowzan, Grzegorz; Lee, Kevin F; Paradowska, Magdalena; Borkowski, Mateusz; Ablewski, Piotr; Wójtewicz, Szymon; Stec, Kamila; Lisak, Daniel; Fermann, Martin E; Trawiński, Ryszard S; Masłowski, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    We present a cavity-enhanced direct optical frequency comb spectroscopy system with a virtually imaged phased array (VIPA) spectrometer and either a dither or a Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) locking scheme used for stable transmission of the comb through the cavity. A self-referenced scheme for frequency axis calibration is shown along with an analysis of its accuracy. A careful comparison between both locking schemes is performed based on near-IR measurements of the carbon monoxide ν=3←0 band P branch transitions in a gas sample with known composition. The noise-equivalent absorptions (NEA) for the PDH and dither schemes are 9.9×10(-10) cm(-1) and 5.3×10(-9) cm(-1), respectively.

  13. Saturated CO{sub 2} absorption near 1.6 μm for kilohertz-accuracy transition frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Burkart, Johannes Romanini, Daniele; Campargue, Alain; Kassi, Samir; Sala, Tommaso; Marangoni, Marco

    2015-05-21

    Doppler-free saturated-absorption Lamb dips were measured on weak rovibrational lines of {sup 12}C{sup 16}O{sub 2} between 6189 and 6215 cm{sup −1} at sub-Pa pressures using optical feedback frequency stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy. By referencing the laser source to an optical frequency comb, transition frequencies for ten lines of the 30013←00001 band P-branch and two lines of the 31113←01101 hot band R-branch were determined with an accuracy of a few parts in 10{sup 11}. Involving rotational quantum numbers up to 42, the data were used for improving the upper level spectroscopic constants. These results provide a highly accurate reference frequency grid over the spectral interval from 1599 to 1616 nm.

  14. A stable frequency comb directly referenced to rubidium electromagnetically induced transparency and two-photon transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Dong; Wu, Jiutao; Zhang, Shuangyou; Ren, Quansheng; Zhang, Zhigang; Zhao, Jianye

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate an approach to create a stable erbium-fiber-based frequency comb at communication band by directly locking the combs to two rubidium atomic transitions resonances (electromagnetically induced transparency absorption and two-photon absorption), respectively. This approach directly transfers the precision and stability of the atomic transitions to the comb. With its distinguishing feature of compactness by removing the conventional octave-spanning spectrum and f-to-2f beating facilities and the ability to directly control the comb's frequency at the atomic transition frequency, this stable optical comb can be widely used in optical communication, frequency standard, and optical spectroscopy and microscopy.

  15. A stable frequency comb directly referenced to rubidium electromagnetically induced transparency and two-photon transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Dong; Wu, Jiutao; Zhang, Shuangyou; Ren, Quansheng; Zhang, Zhigang; Zhao, Jianye

    2014-03-17

    We demonstrate an approach to create a stable erbium-fiber-based frequency comb at communication band by directly locking the combs to two rubidium atomic transitions resonances (electromagnetically induced transparency absorption and two-photon absorption), respectively. This approach directly transfers the precision and stability of the atomic transitions to the comb. With its distinguishing feature of compactness by removing the conventional octave-spanning spectrum and f-to-2f beating facilities and the ability to directly control the comb's frequency at the atomic transition frequency, this stable optical comb can be widely used in optical communication, frequency standard, and optical spectroscopy and microscopy.

  16. Accurate displacement-measuring interferometer with wide range using an I2 frequency-stabilized laser diode based on sinusoidal frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Thanh-Tung; Higuchi, Masato; Aketagawa, Masato

    2016-10-01

    We propose the use of the sinusoidal frequency modulation technique to improve both the frequency stability of an external cavity laser diode (ECLD) and the measurement accuracy and range of a displacement-measuring interferometer. The frequency of the ECLD was modulated at 300 kHz by modulating the injection current, and it was locked to the b21 hyperfine component of the transition 6-3, P(33), 127I2 (633 nm) by the null method. A relative frequency stability of 6.5  ×  10-11 was achieved at 100 s sampling time. The stabilized ECLD was then utilized as a light source for an unbalanced Michelson interferometer. In the interferometer, the displacement and direction of the target mirror can be determined using a Lissajous diagram based on two consecutive and quadrant-phase harmonics of the interference signal. Generally, the measurement range of the interferometer by the proposed method is limited by the modulation index and the signal-to-noise ratio of the harmonics. To overcome this drawback, suitable consecutive harmonic pairs were selected for the specific measurement ranges to measure the displacement. The displacements determined in the specific ranges by the proposed method were compared with those observed by a commercial capacitive sensor. From the comparison, the proposed method has high precision to determine the displacement. The measurement range was also extended up to 10 m by selecting a suitable modulation index and suitable consecutive pairs of harmonics.

  17. Numerical Computation of a Continuous-thrust State Transition Matrix Incorporating Accurate Hardware and Ephemeris Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald; Conway, Bruce; Englander, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    A significant body of work exists showing that providing a nonlinear programming (NLP) solver with expressions for the problem constraint gradient substantially increases the speed of program execution and can also improve the robustness of convergence, especially for local optimizers. Calculation of these derivatives is often accomplished through the computation of spacecraft's state transition matrix (STM). If the two-body gravitational model is employed as is often done in the context of preliminary design, closed form expressions for these derivatives may be provided. If a high fidelity dynamics model, that might include perturbing forces such as the gravitational effect from multiple third bodies and solar radiation pressure is used then these STM's must be computed numerically. We present a method for the power hardward model and a full ephemeris model. An adaptive-step embedded eight order Dormand-Prince numerical integrator is discussed and a method for the computation of the time of flight derivatives in this framework is presented. The use of these numerically calculated derivatieves offer a substantial improvement over finite differencing in the context of a global optimizer. Specifically the inclusion of these STM's into the low thrust missiondesign tool chain in use at NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center allows for an increased preliminary mission design cadence.

  18. Far-Infrared Rotational and Fine-Structure Transition Frequencies and Molecular Constants of 14NO and 15NO in the X2Pi (v = 0) State.

    PubMed

    Varberg; Stroh; Evenson

    1999-07-01

    We have made highly accurate measurements of the absorption spectrum of the 14NO and 15NO isotopomers of nitric oxide in the far-infrared. Pure rotational transitions up to J" = 3712 within the 2Pi1/2 and 2Pi3/2 spin components and several 2Pi3/2 <-- 2Pi1/2 fine-structure transitions were recorded within the ground vibrational state. A least-squares fit to these data combined with some lambda-doubling and rotational transitions measured by previous workers has resulted in accurate values for the rotational, fine, and hyperfine parameters of these two isotopomers. Most of the far-infrared transitions reported here have an experimental uncertainty of about 20 kHz and will be useful for astronomers and atmospheric scientists studying this important molecule. The more accurate calculated frequencies will also be useful as spectroscopic calibration standards. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  19. Highly Accurate Quartic Force Fields, Vibrational Frequencies, and Spectroscopic Constants for Cyclic and Linear C3H3(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xinchuan; Taylor, Peter R.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    High levels of theory have been used to compute quartic force fields (QFFs) for the cyclic and linear forms of the C H + molecular cation, referred to as c-C H + and I-C H +. Specifically the 33 3333 singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), has been used in conjunction with extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit and corrections for scalar relativity and core correlation have been included. The QFFs have been used to compute highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and other spectroscopic constants using both vibrational 2nd-order perturbation theory and variational methods to solve the nuclear Schroedinger equation. Agreement between our best computed fundamental vibrational frequencies and recent infrared photodissociation experiments is reasonable for most bands, but there are a few exceptions. Possible sources for the discrepancies are discussed. We determine the energy difference between the cyclic and linear forms of C H +, 33 obtaining 27.9 kcal/mol at 0 K, which should be the most reliable available. It is expected that the fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants presented here for c-C H + 33 and I-C H + are the most reliable available for the free gas-phase species and it is hoped that 33 these will be useful in the assignment of future high-resolution laboratory experiments or astronomical observations.

  20. Two-photon frequency comb spectroscopy of the 6s-8s transition in cesium.

    PubMed

    Fendel, P; Bergeson, S D; Udem, Th; Hänsch, T W

    2007-03-15

    We report a new absolute frequency measurement of the Cs 6s-8s two-photon transition measured using frequency comb spectroscopy. The fractional frequency uncertainty is 5x10(-11), a factor of 6 better than previous results. The comb is derived from a stabilized picosecond laser and referenced to an octave-spanning femtosecond frequency comb. The relative merits of picosecond-based frequency combs are discussed, and it is shown that the AC Stark shift of the transition is determined by the average rather than the much larger peak intensity.

  1. Accurate Determination of the Frequency Response Function of Submerged and Confined Structures by Using PZT-Patches†.

    PubMed

    Presas, Alexandre; Valentin, David; Egusquiza, Eduard; Valero, Carme; Egusquiza, Mònica; Bossio, Matias

    2017-03-22

    To accurately determine the dynamic response of a structure is of relevant interest in many engineering applications. Particularly, it is of paramount importance to determine the Frequency Response Function (FRF) for structures subjected to dynamic loads in order to avoid resonance and fatigue problems that can drastically reduce their useful life. One challenging case is the experimental determination of the FRF of submerged and confined structures, such as hydraulic turbines, which are greatly affected by dynamic problems as reported in many cases in the past. The utilization of classical and calibrated exciters such as instrumented hammers or shakers to determine the FRF in such structures can be very complex due to the confinement of the structure and because their use can disturb the boundary conditions affecting the experimental results. For such cases, Piezoelectric Patches (PZTs), which are very light, thin and small, could be a very good option. Nevertheless, the main drawback of these exciters is that the calibration as dynamic force transducers (relationship voltage/force) has not been successfully obtained in the past. Therefore, in this paper, a method to accurately determine the FRF of submerged and confined structures by using PZTs is developed and validated. The method consists of experimentally determining some characteristic parameters that define the FRF, with an uncalibrated PZT exciting the structure. These parameters, which have been experimentally determined, are then introduced in a validated numerical model of the tested structure. In this way, the FRF of the structure can be estimated with good accuracy. With respect to previous studies, where only the natural frequencies and mode shapes were considered, this paper discuss and experimentally proves the best excitation characteristic to obtain also the damping ratios and proposes a procedure to fully determine the FRF. The method proposed here has been validated for the structure vibrating

  2. Accurate Determination of the Frequency Response Function of Submerged and Confined Structures by Using PZT-Patches †

    PubMed Central

    Presas, Alexandre; Valentin, David; Egusquiza, Eduard; Valero, Carme; Egusquiza, Mònica; Bossio, Matias

    2017-01-01

    To accurately determine the dynamic response of a structure is of relevant interest in many engineering applications. Particularly, it is of paramount importance to determine the Frequency Response Function (FRF) for structures subjected to dynamic loads in order to avoid resonance and fatigue problems that can drastically reduce their useful life. One challenging case is the experimental determination of the FRF of submerged and confined structures, such as hydraulic turbines, which are greatly affected by dynamic problems as reported in many cases in the past. The utilization of classical and calibrated exciters such as instrumented hammers or shakers to determine the FRF in such structures can be very complex due to the confinement of the structure and because their use can disturb the boundary conditions affecting the experimental results. For such cases, Piezoelectric Patches (PZTs), which are very light, thin and small, could be a very good option. Nevertheless, the main drawback of these exciters is that the calibration as dynamic force transducers (relationship voltage/force) has not been successfully obtained in the past. Therefore, in this paper, a method to accurately determine the FRF of submerged and confined structures by using PZTs is developed and validated. The method consists of experimentally determining some characteristic parameters that define the FRF, with an uncalibrated PZT exciting the structure. These parameters, which have been experimentally determined, are then introduced in a validated numerical model of the tested structure. In this way, the FRF of the structure can be estimated with good accuracy. With respect to previous studies, where only the natural frequencies and mode shapes were considered, this paper discuss and experimentally proves the best excitation characteristic to obtain also the damping ratios and proposes a procedure to fully determine the FRF. The method proposed here has been validated for the structure vibrating

  3. Measurement of rubidium ground-state hyperfine transition frequency using atomic fountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Yuri B.; Szymaniec, Krzysztof; Edris, Soliman

    2015-08-01

    The results of precision measurements of the 87Rb ground-state hyperfine transition frequency, which were conducted at NPL from 2009 to 2013, are reported. The resulting frequency, measured using NPL’s Cs and Rb atomic frequency standards, demonstrates reasonable agreement with the most recent measurements reported by LNE-SYRTE.

  4. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Stabilisation of a laser by the calculated quantum transition frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagaev, S. N.; Dmitriev, A. K.; Lugovoy, A. A.

    2008-01-01

    A method is proposed to stabilise the frequency of a He—Ne laser with an intracavity nonlinear absorption cell by the calculated frequency of the 7→6 transition of F2(2)P(7)ν3 in methane. The long-term frequency stability and reproducibility are measured for a He—Ne/CH4 laser with a telescopic cavity.

  5. Accurate spectroscopic calculations of 21 electronic states of ClO radical including transition properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinxin; Shi, Deheng; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2016-08-01

    The potential energy curves were calculated for the 21 states (X2Π, A2Π, 32Π, 42Π, 52Π, 12Σ+, 22Σ+, 32Σ+, 12Σ-, 22Σ-, 32Σ-, 12Δ, 22Δ, 32Δ, 12Φ, 14Σ+, a4Σ-, 24Σ-, 14Π, 24Π and 14Δ), which originated from the two lowest dissociation channels of ClO radical. The calculations were done for internuclear separations approximately from 0.08 to 1.10 nm using the CASSCF method, which was followed by the icMRCI approach with the aug-cc-pV5Z basis set. Of these 21 states, the 14Π, 24Π, 32Δ, 42Π, 52Π, 12Φ, 32Σ+, 14Δ and 24Σ- states are repulsive. The 12Δ, 12Σ-, 14Σ+, 22Σ-, 12Σ+, 22Σ+, 22Δ and 32Σ- states are very weakly bound. Only the A2Π state has one barrier. The avoided crossing exists between the A2Π and the 32Π state. However, the avoided crossing does not generate any double wells. Core- valence correlation correction was accounted for at the level of an aug-cc-pCVQZ basis set. Scalar relativistic correction was included by the third-order Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian approximation at the level of an aug-cc-pVQZ basis set. All the potential energy curves were extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The spectroscopic parameters were determined. The 12Σ-, 22Σ-, 32Σ- and 14Σ+ states may be very difficult to be detected in an experiment, since each of these Λ-S states has only one or two vibrational states. The Franck-Condon factors and radiative lifetimes were calculated for several low vibrational levels of the A2Π - X2Π, 32Π - a4Σ-, 22Δ - a4Σ- and 32Σ- - 12Σ- transitions. The spin-orbit coupling effect on the spectroscopic parameters of the X2Π, A2Π, 32Π, a4Σ- and 22Σ+ states were discussed. The spectroscopic properties reported here can be expected to be reliably predicted ones.

  6. On the use of spring baseflow recession for a more accurate parameterization of aquifer transit time distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farlin, J.; Maloszewski, P.

    2013-05-01

    Baseflow recession analysis and groundwater dating have up to now developed as two distinct branches of hydrogeology and have been used to solve entirely different problems. We show that by combining two classical models, namely the Boussinesq equation describing spring baseflow recession, and the exponential piston-flow model used in groundwater dating studies, the parameters describing the transit time distribution of an aquifer can be in some cases estimated to a far more accurate degree than with the latter alone. Under the assumption that the aquifer basis is sub-horizontal, the mean transit time of water in the saturated zone can be estimated from spring baseflow recession. This provides an independent estimate of groundwater transit time that can refine those obtained from tritium measurements. The approach is illustrated in a case study predicting atrazine concentration trend in a series of springs draining the fractured-rock aquifer known as the Luxembourg Sandstone. A transport model calibrated on tritium measurements alone predicted different times to trend reversal following the nationwide ban on atrazine in 2005 with different rates of decrease. For some of the springs, the actual time of trend reversal and the rate of change agreed extremely well with the model calibrated using both tritium measurements and the recession of spring discharge during the dry season. The agreement between predicted and observed values was however poorer for the springs displaying the most gentle recessions, possibly indicating a stronger influence of continuous groundwater recharge during the summer months.

  7. Measurement of the Yb I S10-P11 transition frequency at 399 nm using an optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinert, Michaela; Gold Dahl, M. E.; Bergeson, Scott

    2016-11-01

    We determine the frequency of the Yb I S10-P11 transition at 399 nm using an optical frequency comb. Although this transition was measured previously using an optical transfer cavity [D. Das et al., Phys. Rev. A 72, 032506 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevA.72.032506], recent work has uncovered significant errors in that method. We compare our result of 751 526 533.49 ± 0.33 MHz for the 174Yb isotope with those from the literature and discuss observed differences. We verify the correctness of our method by measuring the frequencies of well-known transitions in Rb and Cs, and by demonstrating proper control of systematic errors in both laser metrology and atomic spectroscopy. We also demonstrate the effect of quantum interference due to hyperfine structure in a divalent atomic system and present isotope shift measurements for all stable isotopes.

  8. Accurate Lineshapes from Sub-1 cm-1 Resolution Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of α-Pinene at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Mifflin, Amanda L.; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Ho, Junming; Psciuk, Brian; Negre, Christian; Ebben, Carlena J.; Upshur, Mary Alice; Lu, Zhou; Strick, Benjamin; Thomson, Regan; Batista, Victor; Wang, Hongfei; Geiger, Franz M.

    2015-02-26

    Room temperature sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation (HR-BB-SFG) spectra of the common terpene (+)-α-pinene reveal ten peaks in the C–H stretching region. The spectral resolution exceeds that of Fourier transform infrared, femtosecond stimulated Raman, and traditional BB-SFG and scanning SFG spectroscopy of the same molecule. Experiment and simulation show the spectral lineshapes to be accurate. Homogeneous vibrational decoherence lifetimes of up to 1.7 psec are assigned to specific oscillators and compare favorably to lifetimes computed from density functional tight binding molecular dynamics calculations, while phase-resolved spectra yield orientation information for them. We propose the new spectroscopy as an attractive alternative to time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy or heterodyne-detection schemes for studying vibrational energy relaxation and vibrational coherences in molecules.

  9. Vocational Rehabilitation Professionals' Identified Transition Competencies: Importance, Frequency, and Preparedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plotner, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    Services and programs for transition-age youth with disabilities have been fragmented and inadequate (Noonan, 2004; Oertle & Trach, 2007; Sitlington, Clark, & Kolstoe, 2000). These often-ineffective services have contributed to the sizeable gap betweens students with disabilities and their peers without disabilities in employment and other…

  10. Optical frequency measurement of the 1S-3S two-photon transition in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoult, O.; Nez, F.; Julien, L.; Biraben, F.

    2010-11-01

    This article reports the first optical frequency measurement of the 1S-3S transition in hydrogen. The excitation of this transition occurs at a wavelength of 205 nm which is obtained with two frequency doubling stages of a titanium sapphire laser at 820 nm. Its frequency is measured with an optical frequency comb. The second-order Doppler effect is evaluated from the observation of the motional Stark effect due to a transverse magnetic field perpendicular to the atomic beam. The measured value of the 1S_{1/2}( F = 1)-3S1/2( F = 1) frequency splitting is 2 922 742 936.729(13) MHz with a relative uncertainty of 4.5 × 10-12. After the measurement of the 1S-2S frequency, this result is the most precise of the optical frequencies in hydrogen.

  11. High-Frequency CTD Measurements for Accurate GPS/acoustic Sea-floor Crustal Deformation Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadokoro, K.; Yasuda, K.; Taniguchi, S.; Uemura, Y.; Matsuhiro, K.

    2015-12-01

    The GPS/acoustic sea-floor crustal deformation measurement system has developed as a useful tool to observe tectonic deformation especially at subduction zones. One of the factors preventing accurate GPS/acoustic sea-floor crustal deformation measurement is horizontal heterogeneity of sound speed in the ocean. It is therefore necessary to measure the gradient directly from sound speed structure. We report results of high-frequency CTD measurements using Underway CTD (UCTD) in the Kuroshio region. We perform the UCTD measurements on May 2nd, 2015 at two stations (TCA and TOA) above the sea-floor benchmarks installed across the Nankai Trough, off the south-east of Kii Peninsula, middle Japan. The number of measurement points is six at each station along circles with a diameter of 1.8 nautical miles around the sea-floor benchmark. The stations TCA and TOA are located on the edge and the interior of the Kuroshio current, respectively, judging from difference in sea water density measured at the two stations, as well as a satellite image of sea-surface temperature distribution. We detect a sound speed gradient of high speeds in the southern part and low speeds in the northern part at the two stations. At the TCA station, the gradient is noticeable down to 300 m in depth; the maximum difference in sound speed is +/- 5 m/s. The sound speed difference is as small as +/- 1.3 m/s at depths below 300 m, which causes seafloor benchmark positioning error as large as 1 m. At the TOA station, the gradient is extremely small down to 100 m in depth. The maximum difference in sound speed is less than +/- 0.3 m/s that is negligible small for seafloor benchmark positioning error. Clear gradient of high speed is observed to the depths; the maximum difference in sound speed is +/- 0.8-0.9 m/s, causing seafloor benchmark positioning error of several tens centimeters. The UCTD measurement is effective tool to detect sound speed gradient. We establish a method for accurate sea

  12. NEW ACCURATE MEASUREMENT OF {sup 36}ArH{sup +} AND {sup 38}ArH{sup +} RO-VIBRATIONAL TRANSITIONS BY HIGH RESOLUTION IR ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Cueto, M.; Herrero, V. J.; Tanarro, I.; Doménech, J. L.; Cernicharo, J.; Barlow, M. J.; Swinyard, B. M.

    2014-03-01

    The protonated argon ion, {sup 36}ArH{sup +}, was recently identified in the Crab Nebula from Herschel spectra. Given the atmospheric opacity at the frequency of its J = 1-0 and J = 2-1 rotational transitions (617.5 and 1234.6 GHz, respectively), and the current lack of appropriate space observatories after the recent end of the Herschel mission, future studies on this molecule will rely on mid-infrared observations. We report on accurate wavenumber measurements of {sup 36}ArH{sup +} and {sup 38}ArH{sup +} rotation-vibration transitions in the v = 1-0 band in the range 4.1-3.7 μm (2450-2715 cm{sup –1}). The wavenumbers of the R(0) transitions of the v = 1-0 band are 2612.50135 ± 0.00033 and 2610.70177 ± 0.00042 cm{sup –1} (±3σ) for {sup 36}ArH{sup +} and {sup 38}ArH{sup +}, respectively. The calculated opacity for a gas thermalized at a temperature of 100 K and with a linewidth of 1 km s{sup –1} of the R(0) line is 1.6 × 10{sup –15} × N({sup 36}ArH{sup +}). For column densities of {sup 36}ArH{sup +} larger than 1 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup –2}, significant absorption by the R(0) line can be expected against bright mid-IR sources.

  13. Accurate spin-orbit and spin-other-orbit contributions to the g-tensor for transition metal containing systems.

    PubMed

    Van Yperen-De Deyne, A; Pauwels, E; Van Speybroeck, V; Waroquier, M

    2012-08-14

    In this paper an overview is presented of several approximations within Density Functional Theory (DFT) to calculate g-tensors in transition metal containing systems and a new accurate description of the spin-other-orbit contribution for high spin systems is suggested. Various implementations in a broad variety of software packages (ORCA, ADF, Gaussian, CP2K, GIPAW and BAND) are critically assessed on various aspects including (i) non-relativistic versus relativistic Hamiltonians, (ii) spin-orbit coupling contributions and (iii) the gauge. Particular attention is given to the level of accuracy that can be achieved for codes that allow g-tensor calculations under periodic boundary conditions, as these are ideally suited to efficiently describe extended condensed-phase systems containing transition metals. In periodic codes like CP2K and GIPAW, the g-tensor calculation schemes currently suffer from an incorrect treatment of the exchange spin-orbit interaction and a deficient description of the spin-other-orbit term. In this paper a protocol is proposed, making the predictions of the exchange part to the g-tensor shift more plausible. Focus is also put on the influence of the spin-other-orbit interaction which becomes of higher importance for high-spin systems. In a revisited derivation of the various terms arising from the two-electron spin-orbit and spin-other-orbit interaction (SOO), new insight has been obtained revealing amongst other issues new terms for the SOO contribution. The periodic CP2K code has been adapted in view of this new development. One of the objectives of this study is indeed a serious enhancement of the performance of periodic codes in predicting g-tensors in transition metal containing systems at the same level of accuracy as the most advanced but time consuming spin-orbit mean-field approach. The methods are first applied on rhodium carbide but afterwards extended to a broad test set of molecules containing transition metals from the fourth

  14. Accurate reconstruction of the optical parameter distribution in participating medium based on the frequency-domain radiative transfer equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yao-Bin; Qi, Hong; Zhao, Fang-Zhou; Ruan, Li-Ming

    2016-12-01

    Reconstructing the distribution of optical parameters in the participating medium based on the frequency-domain radiative transfer equation (FD-RTE) to probe the internal structure of the medium is investigated in the present work. The forward model of FD-RTE is solved via the finite volume method (FVM). The regularization term formatted by the generalized Gaussian Markov random field model is used in the objective function to overcome the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem. The multi-start conjugate gradient (MCG) method is employed to search the minimum of the objective function and increase the efficiency of convergence. A modified adjoint differentiation technique using the collimated radiative intensity is developed to calculate the gradient of the objective function with respect to the optical parameters. All simulation results show that the proposed reconstruction algorithm based on FD-RTE can obtain the accurate distributions of absorption and scattering coefficients. The reconstructed images of the scattering coefficient have less errors than those of the absorption coefficient, which indicates the former are more suitable to probing the inner structure. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51476043), the Major National Scientific Instruments and Equipment Development Special Foundation of China (Grant No. 51327803), and the Foundation for Innovative Research Groups of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51121004).

  15. Synthetic frequency protocol for Ramsey spectroscopy of clock transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Basalaev, M. Yu.; Zanon-Willette, T.

    2016-11-01

    We develop a universal method to significantly suppress probe-induced shifts in any type of atomic clock using Ramsey spectroscopy. Our approach is based on the adaptation of the synthetic frequency concept [V. I. Yudin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 030801 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.030801] (previously developed for blackbody radiation shift suppression) to Ramsey spectroscopy with the use of interrogations with different dark time intervals. The most significant suppression of the shift is obtained in combination with the so-called hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy technique [V. I. Yudin et al., Phys. Rev. A 82, 011804(R) (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevA.82.011804]. In this case, the probe-induced frequency shifts can be suppressed considerably from metrologically significant levels to below a fractional level of 10-18 for practically any optical atomic clocks. The main advantage of our method in comparison with other hyper-Ramsey approaches [R. Hobson et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 010501(R) (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.010501; T. Zanon-Willette et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 042506 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.042506] derives from its much greater efficiency and robustness in the presence of decoherence.

  16. On the use of spring baseflow recession for a more accurate parameterization of aquifer transit time distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farlin, J.; Maloszewski, P.

    2012-12-01

    Baseflow recession analysis and groundwater dating have up to now developed as two distinct branches of hydrogeology and were used to solve entirely different problems. We show that by combining two classical models, namely Boussinesq's Equation describing spring baseflow recession and the exponential piston-flow model used in groundwater dating studies, the parameters describing the transit time distribution of an aquifer can be in some cases estimated to a far more accurate degree than with the latter alone. Under the assumption that the aquifer basis is sub-horizontal, the mean residence time of water in the saturated zone can be estimated from spring baseflow recession. This provides an independent estimate of groundwater residence time that can refine those obtained from tritium measurements. This approach is demonstrated in a case study predicting atrazine concentration trend in a series of springs draining the fractured-rock aquifer known as the Luxembourg Sandstone. A transport model calibrated on tritium measurements alone predicted different times to trend reversal following the nationwide ban on atrazine in 2005 with different rates of decrease. For some of the springs, the best agreement between observed and predicted time of trend reversal was reached for the model calibrated using both tritium measurements and the recession of spring discharge during the dry season. The agreement between predicted and observed values was however poorer for the springs displaying the most gentle recessions, possibly indicating the stronger influence of continuous groundwater recharge during the dry period.

  17. The frequency of binary star interlopers amongst transitional discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruíz-Rodríguez, D.; Ireland, M.; Cieza, L.; Kraus, A.

    2016-12-01

    Using Non-Redundant Mask interferometry (NRM), we searched for binary companions to objects previously classified as transitional discs (TD). These objects are thought to be an evolutionary stage between an optically thick disc and optically thin disc. We investigate the presence of a stellar companion as a possible mechanism of material depletion in the inner region of these discs, which would rule out an ongoing planetary formation process in distances comparable to the binary separation. For our detection limits, we implement a new method of completeness correction using a combination of randomly sampled binary orbits and Bayesian inference. The selected sample of 24 TDs belongs to the nearby and young star-forming regions: Ophiuchus (˜130 pc), Taurus-Auriga (˜140 pc) and IC348 (˜220 pc). These regions are suitable to resolve faint stellar companions with moderate to high confidence levels at distances as low as 2 au from the central star. With a total of 31 objects, including 11 known TDs and circumbinary discs from the literature, we have found that a fraction of 0.38 ± 0.09 of the SEDs of these objects are likely due to the tidal interaction between a close binary and its disc, while the remaining SEDs are likely the result of other internal processes such as photoevaporation, grain growth, planet-disc interactions. In addition, we detected four companions orbiting outside the area of the truncation radii and propose that the IR excesses of these systems are due to a disc orbiting a secondary companion.

  18. High frequency of single-base transitions and extreme frequency of precise multiple-base reversion mutations in poliovirus.

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, J C; Giachetti, C; Semler, B L; Holland, J J

    1992-01-01

    We employed independent clones of a temperature-sensitive mutant of type 1 poliovirus, 3AB-310/4, to quantitate the frequency of specific U----C transitions at nucleotide 5310, within the genomic region encoding polypeptide 3AB, which is involved in the initiation of RNA replication. Only this U----C base substitution restores the wild-type phenotypic ability to form plaques at 39 degrees C; the other two base substitutions at this site are lethal. The observed frequency of this specific transition averaged 2 x 10(-5), and all revertant viruses forming plaques at 39 degrees C contained the expected cytidine at nucleotide 5310. Incredibly, only 3 of 10 revertants exhibited this one specific U----C transition whereas 7 of 10 exhibited this same transition plus four additional base substitutions that precisely reverted temperature-sensitive 3AB-310/4 to wild-type poliovirus sequence (these latter four mutations had been introduced into 3AB-310/4 as silent third base mutations to provide new restriction sites in infectious cDNAs). No other mutations were detected in this polypeptide 3AB domain in either the single-base or the precise 5-base revertants. No intermediates were seen; all revertants exhibited either the single U----C transition at nucleotide 5310 or the same transition plus four precise reversions to the wild-type sequence at sites 8, 11, 43, and 46 bases distant from nucleotide 5310. Similar results were obtained after transfection of cDNA-derived transcripts. We discuss possible mechanisms for our data. These include (but may not be limited to) error-prone polymerase activity, sequential RNA recombination events joining independent mutations, or some unusual RNA editing process. PMID:1313561

  19. Non-Maxwellian to Maxwellian transitions of atmospheric microplasmas at microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. U.; Jeong, S. Y.; Won, I. H.; Sung, S. K.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, J. K.

    2016-07-01

    Particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulations and numerical analysis of a single particle motion are performed for atmospheric He microplasmas at microwave frequencies to determine the characteristics of non-Maxwellian to Maxwellian transition. The left and the right regimes of Paschen curve, divided by this transition, reveal that the transition frequencies depend on the gap of electrodes and the neutral gas pressure to follow scaling laws for a new extended Paschen law. The fluid models are reasonable at the right-side regime of Paschen breakdown areas, but not on the left side, which is highly kinetic for electrons. The plasmas driven by weaker electric fields of high enough frequencies at the right-side Paschen regime breed more energetic electrons.

  20. Interpretation and application of reaction class transition state theory for accurate calculation of thermokinetic parameters using isodesmic reaction method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bi-Yao; Li, Ze-Rong; Tan, Ning-Xin; Yao, Qian; Li, Xiang-Yuan

    2013-04-25

    We present a further interpretation of reaction class transition state theory (RC-TST) proposed by Truong et al. for the accurate calculation of rate coefficients for reactions in a class. It is found that the RC-TST can be interpreted through the isodesmic reaction method, which is usually used to calculate reaction enthalpy or enthalpy of formation for a species, and the theory can also be used for the calculation of the reaction barriers and reaction enthalpies for reactions in a class. A correction scheme based on this theory is proposed for the calculation of the reaction barriers and reaction enthalpies for reactions in a class. To validate the scheme, 16 combinations of various ab initio levels with various basis sets are used as the approximate methods and CCSD(T)/CBS method is used as the benchmarking method in this study to calculate the reaction energies and energy barriers for a representative set of five reactions from the reaction class: R(c)CH(R(b))CR(a)CH2 + OH(•) → R(c)C(•)(R(b))CR(a)CH2 + H2O (R(a), R(b), and R(c) in the reaction formula represent the alkyl or hydrogen). Then the results of the approximate methods are corrected by the theory. The maximum values of the average deviations of the energy barrier and the reaction enthalpy are 99.97 kJ/mol and 70.35 kJ/mol, respectively, before correction and are reduced to 4.02 kJ/mol and 8.19 kJ/mol, respectively, after correction, indicating that after correction the results are not sensitive to the level of the ab initio method and the size of the basis set, as they are in the case before correction. Therefore, reaction energies and energy barriers for reactions in a class can be calculated accurately at a relatively low level of ab initio method using our scheme. It is also shown that the rate coefficients for the five representative reactions calculated at the BHandHLYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory via our scheme are very close to the values calculated at CCSD(T)/CBS level. Finally, reaction

  1. Frequency tuning of single photons from a whispering-gallery mode resonator to MHz-wide transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunk, G.; Vogl, U.; Sedlmeir, F.; Strekalov, D. V.; Otterpohl, A.; Averchenko, V.; Schwefel, H. G. L.; Leuchs, G.; Marquardt, Ch.

    2016-11-01

    Quantum repeaters rely on interfacing flying qubits with quantum memories. The most common implementations include a narrowband single photon matched in bandwidth and central frequency to an atomic system. Previously, we demonstrated the compatibility of our versatile source of heralded single photons, which is based on parametric down-conversion in a triply resonant whispering-gallery mode resonator, with alkaline transitions [Schunk et al., Optica 2015, 2, 773]. In this paper, we analyse our source in terms of phase matching, available wavelength-tuning mechanisms and applications to narrowband atomic systems. We resonantly address the D1 transitions of caesium and rubidium with this optical parametric oscillator pumped above its oscillation threshold. Below threshold, the efficient coupling of single photons to atomic transitions heralded by single telecom-band photons is demonstrated. Finally, we present an accurate analytical description of our observations. Providing the demonstrated flexibility in connecting various atomic transitions with telecom wavelengths, we show a promising approach to realize an essential building block for quantum repeaters.

  2. Evaluation of the 'mean frequency' technique. [sum approximation in perturbation theory for atomic transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, E. M.; Reiss, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    The 'mean frequency' technique, a simple procedure introduced by Bebb and Gold for the approximate evaluation of sums occurring in high-order perturbation theory, represents a useful approximation method. Its predictions compare favorably to exact results obtained by Gontier and Trahin for multiphoton bound-bound transitions in hydrogen. However, the technique can be in error if the 'mean frequency' lies near certain integers.

  3. Nonstandard transitions in the Kuramoto model: a role of asymmetry in natural frequency distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Yu; Ito, Keigo; Aoyagi, Toshio; Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki Y.

    2017-01-01

    We study transitions in the Kuramoto model by shedding light on asymmetry in the natural frequency distribution, which has been assumed to be symmetric in many previous studies. The asymmetry brings two nonstandard bifurcation diagrams, with the aid of bimodality. The first diagram consists of stationary states, and has the standard continuous synchronization transition and a subsequent discontinuous transition as the coupling strength increases. Such a bifurcation diagram has been also reported in a variant model, which breaks the odd symmetry of the coupling function by introducing the phase lag. The second diagram includes the oscillatory state emerging from the partially synchronized state and followed by a discontinuous transition. This diagram is firstly revealed in this study. The two bifurcation diagrams are obtained by employing the Ott-Antonsen ansatz, and are verified by direct N-body simulations. We conclude that the asymmetry in distribution, with the bimodality, plays a similar role to the phase lag, and diversifies the transitions.

  4. Frequency-dependent quantum capacitance and plasma wave in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Kai-Tak; Guo, Jing

    2014-03-10

    Frequency-dependent quantum capacitance C{sub Q} of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is computed and compared to that of graphene. It is found that the frequency dependence of C{sub Q} in TMDs differs drastically from that of graphene which has a divergent point. The plasma resonance forms when the quantum capacitance is negative and has the same magnitude as the electrostatic capacitance. The calculation shows that the plasma in TMDs depends on the band-structure-limited velocity, band gap, and doping density, which can be controlled via gate biases. The plasma frequencies of TMDs are in the rage of terahertz useful for various applications.

  5. The application of intraoperative transit time flow measurement to accurately assess anastomotic quality in sequential vein grafting

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Zhang, Fan; Gao, Ming-Xin; Li, Hai-Tao; Li, Jing-Xing; Song, Wei; Huang, Xin-Sheng; Gu, Cheng-Xiong

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Intraoperative transit time flow measurement (TTFM) is widely used to assess anastomotic quality in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). However, in sequential vein grafting, the flow characteristics collected by the conventional TTFM method are usually associated with total graft flow and might not accurately indicate the quality of every distal anastomosis in a sequential graft. The purpose of our study was to examine a new TTFM method that could assess the quality of each distal anastomosis in a sequential graft more reliably than the conventional TTFM approach. METHODS Two TTFM methods were tested in 84 patients who underwent sequential saphenous off-pump CABG in Beijing An Zhen Hospital between April and August 2012. In the conventional TTFM method, normal blood flow in the sequential graft was maintained during the measurement, and the flow probe was placed a few centimetres above the anastomosis to be evaluated. In the new method, blood flow in the sequential graft was temporarily reduced during the measurement by placing an atraumatic bulldog clamp at the graft a few centimetres distal to the anastomosis to be evaluated, while the position of the flow probe remained the same as in the conventional method. This new TTFM method was named the flow reduction TTFM. Graft flow parameters measured by both methods were compared. RESULTS Compared with the conventional TTFM, the flow reduction TTFM resulted in significantly lower mean graft blood flow (P < 0.05); in contrast, yielded significantly higher pulsatility index (P < 0.05). Diastolic filling was not significantly different between the two methods and was >50% in both cases. Interestingly, the flow reduction TTFM identified two defective middle distal anastomoses that the conventional TTFM failed to detect. Graft flows near the defective distal anastomoses were improved substantially after revision. CONCLUSIONS In this study, we found that temporary reduction of graft flow during TTFM seemed to

  6. Spatiotemporal interference of photoelectron wave packets and the time scale of nonadiabatic transitions in the high-frequency regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, Koudai

    2016-10-01

    The method of the envelope Hamiltonian [K. Toyota, U. Saalmann, and J. M. Rost, New J. Phys. 17, 073005 (2015), 10.1088/1367-2630/17/7/073005] is applied to further study a detachment dynamics of a model negative ion in one dimension in the high-frequency regime. This method is based on the Floquet approach, but the time dependency of an envelope function is explicitly kept for arbitrary pulse durations. Therefore, it is capable of describing not only a photon absorption or emission, but also a nonadiabatic transition which is induced by the time-varying envelope of the pulse. It was shown that the envelope Hamiltonian accurately retrieves the results obtained by the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, and the underlying physics were well understood by the adiabatic approximation based on the envelope Hamiltonian. In this paper, we explore two more aspects of the detachment dynamics, which were not considered in our previous work. First, we determine the features of both a spatial and temporal interference of photoelectron wave packets in a photon-absorption process. We conclude that both of the interference mechanisms are universal in ionization dynamics in the high-frequency regime. Second, we extract a pulse duration which maximizes a yield of the nonadiabatic transition as a function of a pulse duration. It is shown that it becomes maximum when the pulse duration is comparable to a time scale of an electron.

  7. Broad-band frequency references in the near-infrared: Accurate dual comb spectroscopy of methane and acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolot, A. M.; Giorgetta, F. R.; Baumann, E.; Swann, W. C.; Coddington, I.; Newbury, N. R.

    2013-03-01

    The Doppler-limited spectra of methane between 176 THz and 184 THz (5870-6130 cm-1) and acetylene between 193 THz and 199 THz (6430-6630 cm-1) are acquired via comb-tooth resolved dual comb spectroscopy with frequency accuracy traceable to atomic standards. A least squares analysis of the measured absorbance and phase line shapes provides line center frequencies with absolute accuracy of 0.2 MHz, or less than one thousandth of the room temperature Doppler width. This accuracy is verified through comparison with previous saturated absorption spectroscopy of 37 strong isolated lines of acetylene. For the methane spectrum, the center frequencies of 46 well-isolated strong lines are determined with similar high accuracy, along with the center frequencies for 1107 non-isolated lines at lower accuracy. The measured methane line-center frequencies have an uncertainty comparable to the few available laser heterodyne measurements in this region but span a much larger optical bandwidth, marking the first broad-band measurements of the methane 2ν3 region directly referenced to atomic frequency standards. This study demonstrates the promise of dual comb spectroscopy to obtain high resolution broadband spectra that are comparable to state-of-the-art Fourier-transform spectrometer measurements but with much improved frequency accuracy.Work of the US government, not subject to US copyright.

  8. Precision frequency measurements of He,43 2 3P→3 3D transitions at 588 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Pei-Ling; Peng, Jin-Long; Hu, Jinmeng; Feng, Yan; Wang, Li-Bang; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2016-12-01

    We report the frequency measurements of the 2 3P→3 3D transitions in He,43 at 588 nm using an optical frequency comb stabilized laser system. The Doppler-free spectra of the 2 3P→3 3D transitions are demonstrated in an rf discharged sealed-off helium cell using intermodulated fluorescence spectroscopy. The measured absolute frequency of the 4He2 3P0→3 3D1 transition is 510 059 755.352(28) MHz, which is more precise than the previous measurement by two orders of magnitude. The ionization energies of the 4He2 3P0 and 2 3S1 states can be derived from our result and agree very well with the previous experimental values. More importantly, the Lamb shift of the 2 3S1 state can be deduced to be 4057.086(34) MHz, which is two times more precise than the previous result. In addition, the absolute frequencies of the 2 3P0,1 /2→3 3D1,3 /2 , 2 3P0,1 /2→3 3D1,1 /2 , and 2 3P0,1 /2→3 3D2,3 /2 transitions in 3He are measured. Our precision surpasses the theoretical calculations by more than one to two orders of magnitude. The hyperfine separations of the 3 3D states in 3He and the frequency differences between 4He and 3He transitions are also presented.

  9. A time domain based method for the accurate measurement of Q-factor and resonance frequency of microwave resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Gyüre, B.; Márkus, B. G.; Bernáth, B.; Simon, F.; Murányi, F.

    2015-09-15

    We present a novel method to determine the resonant frequency and quality factor of microwave resonators which is faster, more stable, and conceptually simpler than the yet existing techniques. The microwave resonator is pumped with the microwave radiation at a frequency away from its resonance. It then emits an exponentially decaying radiation at its eigen-frequency when the excitation is rapidly switched off. The emitted microwave signal is down-converted with a microwave mixer, digitized, and its Fourier transformation (FT) directly yields the resonance curve in a single shot. Being a FT based method, this technique possesses the Fellgett (multiplex) and Connes (accuracy) advantages and it conceptually mimics that of pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance. We also establish a novel benchmark to compare accuracy of the different approaches of microwave resonator measurements. This shows that the present method has similar accuracy to the existing ones, which are based on sweeping or modulating the frequency of the microwave radiation.

  10. A time domain based method for the accurate measurement of Q-factor and resonance frequency of microwave resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyüre, B.; Márkus, B. G.; Bernáth, B.; Murányi, F.; Simon, F.

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel method to determine the resonant frequency and quality factor of microwave resonators which is faster, more stable, and conceptually simpler than the yet existing techniques. The microwave resonator is pumped with the microwave radiation at a frequency away from its resonance. It then emits an exponentially decaying radiation at its eigen-frequency when the excitation is rapidly switched off. The emitted microwave signal is down-converted with a microwave mixer, digitized, and its Fourier transformation (FT) directly yields the resonance curve in a single shot. Being a FT based method, this technique possesses the Fellgett (multiplex) and Connes (accuracy) advantages and it conceptually mimics that of pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance. We also establish a novel benchmark to compare accuracy of the different approaches of microwave resonator measurements. This shows that the present method has similar accuracy to the existing ones, which are based on sweeping or modulating the frequency of the microwave radiation.

  11. Single-frequency dielectric relaxation used to characterize the glass transition time of polydextrose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, Martin G.; Campbell, Zachary J.; Carter, Brady P.

    2017-02-01

    Dielectric relaxation methods are applicable to powdery materials such as carbohydrates. These materials have relaxations that occur in the milli-Hz range while samples are held at fixed temperatures and fixed water activities, a w, (relativity humidity). Under proper conditions these materials undergo physical changes where the initially glassy powder transitions to an amorphous equilibrium state at the glass transition temperature, T g. Determining this transition involves characterizing the boundary curve (T g versus a w) which determines T g and a w conditions where materials are stable with long-shelf life or unstable with very a short shelf-life. This paper serves to illustrate multiple methodologies which can be used to characterize glass transition from frequency-spectra. Three methodologies are described: peak-broadening, peak-shift, and single-frequency. The new single frequency method not only provides results that identical to those of the peak-shift method but increases the data acquisition speeds by a factor of 5. This method is illustrated on polydextrose, a common sugar substitute. The information gathered can then be used to construct the boundary curve which is used to characterize the shelf-life of a material at various conditions.

  12. Tracer sampling frequency influences estimates of young water fraction and streamwater transit time distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockinger, Michael P.; Bogena, Heye R.; Lücke, Andreas; Diekkrüger, Bernd; Cornelissen, Thomas; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-10-01

    The streamwater transit time distribution (TTD) of a catchment is used to derive insights into the movement of precipitation water via various flow paths to the catchment's stream. Typically, TTDs are estimated by using the convolution integral to model a weekly tracer signal measured in streamflow. Another approach for evaluating the transit time of water to the catchment stream is the fraction of young water (Fyw) in streamflow that is younger than a certain threshold age, which also relies on tracer data. However, few studies used tracer data with a higher sampling frequency than weekly. To investigate the influence of the sampling frequency of tracer data on estimates of TTD and Fyw, we estimated both indicators for a humid, mesoscale catchment in Germany using tracer data of weekly and higher sampling frequency. We made use of a 1.5 year long time series of daily to sub-daily precipitation and streamwater isotope measurements, which were aggregated to create the weekly resolution data set. We found that a higher sampling frequency improved the stream isotope simulation compared to a weekly one (0.35 vs. 0.24 Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency) and showed more pronounced short-term dynamics in the simulation result. The TTD based on the high temporal resolution data was considerably different from the weekly one with a shift towards faster transit times, while its corresponding mean transit time of water particles was approximately reduced by half (from 9.5 to 5 years). Similar to this, Fyw almost doubled when applying high resolution data compared to weekly one. Thus, the different approaches yield similar results and strongly support each other. This indicates that weekly isotope tracer data lack information about faster water transport mechanisms in the catchment. Thus, we conclude that a higher than weekly sampling frequency should be preferred when investigating a catchment's water transport characteristics. When comparing TTDs or Fyw of different catchments, the

  13. The number of alleles at a microsatellite defines the allele frequency spectrum and facilitates fast accurate estimation of theta.

    PubMed

    Haasl, Ryan J; Payseur, Bret A

    2010-12-01

    Theoretical work focused on microsatellite variation has produced a number of important results, including the expected distribution of repeat sizes and the expected squared difference in repeat size between two randomly selected samples. However, closed-form expressions for the sampling distribution and frequency spectrum of microsatellite variation have not been identified. Here, we use coalescent simulations of the stepwise mutation model to develop gamma and exponential approximations of the microsatellite allele frequency spectrum, a distribution central to the description of microsatellite variation across the genome. For both approximations, the parameter of biological relevance is the number of alleles at a locus, which we express as a function of θ, the population-scaled mutation rate, based on simulated data. Discovered relationships between θ, the number of alleles, and the frequency spectrum support the development of three new estimators of microsatellite θ. The three estimators exhibit roughly similar mean squared errors (MSEs) and all are biased. However, across a broad range of sample sizes and θ values, the MSEs of these estimators are frequently lower than all other estimators tested. The new estimators are also reasonably robust to mutation that includes step sizes greater than one. Finally, our approximation to the microsatellite allele frequency spectrum provides a null distribution of microsatellite variation. In this context, a preliminary analysis of the effects of demographic change on the frequency spectrum is performed. We suggest that simulations of the microsatellite frequency spectrum under evolutionary scenarios of interest may guide investigators to the use of relevant and sometimes novel summary statistics.

  14. Laboratory submillimeter transition frequencies of Li-7H and Li-6H. [used for abundance investigations in red giant stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plummer, G. M.; Herbst, E.; De Lucia, F. C.

    1984-01-01

    The fundamental (J = 1 - 0) rotational transition frequencies of Li-7H and Li-6H in their ground (v = 0) vibrational states and of Li-7H in its first excited (v = 1) vibrational state have been measured in the laboratory. Use of these transition frequencies should permit astronomical investigations of LiH abundances in red giant stars of high lithium abundance.

  15. Accurate ab Initio Quartic Force Fields, Vibrational Frequencies, and Heats of Formation for FCN, FNC, ClCN, and ClNC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Martin, Jan M. L.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1995-01-01

    The XCN and XNC (X = F, Cl) isomers have been investigated using the CCSD(T) method in conjunction with correlation consistent basis sets. Equilibrium geometries, harmonic frequencies, anharmonic constants, fundamental frequencies, and heats of formation have been evaluated. Agreement with experiment for the fundamental frequencies is very good, even for nu(sub 2), for CICN, which is subject to a strong Fermi resonance with 2nu(sub 3). It is also shown that a second-order perturbation theory approach to solving the nuclear Schroedinger equation gives results in excellent agreement with essentially exact variational calculations. This is true even for nu(sub 2) of ClCN, provided that near-singular terms are eliminated from the perturbation theory formulas and the appropriate Fermi interaction energy matrix is then diagonalized. A band at 615/cm, tentatively assigned as the Cl-N stretch in ClNC in matrix isolation experiments, is shown not to be due to ClNC. Accurate atomization energies are determined and are used to evaluate accurate heats of formation (3.1 +/- 1.5, 33.2 +/- 1.5, 72.6 +/- 1.5, and 75.9 +/- 1.5 kcal/mol for FCN, ClCN, FNC, and ClNC, respectively). It is expected that the theoretical heats of formation for FCN, FNC, and ClNC are the most accurate available.

  16. [Excitation energy and frequency of transition spectral line of electron in an asymmetry quantum dot].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jing-Lin

    2009-03-01

    In an asymmetry quantum dot, the properties of the electron, which is strongly coupled with phonon, were investigated. The variational relations of the first internal excited state energy, the excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot with the transverse and longituainal effective confinement length of quantum dot and the electron-phonon coupling strength were studied by using a linear combination operator and the unitary transformation methods. Numerical calculations for the variational relations of the first internal excited state energy, the excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot with the transverse and longituainal effective confinement length of quantum dot and the electron-phonon coupling strength were performed and the results show that the first internal excited state energy, the excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot will strongly increase with decreasing the transverse and longitudinal effective confinement length. The first internal excited state energy of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot will decrease with increasing the electron-phonon coupling strength. The excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot will increase with increasing the electron-phonon coupling strength.

  17. Dual-axis vapor cell for simultaneous laser frequency stabilization on disparate optical transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, Anupriya Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Jamison, Alan O.; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2015-07-15

    We have developed a dual-axis ytterbium (Yb) vapor cell and used it to simultaneously address the two laser cooling transitions in Yb at wavelengths 399 nm and 556 nm, featuring the disparate linewidths of 2π × 29 MHz and 2π × 182 KHz, respectively. By utilizing different optical paths for the two wavelengths, we simultaneously obtain comparable optical densities suitable for saturated absorption spectroscopy for both the transitions and keep both the lasers frequency stabilized over several hours. We demonstrate that by appropriate control of the cell temperature profile, two atomic transitions differing in relative strength across a large range of over three orders of magnitude can be simultaneously addressed, making the device adaptable to a variety of spectroscopic needs. We also show that our observations can be understood with a simple theoretical model of the Yb vapor.

  18. Accurate absolute frequencies of the {nu}{sub 1}+{nu}{sub 3} band of {sup 13}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} determined using an infrared mode-locked Cr:YAG laser frequency comb

    SciTech Connect

    Madej, Alan A.; Bernard, John E.; John Alcock, A.; Czajkowski, Andrzej; Chepurov, Sergei

    2006-04-15

    Absolute frequency measurements, with up to 1x10{sup -11} level accuracies, are presented for 60 lines of the P and R branches for the {nu}{sub 1}+{nu}{sub 3} band of {sup 13}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} at 1.5 {mu}m (194 THz). The measurements were made using cavity-enhanced, diode-laser-based saturation spectroscopy. With one laser system stabilized to the P(16) line and a second laser system stabilized to the line whose frequency was to be determined, a Cr:YAG frequency comb was employed to accurately measure the tetrahertz level frequency intervals. The results are compared with recent work from other groups and indicate that these lines would form a basis for a high-quality atlas of reference frequencies for this region of the spectrum.

  19. Quantum versus classical phase-locking transition in a frequency-chirped nonlinear oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, I.; Friedland, L.; Gat, O.; Shagalov, A. G.

    2011-07-15

    Classical and quantum-mechanical phase-locking transition in a nonlinear oscillator driven by a chirped-frequency perturbation is discussed. Different limits are analyzed in terms of the dimensionless parameters P{sub 1}={epsilon}/{radical}(2m({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}{sub 0}{alpha}) and P{sub 2}=(3({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){beta})/(4m{radical}({alpha})) ({epsilon}, {alpha}, {beta}, and {omega}{sub 0} being the driving amplitude, the frequency chirp rate, the nonlinearity parameter, and the linear frequency of the oscillator). It is shown that, for P{sub 2}<>P{sub 1}+1, the transition involves quantum-mechanical energy ladder climbing (LC). The threshold for the phase-locking transition and its width in P{sub 1} in both AR and LC limits are calculated. The theoretical results are tested by solving the Schroedinger equation in the energy basis and illustrated via the Wigner function in phase space.

  20. Potential of electric quadrupole transitions in radium isotopes for single-ion optical frequency standards

    SciTech Connect

    Versolato, O. O.; Wansbeek, L. W.; Jungmann, K.; Timmermans, R. G. E.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W.

    2011-04-15

    We explore the potential of the electric quadrupole transitions 7s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-6d {sup 2}D{sub 3/2}, 6d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} in radium isotopes as single-ion optical frequency standards. The frequency shifts of the clock transitions due to external fields and the corresponding uncertainties are calculated. Several competitive {sup A}Ra{sup +} candidates, with A= 223-229, are identified. In particular, we show that the transition 7s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} (F=2,m{sub F}=0)-6d {sup 2}D{sub 3/2} (F=0,m{sub F}=0) at 828 nm in {sup 223}Ra{sup +}, with no linear Zeeman and electric quadrupole shifts, stands out as a relatively simple case, which could be exploited as a compact, robust, and low-cost atomic clock operating at a fractional frequency uncertainty of 10{sup -17}. With more experimental effort, the {sup 223,225,226}Ra{sup +} clocks could be pushed to a projected performance reaching the 10{sup -18} level.

  1. First pure frequency measurement of an optical transition in helium: Lamb shift on the 2[sup 3][ital S][sub 1] metastable level

    SciTech Connect

    Pavone, F.S.; Marin, F.; De Natale, P.; Inguscio, M. , University of Florence, Largo E. Fermi, 2 I-50125 Firenze ); Biraben, F. )

    1994-07-04

    The 2[sup 3][ital S][sub 1-]3[sup 3][ital P][sub 0][sup 4]He transition at [lambda][sub 0]=389 nm is measured with respect to a previously frequency calibrated [sup 87]Rb two-photon transition at 2[lambda][sub 0]=778 nm. The [sup 4]He absolute frequency is 770 732 839 058 (190) kHz, with an accuracy of 2.4 parts in 10[sup 10]. A Lamb shift value of +4057.61 (79) MHz, with 600 kHz uncertainty arising from the theoretical position of the 3[sup 3][ital P][sub 0] energy level, is extracted for the 2[sup 3][ital S][sub 1] level. This value is more than 2 orders of magnitude more accurate than the current best theoretical predictions.

  2. Tunable frequency stabilization to Zeeman sublevel transitions between an intermediate state and Rydberg states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Shanxia; Zhang, Hao; Zhou, Jian; Zhang, Linjie; Zhao, Jianming; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a robust method of direct laser frequency locking on the Zeeman sublevel transitions between an intermediate state and Rydberg states, with continuously tunable frequency range from  -35 MHz to  +35 MHz, which is based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) spectra of nondegenerate Zeeman sublevels in a Rydberg cascade system. With a small axial magnetic field, the EIT spectrum will split into two individual sub-peaks due to the Zeeman Effect of three energy levels, including the 133Cs 6S1/2, 6P3/2 and nl Rydberg states which form the cascade system. It is shown that the coupling field, corresponding to the transitions between the Zeeman sublevels of the intermediate state and Rydberg state, can be locked arbitrarily on any one of the two EIT sub-peaks. The frequency stability of locked lasers is bounded by 0.81 MHz. The root of Allan variance of the frequency reaches a minimum of 2.06× {{10}-8} for an averaging time of 512 s.

  3. An L-band transit-time oscillator with mechanical frequency tunability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Lili; He, Juntao; Ling, Junpu; Cao, Yibing

    2017-02-01

    An L-band coaxial Transit-time Oscillator (TTO) with mechanical frequency tunability is introduced in this paper. Particle-in-cell simulations have been done. The output power efficiency has been improved at least 20% under a 10.2 GW input power and with a tunable range from 1.57 GHz to 1.90 GHz by modulating the outer conductor. It is worth to note that the efficiency can reach as high as 41% at 1.75 GHz. The mechanical engineering method is also detailed in this work. The frequency tuning range of the coaxial TTO is 22.6% of the central frequency. On the other hand, the frequency can be tuned from 1.6 GHz to 1.85 GHz by modulating the inner conductor. The author highlights a hollow structure of the L-band coaxial TTO which can work from 1.03 GHz to 1.31 GHz via modulating the outer conductor in the rest of the article. The frequency tuning range of the hollow TTO is 21.4% of the central frequency. More importantly, the hollow TTO can be easily achieved after the inner conductor is removed from the coaxial TTO. The electric field distributions of the coaxial and hollow TTOs are analyzed, resulting in that the longitudinal and transverse working modes are TM01 and π mode, respectively. The same working mode from these two structures implies the stability of the TTOs mentioned above.

  4. Microwave Frequency Transitions Requiring Laser Ablated Uranium Metal Discovered Using Chirp-Pulse Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, B. E.; Cooke, S. A.

    2014-06-01

    A rod of depleted uranium metal (mp = 1,132° C) has been ablated with the fundamental operating frequency of a Nd:YAG laser. The resulting ablation plume of uranium was then mixed with argon gas and expanded between the transmit/receive horn antennae of a chirp-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. The recorded spectra show nine strong transitions which are not present when the laser is not used in the experimental procedure. A series of experiments in which the backing gas conditions were altered provides evidence that the nine observed transitions are carried by the same species. Should the transitions be from one species it is most likely an asymmetric top. The transitions persist even when ultra-pure argon is used as the sole backing gas. The oxide coating of the uranium metal likely provides a source of oxygen and, presently, the ``top" candidate for the unknown molecule is UO_3, which is known to have C_2v symmetry. Double resonance experiments are planned to aid transition assignments. A plausible explanation for an elusive assignment to date is the presence of pseudo-rotation.

  5. The Transitional Protoplanetary Disk Frequency as a Function of Age: Disk Evolution in the Coronet Cluster, Taurus, and Other 1--8 Myr-old Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, Thayne; Sicilia-Aguilar, Auora

    2011-01-01

    We present Spitzer 3.6-24 micron photometry and spectroscopy for stars in the 1-3 Myr-old Coronet Cluster, expanding upon the survey of Sicilia-Aguilar et al. (2008). Using sophisticated radiative transfer models, we analyze these new data and those from Sicilia-Aguilar et al. (2008) to identify disks with evidence for substantial dust evolution consistent with disk clearing: transitional disks. We then analyze data in Taurus and others young clusters - IC 348, NGC 2362, and eta Cha -- to constrain the transitional disk frequency as a function of time. Our analysis confirms previous results finding evidence for two types of transitional disks -- those with inner holes and those that are homologously depleted. The percentage of disks in the transitional phase increases from approx.15-20% at 1-2 Myr to > 50% at 5-8 Myr; the mean transitional disk lifetime is closer to approx. 1 Myr than 0.1-0.5 Myr, consistent with previous studies by Currie et al. (2009) and Sicilia-Aguilar et al. (2009). In the Coronet Cluster and IC 348, transitional disks are more numerous for very low-mass M3--M6 stars than for more massive K5-M2 stars, while Taurus lacks a strong spectral type-dependent frequency. Assuming standard values for the gas-to-dust ratio and other disk properties, the lower limit for the masses of optically-thick primordial disks is Mdisk approx. 0.001-0.003 M*. We find that single color-color diagrams do not by themselves uniquely identify transitional disks or primordial disks. Full SED modeling is required to accurately assess disk evolution for individual sources and inform statistical estimates of the transitional disk population in large samples using mid-IR colors.

  6. Computational IR spectroscopy of water: OH stretch frequencies, transition dipoles, and intermolecular vibrational coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2013-05-01

    The Hessian matrix reconstruction method initially developed to extract the basis mode frequencies, vibrational coupling constants, and transition dipoles of the delocalized amide I, II, and III vibrations of polypeptides and proteins from quantum chemistry calculation results is used to obtain those properties of delocalized O-H stretch modes in liquid water. Considering the water symmetric and asymmetric O-H stretch modes as basis modes, we here develop theoretical models relating vibrational frequencies, transition dipoles, and coupling constants of basis modes to local water configuration and solvent electric potential. Molecular dynamics simulation was performed to generate an ensemble of water configurations that was in turn used to construct vibrational Hamiltonian matrices. Obtaining the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the matrices and using the time-averaging approximation method, which was developed by the Skinner group, to calculating the vibrational spectra of coupled oscillator systems, we could numerically simulate the O-H stretch IR spectrum of liquid water. The asymmetric line shape and weak shoulder bands were quantitatively reproduced by the present computational procedure based on vibrational exciton model, where the polarization effects on basis mode transition dipoles and inter-mode coupling constants were found to be crucial in quantitatively simulating the vibrational spectra of hydrogen-bond networking liquid water.

  7. Accurate modal superposition method for harmonic frequency response sensitivity of non-classically damped systems with lower-higher-modal truncation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Weiwei; Li, Li; Lei, Sheng

    2017-02-01

    Frequency response and their sensitivities analysis are of fundamental importance. Due to the fact that the mode truncation errors of frequency response functions (FRFs) are introduced for two times, the errors of frequency response sensitivities may be larger than other dynamic analysis. Many modal correction approaches (such as modal acceleration methods, dynamic correction methods, force derivation methods and accurate modal superposition methods) have been presented to eliminate the modal-truncation error. However, these approaches are just suitable to the case of un-damped or classically damped systems. The state-space equation based approaches can extend these approaches to non-classically damped systems, but it may be not only computationally expensive, but also lack physical insight provided by the superposition of the complex modes of the equation of motion with original space. This paper is aimed at dealing with the lower-higher-modal truncation problem of harmonic frequency response sensitivity of non-classically damped systems. Based on the Neumann expansion and the frequency shifting technique, the contribution of the truncated lower and higher modes to the harmonic frequency response sensitivity is explicitly expressed only by the available middle modes and system matrices. An extended hybrid expansion method (EHEM) is then proposed by expressing harmonic frequency response sensitivity as the explicit expression of the middle modes and system matrices. The EHEM maintains original-space without having to involve the state-space equation of motion such that it is efficient in computational effort and storage capacity. Finally, a rail specimen is used to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. A portable method for assessing gastrointestinal motility by simultaneously measuring transit time and contraction frequency.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Yan, G

    2008-01-01

    To portably monitor the motility of the total GI tract, a method for assessing GI motility by simultaneously measuring transit time and contraction frequency is put forward. The portable monitoring system is composed of a swallowable telemetric capsule, a portable recorder, magnetizing coils deposited in vitro, and workstation for data processing. The transit time and contraction frequency of the GI tract are deduced by analysing the variation of the position and orientation angles of a telemetric capsule in time domain and frequency domain. AC electromagnetic localization method is used to determine the position and orientation of the telemetric capsule in vivo. In the paper, the localization model based on a quasi-static magnetic field, the method of monitoring GI motility and the set-up of the monitoring system are detailed. Then from static and dynamic experiments, the performances of the system including the accuracy and dynamic response are evaluated. Finally, the electromagnetic safety of the system is verified by simulating electromagnetic radiation to the human body.

  9. Time-domain analysis of sub-micron transit region GaAs Gunn diodes for use in terahertz frequency multiplication chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, F.; Farrington, N.; Mitchell, C.; Missous, M.

    2010-10-01

    Simulated RF time-domain characteristics for advanced Gunn diodes with hot electron injection and sub-micron transit region lengths for use at frequencies over 100GHz are reported. The physical models used have been developed in SILVACO and are compared to measured results. The devices measured were originally fabricated to investigate the feasibility of GaAs Gunn diode oscillators capable of operating at D-band frequencies and ultimately intended for use in high power (multi-mW) Terahertz sources (~0.6THz) when used in conjunction with novel Schottky diode frequency multiplier technology. The device models created using SILVACO are described and the DC and time-domain results presented. The simulations were used to determine the shortest transit region length capable of producing sustained oscillation. The operation of resonant disk second harmonic Gunn diode oscillators is also discussed and accurate electromagnetic models created using Ansoft High Frequency Structure Simulator presented. Novel methods for combining small-signal frequency-domain electromagnetic simulations with time-domain device simulations in order to account for the significant interactions between the diode and oscillator circuit are described.

  10. DCMB that combines divide-and-conquer and mixed-basis set methods for accurate geometry optimizations, total energies, and vibrational frequencies of large molecules.

    PubMed

    Wu, Anan; Xu, Xin

    2012-06-15

    We present a method, named DCMB, for the calculations of large molecules. It is a combination of a parallel divide-and-conquer (DC) method and a mixed-basis (MB) set scheme. In this approach, atomic forces, total energy and vibrational frequencies are obtained from a series of MB calculations, which are derived from the target system utilizing the DC concept. Unlike the fragmentation based methods, all DCMB calculations are performed over the whole target system and no artificial caps are introduced so that it is particularly useful for charged and/or delocalized systems. By comparing the DCMB results with those from the conventional method, we demonstrate that DCMB is capable of providing accurate prediction of molecular geometries, total energies, and vibrational frequencies of molecules of general interest. We also demonstrate that the high efficiency of the parallel DCMB code holds the promise for a routine geometry optimization of large complex systems.

  11. An Accurate Quartic Force Field, Fundamental Frequencies, and Binding Energy for the High Energy Density Material T(d)N4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Martin, Jan M. L.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CCSD(T) method has been used to compute a highly accurate quartic force field and fundamental frequencies for all N-14 and N-15 isotopomers of the high energy density material T(sub d)N(sub 4). The computed fundamental frequencies show beyond doubt that the bands observed in a matrix isolation experiment by Radziszewski and coworkers are not due to different isotopomers of T(sub d)N(sub 4). The most sophisticated thermochemical calculations to date yield a N(sub 4) -> 2N(sub 2) heat of reaction of 182.22 +/- 0.5 kcal/mol at 0 K (180.64 +/- 0.5 at 298 K). It is hoped that the data reported herein will aid in the ultimate detection of T(sub d)N(sub 4).

  12. Broad Frequency LTCC Vertical Interconnect Transition for Multichip Modules and System on Package Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decrossas, Emmanuel; Glover, Michael D.; Porter, Kaoru; Cannon, Tom; Mantooth, H. Alan; Hamilton, M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Various stripline structures and flip chip interconnect designs for high-speed digital communication systems implemented in low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) substrates are studied in this paper. Specifically, two different transition designs from edge launch 2.4 millimeter connectors to stripline transmission lines embedded in LTCC are discussed. After characterizing the DuPont (sup trademark) 9K7 green tape, different designs are proposed to improve signal integrity for high-speed digital data. The full-wave simulations and experimental data validate the presented designs over a broad frequency band from Direct Current to 50 gigahertz and beyond.

  13. Self-density frequency shift measurements of Raman N 2 Q-branch transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavorel, B.; Chaux, R.; Saint-Loup, R.; Berger, H.

    1987-04-01

    We report stimulated Raman investigations of N 2 Q-branch transitions in view to measure the self-density frequency shift. These measurements performed at 295 K over the density range 0.02-0.8 Amagat lead to a mean shift value equal to -5.5×10 -3 cm -1/Amagat. Moreover, our data extrapolated at zero density allowed new refinements of the N 2 molecular constants: v0=2329.91165 (17) cm -1, B1- B0=-0.0173714 (22) cm -1 and D1- D0=(7.6±5.0)×10 -9 cm -1.

  14. A tailored multi-frequency EPR approach to accurately determine the magnetic resonance parameters of dynamic nuclear polarization agents: application to AMUPol.

    PubMed

    Gast, P; Mance, D; Zurlo, E; Ivanov, K L; Baldus, M; Huber, M

    2017-02-01

    To understand the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhancements of biradical polarizing agents, the magnetic resonance parameters need to be known. We describe a tailored EPR approach to accurately determine electron spin-spin coupling parameters using a combination of standard (9 GHz), high (95 GHz) and ultra-high (275 GHz) frequency EPR. Comparing liquid- and frozen-solution continuous-wave EPR spectra provides accurate anisotropic dipolar interaction D and isotropic exchange interaction J parameters of the DNP biradical AMUPol. We found that D was larger by as much as 30% compared to earlier estimates, and that J is 43 MHz, whereas before it was considered to be negligible. With the refined data, quantum mechanical calculations confirm that an increase in dipolar electron-electron couplings leads to higher cross-effect DNP efficiencies. Moreover, the DNP calculations qualitatively reproduce the difference of TOTAPOL and AMUPol DNP efficiencies found experimentally and suggest that AMUPol is particularly effective in improving the DNP efficiency at magnetic fields higher than 500 MHz. The multi-frequency EPR approach will aid in predicting the optimal structures for future DNP agents.

  15. Accurate electronic and chemical properties of 3d transition metal oxides using a calculated linear response U and a DFT + U(V) method.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhongnan; Joshi, Yogesh V; Raman, Sumathy; Kitchin, John R

    2015-04-14

    We validate the usage of the calculated, linear response Hubbard U for evaluating accurate electronic and chemical properties of bulk 3d transition metal oxides. We find calculated values of U lead to improved band gaps. For the evaluation of accurate reaction energies, we first identify and eliminate contributions to the reaction energies of bulk systems due only to changes in U and construct a thermodynamic cycle that references the total energies of unique U systems to a common point using a DFT + U(V) method, which we recast from a recently introduced DFT + U(R) method for molecular systems. We then introduce a semi-empirical method based on weighted DFT/DFT + U cohesive energies to calculate bulk oxidation energies of transition metal oxides using density functional theory and linear response calculated U values. We validate this method by calculating 14 reactions energies involving V, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co oxides. We find up to an 85% reduction of the mean average error (MAE) compared to energies calculated with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional. When our method is compared with DFT + U with empirically derived U values and the HSE06 hybrid functional, we find up to 65% and 39% reductions in the MAE, respectively.

  16. Accurate electronic and chemical properties of 3d transition metal oxides using a calculated linear response U and a DFT + U(V) method

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhongnan; Kitchin, John R.; Joshi, Yogesh V.; Raman, Sumathy

    2015-04-14

    We validate the usage of the calculated, linear response Hubbard U for evaluating accurate electronic and chemical properties of bulk 3d transition metal oxides. We find calculated values of U lead to improved band gaps. For the evaluation of accurate reaction energies, we first identify and eliminate contributions to the reaction energies of bulk systems due only to changes in U and construct a thermodynamic cycle that references the total energies of unique U systems to a common point using a DFT + U(V ) method, which we recast from a recently introduced DFT + U(R) method for molecular systems. We then introduce a semi-empirical method based on weighted DFT/DFT + U cohesive energies to calculate bulk oxidation energies of transition metal oxides using density functional theory and linear response calculated U values. We validate this method by calculating 14 reactions energies involving V, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co oxides. We find up to an 85% reduction of the mean average error (MAE) compared to energies calculated with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional. When our method is compared with DFT + U with empirically derived U values and the HSE06 hybrid functional, we find up to 65% and 39% reductions in the MAE, respectively.

  17. Mode transition and hysteresis in inductively coupled radio frequency argon discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, Th.; Küllig, C.; Meichsner, J.

    2016-02-01

    This contribution presents experimental results about the mode transition of an inductively coupled radio frequency (RF) (13.56 MHz) argon discharge at different total gas pressures. In particular, the positive ion saturation current and the line integrated electron density are measured by Langmuir probe and 160 GHz microwave interferometer, respectively. The mode transition strongly depends on the total gas pressure and can appear stepwise or continuously. The space resolved positive ion saturation current is separately shown for the E- and H-mode at different total gas pressures. Therewith, the pressure dependency of the RF sheath thickness indicates a collisional sheath. The hysteresis phenomenon during the E-H and the inverse H-E transition is discussed within the framework of the matching situation for different total gas pressures. The hysteresis width is analyzed using the absorbed power as well as the coil voltage and current. As a result, the width strongly increases with pressure regarding the power and the coil voltage in the E-mode and remains constant in the H-mode. In addition, the phase shift between the coil voltage and current shows a hysteresis effect, too.

  18. High transition frequencies of dynamic functional connectivity states in the creative brain.

    PubMed

    Li, Junchao; Zhang, Delong; Liang, Aiying; Liang, Bishan; Wang, Zengjian; Cai, Yuxuan; Gao, Mengxia; Gao, Zhenni; Chang, Song; Jiao, Bingqing; Huang, Ruiwang; Liu, Ming

    2017-04-06

    Creativity is thought to require the flexible reconfiguration of multiple brain regions that interact in transient and complex communication patterns. In contrast to prior emphases on searching for specific regions or networks associated with creative performance, we focused on exploring the association between the reconfiguration of dynamic functional connectivity states and creative ability. We hypothesized that a high frequency of dynamic functional connectivity state transitions will be associated with creative ability. To test this hypothesis, we recruited a high-creative group (HCG) and a low-creative group (LCG) of participants and collected resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) data and Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT) scores from each participant. By combining an independent component analysis with a dynamic network analysis approach, we discovered the HCG had more frequent transitions between dynamic functional connectivity (dFC) states than the LCG. Moreover, a confirmatory analysis using multiplication of temporal derivatives also indicated that there were more frequent dFC state transitions in the HCG. Taken together, these results provided empirical evidence for a linkage between the flexible reconfiguration of dynamic functional connectivity states and creative ability. These findings have the potential to provide new insights into the neural basis of creativity.

  19. High transition frequencies of dynamic functional connectivity states in the creative brain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junchao; Zhang, Delong; Liang, Aiying; Liang, Bishan; Wang, Zengjian; Cai, Yuxuan; Gao, Mengxia; Gao, Zhenni; Chang, Song; Jiao, Bingqing; Huang, Ruiwang; Liu, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Creativity is thought to require the flexible reconfiguration of multiple brain regions that interact in transient and complex communication patterns. In contrast to prior emphases on searching for specific regions or networks associated with creative performance, we focused on exploring the association between the reconfiguration of dynamic functional connectivity states and creative ability. We hypothesized that a high frequency of dynamic functional connectivity state transitions will be associated with creative ability. To test this hypothesis, we recruited a high-creative group (HCG) and a low-creative group (LCG) of participants and collected resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) data and Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT) scores from each participant. By combining an independent component analysis with a dynamic network analysis approach, we discovered the HCG had more frequent transitions between dynamic functional connectivity (dFC) states than the LCG. Moreover, a confirmatory analysis using multiplication of temporal derivatives also indicated that there were more frequent dFC state transitions in the HCG. Taken together, these results provided empirical evidence for a linkage between the flexible reconfiguration of dynamic functional connectivity states and creative ability. These findings have the potential to provide new insights into the neural basis of creativity. PMID:28383052

  20. Polarization dependence of the direct two photon transitions of 87Rb atoms by erbium: Fiber laser frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shaoyang; Xia, Wei; Zhang, Yin; Zhao, Jianye; Zhou, Dawei; Wang, Qing; Yu, Qi; Li, Kunqian; Qi, Xianghui; Chen, Xuzong

    2016-11-01

    The femtosecond fiber-based optical frequency combs have been proved to be powerful tools for investigating the energy levels of atoms and molecules. In this paper, an Er-doped fiber femtosecond optical frequency comb has been implemented for studying the polarization dependence of 5S-5D two-photon transitions in thermal gas of atomic rubidium 87 using an entirely symmetrical optical configuration. By changing the polarization states of the counter-propagating light beams, the polarization dependence of direct two photon transition spectrum is demonstrated, and a dramatic variation (up to 5.5 times) of the two-photon transitions strength has been observed. The theory for the polarization dependence of two photon transition based on the second-order perturbation was established, which is in good agreement with the experimental results. The measurement results indicate that the polarization state manipulation with the existing frequency comb is used for femtosecond optical frequency comb based two photon transition spectroscopic purposes, which will improve the precision measurement of the absolute transition frequency and related applications.

  1. A search for the effect of a high frequency spark on boundary-layer transition at Mach 8.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, J. B.; Boatright, W. B.; Nayadley, J. R., Sr.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the use of a high frequency spark to promote early boundary layer transition on a wind tunnel model was conducted at a Mach number of 8.5. Test variables included four electrode configurations, a frequency range from 10 kHz to 50 kHz, and various power inputs to the spark. The general conclusion obtained from this investigation is that over the parameter range, the high frequency spark is ineffective in inducing early transition at the test Mach number.

  2. Tunability over three frequency bands induced by mode transition in relativistic backward wave oscillator with strong end reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ping; Fan, Juping; Teng, Yan; Shi, Yanchao; Deng, Yuqun; Sun, Jun

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents an efficient approach to realizing the frequency tunability of a relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) over three frequency bands by mode transition without changing the slow wave structure (SWS). It is figured out that the transition of the operation mode in the RBWO can be efficiently achieved by using the strong end reflection of the SWS. This mode transition results in the tunability of the RBWO over three frequency bands at high power and high efficiency without changing the SWS. In numerical simulation, the output frequency of the RBWO can jump over 7.9 GHz in C-band, 9.9 GHz in X-band, and 12.4 GHz in Ku-band with output power exceeding 3.0 GW and conversion efficiency higher than 35% by just reasonably transforming the structures of the front and post resonant reflectors which provide the strong end reflection for the SWS.

  3. Low-frequency optical dielectric response and rigidity transitions in network glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Leal, J. M.; Angel, J. A.; Marquez, E.; Jimenez-Garay, R.; Krecmer, P.

    2006-11-15

    Self-organization occurring in As{sub x}S{sub 1-x} and As{sub x}Se{sub 1-x} glass alloy films reflects in their low-frequency optical dielectric response, and valuable information about the building blocks conforming their structure, can be derived from the analysis of the refractive-index dispersion data. The experimental results are discussed in the framework of the single-oscillator approach proposed by Wemple and DiDomenico, which provides a meaningful parametrization of the phenomena ruling the coupling between the photon-probe and the electron plasma in the near-infrared spectral region. Rigidity transitions occurring in both binary glassy systems are discussed in terms of the differences observed in the oscillator parameters, and these electronic evidences are linked to those arguments found in the literature, based on calorimetric and Raman measurements, that point to a segregated-phase view of glass materials.

  4. Phase transition studies in barium and strontium titanates at microwave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahiya, Jai N.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives were the following: to understand the phase transformations in barium and strontium titanates as the crystals go from one temperature to the other; and to study the dielectric behavior of barium and strontium titanate crystals at a microwave frequency of 9.12 GHz and as a function of temperature. Phase transition studies in barium and strontium titanate are conducted using a cylindrical microwave resonant cavity as a probe. The cavity technique is quite successful in establishing the phase changes in these crystals. It appears that dipole relaxation plays an important role in the behavior of the dielectric response of the medium loading the cavity as phase change takes place within the sample. The method of a loaded resonant microwave cavity as applied in this work has proven to be sensitive enough to monitor small phase changes of the cavity medium.

  5. Absolute frequency of cesium 6S-8S 822 nm two-photon transition by a high-resolution scheme.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Ming; Liu, Tze-Wei; Wu, Ming-Hsuan; Lee, Ray-Kuang; Cheng, Wang-Yau

    2013-08-15

    We present an alternative scheme for determining the frequencies of cesium (Cs) atom 6S-8S Doppler-free transitions. With the use of a single electro-optical crystal, we simultaneously narrow the laser linewidth, lock the laser frequency, and resolve a narrow spectrum point by point. The error budget for this scheme is presented, and we prove that the transition frequency obtained from the Cs cell at room temperature and with one-layer μ-metal shielding is already very near that for the condition of zero collision and zero magnetic field. We point out that a sophisticated linewidth measurement could be a good guidance for choosing a suitable Cs cell for better frequency accuracy.

  6. Absolute frequency list of the ν3-band transitions of methane at a relative uncertainty level of 10(-11).

    PubMed

    Okubo, Sho; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Iwakuni, Kana; Inaba, Hajime; Sasada, Hiroyuki

    2011-11-21

    We determine the absolute frequencies of 56 rotation-vibration transitions of the ν(3) band of CH(4) from 88.2 to 90.5 THz with a typical uncertainty of 2 kHz corresponding to a relative uncertainty of 2.2 × 10(-11) over an average time of a few hundred seconds. Saturated absorption lines are observed using a difference-frequency-generation source and a cavity-enhanced absorption cell, and the transition frequencies are measured with a fiber-laser-based optical frequency comb referenced to a rubidium atomic clock linked to the international atomic time. The determined value of the P(7) F(2)((2)) line is consistent with the International Committee for Weights and Measures recommendation within the uncertainty.

  7. Accurate Predictions of Mean Geomagnetic Dipole Excursion and Reversal Frequencies, Mean Paleomagnetic Field Intensity, and the Radius of Earth's Core Using McLeod's Rule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.; Conrad, Joy

    1996-01-01

    The geomagnetic spatial power spectrum R(sub n)(r) is the mean square magnetic induction represented by degree n spherical harmonic coefficients of the internal scalar potential averaged over the geocentric sphere of radius r. McLeod's Rule for the magnetic field generated by Earth's core geodynamo says that the expected core surface power spectrum (R(sub nc)(c)) is inversely proportional to (2n + 1) for 1 less than n less than or equal to N(sub E). McLeod's Rule is verified by locating Earth's core with main field models of Magsat data; the estimated core radius of 3485 kn is close to the seismologic value for c of 3480 km. McLeod's Rule and similar forms are then calibrated with the model values of R(sub n) for 3 less than or = n less than or = 12. Extrapolation to the degree 1 dipole predicts the expectation value of Earth's dipole moment to be about 5.89 x 10(exp 22) Am(exp 2)rms (74.5% of the 1980 value) and the expected geomagnetic intensity to be about 35.6 (mu)T rms at Earth's surface. Archeo- and paleomagnetic field intensity data show these and related predictions to be reasonably accurate. The probability distribution chi(exp 2) with 2n+1 degrees of freedom is assigned to (2n + 1)R(sub nc)/(R(sub nc). Extending this to the dipole implies that an exceptionally weak absolute dipole moment (less than or = 20% of the 1980 value) will exist during 2.5% of geologic time. The mean duration for such major geomagnetic dipole power excursions, one quarter of which feature durable axial dipole reversal, is estimated from the modern dipole power time-scale and the statistical model of excursions. The resulting mean excursion duration of 2767 years forces us to predict an average of 9.04 excursions per million years, 2.26 axial dipole reversals per million years, and a mean reversal duration of 5533 years. Paleomagnetic data show these predictions to be quite accurate. McLeod's Rule led to accurate predictions of Earth's core radius, mean paleomagnetic field

  8. Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors' Identified Transition Competencies: Perceived Importance, Frequency, and Preparedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plotner, Anthony J.; Trach, John S.; Strauser, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Vocational rehabilitation (VR) professionals are critical partners in the transition process for students with disabilities; therefore, they are required to develop transition service delivery proficiencies. VR professional perceptions of transition competencies are seldom examined due to the perception that transition falls mainly on school-based…

  9. SU-D-18C-05: Variable Bolus Arterial Spin Labeling MRI for Accurate Cerebral Blood Flow and Arterial Transit Time Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, M; Jung, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an MRI perfusion imaging method from which quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps can be calculated. Acquisition with variable post-labeling delays (PLD) and variable TRs allows for arterial transit time (ATT) mapping and leads to more accurate CBF quantification with a scan time saving of 48%. In addition, T1 and M0 maps can be obtained without a separate scan. In order to accurately estimate ATT and T1 of brain tissue from the ASL data, variable labeling durations were invented, entitled variable-bolus ASL. Methods: All images were collected on a healthy subject with a 3T Siemens Skyra scanner. Variable-bolus Psuedo-continuous ASL (PCASL) images were collected with 7 TI times ranging 100-4300ms in increments of 700ms with TR ranging 1000-5200ms. All boluses were 1600ms when the TI allowed, otherwise the bolus duration was 100ms shorter than the TI. All TI times were interleaved to reduce sensitivity to motion. Voxel-wise T1 and M0 maps were estimated using a linear least squares fitting routine from the average singal from each TI time. Then pairwise subtraction of each label/control pair and averaging for each TI time was performed. CBF and ATT maps were created using the standard model by Buxton et al. with a nonlinear fitting routine using the T1 tissue map. Results: CBF maps insensitive to ATT were produced along with ATT maps. Both maps show patterns and averages consistent with literature. The T1 map also shows typical T1 contrast. Conclusion: It has been demonstrated that variablebolus ASL produces CBF maps free from the errors due to ATT and tissue T1 variations and provides M0, T1, and ATT maps which have potential utility. This is accomplished with a single scan in a feasible scan time (under 6 minutes) with low sensivity to motion.

  10. Absolute frequency measurement of the {{}^{1}}{{\\text{S}}_{0}} – {{}^{3}}{{\\text{P}}_{0}} transition of 171Yb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzocaro, Marco; Thoumany, Pierre; Rauf, Benjamin; Bregolin, Filippo; Milani, Gianmaria; Clivati, Cecilia; Costanzo, Giovanni A.; Levi, Filippo; Calonico, Davide

    2017-02-01

    We report the absolute frequency measurement of the unperturbed transition {{}1}{{\\text{S}}0} – {{}3}{{\\text{P}}0} at 578 nm in 171Yb realized in an optical lattice frequency standard relative to a cryogenic caesium fountain. The measurement result is 518 295 836 590 863.59(31) Hz with a relative standard uncertainty of 5.9× {{10}-16} . This value is in agreement with the ytterbium frequency recommended as a secondary representation of the second in the International System of Units.

  11. Vibrational transitions in hydrogen bonded bimolecular complexes - A local mode perturbation theory approach to transition frequencies and intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackeprang, Kasper; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.

    2017-04-01

    The local mode perturbation theory (LMPT) model was developed to improve the description of hydrogen bonded XH-stretching transitions, where X is typically O or N. We present a modified version of the LMPT model to extend its application from hydrated bimolecular complexes to hydrogen bonded bimolecular complexes with donors such as alcohols, amines and acids. We have applied the modified model to a series of complexes of different hydrogen bond type and complex energy. We found that the differences between local mode (LM) and LMPT calculated fundamental XH-stretching transition wavenumbers and oscillator strengths were correlated with the strength of the hydrogen bond. Overall, we have found that the LMPT model in most cases predicts transition wavenumbers within 20 cm-1 of the experimental values.

  12. Effective Landau-Zener transitions in the circuit dynamical Casimir effect with time-varying modulation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodonov, A. V.; Militello, B.; Napoli, A.; Messina, A.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the dissipative single-qubit circuit QED architecture in which the atomic transition frequency undergoes a weak external time modulation. For sinusoidal modulation with linearly varying frequency we derive effective Hamiltonians that resemble the Landau-Zener problem of finite duration associated with a two- or multilevel systems. The corresponding off-diagonal coupling coefficients originate either from the rotating or the counter-rotating terms in the Rabi Hamiltonian, depending on the values of the modulation frequency. It is demonstrated that in the dissipationless case one can accomplish almost complete transitions between the eigenstates of the bare Rabi Hamiltonian even for relatively short durations of the frequency sweep. To assess the experimental feasibility of our scheme we solved numerically the phenomenological and the microscopic quantum master equations in the Markovian regime at zero temperature. Both models exhibit qualitatively similar behavior and indicate that photon generation from vacuum via effective Landau-Zener transitions could be implemented with the current technology on the time scales of a few microseconds. Moreover, unlike the harmonic dynamical Casimir effect implementations, our proposal does not require precise knowledge of the resonant modulation frequency to accomplish meaningful photon generation.

  13. Multireference correlation consistent composite approach [MR-ccCA]: toward accurate prediction of the energetics of excited and transition state chemistry.

    PubMed

    Oyedepo, Gbenga A; Wilson, Angela K

    2010-08-26

    The correlation consistent Composite Approach, ccCA [ Deyonker , N. J. ; Cundari , T. R. ; Wilson , A. K. J. Chem. Phys. 2006 , 124 , 114104 ] has been demonstrated to predict accurate thermochemical properties of chemical species that can be described by a single configurational reference state, and at reduced computational cost, as compared with ab initio methods such as CCSD(T) used in combination with large basis sets. We have developed three variants of a multireference equivalent of this successful theoretical model. The method, called the multireference correlation consistent composite approach (MR-ccCA), is designed to predict the thermochemical properties of reactive intermediates, excited state species, and transition states to within chemical accuracy (e.g., 1 kcal/mol for enthalpies of formation) of reliable experimental values. In this study, we have demonstrated the utility of MR-ccCA: (1) in the determination of the adiabatic singlet-triplet energy separations and enthalpies of formation for the ground states for a set of diradicals and unsaturated compounds, and (2) in the prediction of energetic barriers to internal rotation, in ethylene and its heavier congener, disilene. Additionally, we have utilized MR-ccCA to predict the enthalpies of formation of the low-lying excited states of all the species considered. MR-ccCA is shown to give quantitative results without reliance upon empirically derived parameters, making it suitable for application to study novel chemical systems with significant nondynamical correlation effects.

  14. Tunability over three frequency bands induced by mode transition in relativistic backward wave oscillator with strong end reflections

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ping; Deng, Yuqun; Fan, Juping; Teng, Yan; Shi, Yanchao; Sun, Jun

    2014-10-15

    This paper presents an efficient approach to realizing the frequency tunability of a relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) over three frequency bands by mode transition without changing the slow wave structure (SWS). It is figured out that the transition of the operation mode in the RBWO can be efficiently achieved by using the strong end reflection of the SWS. This mode transition results in the tunability of the RBWO over three frequency bands at high power and high efficiency without changing the SWS. In numerical simulation, the output frequency of the RBWO can jump over 7.9 GHz in C-band, 9.9 GHz in X-band, and 12.4 GHz in Ku-band with output power exceeding 3.0 GW and conversion efficiency higher than 35% by just reasonably transforming the structures of the front and post resonant reflectors which provide the strong end reflection for the SWS.

  15. Heating mode transition in a hybrid direct current/dual-frequency capacitively coupled CF{sub 4} discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Quan-Zhi; Wang, You-Nian; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2014-06-14

    Computer simulations based on the particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision method are performed to study the plasma characteristics and especially the transition in electron heating mechanisms in a hybrid direct current (dc)/dual-frequency (DF) capacitively coupled CF{sub 4} discharge. When applying a superposed dc voltage, the plasma density first increases, then decreases, and finally increases again, which is in good agreement with experiments. This trend can be explained by the transition between the four main heating modes, i.e., DF coupling, dc and DF coupling, dc source dominant heating, and secondary electron dominant heating.

  16. The discharge mode transition and O(5p1) production mechanism of pulsed radio frequency capacitively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. Y.; Hu, J. T.; Liu, J. H.; Xiong, Z. L.; Liu, D. W.; Lu, X. P.; Shi, J. J.

    2012-07-01

    The discharge mode transition from uniform plasma across the gas gap to the α mode happens at the rising phase of the pulsed radio frequency capacitively coupled plasma (PRF CCP). This transition is attributed to the fast increasing stochastic heating at the edge of sheath. In the second stage with the stable current and voltage amplitude, the consistency between experimental and numerical spatial-temporal 777 nm emission profile suggests that He* and He2* dominate the production of O(5p1) through dissociation and excitation of O2. Finally, the sterilization efficiency of PRF CCP is found to be higher than that of plasma jet.

  17. High-Accuracy Measurement of the Blackbody Radiation Frequency Shift of the Ground-State Hyperfine Transition in Cs133

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferts, S. R.; Heavner, T. P.; Parker, T. E.; Shirley, J. H.; Donley, E. A.; Ashby, N.; Levi, F.; Calonico, D.; Costanzo, G. A.

    2014-02-01

    We report a high-accuracy direct measurement of the blackbody radiation shift of the Cs133 ground-state hyperfine transition. This frequency shift is one of the largest systematic frequency biases encountered in realizing the current definition of the International System of Units (SI) second. Uncertainty in the blackbody radiation frequency shift correction has led to its being the focus of intense theoretical effort by a variety of research groups. Our experimental measurement of the shift used three primary frequency standards operating at different temperatures. We achieved an uncertainty a factor of five smaller than the previous best direct measurement. These results tend to validate the claimed accuracy of the recently calculated values.

  18. Frequency stabilization of a 1083 nm fiber laser to {sup 4}He transition lines with optical heterodyne saturation spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, W.; Peng, X. Li, W.; Guo, H.

    2014-07-15

    Two kinds of optical heterodyne saturation spectroscopies, namely, frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) and modulation transfer spectroscopy (MTS), are demonstrated for locking a fiber laser to the transition lines of metastable {sup 4}He atoms around 1083 nm. The servo-loop error signals of FMS and MTS for stabilizing laser frequency are optimized by studying the dependence of the peak-to-peak amplitude and slope on the optical power of pump and probe beams. A comparison of the stabilization performances of FMS/MTS and polarization spectroscopy (PS) is presented, which shows that MTS exhibits relatively superior performance with the least laser frequency fluctuation due to its flat-background dispersive signal, originated from the four-wave mixing process. The Allan deviation of the stabilized laser frequency is 5.4 × 10{sup −12}@100 s with MTS for data acquired in 1000 s, which is sufficiently applicable for fields like laser cooling, optical pumping, and optical magnetometry.

  19. Frequency stabilization of a 1083 nm fiber laser to 4He transition lines with optical heterodyne saturation spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, W.; Peng, X.; Li, W.; Guo, H.

    2014-07-01

    Two kinds of optical heterodyne saturation spectroscopies, namely, frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) and modulation transfer spectroscopy (MTS), are demonstrated for locking a fiber laser to the transition lines of metastable 4He atoms around 1083 nm. The servo-loop error signals of FMS and MTS for stabilizing laser frequency are optimized by studying the dependence of the peak-to-peak amplitude and slope on the optical power of pump and probe beams. A comparison of the stabilization performances of FMS/MTS and polarization spectroscopy (PS) is presented, which shows that MTS exhibits relatively superior performance with the least laser frequency fluctuation due to its flat-background dispersive signal, originated from the four-wave mixing process. The Allan deviation of the stabilized laser frequency is 5.4 × 10-12@100 s with MTS for data acquired in 1000 s, which is sufficiently applicable for fields like laser cooling, optical pumping, and optical magnetometry.

  20. Frequency of close companions among Kepler planets—a transit time variation study

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ji-Wei; Wu, Yanqin; Lithwick, Yoram E-mail: wu@astro.utoronto.ca

    2014-07-10

    A transiting planet exhibits sinusoidal transit time variations (TTVs) if perturbed by a companion near a mean-motion resonance. We search for sinusoidal TTVs in more than 2600 Kepler candidates, using the publicly available Kepler light curves (Q0-Q12). We find that the TTV fractions rise strikingly with the transit multiplicity. Systems where four or more planets transit enjoy a TTV fraction that is roughly five times higher than those where a single planet transits, and about twice as high as those for doubles and triples. In contrast, models in which all transiting planets arise from similar dynamical configurations predict comparable TTV fractions among these different systems. One simple explanation for our results is that there are at least two different classes of Kepler systems, one closely packed and one more sparsely populated.

  1. Frequency of Close Companions among Kepler Planets—a Transit Time Variation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ji-Wei; Wu, Yanqin; Lithwick, Yoram

    2014-07-01

    A transiting planet exhibits sinusoidal transit time variations (TTVs) if perturbed by a companion near a mean-motion resonance. We search for sinusoidal TTVs in more than 2600 Kepler candidates, using the publicly available Kepler light curves (Q0-Q12). We find that the TTV fractions rise strikingly with the transit multiplicity. Systems where four or more planets transit enjoy a TTV fraction that is roughly five times higher than those where a single planet transits, and about twice as high as those for doubles and triples. In contrast, models in which all transiting planets arise from similar dynamical configurations predict comparable TTV fractions among these different systems. One simple explanation for our results is that there are at least two different classes of Kepler systems, one closely packed and one more sparsely populated.

  2. Accurate calculations of spectroscopic parameters, transition properties of 17 Λ-S states and 32 Ω states of SiB+ cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Wei; Shi, Deheng; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2017-02-01

    This work computed the potential energy curves of 17 Λ-S states, which came from the first three dissociation limits, Si+(2Pu) + B(2Pu), Si(3Pg) + B+(1Sg), and Si(1Dg) + B+(1Sg), of the SiB+ cation. The potential energy curves were also calculated for the 32 Ω states generated from these Λ-S states. The calculations were done using the CASSCF method, which was followed by internally contracted MRCI approach with Davidson correction. To obtain the reliable and accurate spectroscopic parameters and vibrational properties, core-valence correlation and scalar relativistic corrections were included. Of these 17 Λ-S states, the C3Σ+, E3Π, 33Π, 23Σ+, 21Π, and 31Σ+ states had double wells. The 31Π state had three wells. The D3Σ-, E3Π, 33Π, and B3Δ states were inverted with the spin-orbit coupling effect accounted for. The 21Δ state, the first well of 31Σ+ state, the second wells of 33Π, 23Σ+, and 21Π states and the second and third wells of 31Π state were weakly bound, which well depths were within several hundreds cm-1. The second well of 31Π state had no vibrational states. The first wells of E3Π and 31Σ+ states had only one vibrational state. The spectroscopic parameters were evaluated. The vibrational properties of some weaklybound states were predicted. Franck-Condon factors of some transitions between different two Λ-S states were determined. The spin-orbit coupling effect on the spectroscopic parameters and vibrational properties was discussed. These results reported here can be expected to be reliably predicted ones.

  3. Frequency measurement of the 2S(1/2)-2D(3/2) electric quadrupole transition in a single 171Yb+ ion.

    PubMed

    Webster, Stephen; Godun, Rachel; King, Steven; Huang, Guilong; Walton, Barney; Tsatourian, Veronika; Margolis, Helen; Lea, Stephen; Gill, Patrick

    2010-03-01

    We report on precision laser spectroscopy of the 2S(1/2)(F = 0)-2D(3/2) (F = 2, m(F) = 0) clock transition in a single ion of 171Yb+. The absolute value of the transition frequency, determined using an optical frequency comb referenced to a hydrogen maser, is 688358979309310 +/- 9 Hz. This corresponds to a fractional frequency uncertainty of 1.3 x 10(-14).

  4. The electron heating mode transition by the change of driving frequency in atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung Yeol; Verboncoeur, John; Lee, Hae June

    2016-09-01

    Over the past twenty years, micro plasma technology including dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) brought great enhancement of stable and high density plasma sources in atmospheric pressure environment. However, the experimental diagnostics are difficult to use in atmospheric pressure micro plasmas, and thus the particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation is a good tool to investigate the nonlinear and kinetic effects of the plasma dynamics. In this study, PIC simulation results show that time-dependent parameters compare well with theoretical estimates like energy diffusion theory in the RF frequency ranges up to 500 MHz in atmospheric pressure plasmas for a set of controllable input parameters. Here, alpha-gamma heating mode transition is observed when the driving frequency matches the maximum of energy relaxation frequency by electron impact excitation. The inflection point in a semi-log scaled electron energy probability function (EEPF) is also explained by energy diffusion theory, which corresponds to a transition point of heating mode. Moreover, it was found that extra results in low gas pressure have the same solution at lower input frequency. For this reason, temporal differential term generates non-stationary EEPF in a specific energy range in Boltzmann kinetics.

  5. Process induced transformations during tablet manufacturing: phase transition analysis of caffeine using DSC and low frequency micro-Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Sébastien; Briancon, Stéphanie; Hedoux, Alain; Guinet, Yannick; Paccou, Laurent; Fessi, Hatem; Puel, François

    2011-11-25

    The phase transition of a model API, caffeine Form I, was studied during tableting process monitored with an instrumented press. The formulation used had a plastic flow behavior according to the Heckel model in the compression pressure range of 70-170 MPa. The quantitative methods of analysis used were Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and low frequency Micro Raman Spectroscopy (MRS) which was used for the first time for the mapping of polymorphs in tablets. They brought complementary contributions since MRS is a microscopic spectral analysis with a spatial resolution of 5 μm(3) and DSC takes into account a macroscopic fraction (10mg) of the tablet. Phase transitions were present at the surfaces, borders and center of the tablets. Whatever the pressure applied during the compression process, the transition degree of caffeine Form I toward Form II was almost constant. MRS provided higher transition degrees (50-60%) than DSC (20-35%). MRS revealed that caffeine Form I particles were partially transformed in all parts of the tablets at a microscopic scale. Moreover, tablet surfaces showed local higher transition degree compared to the other parts.

  6. A New Fast, Accurate and Non-Oscillatory Numerical Approach for Wave Propagation Problems in Solids Application to High-frequency Pulse Propagation in the Hopkinson Pressure Bar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-16

    frequency Pulse Propagation in the Hopkinson Pressure Bar Alexander ldesman TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY SYSTEM 09/ 16/2015 Final Report DISTRIBUTION A...5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY 2500 BROADWAY...Solids: Application to High-Frequency Pulse Propagation in the Hopkinson Pressure Bar Alexander Idesman Texas Tech University Final report The

  7. Optical transitions and frequency upconversion emission of Er 3+ions in novel lead-bismuthate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongtao; Dai, Shixun; Zhang, Debao; Xu, Shiqing; Zhang, Junjie; Hu, Lili; Jiang, Zhonghong

    2004-12-01

    Er 3+-doped strontiam lead bismuth glass for developing upconversion lasers has been fabricated and characterized. The Judd-Ofelt analysis was performed on the absorption spectrum and the transition probabilities, excited state lifetimes, and the fluorescence branching ratios were calculated and discussed. Under 975 nm excitation, intense green and red emissions centered at 525, 546, and 657 nm, corresponding to the transitions 2H→4I, 4S→4I, and 4F→4I, respectively, were observed. The upconversion mechanisms are discussed based on the energy matching and quadratic dependence on excitation power, and the dominant mechanisms are excited state absorption and energy transfer upconversion for the green and red emissions.

  8. Transition and Interaction of Low-Frequency Magnetohydrodynamic Modes during Neutral Beam Injection Heating on HL-2A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Liming; Chen, Wei; Ding, Xuantong; Ji, Xiaoquan; Shi, Zhongbing; Yu, Deliang; Jiang, Min; Li, Dong; Li, Jiaxian; Li, Yonggao; Zhou, Yan; Ma, Rui; Li, Wei; Feng, Beibin; Huang, Yuan; Song, Xianming; Cao, Jianyong; Rao, Jun; Dong, Jiaqi; Xu, Min; Liu, Yi; Yan, Longwen; Yang, Qingwei; Xu, Yuhong; Duan, Xuru

    2017-02-01

    The strong fishbone mode (FB) and long-lived mode (LLM) have been observed during neutral beam injection (NBI) on the HL-2A tokamak. The FB and LLM can transit between each other. The LLM is identified as an internal kink mode (IKM) with the mode structure obtained using a newly developed electron cyclotron emission radiometer imaging (ECEI) system. The frequency of the LLM (fLLM) is higher than the toroidal rotation frequency (ft) near the q = 1 surface (r ˜ 10 cm). Experimental results show that the LLM is likely to be excited at a higher line-averaged electron density (bar{n}e) than that of the FB when the NBI power is fixed. It is found that the FB and its harmonic as seed magnetic islands can trigger tearing modes (TMs). The mode numbers for the low-frequency and high-frequency TMs are m/n = 2/1 and 3/2, respectively. By further investigation, it is found that there is an m/n = 1/1 IKM coexisting at the same time and with the same frequency as the m/n = 2/1 TM, and the m = 1 mode structure of the IKM in the radial cross section is obtained by the Bayesian tomography method utilizing soft X-ray arrays. The nonlinear coupling conditions are satisfied among the two TMs and IKM.

  9. Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Sandy, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This "feature issue" focuses on transition from school to adult life for persons with disabilities. Included are "success stories," brief program descriptions, and a list of resources. Individual articles include the following titles and authors: "Transition: An Energizing Concept" (Paul Bates); "Transition…

  10. Evaluation of variation in ( m_p/m_e) from the frequency difference between the 15N2+ and 87Sr transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajita, Masatoshi

    2016-07-01

    The uncertainty of the 87Sr1 S0-3 P0 transition frequency (429 THz) has been reduced to the level of 10^{-18}. Also, the 15N2+ Q(0) vibrational transition frequency is expected to be measured with an uncertainty of 10^{-17} , and the v = 0-7 transition frequency (422 THz) is close to the 87Sr transition frequency. In this paper, we propose a test for the variation in the proton-to-electron mass ratio μ via precise measurement of the difference (f_d=7 THz) between these transition frequencies. By measuring f_d within the uncertainty of 10^{-16}, a variation in μ of 4 × 10^{-18} can be detected. The 15N2+ v =0 -7 Q(0) transition frequency is free from Zeeman and electric quadrupole shifts. The dc Stark coefficient is about 0.2 mHz/(V/cm)2, and the measurement of f_d with an uncertainty lower than 10^{-16} appears to be attainable using molecular ions in a string crystal. The 15N2+ transition frequency is observed via the two-photon excitation of a laser with a wavelength of 1422 nm (laser A). Another laser with a wavelength of 1396 nm (laser B) is used as a 87Sr clock laser after frequency doubling. The frequency difference between lasers A and B (3.5 THz) should be measured using a frequency comb. Lasers A and B can be transferred to another laboratory via an optical fiber. Therefore, a sensitive test of the variation in μ can be performed in cooperation between two distant laboratories.

  11. Effective theory for the nonrigid rotor in an electromagnetic field: Toward accurate and precise calculations of E2 transitions in deformed nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    Coello Pérez, Eduardo A.; Papenbrock, Thomas F.

    2015-07-27

    In this paper, we present a model-independent approach to electric quadrupole transitions of deformed nuclei. Based on an effective theory for axially symmetric systems, the leading interactions with electromagnetic fields enter as minimal couplings to gauge potentials, while subleading corrections employ gauge-invariant nonminimal couplings. This approach yields transition operators that are consistent with the Hamiltonian, and the power counting of the effective theory provides us with theoretical uncertainty estimates. We successfully test the effective theory in homonuclear molecules that exhibit a large separation of scales. For ground-state band transitions of rotational nuclei, the effective theory describes data well within theoreticalmore » uncertainties at leading order. To probe the theory at subleading order, data with higher precision would be valuable. For transitional nuclei, next-to-leading-order calculations and the high-precision data are consistent within the theoretical uncertainty estimates. In addition, we study the faint interband transitions within the effective theory and focus on the E2 transitions from the 02+ band (the “β band”) to the ground-state band. Here the predictions from the effective theory are consistent with data for several nuclei, thereby proposing a solution to a long-standing challenge.« less

  12. Effective theory for the nonrigid rotor in an electromagnetic field: Toward accurate and precise calculations of E2 transitions in deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Coello Pérez, Eduardo A.; Papenbrock, Thomas F.

    2015-07-27

    In this paper, we present a model-independent approach to electric quadrupole transitions of deformed nuclei. Based on an effective theory for axially symmetric systems, the leading interactions with electromagnetic fields enter as minimal couplings to gauge potentials, while subleading corrections employ gauge-invariant nonminimal couplings. This approach yields transition operators that are consistent with the Hamiltonian, and the power counting of the effective theory provides us with theoretical uncertainty estimates. We successfully test the effective theory in homonuclear molecules that exhibit a large separation of scales. For ground-state band transitions of rotational nuclei, the effective theory describes data well within theoretical uncertainties at leading order. To probe the theory at subleading order, data with higher precision would be valuable. For transitional nuclei, next-to-leading-order calculations and the high-precision data are consistent within the theoretical uncertainty estimates. In addition, we study the faint interband transitions within the effective theory and focus on the E2 transitions from the 02+ band (the “β band”) to the ground-state band. Here the predictions from the effective theory are consistent with data for several nuclei, thereby proposing a solution to a long-standing challenge.

  13. Dynamics of electronic transitions and frequency dependence of negative capacitance in semiconductor diodes under high forward bias

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, Kanika; Datta, Shouvik; Henini, Mohamed; Alshammari, Marzook S.

    2014-09-22

    We observed qualitatively dissimilar frequency dependence of negative capacitance under high charge injection in two sets of functionally different junction diodes: III-V based light emitting and Si-based non-light emitting diodes. Using an advanced approach based on bias activated differential capacitance, we developed a generalized understanding of negative capacitance phenomenon which can be extended to any diode based device structure. We explained the observations as the mutual competition of fast and slow electronic transition rates which are different in different devices. This study can be useful in understanding the interfacial effects in semiconductor heterostructures and may lead to superior device functionality.

  14. High efficiency annular magnetically insulated line oscillator-transit time oscillator with three separate frequencies in three bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Renzhen; Sun, Jun; Chen, Changhua; Zhang, Yongpeng; Shao, Hao

    2009-08-01

    To increase the efficiency of the magnetically insulated line oscillator (MILO) and expand its frequency band, a coaxial transit time oscillator (TTO) is introduced to use the load currents of an annular MILO, called the annular MILO-TTO, which comprises an inward-emitting MILO, an outward-emitting MILO, and a coaxial TTO. In simulation, when the input power is 78 GW and the diode voltage is 520 kV, three microwaves with powers of 3.2, 9.6, and 7.0 GW are generated, with a total efficiency of 25.4%, in the inward-emitting MILO, the outward-emitting MILO, and the coaxial TTO, and the frequencies are 1.7, 3.3, and 4.2 GHz, corresponding to L, S, and C bands, respectively.

  15. On the Frequency of Additional Planets in Short Period Hot Jupiter Systems from Transit Timing Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, Jason; Close, L.; Scuderi, L.

    2011-05-01

    The large number of hot Jupiter planets allows one to probe these systems for additional unseen planets via transit timing variations (TTVs). Even relatively small terrestrial planets, when placed in an energetically favorable mean motion resonance (MMR), can cause detectable TTVs with an amplitude of several minutes (Holman and Murray 2005, Agol et al. 2005). In an effort to discover and characterize such companions, we have embarked on a systematic study of known transiting hot Jupiters, utilizing the 1.55 meter Kuiper telescope on Mt. Bigelow to measure multiple individual transits in an observing season to within 30 second precision, and constrain the nature of any planetary companions. Here, we present current and preliminary results on this study, and show that the systems HAT-P-5, HAT- P-6, HAT-P-8, HAT-P-9, WASP-11/HAT-P-10, HAT-P-11, TrES-2, and WASP-10 do not contain small mass companions in MMRs, or moderate mass companions in close enough proximity to induce TTVs on the order of 1.5 minutes.

  16. Layer-number dependent high-frequency vibration modes in few-layer transition metal dichalcogenides induced by interlayer couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Qing-Hai; Zhang, Xin; Luo, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Jun; Tan, Ping-Heng

    2017-03-01

    Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have attracted extensive attention due to their many novel properties. The atoms within each layer in two-dimensional TMDs are joined together by covalent bonds, while van der Waals interactions combine the layers together. This makes its lattice dynamics layer-number dependent. The evolutions of ultralow frequency (< 50 cm‑1) modes, such as shear and layer-breathing modes have been well-established. Here, we review the layer-number dependent high-frequency (> 50 cm‑1) vibration modes in few-layer TMDs and demonstrate how the interlayer coupling leads to the splitting of high-frequency vibration modes, known as Davydov splitting. Such Davydov splitting can be well described by a van der Waals model, which directly links the splitting with the interlayer coupling. Our review expands the understanding on the effect of interlayer coupling on the high-frequency vibration modes in TMDs and other two-dimensional materials. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2016YFA0301200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11225421, 11474277, 11434010, 61474067, 11604326, 11574305 and 51527901), and the National Young 1000 Talent Plan of China.

  17. Effects of frequency-degree correlation on synchronization transition in scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weiqing; Wu, Ye; Xiao, Jinghua; Zhan, Meng

    2013-02-01

    Explosive synchronization in the scale-free network with a positive frequency-degree correlation has been reported recently (Gomez G. J. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 106 (2011) 128701). In this article, we generalize this study and find that the explosive synchronization is replaced by a kind of hierarchical synchronization if the microscopic correlation between the frequency and the interacting topology of the network becomes negative. A star network model is set to prove this novel behavior. We also find that the degree assortativity has significant influence on the explosive synchronization but slight impact on the hierarchical synchronization. These findings are meaningful for revealing unusual effects of correlations between dynamics and structure of complex networks.

  18. A uniformly accurate multiscale time integrator spectral method for the Klein-Gordon-Zakharov system in the high-plasma-frequency limit regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Weizhu; Zhao, Xiaofei

    2016-12-01

    A multiscale time integrator sine pseudospectral (MTI-SP) method is presented for discretizing the Klein-Gordon-Zakharov (KGZ) system with a dimensionless parameter 0 < ε ≤ 1, which is inversely proportional to the plasma frequency. In the high-plasma-frequency limit regime, i.e. 0 < ε ≪ 1, the solution of the KGZ system propagates waves with amplitude at O (1) and wavelength at O (ε2) in time and O (1) in space, which causes significantly numerical burdens due to the high oscillation in time. The main idea of the numerical method is to carry out a multiscale decomposition by frequency (MDF) to the electric field component of the solution at each time step and then apply the sine pseudospectral discretization for spatial derivatives followed by using the exponential wave integrator in phase space for integrating the MDF and the equation of the ion density component. The method is explicit and easy to be implemented. Extensive numerical results show that the MTI-SP method converges uniformly and optimally in space with exponential convergence rate if the solution is smooth, and uniformly in time with linear convergence rate at O (τ) for ε ∈ (0 , 1 ] with τ time step size and optimally with quadratic convergence rate at O (τ2) in the regime when either ε = O (1) or 0 < ε ≤ τ. Thus the meshing strategy requirement (or ε-scalability) of the MTI-SP for the KGZ system in the high-plasma-frequency limit regime is τ = O (1) and h = O (1) for 0 < ε ≪ 1, which is significantly better than classical methods in the literatures. Finally, we apply the MTI-SP method to study the convergence rates of the KGZ system to its limiting models in the high-plasma-frequency limit and the interactions of bright solitons of the KGZ system, and to identify certain parameter regimes that the solution of the KGZ system will be blow-up in one dimension.

  19. Robust, frequency-stable and accurate mid-IR laser spectrometer based on frequency comb metrology of quantum cascade lasers up-converted in orientation-patterned GaAs.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Michael G; Ernsting, Ingo; Vasilyev, Sergey V; Grisard, Arnaud; Lallier, Eric; Gérard, Bruno; Schiller, Stephan

    2013-11-04

    We demonstrate a robust and simple method for measurement, stabilization and tuning of the frequency of cw mid-infrared (MIR) lasers, in particular of quantum cascade lasers. The proof of principle is performed with a quantum cascade laser at 5.4 µm, which is upconverted to 1.2 µm by sum-frequency generation in orientation-patterned GaAs with the output of a standard high-power cw 1.5 µm fiber laser. Both the 1.2 µm and the 1.5 µm waves are measured by a standard Er:fiber frequency comb. Frequency measurement at the 100 kHz-level, stabilization to sub-10 kHz level, controlled frequency tuning and long-term stability are demonstrated.

  20. Frequency Scale Factors for Some Double-Hybrid Density Functional Theory Procedures: Accurate Thermochemical Components for High-Level Composite Protocols.

    PubMed

    Chan, Bun; Radom, Leo

    2016-08-09

    In the present study, we have obtained geometries and frequency scale factors for a number of double-hybrid density functional theory (DH-DFT) procedures. We have evaluated their performance for obtaining thermochemical quantities [zero-point vibrational energies (ZPVE) and thermal corrections for 298 K enthalpies (ΔH298) and 298 K entropies (S298)] to be used within high-level composite protocols (using the W2X procedure as a probe). We find that, in comparison with the previously prescribed protocol for optimization and frequency calculations (B3-LYP/cc-pVTZ+d), the use of contemporary DH-DFT methods such as DuT-D3 and DSD-type procedures leads to a slight overall improved performance compared with B3-LYP. A major strength of this approach, however, lies in the better robustness of the DH-DFT methods in that the largest deviations are notably smaller than those for B3-LYP. In general, the specific choices of the DH-DFT procedure and the associated basis set do not drastically change the performance. Nonetheless, we find that the DSD-PBE-P86/aug'-cc-pVTZ+d combination has a very slight edge over the others that we have examined, and we recommend its general use for geometry optimization and vibrational frequency calculations, in particular within high-level composite methods such as the higher-level members of the WnX series of protocols. The scale factors determined for DSD-PBE-P86/aug'-cc-pVTZ+d are 0.9830 (ZPVE), 0.9876 (ΔH298), and 0.9923 (S298).

  1. SNP development from RNA-seq data in a nonmodel fish: how many individuals are needed for accurate allele frequency prediction?

    PubMed

    Schunter, C; Garza, J C; Macpherson, E; Pascual, M

    2014-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are rapidly becoming the marker of choice in population genetics due to a variety of advantages relative to other markers, including higher genomic density, data quality, reproducibility and genotyping efficiency, as well as ease of portability between laboratories. Advances in sequencing technology and methodologies to reduce genomic representation have made the isolation of SNPs feasible for nonmodel organisms. RNA-seq is one such technique for the discovery of SNPs and development of markers for large-scale genotyping. Here, we report the development of 192 validated SNP markers for parentage analysis in Tripterygion delaisi (the black-faced blenny), a small rocky-shore fish from the Mediterranean Sea. RNA-seq data for 15 individual samples were used for SNP discovery by applying a series of selection criteria. Genotypes were then collected from 1599 individuals from the same population with the resulting loci. Differences in heterozygosity and allele frequencies were found between the two data sets. Heterozygosity was lower, on average, in the population sample, and the mean difference between the frequencies of particular alleles in the two data sets was 0.135 ± 0.100. We used bootstrap resampling of the sequence data to predict appropriate sample sizes for SNP discovery. As cDNA library production is time-consuming and expensive, we suggest that using seven individuals for RNA sequencing reduces the probability of discarding highly informative SNP loci, due to lack of observed polymorphism, whereas use of more than 12 samples does not considerably improve prediction of true allele frequencies.

  2. High-precision R-branch transition frequencies in the ν2 fundamental band of H 3+ %A Perry, Adam J.; Hodges, James N.; Markus, Charles R.; Kocheril, G. Stephen; McCall, Benjamin J.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-11-01

    The H 3+molecular ion has served as a long-standing benchmark for state-of-the-art ab initio calculations of molecular potentials and variational calculations of rovibrational energy levels. However, the accuracy of such calculations would not have been confirmed if not for the wealth of spectroscopic data that has been made available for this molecule. Recently, a new high-precision ion spectroscopy technique was demonstrated by Hodges et al., which led to the first highly accurate and precise (∼MHz) H 3+transition frequencies. As an extension of this work, we present ten additional R-branch transitions measured to similar precision as a next step toward the ultimate goal of producing a comprehensive high-precision survey of this molecule, from which rovibrational energy levels can be calculated.

  3. Transit-time devices as local oscillators for frequencies above 100 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisele, H.; Kidner, C.; Haddad, G. I.

    1992-01-01

    Very promising preliminary experimental results have been obtained from GaAs IMPATT diodes at F-band frequencies (75 mW, 3.5 percent at 111.1 GHz and 20 mW, 1.4 percent at 120.6 GHz) and from GaAs TUNNETT diodes at W-band frequencies (26 mW, 1.6 percent at 87.2 GHz and 32 mW, 2.6 percent at 93.5 GHz). These results indicate that IMPATT, MITATT and TUNNETT diodes have the highest potential of delivering significant amounts of power at Terahertz frequencies. As shown recently, the noise performance of GaAs W-band IMPATT diodes can compete with that of Gunn devices. Since TUNNETT diodes take advantage of the quieter tunnel injection, they are expected to be especially suited for low-noise local oscillators. This paper will focus on the two different design principles for IMPATT and TUNNETT diodes, the material parameters involved in the design and some aspects of the present device technology. Single-drift flat-profile GaAs D-band IMPATT diodes had oscillations up to 129 GHz with 9 mW, 0.9 percent at 128.4 GHz. Single-drift GaAs TUNNETT diodes had oscillations up to 112.5 GHz with 16 mW and output power levels up to 33 mW and efficiencies up to 3.4 percent around 102 GHz. These results are the best reported so far from GaAs IMPATT and TUNNETT diodes.

  4. Design and fabrication of a low-frequency (1-3 MHz) ultrasound transducer for accurate placement of screw implants in the spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manbachi, Amir; Lee, Mike; Foster, F. Stuart; Ginsberg, Howard J.; Cobbold, Richard S. C.

    2014-03-01

    In 2012 approximately 800,000 spinal fusion surgeries were performed in the United States, requiring the insertion of screws into the pedicles. Their exact placement is critical and made complex due to limited visibility of the spine, continuous bleeding in the exposed regions, and variability in morphologies. The alarmingly high rate of screw misplacements (up to 20%) reported in the literature is of major concern since such misplacements can place the surrounding vital structures at risk. A potential guidance method for determining the best screw trajectory is by the use of real-time ultrasound imaging similar to that used for intravascular imaging. An endovascular transducer could be inserted into the pedicle to image the anatomy from within and identify bone boundaries. A major challenge of imaging within bone is high signal attenuation. The rapid increase of attenuation with frequency requires much lower frequencies (1-3 MHz) than those used in intravascular imaging. This study describes the custom design and fabrication of 2 MHz ultrasound probes (3.5 mm diameter/ 11 Fr) for pedicle screw guidance. Three transducer designs are explored to provide improved sensitivity and signal to noise ratio, compared to the previously tested transducer within the pedicle. Experimental measurements are compared with the results obtained using various simulation tools. The work reported in this paper represents the first stage in our ultimate goal of developing a 32- element phased array that is capable of generating a radial B-mode image.

  5. Order-disorder transition in conflicting dynamics leading to rank-frequency generalized beta distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Martinez, R.; Martinez-Mekler, G.; Cocho, G.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of rank-ordered distributions of phenomena present in a variety of fields such as biology, sociology, linguistics, finance and geophysics has been a matter of intense research. Often power laws have been encountered; however, their validity tends to hold mainly for an intermediate range of rank values. In a recent publication (Martínez-Mekler et al., 2009 [7]), a generalization of the functional form of the beta distribution has been shown to give excellent fits for many systems of very diverse nature, valid for the whole range of rank values, regardless of whether or not a power law behavior has been previously suggested. Here we give some insight on the significance of the two free parameters which appear as exponents in the functional form, by looking into discrete probabilistic branching processes with conflicting dynamics. We analyze a variety of realizations of these so-called expansion-modification models first introduced by Wentian Li (1989) [10]. We focus our attention on an order-disorder transition we encounter as we vary the modification probability p. We characterize this transition by means of the fitting parameters. Our numerical studies show that one of the fitting exponents is related to the presence of long-range correlations exhibited by power spectrum scale invariance, while the other registers the effect of disordering elements leading to a breakdown of these properties. In the absence of long-range correlations, this parameter is sensitive to the occurrence of unlikely events. We also introduce an approximate calculation scheme that relates this dynamics to multinomial multiplicative processes. A better understanding through these models of the meaning of the generalized beta-fitting exponents may contribute to their potential for identifying and characterizing universality classes.

  6. Accurate spectroscopic properties of 10 Λ-S states and 25 Ω states of BS+ cation including the electronic transition properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinxin; Shi, Deheng; Zhou, Dan; Zhu, Zunlue; Sun, Jinfeng

    2015-11-01

    The potential energy curves of 10 Λ-S states of BS+ yielded from the first four dissociation limits are calculated by the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction approach with the Davidson correction. The core-valence correlation and scalar relativistic corrections are included. Basis on the calculated potential energy curves, the spectroscopic parameters are evaluated. All the PECs are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The spin-orbit coupling are taken into account by the state interaction method with the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. Finally, the transition dipole moments, Franck-Condon Factors and radiative lifetimes of transitions from the 23Π0-, 23Π0+, 23Σ0- and 23Σ1- states to ground state 13Π2 are predicted for future experiment.

  7. Effects of rate-of-change pattern on the discrimination of unidirectional gliding tones with fixed frequency and time transition spans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pei-Chun; Tang, Shih-Tsang; Young, Shuenn-Tsong

    2005-09-01

    Listening experiments were designed to test the three hypotheses for detection and discrimination of glides in frequency: (1) end point sampling; (2) a weighted average method; and (3) decision based on changes in the low-frequency side of the excitation pattern. Forty-eight frequency and time transition spans were chosen. The center frequencies of testing signals were 500 Hz, 2 KHz, and 6 KHz, with frequency spans of 0, 0.5, 1, and 2 ERBs and durations of 20, 50, 200, and 400 ms. For a given transition span, the frequency difference limens for five different gliding patterns were measured, including linear chirp, quadratic and inverse quadratic sweep chirps, and FM modulated sweeps. All test patterns had the following features: (1) they are unidirectional gliding tones with increasing instantaneous frequency throughout the whole duration; (2) the phase functions are at least first-order differentiable, thus the interference of click sounds caused by fast frequency transitions are alleviated. The results showed that none of these hypotheses was able to explain the mechanism for detection and discrimination of glides in frequency well. It is speculated that, at least, both sides of the excitation patterns should be compared, and that the time-related cues could have an effect as well.

  8. Accurate absolute reference frequencies from 1511 to 1545 nm of the {nu}{sub 1}+{nu}{sub 3} band of {sup 12}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} determined with laser frequency comb interval measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Madej, Alan A.; Alcock, A. John; Czajkowski, Andrzej; Bernard, John E.; Chepurov, Sergei

    2006-10-15

    Absolute frequency measurements, with uncertainties as low as 2 kHz (1x10{sup -11}), are presented for the {nu}{sub 1}+{nu}{sub 3} band of {sup 12}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} at 1.5 {mu}m (194-198 THz). The measurements were made using cavity-enhanced, diode-laser-based saturation spectroscopy. With one laser system stabilized to the P(16) line of {sup 13}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and a system stabilized to the line in {sup 12}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} whose frequency was to be determined, a Cr:YAG laser-based frequency comb was employed to measure the frequency intervals. The systematic uncertainty is notably reduced relative to that of previous studies, and the region of measured lines has been extended. Improved molecular constants are obtained.

  9. Accuracy estimation of the O162+ transition frequencies targeting the search for the variation in the proton-electron mass ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajita, Masatoshi

    2017-02-01

    We estimate the Stark and Zeeman shifts in the transition frequencies of the O162+ molecular ion as a step in the search for the variation in the proton-to-electron mass ratio μ . The X2Π v =21 -a4Π v =0 or the X2Π v =21 -a4Π v =1 transition frequencies (THz region) of the O162+ molecular ion have particularly high sensitivity to the variation in μ . Note also that the Stark shift in the O162+ transition frequencies is expected to be much smaller than that for heteronuclear diatomic molecules. However, the actual systematic uncertainties for the O162+ transition frequencies have never been estimated. We estimated the Stark and Zeeman shifts in the different O162+ transition frequencies. When the molecular ions in a string crystal formed in a linear trap (trap electric field <0.1 V/cm, and Stark shift <10-20 ) are used, the X2Π1 /2(v ,J ) =(0 ,1 /2 ) -(v',1 /2 ) (v'≥1 ) transition frequencies are most advantageous for the search for the variation in μ (" close=")v ,J )">Δ μ /μ <10-17 because the Zeeman shift is easily suppressed to lower than 10-18 and the electric quadrupole shift is zero. On the other hand, the X2Π1 /2(0 ,1 /2 ) transition frequency has another merit in that the positive Stark shift induced by the trap electric field can be canceled by the quadratic Doppler shift. Therefore, the measurement using molecular ions in a Coulomb crystal broadened in the radial direction is also possible, when the Zeeman shift is effectively eliminated.

  10. Methods and systems for low frequency seismic and infrasound detection of geo-pressure transition zones

    DOEpatents

    Shook, G. Michael; LeRoy, Samuel D.; Benzing, William M.

    2006-07-18

    Methods for determining the existence and characteristics of a gradational pressurized zone within a subterranean formation are disclosed. One embodiment involves employing an attenuation relationship between a seismic response signal and increasing wavelet wavelength, which relationship may be used to detect a gradational pressurized zone and/or determine characteristics thereof. In another embodiment, a method for analyzing data contained within a response signal for signal characteristics that may change in relation to the distance between an input signal source and the gradational pressurized zone is disclosed. In a further embodiment, the relationship between response signal wavelet frequency and comparative amplitude may be used to estimate an optimal wavelet wavelength or range of wavelengths used for data processing or input signal selection. Systems for seismic exploration and data analysis for practicing the above-mentioned method embodiments are also disclosed.

  11. Systems for low frequency seismic and infrasound detection of geo-pressure transition zones

    DOEpatents

    Shook, G. Michael; LeRoy, Samuel D.; Benzing, William M.

    2007-10-16

    Methods for determining the existence and characteristics of a gradational pressurized zone within a subterranean formation are disclosed. One embodiment involves employing an attenuation relationship between a seismic response signal and increasing wavelet wavelength, which relationship may be used to detect a gradational pressurized zone and/or determine characteristics thereof. In another embodiment, a method for analyzing data contained within a response signal for signal characteristics that may change in relation to the distance between an input signal source and the gradational pressurized zone is disclosed. In a further embodiment, the relationship between response signal wavelet frequency and comparative amplitude may be used to estimate an optimal wavelet wavelength or range of wavelengths used for data processing or input signal selection. Systems for seismic exploration and data analysis for practicing the above-mentioned method embodiments are also disclosed.

  12. Time-frequency dynamics of superluminal pulse transition to the subluminal regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorrah, Ahmed H.; Ramakrishnan, Abhinav; Mojahedi, Mo

    2015-03-01

    Spectral reshaping and nonuniform phase delay associated with an electromagnetic pulse propagating in a temporally dispersive medium may lead to interesting observations in which the group velocity becomes superluminal or even negative. In such cases, the finite bandwidth of the superluminal region implies the inevitable existence of a cutoff distance beyond which a superluminal pulse becomes subluminal. In this paper, we derive a closed-form analytic expression to estimate this cutoff distance in abnormal dispersive media with gain. Moreover, the method of steepest descent is used to track the time-frequency dynamics associated with the evolution of the center of mass of a superluminal pulse to the subluminal regime. This evolution takes place at longer propagation depths as a result of the subluminal components affecting the behavior of the pulse. Finally, the analysis presents the fundamental limitations of superluminal propagation in light of factors such as the medium depth, pulse width, and the medium dispersion strength.

  13. Energetic electron avalanches and mode transitions in planar inductively coupled radio-frequency driven plasmas operated in oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Zaka-ul-Islam, M.; Niemi, K.; Gans, T.; O'Connell, D.

    2011-07-25

    Space and phase resolved optical emission spectroscopic measurements reveal that in certain parameter regimes, inductively coupled radio-frequency driven plasmas exhibit three distinct operation modes. At low powers, the plasma operates as an alpha-mode capacitively coupled plasma driven through the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath potential in front of the antenna. At high powers, the plasma operates in inductive mode sustained through induced electric fields due to the time varying currents and associated magnetic fields from the antenna. At intermediate powers, close to the often observed capacitive to inductive (E-H) transition regime, energetic electron avalanches are identified to play a significant role in plasma sustainment, similar to gamma-mode capacitively coupled plasmas. These energetic electrons traverse the whole plasma gap, potentially influencing plasma surface interactions as exploited in technological applications.

  14. How Accurate Can a Local Coupled Cluster Approach Be in Computing the Activation Energies of Late-Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Reactions with Au, Pt, and Ir?

    PubMed

    Kang, Runhua; Lai, Wenzhen; Yao, Jiannian; Shaik, Sason; Chen, Hui

    2012-09-11

    To improve the accuracy of local coupled cluster (LCC) methods in computing activation energies, we propose herein a new computational scheme. Its applications to various types of late-transition-metal-catalyzed reactions involving Au, Pt, and Ir indicate that the new corrective approach for LCC methods can downsize the mean unsigned deviation and maximum deviation, from the CCSD(T)/CBS reference, to about 0.3 and 0.9 kcal/mol. Using this method, we also calibrated the performance of popular density functionals, with respect to the same test set of reactions. It is concluded that the best functional is the general-purpose double hybrid functional B2GP-PLYP. Other well-performing functionals include the "kinetic" functionals M06-2X and BMK, which have a large percentage of HF exchange, and general-purpose functionals like PBE0 and wB97X. Comparatively, general-purpose functionals like PBE0 and TPSSh perform much better than the tested "kinetic" functionals for Pt-/Ir-catalyzed reactions, while the opposite is true for Au-catalyzed reactions. In contrast, wB97X performs more uniformly in these two classes of reactions. These findings hint that even within the scope of late transition metals, different types of reactions may require different types of optimal DFT methods. Empirical dispersion correction of DFT was found to have a small or no effect on the studied reactions barriers.

  15. Low-frequency Raman modes as fingerprints of layer stacking configurations of transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Liangbo; Puretzky, Alexander; Sumpter, Bobby; Meunier, Vincent; Geohegan, David; David B. Geohegan Team; Vincent Meunier Team

    The tunable optoelectronic properties of stacked two-dimensional (2D) crystal monolayers are determined by their stacking orientation, order, and atomic registry. Atomic-resolution Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (AR-Z-STEM) can be used to determine the exact atomic registration between different layers in few-layer 2D stacks; however, fast and relatively inexpensive optical characterization techniques are essential for rapid development of the field. Using two- and three-layer MoSe2 and WSe2 crystals synthesized by chemical vapor deposition, we show that the generally unexplored low-frequency (LF) Raman modes (<50 cm-1) that originate from interlayer vibrations can serve as fingerprints to characterize not only the number of layers, but also their stacking configurations [Puretzky and Liang et al, ACS Nano 2015, 9, 6333]. First-principles Raman calculations and group theory analysis corroborate the experimental assignments determined by AR-Z-STEM and show that the calculated LF mode fingerprints are related to the 2D crystal symmetries. Our combined experimental/theoretical work demonstrates the LF Raman modes potentially more effective than HF Raman modes to probe the layer stacking and interlayer interaction for 2D materials. The authors acknowledge support from Eugene P. Wigner Fellowship at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  16. Temperature Dependent Low Frequency Optical and DC Transport Near a Metal Insulator Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlman, R. S.; Epstein, A. J.; Tanner, D. B.; Ihas, G. G.; Ishiguro, T.; Kaneko, H.; Min, Y. G.; MacDiarmid, A. G.

    1996-03-01

    We report measurements of the temperature dependent far infrared (10-100 cm-1) reflectance and milliKelvin transport of highly conducting polyaniline doped with d,1-camphorsulfonic acid (PAN-CSA) and polypyrrole doped with hexafluorophosphate (PPy-PF_6). With decreasing T (to ~ 200 K), the reflectance initially increases for ω > 20 cm-1 and decreases at lower frequencies. As T is further decreased, there is a continuous reduction in the reflection. There is no indication of a gap opening at low temperatures in contrast to earlier reports for PPy-PF_6.^1 These results will be discussed along with mK magnetotransport measurements for ``metallic'' PAN-CSA samples that have a negative magnetoresistance similar to metallic PPy-PF6 ^2 and other nonmetallic samples, indicating the importance of weak localization channels for transport in highly conducting polymers. ^*Supported in part by NIST ATP 1993-01-0149 and NSF DMR-9403894. ^1K. Lee, et al., Synth. Met. 68, 287 (1995). ^2J. C. Clark, et al., Synth. Met. 69, 215 (1995).

  17. Accurate identification of the frequency response functions for the rotor-bearing-foundation system using the modified pseudo mode shape method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yeong-Shu; Cheng, Ye-Dar; Yang, Tachung; Koai, Kwang-Lu

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, an identification technique in the dynamic analyses of rotor-bearing-foundation systems called the pseudo mode shape method (PMSM) was improved in order to enhance the accuracy of the identified dynamic characteristic matrices of its foundation models. Two procedures, namely, phase modification and numerical optimisation, were proposed in the algorithm of PMSM to effectively improve its accuracy. Generally, it is always necessary to build the whole foundation model in studying the dynamics of a rotor system through the finite element analysis method. This is either unfeasible or impractical when the foundation is too complicated. Instead, the PMSM uses the frequency response function (FRF) data of joint positions between the rotor and the foundation to establish the equivalent mass, damping, and stiffness matrices of the foundation without having to build the physical model. However, the accuracy of the obtained system's FRF is still unsatisfactory, especially at those higher modes. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the presented methods, a solid foundation was solved for its FRF by using both the original and modified PMSM, as well as the finite element (ANSYS) model for comparisons. The results showed that the accuracy of the obtained FRF was improved remarkably with the modified PMSM based on the results of the ANSYS. In addition, an induction motor resembling a rotor-bearing-foundation system, with its housing treated as the foundation, was taken as an example to verify the algorithm experimentally. The FRF curves at the bearing supports of the rotor (armature) were obtained through modal testing to estimate the above-mentioned equivalent matrices of the housing. The FRF of the housing, which was calculated from the equivalent matrices with the modified PMSM, showed satisfactory consistency with that from the modal testing.

  18. Effects of Anisotropic Parabolic Potential on the Energy Levels and Transition Frequency of Strong-Coupling Polaron in a Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chun-Yu; Zhao, Cui-Lan; Xiao, Jing-Lin

    2013-07-01

    In the presence of a three-dimensional anisotropic parabolic potential (APP), the energy levels and the transition frequency between relevant levels of the strong-coupling polaron in a quantum dot (QD) are investigated by using the well-known Lee-Low-Pines (LLP) unitary transformation method and the Pekar type variational (PTV) method. The relations of the energy levels and the transition frequency with the electron-phonon (EP) coupling strength and the effective confinement lengths are derived. Numerical calculations show that the energy levels are decreasing functions of the EP coupling strength, whereas the transition frequency is an increasing one of it. And they are all increasing rapidly with decreasing the effective confinement lengths in different directions, which are showing the novel quantum size confining effect of the QD.

  19. Accurate determination of the reaction course in HY2 <−> Y + YH (Y = O, S): detailed analysis of the covalent- to hydrogen-bonding transition.

    PubMed

    Varandas, A J C

    2013-08-15

    The accurate prediction of a bond-breaking/bond-forming reaction course is useful but very difficult. Toward this goal, a cost-effective multireference scheme (A. J. C. Varandas, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2012, 8, 428) is tested that provides a generalization of the Hartree-Fock plus dispersion model for closed-shell interactions, and hence is based on the popular but largely untested idea of performing single point calculations with a high-level method at stationary points or along paths located using a lower level method. The energetics so calculated for the reaction HO2 <−> O + OH is predicted in excellent agreement with the experimental data, whereas the reaction path shows a scar at the onset of hydrogen-bonding: a weak van der Waals type minimum separated from the deep covalent well by a small barrier, all below the O + OH asymptote. The O-OH long-range interaction potential is also examined and possible implications in reaction dynamics discussed. Corresponding attributes for the reaction HS2 <−> S + SH are predicted, in good agreement with the best theoretical and experimental results. A perspective on the general utility of the approach is presented.

  20. Improved Frequency Measurement of the 1S0-3P0 Clock Transition in 87Sr Using a Cs Fountain Clock as a Transfer Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Takehiko; Akamatsu, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Takumi; Takamizawa, Akifumi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Ikegami, Takeshi; Suzuyama, Tomonari; Inaba, Hajime; Okubo, Sho; Yasuda, Masami; Hong, Feng-Lei; Onae, Atsushi; Hosaka, Kazumoto

    2015-11-01

    We performed an absolute frequency measurement of the 1S0-3P0 transition in 87Sr with a fractional uncertainty of 1.2 × 10-15, which is less than one-third that of our previous measurement. A caesium fountain atomic clock was used as a transfer oscillator to reduce the uncertainty of the link between a strontium optical lattice clock and the SI second. The absolute value of the transition frequency is 429 228 004 229 873.56(49) Hz.

  1. Using ecological forecasting of future vegetation transition and fire frequency change in the Sierra Nevada to assess fire management strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, J. H.; Schwartz, M. W.; Holguin, A. J.; Moritz, M.; Batllori, E.; Folger, K.; Nydick, K.

    2013-12-01

    Ecological systems may respond in complex manners as climate change progresses. Among the responses, site-level climate conditions may cause a shift in vegetation due to the physiological tolerances of plant species, and the fire return interval may change. Natural resource managers challenged with maintaining ecosystem health need a way to forecast how these processes may affect every location, in order to determine appropriate management actions and prioritize locations for interventions. We integrated climate change-driven vegetation type transitions with projected change in fire frequency for 45,203 km2 of the southern Sierra Nevada, California, containing over 10 land management agencies as well as private lands. This Magnitude of Change (MOC) approach involves classing vegetation types in current time according to their climate envelopes, and identifying which sites will in the future have climates beyond what that vegetation currently occurs in. Independently, fire models are used to determine the change in fire frequency for each site. We examined 82 vegetation types with >50 grid cell occurrences. We found iconic resources such as the giant sequoia, lower slope oak woodlands, and high elevation conifer forests are projected as highly vulnerable by models that project a warmer drier future, but not as much by models that project a warmer future that is not drier than current conditions. Further, there were strongly divergent vulnerabilities of these forest types across land ownership (National Parks versus US Forest Service lands), and by GCM. For example, of 50 giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) groves and complexes, all but 3 (on Sierra National Forest) were in the 2 highest levels of risk of climate and fire under the GFDL A2 projection, while 15 groves with low-to-moderate risk were found on both the National Parks and National Forests 18 in the 2 under PCM A2. Landscape projections of potential MOC suggest that the region is likely to experience

  2. Measurement of absolute transition frequencies of {sup 87}Rb to nS and nD Rydberg states by means of electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, Markus; Karlewski, Florian; Hattermann, Helge; Hoeckh, Simone; Jessen, Florian; Cano, Daniel; Fortagh, Jozsef

    2011-05-15

    We report the measurement of absolute excitation frequencies of {sup 87}Rb to nS and nD Rydberg states. The Rydberg transition frequencies are obtained by observing electromagnetically induced transparency on a rubidium vapor cell. The accuracy of the measurement of each state is < or approx. 1 MHz, which is achieved by frequency stabilizing the two diode lasers employed for the spectroscopy to a frequency comb and a frequency comb calibrated wavelength meter, respectively. Based on the spectroscopic data we determine the quantum defects of {sup 87}Rb, and compare it with previous measurements on {sup 85}Rb. We determine the ionization frequency from the 5S{sub 1/2}(F=1) ground state of {sup 87}Rb to 1010.029 164 6(3)THz, providing the binding energy of the ground state with an accuracy improved by two orders of magnitude.

  3. Atomic sulfur: Frequency measurement of the J = 0 left arrow 1 fine-structure transition at 56.3 microns by laser magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John M.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Zink, Lyndon R.

    1994-01-01

    The J = 0 left arrow 1 fine-structure transition in atomic sulfur (S I) in its ground (3)P state has been detected in the laboratory by far-infrared laser magnetic resonance. The fine-structure interval has been measured accurately as 5,322,492.9 +/- 2.8 MHz which corresponds to a wavelength of 56.325572 +/- 0.000030 micrometers.

  4. Identification of main-sequence stars with mid-infrared excesses: Frequency of beta Pictoris analogs and transition disk systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzpen, Brian Robert

    spectroscopy is obtained for a large subset of the mid-IR excess sources for the purpose of stellar and circumstellar characterization. Finally, a statistical analysis of a complete stellar sample is investigated to determine that the frequency of dusty mid-IR debris disks is 0.3±0.3% and transition disks is 1.2±0.6%. The frequencies of these mid-IR excess sources are used to constrain disk lifetimes to 5±2 Myr.

  5. Dependencies of inter- and intragrain superconductive transitions in polycrystalline RuSr 2GdCu 2O 8 superconductor on field and frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, A. M.; Abu-Samreh, M. M.; Kitaneh, R. M.-L.; Braun, H. F.

    2008-02-01

    Measurements of the complex ac susceptibility components were employed to extract inter- and intragrain superconductive transition temperatures as well as the average transition temperature of RuSr 2GdCu 2O 8 polycrystalline superconductor. The intra- and intergranular components of the granular susceptibility components were also estimated. It was found that both the intra- and intergranular transition temperatures increase by increasing field frequencies and decrease by increasing the field amplitudes. This might be an indication that the grains of RuSr 2GdCu 2O 8 behave differently from a homogeneous bulk superconductor. The nature of d χ'/d T curves indicated the presence of a superconducting transition between grains, coupled by weak links with a distribution of critical temperatures, and the superconducting transition within the grains. The two transitions observed are linked to the typical intra- and intergrain transitions of a granular superconductor. The weak coupling between grains might be modeled in terms of Josephson-junction arrays.

  6. Analysis of methods for calculating the transition frequencies of the torsional vibration of acrolein isomers in the ground ( S 0) electronic state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroleva, L. A.; Tyulin, V. I.; Matveev, V. K.; Pentin, Yu. A.

    2013-05-01

    B3LYP, MP2, CCSD(T), and MP4/MP2 in the 6-311G( d, p), 6-311++G( d, p), cc-pVTZ, aug-cc-pVTZ bases used to calculate the transition frequencies of torsional vibration of trans- and cis-isomers of acrolein in the ground electronic state ( S 0) are analyzed. It is found that for trans-isomers, all methods of calculation except for B3LYP in the cc-pVTZ basis yield good agreement between the calculated and experimental values. It is noted that for the cis-isomer of acrolein, no method of calculation confirms the experimental value of the frequency of torsional vibration (138 cm-1). It is shown that the calculated and experimental values for obertones at 273.0 cm-1 and other transitions of torsional vibration are different for this isomer in particular. However, it is established that in some calculation methods (B3LYP, MP2), the frequency of the torsional vibration of the cis-isomer coincides with another experimental value of this frequency (166.5 cm-1). It is concluded that in analyzing the vibrational structure of the UV spectrum, the calculated and experimental values of its obertone (331.3 cm-1) coincide, along with its frequency. It is also noted that the frequency of torsional vibration for the cis-isomer (166.5 cm-1) can also be found in other experimental works if we change the allocation of torsional transition 18{1/1}.

  7. Sub-MHz accuracy measurement of the S(2) 2-0 transition frequency of D2 by Comb-Assisted Cavity Ring Down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondelain, D.; Kassi, S.; Sala, T.; Romanini, D.; Gatti, D.; Campargue, A.

    2016-08-01

    The line position of the very weak S(2) transition of deuterium in the 2-0 band has been measured with a Comb-Assisted Cavity Ring Down spectrometer. The high sensitivity spectra were recorded at 5 and 10 mbar with a Noise Equivalent Absorption, αmin, of 8 × 10-11 cm-1. The line positions at 5 and 10 mbar were measured with sub-MHz accuracy (460 and 260 kHz, respectively). After correction of the line pressure-shift, the frequency at zero pressure of the S(2) transition of the first overtone band was determined to be 187 104 299.51 ± 0.50 MHz. This value agrees within 1.7 MHz with the frequency obtained from the best available ab initio calculations and corresponds to only 15% of the claimed theoretical uncertainty.

  8. Radio frequency-power and the ring-mode to red-mode transition in an inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Coffer, J. G.; Camparo, J. C.

    2012-04-15

    The optical output of an alkali-metal inductively coupled plasma (alkali-ICP) plays an important role in both atomic magnetometers and atomic clocks, producing these devices' atomic signals through optical pumping. Unfortunately, though the alkali-ICP's optical pumping efficiency grows exponentially with temperature, at relatively high temperatures ({approx}140 deg. C) the discharge transitions from ''ring mode'' to ''red mode'', which is a spectral change in the plasma's output that corresponds broadly to a transition from ''good emission'' for optical pumping to ''poor emission.'' Recently, evidence has accumulated pointing to radiation trapping as the mechanism driving the ring-mode to red-mode transition, suggesting that the phenomenon is primarily linked to the alkali vapor's temperature. However, observations of the transition made in the 1960 s, demonstrating that the ICP temperature associated with the transition depended on rf-power, would appear to cast doubt on this mechanism. Here, we carefully investigate the influence of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition, finding that rf-power only affects the transition through discharge heating. Thus, the present work shows that the primary effect of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition can be understood in terms of the radiation trapping mechanism.

  9. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  10. Effects of impedance matching network on the discharge mode transitions in a radio-frequency inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Z. F.; Yuan, G. Y.; Gao, W.; Sun, J. C.

    2008-06-15

    In inductively coupled plasma sources, discharge transitions from electrostatic mode (E mode) to electromagnetic mode (H mode) and from H mode to E mode occur. In previous studies, only a few works paid attention to the effects of the impedance matching network. Cunge et al. [Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 8, 576 (1999)] investigated the E-H and H-E mode transitions under two different impedance matching situations, but no physical mechanism or interpretation was presented. This issue is remained to be systematically and quantitatively investigated, and the underlying mechanism to be unveiled. In this paper, the effects of the impedance matching network were experimentally studied in electropositive argon gas by varying the series capacitance in an inversely L-shaped matching network. The positive and negative feedback regions are established according to the effect of varying the series capacitance on the output power of the rf power supply. It was found that under the same experimental parameters, the discharge mode transitions are apt to be discontinuous and continuous in the positive and negative feedback regions, respectively. In addition, the critical coil rf current (or applied power) at the mode transition, the hysteretic loop width, and the difference in applied power during the discharge mode transition vary with the series capacitance. The critical coil rf current at the E-H mode transition is not always higher than that at the H-E mode transition.

  11. Theoretical studies for the N{sub 2}–N{sub 2}O van der Waals complex: The potential energy surface, intermolecular vibrations, and rotational transition frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Rui; Zheng, Limin; Yang, Minghui E-mail: yangmh@wipm.ac.cn; Lu, Yunpeng E-mail: yangmh@wipm.ac.cn

    2015-10-21

    Theoretical studies of the potential energy surface (PES) and bound states are performed for the N{sub 2}–N{sub 2}O van der Waals (vdW) complex. A four-dimensional intermolecular PES is constructed at the level of single and double excitation coupled-cluster method with a non-iterative perturbation treatment of triple excitations [CCSD(T)] with aug-cc-pVTZ basis set supplemented with bond functions. Two equivalent T-shaped global minima are located, in which the O atom of N{sub 2}O monomer is near the N{sub 2} monomer. The intermolecular fundamental vibrational states are assigned by inspecting the orientation of the nodal surface of the wavefunctions. The calculated frequency for intermolecular disrotation mode is 23.086 cm{sup −1}, which is in good agreement with the available experimental data of 22.334 cm{sup −1}. A negligible tunneling splitting with the value of 4.2 MHz is determined for the ground vibrational state and the tunneling splitting increases as the increment of the vibrational frequencies. Rotational levels and transition frequencies are calculated for both isotopomers {sup 14}N{sub 2}–N{sub 2}O and {sup 15}N{sub 2}–N{sub 2}O. The accuracy of the PES is validated by the good agreement between theoretical and experimental results for the transition frequencies and spectroscopic parameters.

  12. Observation and Absolute Frequency Measurements of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} Optical Clock Transition in Neutral Ytterbium

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, C.W.; Barber, Z.W.; Oates, C.W.; Fortier, T.M.; Diddams, S.A.; Hollberg, L.

    2005-08-19

    We report the direct excitation of the highly forbidden (6s{sup 2}){sup 1}S{sub 0}{r_reversible}(6s6p){sup 3}P{sub 0} optical transition in two odd isotopes of neutral ytterbium. As the excitation laser frequency is scanned, absorption is detected by monitoring the depletion from an atomic cloud at {approx}70 {mu}K in a magneto-optical trap. The measured frequency in {sup 171}Yb (F=1/2) is 518 295 836 591.6{+-}4.4 kHz. The measured frequency in {sup 173}Yb (F=5/2) is 518 294 576 847.6{+-}4.4 kHz. Measurements are made with a femtosecond-laser frequency comb calibrated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology cesium fountain clock and represent nearly a 10{sup 6}-fold reduction in uncertainty. The natural linewidth of these J=0 to J=0 transitions is calculated to be {approx}10 mHz, making them well suited to support a new generation of optical atomic clocks based on confinement in an optical lattice.

  13. Phase transition behaviors of the supported DPPC bilayer investigated by sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM).

    PubMed

    Wu, Heng-Liang; Tong, Yujin; Peng, Qiling; Li, Na; Ye, Shen

    2016-01-21

    The phase transition behaviors of a supported bilayer of dipalmitoylphosphatidyl-choline (DPPC) have been systematically evaluated by in situ sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). By using an asymmetric bilayer composed of per-deuterated and per-protonated monolayers, i.e., DPPC-d75/DPPC and a symmetric bilayer of DPPC/DPPC, we were able to probe the molecular structural changes during the phase transition process of the lipid bilayer by SFG spectroscopy. It was found that the DPPC bilayer is sequentially melted from the top (adjacent to the solution) to bottom leaflet (adjacent to the substrate) over a wide temperature range. The conformational ordering of the supported bilayer does not decrease (even slightly increases) during the phase transition process. The conformational defects in the bilayer can be removed after the complete melting process. The phase transition enthalpy for the bottom leaflet was found to be approximately three times greater than that for the top leaflet, indicating a strong interaction of the lipids with the substrate. The present SFG and AFM observations revealed similar temperature dependent profiles. Based on these results, the temperature-induced structural changes in the supported lipid bilayer during its phase transition process are discussed in comparison with previous studies.

  14. Simulation methods for looping transitions.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, B J; Silverstone, H J

    1998-09-01

    Looping transitions occur in field-swept electron magnetic resonance spectra near avoided crossings and involve a single pair of energy levels that are in resonance at two magnetic field strengths, before and after the avoided crossing. When the distance between the two resonances approaches a linewidth, the usual simulation of the spectra, which results from a linear approximation of the dependence of the transition frequency on magnetic field, breaks down. A cubic approximation to the transition frequency, which can be obtained from the two resonance fields and the field-derivatives of the transition frequencies, along with linear (or better) interpolation of the transition-probability factor, restores accurate simulation. The difference is crucial for accurate line shapes at fixed angles, as in an oriented single crystal, but the difference turns out to be a smaller change in relative intensity for a powder spectrum. Spin-3/2 Cr3+ in ruby and spin-5/2 Fe3+ in transferrin oxalate are treated as examples.

  15. Modes and the alpha-gamma transition in rf capacitive discharges in N{sub 2}O at different rf frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Lisovskiy, V.; Booth, J.-P.; Landry, K.; Douai, D.; Cassagne, V.; Yegorenkov, V.

    2006-10-15

    This paper reports current-voltage characteristics and pressure-voltage transition curves from the weak-current {alpha}-mode to the strong-current {gamma}-mode for rf capacitive discharges in N{sub 2}O at frequencies of 2 MHz, 13.56 MHz, and 27.12 MHz. At 2 MHz the rf discharge is mostly resistive whereas at 13.56 MHz and 27.12 MHz it is mostly capacitive. The weak-current {alpha}-mode was found to exist only above a certain minimum gas pressure for all frequencies studied. N. Yatsenko [Sov. Phys. Tech. Phys. 26, 678 (1981)] previously proposed that the {alpha}-{gamma} transition corresponds to breakdown of the sheaths. However, we show that this is the case only for sufficiently high gas pressures. At lower pressure there is a smooth transition from the weak-current {alpha}-mode to a strong-current {gamma}-mode, in which the sheaths produce fast electrons but the sheath has not undergone breakdown.

  16. Isotope shifts and transition frequencies for the S and P states of lithium: Bethe logarithms and second-order relativistic recoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. M.; Li, Chun; Yan, Z.-C.; Drake, G. W. F.

    2017-03-01

    Isotope shifts and total transition frequencies are calculated for the 2 2S-3 2S transition of the lithium isotopes 6Li, 7Li, 8Li, 9Li, and the halo nucleus 11Li. The accuracy is improved for previously calculated relativistic and quantum electrodynamic corrections, and in particular a disagreement for the Bethe logarithm is resolved for the ground 2S state. Our previous result is confirmed for the 2 2P state. We use the pseudostate expansion method to perform the sum over virtual intermediate states. Results for the second-order relativistic recoil term of order α2(μ/M ) 2 Ry are shown to make a significant contribution relative to the theoretical uncertainty, but because of accidental cancellations the final result for the isotope shift is nearly unchanged. However, the spin-orbit term makes an unexpectedly large contribution to the splitting isotope shift (SIS) for the 2 1/2 2P -2 3/2 2P fine structure, increasing the theoretical value for the 6Li-7Li isotopes to 0.556 31 (7 )±0.001 MHz. A comparison is made with high-precision measurements and other calculations for the SIS and for the total 2 2S-3 2S transition frequency.

  17. Frequency of papillary tubal hyperplasia (PTH), salpingoliths and transition from adenoma to borderline ovarian tumors (BOT): A systematic analysis of 74 BOT with different histologic types.

    PubMed

    Horn, Lars-Christian; Angermann, Karolin; Hentschel, Bettina; Einenkel, Jens; Höhn, Anne Kathrin

    2017-02-06

    Borderline ovarian tumors (BOT) arise from cystadenomas and represent a transition step within the development of low-grade ovarian carcinomas (Type I tumors). That pathway mirrors the adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence known for colorectal cancer. It has been suggested that papillary tubal hyperplasia (PTH) and salpingoliths may be associated with the development of BOT. To evaluate the frequency of the presence of benign cystadenoma and its transition to BOT in a given patient as well as the presence of PTH and salpingoliths we re-valuated in 74 consecutive cases of BOT with different histologic types. The majority of cases represented serous-BOT (60.8%), followed by mucinous BOT (25.7%), other histologic types were rare. 86.5% showed an adenoma-BOT sequence, which was seen in all mucinous BOT but was missed in 15.6% of serous BOT. Two cases had salpingoliths without associated PTH. PTH was seen in four out of the 74 (5.4%) BOT and occurred only in cases with serous histology. The vast majority of BOT represent a transition from benign cystadenoma to BOT in cases with mucinous and serous histology. Salpingoliths are rarely seen in association with BOT and occurred exclusively in BOT with serous histology. PTH may represent a distinct lesion but is rarely seen in association with BOT, especially in those with non-serous histology. Further studies are needed to evaluate the frequency and pathogenetic association of PTH with BOT.

  18. On the E-H transition in inductively coupled radio frequency oxygen plasmas: I. Density and temperature of electrons, ground state and singlet metastable molecular oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, Th; Küllig, C.; Meichsner, J.

    2017-02-01

    In this series of two papers, the E-H transition in a planar inductively coupled radio frequency discharge (13.56 MHz) in pure oxygen is studied using comprehensive plasma diagnostic methods. The electron density serves as the main plasma parameter to distinguish between the operation modes. The (effective) electron temperature, which is calculated from the electron energy distribution function and the difference between the floating and plasma potential, halves during the E-H transition. Furthermore, the pressure dependency of the RF sheath extension in the E-mode implies a collisional RF sheath for the considered total gas pressures. The gas temperature increases with the electron density during the E-H transition and doubles in the H-mode compared to the E-mode, whereas the molecular ground state density halves at the given total gas pressure. Moreover, the singlet molecular metastable density reaches 2% in the E-mode and 4% in the H-mode of the molecular ground state density. These measured plasma parameters can be used as input parameters for global rate equation calculations to analyze several elementary processes. Here, the ionization rate for the molecular oxygen ions is exemplarily determined and reveals, together with the optical excitation rate patterns, a change in electronegativity during the mode transition.

  19. The discharge mode transition and O({sup 5}p{sub 1}) production mechanism of pulsed radio frequency capacitively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. Y.; Hu, J. T.; Liu, J. H.; Xiong, Z. L.; Liu, D. W.; Lu, X. P.; Shi, J. J.

    2012-07-23

    The discharge mode transition from uniform plasma across the gas gap to the {alpha} mode happens at the rising phase of the pulsed radio frequency capacitively coupled plasma (PRF CCP). This transition is attributed to the fast increasing stochastic heating at the edge of sheath. In the second stage with the stable current and voltage amplitude, the consistency between experimental and numerical spatial-temporal 777 nm emission profile suggests that He* and He{sub 2}* dominate the production of O({sup 5}p{sub 1}) through dissociation and excitation of O{sub 2}. Finally, the sterilization efficiency of PRF CCP is found to be higher than that of plasma jet.

  20. Progress Report on a Portable TI:SAPPHIRE Comb Laser with Frequencies Referring to Cesium Atom Two-Photon Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wang-Yau; Wu, Chien-Ming; Liu, Tz-Wei; Chen, Yo-Huan

    2010-06-01

    A portable Ti:sapphire comb laser would contribute significantly to generalize comb-laser applications, such as the astro-comb missions or other interdisciplinary collaborations. To develop a portable comb laser, three barriers lie ahead: one is to miniaturize and robotize the frequency reference system of the comb laser; the second is to ensure the long-term frequency accuracy without satellite connection, and the third is to miniaturize the pumping laser system. We developed two hand-size cesium-stabilized diode lasers at 822 nm and 884 nm to serve as frequency references for a comb laser and we carried out a comb-laser-based CPT experiment with one single cesium cell that might offer a locking procedure for long-term comb laser accuracy. We will also report our plans and progress on a fiber laser pumped Ti:sapphire comb laser.

  1. Spectral Index and Quasi-Periodic Oscillation Frequency Correlation in Black Hole (BH) Sources: Observational Evidence of Two Phases and Phase Transition in BHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Fiorito, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that strong correlations are observed between the low frequencies (1-10 Hz) of quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several Black Hole (BH) candidate sources, in low hard states, steep power-law (soft) states and in transition between these states. The observations indicate that the X-ray spectrum of such state (phases) show the presence of a power-law component and are sometimes related to simultaneous radio emission indicated the probable presence of a jet. Strong QPOs (less than 20% rms) are present in the power density spectrum in the spectral range where the power-law component is dominant ( i.e. 60-90% ). This evidence contradicts the dominant long standing interpretation of QPOs as a signature of the thermal accretion disk. We present the data from the literature and our own data to illustrate the dominance of power-law index-QPO frequency correlations. We provide a model, that identifies and explains the origin of the QPOs and how they are imprinted on the properties of power-law flux component. We argue the existence of a bounded compact coronal region which is a natural consequence of the adjustment of Keplerian disk flow to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object and that ultimately leads to the formation of a transition layer (TL) between the adjustment radius and the innermost boundary. The model predicts two phases or states dictated by the photon upscattering produced in the TL: (1) hard state, in which the TL is optically thin and very hot (kT approx. greater than 50 keV) producing photon upscattering via thermal Componization; the photon spectrum index Gamma appprox.1.5 for this state is dictated by gravitational energy release and Compton cooling in an optically thin shock near the adjustment radius; (2) a soft state which is optically thick and relatively cold (approx. less than 5 keV); the index for this state, Gamma approx. 2.8 is determined by soft

  2. Efficient and accurate computation of the incomplete Airy functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinides, E. D.; Marhefka, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    The incomplete Airy integrals serve as canonical functions for the uniform ray optical solutions to several high-frequency scattering and diffraction problems that involve a class of integrals characterized by two stationary points that are arbitrarily close to one another or to an integration endpoint. Integrals with such analytical properties describe transition region phenomena associated with composite shadow boundaries. An efficient and accurate method for computing the incomplete Airy functions would make the solutions to such problems useful for engineering purposes. In this paper a convergent series solution for the incomplete Airy functions is derived. Asymptotic expansions involving several terms are also developed and serve as large argument approximations. The combination of the series solution with the asymptotic formulae provides for an efficient and accurate computation of the incomplete Airy functions. Validation of accuracy is accomplished using direct numerical integration data.

  3. Experimentally constrained CA1 fast-firing parvalbumin-positive interneuron network models exhibit sharp transitions into coherent high frequency rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Katie A.; Huh, Carey Y. L.; Amilhon, Bénédicte; Williams, Sylvain; Skinner, Frances K.

    2013-01-01

    The coupling of high frequency oscillations (HFOs; >100 Hz) and theta oscillations (3–12 Hz) in the CA1 region of rats increases during REM sleep, indicating that it may play a role in memory processing. However, it is unclear whether the CA1 region itself is capable of providing major contributions to the generation of HFOs, or if they are strictly driven through input projections. Parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons may play an essential role in these oscillations due to their extensive connections with neighboring pyramidal cells, and their characteristic fast-spiking. Thus, we created mathematical network models to investigate the conditions under which networks of CA1 fast-spiking PV+ interneurons are capable of producing high frequency population rhythms. We used whole-cell patch clamp recordings of fast-spiking, PV+ cells in the CA1 region of an intact hippocampal preparation in vitro to derive cellular properties, from which we constrained an Izhikevich-type model. Novel, biologically constrained network models were constructed with these individual cell models, and we investigated networks across a range of experimentally determined excitatory inputs and inhibitory synaptic strengths. For each network, we determined network frequency and coherence. Network simulations produce coherent firing at high frequencies (>90 Hz) for parameter ranges in which PV-PV inhibitory synaptic conductances are necessarily small and external excitatory inputs are relatively large. Interestingly, our networks produce sharp transitions between random and coherent firing, and this sharpness is lost when connectivity is increased beyond biological estimates. Our work suggests that CA1 networks may be designed with mechanisms for quickly gating in and out of high frequency coherent population rhythms, which may be essential in the generation of nested theta/high frequency rhythms. PMID:24155715

  4. Tracing part-per-billion line shifts with direct-frequency-comb Vernier spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siciliani de Cumis, M.; Eramo, R.; Coluccelli, N.; Cassinerio, M.; Galzerano, G.; Laporta, P.; De Natale, P.; Cancio Pastor, P.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate frequency measurements of molecular transitions around 2 μ m are performed by using a direct-frequency-comb spectroscopy approach that combines an Er+ frequency-comb oscillator at 1.5 μ m , a Tm-Ho fiber amplifier, and a Fabry-Perot-filter, high-resolution dispersive spectrometer optical multiplex-detection system. This apparatus has unique performances in terms of a wide dynamic range to integrate the intensity per comb mode, which allows one to measure molecular absorption profiles with high precision. Spectroscopic information about transition frequencies and linewidths is very accurately determined. Relative frequency uncertainties of the order of a few parts in 10-9 are achieved for rovibrational transitions of the CO2 molecule around 5100 cm-1. Moreover, tiny frequency shifts due to molecular collisions and interacting laser power using direct comb spectroscopy are investigated in a systematic way.

  5. Frequency Analysis of Chaotic Flow in Transition to Turbulence in Taylor-Couette System with Small Aspect Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Tatsuya; Oishi, Yoshihiko; Kawai, Hideki; Kikura, Hiroshige; Stepanus Situmorang, Riky; Ambarita, Himsar

    2017-01-01

    Taylor-Couette flow with small aspect ratio has characteristics such as the different vortex structure, because of a boundary layer of the upper and lower wall and the acceleration of the inner cylinder. In this study, the mechanism of Taylor-Couette system with the small aspect ratio is measured and analyzed by using an ultrasound measurement and a numerical simulation. The process of transition to turbulent flow is observed by using a spectra analysis in a radial and an axial direction. The experimental and numerical results confirmed the characteristics of the broadband component in Taylor-Couette system.

  6. Study on the mode-transition of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge between uniform and filamentary by controlling pressures and pulse repetition frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S.; Pei, X.; Hasnain, Q.; Nie, L.; Lu, X.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the temporally resolved evolution of the nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in a moderate 6 mm discharge gap under various pressures and pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) by intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) images, using dry air and its components oxygen and nitrogen. It is found that the pressures are very different when the mode transits between uniform and filamentary in air, oxygen, and nitrogen. The PRFs can also obviously affect the mode-transition. The transition mechanism in the pulsed DBD is not Townsend-to-Streamer, which is dominant in the traditional alternating-voltage DBD. The pulsed DBD in a uniform mode develops in the form of plane ionization wave due to overlap of primary avalanches, while the increase in pressure disturbs the overlap and discharge develops in streamer, corresponding to the filamentary mode. Increasing the initial electron density by pre-ionization may contribute to discharge uniformity at higher pressures. We also found that the dependence of homogeneity upon PRF is a non-monotonic one.

  7. Study on the mode-transition of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge between uniform and filamentary by controlling pressures and pulse repetition frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sizhe; Lu, Xinpei

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the temporally resolved evolution of the nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in a moderate 6mm gap under various pressures and pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) by intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) images, using synthetic air and its components oxygen and nitrogen. It is found that the pressures are very different when the DBD mode transits between uniform and filamentary in air, oxygen, and nitrogen. The PRFs can also obviously affect the mode-transition. The transition mechanism in the pulsed DBD is not Townsend-to-streamer, which is dominant in the traditional alternating-voltage DBDs. The pulsed DBD in a uniform mode develops in the form of plane ionization wave, due to overlap of primary avalanches, while the increase in pressure disturbs the overlap and DBD develops in streamer instead, corresponding to the filamentary mode. Increasing the initiatory electron density by pre-ionization methods may contribute to discharge uniformity at higher pressures. We also find that the dependence of uniformity upon PRF is non-monotonic.

  8. Accuracy of time-domain and frequency-domain methods used to characterize catchment transit time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godsey, S. E.; Kirchner, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    The mean residence time - the average time that it takes rainfall to reach the stream - is a basic parameter used to characterize catchment processes. Heterogeneities in these processes lead to a distribution of travel times around the mean residence time. By examining this travel time distribution, we can better predict catchment response to contamination events. A catchment system with shorter residence times or narrower distributions will respond quickly to contamination events, whereas systems with longer residence times or longer-tailed distributions will respond more slowly to those same contamination events. The travel time distribution of a catchment is typically inferred from time series of passive tracers (e.g., water isotopes or chloride) in precipitation and streamflow. Variations in the tracer concentration in streamflow are usually damped compared to those in precipitation, because precipitation inputs from different storms (with different tracer signatures) are mixed within the catchment. Mathematically, this mixing process is represented by the convolution of the travel time distribution and the precipitation tracer inputs to generate the stream tracer outputs. Because convolution in the time domain is equivalent to multiplication in the frequency domain, it is relatively straightforward to estimate the parameters of the travel time distribution in either domain. In the time domain, the parameters describing the travel time distribution are typically estimated by maximizing the goodness of fit between the modeled and measured tracer outputs. In the frequency domain, the travel time distribution parameters can be estimated by fitting a power-law curve to the ratio of precipitation spectral power to stream spectral power. Differences between the methods of parameter estimation in the time and frequency domain mean that these two methods may respond differently to variations in data quality, record length and sampling frequency. Here we evaluate how

  9. Temperature-modulated calorimetry of the frequency dependence of the glass transition of poly(ethylene terephthalate) and ....

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderlich, B.; Okazaki, I.

    1997-03-01

    Temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry, TMDSC, is new technique that permits to measure the apparent heat capacity vs modulation frequency. The method is briefly described and a quasi- isothermal measurement method is used to derive the kinetic parameters for PET and PS. A first-order kinetics expression was used to describe the approach to equilibrium and point out the limits caused by asymmetry and cooperativity of the kinetics. Use of a complex description of heat capacity and entropy is discussed. Activation energies vary from 75 to 350 kJ/mol, dependent on thermal pretreatment and the preexponential factor is correlated with the activation energy.

  10. Transitions of an atmospheric-pressure diffuse dielectric barrier discharge in helium for frequencies increasing from kHz to MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, J.-S.; Margot, J.; Massines, F.

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that tuning a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in the medium-frequency range (MF: from 0.3 to 3 MHz) allows a low-power and a high-power mode to be sustained. In the present article the effect of the driving frequency on a DBD is studied from the low-frequency range (LF: from 30 to 300 kHz) to the high-frequency range (HF: from 3 to 30 MHz). This is achieved using fast imaging together with electrical and spectroscopic diagnostics. At every frequency, a diffuse discharge is sustained. It is observed that at 25 kHz the discharge is an atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) while at 15 MHz the discharge behaves as a capacitive discharge in the RF-α mode. The usual LF APGD behavior is observed up to 100 kHz. Above 200 kHz, the positive column remains during the whole cycle so that the hybrid mode is sustained. At 5 MHz, the hybrid mode finally turns into the RF-α mode. In addition to the LF APGD, RF-α and hybrid modes obtained when the applied voltage is significantly higher than the ignition value, two other modes can be reached at low applied voltage. A Townsend-like mode is achieved from 50 to 100 kHz while in the medium-frequency range, the Ω mode is sustained. Moreover, only from 1.0 to 2.7 MHz there is a large hysteresis occurring when the discharge transits back and forth from the Ω to the hybrid mode. It is also found that when the frequency increases from 25 kHz to 15 MHz, the rms current increases over two orders of magnitudes while the rms voltage decreases by about 60%. The gas temperature estimated from N2 rotational spectra is always close to room temperature but the discharge is more energy efficient (in the HF range) as a lower fraction of energy turns into gas heating.

  11. Definition of Shifts of Optical Transitions Frequencies due to Pulse Perturbation Action by the Photon Echo Signal Form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisin, V. N.; Shegeda, A. M.; Samartsev, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    A relative phase shift between the different groups of excited dipoles, which appears as result of its frequency splitting due to action of a pulse of electric or magnetic fields, depends on a time, if the pulse overlaps in time with echo-pulse. As а consequence, the echo waveform is changed. The echo time form is modulated. The inverse modulation period well enough approximates Zeeman and pseudo-Stark splitting in the cases of magnetic and, therefore, electrical fields. Thus the g-factors of ground 4I15/2 and excited 4F9/2 optical states of Er3+ ion in LuLiF4 and YLiF4 have been measured and pseudo-Stark shift of R1 line in ruby has been determined.

  12. SPECTROSCOPIC CONSTANTS AND VIBRATIONAL FREQUENCIES FOR l-C{sub 3}H{sup +} AND ISOTOPOLOGUES FROM HIGHLY ACCURATE QUARTIC FORCE FIELDS: THE DETECTION OF l-C{sub 3}H{sup +} IN THE HORSEHEAD NEBULA PDR QUESTIONED

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Xinchuan; Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2013-05-10

    Very recently, molecular rotational transitions observed in the photon-dominated region of the Horsehead nebula have been attributed to l-C{sub 3}H{sup +}. In an effort to corroborate this finding, we employed state-of-the-art and proven high-accuracy quantum chemical techniques to compute spectroscopic constants for this cation and its isotopologues. Even though the B rotational constant from the fit of the observed spectrum and our computations agree to within 20 MHz, a typical level of accuracy, the D rotational constant differs by more than 40%, while the H rotational constant differs by three orders of magnitude. With the likely errors in the rotational transition energies resulting from this difference in D on the order of 1 MHz for the lowest observed transition (J = 4 {yields} 3) and growing as J increases, the assignment of the observed rotational lines from the Horsehead nebula to l-C{sub 3}H{sup +} is questionable.

  13. Spectroscopic Constants and Vibrational Frequencies for l-C3H+ and Isotopologues from Highly-Accurate Quartic Force Fields: The Detection of l-C3H+ in the Horsehead Nebula PDR Questioned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xinchuan; Fortenberry, Ryan Clifton; Lee, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Very recently, molecular rotational transitions observed in the photon-dominated region of the Horsehead nebula have been attributed to l-C3H+. In an effort to corroborate this finding, we employed state-of-the art and proven high-accuracy quantum chemical techniques to compute spectroscopic constants for this cation and its isotopologues. Even though the B rotational constant from the fit of the observed spectrum and our computations agree to within 20 MHz, a typical level of accuracy, the D rotational constant differs by more than 40%, while the H rotational constant differs by three orders of magnitude. With the likely errors in the rotational transition energies resulting from this difference in D on the order of 1 MHz for the lowest observed transition (J = 4 yields 3) and growing as J increases, the assignment of the observed rotational lines from the Horsehead nebula to l-C3H+ is questionable.

  14. Line-shape study of self-broadened O{sub 2} transitions measured by Pound-Drever-Hall-locked frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtewicz, S.; Lisak, D.; Cygan, A.; Domyslawska, J.; Trawinski, R. S.; Ciurylo, R.

    2011-09-15

    We present high-sensitivity and high-spectral-resolution line-shape and line-intensity measurements of self-broadened O{sub 2} b {sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}(v=1)(leftarrow)X {sup 3}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup -}(v=0) band transitions measured using the Pound-Drever-Hall-locked frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy technique. We give collisional broadening parameters and take into account the line-narrowing effects described by Dicke narrowing or the speed dependence of collisional broadening. We compare line intensities measured with relative uncertainties below 0.4% to data available in the HITRAN spectroscopic database.

  15. Spectral Index and Quasi-Periodic Oscillation Frequency Correlation in Black Hole Sources: Observational Evidence of Two Phases and Phase Transition in Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Fiorito, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that strong correlations are observed between the low frequencies (1-10 Hz) of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several black hole (BH) candidate sources, in low (hard) states, steep power law (soft) states, and transitions between these states. The observations indicate that the X-ray spectra of such state (phases) show the presence of a power-law component and are sometimes related to simultaneous radio emission, indicating the probable presence of a jet. Strong QPOs (>20% rms) are present in the power density spectrum in the spectral range where the power-law component is dominant (i.e., 60%90%). This evidence contradicts the dominant, long-standing interpretation of QPOs as a signature of the thermal accretion disk. We present the data from the literature and our own data to illustrate the dominance of power-law index-QPO frequency correlations. We provide a model that identifies and explains the origin of the QPOs and how they are imprinted on the properties of the power-law flux component. We argue for the existence of a bounded compact coronal region that is a natural consequence of the adjustment of the Keplerian disk flow to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object and that ultimately leads to the formation of a transition layer (TL) between the adjustment radius and the innermost boundary. The model predicts two phases or states dictated by the photon upscattering produced in the TL: (1) a hard state, in which the TL is optically thin and very hot (kT approximately greater than 50 keV), producing photon upscattering via thermal Comptonization (the photon spectrum index Gamma approximates 1.7 for this state is dictated by gravitational energy release and Compton cooling in an optically thin shock near the adjustment radius), and (2) a soft state that is optically thick and relatively cold (kT approximately less than 5 keV the index for this state, Gamma

  16. On the E-H transition in inductively coupled radio frequency oxygen plasmas: II. Electronegativity and the impact on particle kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, Th; Küllig, C.; Meichsner, J.

    2017-02-01

    In this series of two papers we present results about the E-H transition of an inductively coupled oxygen discharge driven at radio frequency (13.56 MHz) for different total gas pressures. The mode transition from the low density E-mode to the high density H-mode is studied using comprehensive plasma diagnostics. The measured electron density can be used to distinguish between the different operation modes. This paper focuses on the determination of the negative atomic ion density and the electronegativity by two experimental methods and global rate equation calculation. As a result, the electronegativity significantly decreases over two orders of magnitude from about 25 in the E-mode to about 0.1 in the H-mode. The temporal behavior of the electronegativity in pulsed ICP shows that the negative atomic ion density reaches a steady state after 10 ms. Negative atomic ions are mainly produced by the dissociative attachment with the molecular ground state. The ion-ion recombination with the positive molecular ions and the collisional detachment with the singlet molecular metastables contribute significantly to the loss of the negative atomic ions.

  17. Monitoring of slip at the transition zone on the plate interface estimated from non-volcanic deep low-frequency tremors in southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, R.; Hiramatsu, Y.; Obara, K.; Matsuzawa, T.

    2011-12-01

    In southwestern Japan, non-volcanic deep low-frequency (DLF) tremors (e.g., Obara, 2002) and short-term slow slip events (S-SSEs; e.g., Obara et al., 2004) occur in temporal and spatial coincidence with the active stages of DLF tremors (Obara et al., 2004). Based on this feature, Hiramatsu et al. (2008) proposed a method to monitor slip at the transition zone between the locked and aseismic slip zones on the plate interface using DLF tremors. In this study, we applied the method as the same way of previous studies (Hiramatsu et al., 2008; Hirose et al., 2010) and estimated the long-term average slip rate at the transition zone from DLF tremors in southwestern Japan. We also estimated the slip distributions of S-SSEs from DLF tremors using the modified envelope correlation method (ECM) tremor catalog (Maeda and Obara, 2009) and the hourly centroid tremor catalog (Obara et al., 2010) along with the ECM tremor catalog (Obara, 2002) in southwestern Japan. The modified ECM applied both the differential travel time and the spatial distribution of mean square amplitudes to estimate a tremor's spatial location and radiation energy. The hourly centroid tremor catalog is constructed using a clustering process to estimate centroid locations, revealing clear depth-dependent behavior of the tremor activity. The cumulative seismic moment from 2001 to 2009 increases at a constant rate, indicating a constant moment release rate in the long-term average. We estimated slip rate at the transition zone using the formula ˙ {M0} = μ S_˙ {U}, where ˙ {M0} is the moment release rate, μ the rigidity, S the fault area that is related to the slip of S-SSEs in each region, and ˙ {U} the slip rate. We obtained the slip rates of 4.1 ± 0.5 cm/yr, 3.7 ± 0.6 cm/yr, and 2.6 ± 0.2 cm/yr in the western Shikoku, northern Kii peninsula, and Tokai regions, respectively, at the transition zone through the analyzed period. The slip deficit rate at the transition zone in each region is 2.6cm/yr, 2

  18. Illuminating the Transition Between Steady Sliding and Episodic Tremor and Slow Slip Using Low Frequency Earthquakes at the Downdip Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creager, K. C.; Sweet, J.; Vidale, J. E.; Houston, H.

    2012-12-01

    Using data from the Array of Arrays and CAFE experiments, we have identified eight Low-Frequency Earthquake (LFE) families on the subduction plate interface, under the Olympic Peninsula, Washington State. We analyze the time history of each during the time interval 2007-2012. The updip-most family (LFE1) only lights up during the well-known northern Cascadia Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) events that recur every 15 months. The recurrence intervals shorten from updip LFE1 to the downdip-most family (LFE4), which repeats every 14 days; 30 times more frequently. This presentation focuses on the downdip family. See the Sweet presentation, this session, for an analysis of the updip-most LFE family. LFEs from family 4 typically have durations of about one hour, with as many as 100 repeats during that time. Unlike their updip counterparts, they occur as discrete events without other LFEs or tremor visible during that time. They are strongly modulated by tidal shear stress. Twice as many LFEs occur during encouraging shear stress as during discouraging times. In contrast, these same LFEs occur when tidal normal stress is compressive which should inhibit slip. To reconcile LFE occurrence with favorable tidal Coulomb stress requires that the friction coefficient be less than 0.2 .This extreme sensitivity to very small shear stresses also suggests near lithostatic pore fluid pressures. We propose that the bursts of LFEs in this family correspond to discrete slow-slip events that occur with remarkable regularity. To add up to plate rates, each burst would correspond to a little more than 1 mm of slip, and each individual LFE to a little less than 0.1 mm, assuming all the slip occurs in the form of LFE activity and each LFE ruptures the same spot. One of these event sequences was captured by our 1-km aperture 80-element Big Skidder Array in 2008. Careful stacked correlation functions from 32 LFEs relative to a reference event showed S-P times varied only up to 0.02s, which

  19. Test of variational transition state theory and multidimensional semiclassical transmission coefficient methods against accurate quantal rate constants for H + H/sub 2//HD, D + H/sub 2/, and O + H/sub 2//D/sub 2//HD, including intra- and intermolecular kinetic isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, B.C.; Truhlar, D.G.; Schatz, G.C.

    1986-05-28

    Rate constants and kinetic isotope effects for the title reactions have been calculated by using accurate quantum dynamical methods and used to test the accuracy of corresponding rate constants from conventional and variational transition state theory. The quantum dynamical rate constants are estimated to be within 35% of the exact rate constants for the potential surfaces chosen for this comparison. For all the reactions considered, the conventional and variational transition state theory rate constants with unit transmission coefficient are found to be very close to each other (better than 7%) but in poor agreement with the accurate quantum results (off by factors of 6-22 at 300 K). This indicates that although variational effects are small, tunnelling makes a very important contribution to the rate constants, and it is found that this tunnelling contribution is described quantitatively for all the reactions considered with use of the least action ground state (LAG) transmission coefficient. The combination of improved canonical variational theory (ICVT) and LAG yields rate constants which have an average error (considering all the reactions and temperatures studied) of 15% compared to the accurate quantum rate constants, and in only one case (D + H/sub 2/ at 200 K) does the ICVT/LAG rate constant differ by more than 35% from the accurate value. The comparison of ICVT/LAG kinetic isotope effects is found to be similarly good, with the worst comparisons occurring for intramolecular (X + HD) isotope ratios.

  20. Test of variational transition-state theory and multidimensional semiclassical transmission coefficient methods against accurate quantal rate constants for H + H/sub 2//HD, D + H/sub 2/, and O + H/sub 2//D/sub 2//HD, including intra- and intermolecular kinetic isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, B.C.; Truhlar, D.G.; Schatz, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    Rate constants and kinetic isotope effects for the title reactions were calculated using accurate quantum-dynamical methods, and used to test the accuracy of corresponding rate constants from conventional and variational transition-state theory. The quantum-dynamical rate constants are estimated to be within 35% of the exact rate constants for the potential energy surfaces chosen for this comparison. For all the reactions considered, the conventional and variational transition-state theory rate constants with unit transmission coefficient are found to be very close to each other (better than 7%), but in poor agreement with the accurate quantum results (off by factors of 6-22 at 300K). This indicates that although variational effects are small, tunneling makes a very important contribution to the rate constants, and it is found that the tunneling contribution is described quantitatively for all the reactions considered using the least-action ground state (LAG) transmission coefficient. The combination of improved canonical variational theory (ICVT) and LAG yields rate constants that have an average error (considering all the reactions and temperatures studied) of only 15% compared to the accurate quantal rate constants, and in only one case (D + H/sub 2/ at 200K) does the ICVT/LAG rate constant differ by more than 35% from the accurate value. The comparison of ICVT/LAG kinetic isotope effects is found to be similarly good, with worst comparisons occurring for intramolecular (X+HD) isotope ratios.

  1. Frequency Measurements of Al+ and Hg+ Optical Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itano, W. M.; Bergquist, J. C.; Rosenband, T.; Wineland, D. J.; Hume, D.; Chou, C.-W.; Jefferts, S. R.; Heavner, T. P.; Parker, T. E.; Diddams, S. A.; Fortier, T. M.

    2010-02-01

    Frequency standards based on narrow optical transitions in 27Al+ and 199Hg+ ions have been developed at NIST. Both standards have absolute reproducibilities of a few parts in 1017. This is about an order of magnitude better than the fractional uncertainty of the SI second, which is based on the 133Cs hyperfine frequency. Use of femtosecond laser frequency combs makes it possible to compare the optical frequency standards to microwave frequency standards or to each other. The ratio of the Al+ and Hg+ frequencies can be measured more accurately than the reproducibility of the primary cesium frequency standards. Frequency measurements made over time can be used to set limits on the time variation of fundamental constants, such as the fine structure constant α or the quark masses.

  2. Frequency Standards and Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Lute

    2009-04-01

    imaging an event horizon (Invited) / S. Doeleman. Optically-pumped space cesium clock for Galileo: results of the breadboard / R. Ruffieux ... [et al.] -- pt. IV. Optical clocks I: lattice clocks. Optical lattice clock: seven years of progress and next steps (Invited) / H. Katori, M. Takamoto and T. Akatsuka. The Yb optical lattice clock (Invited) / N. D. Demke ... [et al.]. Optical Lattice clock with Sr atoms (Invited) / P. G. Westergaard ... [et al.]. Development of an optical clock based on neutral strontium atoms held in a lattice trap / E. A. Curtis ... [et al.]. Decoherence and losses by collisions in a [symbol]Sr lattice clock / J. S. R. Vellore Winfred ... [et al.]. Lattice Yb optical clock and cryogenic Cs fountain at INRIM / F. Levi ... [et al.] -- pt. V. Optical clocks II: ion clocks. [Symbol]Yb+ single-ion optical frequency standards (Invited) / Chr. Tamm ... [et al.]. An optical clock based on a single trapped [symbol]Sr+ ion (Invited) / H. S. Margolis ... [et al.]. A trapped [symbol]Yb+ ion optical frequency standard based on the [symbol] transition (Invited) / P. Gill ... [et al.]. Overview of highly accurate RF and optical frequency standards at the National Research Council of Canada (Invited) / A. A. Madej ... [et al.] -- pt. VI. Optical frequency combs. Extreme ultraviolet frequency combs for spectroscopy (Invited) / A. Ozawa ... [et al.]. Development of an optical clockwork for the single trapped strontium ion standard at 445 THz / J. E. Bernard ... [et al.]. A phase-coherent link between the visible and infrared spectral ranges using a combination of CW OPO and femtosecond laser frequency comb / E. V. Kovalchuk and A. Peters. Improvements to the robustness of a TI: sapphire-based femtosecond comb at NPL / V. Tsatourian ... [et al.] -- pt. VII. Atomic microwave standards. NIST FI and F2 (Invited) / T. P. Heavner ... [et al.]. Atomic fountains for the USNO master clock (Invited) / C. Ekstrom ... [et al.]. The transportable cesium fountain clock NIM5

  3. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  4. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  5. Fast stabilization of a CO{sub 2} laser for a frequency standard at 10 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Pisani, M.Q.; Sassi, M.P.; Zucco, M.

    1994-12-31

    A CO{sub 2} laser has been frequency stabilized to an OsO{sub 4} transition with a control bandwidth of 10 kHz. The obtained spectral purity of the laser is 100 Hz. The realization of very accurate frequency standards and experiments of high resolution spectroscopy in the 10 {mu}m region are made possible by this source.

  6. Migration Episode of Shallow Low-frequency Tremor at the Nankai Trough Subduction Zone: Seismological Evidence for Episodic Slow Slip Event Occurring at the Shallow Transition Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Y.; Yakiwara, H.; Shimizu, H.; Uchida, K.; Hirano, S.; Miyamachi, H.; Umakoshi, K.; Nakamoto, M.; Fukui, M.; Kamizono, M.; Kanehara, H.; Yamada, T.; Shinohara, M.; Obara, K.

    2014-12-01

    To understand the shallow part of plate interface between megathrust seismogenic zone and trench axis is very important for development of huge earthquake rupture and generation of tsunami. Monitoring of offshore seismicity near the Nankai trough by temporal ocean bottom seismographic observation in 2013 revealed that low-frequency tremor occurred associated with shallow very-low-frequency earthquakes (VLFEs) in the shallow part of plate interface. The shallow tremor episode lasted for approximately 1 month, which is almost consistent with the shallow VLFE activity observed from land broad-band seismic stations [Asano, 2014]. The horizontal location of shallow tremor estimate by envelope correlation method [Obara, 2002] shows a belt-like distribution along trench strike with narrow width than the deep tremor. The most remarkable feature of the shallow tremor activity is migration. There are two migration modes including diffusive slower migration and rapid tremor reversal (RTR), which are very similar to the deep tremor as a part of the ETS. This strongly indicates a possibility of the occurrence of episodic slow slip event in the shallow transition zone. That is to say, the migration of shallow tremor is supposed to be caused by migrating rupture front of SSE. In addition, the migration was detouring around the subducted Kyushu-Palau ridge. This suggests that the occurrence of tremor is sensitive to change in the shape of plate interface and seeks to propagate along almost the same depth range, in other word, a specified temperature and pressure condition. The narrow width distribution of shallow tremor also indicates that the shallow tremor is strongly related to dehydration process of a specified mineral under a narrow limited range of temperature and pressure condition compared to the deep tremor.

  7. Improved Log(gf) Values for Lines of Ti I and Abundance Determinations in the Photospheres of the Sun and Metal-Poor Star HD 84937 (Accurate Transition Probabilities for Ti I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, J. E.; Guzman, A.; Wood, M. P.; Sneden, C.; Cowan, J. J.

    2013-04-01

    New atomic transition probability measurements for 948 lines of Ti I are reported. Branching fractions from Fourier transform spectra and from spectra recorded using a 3 m echelle spectrometer are combined with published radiative lifetimes from laser-induced fluorescence measurements to determine these transition probabilities. Generally good agreement is found in comparisons to the NIST Atomic Spectra Database. The new Ti I data are applied to re-determine the Ti abundance in the photospheres of the Sun and metal-poor star HD 84937 using many lines covering a range of wavelength and excitation potential to explore possible non-local thermal equilibrium effects. The variation of relative Ti/Fe abundance with metallicity in metal-poor stars observed in earlier studies is supported in this study.

  8. IMPROVED log(gf) VALUES FOR LINES OF Ti I AND ABUNDANCE DETERMINATIONS IN THE PHOTOSPHERES OF THE SUN AND METAL-POOR STAR HD 84937 (ACCURATE TRANSITION PROBABILITIES FOR Ti I)

    SciTech Connect

    Lawler, J. E.; Guzman, A.; Wood, M. P.; Sneden, C.; Cowan, J. J. E-mail: adrianaguzman2014@u.northwestern.edu E-mail: chris@verdi.as.utexas.edu

    2013-04-01

    New atomic transition probability measurements for 948 lines of Ti I are reported. Branching fractions from Fourier transform spectra and from spectra recorded using a 3 m echelle spectrometer are combined with published radiative lifetimes from laser-induced fluorescence measurements to determine these transition probabilities. Generally good agreement is found in comparisons to the NIST Atomic Spectra Database. The new Ti I data are applied to re-determine the Ti abundance in the photospheres of the Sun and metal-poor star HD 84937 using many lines covering a range of wavelength and excitation potential to explore possible non-local thermal equilibrium effects. The variation of relative Ti/Fe abundance with metallicity in metal-poor stars observed in earlier studies is supported in this study.

  9. Using Scaling for accurate stochastic macroweather forecasts (including the "pause")

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovejoy, Shaun; del Rio Amador, Lenin

    2015-04-01

    At scales corresponding to the lifetimes of structures of planetary extent (about 5 - 10 days), atmospheric processes undergo a drastic "dimensional transition" from high frequency weather to lower frequency macroweather processes. While conventional GCM's generally well reproduce both the transition and the corresponding (scaling) statistics, due to their sensitive dependence on initial conditions, the role of the weather scale processes is to provide random perturbations to the macroweather processes. The main problem with GCM's is thus that their long term (control run, unforced) statistics converge to the GCM climate and this is somewhat different from the real climate. This is the motivation for using a stochastic model and exploiting the empirical scaling properties and past data to make a stochastic model. It turns out that macroweather intermittency is typically low (the multifractal corrections are small) so that they can be approximated by fractional Gaussian Noise (fGN) processes whose memory can be enormous. For example for annual forecasts, and using the observed global temperature exponent, even 50 years of global temperature data would only allow us to exploit 90% of the available memory (for ocean regions, the figure increases to 600 years). The only complication is that anthropogenic effects dominate the global statistics at time scales beyond about 20 years. However, these are easy to remove using the CO2 forcing as a linear surrogate for all the anthropogenic effects. Using this theoretical framework, we show how to make accurate stochastic macroweather forecasts. We illustrate this on monthly and annual scale series of global and northern hemisphere surface temperatures (including nearly perfect hindcasts of the "pause" in the warming since 1998). We obtain forecast skill nearly as high as the theoretical (scaling) predictability limits allow. These scaling hindcasts - using a single effective climate sensitivity and single scaling exponent are

  10. Magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Xiaoji; Xu Xia; Chen Xuzong; Chen Jingbiao

    2010-01-15

    Magic wavelengths for laser trapping of boson isotopes of alkaline-earth metal atoms Sr, Ca, and Mg are investigated while considering terahertz clock transitions between the {sup 3}P{sub 0}, {sup 3}P{sub 1}, and {sup 3}P{sub 2} metastable triplet states. Our calculation shows that magic wavelengths for laser trapping do exist. This result is important because those metastable states have already been used to make accurate clocks in the terahertz frequency domain. Detailed discussions for magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions are given in this article.

  11. Magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoji; Xu, Xia; Chen, Xuzong; Chen, Jingbiao

    2010-01-01

    Magic wavelengths for laser trapping of boson isotopes of alkaline-earth metal atoms Sr, Ca, and Mg are investigated while considering terahertz clock transitions between the 3P0, 3P1, and 3P2 metastable triplet states. Our calculation shows that magic wavelengths for laser trapping do exist. This result is important because those metastable states have already been used to make accurate clocks in the terahertz frequency domain. Detailed discussions for magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions are given in this article.

  12. An ultra-stable optical frequency standard for telecommunication purposes based upon the 5S1/2 → 5D5/2 two-photon transition in rubidium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra, Osama; Hussein, Hatem

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we report the development of a frequency standard for optical fiber communication applications based on a two-photon transition in rubidium at 385.2 THz. This standard kills two birds with one stone in the sense it is capable of providing us with two highly stable serviceable wavelengths at 778.1 and 1556.2 nm. In this system, we exploit the narrow line-width of a fiber laser emitting at 1556.2 nm in conjunction with an erbium-doped fiber amplifier to generate a sufficient second harmonic laser beam at 778.1 nm in a periodically polled lithium niobate waveguide mixer in order to probe and frequency-lock the laser to the 5S1/2 ( F g = 3)-5D5/2 ( F e = 5) hyperfine two-photon transition component in 85Rb. The metrological performance of the standard is evaluated with the aid of an optical frequency comb synthesizer. Allan variance measurement shows a stability of 4 × 10-12 at 1 s (limited by the comb stability), reaching a floor of 6.8 × 10-13 at 1000 s. After correction of all the major systematic frequency shifts including the light shift, the absolute frequency is found to be 385 285 142 374.0 (5.0) kHz. Moreover, the absolute frequencies of most of the hyperfine components of the 5S1/2-5D5/2 transition of the two naturally existing rubidium isotopes are measured using a femtosecond frequency comb synthesizer after stabilizing a laser on each component.

  13. Note: A frequency modulated wireless interrogation system exploiting narrowband acoustic resonator for remote physical quantity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droit, C.; Martin, G.; Ballandras, S.; Friedt, J.-M.

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate the wireless conversion of frequency modulation to amplitude modulation by radio frequency resonators as means of accurately determining the resonance frequency of passive acoustoelectronic sensors. The emitted frequency modulated radio frequency pulses are generated by a pulsed radar for probing a surface acoustic wave based sensor. The sharp sign transition of the amplitude modulated received signal provides a signal on which a feedback loop is locked to monitor the resonance signal. The strategy is demonstrated using a full software implementation on a generic hardware, resulting in 2 Hz resolution at 1 s integration time limited by the proportional feedback loop.

  14. Note: A frequency modulated wireless interrogation system exploiting narrowband acoustic resonator for remote physical quantity measurement.

    PubMed

    Droit, C; Martin, G; Ballandras, S; Friedt, J-M

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate the wireless conversion of frequency modulation to amplitude modulation by radio frequency resonators as means of accurately determining the resonance frequency of passive acoustoelectronic sensors. The emitted frequency modulated radio frequency pulses are generated by a pulsed radar for probing a surface acoustic wave based sensor. The sharp sign transition of the amplitude modulated received signal provides a signal on which a feedback loop is locked to monitor the resonance signal. The strategy is demonstrated using a full software implementation on a generic hardware, resulting in 2 Hz resolution at 1 s integration time limited by the proportional feedback loop.

  15. BIOACCESSIBILITY TESTS ACCURATELY ESTIMATE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hazards of soil-borne Pb to wild birds may be more accurately quantified if the bioavailability of that Pb is known. To better understand the bioavailability of Pb to birds, we measured blood Pb concentrations in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) fed diets containing Pb-contaminated soils. Relative bioavailabilities were expressed by comparison with blood Pb concentrations in quail fed a Pb acetate reference diet. Diets containing soil from five Pb-contaminated Superfund sites had relative bioavailabilities from 33%-63%, with a mean of about 50%. Treatment of two of the soils with P significantly reduced the bioavailability of Pb. The bioaccessibility of the Pb in the test soils was then measured in six in vitro tests and regressed on bioavailability. They were: the “Relative Bioavailability Leaching Procedure” (RBALP) at pH 1.5, the same test conducted at pH 2.5, the “Ohio State University In vitro Gastrointestinal” method (OSU IVG), the “Urban Soil Bioaccessible Lead Test”, the modified “Physiologically Based Extraction Test” and the “Waterfowl Physiologically Based Extraction Test.” All regressions had positive slopes. Based on criteria of slope and coefficient of determination, the RBALP pH 2.5 and OSU IVG tests performed very well. Speciation by X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that, on average, most of the Pb in the sampled soils was sorbed to minerals (30%), bound to organic matter 24%, or present as Pb sulfate 18%. Ad

  16. Accurate spectral color measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, Jouni; Jaeaeskelaeinen, Timo; Parkkinen, Jussi P. S.

    1999-08-01

    Surface color measurement is of importance in a very wide range of industrial applications including paint, paper, printing, photography, textiles, plastics and so on. For a demanding color measurements spectral approach is often needed. One can measure a color spectrum with a spectrophotometer using calibrated standard samples as a reference. Because it is impossible to define absolute color values of a sample, we always work with approximations. The human eye can perceive color difference as small as 0.5 CIELAB units and thus distinguish millions of colors. This 0.5 unit difference should be a goal for the precise color measurements. This limit is not a problem if we only want to measure the color difference of two samples, but if we want to know in a same time exact color coordinate values accuracy problems arise. The values of two instruments can be astonishingly different. The accuracy of the instrument used in color measurement may depend on various errors such as photometric non-linearity, wavelength error, integrating sphere dark level error, integrating sphere error in both specular included and specular excluded modes. Thus the correction formulas should be used to get more accurate results. Another question is how many channels i.e. wavelengths we are using to measure a spectrum. It is obvious that the sampling interval should be short to get more precise results. Furthermore, the result we get is always compromise of measuring time, conditions and cost. Sometimes we have to use portable syste or the shape and the size of samples makes it impossible to use sensitive equipment. In this study a small set of calibrated color tiles measured with the Perkin Elmer Lamda 18 and the Minolta CM-2002 spectrophotometers are compared. In the paper we explain the typical error sources of spectral color measurements, and show which are the accuracy demands a good colorimeter should have.

  17. High-precision frequency measurement of the 423-nm Ca i line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salumbides, E. J.; Maslinskas, V.; Dildar, I. M.; Wolf, A. L.; van Duijn, E.-J.; Eikema, K. S. E.; Ubachs, W.

    2011-01-01

    We have performed an accurate frequency calibration of the 4s21S0→4s4p1P1 principal resonance line of the neutral calcium atom at 423 nm. Doppler-free cw excitation on a Ca atomic beam was performed by utilizing a Sagnac geometry in the alignment of the excitation beams. From frequency calibrations against a frequency comb, stabilized to a global positioning system (GPS) disciplined Rb standard, the transition frequency is determined at 709 078 373.01(35) MHz for the main Ca40 isotope. Slightly lower accuracies are obtained for the transition frequencies of the less abundant isotopes. The achieved fractional uncertainty of 5×10-10 exceeds the requirements for including this transition in investigations that aim to probe a possible variation in the fine-structure constant α on cosmological time scales.

  18. High-precision frequency measurement of the 423-nm Ca i line

    SciTech Connect

    Salumbides, E. J.; Maslinskas, V.; Dildar, I. M.; Wolf, A. L.; Duijn, E.-J. van; Eikema, K. S. E.; Ubachs, W.

    2011-01-15

    We have performed an accurate frequency calibration of the 4s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0{yields}}4s4p {sup 1}P{sub 1} principal resonance line of the neutral calcium atom at 423 nm. Doppler-free cw excitation on a Ca atomic beam was performed by utilizing a Sagnac geometry in the alignment of the excitation beams. From frequency calibrations against a frequency comb, stabilized to a global positioning system (GPS) disciplined Rb standard, the transition frequency is determined at 709 078 373.01(35) MHz for the main {sup 40}Ca isotope. Slightly lower accuracies are obtained for the transition frequencies of the less abundant isotopes. The achieved fractional uncertainty of 5x10{sup -10} exceeds the requirements for including this transition in investigations that aim to probe a possible variation in the fine-structure constant {alpha} on cosmological time scales.

  19. Applications of Kinetic Inductance: Parametric Amplifier & Phase Shifter, 2DEG Coupled Co-planar Structures & Microstrip to Slotline Transition at RF Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdi, Harshad

    Kinetic inductance springs from the inertia of charged mobile carriers in alternating electric fields and it is fundamentally different from the magnetic inductance which is only a geometry dependent property. The magnetic inductance is proportional to the volume occupied by the electric and magnetic fields and is often limited by the number of turns of the coil. Kinetic inductance on the other hand is inversely proportional to the density of electrons or holes that exert inertia, the unit mass of the charge carriers and the momentum relaxation time of these charge carriers, all of which can be varied merely by modifying the material properties. Highly sensitive and broadband signal amplifiers often broaden the field of study in astrophysics. Quantum-noise limited travelling wave kinetic inductance parametric amplifiers offer a noise figure of around 0.5 K +/- 0.3 K as compared to 20 K in HEMT signal amplifiers and can be designed to operate to cover the entire W-band (75 GHz -- 115 GHz). The research cumulating to this thesis involves applying and exploiting kinetic inductance properties in designing a W-band orthogonal mode transducer, quadratic gain phase shifter with a gain of ~49 dB over a meter of microstrip transmission line. The phase shifter will help in measuring the maximum amount of phase shift Deltaφmax(I) that can be obtained from half a meter transmission line which helps in predicting the gain of a travelling wave parametric amplifier. In another project, a microstrip to slot line transition is designed and optimized to operate at 150 GHz and 220 GHz frequencies, that is used as a part of horn antenna coupled microwave kinetic inductance detector proposed to operate from 138 GHz to 250 GHz. In the final project, kinetic inductance in a 2D electron gas (2DEG) is explored by design, simulation, fabrication and experimentation. A transmission line model of a 2DEG proposed by Burke (1999), is simulated and verified experimentally by fabricating a

  20. Hydrogen masers with cavity frequency switching servos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Harry E.; Owings, H. B.; Koppang, Paul A.

    1990-01-01

    The stability of the free-running hydrogen maser is limited by pulling of the unperturbed hydrogen transition frequency due to instability of the cavity resonance frequency. While automatic spin-exchange tuning is in principle the more basic and accurate method, the required beam intensity switching and the long servo time constant result in reduced stability for measuring intervals up to 10(exp 6) seconds. More importantly, the spin-exchange tuning method requires a second stable frequency source as a reference, ideally a second hydrogen maser, to get the best results. The cavity frequency switching servo, on the other hand, has very little effect on the maser short term stability, and is fast enough to correct for cavity drift while maintaining the cavity at the spin-exchange tuned offset required to minimize instability due to beam intensity fluctuations. Not only does the cavity frequency switching servo not require a second stable frequency source, but the frequency reference is the atomic hydrogen radiated beam signal, so that no extra RF connections need be made to the cavity, and externally generated signals that would perturb the hydrogen atom need not be transmitted through the cavity. The operation of the cavity frequency switching stabilization method is discussed and the transient response of the servo and certain other aspects of the technique that have potential for achieving improved basic accuracy are illustrated.

  1. Digital system accurately controls velocity of electromechanical drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, G. B.

    1965-01-01

    Digital circuit accurately regulates electromechanical drive mechanism velocity. The gain and phase characteristics of digital circuits are relatively unimportant. Control accuracy depends only on the stability of the input signal frequency.

  2. Measurement of the {}^{{20,22}}Ne {}^{3}{{\\rm{P}}}_{2}{{\\rm{{--}}}}^{3}{{\\rm{D}}}_{3} transition isotope shift using a single, phase-modulated laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohayon, B.; Gumpel, G.; Ron, G.

    2017-03-01

    We develop a simple technique to accurately measure frequency differences between far-lying resonances in a spectroscopy signal using a single, unlocked laser. This technique was used to measure the isotope shift (IS) of the cooling transition of metastable neon. Our result of 1626.287(53) MHz is the most accurate determination of this value to date.

  3. Limits on gravitational Einstein equivalence principle violation from monitoring atomic clock frequencies during a year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    The Sun's gravitational potential at Earth varies during a year due to varying Earth-Sun distance. Comparing the results of very accurate measurements of atomic clock transitions performed at different times in the year allows us to study the dependence of the atomic frequencies on the gravitational potential. We examine the measurement data for the ratio of the frequencies in Hg+ and Al+ clock transitions and absolute frequency measurements (with respect to the caesium frequency standard) for Dy, Sr, H, hyperfine transitions in Rb and H and obtain significantly improved limits on the values of the gravity-related parameter of the Einstein equivalence principle violating term in the electron sector of the Standard Model extension Hamiltonian c00=(-3.0 ±5.7 )×10-7 and the parameter for the gravity-related variation of the fine structure constant κα=(-5.3 ±10 )×10-8.

  4. High density terahertz frequency comb produced by coherent synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Tammaro, S; Pirali, O; Roy, P; Lampin, J-F; Ducournau, G; Cuisset, A; Hindle, F; Mouret, G

    2015-07-20

    Frequency combs have enabled significant progress in frequency metrology and high-resolution spectroscopy extending the achievable resolution while increasing the signal-to-noise ratio. In its coherent mode, synchrotron radiation is accepted to provide an intense terahertz continuum covering a wide spectral range from about 0.1 to 1 THz. Using a dedicated heterodyne receiver, we reveal the purely discrete nature of this emission. A phase relationship between the light pulses leads to a powerful frequency comb spanning over one decade in frequency. The comb has a mode spacing of 846 kHz, a linewidth of about 200 Hz, a fractional precision of about 2 × 10(-10) and no frequency offset. The unprecedented potential of the comb for high-resolution spectroscopy is demonstrated by the accurate determination of pure rotation transitions of acetonitrile.

  5. High density terahertz frequency comb produced by coherent synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Tammaro, S.; Pirali, O.; Roy, P.; Lampin, J.-F.; Ducournau, G.; Cuisset, A.; Hindle, F.; Mouret, G.

    2015-01-01

    Frequency combs have enabled significant progress in frequency metrology and high-resolution spectroscopy extending the achievable resolution while increasing the signal-to-noise ratio. In its coherent mode, synchrotron radiation is accepted to provide an intense terahertz continuum covering a wide spectral range from about 0.1 to 1 THz. Using a dedicated heterodyne receiver, we reveal the purely discrete nature of this emission. A phase relationship between the light pulses leads to a powerful frequency comb spanning over one decade in frequency. The comb has a mode spacing of 846 kHz, a linewidth of about 200 Hz, a fractional precision of about 2 × 10−10 and no frequency offset. The unprecedented potential of the comb for high-resolution spectroscopy is demonstrated by the accurate determination of pure rotation transitions of acetonitrile. PMID:26190043

  6. Autonomous Rubidium Clock Weak Frequency Jump Detector for Onboard Navigation Satellite System.

    PubMed

    Khare, Akshay; Arora, Rajat; Banik, Alak; Mehta, Sanjay D

    2016-02-01

    Frequency jumps are common in rubidium frequency sources. They affect the estimation of user position in navigational satellite systems. These jumps must be detected and corrected immediately as they have direct impact on the navigation system integrity. A novel weak frequency jump detector is proposed based on a Kalman filter with a multi-interval approach. This detector can be applied for both "sudden" and "slow" frequency transitions. In this detection method, noises of clock data are reduced by Kalman filtering, for accurate estimation of jump size with less latency. Analysis on in-orbit rubidium atomic frequency standard (RAFS) phase telemetry data shows that the detector can be used for fast detection and correction of weak frequency jumps. Furthermore, performance comparison of different existing frequency jump detection techniques with the proposed detector is discussed. A multialgorithm-based strategy is proposed depending on the jump size and latency for onboard navigation satellites having RAFS as the primary frequency source.

  7. Frequency stabilization of diode laser on the wavelength of 5P3/2→5D5/2 of rubidium transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalatskiy, A. Yu.; Afanasiev, A. E.; Melentiev, P. N.; Balykin, V. I.

    2016-12-01

    The method of frequency stabilization of diode laser on the wavelength of 5P3/2→5D5/2 of rubidium (776 nm) has been realized. The two-photon absorption spectroscopy of the rubidium vapors is underlie of the suggested scheme. The basic parameters such as the intensity of laser radiation and concentration of the vapors have been investigated. The frequency stability of radiation was about 1 MHz

  8. Transition from precise to accurate critical dimension metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukraintsev, Vladimir A.; Tsai, Margaret C.; Lii, Tom; Jackson, Ricky A.

    2007-03-01

    A new measurement system analysis (MSA) methodology has been developed at Texas Instruments (TI) to evaluate the status of the 65 nm technology critical dimension (CD) metrology and its readiness for production. Elements of the methodology were used in a previously reported scatterometry evaluation [1]. At every critical process level the precision, bias, linearity and total measurement uncertainty (TMU) were evaluated for metrology fleet over extended periods of time, and with the technology representative set of samples. The samples with variations that fully covered and often exceeded process space were pre-calibrated by CD atomic force microscope (AFM). CD AFM measurement precision was determined for every analyzed process level based on repeated measurements conducted over several days. The National Institute of Standards and Technologies (NIST) traceable standards were used to verify CD AFM line CD and scale calibrations. Therefore, for the first time the NIST traceability has been established for CD metrology at every critical process level for the entire technology. The data indicates an overall healthy status of the 65 nm CD metrology. Sub-nanometer accuracy has been established for gate CD metrology. The thorough CD metrology characterization and specifically absolute CD calibration were instrumental in seamless technology transfer from 200 mm to 300 mm fabs. The qualification of CD metrology also revealed several problems. Most of these are well-known from previous studies and should soon be addressed. CD scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has a systematic problem with bias of CD measurements. The problem is common for several front-end and back-end of line process levels. For most process levels, TMU of CD SEM is noticeably affected by sample modification inflicted by electron irradiation (shrinkage, charging, buildups, etc.). This causes problems, especially in the case of fleet TMU evaluation. An improved data collection methodology should be devised to minimize the impact of sample modification on fleet TMU measurements. The reported progress in semiconductor industrial CD metrology became possible after a recent breakthrough in line CD standard technology [2,3], recognition of CD AFM as an instrument for CD traceability [4,5] and development of the concept and mathematical tools for TMU analysis [6,7].

  9. Low-Frequency Navigational System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    Accurate vehicle position determination over 50 by 50-km service area accomplished by low-frequency-radio navigational system comprised of four frequency/phase comparison transmitters and receivers. Use of grid-calibration table permits accurate position determination in vehicle receiver system.

  10. Accurate determination of the fine-structure intervals in the 3P ground states of C-13 and C-12 by far-infrared laser magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooksy, A. L.; Saykally, R. J.; Brown, J. M.; Evenson, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    Accurate values are presented for the fine-structure intervals in the 3P ground state of neutral atomic C-12 and C-13 as obtained from laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The rigorous analysis of C-13 hyperfine structure, the measurement of resonant fields for C-12 transitions at several additional far-infrared laser frequencies, and the increased precision of the C-12 measurements, permit significant improvement in the evaluation of these energies relative to earlier work. These results will expedite the direct and precise measurement of these transitions in interstellar sources and should assist in the determination of the interstellar C-12/C-13 abundance ratio.

  11. Accurate Evaluation of Quantum Integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, D. C.; Goorvitch, D.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Combining an appropriate finite difference method with Richardson's extrapolation results in a simple, highly accurate numerical method for solving a Schrodinger's equation. Important results are that error estimates are provided, and that one can extrapolate expectation values rather than the wavefunctions to obtain highly accurate expectation values. We discuss the eigenvalues, the error growth in repeated Richardson's extrapolation, and show that the expectation values calculated on a crude mesh can be extrapolated to obtain expectation values of high accuracy.

  12. Dimensional phase transition in small Yukawa clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, T. E.; Wells, K. D.

    2010-01-15

    We investigate the one- to two-dimensional zigzag transition in clusters consisting of a small number of particles interacting through a Yukawa (Debye) potential and confined in a two-dimensional biharmonic potential well. Dusty (complex) plasma clusters with n<=19 monodisperse particles are characterized experimentally for two different confining wells. The well anisotropy is accurately measured, and the Debye shielding parameter is determined from the longitudinal breathing frequency. Debye shielding is shown to be important. A model for this system is used to predict equilibrium particle configurations. The experiment and model exhibit excellent agreement. The critical value of n for the zigzag transition is found to be less than that predicted for an unshielded Coulomb interaction. The zigzag transition is shown to behave as a continuous phase transition from a one-dimensional to a two-dimensional state, where the state variables are the number of particles, the well anisotropy and the Debye shielding parameter. A universal critical exponent for the zigzag transition is identified for transitions caused by varying the Debye shielding parameter.

  13. Kinetics of the reaction of the heaviest hydrogen atom with H2, the 4Heμ + H2 → 4HeμH + H reaction: experiments, accurate quantal calculations, and variational transition state theory, including kinetic isotope effects for a factor of 36.1 in isotopic mass.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Donald G; Arseneau, Donald J; Sukhorukov, Oleksandr; Brewer, Jess H; Mielke, Steven L; Truhlar, Donald G; Schatz, George C; Garrett, Bruce C; Peterson, Kirk A

    2011-11-14

    The neutral muonic helium atom (4)Heμ, in which one of the electrons of He is replaced by a negative muon, may be effectively regarded as the heaviest isotope of the hydrogen atom, with a mass of 4.115 amu. We report details of the first muon spin rotation (μSR) measurements of the chemical reaction rate constant of (4)Heμ with molecular hydrogen, (4)Heμ + H(2) → (4)HeμH + H, at temperatures of 295.5, 405, and 500 K, as well as a μSR measurement of the hyperfine coupling constant of muonic He at high pressures. The experimental rate constants, k(Heμ), are compared with the predictions of accurate quantum mechanical (QM) dynamics calculations carried out on a well converged Born-Huang (BH) potential energy surface, based on complete configuration interaction calculations and including a Born-Oppenheimer diagonal correction. At the two highest measured temperatures the agreement between the quantum theory and experiment is good to excellent, well within experimental uncertainties that include an estimate of possible systematic error, but at 295.5 K the quantum calculations for k(Heμ) are below the experimental value by 2.1 times the experimental uncertainty estimates. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Variational transition state theory calculations with multidimensional tunneling have also been carried out for k(Heμ) on the BH surface, and they agree with the accurate QM rate constants to within 30% over a wider temperature range of 200-1000 K. Comparisons between theory and experiment are also presented for the rate constants for both the D + H(2) and Mu + H(2) reactions in a novel study of kinetic isotope effects for the H + H(2) reactions over a factor of 36.1 in isotopic mass of the atomic reactant.

  14. How the transition frequencies of microtubule dynamic instability (nucleation, catastrophe, and rescue) regulate microtubule dynamics in interphase and mitosis: analysis using a Monte Carlo computer simulation.

    PubMed Central

    Gliksman, N R; Skibbens, R V; Salmon, E D

    1993-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) in newt mitotic spindles grow faster than MTs in the interphase cytoplasmic microtubule complex (CMTC), yet spindle MTs do not have the long lengths or lifetimes of the CMTC microtubules. Because MTs undergo dynamic instability, it is likely that changes in the durations of growth or shortening are responsible for this anomaly. We have used a Monte Carlo computer simulation to examine how changes in the number of MTs and changes in the catastrophe and rescue frequencies of dynamic instability may be responsible for the cell cycle dependent changes in MT characteristics. We used the computer simulations to model interphase-like or mitotic-like MT populations on the basis of the dynamic instability parameters available from newt lung epithelial cells in vivo. We started with parameters that produced MT populations similar to the interphase newt lung cell CMTC. In the simulation, increasing the number of MTs and either increasing the frequency of catastrophe or decreasing the frequency of rescue reproduced the changes in MT dynamics measured in vivo between interphase and mitosis. Images PMID:8298190

  15. Microfabricated ion frequency standard

    DOEpatents

    Schwindt, Peter; Biedermann, Grant; Blain, Matthew G.; Stick, Daniel L.; Serkland, Darwin K.; Olsson, III, Roy H.

    2010-12-28

    A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

  16. Self-organised aggregation of a pair of particles with different resonant frequencies and electric dipole moments of transitions, controlled by an external quasi-resonant field

    SciTech Connect

    Slabko, V V; Tsipotan, A S; Aleksandrovsky, A S

    2013-05-31

    The influence of the oscillation phases of the dipole moments induced in metal nanoparticles and quantum dots by an external laser field on their interaction energy is considered. It is shown that a difference in resonant frequencies leads to the formation of additional minima and maxima, which are absent in the spectral dependence of the interaction energy of identical particles at similar orientations of the pair of particles with respect to the plane of polarisation of radiation. These features are due to the fact that the oscillation phase difference of the induced dipole moments of particles reaches values close to {pi}. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  17. Accurate tracking of high dynamic vehicles with translated GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankshain, Kenneth M.

    The GPS concept and the translator processing system (TPS) which were developed for accurate and cost-effective tracking of various types of high dynamic expendable vehicles are described. A technique used by the translator processing system (TPS) to accomplish very accurate high dynamic tracking is presented. Automatic frequency control and fast Fourier transform processes are combined to track 100 g acceleration and 100 g/s jerk with 1-sigma velocity measurement error less than 1 ft/sec.

  18. ACCURATE SPECTROSCOPIC CHARACTERIZATION OF OXIRANE: A VALUABLE ROUTE TO ITS IDENTIFICATION IN TITAN’S ATMOSPHERE AND THE ASSIGNMENT OF UNIDENTIFIED INFRARED BANDS

    PubMed Central

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to provide an accurate spectroscopic characterization of oxirane, state-of-the-art computational methods and approaches have been employed to determine highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and rotational parameters. Available experimental data were used to assess the reliability of our computations, and an accuracy on average of 10 cm−1 for fundamental transitions as well as overtones and combination bands has been pointed out. Moving to rotational spectroscopy, relative discrepancies of 0.1%, 2%–3%, and 3%–4% were observed for rotational, quartic, and sextic centrifugal-distortion constants, respectively. We are therefore confident that the highly accurate spectroscopic data provided herein can be useful for identification of oxirane in Titan’s atmosphere and the assignment of unidentified infrared bands. Since oxirane was already observed in the interstellar medium and some astronomical objects are characterized by very high D/H ratios, we also considered the accurate determination of the spectroscopic parameters for the mono-deuterated species, oxirane-d1. For the latter, an empirical scaling procedure allowed us to improve our computed data and to provide predictions for rotational transitions with a relative accuracy of about 0.02% (i.e., an uncertainty of about 40 MHz for a transition lying at 200 GHz). PMID:26543240

  19. Blackbody radiation shift in ^87Rb frequency standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, Marianna; Safronova, U. I.

    2010-03-01

    The operation of atomic clocks is generally carried out at room temperature, whereas the definition of the second refers to the clock transition in an atom at absolute zero. This implies that the clock transition frequency should be corrected in practice for the effect of finite temperature of which the leading contributor is the blackbody radiation (BBR) shift. Experimental measurements of the BBR shifts are difficult. In this work, we have calculated the blackbody radiation shift of the ground-state hyperfine microwave transition in ^87Rb using the relativistic all-order method and evaluated the accuracy of our final value. Particular care is taken to accurately account for the contributions from highly-excited states. Various Rb atomic properties, including E1, E2, and E3 ground state polarizabilities, np and nd E1 polarizabilities, and hyperfine constants are also calculated. The results are compared with experiment and other theory where available.

  20. Practical aspects of spatially high accurate methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Andrew G.; Mitchell, Curtis R.; Walters, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    The computational qualities of high order spatially accurate methods for the finite volume solution of the Euler equations are presented. Two dimensional essentially non-oscillatory (ENO), k-exact, and 'dimension by dimension' ENO reconstruction operators are discussed and compared in terms of reconstruction and solution accuracy, computational cost and oscillatory behavior in supersonic flows with shocks. Inherent steady state convergence difficulties are demonstrated for adaptive stencil algorithms. An exact solution to the heat equation is used to determine reconstruction error, and the computational intensity is reflected in operation counts. Standard MUSCL differencing is included for comparison. Numerical experiments presented include the Ringleb flow for numerical accuracy and a shock reflection problem. A vortex-shock interaction demonstrates the ability of the ENO scheme to excel in simulating unsteady high-frequency flow physics.

  1. Evaluation of high-frequency mean streamwater transit-time estimates using groundwater age and dissolved silica concentrations in a small forested watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Norman E.; Burns, Douglas A.; Aulenbach, Brent T.

    2014-01-01

    Many previous investigations of mean streamwater transit times (MTT) have been limited by an inability to quantify the MTT dynamics. Here, we draw on (1) a linear relation (r 2 = 0.97) between groundwater 3H/3He ages and dissolved silica (Si) concentrations, combined with (2) predicted streamwater Si concentrations from a multiple-regression relation (R 2 = 0.87) to estimate MTT at 5-min intervals for a 23-year time series of streamflow [water year (WY) 1986 through 2008] at the Panola Mountain Research Watershed, Georgia. The time-based average MTT derived from the 5-min data was ~8.4 ± 2.9 years and the volume-weighted (VW) MTT was ~4.7 years for the study period, reflecting the importance of younger runoff water during high flow. The 5-min MTTs are normally distributed and ranged from 0 to 15 years. Monthly VW MTTs averaged 7.0 ± 3.3 years and ranged from 4 to 6 years during winter and 8–10 years during summer. The annual VW MTTs averaged 5.6 ± 2.0 years and ranged from ~5 years during wet years (2003 and 2005) to >10 years during dry years (2002 and 2008). Stormflows are composed of much younger water than baseflows, and although stormflow only occurs ~17 % of the time, this runoff fraction contributed 39 % of the runoff during the 23-year study period. Combining the 23-year VW MTT (including stormflow) with the annual average baseflow for the period (~212 mm) indicates that active groundwater storage is ~1,000 mm. However, the groundwater storage ranged from 1,040 to 1,950 mm using WY baseflow and WY VW MTT. The approach described herein may be applicable to other watersheds underlain by granitoid bedrock, where weathering is the dominant control on Si concentrations in soils, groundwater, and streamwater.

  2. Rapid and accurate measurement of the frequency-frequency correlation function.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Derek G; Kubarych, Kevin J

    2013-07-25

    Using an implementation of heterodyne-detected vibrational echo spectroscopy, we show that equilibrium spectral diffusion caused by solvation dynamics can be measured in a fraction of the time required using traditional two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy. Spectrally resolved, heterodyne-detected rephasing and nonrephasing signals, recorded at a single delay between the first two pulses in a photon echo sequence, can be used to measure the full waiting time dependent spectral dynamics that are typically extracted from a series of 2D-IR spectra. Hence, data acquisition is accelerated by more than 1 order of magnitude, while permitting extremely fine sampling of the spectral dynamics during the waiting time between the second and third pulses. Using cymantrene (cyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl, CpMn(CO)3) in alcohol solutions, we compare this novel approach--denoted rapidly acquired spectral diffusion (RASD)--with a traditional method using full 2D-IR spectra, finding excellent agreement. Though this approach is largely limited to isolated vibrational bands, we also show how to remove interference from cross-peaks that can produce characteristic modulations of the spectral dynamics through vibrational quantum beats.

  3. Magic Frequencies for Cesium Primary-Frequency Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flambaum, V. V.; Dzuba, V. A.; Derevianko, A.

    2008-11-01

    We consider microwave hyperfine transitions in the ground state of cesium and rubidium atoms which are presently used as the primary and the secondary frequency standards. The atoms are confined in an optical lattice generated by a circularly polarized laser field. We demonstrate that applying an external magnetic field with appropriately chosen direction may cancel dynamic Stark frequency shift making the frequency of the clock transition insensitive to the strengths of both the laser and the magnetic fields. This can be attained for practically any laser frequency which is sufficiently distant from a resonance.

  4. Magic Frequencies for Cesium Primary-Frequency Standard

    SciTech Connect

    Flambaum, V. V.; Dzuba, V. A.; Derevianko, A.

    2008-11-28

    We consider microwave hyperfine transitions in the ground state of cesium and rubidium atoms which are presently used as the primary and the secondary frequency standards. The atoms are confined in an optical lattice generated by a circularly polarized laser field. We demonstrate that applying an external magnetic field with appropriately chosen direction may cancel dynamic Stark frequency shift making the frequency of the clock transition insensitive to the strengths of both the laser and the magnetic fields. This can be attained for practically any laser frequency which is sufficiently distant from a resonance.

  5. Gravitationally induced quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the probability for resonantly inducing transitions in quantum states due to time-dependent gravitational perturbations. Contrary to common wisdom, the probability of inducing transitions is not infinitesimally small. We consider a system of ultracold neutrons, which are organized according to the energy levels of the Schrödinger equation in the presence of the Earth's gravitational field. Transitions between energy levels are induced by an oscillating driving force of frequency ω . The driving force is created by oscillating a macroscopic mass in the neighborhood of the system of neutrons. The neutron lifetime is approximately 880 sec while the probability of transitions increases as t2. Hence, the optimal strategy is to drive the system for two lifetimes. The transition amplitude then is of the order of 1.06 ×10-5, and hence with a million ultracold neutrons, one should be able to observe transitions.

  6. Impedance Scaling for Small Angle Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; Bane, Karl; Zagorodnov, I.; /DESY

    2010-10-27

    Based on the parabolic equation approach to Maxwell's equations we have derived scaling properties of the high frequency impedance/short bunch wakefields of structures. For the special case of small angle transitions we have shown the scaling properties are valid for all frequencies. Using these scaling properties one can greatly reduce the calculation time of the wakefield/impedance of long, small angle, beam pipe transitions, like one often finds in insertion regions of storage rings. We have tested the scaling with wakefield simulations of 2D and 3D models of such transitions, and found that the scaling works well. In modern ring-based light sources one often finds insertion devices having extremely small vertical apertures (on the order of millimeters) to allow for maximal undulator fields reaching the beam. Such insertion devices require that there be beam pipe transitions from these small apertures to the larger cross-sections (normally on the order of centimeters) found in the rest of the ring. The fact that there may be many such transitions, and that these transitions introduce beam pipe discontinuities very close to the beam path, means that their impedance will be large and, in fact, may dominate the impedance budget of the entire ring. To reduce their impact on impedance, the transitions are normally tapered gradually over a long distance. The accurate calculation of the impedance or wakefield of these long transitions, which are typically 3D objects (i.e. they do not have cylindrical symmetry), can be quite a challenging numerical task. In this report we present a method of obtaining the impedance of a long, small angle transition from the calculation of a scaled, shorter one. Normally, the actual calculation is obtained from a time domain simulation of the wakefield in the structure, where the impedance can be obtained by performing a Fourier transform. We shall see that the scaled calculation reduces the computer time and memory requirements

  7. On numerically accurate finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagtegaal, J. C.; Parks, D. M.; Rice, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A general criterion for testing a mesh with topologically similar repeat units is given, and the analysis shows that only a few conventional element types and arrangements are, or can be made suitable for computations in the fully plastic range. Further, a new variational principle, which can easily and simply be incorporated into an existing finite element program, is presented. This allows accurate computations to be made even for element designs that would not normally be suitable. Numerical results are given for three plane strain problems, namely pure bending of a beam, a thick-walled tube under pressure, and a deep double edge cracked tensile specimen. The effects of various element designs and of the new variational procedure are illustrated. Elastic-plastic computation at finite strain are discussed.

  8. Multiplexed sub-Doppler spectroscopy with an optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, D. A.; Fleisher, A. J.; Plusquellic, D. F.; Hodges, J. T.

    2016-12-01

    An optical frequency comb generated with an electro-optic phase modulator and a chirped radio-frequency waveform is used to perform pump-probe spectroscopy on the D1 and D2 transitions of atomic potassium at 770.1 and 766.7 nm, respectively. With a comb tooth spacing of 200 kHz and an optical bandwidth of 2 GHz the hyperfine transitions can be observed simultaneously. Interferograms are recorded in as little as 5 µs (a timescale corresponding to the inverse of the comb tooth spacing). Importantly, the sub-Doppler features can be measured as long as the laser carrier frequency lies within the Doppler profile, thus removing the need for slow scanning or a priori knowledge of the frequencies of the sub-Doppler features. Sub-Doppler optical frequency comb spectroscopy has the potential to dramatically reduce acquisition times and allow for rapid and accurate assignment of complex molecular and atomic spectra which are presently intractable.

  9. Transition Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Statfeld, Jenna L.

    2011-01-01

    Post-school transition is the movement of a child with disabilities from school to activities that occur after the completion of school. This paper provides information about: (1) post-school transition; (2) transition plan; (3) transition services; (4) transition planning; (5) vocational rehabilitation services; (6) services that are available…

  10. Virus mutation frequencies can be greatly underestimated by monoclonal antibody neutralization of virions.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, J J; de la Torre, J C; Steinhauer, D A; Clarke, D; Duarte, E; Domingo, E

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody-resistant mutants have been widely used to estimate virus mutation frequencies. We demonstrate that standard virion neutralization inevitably underestimates monoclonal antibody-resistant mutant genome frequencies of vesicular stomatitis virus, due to phenotypic masking-mixing when wild-type (wt) virions are present in thousandsfold greater numbers. We show that incorporation of antibody into the plaque overlay medium (after virus penetration at 37 degrees C) can provide accurate estimates of genome frequencies of neutral monoclonal antibody-resistant mutant viruses in wt clones. By using this method, we have observed two adjacent G----A base transition frequencies in the I3 epitope to be of the order of 10(-4) in a wt glycine codon. This appears to be slightly lower than the frequencies observed at other sites for total (viable and nonviable) virus genomes when using a direct sequence approach. Images PMID:2479770

  11. Hyperfine structure and isotope shifts of transitions in neutral and singly ionized ytterbium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berends, R. W.; Maleki, L.

    1992-01-01

    The present experimental investigation of the hyperfine structure and isotopic shifts of transitions in neutral and singly-ionized Yb, which constitute a system of some interest to microwave-frequency standards, used counterpropagating pump and probe laser beams directed through a hollow-cathode discharge lamp. The results obtained are in agreement with previous measurements except in the case of the Yb-173(+) 6 2P0 sub 3/2 state, which is more accurately determined.

  12. Accurate equilibrium structures for piperidine and cyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Demaison, Jean; Craig, Norman C; Groner, Peter; Écija, Patricia; Cocinero, Emilio J; Lesarri, Alberto; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter

    2015-03-05

    Extended and improved microwave (MW) measurements are reported for the isotopologues of piperidine. New ground state (GS) rotational constants are fitted to MW transitions with quartic centrifugal distortion constants taken from ab initio calculations. Predicate values for the geometric parameters of piperidine and cyclohexane are found from a high level of ab initio theory including adjustments for basis set dependence and for correlation of the core electrons. Equilibrium rotational constants are obtained from GS rotational constants corrected for vibration-rotation interactions and electronic contributions. Equilibrium structures for piperidine and cyclohexane are fitted by the mixed estimation method. In this method, structural parameters are fitted concurrently to predicate parameters (with appropriate uncertainties) and moments of inertia (with uncertainties). The new structures are regarded as being accurate to 0.001 Å and 0.2°. Comparisons are made between bond parameters in equatorial piperidine and cyclohexane. Another interesting result of this study is that a structure determination is an effective way to check the accuracy of the ground state experimental rotational constants.

  13. Accurate ab Initio Spin Densities.

    PubMed

    Boguslawski, Katharina; Marti, Konrad H; Legeza, Ors; Reiher, Markus

    2012-06-12

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of α and β electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740].

  14. Pressure broadening and frequency shift of the 5S1/2 → 5D5/2 and 5S1/2 → 7S1/2 two photon transitions in 85Rb by the noble gases and N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zameroski, Nathan D.; Hager, Gordon D.; Erickson, Christopher J.; Burke, John H.

    2014-11-01

    Doppler free two photon absorption spectroscopy was employed to measure the pressure broadening and frequency shift rates of the 5S1/2 (F = 3) → 5D5/2 (F = 5, 4, 3, 2, 1) (778.105 nm) and the 5S1/2 (F = 2) → 7S1/2 (F = 2) (760.126 nm) two photon transitions in 85Rb by the noble gases and N2. To our knowledge, these rates are reported on for the first time. The self-broadening and shift rate of the 5S1/2 (F = 3) → 5D5/2 (F = 5, 4, 3, 2, 1) transition and self -broadening rate of the 5S1/2 (F = 2) → 7S1/2 (F = 2) transition were also measured. The temperature dependence of the self-frequency shift (Rb-Rb collisions) of these transitions is presented. Helium diffusion rates through Quartz and Pyrex cells are also calculated and the implication of helium diffusion through glass vapor cells is discussed in regards to atomic frequency standards based on these transitions. Experimental pressure broadening and shift rates are compared to theoretically calculated rates assuming a 6, 8 or 6, 8, 10 difference potential and pseudo potential model. Reasonable agreement is achieved between experimental and theoretical values.

  15. Investigations of the Rg-BrCl (Rg=He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) binary van der Waals complexes: ab initio intermolecular potential energy surfaces, vibrational states and predicted pure rotational transition frequencies.

    PubMed

    Li, Song; Zheng, Rui; Chen, Shan-Jun; Chen, Yan; Chen, Peng

    2017-03-05

    The intermolecular potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the ground electronic state for the Rg-BrCl (Rg=He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) van der Waals complexes have been constructed by using the coupled-cluster method in combination with the augmented quadruple-zeta correlation-consistent basis sets supplemented with an additional set of bond functions. The features of the anisotropic PESs for these complexes are remarkably similar, which are characterized by three minima and two saddle points between them. The global minimum corresponds to a collinear Rg-Br-Cl configuration. Two local minima, correlate with an anti-linear Rg-Cl-Br geometry and a nearly T-shaped structure, can also be located on each PES. The quantum bound state calculations enable us to investigate intermolecular vibrational states and rotational energy levels of the complexes. The transition frequencies are predicted and are fitted to obtain their corresponding spectroscopic constants. In general, the periodic trends are observed for this complex family. Comparisons with available experimental data for the collinear isomer of Ar-BrCl demonstrate reliability of our theoretical predictions, and our results for the other two isomers of Ar-BrCl as well as for other members of the complex family are also anticipated to be trustable. Except for the collinear isomer of Ar-BrCl, the data presented in this paper would be beneficial to improve our knowledge for these experimentally unknown species.

  16. Investigations of the Rg-BrCl (Rg = He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) binary van der Waals complexes: ab initio intermolecular potential energy surfaces, vibrational states and predicted pure rotational transition frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Song; Zheng, Rui; Chen, Shan-Jun; Chen, Yan; Chen, Peng

    2017-03-01

    The intermolecular potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the ground electronic state for the Rg-BrCl (Rg = He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) van der Waals complexes have been constructed by using the coupled-cluster method in combination with the augmented quadruple-zeta correlation-consistent basis sets supplemented with an additional set of bond functions. The features of the anisotropic PESs for these complexes are remarkably similar, which are characterized by three minima and two saddle points between them. The global minimum corresponds to a collinear Rg-Br-Cl configuration. Two local minima, correlate with an anti-linear Rg-Cl-Br geometry and a nearly T-shaped structure, can also be located on each PES. The quantum bound state calculations enable us to investigate intermolecular vibrational states and rotational energy levels of the complexes. The transition frequencies are predicted and are fitted to obtain their corresponding spectroscopic constants. In general, the periodic trends are observed for this complex family. Comparisons with available experimental data for the collinear isomer of Ar-BrCl demonstrate reliability of our theoretical predictions, and our results for the other two isomers of Ar-BrCl as well as for other members of the complex family are also anticipated to be trustable. Except for the collinear isomer of Ar-BrCl, the data presented in this paper would be beneficial to improve our knowledge for these experimentally unknown species.

  17. Raman study of the pressure-induced neutral-to-ionic transition in tetrathiafulvalene chloranil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanfland, M.; Brillante, A.; Girlando, A.; Syassen, K.

    1988-07-01

    The pressure-induced phase transition from a neutral regular stack to an ionic dimerized stack (NR-ID) in the tetrathiafulvalene chloranil charge-transfer crystal has been studied by Raman spectroscopy. An accurate estimate of the change of ionicity during the phase transition is obtained from calculations of mode frequencies which are based on the trimer (NR phase) and dimer (ID phase) models of the electron-molecular-vibration interaction. The possibility of the formation of ionic dimers embedded in neutral chains as precursors of the phase change is discussed.

  18. Impacts of frequency increment errors on frequency diverse array beampattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Kuandong; Chen, Hui; Shao, Huaizong; Cai, Jingye; Wang, Wen-Qin

    2015-12-01

    Different from conventional phased array, which provides only angle-dependent beampattern, frequency diverse array (FDA) employs a small frequency increment across the antenna elements and thus results in a range angle-dependent beampattern. However, due to imperfect electronic devices, it is difficult to ensure accurate frequency increments, and consequently, the array performance will be degraded by unavoidable frequency increment errors. In this paper, we investigate the impacts of frequency increment errors on FDA beampattern. We derive the beampattern errors caused by deterministic frequency increment errors. For stochastic frequency increment errors, the corresponding upper and lower bounds of FDA beampattern error are derived. They are verified by numerical results. Furthermore, the statistical characteristics of FDA beampattern with random frequency increment errors, which obey Gaussian distribution and uniform distribution, are also investigated.

  19. Accurate potential energy surfaces with a DFT+U(R) approach.

    PubMed

    Kulik, Heather J; Marzari, Nicola

    2011-11-21

    We introduce an improvement to the Hubbard U augmented density functional approach known as DFT+U that incorporates variations in the value of self-consistently calculated, linear-response U with changes in geometry. This approach overcomes the one major shortcoming of previous DFT+U studies, i.e., the use of an averaged Hubbard U when comparing energies for different points along a potential energy surface is no longer required. While DFT+U is quite successful at providing accurate descriptions of localized electrons (e.g., d or f) by correcting self-interaction errors of standard exchange correlation functionals, we show several diatomic molecule examples where this position-dependent DFT+U(R) provides a significant two- to four-fold improvement over DFT+U predictions, when compared to accurate correlated quantum chemistry and experimental references. DFT+U(R) reduces errors in binding energies, frequencies, and equilibrium bond lengths by applying the linear-response, position-dependent U(R) at each configuration considered. This extension is most relevant where variations in U are large across the points being compared, as is the case with covalent diatomic molecules such as transition-metal oxides. We thus provide a tool for deciding whether a standard DFT+U approach is sufficient by determining the strength of the dependence of U on changes in coordinates. We also apply this approach to larger systems with greater degrees of freedom and demonstrate how DFT+U(R) may be applied automatically in relaxations, transition-state finding methods, and dynamics.

  20. Accurate van der Waals coefficients from density functional theory

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jianmin; Perdew, John P.; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn

    2012-01-01

    The van der Waals interaction is a weak, long-range correlation, arising from quantum electronic charge fluctuations. This interaction affects many properties of materials. A simple and yet accurate estimate of this effect will facilitate computer simulation of complex molecular materials and drug design. Here we develop a fast approach for accurate evaluation of dynamic multipole polarizabilities and van der Waals (vdW) coefficients of all orders from the electron density and static multipole polarizabilities of each atom or other spherical object, without empirical fitting. Our dynamic polarizabilities (dipole, quadrupole, octupole, etc.) are exact in the zero- and high-frequency limits, and exact at all frequencies for a metallic sphere of uniform density. Our theory predicts dynamic multipole polarizabilities in excellent agreement with more expensive many-body methods, and yields therefrom vdW coefficients C6, C8, C10 for atom pairs with a mean absolute relative error of only 3%. PMID:22205765

  1. Library preparation for highly accurate population sequencing of RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Ashley; Andino, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Circular resequencing (CirSeq) is a novel technique for efficient and highly accurate next-generation sequencing (NGS) of RNA virus populations. The foundation of this approach is the circularization of fragmented viral RNAs, which are then redundantly encoded into tandem repeats by ‘rolling-circle’ reverse transcription. When sequenced, the redundant copies within each read are aligned to derive a consensus sequence of their initial RNA template. This process yields sequencing data with error rates far below the variant frequencies observed for RNA viruses, facilitating ultra-rare variant detection and accurate measurement of low-frequency variants. Although library preparation takes ~5 d, the high-quality data generated by CirSeq simplifies downstream data analysis, making this approach substantially more tractable for experimentalists. PMID:24967624

  2. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  3. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  4. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  5. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  6. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  7. Differential equation based method for accurate approximations in optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1990-01-01

    A method to efficiently and accurately approximate the effect of design changes on structural response is described. The key to this method is to interpret sensitivity equations as differential equations that may be solved explicitly for closed form approximations, hence, the method is denoted the Differential Equation Based (DEB) method. Approximations were developed for vibration frequencies, mode shapes and static displacements. The DEB approximation method was applied to a cantilever beam and results compared with the commonly-used linear Taylor series approximations and exact solutions. The test calculations involved perturbing the height, width, cross-sectional area, tip mass, and bending inertia of the beam. The DEB method proved to be very accurate, and in most cases, was more accurate than the linear Taylor series approximation. The method is applicable to simultaneous perturbation of several design variables. Also, the approximations may be used to calculate other system response quantities. For example, the approximations for displacements are used to approximate bending stresses.

  8. Quasicontiguous frequency-fluctuation model for calculation of hydrogen and hydrogenlike Stark-broadened line shapes in plasmas.

    PubMed

    Stambulchik, E; Maron, Y

    2013-05-01

    We present an analytical method for the calculation of shapes of Stark-broadened spectral lines in plasmas, applicable to hydrogen and hydrogenlike transitions (including Rydberg ones) with Δn>1. The method is based on the recently suggested quasicontiguous approximation of the static Stark line shapes, while the dynamical effects are accounted for using the frequency-fluctuation-model approach. Comparisons with accurate computer simulations show excellent agreement.

  9. FET Frequency Discriminator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    conversion . characteristic of the frequency discriminator is significant and :ending upon the specific system - may be the limiting factor in the accu of...the results obtained did not .-" allow for the accurate determinat ion of the change in impedance, addit ional 14 -~ 12V - - Figure 7. Impedance plot...44*. -. 7 ’I -- -..- ,. -, 4., /-.,’ .3 8 V ............... ... .. .$, L- 12v - Figure 9. Impedance plot tor five diodes inl parallel. A circuit was

  10. Accurate Biomass Estimation via Bayesian Adaptive Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, K.; Knuth, K.; Castle, P.

    2005-12-01

    Typical estimates of standing wood derived from remote sensing sources take advantage of aggregate measurements of canopy heights (e.g. LIDAR) and canopy diameters (segmentation of IKONOS imagery) to obtain a wood volume estimate by assuming homogeneous species and a fixed function that returns volume. The validation of such techniques use manually measured diameter at breast height records (DBH). Our goal is to improve the accuracy and applicability of biomass estimation methods to heterogeneous forests and transitional areas. We are developing estimates with quantifiable uncertainty using a new form of estimation function, active sampling, and volumetric reconstruction image rendering for species specific mass truth. Initially we are developing a Bayesian adaptive sampling method for BRDF associated with the MISR Rahman model with respect to categorical biomes. This involves characterizing the probability distributions of the 3 free parameters of the Rahman model for the 6 categories of biomes used by MISR. Subsequently, these distributions can be used to determine the optimal sampling methodology to distinguish biomes during acquisition. We have a remotely controlled semi-autonomous helicopter that has stereo imaging, lidar, differential GPS, and spectrometers covering wavelengths from visible to NIR. We intend to automatically vary the way points of the flight path via the Bayesian adaptive sampling method. The second critical part of this work is in automating the validation of biomass estimates via using machine vision techniques. This involves taking 2-D pictures of trees of known species, and then via Bayesian techniques, reconstructing 3-D models of the trees to estimate the distribution moments associated with wood volume. Similar techniques have been developed by the medical imaging community. This then provides probability distributions conditional upon species. The final part of this work is in relating the BRDF actively sampled measurements to species

  11. Frequency Combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    Much of modern research in the field of atomic, molecular, and optical science relies on lasers, which were invented some 50 years ago and perfected in five decades of intense research and development. Today, lasers and photonic technologies impact most fields of science and they have become indispensible in our daily lives. Laser frequency combs were conceived a decade ago as tools for the precision spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen. Through the development of optical frequency comb techniques, technique a setup of the size 1 ×1 m2, good for precision measurements of any frequency, and even commercially available, has replaced the elaborate previous frequency-chain schemes for optical frequency measurements, which only worked for selected frequencies. A true revolution in optical frequency measurements has occurred, paving the way for the creation of all-optical clocks clock with a precision that might approach 10-18. A decade later, frequency combs are now common equipment in all frequency metrology-oriented laboratories. They are also becoming enabling tools for an increasing number of applications, from the calibration of astronomical spectrographs to molecular spectroscopy. This chapter first describes the principle of an optical frequency comb synthesizer. Some of the key technologies to generate such a frequency comb are then presented. Finally, a non-exhaustive overview of the growing applications is given.

  12. Efficient Geometric Probabilities of Multi-Transiting Exoplanetary Systems from CORBITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brakensiek, Joshua; Ragozzine, Darin

    2016-04-01

    NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope has successfully discovered thousands of exoplanet candidates using the transit method, including hundreds of stars with multiple transiting planets. In order to estimate the frequency of these valuable systems, it is essential to account for the unique geometric probabilities of detecting multiple transiting extrasolar planets around the same parent star. In order to improve on previous studies that used numerical methods, we have constructed an efficient, semi-analytical algorithm called the Computed Occurrence of Revolving Bodies for the Investigation of Transiting Systems (CORBITS), which, given a collection of conjectured exoplanets orbiting a star, computes the probability that any particular group of exoplanets can be observed to transit. The algorithm applies theorems of elementary differential geometry to compute the areas bounded by circular curves on the surface of a sphere. The implemented algorithm is more accurate and orders of magnitude faster than previous algorithms, based on comparisons with Monte Carlo simulations. We use CORBITS to show that the present solar system would only show a maximum of three transiting planets, but that this varies over time due to dynamical evolution. We also used CORBITS to geometrically debias the period ratio and mutual Hill sphere distributions of Kepler's multi-transiting planet candidates, which results in shifting these distributions toward slightly larger values. In an Appendix, we present additional semi-analytical methods for determining the frequency of exoplanet mutual events, i.e., the geometric probability that two planets will transit each other (planet-planet occultation, relevant to transiting circumbinary planets) and the probability that this transit occurs simultaneously as they transit their star. The CORBITS algorithms and several worked examples are publicly available.

  13. Accurate Optical Lattice Clock with {sup 87}Sr Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Le Targat, Rodolphe; Baillard, Xavier; Fouche, Mathilde; Brusch, Anders; Tcherbakoff, Olivier; Rovera, Giovanni D.; Lemonde, Pierre

    2006-09-29

    We report a frequency measurement of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} transition of {sup 87}Sr atoms in an optical lattice clock. The frequency is determined to be 429 228 004 229 879(5) Hz with a fractional uncertainty that is comparable to state-of-the-art optical clocks with neutral atoms in free fall. The two previous measurements of this transition were found to disagree by about 2x10{sup -13}, i.e., almost 4 times the combined error bar and 4 to 5 orders of magnitude larger than the claimed ultimate accuracy of this new type of clocks. Our measurement is in agreement with one of these two values and essentially resolves this discrepancy.

  14. Mapping the QCD Phase Transition with Accreting Compact Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Blaschke, D.; Poghosyan, G.; Grigorian, H.

    2008-10-29

    We discuss an idea for how accreting millisecond pulsars could contribute to the understanding of the QCD phase transition in the high-density nuclear matter equation of state (EoS). It is based on two ingredients, the first one being a ''phase diagram'' of rapidly rotating compact star configurations in the plane of spin frequency and mass, determined with state-of-the-art hybrid equations of state, allowing for a transition to color superconducting quark matter. The second is the study of spin-up and accretion evolution in this phase diagram. We show that the quark matter phase transition leads to a characteristic line in the {omega}-M plane, the phase border between neutron stars and hybrid stars with a quark matter core. Along this line a drop in the pulsar's moment of inertia entails a waiting point phenomenon in the accreting millisecond pulsar (AMXP) evolution: most of these objects should therefore be found along the phase border in the {omega}-M plane, which may be viewed as the AMXP analog of the main sequence in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for normal stars. In order to prove the existence of a high-density phase transition in the cores of compact stars we need population statistics for AMXPs with sufficiently accurate determination of their masses, spin frequencies and magnetic fields.

  15. Timing of cochlear responses inferred from frequency-threshold tuning curves of auditory-nerve fibers

    PubMed Central

    Temchin, Andrei N.; Recio-Spinoso, Alberto; Ruggero, Mario A.

    2010-01-01

    Links between frequency tuning and timing were explored in the responses to sound of auditory-nerve fibers. Synthetic transfer functions were constructed by combining filter functions, derived via minimum-phase computations from average frequency-threshold tuning curves of chinchilla auditory-nerve fibers with high spontaneous activity (A. N. Temchin et al., J. Neurophysiol. 100: 2889–2898, 2008), and signal-front delays specified by the latencies of basilar-membrane and auditory-nerve fiber responses to intense clicks (A. N. Temchin et al., J. Neurophysiol. 93: 3635–3648, 2005). The transfer functions predict several features of the phase-frequency curves of cochlear responses to tones, including their shape transitions in the regions with characteristic frequencies of 1 kHz and 3–4 kHz (A. N. Temchin and M. A. Ruggero, JARO 11: 297–318, 2010). The transfer functions also predict the shapes of cochlear impulse responses, including the polarities of their frequency sweeps and their transition at characteristic frequencies around 1 kHz. Predictions are especially accurate for characteristic frequencies < 1 kHz. PMID:20951191

  16. Blackbody radiation shift in the {sup 87}Rb frequency standard

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, M. S.; Jiang Dansha; Safronova, U. I.

    2010-08-15

    The operation of atomic clocks is generally carried out at room temperature, whereas the definition of the second refers to the clock transition in an atom at absolute zero. This implies that the clock transition frequency should be corrected in practice for the effect of finite temperature, of which the leading contributor is the blackbody radiation (BBR) shift. Experimental measurements of the BBR shifts are difficult. In this work, we have calculated the blackbody radiation shift of the ground-state hyperfine microwave transition in {sup 87}Rb using the relativistic all-order method and carried out a detailed evaluation of the accuracy of our final value. Particular care is taken to accurately account for the contributions from highly excited states. Our predicted value for the Stark coefficient, k{sub S}=-1.240(4)x10{sup -10} Hz/(V/m){sup 2}, is three times more accurate than the previous calculation [E. J. Angstman, V. A. Dzuba, and V. V. Flambaum, Phys. Rev. A 74, 023405 (2006)].

  17. Blackbody radiation shift in the Rb87 frequency standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, M. S.; Jiang, Dansha; Safronova, U. I.

    2010-08-01

    The operation of atomic clocks is generally carried out at room temperature, whereas the definition of the second refers to the clock transition in an atom at absolute zero. This implies that the clock transition frequency should be corrected in practice for the effect of finite temperature, of which the leading contributor is the blackbody radiation (BBR) shift. Experimental measurements of the BBR shifts are difficult. In this work, we have calculated the blackbody radiation shift of the ground-state hyperfine microwave transition in Rb87 using the relativistic all-order method and carried out a detailed evaluation of the accuracy of our final value. Particular care is taken to accurately account for the contributions from highly excited states. Our predicted value for the Stark coefficient, kS=-1.240(4)×10-10Hz/(V/m)2, is three times more accurate than the previous calculation [E. J. Angstman, V. A. Dzuba, and V. V. Flambaum, Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.74.023405 74, 023405 (2006)].

  18. Accurate orbit propagation with planetary close encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baù, Giulio; Milani Comparetti, Andrea; Guerra, Francesca

    2015-08-01

    We tackle the problem of accurately propagating the motion of those small bodies that undergo close approaches with a planet. The literature is lacking on this topic and the reliability of the numerical results is not sufficiently discussed. The high-frequency components of the perturbation generated by a close encounter makes the propagation particularly challenging both from the point of view of the dynamical stability of the formulation and the numerical stability of the integrator. In our approach a fixed step-size and order multistep integrator is combined with a regularized formulation of the perturbed two-body problem. When the propagated object enters the region of influence of a celestial body, the latter becomes the new primary body of attraction. Moreover, the formulation and the step-size will also be changed if necessary. We present: 1) the restarter procedure applied to the multistep integrator whenever the primary body is changed; 2) new analytical formulae for setting the step-size (given the order of the multistep, formulation and initial osculating orbit) in order to control the accumulation of the local truncation error and guarantee the numerical stability during the propagation; 3) a new definition of the region of influence in the phase space. We test the propagator with some real asteroids subject to the gravitational attraction of the planets, the Yarkovsky and relativistic perturbations. Our goal is to show that the proposed approach improves the performance of both the propagator implemented in the OrbFit software package (which is currently used by the NEODyS service) and of the propagator represented by a variable step-size and order multistep method combined with Cowell's formulation (i.e. direct integration of position and velocity in either the physical or a fictitious time).

  19. Changing Cycle Lengths in State-Transition Models: Challenges and Solutions.

    PubMed

    Chhatwal, Jagpreet; Jayasuriya, Suren; Elbasha, Elamin H

    2016-11-01

    The choice of a cycle length in state-transition models should be determined by the frequency of clinical events and interventions. Sometimes there is need to decrease the cycle length of an existing state-transition model to reduce error in outcomes resulting from discretization of the underlying continuous-time phenomena or to increase the cycle length to gain computational efficiency. Cycle length conversion is also frequently required if a new state-transition model is built using observational data that have a different measurement interval than the model's cycle length. We show that a commonly used method of converting transition probabilities to different cycle lengths is incorrect and can provide imprecise estimates of model outcomes. We present an accurate approach that is based on finding the root of a transition probability matrix using eigendecomposition. We present underlying mathematical challenges of converting cycle length in state-transition models and provide numerical approximation methods when the eigendecomposition method fails. Several examples and analytical proofs show that our approach is more general and leads to more accurate estimates of model outcomes than the commonly used approach. MATLAB codes and a user-friendly online toolkit are made available for the implementation of the proposed methods.

  20. Work transitions.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Nadya A; Bynner, John

    2008-01-01

    Individuals make choices in, and adjust to, a world of work that is often a moving target. Because work is so central to human functioning, and transitions in and out of work can have major mental health repercussions, the authors argue that applied psychologists in health services need to understand those transitions. This article focuses on the different types of transition throughout a person's working life and the resources needed at different stages to ensure the success of these transitions. The authors start by examining the roles of capability and adaptability in supporting and facilitating adjustment to work transitions and their relation to identity development. They then examine the role of social and institutional contexts in shaping work transitions and their outcomes. The authors focus on voluntary versus involuntary transitions and then broaden the lens in discussing the policy implications of research on work transitions.

  1. Extracting transition rates from zero-polarizability spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhrianda, Zuhrianda; Safronova, Marianna S.; Safronova, Ulyana I.; Clark, Charles W.

    2016-05-01

    Accurate knowledge of atomic properties has been critical for the design and interpretation of experiments, quantifying and reducing uncertainties and decoherence, and development of concepts for next-generation experiments and precision measurement techniques. We predict a sequence of magic-zero wavelengths for which ac Stark shift vanishes for the Sr excited 5 s 5p3P0 state, and provide a general roadmap for extracting transition matrix elements using precise frequency measurements. We demonstrate that such measurements can serve as a best global benchmark of the spectroscopic accuracy that is required for the development of high-precision predictive methods. These magic-zero wavelengths are also needed for state-selective atom manipulation for implementation of quantum logic operations. We also identify five magic wavelengths of the 5s21S0 - 5 s 5 p3P0 Sr clock transition between 350 nm and 500 nm which can also serve as precision benchmarks.

  2. Accurate energy levels for singly ionized platinum (Pt II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reader, Joseph; Acquista, Nicolo; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Engleman, Rolf, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    New observations of the spectrum of Pt II have been made with hollow-cathode lamps. The region from 1032 to 4101 A was observed photographically with a 10.7-m normal-incidence spectrograph. The region from 2245 to 5223 A was observed with a Fourier-transform spectrometer. Wavelength measurements were made for 558 lines. The uncertainties vary from 0.0005 to 0.004 A. From these measurements and three parity-forbidden transitions in the infrared, accurate values were determined for 28 even and 72 odd energy levels of Pt II.

  3. Frequency scanning interferometry with nanometer precision using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diode under scanning speed control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakuma, Seiichi

    2015-12-01

    Frequency scanning interferometry technique with a nanometer precision using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diode (VCSEL) is presented. Since the frequency scanning of the VCSEL is linearized by the phase-locked-loop technique, the gradient of the interference fringe order can be precisely determined using linear least squares fitting. This enables a length measurement with a precision better than a quarter wavelength, and the absolute fringe number including the integer part at the atomic transition spectrum (rubidium-D2 line) is accurately determined. The validity of the method is demonstrated by excellent results of block gauge measurement with a root mean square error better than 5 nm.

  4. Phonon Analysis in Multiphonon Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kun; Gu, Zongquan

    In the investigation of multiphonon transitions, single-mode or single-frequency models are widely used. In view of the fact that such oversimplified models can be seriously inadequate, the present work bridges the gap between the complexity of the general formal theory and the simplicity required for concrete applications by introducing the concept of multi-frequency models. That is, the theory is so formulated that a general system can be approximated by multi-frequency models of any degree of elaboration. A statistical thermodynamic formalism is developed for treating such multi-frequency models, which, on the one hand, greatly reduces the labour of calculation with such models and, on the other hand, leads directly to a simple statistical distribution law for numbers of phonons of each frequency participating in a multiphonon transition. Applications of the theory to concrete models lead to certain general conclusions on frequency dispersion effects in multiphonon transitions. The use of the theory is further demonstrated by fully accounting for the paradoxical experimental results reported by Jia and Yen that the isotopic substitution of H by D in CsMn Cl3· 2H2O reduces the multiphonon nonradiative transition probability of excited Mn2+ ion by more than ten-fold, and yet leaves the corresponding luminescence phonon sideband little changed. In the last section of the paper, the relation between the statistical thermodynamic formalism and existing multiphonon transition theory is elucidated, thereby the theoretical basis of the statistical formalism becomes clearly defined.

  5. Frequency discrimination of brief tonal steps as a function of frequency in the lesser bulldog bat.

    PubMed

    Roverud, R C

    1999-09-01

    In a two-alternative, forced-choice task lesser bulldog bats were trained to distinguish between a pure tone pulse and a pulse composed of a series of brief tonal steps oscillating between two different frequencies. The tone-step pulse gradually approximates the pure tone pulse as the frequency difference between the steps becomes progressively smaller. Frequency difference limens for the brief tonal frequency steps were determined for a broad range of ultrasonic frequencies. The variation in tone-step difference limens with frequency appears to be correlated to the frequency structure of the bat's short-constant-frequency/frequency-modulated echolocation sound. There was a marked decline in the value of the relative frequency difference limens (Weber ratio) over a fairly narrow range of frequencies above the constant frequency and a sharp increase in threshold above this range. The relative thresholds for frequency discrimination were small and uniform over the frequency range of the frequency-modulated sweep and increased for frequencies below the frequency-modulated sweep. Thus, the most accurate frequency-discrimination abilities occur over a narrow frequency range around the frequency of the constant-frequency component of returning echoes. Frequency discrimination over the range of frequencies of the frequency-modulated component is relatively good.

  6. Transition States and transition state analogue interactions with enzymes.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Vern L

    2015-04-21

    Enzymatic transition states have lifetimes of a few femtoseconds (fs). Computational analysis of enzyme motions leading to transition state formation suggests that local catalytic site motions on the fs time scale provide the mechanism to locate transition states. An experimental test of protein fs motion and its relation to transition state formation can be provided by isotopically heavy proteins. Heavy enzymes have predictable mass-altered bond vibration states without altered electrostatic properties, according to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. On-enzyme chemistry is slowed in most heavy proteins, consistent with altered protein bond frequencies slowing the search for the transition state. In other heavy enzymes, structural changes involved in reactant binding and release are also influenced. Slow protein motions associated with substrate binding and catalytic site preorganization are essential to allow the subsequent fs motions to locate the transition state and to facilitate the efficient release of products. In the catalytically competent geometry, local groups move in stochastic atomic motion on the fs time scale, within transition state-accessible conformations created by slower protein motions. The fs time scale for the transition state motions does not permit thermodynamic equilibrium between the transition state and stable enzyme states. Isotopically heavy enzymes provide a diagnostic tool for fast coupled protein motions to transition state formation and mass-dependent conformational changes. The binding of transition state analogue inhibitors is the opposite in catalytic time scale to formation of the transition state but is related by similar geometries of the enzyme-transition state and enzyme-inhibitor interactions. While enzymatic transition states have lifetimes as short as 10(-15) s, transition state analogues can bind tightly to enzymes with release rates greater than 10(3) s. Tight-binding transition state analogues stabilize the rare but

  7. Extratropical Transitions in Atlantic Canada: Impacts and Adaptive Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Athena; Catto, Norm

    2013-04-01

    . Storm surge damage occurred along the north shore of the Bonavista Peninsula. Similar effects, differing only in the size of the affected areas, have resulted from several extratropical transitions which have impacted Atlantic Canada since July 1989. Extratropical transition "Leslie" impacted Newfoundland on 10-11 September 2012. Although the area affected was comparable to "Igor", wind velocities and rainfall totals were less, fortunately limiting damage. Preparation, advance warning to the population, proaction, and response efforts all showed significant improvement, however, indicating that the experience gained from coping with "Igor" had been successfully applied in adaptation to "Leslie". Extratropical transitions pose a significantly different set of challenges for adaptation in comparison to purely tropical hurricanes, and responses and adaptation strategies should be tailored to address these specific events. Calculating the frequency, magnitude and intensity of potential shifts is important for accurate forecasting and public awareness, safety management, preparedness, and adaptation. Available data indicate an increase in extratropical frequency and severity in Atlantic Canada since 1991, but there are difficulties in establishing the extent and nature of transition for previous storm events. A cautionary policy would assume no significant changes in extratropical transition frequency for Atlantic Canada, but would also acknowledge that large events remain probable.

  8. Efficient Geometric Probabilities of Multi-transiting Systems, Circumbinary Planets, and Exoplanet Mutual Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brakensiek, Joshua; Ragozzine, D.

    2012-10-01

    The transit method for discovering extra-solar planets relies on detecting regular diminutions of light from stars due to the shadows of planets passing in between the star and the observer. NASA's Kepler Mission has successfully discovered thousands of exoplanet candidates using this technique, including hundreds of stars with multiple transiting planets. In order to estimate the frequency of these valuable systems, our research concerns the efficient calculation of geometric probabilities for detecting multiple transiting extrasolar planets around the same parent star. In order to improve on previous studies that used numerical methods (e.g., Ragozzine & Holman 2010, Tremaine & Dong 2011), we have constructed an efficient, analytical algorithm which, given a collection of conjectured exoplanets orbiting a star, computes the probability that any particular group of exoplanets are transiting. The algorithm applies theorems of elementary differential geometry to compute the areas bounded by circular curves on the surface of a sphere (see Ragozzine & Holman 2010). The implemented algorithm is more accurate and orders of magnitude faster than previous algorithms, based on comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. Expanding this work, we have also developed semi-analytical methods for determining the frequency of exoplanet mutual events, i.e., the geometric probability two planets will transit each other (Planet-Planet Occultation) and the probability that this transit occurs simultaneously as they transit their star (Overlapping Double Transits; see Ragozzine & Holman 2010). The latter algorithm can also be applied to calculating the probability of observing transiting circumbinary planets (Doyle et al. 2011, Welsh et al. 2012). All of these algorithms have been coded in C and will be made publicly available. We will present and advertise these codes and illustrate their value for studying exoplanetary systems.

  9. Laboratory Measurement of the Pure Rotational Transitions of HCNH+ and Its Isotopic Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, M.; Ozeki, H.; Saito, S.

    1998-03-01

    The pure rotational transitions of the protonated hydrogen cyanide ion, HCNH+, and its isotopic species, HCND+ and DCND+, were measured in the 107-482 GHz region with a source-modulated microwave spectrometer. The ions were generated in a cell with a magnetically confined DC-glow discharge of HCN and/or DCN. The rotational constant B0 and the centrifugal distortion constant D0 for each ion were precisely determined by a least-squares fitting to the observed spectral lines. The observed rotational transition frequencies by laboratory spectroscopy and the predicted ones are accurate to about 30-40 kHz and are useful as rest frequencies for astronomical searches of HCNH+ and HCND+.

  10. Accurate potential energy, dipole moment curves, and lifetimes of vibrational states of heteronuclear alkali dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, Dmitry A.; Varganov, Sergey A.; Derevianko, Andrei

    2014-05-14

    We calculate the potential energy curves, the permanent dipole moment curves, and the lifetimes of the ground and excited vibrational states of the heteronuclear alkali dimers XY (X, Y = Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs) in the X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} electronic state using the coupled cluster with singles doubles and triples method. All-electron quadruple-ζ basis sets with additional core functions are used for Li and Na, and small-core relativistic effective core potentials with quadruple-ζ quality basis sets are used for K, Rb, and Cs. The inclusion of the coupled cluster non-perturbative triple excitations is shown to be crucial for obtaining the accurate potential energy curves. A large one-electron basis set with additional core functions is needed for the accurate prediction of permanent dipole moments. The dissociation energies are overestimated by only 14 cm{sup −1} for LiNa and by no more than 114 cm{sup −1} for the other molecules. The discrepancies between the experimental and calculated harmonic vibrational frequencies are less than 1.7 cm{sup −1}, and the discrepancies for the anharmonic correction are less than 0.1 cm{sup −1}. We show that correlation between atomic electronegativity differences and permanent dipole moment of heteronuclear alkali dimers is not perfect. To obtain the vibrational energies and wave functions the vibrational Schrödinger equation is solved with the B-spline basis set method. The transition dipole moments between all vibrational states, the Einstein coefficients, and the lifetimes of the vibrational states are calculated. We analyze the decay rates of the vibrational states in terms of spontaneous emission, and stimulated emission and absorption induced by black body radiation. In all studied heteronuclear alkali dimers the ground vibrational states have much longer lifetimes than any excited states.

  11. Accurate potential energy, dipole moment curves, and lifetimes of vibrational states of heteronuclear alkali dimers.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Dmitry A; Derevianko, Andrei; Varganov, Sergey A

    2014-05-14

    We calculate the potential energy curves, the permanent dipole moment curves, and the lifetimes of the ground and excited vibrational states of the heteronuclear alkali dimers XY (X, Y = Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs) in the X(1)Σ(+) electronic state using the coupled cluster with singles doubles and triples method. All-electron quadruple-ζ basis sets with additional core functions are used for Li and Na, and small-core relativistic effective core potentials with quadruple-ζ quality basis sets are used for K, Rb, and Cs. The inclusion of the coupled cluster non-perturbative triple excitations is shown to be crucial for obtaining the accurate potential energy curves. A large one-electron basis set with additional core functions is needed for the accurate prediction of permanent dipole moments. The dissociation energies are overestimated by only 14 cm(-1) for LiNa and by no more than 114 cm(-1) for the other molecules. The discrepancies between the experimental and calculated harmonic vibrational frequencies are less than 1.7 cm(-1), and the discrepancies for the anharmonic correction are less than 0.1 cm(-1). We show that correlation between atomic electronegativity differences and permanent dipole moment of heteronuclear alkali dimers is not perfect. To obtain the vibrational energies and wave functions the vibrational Schrödinger equation is solved with the B-spline basis set method. The transition dipole moments between all vibrational states, the Einstein coefficients, and the lifetimes of the vibrational states are calculated. We analyze the decay rates of the vibrational states in terms of spontaneous emission, and stimulated emission and absorption induced by black body radiation. In all studied heteronuclear alkali dimers the ground vibrational states have much longer lifetimes than any excited states.

  12. Mill profiler machines soft materials accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Mill profiler machines bevels, slots, and grooves in soft materials, such as styrofoam phenolic-filled cores, to any desired thickness. A single operator can accurately control cutting depths in contour or straight line work.

  13. Method for Accurate Surface Temperature Measurements During Fast Induction Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larregain, Benjamin; Vanderesse, Nicolas; Bridier, Florent; Bocher, Philippe; Arkinson, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    A robust method is proposed for the measurement of surface temperature fields during induction heating. It is based on the original coupling of temperature-indicating lacquers and a high-speed camera system. Image analysis tools have been implemented to automatically extract the temporal evolution of isotherms. This method was applied to the fast induction treatment of a 4340 steel spur gear, allowing the full history of surface isotherms to be accurately documented for a sequential heating, i.e., a medium frequency preheating followed by a high frequency final heating. Three isotherms, i.e., 704, 816, and 927°C, were acquired every 0.3 ms with a spatial resolution of 0.04 mm per pixel. The information provided by the method is described and discussed. Finally, the transformation temperature Ac1 is linked to the temperature on specific locations of the gear tooth.

  14. Transitional Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Mary; Keating, Stacen A.

    2008-01-01

    Transitional care encompasses a broad range of services and environments designed to promote the safe and timely passage of patients between levels of health care and across care settings. High-quality transitional care is especially important for older adults with multiple chronic conditions and complex therapeutic regimens, as well as for their…

  15. Influence of modulation frequency in rubidium cell frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audoin, C.; Viennet, J.; Cyr, N.; Vanier, J.

    1983-01-01

    The error signal which is used to control the frequency of the quartz crystal oscillator of a passive rubidium cell frequency standard is considered. The value of the slope of this signal, for an interrogation frequency close to the atomic transition frequency is calculated and measured for various phase (or frequency) modulation waveforms, and for several values of the modulation frequency. A theoretical analysis is made using a model which applies to a system in which the optical pumping rate, the relaxation rates and the RF field are homogeneous. Results are given for sine-wave phase modulation, square-wave frequency modulation and square-wave phase modulation. The influence of the modulation frequency on the slope of the error signal is specified. It is shown that the modulation frequency can be chosen as large as twice the non-saturated full-width at half-maximum without a drastic loss of the sensitivity to an offset of the interrogation frequency from center line, provided that the power saturation factor and the amplitude of modulation are properly adjusted.

  16. Electrical Conductivity in Transition Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher; Vickneson, Kishanda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this "Science Note" is to describe how to test the electron-sea model to determine whether it accurately predicts relative electrical conductivity for first-row transition metals. In the electron-sea model, a metal crystal is viewed as a three-dimensional array of metal cations immersed in a sea of delocalised valence…

  17. Frequency dependence of organic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemans, W.; Janssen, P.; van der Heijden, E. H. M.; Kemerink, M.; Koopmans, B.

    2010-09-01

    To identify the microscopic mechanisms of organic magnetoresistance (OMAR), the dependency on the frequency of the applied magnetic field is explored, which consists of a dc and ac component. The measured magnetoconductance decreases when the frequency is increased. The decrease is stronger for lower voltages, which is shown to be linked to the presence of a negative capacitance, as measured with admittance spectroscopy. The negative capacitance disappears when the frequency becomes comparable to the inverse transit time of the minority carriers. These results are in agreement with recent interpretations that magnetic field effects on minority carrier mobility dominate OMAR.

  18. Laboratory rotational ground state transitions of NH3D+ and CF+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffels, A.; Kluge, L.; Schlemmer, S.; Brünken, S.

    2016-09-01

    Aims: This paper reports accurate laboratory frequencies of the rotational ground state transitions of two astronomically relevant molecular ions, NH3D+ and CF+. Methods: Spectra in the millimetre-wave band were recorded by the method of rotational state-selective attachment of He atoms to the molecular ions stored and cooled in a cryogenic ion trap held at 4 K. The lowest rotational transition in the A state (ortho state) of NH3D+ (JK = 10-00), and the two hyperfine components of the ground state transition of CF+ (J = 1-0) were measured with a relative precision better than 10-7. Results: For both target ions, the experimental transition frequencies agree with recent observations of the same lines in different astronomical environments. In the case of NH3D+ the high-accuracy laboratory measurements lend support to its tentative identification in the interstellar medium. For CF+ the experimentally determined hyperfine splitting confirms previous quantum-chemical calculations and the intrinsic spectroscopic nature of a double-peaked line profile observed in the J = 1-0 transition towards the Horsehead photon-dominated region (PDR).

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Line Frequencies for Uracil (Bruenken+, 2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruenken, S.; McCarthy, M. C.; Thaddeus, P.; Godfrey, P. D.; Brown, R. D.

    2006-08-01

    We report new laboratory spectroscopic data on the nucleic acid uracil. The dataset has been extended both into the microwave and towards mm-wavelengths with the aim to provide accurate transition rest frequencies for astrophysical searches. The complete experimental linelist used for the analysis of the data is compiled in Table 2. Lines marked with an asterisk are taken from Brown et al. (1988, J. Mol. Struct. 190, 185 and J. Am. Chem. Soc. 110, 2329), all other lines have been measured in this work. (1 data file).

  20. The Supported Teen: Transitioning to High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, Benton

    2012-01-01

    Transition plans for students with special needs provide support for social and academic success while giving students an accurate picture of what to expect in high school. The Texas Comprehensive Center recommends that schools develop a comprehensive transition plan district-wide. This district plan must include the cooperation of staff from the…

  1. An asymptotic preserving unified gas kinetic scheme for frequency-dependent radiative transfer equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wenjun; Jiang, Song; Xu, Kun; Li, Shu

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an extension of previous work (Sun et al., 2015 [22]) of the unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS) for the gray radiative transfer equations to the frequency-dependent (multi-group) radiative transfer system. Different from the gray radiative transfer equations, where the optical opacity is only a function of local material temperature, the simulation of frequency-dependent radiative transfer is associated with additional difficulties from the frequency-dependent opacity. For the multiple frequency radiation, the opacity depends on both the spatial location and the frequency. For example, the opacity is typically a decreasing function of frequency. At the same spatial region the transport physics can be optically thick for the low frequency photons, and optically thin for high frequency ones. Therefore, the optical thickness is not a simple function of space location. In this paper, the UGKS for frequency-dependent radiative system is developed. The UGKS is a finite volume method and the transport physics is modeled according to the ratio of the cell size to the photon's frequency-dependent mean free path. When the cell size is much larger than the photon's mean free path, a diffusion solution for such a frequency radiation will be obtained. On the other hand, when the cell size is much smaller than the photon's mean free path, a free transport mechanism will be recovered. In the regime between the above two limits, with the variation of the ratio between the local cell size and photon's mean free path, the UGKS provides a smooth transition in the physical and frequency space to capture the corresponding transport physics accurately. The seemingly straightforward extension of the UGKS from the gray to multiple frequency radiation system is due to its intrinsic consistent multiple scale transport modeling, but it still involves lots of work to properly discretize the multiple groups in order to design an asymptotic preserving (AP) scheme in all

  2. Transition metals

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo-Moreno, Ana; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Shabala, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    Transition metals such as Iron (Fe) and Copper (Cu) are essential for plant cell development. At the same time, due their capability to generate hydroxyl radicals they can be potentially toxic to plant metabolism. Recent works on hydroxyl-radical activation of ion transporters suggest that hydroxyl radicals generated by transition metals could play an important role in plant growth and adaptation to imbalanced environments. In this mini-review, the relation between transition metals uptake and utilization and oxidative stress-activated ion transport in plant cells is analyzed, and a new model depicting both apoplastic and cytosolic mode of ROS signaling to plasma membrane transporters is suggested. PMID:23333964

  3. An Accurate and Efficient Method of Computing Differential Seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S.; Zhu, L.

    2013-12-01

    Inversion of seismic waveforms for Earth structure usually requires computing partial derivatives of seismograms with respect to velocity model parameters. We developed an accurate and efficient method to calculate differential seismograms for multi-layered elastic media, based on the Thompson-Haskell propagator matrix technique. We first derived the partial derivatives of the Haskell matrix and its compound matrix respect to the layer parameters (P wave velocity, shear wave velocity and density). We then derived the partial derivatives of surface displacement kernels in the frequency-wavenumber domain. The differential seismograms are obtained by using the frequency-wavenumber double integration method. The implementation is computationally efficient and the total computing time is proportional to the time of computing the seismogram itself, i.e., independent of the number of layers in the model. We verified the correctness of results by comparing with differential seismograms computed using the finite differences method. Our results are more accurate because of the analytical nature of the derived partial derivatives.

  4. Active Faraday optical frequency standard.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2014-11-01

    We propose the mechanism of an active Faraday optical clock, and experimentally demonstrate an active Faraday optical frequency standard based on narrow bandwidth Faraday atomic filter by the method of velocity-selective optical pumping of cesium vapor. The center frequency of the active Faraday optical frequency standard is determined by the cesium 6 (2)S(1/2) F=4 to 6 (2)P(3/2) F'=4 and 5 crossover transition line. The optical heterodyne beat between two similar independent setups shows that the frequency linewidth reaches 281(23) Hz, which is 1.9×10(4) times smaller than the natural linewidth of the cesium 852-nm transition line. The maximum emitted light power reaches 75 μW. The active Faraday optical frequency standard reported here has advantages of narrow linewidth and reduced cavity pulling, which can readily be extended to other atomic transition lines of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms trapped in optical lattices at magic wavelengths, making it useful for new generation of optical atomic clocks.

  5. Differential equation based method for accurate approximations in optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a method to efficiently and accurately approximate the effect of design changes on structural response. The key to this new method is to interpret sensitivity equations as differential equations that may be solved explicitly for closed form approximations, hence, the method is denoted the Differential Equation Based (DEB) method. Approximations were developed for vibration frequencies, mode shapes and static displacements. The DEB approximation method was applied to a cantilever beam and results compared with the commonly-used linear Taylor series approximations and exact solutions. The test calculations involved perturbing the height, width, cross-sectional area, tip mass, and bending inertia of the beam. The DEB method proved to be very accurate, and in msot cases, was more accurate than the linear Taylor series approximation. The method is applicable to simultaneous perturbation of several design variables. Also, the approximations may be used to calculate other system response quantities. For example, the approximations for displacement are used to approximate bending stresses.

  6. Observation of transitions in lithiumlike germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behring, W. E.; Seely, J. F.; Brown, C. M.; Feldman, U.; Knauer, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    Transitions of the type n = 2-2, n = 2-3 and n = 3-4 in Li-like Ge(29+) have been observed in the spectrum from a laser-produced plasma. The energy levels and ionization energy of Ge(29+) were derived from the observed wavelengths. The wavelength of the 2s 2S1/2-2p 2P3/2 transition is sufficiently accurate to determine the quantum-electrodynamic contribution to the transition energy.

  7. EMR Gage Would Measure Coal Thickness Accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. D.; Rollwitz, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory tests indicate electron magnetic resonance (EMR) would be effective in measuring thickness of coal overlying rock substrate. In prototype dual-frequency EMR system, Sample is irradiated by two radio frequencies. Signals are mixed, producing sum and difference output frequencies that are detected by receiver. Magnetic field is varied to scan resonant spot through sample. In system designed for field use, electromagnet is U-shaped, so that sample can be adjacent to, rather than inside the probe. Same coil is used for transmitting and receiving.

  8. Optical frequency standards based on mercury and aluminum ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itano, W. M.; Bergquist, J. C.; Brusch, A.; Diddams, S. A.; Fortier, T. M.; Heavner, T. P.; Hollberg, L.; Hume, D. B.; Jefferts, S. R.; Lorini, L.; Parker, T. E.; Rosenband, T.; Stalnaker, J. E.

    2007-09-01

    Single-trapped-ion frequency standards based on a 282 nm transition in 199Hg+ and on a 267 nm transition in 27Al + have been developed at NIST over the past several years. Their frequencies are measured relative to each other and to the NIST primary frequency standard, the NIST-F1 cesium fountain, by means of a self-referenced femtosecond laser frequency comb. Both ion standards have demonstrated instabilities and inaccuracies of less than 1 × 10 -16.

  9. Accurate pointing of tungsten welding electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegelmeier, P.

    1971-01-01

    Thoriated-tungsten is pointed accurately and quickly by using sodium nitrite. Point produced is smooth and no effort is necessary to hold the tungsten rod concentric. The chemically produced point can be used several times longer than ground points. This method reduces time and cost of preparing tungsten electrodes.

  10. Static and dynamic polarizability and the Stark and blackbody-radiation frequency shifts of the molecular hydrogen ions H2+, HD+, and D2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, S.; Bakalov, D.; Bekbaev, A. K.; Korobov, V. I.

    2014-05-01

    We calculate the dc Stark effect for three molecular hydrogen ions in the nonrelativistic approximation. The effect is calculated both in dependence on the rovibrational state and in dependence on the hyperfine state. We discuss special cases and approximations. We also calculate the ac polarizabilities for several rovibrational levels and therefrom evaluate accurately the blackbody radiation shift, including the effects of excited electronic states. The results enable the detailed evaluation of certain systematic shifts of the transitions frequencies for the purpose of ultrahigh-precision optical, microwave, or radio-frequency spectroscopy in ion traps.

  11. Accurate oscillator strengths for interstellar ultraviolet lines of Cl I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schectman, R. M.; Federman, S. R.; Beideck, D. J.; Ellis, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Analyses on the abundance of interstellar chlorine rely on accurate oscillator strengths for ultraviolet transitions. Beam-foil spectroscopy was used to obtain f-values for the astrophysically important lines of Cl I at 1088, 1097, and 1347 A. In addition, the line at 1363 A was studied. Our f-values for 1088, 1097 A represent the first laboratory measurements for these lines; the values are f(1088)=0.081 +/- 0.007 (1 sigma) and f(1097) = 0.0088 +/- 0.0013 (1 sigma). These results resolve the issue regarding the relative strengths for 1088, 1097 A in favor of those suggested by astronomical measurements. For the other lines, our results of f(1347) = 0.153 +/- 0.011 (1 sigma) and f(1363) = 0.055 +/- 0.004 (1 sigma) are the most precisely measured values available. The f-values are somewhat greater than previous experimental and theoretical determinations.

  12. Accurate finite difference methods for time-harmonic wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harari, Isaac; Turkel, Eli

    1994-01-01

    Finite difference methods for solving problems of time-harmonic acoustics are developed and analyzed. Multidimensional inhomogeneous problems with variable, possibly discontinuous, coefficients are considered, accounting for the effects of employing nonuniform grids. A weighted-average representation is less sensitive to transition in wave resolution (due to variable wave numbers or nonuniform grids) than the standard pointwise representation. Further enhancement in method performance is obtained by basing the stencils on generalizations of Pade approximation, or generalized definitions of the derivative, reducing spurious dispersion, anisotropy and reflection, and by improving the representation of source terms. The resulting schemes have fourth-order accurate local truncation error on uniform grids and third order in the nonuniform case. Guidelines for discretization pertaining to grid orientation and resolution are presented.

  13. Accurate measurement of the pulse wave delay with imaging photoplethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Kamshilin, Alexei A.; Sidorov, Igor S.; Babayan, Laura; Volynsky, Maxim A.; Giniatullin, Rashid; Mamontov, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of the cardiovascular parameters using noncontact video-based or imaging photoplethysmography (IPPG) is usually considered as inaccurate because of strong influence of motion artefacts. To optimize this technique we performed a simultaneous recording of electrocardiogram and video frames of the face for 36 healthy volunteers. We found that signal disturbances originate mainly from the stochastically enhanced dichroic notch caused by endogenous cardiovascular mechanisms, with smaller contribution of the motion artefacts. Our properly designed algorithm allowed us to increase accuracy of the pulse-transit-time measurement and visualize propagation of the pulse wave in the facial region. Thus, the accurate measurement of the pulse wave parameters with this technique suggests a sensitive approach to assess local regulation of microcirculation in various physiological and pathological states. PMID:28018731

  14. Physical origin of the frequency shifts in cesium beam frequency standards: Related environmental sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audoin, Claude; Dimarcq, N.; Giordano, V.; Viennet, J.

    1990-01-01

    When observed in a cesium beam frequency standard, the hyperfine transition frequency of the atoms differs slightly from the invariant transition frequency of the unperturbed atoms at rest. The various physical and technical origins of the frequency offsets are stated. They relate to fundamental physical effects, to the method of probing the atomic resonance and to the frequency control of the slaved oscillator. The variation of the frequency offsets under a change of the value of the internal operating characteristics is considered. The sensitivity to a change of the magnetic induction, the microwave power, and the temperature is given. A comparison is made of the sensitivity of cesium beam frequency standards of the commercially available type, making use of magnetic state selection, and of devices under study, in which the state preparation and detection is accomplished optically. The pathways between the external stimuli and the physical origin of the frequency offsets are specified.

  15. AN ACCURATE FLUX DENSITY SCALE FROM 1 TO 50 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, R. A.; Butler, B. J. E-mail: BButler@nrao.edu

    2013-02-15

    We develop an absolute flux density scale for centimeter-wavelength astronomy by combining accurate flux density ratios determined by the Very Large Array between the planet Mars and a set of potential calibrators with the Rudy thermophysical emission model of Mars, adjusted to the absolute scale established by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. The radio sources 3C123, 3C196, 3C286, and 3C295 are found to be varying at a level of less than {approx}5% per century at all frequencies between 1 and 50 GHz, and hence are suitable as flux density standards. We present polynomial expressions for their spectral flux densities, valid from 1 to 50 GHz, with absolute accuracy estimated at 1%-3% depending on frequency. Of the four sources, 3C286 is the most compact and has the flattest spectral index, making it the most suitable object on which to establish the spectral flux density scale. The sources 3C48, 3C138, 3C147, NGC 7027, NGC 6542, and MWC 349 show significant variability on various timescales. Polynomial coefficients for the spectral flux density are developed for 3C48, 3C138, and 3C147 for each of the 17 observation dates, spanning 1983-2012. The planets Venus, Uranus, and Neptune are included in our observations, and we derive their brightness temperatures over the same frequency range.

  16. Accurate estimators of correlation functions in Fourier space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefusatti, E.; Crocce, M.; Scoccimarro, R.; Couchman, H. M. P.

    2016-08-01

    Efficient estimators of Fourier-space statistics for large number of objects rely on fast Fourier transforms (FFTs), which are affected by aliasing from unresolved small-scale modes due to the finite FFT grid. Aliasing takes the form of a sum over images, each of them corresponding to the Fourier content displaced by increasing multiples of the sampling frequency of the grid. These spurious contributions limit the accuracy in the estimation of Fourier-space statistics, and are typically ameliorated by simultaneously increasing grid size and discarding high-frequency modes. This results in inefficient estimates for e.g. the power spectrum when desired systematic biases are well under per cent level. We show that using interlaced grids removes odd images, which include the dominant contribution to aliasing. In addition, we discuss the choice of interpolation kernel used to define density perturbations on the FFT grid and demonstrate that using higher order interpolation kernels than the standard Cloud-In-Cell algorithm results in significant reduction of the remaining images. We show that combining fourth-order interpolation with interlacing gives very accurate Fourier amplitudes and phases of density perturbations. This results in power spectrum and bispectrum estimates that have systematic biases below 0.01 per cent all the way to the Nyquist frequency of the grid, thus maximizing the use of unbiased Fourier coefficients for a given grid size and greatly reducing systematics for applications to large cosmological data sets.

  17. A new model for broadband waveguide to microstrip transition design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Downey, Alan N.

    1986-01-01

    A new model is presented which permits the prediction of the resonant frequencies created by antipodal finline waveguide to microstrip transitions. The transition is modeled as a tapered transmission line in series with an infinite set of coupled resonant circuits. The resonant circuits are modeled as simple microwave resonant cavities of which the resonant frequencies are easily determined. The model is developed and the resonant frequencies determined for several different transitions. Experimental results are given to confirm the models.

  18. Quantum frequency bridge: high-accuracy characterization of a nearly-noiseless parametric frequency converter.

    PubMed

    Burenkov, Ivan A; Gerrits, Thomas; Lita, Adriana; Nam, Sae Woo; Krister Shalm, L; Polyakov, Sergey V

    2017-01-23

    We demonstrate an efficient and inherently ultra-low noise frequency conversion via a parametric sum frequency generation. Due to the wide separation between the input and pump frequencies and the low pump frequency relative to the input photons, the upconversion results in only ≈100 background photons per hour. To measure such a low rate, we introduced a dark count reduction algorithm for an optical transition edge sensor.

  19. Feedback about More Accurate versus Less Accurate Trials: Differential Effects on Self-Confidence and Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected by feedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On Day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of…

  20. Accurate Anharmonic IR Spectra from Integrated Cc/dft Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Vincenzo; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien; Carnimeo, Ivan; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2014-06-01

    The recent implementation of the computation of infrared (IR) intensities beyond the double harmonic approximation [1] paved the route to routine calculations of infrared spectra for a wide set of molecular systems. Contrary to common beliefs, second-order perturbation theory is able to deliver results of high accuracy provided that anharmonic resonances are properly managed [1,2]. It has been already shown for several small closed- and open shell molecular systems that the differences between coupled cluster (CC) and DFT anharmonic wavenumbers are mainly due to the harmonic terms, paving the route to introduce effective yet accurate hybrid CC/DFT schemes [2]. In this work we present that hybrid CC/DFT models can be applied also to the IR intensities leading to the simulation of highly accurate fully anharmonic IR spectra for medium-size molecules, including ones of atmospheric interest, showing in all cases good agreement with experiment even in the spectral ranges where non-fundamental transitions are predominant[3]. [1] J. Bloino and V. Barone, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 124108 (2012) [2] V. Barone, M. Biczysko, J. Bloino, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 16, 1759-1787 (2014) [3] I. Carnimeo, C. Puzzarini, N. Tasinato, P. Stoppa, A. P. Charmet, M. Biczysko, C. Cappelli and V. Barone, J. Chem. Phys., 139, 074310 (2013)

  1. Intermittent optical frequency measurements to reduce the dead time uncertainty of frequency link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, Hidekazu; Ido, Tetsuya

    2015-11-01

    The absolute frequency of the 87Sr lattice clock transition was evaluated with an uncertainty of 1.1 × 10-15 using a frequency link to the international atomic time (TAI). The frequency uncertainty of a hydrogen maser used as a transfer oscillator was reduced by homogeneously distributed intermittent measurement over a five-day grid of TAI. Three sets of four or five days measurements as well as systematic uncertainty of the clock at 8.6 × 10-17 have resulted in an absolute frequency of 87Sr 1S0-3P0 clock transition to be 429 228 004 229 872.85 (47) Hz.

  2. Accurate Guitar Tuning by Cochlear Implant Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  3. New model accurately predicts reformate composition

    SciTech Connect

    Ancheyta-Juarez, J.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. )

    1994-01-31

    Although naphtha reforming is a well-known process, the evolution of catalyst formulation, as well as new trends in gasoline specifications, have led to rapid evolution of the process, including: reactor design, regeneration mode, and operating conditions. Mathematical modeling of the reforming process is an increasingly important tool. It is fundamental to the proper design of new reactors and revamp of existing ones. Modeling can be used to optimize operating conditions, analyze the effects of process variables, and enhance unit performance. Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo has developed a model of the catalytic reforming process that accurately predicts reformate composition at the higher-severity conditions at which new reformers are being designed. The new AA model is more accurate than previous proposals because it takes into account the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate constants of each chemical reaction.

  4. Accurate colorimetric feedback for RGB LED clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Kwong; Ashdown, Ian

    2006-08-01

    We present an empirical model of LED emission spectra that is applicable to both InGaN and AlInGaP high-flux LEDs, and which accurately predicts their relative spectral power distributions over a wide range of LED junction temperatures. We further demonstrate with laboratory measurements that changes in LED spectral power distribution with temperature can be accurately predicted with first- or second-order equations. This provides the basis for a real-time colorimetric feedback system for RGB LED clusters that can maintain the chromaticity of white light at constant intensity to within +/-0.003 Δuv over a range of 45 degrees Celsius, and to within 0.01 Δuv when dimmed over an intensity range of 10:1.

  5. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task.

  6. Frequency-comb referenced collinear laser spectroscopy of Be+ for nuclear structure investigations and many-body QED tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, A.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Geppert, Ch.; Blaum, K.; Bissell, M. L.; Frömmgen, N.; Hammen, M.; Kreim, K.; Kowalska, M.; Krämer, J.; Neugart, R.; Neyens, G.; Sánchez, R.; Tiedemann, D.; Yordanov, D. T.; Zakova, M.

    2017-01-01

    Transition frequencies of the 2s ^2{{S}}_{1/2} → 2p ^2 {{P}}_{1/2, 3/2} transitions in Be^+ were measured in stable and short-lived isotopes at ISOLDE (CERN) using collinear laser spectroscopy and frequency-comb-referenced dye lasers. Quasi-simultaneous measurements in copropagating and counterpropagating geometry were performed to become independent from acceleration voltage determinations for Doppler-shift corrections of the fast ion beam. Isotope shifts and fine-structure splittings were obtained from the transition frequencies measured with a frequency comb with accuracies better than 1 MHz and led to a precise determination of the nuclear charge radii of ^{7,10-12}Be relative to the stable isotope 9Be. Moreover, an accurate determination of the 2 p fine-structure splitting allowed a test of high-precision bound-state QED calculations in the three-electron system. Here, we describe the laser spectroscopic method in detail, including several tests that were carried out to determine or estimate systematic uncertainties. Final values from two experimental runs at ISOLDE are presented, and the results are discussed.

  7. Numerical evaluation of the incomplete airy functions and their application to high frequency scattering and diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinides, E. D.; Marhefka, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    The incomplete Airy integrals serve as canonical functions for the uniform ray optical solutions to several high frequency scattering and diffraction problems that involve a class of integrals characterized by two stationary points that are arbitrarily close to one another or to an integration endpoint. Integrals of such analytical properties describe transition region phenomena associated with composite shadow boundaries. An efficient and accurate method for computing the incomplete Airy functions would make the solutions to such problems useful for engineering purposes. Here, a convergent series solution form for the incomplete Airy functions is derived. Asymptotic expansions involving several terms were also developed and serve as large argument approximations. The combination of the series solution form with the asymptotic formulae provides for an efficient and accurate computation of the incomplete Airy functions. Validation of accuracy is accomplished using direct numerical integration data.

  8. An Accurate, Simplified Model Intrabeam Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl LF

    2002-05-23

    Beginning with the general Bjorken-Mtingwa solution for intrabeam scattering (IBS) we derive an accurate, greatly simplified model of IBS, valid for high energy beams in normal storage ring lattices. In addition, we show that, under the same conditions, a modified version of Piwinski's IBS formulation (where {eta}{sub x,y}{sup 2}/{beta}{sub x,y} has been replaced by {Eta}{sub x,y}) asymptotically approaches the result of Bjorken-Mtingwa.

  9. An accurate registration technique for distorted images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delapena, Michele; Shaw, Richard A.; Linde, Peter; Dravins, Dainis

    1990-01-01

    Accurate registration of International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) images is crucial because the variability of the geometrical distortions that are introduced by the SEC-Vidicon cameras ensures that raw science images are never perfectly aligned with the Intensity Transfer Functions (ITFs) (i.e., graded floodlamp exposures that are used to linearize and normalize the camera response). A technique for precisely registering IUE images which uses a cross correlation of the fixed pattern that exists in all raw IUE images is described.

  10. On accurate determination of contact angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.

    1992-01-01

    Methods are proposed that exploit a microgravity environment to obtain highly accurate measurement of contact angle. These methods, which are based on our earlier mathematical results, do not require detailed measurement of a liquid free-surface, as they incorporate discontinuous or nearly-discontinuous behavior of the liquid bulk in certain container geometries. Physical testing is planned in the forthcoming IML-2 space flight and in related preparatory ground-based experiments.

  11. Estimations of uncertainties of frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyer, Laurent; Nicoletti, Jean-Marc; Morgenthaler, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Diverse variable phenomena in the Universe are periodic. Astonishingly many of the periodic signals present in stars have timescales coinciding with human ones (from minutes to years). The periods of signals often have to be deduced from time series which are irregularly sampled and sparse, furthermore correlations between the brightness measurements and their estimated uncertainties are common. The uncertainty on the frequency estimation is reviewed. We explore the astronomical and statistical literature, in both cases of regular and irregular samplings. The frequency uncertainty is depending on signal to noise ratio, the frequency, the observational timespan. The shape of the light curve should also intervene, since sharp features such as exoplanet transits, stellar eclipses, raising branches of pulsation stars give stringent constraints. We propose several procedures (parametric and nonparametric) to estimate the uncertainty on the frequency which are subsequently tested against simulated data to assess their performances.

  12. Accurate calculation of Green functions on the d-dimensional hypercubic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Yen Lee

    2011-07-01

    We write the Green function of the d-dimensional hypercubic lattice in a piecewise form covering the entire real frequency axis. Each piece is a single integral involving modified Bessel functions of the first and second kinds. The smoothness of the integrand allows both real and imaginary parts of the Green function to be computed quickly and accurately for any dimension d and any real frequency, and the computational time scales only linearly with d.

  13. Generating clock signals for a cycle accurate, cycle reproducible FPGA based hardware accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Asaad, Sameth W.; Kapur, Mohit

    2016-01-05

    A method, system and computer program product are disclosed for generating clock signals for a cycle accurate FPGA based hardware accelerator used to simulate operations of a device-under-test (DUT). In one embodiment, the DUT includes multiple device clocks generating multiple device clock signals at multiple frequencies and at a defined frequency ratio; and the FPG hardware accelerator includes multiple accelerator clocks generating multiple accelerator clock signals to operate the FPGA hardware accelerator to simulate the operations of the DUT. In one embodiment, operations of the DUT are mapped to the FPGA hardware accelerator, and the accelerator clock signals are generated at multiple frequencies and at the defined frequency ratio of the frequencies of the multiple device clocks, to maintain cycle accuracy between the DUT and the FPGA hardware accelerator. In an embodiment, the FPGA hardware accelerator may be used to control the frequencies of the multiple device clocks.

  14. Presidential Transitions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-09

    Podesta for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies, “Presidential Transition Guidance,” Nov. 13, 2000. 89 U.S. General Services Administration...2000, presidential election, White House Chief of Staff John Podesta issued a November 13, 2000, memorandum to executive branch agencies stating that

  15. Tessellations & Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Describes two sixth-grade lessons on the work of M. C. Escher: (1) the first lesson instructs students on tessellations, or tiles that interlock in a repeated pattern; (2) the second lesson explores Escher's drawings of transitions from two- to three-dimensional space. (DSK)

  16. BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS: Parametric noise in a nonlinear frequency up-converter of infrared signals by two-photon pumping of 3S-3D and 3S-5S transitions in sodium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galaĭchuk, Yu A.; Kudryashov, V. A.; Strizhevskiĭ, V. L.; Fontaniĭ, V. A.; Yashkir, Yu N.

    1985-07-01

    A systematic analysis was made of the spectral characteristics of resonance four-photon parametric conversion of infrared radiation as a result of two-photon resonance pumping of the 3S-3D and 3S-5S transitions in sodium and the influence of these characteristics on the threshold sensitivity of a parametric conversion detector was investigated. An experimental study was made of the characteristics of the noise radiation generated as a result of hyperparametric scattering. The results obtained can be used to select the optimal parameters of high-sensitivity detectors of weak infrared signals by parametric conversion in alkali metal vapors.

  17. All-Sky Interferometry with Spherical Harmonic Transit Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, J.Richard; Sigurdson, Kris; Pen, Ue-Li; Stebbins, Albert; Sitwell, Michael

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we describe the spherical harmonic transit telescope, a novel formalism for the analysis of transit radio telescopes. This all-sky approach bypasses the curved sky complications of traditional interferometry and so is particularly well suited to the analysis of wide-field radio interferometers. It enables compact and computationally efficient representations of the data and its statistics that allow new ways of approaching important problems like map-making and foreground removal. In particular, we show how it enables the use of the Karhunen-Loeve transform as a highly effective foreground filter, suppressing realistic foreground residuals for our fiducial example by at least a factor twenty below the 21cm signal even in highly contaminated regions of the sky. This is despite the presence of the angle-frequency mode mixing inherent in real-world instruments with frequency-dependent beams. We show, using Fisher forecasting, that foreground cleaning has little effect on power spectrum constraints compared to hypothetical foreground-free measurements. Beyond providing a natural real-world data analysis framework for 21cm telescopes now under construction and future experiments, this formalism allows accurate power spectrum forecasts to be made that include the interplay of design constraints and realistic experimental systematics with twenty-first century 21cm science.

  18. High frequency electromagnetic impedance measurements for characterization, monitoring and verification efforts. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.H.; Pellerin, L.; Becker, A.

    1998-06-01

    'Non-invasive, high-resolution imaging of the shallow subsurface is needed for delineation of buried waste, detection of unexploded ordinance, verification and monitoring of containment structures, and other environmental applications. Electromagnetic measurements at frequencies between 1 and 100 MHz are important for such applications, because the induction number of many targets is small due, and the ability to determine the dielectric permittivity in addition to electrical conductivity of the subsurface is possible. Earlier workers were successful in developing systems for detecting anomalous areas, but no quantifiable information was accurately determined. For high resolution imaging, accurate measurements are necessary so the field data can be mapped into the space of the subsurface parameters. The authors are developing a non-invasive method for accurately imaging the electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of the shallow subsurface using the plane wave impedance approach, known as the magnetotelluric (MT) method at low frequencies. Electric and magnetic sensors are being tested in a known area against theoretical predictions, thereby insuring that the data collected with the high-frequency impedance (HFI) system will support high-resolution, multi-dimensional imaging techniques. The summary of the work to date is divided into three sections: equipment procurement, instrumentation, and theoretical developments. For most earth materials, the frequency range from 1 to 100 MHz encompasses a very difficult transition zone between the wave propagation of displacement currents and the diffusive behavior of conduction currents. Test equipment, such as signal generators and amplifiers, does not cover the entire range except at great expense. Hence the authors have divided the range of investigation into three sub-ranges: 1--10 MHz, 10--30 MHz, and 30--100 MHz. Results to date are in the lowest frequency range of 1--10 MHz. Even though conduction currents

  19. Theoretical Studies of Atomic Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Charlotte Froese Fischer

    2005-07-08

    Atomic structure calculations were performed for properties such as energy levels, binding energies, transition probabilities, lifetimes, hyperfine structure, and isotope shifts. Accurate computational procedures were devised so that properties could be predicted even when they could not be obtained from experiment, and to assist in the identification of observed data. The method used was the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) method, optionally corrected for relativistic effects in the Breit-Pauli approximation. Fully relativistic Dirac-Fock calculations also were performed using the GRASP code A database of energy levels, lifetimes, and transition probabilities was designed and implemented and, at present, includes many results for Be-like to Ar-like.

  20. Spectroscopically Accurate Line Lists for Application in Sulphur Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, D. S.; Azzam, A. A. A.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Tennyson, J.

    2013-09-01

    Monitoring sulphur chemistry is thought to be of great importance for exoplanets. Doing this requires detailed knowledge of the spectroscopic properties of sulphur containing molecules such as hydrogen sulphide (H2S) [1], sulphur dioxide (SO2), and sulphur trioxide (SO3). Each of these molecules can be found in terrestrial environments, produced in volcano emissions on Earth, and analysis of their spectroscopic data can prove useful to the characterisation of exoplanets, as well as the study of planets in our own solar system, with both having a possible presence on Venus. A complete, high temperature list of line positions and intensities for H32 2 S is presented. The DVR3D program suite is used to calculate the bound ro-vibration energy levels, wavefunctions, and dipole transition intensities using Radau coordinates. The calculations are based on a newly determined, spectroscopically refined potential energy surface (PES) and a new, high accuracy, ab initio dipole moment surface (DMS). Tests show that the PES enables us to calculate the line positions accurately and the DMS gives satisfactory results for line intensities. Comparisons with experiment as well as with previous theoretical spectra will be presented. The results of this study will form an important addition to the databases which are considered as sources of information for space applications; especially, in analysing the spectra of extrasolar planets, and remote sensing studies for Venus and Earth, as well as laboratory investigations and pollution studies. An ab initio line list for SO3 was previously computed using the variational nuclear motion program TROVE [2], and was suitable for modelling room temperature SO3 spectra. The calculations considered transitions in the region of 0-4000 cm-1 with rotational states up to J = 85, and includes 174,674,257 transitions. A list of 10,878 experimental transitions had relative intensities placed on an absolute scale, and were provided in a form suitable

  1. X-Ray Transition Energies Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 128 X-Ray Transition Energies Database (Web, free access)   This X-ray transition table provides the energies and wavelengths for the K and L transitions connecting energy levels having principal quantum numbers n = 1, 2, 3, and 4. The elements covered include Z = 10, neon to Z = 100, fermium. There are two unique features of this data base: (1) a serious attempt to have all experimental values on a scale consistent with the International System of measurement (the SI) and (2) inclusion of accurate theoretical estimates for all transitions.

  2. Accurate upwind methods for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1993-01-01

    A new class of piecewise linear methods for the numerical solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations of gas dynamics is presented. These methods are uniformly second-order accurate, and can be considered as extensions of Godunov's scheme. With an appropriate definition of monotonicity preservation for the case of linear convection, it can be shown that they preserve monotonicity. Similar to Van Leer's MUSCL scheme, they consist of two key steps: a reconstruction step followed by an upwind step. For the reconstruction step, a monotonicity constraint that preserves uniform second-order accuracy is introduced. Computational efficiency is enhanced by devising a criterion that detects the 'smooth' part of the data where the constraint is redundant. The concept and coding of the constraint are simplified by the use of the median function. A slope steepening technique, which has no effect at smooth regions and can resolve a contact discontinuity in four cells, is described. As for the upwind step, existing and new methods are applied in a manner slightly different from those in the literature. These methods are derived by approximating the Euler equations via linearization and diagonalization. At a 'smooth' interface, Harten, Lax, and Van Leer's one intermediate state model is employed. A modification for this model that can resolve contact discontinuities is presented. Near a discontinuity, either this modified model or a more accurate one, namely, Roe's flux-difference splitting. is used. The current presentation of Roe's method, via the conceptually simple flux-vector splitting, not only establishes a connection between the two splittings, but also leads to an admissibility correction with no conditional statement, and an efficient approximation to Osher's approximate Riemann solver. These reconstruction and upwind steps result in schemes that are uniformly second-order accurate and economical at smooth regions, and yield high resolution at discontinuities.

  3. Accurate measurement of unsteady state fluid temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, two accurate methods for determining the transient fluid temperature were presented. Measurements were conducted for boiling water since its temperature is known. At the beginning the thermometers are at the ambient temperature and next they are immediately immersed into saturated water. The measurements were carried out with two thermometers of different construction but with the same housing outer diameter equal to 15 mm. One of them is a K-type industrial thermometer widely available commercially. The temperature indicated by the thermometer was corrected considering the thermometers as the first or second order inertia devices. The new design of a thermometer was proposed and also used to measure the temperature of boiling water. Its characteristic feature is a cylinder-shaped housing with the sheath thermocouple located in its center. The temperature of the fluid was determined based on measurements taken in the axis of the solid cylindrical element (housing) using the inverse space marching method. Measurements of the transient temperature of the air flowing through the wind tunnel using the same thermometers were also carried out. The proposed measurement technique provides more accurate results compared with measurements using industrial thermometers in conjunction with simple temperature correction using the inertial thermometer model of the first or second order. By comparing the results, it was demonstrated that the new thermometer allows obtaining the fluid temperature much faster and with higher accuracy in comparison to the industrial thermometer. Accurate measurements of the fast changing fluid temperature are possible due to the low inertia thermometer and fast space marching method applied for solving the inverse heat conduction problem.

  4. The first accurate description of an aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    2006-12-01

    As technology has advanced, the scientific study of auroral phenomena has increased by leaps and bounds. A look back at the earliest descriptions of aurorae offers an interesting look into how medieval scholars viewed the subjects that we study.Although there are earlier fragmentary references in the literature, the first accurate description of the aurora borealis appears to be that published by the German Catholic scholar Konrad von Megenberg (1309-1374) in his book Das Buch der Natur (The Book of Nature). The book was written between 1349 and 1350.

  5. Determining accurate distances to nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanos, Alceste Zoe

    2005-11-01

    Determining accurate distances to nearby or distant galaxies is a very simple conceptually, yet complicated in practice, task. Presently, distances to nearby galaxies are only known to an accuracy of 10-15%. The current anchor galaxy of the extragalactic distance scale is the Large Magellanic Cloud, which has large (10-15%) systematic uncertainties associated with it, because of its morphology, its non-uniform reddening and the unknown metallicity dependence of the Cepheid period-luminosity relation. This work aims to determine accurate distances to some nearby galaxies, and subsequently help reduce the error in the extragalactic distance scale and the Hubble constant H 0 . In particular, this work presents the first distance determination of the DIRECT Project to M33 with detached eclipsing binaries. DIRECT aims to obtain a new anchor galaxy for the extragalactic distance scale by measuring direct, accurate (to 5%) distances to two Local Group galaxies, M31 and M33, with detached eclipsing binaries. It involves a massive variability survey of these galaxies and subsequent photometric and spectroscopic follow-up of the detached binaries discovered. In this work, I also present a catalog of variable stars discovered in one of the DIRECT fields, M31Y, which includes 41 eclipsing binaries. Additionally, we derive the distance to the Draco Dwarf Spheroidal galaxy, with ~100 RR Lyrae found in our first CCD variability study of this galaxy. A "hybrid" method of discovering Cepheids with ground-based telescopes is described next. It involves applying the image subtraction technique on the images obtained from ground-based telescopes and then following them up with the Hubble Space Telescope to derive Cepheid period-luminosity distances. By re-analyzing ESO Very Large Telescope data on M83 (NGC 5236), we demonstrate that this method is much more powerful for detecting variability, especially in crowded fields. I finally present photometry for the Wolf-Rayet binary WR 20a

  6. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material.

  7. Time-accurate simulations of a shear layer forced at a single frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, R. W.; Huang, P. G.; Macinnes, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the forced shear layer studied experimentally by Oster and Wygnanski, and Weisbrot. Two different computational approaches are examined: Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES). The DNS approach solves the full three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations for a temporally evolving mixing layer, while the LES approach solves the two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations with a subgrid scale turbulence model. While the comparison between these calculations and experimental data was hampered by a lack of information on the inflow boundary conditions, the calculations are shown to qualitatively agree with several aspects of the experiment. The sensitivity of these calculations to factors such as mesh refinement and Reynolds number is illustrated.

  8. Accurate measurement method of Fabry-Perot cavity parameters via optical transfer function

    SciTech Connect

    Bondu, Francois; Debieu, Olivier

    2007-05-10

    It is shown how the transfer function from frequency noise to a Pound-Drever-Hall signal for a Fabry-Perot cavity can be used to accurately measure cavity length, cavity linewidth, mirror curvature, misalignments, laser beam shape mismatching with resonant beam shape, and cavity impedance mismatching with respect to vacuum.

  9. Eliminating Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallick, Barb; Lee, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Adults often find themselves transitioning from one activity to another in a short time span. Most of the time, they do not feel they have a lot of control over their schedules, but wish that they could carve out extended time to relax and focus on one project. Picture a group of children in the block area who have spent 15 or 20 minutes building…

  10. Frequency-comb referenced spectroscopy of v4- and v5-excited hot bands in the 1.5 μm spectrum of C2H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twagirayezu, Sylvestre; Cich, Matthew J.; Sears, Trevor J.; McRaven, Christopher P.; Hall, Gregory E.

    2015-10-01

    Doppler-free transition frequencies for v4- and v5-excited hot bands have been measured in the v1 + v3 band region of the spectrum of acetylene using saturation dip spectroscopy with an extended cavity diode laser referenced to a frequency comb. The frequency accuracy of the measured transitions, as judged from line shape model fits and comparison to known frequencies in the v1 + v3 band itself, is between 3 and 22 kHz. This is some three orders of magnitude improvement on the accuracy and precision of previous line position estimates that were derived from the analysis of high-resolution Fourier transform infrared absorption spectra. Comparison to transition frequencies computed from constants derived from published Fourier transform infrared spectra shows that some upper rotational energy levels suffer specific perturbations causing energy level shifts of up to several hundred MHz. These perturbations are due to energy levels of the same rotational quantum number derived from nearby vibrational levels that become degenerate at specific energies. Future identification of the perturbing levels will provide accurate relative energies of excited vibrational levels of acetylene in the 7100-7600 cm-1 energy region.

  11. Accurate taxonomic assignment of short pyrosequencing reads.

    PubMed

    Clemente, José C; Jansson, Jesper; Valiente, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Ambiguities in the taxonomy dependent assignment of pyrosequencing reads are usually resolved by mapping each read to the lowest common ancestor in a reference taxonomy of all those sequences that match the read. This conservative approach has the drawback of mapping a read to a possibly large clade that may also contain many sequences not matching the read. A more accurate taxonomic assignment of short reads can be made by mapping each read to the node in the reference taxonomy that provides the best precision and recall. We show that given a suffix array for the sequences in the reference taxonomy, a short read can be mapped to the node of the reference taxonomy with the best combined value of precision and recall in time linear in the size of the taxonomy subtree rooted at the lowest common ancestor of the matching sequences. An accurate taxonomic assignment of short reads can thus be made with about the same efficiency as when mapping each read to the lowest common ancestor of all matching sequences in a reference taxonomy. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach on several metagenomic datasets of marine and gut microbiota.

  12. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  13. Accurate pose estimation for forensic identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merckx, Gert; Hermans, Jeroen; Vandermeulen, Dirk

    2010-04-01

    In forensic authentication, one aims to identify the perpetrator among a series of suspects or distractors. A fundamental problem in any recognition system that aims for identification of subjects in a natural scene is the lack of constrains on viewing and imaging conditions. In forensic applications, identification proves even more challenging, since most surveillance footage is of abysmal quality. In this context, robust methods for pose estimation are paramount. In this paper we will therefore present a new pose estimation strategy for very low quality footage. Our approach uses 3D-2D registration of a textured 3D face model with the surveillance image to obtain accurate far field pose alignment. Starting from an inaccurate initial estimate, the technique uses novel similarity measures based on the monogenic signal to guide a pose optimization process. We will illustrate the descriptive strength of the introduced similarity measures by using them directly as a recognition metric. Through validation, using both real and synthetic surveillance footage, our pose estimation method is shown to be accurate, and robust to lighting changes and image degradation.

  14. Sparse and accurate high resolution SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Duc; Zhao, Kexin; Rowe, William; Li, Jian

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the usage of an adaptive method, the Iterative Adaptive Approach (IAA), in combination with a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate to reconstruct high resolution SAR images that are both sparse and accurate. IAA is a nonparametric weighted least squares algorithm that is robust and user parameter-free. IAA has been shown to reconstruct SAR images with excellent side lobes suppression and high resolution enhancement. We first reconstruct the SAR images using IAA, and then we enforce sparsity by using MAP with a sparsity inducing prior. By coupling these two methods, we can produce a sparse and accurate high resolution image that are conducive for feature extractions and target classification applications. In addition, we show how IAA can be made computationally efficient without sacrificing accuracies, a desirable property for SAR applications where the size of the problems is quite large. We demonstrate the success of our approach using the Air Force Research Lab's "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set Version 1.0" challenge dataset. Via the widely used FFT, individual vehicles contained in the scene are barely recognizable due to the poor resolution and high side lobe nature of FFT. However with our approach clear edges, boundaries, and textures of the vehicles are obtained.

  15. Accurate basis set truncation for wavefunction embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Taylor A.; Goodpaster, Jason D.; Manby, Frederick R.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) provides a formally exact framework for performing embedded subsystem electronic structure calculations, including DFT-in-DFT and wavefunction theory-in-DFT descriptions. In the interest of efficiency, it is desirable to truncate the atomic orbital basis set in which the subsystem calculation is performed, thus avoiding high-order scaling with respect to the size of the MO virtual space. In this study, we extend a recently introduced projection-based embedding method [F. R. Manby, M. Stella, J. D. Goodpaster, and T. F. Miller III, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2564 (2012)], 10.1021/ct300544e to allow for the systematic and accurate truncation of the embedded subsystem basis set. The approach is applied to both covalently and non-covalently bound test cases, including water clusters and polypeptide chains, and it is demonstrated that errors associated with basis set truncation are controllable to well within chemical accuracy. Furthermore, we show that this approach allows for switching between accurate projection-based embedding and DFT embedding with approximate kinetic energy (KE) functionals; in this sense, the approach provides a means of systematically improving upon the use of approximate KE functionals in DFT embedding.

  16. Improved Tracking of an Atomic-Clock Resonance Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Chung, Sang K.; Tu, Meirong

    2010-01-01

    An improved method of making an electronic oscillator track the frequency of an atomic-clock resonance transition is based on fitting a theoretical nonlinear curve to measurements at three oscillator frequencies within the operational frequency band of the transition (in other words, at three points within the resonance peak). In the measurement process, the frequency of a microwave oscillator is repeatedly set at various offsets from the nominal resonance frequency, the oscillator signal is applied in a square pulse of the oscillator signal having a suitable duration (typically, of the order of a second), and, for each pulse at each frequency offset, fluorescence photons of the transition in question are counted. As described below, the counts are used to determine a new nominal resonance frequency. Thereafter, offsets are determined with respect to the new resonance frequency. The process as described thus far is repeated so as to repeatedly adjust the oscillator to track the most recent estimate of the nominal resonance frequency.

  17. Quantum systems under frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Silveri, M P; Tuorila, J A; Thuneberg, E V; Paraoanu, G S

    2017-05-01

    We review the physical phenomena that arise when quantum mechanical energy levels are modulated in time. The dynamics resulting from changes in the transition frequency is a problem studied since the early days of quantum mechanics. It has been of constant interest both experimentally and theoretically since, with the simple two-state model providing an inexhaustible source of novel concepts. When the transition frequency of a quantum system is modulated, several phenomena can be observed, such as Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana interference, motional averaging and narrowing, and the formation of dressed states with the appearance of sidebands in the spectrum. Adiabatic changes result in the accumulation of geometric phases, which can be used to create topological states. In recent years, an exquisite experimental control in the time domain was gained through the parameters entering the Hamiltonian, and high-fidelity readout schemes allowed the state of the system to be monitored non-destructively. These developments were made in the field of quantum devices, especially in superconducting qubits, as a well as in atomic physics, in particular in ultracold gases. As a result of these advances, it became possible to demonstrate many of the fundamental effects that arise in a quantum system when its transition frequencies are modulated. The purpose of this review is to present some of these developments, from two-state atoms and harmonic oscillators to multilevel and many-particle systems.

  18. Frequency spectrum analyzer with phase-lock

    DOEpatents

    Boland, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    A frequency-spectrum analyzer with phase-lock for analyzing the frequency and amplitude of an input signal is comprised of a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) which is driven by a ramp generator, and a phase error detector circuit. The phase error detector circuit measures the difference in phase between the VCO and the input signal, and drives the VCO locking it in phase momentarily with the input signal. The input signal and the output of the VCO are fed into a correlator which transfers the input signal to a frequency domain, while providing an accurate absolute amplitude measurement of each frequency component of the input signal.

  19. Low frequency acoustic and electromagnetic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Maccamy, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper deals with two classes of problems arising from acoustics and electromagnetics scattering in the low frequency stations. The first class of problem is solving Helmholtz equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions on an arbitrary two dimensional body while the second one is an interior-exterior interface problem with Helmholtz equation in the exterior. Low frequency analysis show that there are two intermediate problems which solve the above problems accurate to 0(k(2) log k) where k is the frequency. These solutions greatly differ from the zero frequency approximations. For the Dirichlet problem numerical examples are shown to verify the theoretical estimates.

  20. Cumulative frequency fit for particle size distribution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhuyun; Gautam, Mridul; Mehta, Sandeep

    2002-08-01

    A cumulative frequency distribution fit method is presented for analyzing particle size distributions by minimizing the summation of the square of cumulative frequency errors. Compared to the frequency fit method, the cumulative frequency fit method yields a more accurate solution. Based upon this, a spreadsheet was developed for analyzing multi-modal particle size distribution. The motivation for the work presented in this article was the current interest in ultra-fine and nano-sized particle exhaust emissions from heavy-duty diesel engines. The new spreadsheet provides a quick and convenient way to conduct particle size distribution analysis.

  1. Low frequency acoustic and electromagnetic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Maccamy, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper deals with two classes of problems arising from acoustics and electromagnetics scattering in the low frequency stations. The first class of problem is solving Helmholtz equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions on an arbitrary two dimensional body while the second one is an interior-exterior interface problem with Helmholtz equation in the exterior. Low frequency analysis show that there are two intermediate problems which solve the above problems accurate to 0(k/2/ log k) where k is the frequency. These solutions greatly differ from the zero frequency approximations. For the Dirichlet problem numerical examples are shown to verify the theoretical estimates.

  2. Laser spectroscopy on forbidden transitions in trapped highly charged Ar(13+) ions.

    PubMed

    Mäckel, V; Klawitter, R; Brenner, G; Crespo López-Urrutia, J R; Ullrich, J

    2011-09-30

    We demonstrate resonant fluorescence laser spectroscopy in highly charged ions (HCI) stored in an electron beam ion trap by investigating the dipole-forbidden 1s(2)2s(2)2p (2)P(3/2)-(2)P(1/2) transition in boronlike Ar(13+) ions. Forced evaporative cooling yielded a high resolving power, resulting in an accurate wavelength determination to λ=441.255 68(26)  nm. By applying stronger cooling and two-photon excitation, new optical frequency standards based upon ultrastable transitions in such HCI could be realized in the future, e.g., for the search of time variations of the fine-structure constant.

  3. RSRM Chamber Pressure Oscillations: Transit Time Models and Unsteady CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tom; Stewart, Eric

    1996-01-01

    Space Shuttle solid rocket motor low frequency internal pressure oscillations have been observed since early testing. The same type of oscillations also are present in the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM). The oscillations, which occur during RSRM burn, are predominantly at the first three motor cavity longitudinal acoustic mode frequencies. Broadband flow and combustion noise provide the energy to excite these modes at low levels throughout motor burn, however, at certain times during burn the fluctuating pressure amplitude increases significantly. The increased fluctuations at these times suggests an additional excitation mechanism. The RSRM has inhibitors on the propellant forward facing surface of each motor segment. The inhibitors are in a slot at the segment field joints to prevent burning at that surface. The aft facing segment surface at a field joint slot burns and forms a cavity of time varying size. Initially the inhibitor is recessed in the field joint cavity. As propellant burns away the inhibitor begins to protrude into the bore flow. Two mechanisms (transit time models) that are considered potential pressure oscillation excitations are cavity-edge tones, and inhibitor hole-tones. Estimates of frequency variation with time of longitudinal acoustic modes, cavity edge-tones, and hole-tones compare favorably with frequencies measured during motor hot firing. It is believed that the highest oscillation amplitudes occur when vortex shedding frequencies coincide with motor longitudinal acoustic modes. A time accurate computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis was made to replicate the observations from motor firings and to observe the transit time mechanisms in detail. FDNS is the flow solver used to detail the time varying aspects of the flow. The fluid is approximated as a single-phase ideal gas. The CFD model was an axisymmetric representation of the RSRM at 80 seconds into burn.Deformation of the inhibitors by the internal flow was determined

  4. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, D.D.

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperatures in the range of about 1800/sup 0/ to 2700/sup 0/C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  5. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperaes in the range of about 1800.degree. to 2700.degree. C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  6. LSM: perceptually accurate line segment merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Naila; Khan, Nazar

    2016-11-01

    Existing line segment detectors tend to break up perceptually distinct line segments into multiple segments. We propose an algorithm for merging such broken segments to recover the original perceptually accurate line segments. The algorithm proceeds by grouping line segments on the basis of angular and spatial proximity. Then those line segment pairs within each group that satisfy unique, adaptive mergeability criteria are successively merged to form a single line segment. This process is repeated until no more line segments can be merged. We also propose a method for quantitative comparison of line segment detection algorithms. Results on the York Urban dataset show that our merged line segments are closer to human-marked ground-truth line segments compared to state-of-the-art line segment detection algorithms.

  7. Highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-12-30

    Disclosed is a highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine, comprising a revolute joint, comprising a circular encoder wheel, having an axis of rotation; a plurality of marks disposed around at least a portion of the circumference of the encoder wheel; bearing means for supporting the encoder wheel, while permitting free rotation of the encoder wheel about the wheel's axis of rotation; and a sensor, rigidly attached to the bearing means, for detecting the motion of at least some of the marks as the encoder wheel rotates; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the encoder wheel, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the sensor, for converting the output of the sensor into a set of cylindrical coordinates representing the position of the probe tip relative to a reference cylindrical coordinate system.

  8. Toward Accurate and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S.

    2016-01-01

    Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable accurate comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. PMID:27565341

  9. Obtaining accurate translations from expressed sequence tags.

    PubMed

    Wasmuth, James; Blaxter, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The genomes of an increasing number of species are being investigated through the generation of expressed sequence tags (ESTs). However, ESTs are prone to sequencing errors and typically define incomplete transcripts, making downstream annotation difficult. Annotation would be greatly improved with robust polypeptide translations. Many current solutions for EST translation require a large number of full-length gene sequences for training purposes, a resource that is not available for the majority of EST projects. As part of our ongoing EST programs investigating these "neglected" genomes, we have developed a polypeptide prediction pipeline, prot4EST. It incorporates freely available software to produce final translations that are more accurate than those derived from any single method. We describe how this integrated approach goes a long way to overcoming the deficit in training data.

  10. Micron Accurate Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron accurate measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.

  11. Accurate radio positions with the Tidbinbilla interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batty, M. J.; Gulkis, S.; Jauncey, D. L.; Rayner, P. T.

    1979-01-01

    The Tidbinbilla interferometer (Batty et al., 1977) is designed specifically to provide accurate radio position measurements of compact radio sources in the Southern Hemisphere with high sensitivity. The interferometer uses the 26-m and 64-m antennas of the Deep Space Network at Tidbinbilla, near Canberra. The two antennas are separated by 200 m on a north-south baseline. By utilizing the existing antennas and the low-noise traveling-wave masers at 2.29 GHz, it has been possible to produce a high-sensitivity instrument with a minimum of capital expenditure. The north-south baseline ensures that a good range of UV coverage is obtained, so that sources lying in the declination range between about -80 and +30 deg may be observed with nearly orthogonal projected baselines of no less than about 1000 lambda. The instrument also provides high-accuracy flux density measurements for compact radio sources.

  12. Magnetic ranging tool accurately guides replacement well

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, J.B.; Wesson, J.P. )

    1992-12-21

    This paper reports on magnetic ranging surveys and directional drilling technology which accurately guided a replacement well bore to intersect a leaking gas storage well with casing damage. The second well bore was then used to pump cement into the original leaking casing shoe. The repair well bore kicked off from the surface hole, bypassed casing damage in the middle of the well, and intersected the damaged well near the casing shoe. The repair well was subsequently completed in the gas storage zone near the original well bore, salvaging the valuable bottom hole location in the reservoir. This method would prevent the loss of storage gas, and it would prevent a potential underground blowout that could permanently damage the integrity of the storage field.

  13. Transition in Pulsatile Pipe Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, Pavlos; Brindise, Melissa

    2016-11-01

    Transition has been observed to occur in the aorta, and stenotic vessels, where pulsatile flow exists. However, few studies have investigated the characteristics and effects of transition in oscillating or pulsatile flow and none have utilized a physiological waveform. In this work, we explore transition in pipe flow using three pulsatile waveforms which all maintain the same mean and maximum flow rates and range to zero flow, as is physiologically typical. Velocity fields were obtained using planar particle image velocimetry for each pulsatile waveform at six mean Reynolds numbers ranging between 500 and 4000. Turbulent statistics including turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and Reynolds stresses were computed. Quadrant analysis was used to identify characteristics of the production and dissipation of turbulence. Coherent structures were identified using the λci method. We developed a wavelet-Hilbert time-frequency analysis method to identify high frequency structures and compared these to the coherent structures. The results of this study demonstrate that the different pulsatile waveforms induce different levels of TKE and high frequency structures, suggesting that the rates of acceleration and deceleration influence the onset and development of transition.

  14. The high cost of accurate knowledge.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Kathleen M; Weber, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    Many business thinkers believe it's the role of senior managers to scan the external environment to monitor contingencies and constraints, and to use that precise knowledge to modify the company's strategy and design. As these thinkers see it, managers need accurate and abundant information to carry out that role. According to that logic, it makes sense to invest heavily in systems for collecting and organizing competitive information. Another school of pundits contends that, since today's complex information often isn't precise anyway, it's not worth going overboard with such investments. In other words, it's not the accuracy and abundance of information that should matter most to top executives--rather, it's how that information is interpreted. After all, the role of senior managers isn't just to make decisions; it's to set direction and motivate others in the face of ambiguities and conflicting demands. Top executives must interpret information and communicate those interpretations--they must manage meaning more than they must manage information. So which of these competing views is the right one? Research conducted by academics Sutcliffe and Weber found that how accurate senior executives are about their competitive environments is indeed less important for strategy and corresponding organizational changes than the way in which they interpret information about their environments. Investments in shaping those interpretations, therefore, may create a more durable competitive advantage than investments in obtaining and organizing more information. And what kinds of interpretations are most closely linked with high performance? Their research suggests that high performers respond positively to opportunities, yet they aren't overconfident in their abilities to take advantage of those opportunities.

  15. Accurate Sizing of Nanoparticles Using Confocal Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kuyper, Christopher L.; Fujimoto, Bryant S.; Zhao, Yiqiong; Schiro, Perry G.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to size accurately low concentrations of nanoscale particles in small volumes is useful for a broad range of disciplines. Here, we characterize confocal correlation spectroscopy (CCS), which is capable of measuring sizes of both fluorescent and non-fluorescent particles, such as quantum dots, gold colloids, latex spheres, and fluorescent beads. We measured accurately particles ranging in diameter from 11 nm to 300 nm, a size range that had been difficult to probe, owing to a phenomenon coined biased diffusion that causes diffusion times, or particle size, to deviate as a function of laser power. At low powers, artifacts mimicking biased diffusion are caused by saturation of the detector, which is especially problematic when probing highly fluorescent or highly scattering nanoparticles. At higher powers (>1 mW), however, autocorrelation curves in both resonant and non-resonant conditions show a structure indicative of an increased contribution from longer correlation times coupled with a decrease in shorter correlation times. We propose this change in the autocorrelation curve is due to partial trapping of the particles as they transit the probe volume. Furthermore, we found only a slight difference in the effect of biased diffusion when comparing resonant and non-resonant conditions. Simulations suggest the depth of trapping potential necessary for biased diffusion is >1 kBT. Overcoming artifacts from detector saturation and biased diffusion, confocal correlation spectroscopy is particularly advantageous due to its ability to size particles in small volumes characteristic of microfluidic channels and aqueous microdroplets. We believe the method will find increasing use in a wide range of applications in measuring nanoparticles and macromolecular systems. PMID:17134198

  16. Different ways to active optical frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Duo; Xue, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiaogang; Chen, Jingbiao

    2016-06-01

    Active optical frequency standard, or active optical clock, is a new concept of optical frequency standard, where a weak feedback with phase coherence information in optical bad-cavity limitation is formed, and the continuous self-sustained coherent stimulated emission between two atomic transition levels with population inversion is realized. Through ten years of both theoretical and experimental exploration, the narrow linewidth and suppression of cavity pulling effect of active optical frequency standard have been initially proved. In this paper, after a simple review, we will mainly present the most recent experimental progresses of active optical frequency standards in Peking University, including 4-level cesium active optical frequency standards and active Faraday optical frequency standards. The future development of active optical frequency standards is also discussed.

  17. Using Nice-Ohvms Lineshapes to Study Relaxation Rates and Transition Dipole Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, James N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-06-01

    Noise Immune Cavity Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (NICE-OHVMS) is a successful technique that we have developed to sensitively, precisely, and accurately record transitions of molecular ions. It has been used exclusively as a method for precise transition frequency measurement via saturation and fitting of the resultant Lamb dips. NICE-OHVMS has been employed to improve the uncertainties on H_3^+, CH_5^+, HeH^+, and OH^+, reducing the transition frequency uncertainties by two orders of magnitude. Because NICE-OHVMS is a saturation technique, this provides a unique opportunity to access information about the ratio of the transition dipole moment to the relaxation rate of the transition. This can be done in two ways, either through comparison of Lamb dip depth to the transition profile or comparison of the absorption intensity and dispersion intensity. Due to the complexity of the modulation scheme, there are many parameters that affect the apparent intensity of the recorded lineshape. A complete understanding of the lineshape is required to make the measurements of interest. Here we present a model that accounts for the heterodyne modulation and velocity modulation, assuming that the fundamental lineshape is represented by a Voigt profile. Fits to data are made and interpreted in order to extract the saturation parameter. K.N. Crabtree et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 551, 1 (2012). J.N. Hodges et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 164201 (2013). A.J. Perry et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. 317, 71 (2015). A.J. Perry et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141, 101101 (2014). C.R. Marcus et al., Astrophys. J. 817, 138 (2016).

  18. Radar frequency radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malowicki, E.

    1981-11-01

    A method is presented for the determination of radar frequency radiation power densities that the PAVE PAWS radar system could produce in its air and ground environment. The effort was prompted by the concern of the people in the vicinity of OTIS AFB MA and BEALE AFB CA about the possible radar frequency radiation hazard of the PAVE PAWS radar. The method is based on the following main assumptions that: (a) the total field can be computed as the vector summation of the individual fields due to each antenna element; (b) the individual field can be calculated using distances for which the field point is in the far field of the antenna element. An RFR computer program was coded for the RADC HE 6180 digital computer and exercised to calculate the radiation levels in the air and ground space for the present baseline and the possible Six DB and 10 DB growth systems of the PAVE PAWS radar system at OTIS AFB MA. The average radiation levels due to the surveillance fence were computed for three regions: in the air space in front of the radar, at the radar hazard fence at OTIS AFB MA and at representative ground points in the OTIS AFB vicinity. It was concluded that the radar frequency radiation of PAVE PAWS does not present a hazard to personnel provided there is no entry to the air hazard zone or to the area within the hazard fence. The method developed offers a cost effective way to determine radiation levels from a phased array radar especially in the near field and transition regions.

  19. Rarefied Transitional Bridging of Blunt Body Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, R. G.; Blanchard, R. C.; Moss, J. N.

    1998-01-01

    The bridging procedures discussed provide an accurate engineering method for predicting rarefied transitional aerodynamics of spherically-blunted cone entry vehicles. The single-point procedure offers a way to improve the bridging procedures while minimizing the computational effort. However, the accuracy of these procedures ultimately depends on accurate knowledge of the aerodynamics in the free-molecular and continuum limits. The excellent agreement shown for DSMC predictions and bridging relations with the Viking flight data in transitional regime enhance the coincidence in these procedures.

  20. Approaching system equilibrium with accurate or not accurate feedback information in a two-route system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-mei; Xie, Dong-fan; Li, Qi

    2015-02-01

    With the development of intelligent transport system, advanced information feedback strategies have been developed to reduce traffic congestion and enhance the capacity. However, previous strategies provide accurate information to travelers and our simulation results show that accurate information brings negative effects, especially in delay case. Because travelers prefer to the best condition route with accurate information, and delayed information cannot reflect current traffic condition but past. Then travelers make wrong routing decisions, causing the decrease of the capacity and the increase of oscillations and the system deviating from the equilibrium. To avoid the negative effect, bounded rationality is taken into account by introducing a boundedly rational threshold BR. When difference between two routes is less than the BR, routes have equal probability to be chosen. The bounded rationality is helpful to improve the efficiency in terms of capacity, oscillation and the gap deviating from the system equilibrium.

  1. Higher order accurate partial implicitization: An unconditionally stable fourth-order-accurate explicit numerical technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, R. A., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The previously obtained second-order-accurate partial implicitization numerical technique used in the solution of fluid dynamic problems was modified with little complication to achieve fourth-order accuracy. The Von Neumann stability analysis demonstrated the unconditional linear stability of the technique. The order of the truncation error was deduced from the Taylor series expansions of the linearized difference equations and was verified by numerical solutions to Burger's equation. For comparison, results were also obtained for Burger's equation using a second-order-accurate partial-implicitization scheme, as well as the fourth-order scheme of Kreiss.

  2. Nonlinear frequency coupling in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Waskoenig, J.; Gans, T.

    2010-05-03

    Plasma ionization, and associated mode transitions, in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas are governed through nonlinear frequency coupling in the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath. Ionization in low-power mode is determined by the nonlinear coupling of electron heating and the momentary local plasma density. Ionization in high-power mode is driven by electron avalanches during phases of transient high electric fields within the boundary sheath. The transition between these distinctly different modes is controlled by the total voltage of both frequency components.

  3. 40 CFR 93.104 - Frequency of conformity determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Frequency of conformity determinations..., Funded or Approved Under Title 23 U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Laws § 93.104 Frequency of conformity... implementation plan. (b) Frequency of conformity determinations for transportation plans. (1) Each...

  4. 40 CFR 93.104 - Frequency of conformity determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Frequency of conformity determinations..., Funded or Approved Under Title 23 U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Laws § 93.104 Frequency of conformity... implementation plan. (b) Frequency of conformity determinations for transportation plans. (1) Each...

  5. 40 CFR 93.104 - Frequency of conformity determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Frequency of conformity determinations..., Funded or Approved Under Title 23 U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Laws § 93.104 Frequency of conformity... implementation plan. (b) Frequency of conformity determinations for transportation plans. (1) Each...

  6. Mode Transition of Trichel pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kexin, Zhang; Yongjun, Piao; Miao, Tang; Jingfeng, Tang; Liqiu, Wei; Chaohai, Zhang

    2015-11-01

    The trichel pulse is a typical kind of negative corona current observed in electronegative gases. In this work, stochastic behavior of the trichel pulse has been investigated. The experiment is performed in a negative corona reactor consisting of a stainless steel pin and a stainless steel powered by a dc high voltage source. The characteristic parameters distributions of corona current pulses, including the amplitude, rise time, half-wave time, and repetition frequency, are analyzed statistically. The results show there is a mode transition during the period of voltage increasing. This transition process happens in a certain voltage region, and change of pulse amplitude is the main difference between the two modes.

  7. Stimulated coherent transition radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hung-chi Lihn

    1996-03-01

    Coherent radiation emitted from a relativistic electron bunch consists of wavelengths longer than or comparable to the bunch length. The intensity of this radiation out-numbers that of its incoherent counterpart, which extends to wavelengths shorter than the bunch length, by a factor equal to the number of electrons in the bunch. In typical accelerators, this factor is about 8 to 11 orders of magnitude. The spectrum of the coherent radiation is determined by the Fourier transform of the electron bunch distribution and, therefore, contains information of the bunch distribution. Coherent transition radiation emitted from subpicosecond electron bunches at the Stanford SUNSHINE facility is observed in the far-infrared regime through a room-temperature pyroelectric bolometer and characterized through the electron bunch-length study. To measure the bunch length, a new frequency-resolved subpicosecond bunch-length measuring system is developed. This system uses a far-infrared Michelson interferometer to measure the spectrum of coherent transition radiation through optical autocorrelation with resolution far better than existing time-resolved methods. Hence, the radiation spectrum and the bunch length are deduced from the autocorrelation measurement. To study the stimulation of coherent transition radiation, a special cavity named BRAICER is invented. Far-infrared light pulses of coherent transition radiation emitted from electron bunches are delayed and circulated in the cavity to coincide with subsequent incoming electron bunches. This coincidence of light pulses with electron bunches enables the light to do work on electrons, and thus stimulates more radiated energy. The possibilities of extending the bunch-length measuring system to measure the three-dimensional bunch distribution and making the BRAICER cavity a broadband, high-intensity, coherent, far-infrared light source are also discussed.

  8. Accurate VUV Laboratory Measurements of Fe III Transitions for Astrophysical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell-Whitehead, R. J.; Pickering, J. C.; Smillie, D.; Nave, G.; Szabo, C. I.; Smith, Peter L.; Nielsen, K. E.; Peters, G.

    2006-01-01

    We report preliminary measurements of Fe III spectra in the 1150 to 2500 A wavelength interval. Spectra have been recorded with an iron-neon Penning discharge lamp (PDL) between 1600 and 2500 A at Imperial College (IC) using high resolution Fourier (FT) transform spectroscopy. These FT spectrometer measurements were extended beyond 1600 A to 1150 A using high-resolution grating spectroscopy at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). These recorded spectra represent the first radiometrically calibrated measurements of a doubly-ionized iron-group element spectrum combining the techniques of vacuum ultraviolet FT and grating spectroscopy. The spectral range of the new laboratory measurements corresponds to recent HST/STIS observations of sharp-lined B stars and of Eta Carinae. The new improved atomic data can be applied to abundance studies and diagnostics of astrophysical plasmas.

  9. Communication: Vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of the tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) anion and accurate determination of the electron affinity of TCNQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guo-Zhu; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) is widely used as an electron acceptor to form highly conducting organic charge-transfer solids. Surprisingly, the electron affinity (EA) of TCNQ is not well known and has never been directly measured. Here, we report vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) of the TCNQ- anion produced using electrospray and cooled in a cryogenic ion trap. Photoelectron spectrum taken at 354.7 nm represents the detachment transition from the ground state of TCNQ- to that of neutral TCNQ with a short vibrational progression. The EA of TCNQ is measured accurately to be 3.383 ± 0.001 eV (27 289 ± 8 cm-1), compared to the 2.8 ± 0.1 eV value known in the literature and measured previously using collisional ionization technique. In addition, six vibrational peaks are observed in the photoelectron spectrum, yielding vibrational frequencies for three totally symmetric modes of TCNQ. Two-photon PES via a bound electronic excited state of TCNQ- at 3.100 eV yields a broad low kinetic energy peak due to fast internal conversion to vibrationally excited levels of the anion ground electronic state. The high EA measured for TCNQ underlies its ability as a good electron acceptor.

  10. Communication: Vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of the tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) anion and accurate determination of the electron affinity of TCNQ

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Guo-Zhu; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2015-12-14

    Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) is widely used as an electron acceptor to form highly conducting organic charge-transfer solids. Surprisingly, the electron affinity (EA) of TCNQ is not well known and has never been directly measured. Here, we report vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) of the TCNQ{sup −} anion produced using electrospray and cooled in a cryogenic ion trap. Photoelectron spectrum taken at 354.7 nm represents the detachment transition from the ground state of TCNQ{sup −} to that of neutral TCNQ with a short vibrational progression. The EA of TCNQ is measured accurately to be 3.383 ± 0.001 eV (27 289 ± 8 cm{sup −1}), compared to the 2.8 ± 0.1 eV value known in the literature and measured previously using collisional ionization technique. In addition, six vibrational peaks are observed in the photoelectron spectrum, yielding vibrational frequencies for three totally symmetric modes of TCNQ. Two-photon PES via a bound electronic excited state of TCNQ{sup −} at 3.100 eV yields a broad low kinetic energy peak due to fast internal conversion to vibrationally excited levels of the anion ground electronic state. The high EA measured for TCNQ underlies its ability as a good electron acceptor.

  11. Communication: Vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of the tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) anion and accurate determination of the electron affinity of TCNQ.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guo-Zhu; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2015-12-14

    Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) is widely used as an electron acceptor to form highly conducting organic charge-transfer solids. Surprisingly, the electron affinity (EA) of TCNQ is not well known and has never been directly measured. Here, we report vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) of the TCNQ(-) anion produced using electrospray and cooled in a cryogenic ion trap. Photoelectron spectrum taken at 354.7 nm represents the detachment transition from the ground state of TCNQ(-) to that of neutral TCNQ with a short vibrational progression. The EA of TCNQ is measured accurately to be 3.383 ± 0.001 eV (27,289 ± 8 cm(-1)), compared to the 2.8 ± 0.1 eV value known in the literature and measured previously using collisional ionization technique. In addition, six vibrational peaks are observed in the photoelectron spectrum, yielding vibrational frequencies for three totally symmetric modes of TCNQ. Two-photon PES via a bound electronic excited state of TCNQ(-) at 3.100 eV yields a broad low kinetic energy peak due to fast internal conversion to vibrationally excited levels of the anion ground electronic state. The high EA measured for TCNQ underlies its ability as a good electron acceptor.

  12. Comprehensive time series analysis of the transiting extrasolar planet WASP-33b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, G.; Kovács, T.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bieryla, A.; Latham, D.; Noyes, R. W.; Regály, Zs.; Esquerdo, G. A.

    2013-05-01

    Context. HD 15082 (WASP-33) is the hottest and fastest rotating star known to harbor a transiting extrasolar planet (WASP-33b). The lack of high precision radial velocity (RV) data stresses the need for precise light curve analysis and gathering further RV data. Aims: By using available photometric and RV data, we perform a blend analysis, compute more accurate system parameters, confine the planetary mass, and, attempt to cast light on the observed transit anomalies. Methods: We combined the original HATNet observations and various followup data to jointly analyze the signal content and extract the transit component and used our RV data to aid the global parameter determination. Results: The blend analysis of the combination of multicolor light curves yields the first independent confirmation of the planetary nature of WASP-33b. We clearly identify three frequency components in the 15-21 d-1 regime with amplitudes 7-5 mmag. These frequencies correspond to the δ Scuti-type pulsation of the host star. None of these pulsation frequencies or their low-order linear combinations are in close resonance with the orbital frequency. We show that these pulsation components explain some but not all of the observed transit anomalies. The grand-averaged transit light curve shows that there is a ~1.5 mmag brightening shortly after the planet passes the mid-transit phase. Although the duration and amplitude of this brightening varies, it is visible even through the direct inspections of the individual transit events (some 40-60% of the followup light curves show this phenomenon). We suggest that the most likely explanation of this feature is the presence of a well-populated spot belt which is highly inclined to the orbital plane. This geometry is consistent with the inference from the spectroscopic anomalies. Finally, we constrain the planetary mass to Mp = 3.27 ± 0.73 MJ by using our RV data collected by the TRES spectrograph. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http

  13. Does a pneumotach accurately characterize voice function?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Gage; Krane, Michael

    2016-11-01

    A study is presented which addresses how a pneumotach might adversely affect clinical measurements of voice function. A pneumotach is a device, typically a mask, worn over the mouth, in order to measure time-varying glottal volume flow. By measuring the time-varying difference in pressure across a known aerodynamic resistance element in the mask, the glottal volume flow waveform is estimated. Because it adds aerodynamic resistance to the vocal system, there is some concern that using a pneumotach may not accurately portray the behavior of the voice. To test this hypothesis, experiments were performed in a simplified airway model with the principal dimensions of an adult human upper airway. A compliant constriction, fabricated from silicone rubber, modeled the vocal folds. Variations of transglottal pressure, time-averaged volume flow, model vocal fold vibration amplitude, and radiated sound with subglottal pressure were performed, with and without the pneumotach in place, and differences noted. Acknowledge support of NIH Grant 2R01DC005642-10A1.

  14. Accurate thermoplasmonic simulation of metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Da-Miao; Liu, Yan-Nan; Tian, Fa-Lin; Pan, Xiao-Min; Sheng, Xin-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Thermoplasmonics leads to enhanced heat generation due to the localized surface plasmon resonances. The measurement of heat generation is fundamentally a complicated task, which necessitates the development of theoretical simulation techniques. In this paper, an efficient and accurate numerical scheme is proposed for applications with complex metallic nanostructures. Light absorption and temperature increase are, respectively, obtained by solving the volume integral equation (VIE) and the steady-state heat diffusion equation through the method of moments (MoM). Previously, methods based on surface integral equations (SIEs) were utilized to obtain light absorption. However, computing light absorption from the equivalent current is as expensive as O(NsNv), where Ns and Nv, respectively, denote the number of surface and volumetric unknowns. Our approach reduces the cost to O(Nv) by using VIE. The accuracy, efficiency and capability of the proposed scheme are validated by multiple simulations. The simulations show that our proposed method is more efficient than the approach based on SIEs under comparable accuracy, especially for the case where many incidents are of interest. The simulations also indicate that the temperature profile can be tuned by several factors, such as the geometry configuration of array, beam direction, and light wavelength.

  15. Accurate method for computing correlated color temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Changjun; Cui, Guihua; Melgosa, Manuel; Ruan, Xiukai; Zhang, Yaoju; Ma, Long; Xiao, Kaida; Luo, M Ronnier

    2016-06-27

    For the correlated color temperature (CCT) of a light source to be estimated, a nonlinear optimization problem must be solved. In all previous methods available to compute CCT, the objective function has only been approximated, and their predictions have achieved limited accuracy. For example, different unacceptable CCT values have been predicted for light sources located on the same isotemperature line. In this paper, we propose to compute CCT using the Newton method, which requires the first and second derivatives of the objective function. Following the current recommendation by the International Commission on Illumination (CIE) for the computation of tristimulus values (summations at 1 nm steps from 360 nm to 830 nm), the objective function and its first and second derivatives are explicitly given and used in our computations. Comprehensive tests demonstrate that the proposed method, together with an initial estimation of CCT using Robertson's method [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 58, 1528-1535 (1968)], gives highly accurate predictions below 0.0012 K for light sources with CCTs ranging from 500 K to 106 K.

  16. Accurate Theoretical Thermochemistry for Fluoroethyl Radicals.

    PubMed

    Ganyecz, Ádám; Kállay, Mihály; Csontos, József

    2017-02-09

    An accurate coupled-cluster (CC) based model chemistry was applied to calculate reliable thermochemical quantities for hydrofluorocarbon derivatives including radicals 1-fluoroethyl (CH3-CHF), 1,1-difluoroethyl (CH3-CF2), 2-fluoroethyl (CH2F-CH2), 1,2-difluoroethyl (CH2F-CHF), 2,2-difluoroethyl (CHF2-CH2), 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl (CF3-CH2), 1,2,2,2-tetrafluoroethyl (CF3-CHF), and pentafluoroethyl (CF3-CF2). The model chemistry used contains iterative triple and perturbative quadruple excitations in CC theory, as well as scalar relativistic and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer corrections. To obtain heat of formation values with better than chemical accuracy perturbative quadruple excitations and scalar relativistic corrections were inevitable. Their contributions to the heats of formation steadily increase with the number of fluorine atoms in the radical reaching 10 kJ/mol for CF3-CF2. When discrepancies were found between the experimental and our values it was always possible to resolve the issue by recalculating the experimental result with currently recommended auxiliary data. For each radical studied here this study delivers the best heat of formation as well as entropy data.

  17. Accurate, reliable prototype earth horizon sensor head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F.; Cohen, H.

    1973-01-01

    The design and performance is described of an accurate and reliable prototype earth sensor head (ARPESH). The ARPESH employs a detection logic 'locator' concept and horizon sensor mechanization which should lead to high accuracy horizon sensing that is minimally degraded by spatial or temporal variations in sensing attitude from a satellite in orbit around the earth at altitudes in the 500 km environ 1,2. An accuracy of horizon location to within 0.7 km has been predicted, independent of meteorological conditions. This corresponds to an error of 0.015 deg-at 500 km altitude. Laboratory evaluation of the sensor indicates that this accuracy is achieved. First, the basic operating principles of ARPESH are described; next, detailed design and construction data is presented and then performance of the sensor under laboratory conditions in which the sensor is installed in a simulator that permits it to scan over a blackbody source against background representing the earth space interface for various equivalent plant temperatures.

  18. Accurate methods for large molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Mark S; Mullin, Jonathan M; Pruitt, Spencer R; Roskop, Luke B; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V; Boatz, Jerry A

    2009-07-23

    Three exciting new methods that address the accurate prediction of processes and properties of large molecular systems are discussed. The systematic fragmentation method (SFM) and the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method both decompose a large molecular system (e.g., protein, liquid, zeolite) into small subunits (fragments) in very different ways that are designed to both retain the high accuracy of the chosen quantum mechanical level of theory while greatly reducing the demands on computational time and resources. Each of these methods is inherently scalable and is therefore eminently capable of taking advantage of massively parallel computer hardware while retaining the accuracy of the corresponding electronic structure method from which it is derived. The effective fragment potential (EFP) method is a sophisticated approach for the prediction of nonbonded and intermolecular interactions. Therefore, the EFP method provides a way to further reduce the computational effort while retaining accuracy by treating the far-field interactions in place of the full electronic structure method. The performance of the methods is demonstrated using applications to several systems, including benzene dimer, small organic species, pieces of the alpha helix, water, and ionic liquids.

  19. Accurate lineshape spectroscopy and the Boltzmann constant

    PubMed Central

    Truong, G.-W.; Anstie, J. D.; May, E. F.; Stace, T. M.; Luiten, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy has an illustrious history delivering serendipitous discoveries and providing a stringent testbed for new physical predictions, including applications from trace materials detection, to understanding the atmospheres of stars and planets, and even constraining cosmological models. Reaching fundamental-noise limits permits optimal extraction of spectroscopic information from an absorption measurement. Here, we demonstrate a quantum-limited spectrometer that delivers high-precision measurements of the absorption lineshape. These measurements yield a very accurate measurement of the excited-state (6P1/2) hyperfine splitting in Cs, and reveals a breakdown in the well-known Voigt spectral profile. We develop a theoretical model that accounts for this breakdown, explaining the observations to within the shot-noise limit. Our model enables us to infer the thermal velocity dispersion of the Cs vapour with an uncertainty of 35 p.p.m. within an hour. This allows us to determine a value for Boltzmann's constant with a precision of 6 p.p.m., and an uncertainty of 71 p.p.m. PMID:26465085

  20. Accurate upper body rehabilitation system using kinect.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sanjana; Bhowmick, Brojeshwar; Chakravarty, Kingshuk; Sinha, Aniruddha; Das, Abhijit

    2016-08-01

    The growing importance of Kinect as a tool for clinical assessment and rehabilitation is due to its portability, low cost and markerless system for human motion capture. However, the accuracy of Kinect in measuring three-dimensional body joint center locations often fails to meet clinical standards of accuracy when compared to marker-based motion capture systems such as Vicon. The length of the body segment connecting any two joints, measured as the distance between three-dimensional Kinect skeleton joint coordinates, has been observed to vary with time. The orientation of the line connecting adjoining Kinect skeletal coordinates has also been seen to differ from the actual orientation of the physical body segment. Hence we have proposed an optimization method that utilizes Kinect Depth and RGB information to search for the joint center location that satisfies constraints on body segment length and as well as orientation. An experimental study have been carried out on ten healthy participants performing upper body range of motion exercises. The results report 72% reduction in body segment length variance and 2° improvement in Range of Motion (ROM) angle hence enabling to more accurate measurements for upper limb exercises.

  1. Noninvasive hemoglobin monitoring: how accurate is enough?

    PubMed

    Rice, Mark J; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Morey, Timothy E

    2013-10-01

    Evaluating the accuracy of medical devices has traditionally been a blend of statistical analyses, at times without contextualizing the clinical application. There have been a number of recent publications on the accuracy of a continuous noninvasive hemoglobin measurement device, the Masimo Radical-7 Pulse Co-oximeter, focusing on the traditional statistical metrics of bias and precision. In this review, which contains material presented at the Innovations and Applications of Monitoring Perfusion, Oxygenation, and Ventilation (IAMPOV) Symposium at Yale University in 2012, we critically investigated these metrics as applied to the new technology, exploring what is required of a noninvasive hemoglobin monitor and whether the conventional statistics adequately answer our questions about clinical accuracy. We discuss the glucose error grid, well known in the glucose monitoring literature, and describe an analogous version for hemoglobin monitoring. This hemoglobin error grid can be used to evaluate the required clinical accuracy (±g/dL) of a hemoglobin measurement device to provide more conclusive evidence on whether to transfuse an individual patient. The important decision to transfuse a patient usually requires both an accurate hemoglobin measurement and a physiologic reason to elect transfusion. It is our opinion that the published accuracy data of the Masimo Radical-7 is not good enough to make the transfusion decision.

  2. Accurate, reproducible measurement of blood pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, N R; Chockalingam, A; Fodor, J G; McKay, D W

    1990-01-01

    The diagnosis of mild hypertension and the treatment of hypertension require accurate measurement of blood pressure. Blood pressure readings are altered by various factors that influence the patient, the techniques used and the accuracy of the sphygmomanometer. The variability of readings can be reduced if informed patients prepare in advance by emptying their bladder and bowel, by avoiding over-the-counter vasoactive drugs the day of measurement and by avoiding exposure to cold, caffeine consumption, smoking and physical exertion within half an hour before measurement. The use of standardized techniques to measure blood pressure will help to avoid large systematic errors. Poor technique can account for differences in readings of more than 15 mm Hg and ultimately misdiagnosis. Most of the recommended procedures are simple and, when routinely incorporated into clinical practice, require little additional time. The equipment must be appropriate and in good condition. Physicians should have a suitable selection of cuff sizes readily available; the use of the correct cuff size is essential to minimize systematic errors in blood pressure measurement. Semiannual calibration of aneroid sphygmomanometers and annual inspection of mercury sphygmomanometers and blood pressure cuffs are recommended. We review the methods recommended for measuring blood pressure and discuss the factors known to produce large differences in blood pressure readings. PMID:2192791

  3. Fast and accurate exhaled breath ammonia measurement.

    PubMed

    Solga, Steven F; Mudalel, Matthew L; Spacek, Lisa A; Risby, Terence H

    2014-06-11

    This exhaled breath ammonia method uses a fast and highly sensitive spectroscopic method known as quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) that uses a quantum cascade based laser. The monitor is coupled to a sampler that measures mouth pressure and carbon dioxide. The system is temperature controlled and specifically designed to address the reactivity of this compound. The sampler provides immediate feedback to the subject and the technician on the quality of the breath effort. Together with the quick response time of the monitor, this system is capable of accurately measuring exhaled breath ammonia representative of deep lung systemic levels. Because the system is easy to use and produces real time results, it has enabled experiments to identify factors that influence measurements. For example, mouth rinse and oral pH reproducibly and significantly affect results and therefore must be controlled. Temperature and mode of breathing are other examples. As our understanding of these factors evolves, error is reduced, and clinical studies become more meaningful. This system is very reliable and individual measurements are inexpensive. The sampler is relatively inexpensive and quite portable, but the monitor is neither. This limits options for some clinical studies and provides rational for future innovations.

  4. Accurate Fission Data for Nuclear Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solders, A.; Gorelov, D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Lantz, M.; Mattera, A.; Penttilä, H.; Pomp, S.; Rakopoulos, V.; Rinta-Antila, S.

    2014-05-01

    The Accurate fission data for nuclear safety (AlFONS) project aims at high precision measurements of fission yields, using the renewed IGISOL mass separator facility in combination with a new high current light ion cyclotron at the University of Jyväskylä. The 30 MeV proton beam will be used to create fast and thermal neutron spectra for the study of neutron induced fission yields. Thanks to a series of mass separating elements, culminating with the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, it is possible to achieve a mass resolving power in the order of a few hundred thousands. In this paper we present the experimental setup and the design of a neutron converter target for IGISOL. The goal is to have a flexible design. For studies of exotic nuclei far from stability a high neutron flux (1012 neutrons/s) at energies 1 - 30 MeV is desired while for reactor applications neutron spectra that resembles those of thermal and fast nuclear reactors are preferred. It is also desirable to be able to produce (semi-)monoenergetic neutrons for benchmarking and to study the energy dependence of fission yields. The scientific program is extensive and is planed to start in 2013 with a measurement of isomeric yield ratios of proton induced fission in uranium. This will be followed by studies of independent yields of thermal and fast neutron induced fission of various actinides.

  5. Satellite time and frequency transfer (STIFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of placing a hydrogen maser high stability clock in Earth orbit to provide accurate time and frequency comparisons worldwide to major timing centers and to a large number of radio observatory antenna sites involved in VLBI measurements was studied. The proposal was chiefly directed toward studies and initial hardware designs for time comparisons between hydrogen maser frequency standards and to modifications of the hydrogen maser for long-term use in space.

  6. Radio frequency interference at the geostationary orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sue, M. K.

    1981-01-01

    Growing demands on the frequency spectrum have increased the possibility of radio frequency interference (RFI). Various approaches to obtain in orbit RFI data are compared; this comparision indicates that the most practical way to obtain RFI data for a desired orbit (such as a geostationary orbit) is through the extrapolation of in orbit RFI measurements by a low orbit satellite. It is concluded that a coherent RFI program that uses both experimental data and analytical predictions provides accurate RFI data at minimal cost.

  7. Laser frequency stabilization using bichromatic crossover spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Taek; Seb Moon, Han

    2015-03-07

    We propose a Doppler-free spectroscopic method named bichromatic crossover spectroscopy (BCS), which we then use for the frequency stabilization of an off-resonant frequency that does not correspond to an atomic transition. The observed BCS in the 5S{sub 1/2} → 5P{sub 1/2} transition of {sup 87}Rb is related to the hyperfine structure of the conventional saturated absorption spectrum of this transition. Furthermore, the Doppler-free BCS is numerically calculated by considering all of the degenerate magnetic sublevels of the 5S{sub 1/2} → 5P{sub 1/2} transition in an atomic vapor cell, and is found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. Finally, we successfully achieve modulation-free off-resonant locking at the center frequency between the two 5S{sub 1/2}(F = 1 and 2) → 5P{sub 1/2}(F′ = 1) transitions using a polarization rotation of the BCS. The laser frequency stability was estimated to be the Allan variance of 2.1 × 10{sup −10} at 1 s.

  8. Precision Calculation of Blackbody Radiation Shifts for Optical Frequency Metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, M. S.; Kozlov, M. G.; Clark, Charles W.

    2011-09-30

    We show that three group IIIB divalent ions, B{sup +}, Al{sup +}, and In{sup +}, have anomalously small blackbody radiation (BBR) shifts of the ns{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}-nsnp {sup 3}P{sub 0}{sup o} clock transitions. The fractional BBR shifts for these ions are at least 10 times smaller than those of any other present or proposed optical frequency standards at the same temperature, and are less than 0.3% of the Sr clock shift. We have developed a hybrid configuration-interaction + coupled-cluster method that provides accurate treatment of correlation corrections in such ions and yields a rigorous upper bound on the uncertainty of the final results. We reduce the BBR contribution to the fractional frequency uncertainty of the Al{sup +} clock to 4x10{sup -19} at T=300 K. We also reduce the uncertainties due to this effect at room temperature to 10{sup -18} level for B{sup +} and In{sup +} to facilitate further development of these systems for metrology and quantum sensing.

  9. Quantifying evolutionary dynamics from variant-frequency time series

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Bhavin S.

    2016-01-01

    From Kimura’s neutral theory of protein evolution to Hubbell’s neutral theory of biodiversity, quantifying the relative importance of neutrality versus selection has long been a basic question in evolutionary biology and ecology. With deep sequencing technologies, this question is taking on a new form: given a time-series of the frequency of different variants in a population, what is the likelihood that the observation has arisen due to selection or neutrality? To tackle the 2-variant case, we exploit Fisher’s angular transformation, which despite being discovered by Ronald Fisher a century ago, has remained an intellectual curiosity. We show together with a heuristic approach it provides a simple solution for the transition probability density at short times, including drift, selection and mutation. Our results show under that under strong selection and sufficiently frequent sampling these evolutionary parameters can be accurately determined from simulation data and so they provide a theoretical basis for techniques to detect selection from variant or polymorphism frequency time-series. PMID:27616332

  10. Quantifying evolutionary dynamics from variant-frequency time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Bhavin S.

    2016-09-01

    From Kimura’s neutral theory of protein evolution to Hubbell’s neutral theory of biodiversity, quantifying the relative importance of neutrality versus selection has long been a basic question in evolutionary biology and ecology. With deep sequencing technologies, this question is taking on a new form: given a time-series of the frequency of different variants in a population, what is the likelihood that the observation has arisen due to selection or neutrality? To tackle the 2-variant case, we exploit Fisher’s angular transformation, which despite being discovered by Ronald Fisher a century ago, has remained an intellectual curiosity. We show together with a heuristic approach it provides a simple solution for the transition probability density at short times, including drift, selection and mutation. Our results show under that under strong selection and sufficiently frequent sampling these evolutionary parameters can be accurately determined from simulation data and so they provide a theoretical basis for techniques to detect selection from variant or polymorphism frequency time-series.

  11. Important Nearby Galaxies without Accurate Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, Kristen

    2014-10-01

    The Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) and its offspring programs (e.g., THINGS, HERACLES, KINGFISH) have resulted in a fundamental change in our view of star formation and the ISM in galaxies, and together they represent the most complete multi-wavelength data set yet assembled for a large sample of nearby galaxies. These great investments of observing time have been dedicated to the goal of understanding the interstellar medium, the star formation process, and, more generally, galactic evolution at the present epoch. Nearby galaxies provide the basis for which we interpret the distant universe, and the SINGS sample represents the best studied nearby galaxies.Accurate distances are fundamental to interpreting observations of galaxies. Surprisingly, many of the SINGS spiral galaxies have numerous distance estimates resulting in confusion. We can rectify this situation for 8 of the SINGS spiral galaxies within 10 Mpc at a very low cost through measurements of the tip of the red giant branch. The proposed observations will provide an accuracy of better than 0.1 in distance modulus. Our sample includes such well known galaxies as M51 (the Whirlpool), M63 (the Sunflower), M104 (the Sombrero), and M74 (the archetypal grand design spiral).We are also proposing coordinated parallel WFC3 UV observations of the central regions of the galaxies, rich with high-mass UV-bright stars. As a secondary science goal we will compare the resolved UV stellar populations with integrated UV emission measurements used in calibrating star formation rates. Our observations will complement the growing HST UV atlas of high resolution images of nearby galaxies.

  12. Accurate paleointensities - the multi-method approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    The accuracy of models describing rapid changes in the geomagnetic field over the past millennia critically depends on the availability of reliable paleointensity estimates. Over the past decade methods to derive paleointensities from lavas (the only recorder of the geomagnetic field that is available all over the globe and through geologic times) have seen significant improvements and various alternative techniques were proposed. The 'classical' Thellier-style approach was optimized and selection criteria were defined in the 'Standard Paleointensity Definitions' (Paterson et al, 2014). The Multispecimen approach was validated and the importance of additional tests and criteria to assess Multispecimen results must be emphasized. Recently, a non-heating, relative paleointensity technique was proposed -the pseudo-Thellier protocol- which shows great potential in both accuracy and efficiency, but currently lacks a solid theoretical underpinning. Here I present work using all three of the aforementioned paleointensity methods on suites of young lavas taken from the volcanic islands of Hawaii, La Palma, Gran Canaria, Tenerife, and Terceira. Many of the sampled cooling units are <100 years old, the actual field strength at the time of cooling is therefore reasonably well known. Rather intuitively, flows that produce coherent results from two or more different paleointensity methods yield the most accurate estimates of the paleofield. Furthermore, the results for some flows pass the selection criteria for one method, but fail in other techniques. Scrutinizing and combing all acceptable results yielded reliable paleointensity estimates for 60-70% of all sampled cooling units - an exceptionally high success rate. This 'multi-method paleointensity approach' therefore has high potential to provide the much-needed paleointensities to improve geomagnetic field models for the Holocene.

  13. Accurate glucose detection in a small etalon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, Joerg; Kuebler, Sebastian; Recht, Michael; Torres, Francisco; Roe, Jeffrey; Kiesel, Peter; Bruce, Richard

    2010-02-01

    We are developing a continuous glucose monitor for subcutaneous long-term implantation. This detector contains a double chamber Fabry-Perot-etalon that measures the differential refractive index (RI) between a reference and a measurement chamber at 850 nm. The etalon chambers have wavelength dependent transmission maxima which dependent linearly on the RI of their contents. An RI difference of ▵n=1.5.10-6 changes the spectral position of a transmission maximum by 1pm in our measurement. By sweeping the wavelength of a single-mode Vertical-Cavity-Surface-Emitting-Laser (VCSEL) linearly in time and detecting the maximum transmission peaks of the etalon we are able to measure the RI of a liquid. We have demonstrated accuracy of ▵n=+/-3.5.10-6 over a ▵n-range of 0 to 1.75.10-4 and an accuracy of 2% over a ▵nrange of 1.75.10-4 to 9.8.10-4. The accuracy is primarily limited by the reference measurement. The RI difference between the etalon chambers is made specific to glucose by the competitive, reversible release of Concanavalin A (ConA) from an immobilized dextran matrix. The matrix and ConA bound to it, is positioned outside the optical detection path. ConA is released from the matrix by reacting with glucose and diffuses into the optical path to change the RI in the etalon. Factors such as temperature affect the RI in measurement and detection chamber equally but do not affect the differential measurement. A typical standard deviation in RI is +/-1.4.10-6 over the range 32°C to 42°C. The detector enables an accurate glucose specific concentration measurement.

  14. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Battum, L. J.; Huizenga, H.; Verdaasdonk, R. M.; Heukelom, S.

    2016-01-01

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2-2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner’s transmission mode, with red-green-blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner’s optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film.

  15. Towards Accurate Application Characterization for Exascale (APEX)

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Simon David

    2015-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has been engaged in hardware and software codesign activities for a number of years, indeed, it might be argued that prototyping of clusters as far back as the CPLANT machines and many large capability resources including ASCI Red and RedStorm were examples of codesigned solutions. As the research supporting our codesign activities has moved closer to investigating on-node runtime behavior a nature hunger has grown for detailed analysis of both hardware and algorithm performance from the perspective of low-level operations. The Application Characterization for Exascale (APEX) LDRD was a project concieved of addressing some of these concerns. Primarily the research was to intended to focus on generating accurate and reproducible low-level performance metrics using tools that could scale to production-class code bases. Along side this research was an advocacy and analysis role associated with evaluating tools for production use, working with leading industry vendors to develop and refine solutions required by our code teams and to directly engage with production code developers to form a context for the application analysis and a bridge to the research community within Sandia. On each of these accounts significant progress has been made, particularly, as this report will cover, in the low-level analysis of operations for important classes of algorithms. This report summarizes the development of a collection of tools under the APEX research program and leaves to other SAND and L2 milestone reports the description of codesign progress with Sandia’s production users/developers.

  16. Accurate identification of periodic oscillations buried in white or colored noise using fast orthogonal search.

    PubMed

    Chon, K H

    2001-06-01

    We use a previously introduced fast orthogonal search algorithm to detect sinusoidal frequency components buried in either white or colored noise. We show that the method outperforms the correlogram, modified covariance autoregressive (MODCOVAR) and multiple-signal classification (MUSIC) methods. Fast orthogonal search method achieves accurate detection of sinusoids even with signal-to-noise ratios as low as -10 dB, and is superior at detecting sinusoids buried in 1/f noise. Since the utilized method accurately detects sinusoids even under colored noise, it can be used to extract a 1/f noise process observed in physiological signals such as heart rate and renal blood pressure and flow data.

  17. Radioactive transitions in the helium isoelectronic sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalgarno, A.

    1971-01-01

    The principles of the atomic spectrum theory are used to quantitatively analyze radiation transitions in two-electron helium-like atomic systems. Quantum theoretical methods, describing absorption and emission of a single photon in a radiative transition between two stationary states of an atomic system, reproduced the energy level diagram for the low lying states of helium. Reliable values are obtained from accurate variationally determined two-electron nonrelativistic wave functions for radiative transition probabilities of 2 3p states in the helium isoelectric sequence, and for the 2 1s and 2 3s1 states of the helium sequence.

  18. Ab initio calculations to support accurate modelling of the rovibronic spectroscopy calculations of vanadium monoxide (VO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKemmish, Laura K.; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    Accurate knowledge of the rovibronic near-infrared and visible spectra of vanadium monoxide (VO) is very important for studies of cool stellar and hot planetary atmospheres. Here, the required ab initio dipole moment and spin-orbit coupling curves for VO are produced. This data forms the basis of a new VO line list considering 13 different electronic states and containing over 277 million transitions. Open shell transition, metal diatomics are challenging species to model through ab initio quantum mechanics due to the large number of low-lying electronic states, significant spin-orbit coupling and strong static and dynamic electron correlation. Multi-reference configuration interaction methodologies using orbitals from a complete active space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) calculation are the standard technique for these systems. We use different state-specific or minimal-state CASSCF orbitals for each electronic state to maximise the calculation accuracy. The off-diagonal dipole moment controls the intensity of electronic transitions. We test finite-field off-diagonal dipole moments, but found that (1) the accuracy of the excitation energies were not sufficient to allow accurate dipole moments to be evaluated and (2) computer time requirements for perpendicular transitions were prohibitive. The best off-diagonal dipole moments are calculated using wavefunctions with different CASSCF orbitals.

  19. ACCURATE RITZ WAVELENGTHS OF PARITY-FORBIDDEN [Co II] AND [V II] LINES OF ASTROPHYSICAL INTEREST

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffoni, M. P.; Pickering, J. C.

    2013-08-15

    We report a comprehensive list of accurate Ritz wavelengths for parity-forbidden [Co II] and [V II] lines obtained from the analysis of energy levels measured in the laboratory with Fourier transform emission spectroscopy. Such lines, particularly those in the infrared, are in demand for the analysis of low-density astrophysical plasmas in and around objects such as planetary nebulae, star-forming regions, and active galactic nuclei. Transitions between all known metastable levels of Co II and V II are included in our analysis, producing wavelengths for 1477 [V II] lines and 782 [Co II] lines. Of these, 170 [V II] lines and 171 [Co II] lines arise from transitions with calculated transition probabilities greater than 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} s{sup -1} and upper level excitations of less than 5 eV, and thus are likely to be observed in astrophysical spectra.

  20. A time-accurate adaptive grid method and the numerical simulation of a shock-vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bockelie, Michael J.; Eiseman, Peter R.

    1990-01-01

    A time accurate, general purpose, adaptive grid method is developed that is suitable for multidimensional steady and unsteady numerical simulations. The grid point movement is performed in a manner that generates smooth grids which resolve the severe solution gradients and the sharp transitions in the solution gradients. The temporal coupling of the adaptive grid and the PDE solver is performed with a grid prediction correction method that is simple to implement and ensures the time accuracy of the grid. Time accurate solutions of the 2-D Euler equations for an unsteady shock vortex interaction demonstrate the ability of the adaptive method to accurately adapt the grid to multiple solution features.

  1. Frequency noise in frequency swept fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-04-01

    This Letter presents a measurement of the spectral content of frequency shifted pulses generated by a lightwave synthesized frequency sweeper. We found that each pulse is shifted in frequency with very high accuracy. We also discovered that noise originating from light leaking through the acousto- optical modulators and forward propagating Brillouin scattering appear in the spectrum.

  2. Accurate measurement of RF exposure from emerging wireless communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letertre, Thierry; Monebhurrun, Vikass; Toffano, Zeno

    2013-04-01

    Isotropic broadband probes or spectrum analyzers (SAs) may be used for the measurement of rapidly varying electromagnetic fields generated by emerging wireless communication systems. In this paper this problematic is investigated by comparing the responses measured by two different isotropic broadband probes typically used to perform electric field (E-field) evaluations. The broadband probes are submitted to signals with variable duty cycles (DC) and crest factors (CF) either with or without Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) modulation but with the same root-mean-square (RMS) power. The two probes do not provide accurate enough results for deterministic signals such as Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WIMAX) or Long Term Evolution (LTE) as well as for non-deterministic signals such as Wireless Fidelity (WiFi). The legacy measurement protocols should be adapted to cope for the emerging wireless communication technologies based on the OFDM modulation scheme. This is not easily achieved except when the statistics of the RF emission are well known. In this case the measurement errors are shown to be systematic and a correction factor or calibration can be applied to obtain a good approximation of the total RMS power.

  3. Can numerical simulations accurately predict hydrodynamic instabilities in liquid films?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denner, Fabian; Charogiannis, Alexandros; Pradas, Marc; van Wachem, Berend G. M.; Markides, Christos N.; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the dynamics of hydrodynamic instabilities in liquid film flows is an active field of research in fluid dynamics and non-linear science in general. Numerical simulations offer a powerful tool to study hydrodynamic instabilities in film flows and can provide deep insights into the underlying physical phenomena. However, the direct comparison of numerical results and experimental results is often hampered by several reasons. For instance, in numerical simulations the interface representation is problematic and the governing equations and boundary conditions may be oversimplified, whereas in experiments it is often difficult to extract accurate information on the fluid and its behavior, e.g. determine the fluid properties when the liquid contains particles for PIV measurements. In this contribution we present the latest results of our on-going, extensive study on hydrodynamic instabilities in liquid film flows, which includes direct numerical simulations, low-dimensional modelling as well as experiments. The major focus is on wave regimes, wave height and wave celerity as a function of Reynolds number and forcing frequency of a falling liquid film. Specific attention is paid to the differences in numerical and experimental results and the reasons for these differences. The authors are grateful to the EPSRC for their financial support (Grant EP/K008595/1).

  4. Transition Path Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    vanden-Eijnden, E.

    The dynamical behavior of many systems arising in physics, chemistry, biology, etc. is dominated by rare but important transition events between long lived states. For over 70 years, transition state theory (TST) has provided the main theoretical framework for the description of these events [17,33,34]. Yet, while TST and evolutions thereof based on the reactive flux formalism [1, 5] (see also [30,31]) give an accurate estimate of the transition rate of a reaction, at least in principle, the theory tells very little in terms of the mechanism of this reaction. Recent advances, such as transition path sampling (TPS) of Bolhuis, Chandler, Dellago, and Geissler [3, 7] or the action method of Elber [15, 16], may seem to go beyond TST in that respect: these techniques allow indeed to sample the ensemble of reactive trajectories, i.e. the trajectories by which the reaction occurs. And yet, the reactive trajectories may again be rather uninformative about the mechanism of the reaction. This may sound paradoxical at first: what more than actual reactive trajectories could one need to understand a reaction? The problem, however, is that the reactive trajectories by themselves give only a very indirect information about the statistical properties of these trajectories. This is similar to why statistical mechanics is not simply a footnote in books about classical mechanics. What is the probability density that a trajectory be at a given location in state-space conditional on it being reactive? What is the probability current of these reactive trajectories? What is their rate of appearance? These are the questions of interest and they are not easy to answer directly from the ensemble of reactive trajectories. The right framework to tackle these questions also goes beyond standard equilibrium statistical mechanics because of the nontrivial bias that the very definition of the reactive trajectories imply - they must be involved in a reaction. The aim of this chapter is to

  5. All-sky Interferometry with Spherical Harmonic Transit Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, J. Richard; Sigurdson, Kris; Pen, Ue-Li; Stebbins, Albert; Sitwell, Michael

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we describe the spherical harmonic transit telescope through the use of a novel formalism for the analysis of transit radio telescopes. This all-sky approach bypasses the curved-sky complications of traditional interferometry and so is particularly well-suited to the analysis of wide-field radio interferometers. It enables compact and computationally efficient representations of the data and its statistics, which allow new ways of approaching important problems like map-making and foreground removal. In particular, we show how it enables the use of the Karhunen-Loève transform as a highly effective foreground filter, suppressing realistic foreground residuals for our fiducial example by at least a factor 20 below the 21 cm signal, even in highly contaminated regions of the sky. This is despite the presence of the mode-mixing inherent in real-world instruments with frequency-dependent beams. We show, using Fisher forecasting, that foreground cleaning has little effect on power spectrum constraints compared to hypothetical foreground-free measurements. Beyond providing a natural real-world data analysis framework for 21 cm telescopes now under construction and future experiments, this formalism allows accurate power spectrum forecasts to be made that include the interplay of design constraints and realistic experimental systematics with 21st century 21 cm science.

  6. All-sky interferometry with spherical harmonic transit telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, J. Richard; Pen, Ue-Li; Sigurdson, Kris; Sitwell, Michael; Stebbins, Albert

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we describe the spherical harmonic transit telescope through the use of a novel formalism for the analysis of transit radio telescopes. This all-sky approach bypasses the curved-sky complications of traditional interferometry and so is particularly well-suited to the analysis of wide-field radio interferometers. It enables compact and computationally efficient representations of the data and its statistics, which allow new ways of approaching important problems like map-making and foreground removal. In particular, we show how it enables the use of the Karhunen-Loève transform as a highly effective foreground filter, suppressing realistic foreground residuals for our fiducial example by at least a factor 20 below the 21 cm signal, even in highly contaminated regions of the sky. This is despite the presence of the mode-mixing inherent in real-world instruments with frequency-dependent beams. We show, using Fisher forecasting, that foreground cleaning has little effect on power spectrum constraints compared to hypothetical foreground-free measurements. Beyond providing a natural real-world data analysis framework for 21 cm telescopes now under construction and future experiments, this formalism allows accurate power spectrum forecasts to be made that include the interplay of design constraints and realistic experimental systematics with 21st century 21 cm science.

  7. Simple Mathematical Models Do Not Accurately Predict Early SIV Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Noecker, Cecilia; Schaefer, Krista; Zaccheo, Kelly; Yang, Yiding; Day, Judy; Ganusov, Vitaly V.

    2015-01-01

    Upon infection of a new host, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replicates in the mucosal tissues and is generally undetectable in circulation for 1–2 weeks post-infection. Several interventions against HIV including vaccines and antiretroviral prophylaxis target virus replication at this earliest stage of infection. Mathematical models have been used to understand how HIV spreads from mucosal tissues systemically and what impact vaccination and/or antiretroviral prophylaxis has on viral eradication. Because predictions of such models have been rarely compared to experimental data, it remains unclear which processes included in these models are critical for predicting early HIV dynamics. Here we modified the “standard” mathematical model of HIV infection to include two populations of infected cells: cells that are actively producing the virus and cells that are transitioning into virus production mode. We evaluated the effects of several poorly known parameters on infection outcomes in this model and compared model predictions to experimental data on infection of non-human primates with variable doses of simian immunodifficiency virus (SIV). First, we found that the mode of virus production by infected cells (budding vs. bursting) has a minimal impact on the early virus dynamics for a wide range of model parameters, as long as the parameters are constrained to provide the observed rate of SIV load increase in the blood of infected animals. Interestingly and in contrast with previous results, we found that the bursting mode of virus production generally results in a higher probability of viral extinction than the budding mode of virus production. Second, this mathematical model was not able to accurately describe the change in experimentally determined probability of host infection with increasing viral doses. Third and finally, the model was also unable to accurately explain the decline in the time to virus detection with increasing viral dose. These results

  8. Towards a scalable and accurate quantum approach for describing vibrations of molecule–metal interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Madebene, Bruno; Ulusoy, Inga; Mancera, Luis; Scribano, Yohann; Chulkov, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Summary We present a theoretical framework for the computation of anharmonic vibrational frequencies for large systems, with a particular focus on determining adsorbate frequencies from first principles. We give a detailed account of our local implementation of the vibrational self-consistent field approach and its correlation corrections. We show that our approach is both robust, accurate and can be easily deployed on computational grids in order to provide an efficient computational tool. We also present results on the vibrational spectrum of hydrogen fluoride on pyrene, on the thiophene molecule in the gas phase, and on small neutral gold clusters. PMID:22003450

  9. Accurate formula for conversion of tunneling current in dynamic atomic force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sader, John E.; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2010-07-01

    Recent developments in frequency modulation atomic force microscopy enable simultaneous measurement of frequency shift and time-averaged tunneling current. Determination of the interaction force is facilitated using an analytical formula, valid for arbitrary oscillation amplitudes [Sader and Jarvis, Appl. Phys. Lett. 84, 1801 (2004)]. Here we present the complementary formula for evaluation of the instantaneous tunneling current from the time-averaged tunneling current. This simple and accurate formula is valid for any oscillation amplitude and current law. The resulting theoretical framework allows for simultaneous measurement of the instantaneous tunneling current and interaction force in dynamic atomic force microscopy.

  10. A Biochemical Magic Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1993-01-01

    Life is composed principally of four classes of biomolecules - protein, nucleic acid, polysaccharide and lipid. Using 1) estimates of the reducing equivalents (electron pairs) needed to synthesize these biomolecules from carbon dioxide, and 2) measurements of the molecular composition of different organisms, we calculated the average number of electron pairs required for the reduction of carbon dioxide to biological carbon (electron pairs/carbon atom). These calculations showed that the carbon of the Earths biosphere is at the reduction level of formaldehyde that requires 2 electron pairs/carbon atom to be synthesized from carbon dioxide. This was also the reduction level of carbon of individual organisms, except for those that stored large amounts of fuel as lipid. Since this chemical property of life is easily discovered and probably universal, it's most likely known by other intelligent life in the universe. It could be the one thing we know about other carbon-based life in the universe, and the one thing that other intelligent life knows about us. We believe this common knowledge that formaldehyde represents the reduction level of life's carbon could lead to the selection of the 72.83814 GHz line of the 0,0,0,1,0,1 ground-state rotational transition of formaldehyde as a frequency for interstellar communication.

  11. Rate of thermal transitions in kagome spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liashko, S. Y.; Uzdin, V. M.; Jónsson, H.

    2016-08-01

    The rate of thermal transitions in a kagome spin ice element is calculated using harmonic transition state theory for magnetic systems. Each element consists of six prolate magnetic islands. Minimum energy paths on the multidimensional energy surface are found to estimate activation energy. Vibrational frequencies are also calculated to estimate the rate of the various transitions. An overall transition rate between equivalent ground states is calculated by using the stationary state approximation including all possible transition paths. The resulting transition rate is in a good agreement with experimentally measured lifetime.

  12. Characteristics of Boundary Layer Transition in a Multi-Stage Low-Pressure Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisler, Dave; Halstead, David E.; Okiishi, Ted

    2007-01-01

    An experimental investigation of boundary layer transition in a multi-stage turbine has been completed using surface-mounted hot-film sensors. Tests were carried out using the two-stage Low Speed Research Turbine of the Aerodynamics Research Laboratory of GE Aircraft Engines. Blading in this facility models current, state-of-the-art low pressure turbine configurations. The instrumentation technique involved arrays of densely-packed hot-film sensors on the surfaces of second stage rotor and nozzle blades. The arrays were located at mid-span on both the suction and pressure surfaces. Boundary layer measurements were acquired over a complete range of relevant Reynolds numbers. Data acquisition capabilities provided means for detailed data interrogation in both time and frequency domains. Data indicate that significant regions of laminar and transitional boundary layer flow exist on the rotor and nozzle suction surfaces. Evidence of relaminarization both near the leading edge of the suction surface and along much of the pressure surface was observed. Measurements also reveal the nature of the turbulent bursts occuring within and between the wake segments convecting through the blade row. The complex character of boundary layer transition resulting from flow unsteadiness due to nozzle/nozzle, rotor/nozzle, and nozzle/rotor wake interactions are elucidated using these data. These measurements underscore the need to provide turbomachinery designers with models of boundary layer transition to facilitate accurate prediction of aerodynamic loss and heat transfer.

  13. Doppler modulation and Zeeman modulation: laser frequency stabilization without direct frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Weis, A; Derler, S

    1988-07-01

    We discuss two methods (Zeeman modulation and Doppler modulation) for locking the frequency of a singlemode cw laser to an atomic absorption line. These methods do not require the laser frequency to be modulated directly. In the first scheme the absorption frequency of the atom is modulated via the Zeeman effect; in the second scheme the laser frequency is modulated indirectly via the Doppler effect in an atomic beam. We used the two methods successfully to lock two dye lasers to the transitions 6S((1/2)) ? 7S((1/2)) and 7S((1/2)) ? 15P(?) in atomic cesium.

  14. Searching for an Oscillating Massive Scalar Field as a Dark Matter Candidate Using Atomic Hyperfine Frequency Comparisons.

    PubMed

    Hees, A; Guéna, J; Abgrall, M; Bize, S; Wolf, P

    2016-08-05

    We use 6 yrs of accurate hyperfine frequency comparison data of the dual rubidium and caesium cold atom fountain FO2 at LNE-SYRTE to search for a massive scalar dark matter candidate. Such a scalar field can induce harmonic variations of the fine structure constant, of the mass of fermions, and of the quantum chromodynamic mass scale, which will directly impact the rubidium/caesium hyperfine transition frequency ratio. We find no signal consistent with a scalar dark matter candidate but provide improved constraints on the coupling of the putative scalar field to standard matter. Our limits are complementary to previous results that were only sensitive to the fine structure constant and improve them by more than an order of magnitude when only a coupling to electromagnetism is assumed.

  15. Searching for an Oscillating Massive Scalar Field as a Dark Matter Candidate Using Atomic Hyperfine Frequency Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hees, A.; Guéna, J.; Abgrall, M.; Bize, S.; Wolf, P.

    2016-08-01

    We use 6 yrs of accurate hyperfine frequency comparison data of the dual rubidium and caesium cold atom fountain FO2 at LNE-SYRTE to search for a massive scalar dark matter candidate. Such a scalar field can induce harmonic variations of the fine structure constant, of the mass of fermions, and of the quantum chromodynamic mass scale, which will directly impact the rubidium/caesium hyperfine transition frequency ratio. We find no signal consistent with a scalar dark matter candidate but provide improved constraints on the coupling of the putative scalar field to standard matter. Our limits are complementary to previous results that were only sensitive to the fine structure constant and improve them by more than an order of magnitude when only a coupling to electromagnetism is assumed.

  16. 77 FR 3800 - Accurate NDE & Inspection, LLC; Confirmatory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... COMMISSION Accurate NDE & Inspection, LLC; Confirmatory Order In the Matter of Accurate NDE & Docket: 150... request ADR with the NRC in an attempt to resolve issues associated with this matter. In response, on August 9, 2011, Accurate NDE requested ADR to resolve this matter with the NRC. On September 28,...

  17. Wetting transition on patterned surfaces: transition states and energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Ren, Weiqing

    2014-03-18

    We study the wetting transition on microstructured hydrophobic surfaces. We use the string method [J. Chem. Phys. 2007, 126, 164103; J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 134105] to accurately compute the transition states, the energy barriers, and the minimum energy paths for the wetting transition from the Cassie-Baxter state to the Wenzel state. Numerical results are obtained for the wetting of a hydrophobic surface textured with a square lattice of pillars. It is found that the wetting of the solid substrate occurs via infiltration of the liquid in a single groove, followed by lateral propagation of the liquid front. The propagation of the liquid front proceeds in a stepwise manner, and a zipping mechanism is observed during the infiltration of each layer. The minimum energy path for the wetting transition goes through a sequence of intermediate metastable states, whose wetted areas reflect the microstructure of the patterned surface. We also study the dependence of the energy barrier on the drop size and the gap between the pillars.

  18. Modeling Transition to Turbulence using the Turbulent Potential Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wang; Perot, Blair

    2001-11-01

    While transition is a very different phenomenon from fully developed turbulence, it is governed, on average, by equations with are mathematically the same as the RANS equations for fully turbulent flow. It is therefore theoretically possible for RANS equation systems to display transition-like behavior a very rapid growth in turbulent kinetic energy levels, skin friction, etc. In this work, the ability of the turbulent potential model to accurately predict laminar to turbulent transition in flat plate boundary layers is examined. The model accurately predicts the entire range of free-stream turbulence levels from strong bypass transition (6natural transition (0.03It shows correct sensitivity to favorable and adverse pressure gradients, as well as acoustic noise levels. Past results indicated the ability of the model to relaminarize the flow. Recent work has focused attention on the model’s ability to predict transition in mixing layers.

  19. Frequency-comb referenced spectroscopy of v₄₋ and v₅₋excited hot bands in the 1.5 and μm spectrum of C₂H₂

    SciTech Connect

    Twagirayezu, Sylvestre; Cich, Matthew J.; Sears, Trevor J.; McRaven, Christopher P.; Hall, Gregory E.

    2015-07-14

    Doppler-free transition frequencies for v₄₋ and v₅₋excited hot bands have been measured in the v₁ + v₃ band region of the spectrum of acetylene using saturation dip spectroscopy with an extended cavity diode laser referenced to a frequency comb. The frequency accuracy of the measured transitions, as judged from line shape model fits and comparison to known frequencies in the v₁ + v₃ band itself, is between 3 and 22 kHz. This is some three orders of magnitude improvement on the accuracy and precision of previous line position estimates that were derived from the analysis of high-resolution Fourier transform infrared absorption spectra. Comparison to transition frequencies computed from constants derived from published Fourier transform infrared spectra shows that some upper rotational energy levels suffer specific perturbations causing energy level shifts of up to several hundred MHz. These perturbations are due to energy levels of the same rotational quantum number derived from nearby vibrational levels that become degenerate at specific energies. Future identification of the perturbing levels will provide accurate relative energies of excited vibrational levels of acetylene in the 7100–7600 cm⁻¹ energy region.

  20. Frequency-comb referenced spectroscopy of v₄₋ and v₅₋excited hot bands in the 1.5 and μm spectrum of C₂H₂

    DOE PAGES

    Twagirayezu, Sylvestre; Cich, Matthew J.; Sears, Trevor J.; ...

    2015-07-14

    Doppler-free transition frequencies for v₄₋ and v₅₋excited hot bands have been measured in the v₁ + v₃ band region of the spectrum of acetylene using saturation dip spectroscopy with an extended cavity diode laser referenced to a frequency comb. The frequency accuracy of the measured transitions, as judged from line shape model fits and comparison to known frequencies in the v₁ + v₃ band itself, is between 3 and 22 kHz. This is some three orders of magnitude improvement on the accuracy and precision of previous line position estimates that were derived from the analysis of high-resolution Fourier transform infraredmore » absorption spectra. Comparison to transition frequencies computed from constants derived from published Fourier transform infrared spectra shows that some upper rotational energy levels suffer specific perturbations causing energy level shifts of up to several hundred MHz. These perturbations are due to energy levels of the same rotational quantum number derived from nearby vibrational levels that become degenerate at specific energies. Future identification of the perturbing levels will provide accurate relative energies of excited vibrational levels of acetylene in the 7100–7600 cm⁻¹ energy region.« less

  1. Quantum Phase Transition and Universal Dynamics in the Rabi Model.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Myung-Joong; Puebla, Ricardo; Plenio, Martin B

    2015-10-30

    We consider the Rabi Hamiltonian, which exhibits a quantum phase transition (QPT) despite consisting only of a single-mode cavity field and a two-level atom. We prove QPT by deriving an exact solution in the limit where the atomic transition frequency in the unit of the cavity frequency tends to infinity. The effect of a finite transition frequency is studied by analytically calculating finite-frequency scaling exponents as well as performing a numerically exact diagonalization. Going beyond this equilibrium QPT setting, we prove that the dynamics under slow quenches in the vicinity of the critical point is universal; that is, the dynamics is completely characterized by critical exponents. Our analysis demonstrates that the Kibble-Zurek mechanism can precisely predict the universal scaling of residual energy for a model without spatial degrees of freedom. Moreover, we find that the onset of the universal dynamics can be observed even with a finite transition frequency.

  2. Topological Lifshitz transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volovik, G. E.

    2017-01-01

    Different types of Lifshitz transitions are governed by topology in momentum space. They involve the topological transitions with the change of topology of Fermi surfaces, Weyl and Dirac points, nodal lines, and also the transitions between the fully gapped states.

  3. Transitions: A Personal Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Ann Stace

    1995-01-01

    Distinguishes between unchosen transitions (children maturing and leaving, parents aging, companies downsizing) and chosen ones (moving, divorce, marriage, career changes). Describes the steps one goes through: uneasiness, renewed energy, complaining, exploration, partial transition, and the completed transition. (JOW)

  4. Transition from hospital to home for parents of preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Boykova, Marina; Kenner, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Research on the phenomenon of transition spans several decades. This article discusses the transition from hospital to home and the challenges parents of preterm infants experience during a neonatal intensive care unit stay and after discharge. The article explores the link between parental problems and rehospitalizations and the need for accurate measures of transitional concerns. An example of a theoretical model and instrument is described.

  5. Power series evaluation of transition and covariance matrices.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bierman, G. J.

    1972-01-01

    Reexamination power series solutions to the matrix covariance differential equation and the transition differential equation. Truncation error bounds are derived which are computationally attractive and which extend previous results. Polynomial approximations are obtained by exploiting the functional equations satisfied by the transition and covariance matrices. The series-functional equation propagation technique represents a fast and accurate alternative to the numerical integration of the time-invariant transition and covariance equations.

  6. Primary cesium time and frequency standards

    SciTech Connect

    Abashev, Yu.G.; Elkin, G.A.; Pushkin, S.B.

    1984-05-01

    Cesium frequency standards are used to determine the atomic second in SI units and to provide a national atomic-time scale at the leading meteorological laboratories of the world. In this paper, the state of cesium and atomic frequency standards are examined and methods of increasing their accuracy are analyzed. High-purity polycrystals of platinum-iridium alloy or high-purity and structurally perfect single crystals of tungsten and molybdenum are used as ionizers in beam detection. Relative frequency instabilities that have been obtained at the various laboratories are presented. The main sources of error in reproducing the unperturbed-transition frequency of cesium atoms are discussed, including the second-order Doppler effect and the Majorana effect. Accuracy estimates for cesium frequency standards of the world's leading meteorological laboratories are shown.

  7. Delay of Transition Using Forced Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, Reginald J.

    2014-01-01

    Several experiments which have reported a delay of transition are analyzed in terms of the frequencies of the induced disturbances generated by different flow control elements. Two of the experiments employed passive stabilizers in the boundary layer, one leading-edge bluntness, and one employed an active spark discharge in the boundary layer. It is found that the frequencies generated by the various elements lie in the damping region of the associated stability curve. It is concluded that the creation of strong disturbances in the damping region stabilizes the boundary-layer and delays the transition from laminar to turbulent flow.

  8. Cavity QED of the graphene cyclotron transition.

    PubMed

    Hagenmüller, David; Ciuti, Cristiano

    2012-12-28

    We investigate theoretically the cavity quantum electrodynamics of the cyclotron transition for Dirac fermions in graphene. We show that the ultrastrong coupling regime characterized by a vacuum Rabi frequency comparable or even larger than the transition frequency can be obtained for high enough filling factors of the graphene Landau levels. Important qualitative differences occur with respect to the corresponding physics of massive electrons in a semiconductor quantum well. In particular, an instability for the ground state analogous to the one occurring in the Dicke model is predicted for an increasing value of the electron density.

  9. Accurate Electron Affinity of Iron and Fine Structures of Negative Iron ions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaolin; Luo, Zhihong; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-01-01

    Ionization potential (IP) is defined as the amount of energy required to remove the most loosely bound electron of an atom, while electron affinity (EA) is defined as the amount of energy released when an electron is attached to a neutral atom. Both IP and EA are critical for understanding chemical properties of an element. In contrast to accurate IPs and structures of neutral atoms, EAs and structures of negative ions are relatively unexplored, especially for the transition metal anions. Here, we report the accurate EA value of Fe and fine structures of Fe− using the slow electron velocity imaging method. These measurements yield a very accurate EA value of Fe, 1235.93(28) cm−1 or 153.236(34) meV. The fine structures of Fe− were also successfully resolved. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations, and also paves the way for improving the EA measurements of other transition metal atoms to the sub cm−1 accuracy. PMID:27138292

  10. Accurate Electron Affinity of Iron and Fine Structures of Negative Iron ions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaolin; Luo, Zhihong; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-05-03

    Ionization potential (IP) is defined as the amount of energy required to remove the most loosely bound electron of an atom, while electron affinity (EA) is defined as the amount of energy released when an electron is attached to a neutral atom. Both IP and EA are critical for understanding chemical properties of an element. In contrast to accurate IPs and structures of neutral atoms, EAs and structures of negative ions are relatively unexplored, especially for the transition metal anions. Here, we report the accurate EA value of Fe and fine structures of Fe(-) using the slow electron velocity imaging method. These measurements yield a very accurate EA value of Fe, 1235.93(28) cm(-1) or 153.236(34) meV. The fine structures of Fe(-) were also successfully resolved. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations, and also paves the way for improving the EA measurements of other transition metal atoms to the sub cm(-1) accuracy.

  11. Transition to turbulence in pulsating pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Duo; Warnecke, Sascha; Hof, Bjoern; Avila, Marc

    2014-11-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the transition to turbulence in a pulsating pipe flow. This flow is a prototype of various pulsating flows in both nature and engineering, such as in the cardiovascular system where the onset of turbulence is often possibly related to various diseases (e.g., the formation of aneurysms). The experiments are carried out in a straight rigid pipe using water with a sinusoidal modulation of the flow rate. The governing parameters, Reynolds number, Womersley number α (dimensionless pulsating frequency) and the pulsating amplitude A, cover a wide range 3 < α < 23 and 0 < A < 1 . To characterize the transition to turbulence, we determine how the characteristic lifetime of turbulent spots (/puffs) are affected by the pulsation. While at high pulsation frequencies (α > 12) lifetimes of turbulent spots are entirely unaffected by the pulsation, at lower frequencies they are substantially affected. With decreasing frequency much larger Reynolds numbers are needed to obtain spots of the same characteristic lifetime. Hence at low frequency transition is delayed significantly. In addition the effect of the pulsation amplitude on the transition delay is quantified. Duo Xu would like to acknowledge the support from Humboldt Foundation.

  12. Mantle transition zone shear velocity gradients beneath USArray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmandt, Brandon

    2012-11-01

    Broadband P-to-s scattering isolated by teleseismic receiver function analysis is used to investigate shear velocity (VS) gradients in the mantle transition zone beneath USArray. Receiver functions from 2244 stations were filtered in multiple frequency bands and migrated to depth through P and S tomography models. The depth-migrated receiver functions were stacked along their local 410 and 660 km discontinuity depths to reduce stack incoherence and more accurately recover the frequency-dependent amplitudes of P410s and P660s. The stacked waveforms were inverted for one-dimensional VS between 320 and 840 km depth. First, a gradient-based inversion was used to find a least-squares solution and a subsequent Monte Carlo search about that solution constrained the range of VS profiles that provide an acceptable fit to the receiver function stacks. Relative to standard references models, all the acceptable models have diminished VS gradients surrounding the 410, a local VS gradient maximum at 490-500 km depth, and an enhanced VS gradient above the 660. The total 410 VS increase of 6.3% is greater than in reference models, and it occurs over a thickness of 20 km. However, 60% of this VS increase occurs over only 6 km. The 20 km total thickness of the 410 and diminished VS gradients surrounding the 410 are potential indications of high water content in the regional transition zone. An enhanced VS gradient overlying the 660 likely results from remnants of subduction lingering at the base of the transition zone. Cool temperatures from slabs subducted since the late Cretaceous and longer-term accumulation of former ocean crust both may contribute to the high gradient above the 660. The shallow depth of the 520 km discontinuity, 490-500 km, implies that the regional mean temperature in the transition zone is 110-160 K cooler than the global mean. A concentrated Vs gradient maximum centered near 660 km depth and a low VS gradient below 675 km confirms that the ringwoodite to

  13. Laser transit anemometer experiences in supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, William W., Jr.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present examples of velocity measurements obtained in supersonic flow fields with the laser transit anemometer system. Velocity measurements of a supersonic jet exhausting in a transonic flow field, a cone boundary survey in a Mach 4 flow field, and a determination of the periodic disturbance frequencies of a sonic nozzle flow field are presented. Each of the above three cases also serves to illustrate different modes of laser transit anemometer operation. A brief description of the laser transit anemometer system is also presented.

  14. Frequency Comb Cooling Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-18

    frequency combs ). Recently the power and spectral coverage of frequency combs have grown considerably with projected 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE...Aug-2011 18-May-2012 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final report on frequency comb cooling project The views, opinions and/or... frequency combs ). Recently the power and spectral coverage of frequency combs have grown considerably with projected average powers above 10 kW. We

  15. Precision Teaching, Frequency-Building, and Ballet Dancing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lokke, Gunn E. H.; Lokke, Jon A.; Arntzen, Erick

    2008-01-01

    This article reports the effectiveness of a brief intervention aimed at achieving fluency in basic ballet moves in a 9-year-old Norwegian girl by use of frequency-building and Precision Teaching procedures. One nonfluent ballet move was pinpointed, and instructional and training procedures designed to increase the frequency of accurate responding…

  16. Estimating rapidly varying frequencies in the presence of noise

    SciTech Connect

    Machorro, E

    2010-10-01

    A variable window length least-squares fitting and the interpolated fast Fourier transform methods are used to estimate the rapidly changing frequency of a signal with measurement noise. The least-squares method is computationally more expensive, but provides more accurate frequency estimates

  17. Effects of Reduced Frequency on Network Configuration and Synchronization Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu-Hua, Zhu

    2016-05-01

    Not Available Supported by the Open Fund from Guangxi Colleges and Universities Key Laboratory of Complex System Optimization and Big Data Processing under Grant No 2015CSOBDP0101, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No 11162019.

  18. Frequency-dependent viscous flow in channels with fractal rough surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cortis, A.; Berryman, J.G.

    2010-05-01

    The viscous dynamic permeability of some fractal-like channels is studied. For our particular class of geometries, the ratio of the pore surface area-to-volume tends to {infinity} (but has a finite cutoff), and the universal scaling of the dynamic permeability, k({omega}), needs modification. We performed accurate numerical computations of k({omega}) for channels characterized by deterministic fractal wall surfaces, for a broad range of fractal dimensions. The pertinent scaling model for k({omega}) introduces explicitly the fractal dimension of the wall surface for a range of frequencies across the transition between viscous and inertia dominated regimes. The new model provides excellent agreement with our numerical simulations.

  19. A new model for broadband waveguide-to-microstrip transition design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Downey, Alan N.

    1988-01-01

    A new model is presented which permits the prediction of the resonant frequencies created by antipodal finline waveguide to microstrip transitions. The transition is modeled as a tapered transmission line in series with an infinite set of coupled resonant circuits. The resonant circuits are modeled as simple microwave resonant cavities of which the resonant frequencies are easily determined. The model is developed and the resonant frequencies determined for several different transitions. Experimental results are given to confirm the models.

  20. Hexatic-to-disorder transition in colloidal crystals near electrodes: rapid annealing of polycrystalline domains.

    PubMed

    Dutcher, C S; Woehl, T J; Talken, N H; Ristenpart, W D

    2013-09-20

    Colloids are known to form planar, hexagonal closed packed (hcp) crystals near electrodes in response to electrohydrodynamic (EHD) flow. Previous work has established that the EHD velocity increases as the applied ac frequency decreases. Here we report the existence of an order-to-disorder transition at sufficiently low frequencies, despite the increase in the attractive EHD driving force. At large frequencies (~500 Hz), spherical micron-scale particles form hcp crystals; as the frequency is decreased below ~250 Hz, however, the crystalline structure transitions to randomly closed packed (rcp). The transition is reversible and second order with respect to frequency, and independent measurements of the EHD aggregation rate confirm that the EHD driving force is indeed higher at the lower frequencies. We present evidence that the transition is instead caused by an increased particle diffusivity due to increased particle height over the electrode at lower frequencies, and we demonstrate that the hcp-rcp transition facilitates rapid annealing of polycrystalline domains.