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Sample records for accurate treatment planning

  1. Fast and accurate sensitivity analysis of IMPT treatment plans using Polynomial Chaos Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkó, Zoltán; van der Voort, Sebastian R.; van de Water, Steven; Hartman, Charlotte M. H.; Hoogeman, Mischa; Lathouwers, Danny

    2016-06-01

    The highly conformal planned dose distribution achievable in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) can severely be compromised by uncertainties in patient setup and proton range. While several robust optimization approaches have been presented to address this issue, appropriate methods to accurately estimate the robustness of treatment plans are still lacking. To fill this gap we present Polynomial Chaos Expansion (PCE) techniques which are easily applicable and create a meta-model of the dose engine by approximating the dose in every voxel with multidimensional polynomials. This Polynomial Chaos (PC) model can be built in an automated fashion relatively cheaply and subsequently it can be used to perform comprehensive robustness analysis. We adapted PC to provide among others the expected dose, the dose variance, accurate probability distribution of dose-volume histogram (DVH) metrics (e.g. minimum tumor or maximum organ dose), exact bandwidths of DVHs, and to separate the effects of random and systematic errors. We present the outcome of our verification experiments based on 6 head-and-neck (HN) patients, and exemplify the usefulness of PCE by comparing a robust and a non-robust treatment plan for a selected HN case. The results suggest that PCE is highly valuable for both research and clinical applications.

  2. Fast and accurate sensitivity analysis of IMPT treatment plans using Polynomial Chaos Expansion.

    PubMed

    Perkó, Zoltán; van der Voort, Sebastian R; van de Water, Steven; Hartman, Charlotte M H; Hoogeman, Mischa; Lathouwers, Danny

    2016-06-21

    The highly conformal planned dose distribution achievable in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) can severely be compromised by uncertainties in patient setup and proton range. While several robust optimization approaches have been presented to address this issue, appropriate methods to accurately estimate the robustness of treatment plans are still lacking. To fill this gap we present Polynomial Chaos Expansion (PCE) techniques which are easily applicable and create a meta-model of the dose engine by approximating the dose in every voxel with multidimensional polynomials. This Polynomial Chaos (PC) model can be built in an automated fashion relatively cheaply and subsequently it can be used to perform comprehensive robustness analysis. We adapted PC to provide among others the expected dose, the dose variance, accurate probability distribution of dose-volume histogram (DVH) metrics (e.g. minimum tumor or maximum organ dose), exact bandwidths of DVHs, and to separate the effects of random and systematic errors. We present the outcome of our verification experiments based on 6 head-and-neck (HN) patients, and exemplify the usefulness of PCE by comparing a robust and a non-robust treatment plan for a selected HN case. The results suggest that PCE is highly valuable for both research and clinical applications.

  3. Can radiation therapy treatment planning system accurately predict surface doses in postmastectomy radiation therapy patients?

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Sharon; Back, Michael; Tan, Poh Wee; Lee, Khai Mun; Baggarley, Shaun; Lu, Jaide Jay

    2012-07-01

    Skin doses have been an important factor in the dose prescription for breast radiotherapy. Recent advances in radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and new treatment schemes such as hypofractionated breast therapy have made the precise determination of the surface dose necessary. Detailed information of the dose at various depths of the skin is also critical in designing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of surface dose calculation by a clinically used treatment planning system and those measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) in a customized chest wall phantom. This study involved the construction of a chest wall phantom for skin dose assessment. Seven TLDs were distributed throughout each right chest wall phantom to give adequate representation of measured radiation doses. Point doses from the CMS Xio Registered-Sign treatment planning system (TPS) were calculated for each relevant TLD positions and results correlated. There were no significant difference between measured absorbed dose by TLD and calculated doses by the TPS (p > 0.05 (1-tailed). Dose accuracy of up to 2.21% was found. The deviations from the calculated absorbed doses were overall larger (3.4%) when wedges and bolus were used. 3D radiotherapy TPS is a useful and accurate tool to assess the accuracy of surface dose. Our studies have shown that radiation treatment accuracy expressed as a comparison between calculated doses (by TPS) and measured doses (by TLD dosimetry) can be accurately predicted for tangential treatment of the chest wall after mastectomy.

  4. SU-E-T-273: Do Task Group External Beam QA Recommendations Guarantee Accurate Treatment Plan Dose Delivery?

    SciTech Connect

    Templeton, A; Liao, Y; Redler, G; Zhen, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: AAPM task groups 40/142 have provided an invaluable set of goals for physicists designing QA programs, attempting to standardize what would otherwise likely be a highly variable phenomenon across institutions. However, with the complexity of modalities such as VMAT, we hypothesize that following these guidelines to the letter might still allow unacceptable dose discrepancies. To explore this hypothesis we simulated machines bordering on QA acceptability, and calculated the effect on patient plans. Methods: Two errant machines were simulated in Aria/Eclipse, each just within task group criteria for output, percent depth dose, beam profile, gantry and collimator rotations, and jaw and MLC positions. One machine minimized dose to the PTV (machine A) and the other maximized dose to the OARs (machine B). Clinical treatment plans (3-phase prostate, n=3; hypofractionated lung, n=1) were calculated on these machines and the dose distributions compared. A prostate case was examined for contribution of error sources and evaluated using delivery QA data. Results: The prostate plans showed mean decreases in target D95 of 9.9% of prescription dose on machine A. On machine B, The rectal and bladder V70Gy each increased by 7.1 percentage points, while their V45Gy increased by 16.2% and 15.0% respectively. In the lung plan, the target D95 decreased by 12.8% and the bronchial tree Dmax increased by 21% of prescription dose, on machines A and B. One prostate plan showed target dose errors of 3.8% from MLC changes, 2% from output, ∼3% from energy and ∼0.5% from other factors. This plan achieved an 88.4% gamma passing rate using 3%/3mm using ArcCHECK. Conclusion: In the unlikely event that a machine exhibits all maximum errors allowed by TG 40/142, unacceptably large changes in dose delivered are possible especially in highly modulated VMAT plans, despite the machine passing routine QA.

  5. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material.

  6. Fast and accurate Monte Carlo modeling of a kilovoltage X-ray therapy unit using a photon-source approximation for treatment planning in complex media

    PubMed Central

    Zeinali-Rafsanjani, B.; Mosleh-Shirazi, M. A.; Faghihi, R.; Karbasi, S.; Mosalaei, A.

    2015-01-01

    To accurately recompute dose distributions in chest-wall radiotherapy with 120 kVp kilovoltage X-rays, an MCNP4C Monte Carlo model is presented using a fast method that obviates the need to fully model the tube components. To validate the model, half-value layer (HVL), percentage depth doses (PDDs) and beam profiles were measured. Dose measurements were performed for a more complex situation using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) placed within a Rando phantom. The measured and computed first and second HVLs were 3.8, 10.3 mm Al and 3.8, 10.6 mm Al, respectively. The differences between measured and calculated PDDs and beam profiles in water were within 2 mm/2% for all data points. In the Rando phantom, differences for majority of data points were within 2%. The proposed model offered an approximately 9500-fold reduced run time compared to the conventional full simulation. The acceptable agreement, based on international criteria, between the simulations and the measurements validates the accuracy of the model for its use in treatment planning and radiobiological modeling studies of superficial therapies including chest-wall irradiation using kilovoltage beam. PMID:26170553

  7. Teaching Treatment Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Linda

    1993-01-01

    Describes approach to teaching treatment planning that author has used successfully in both seminars and graduate courses. Clarifies nature and importance of systematic treatment planning, then describes context in which treatment planning seems more effectively taught, and concludes with step-by-step plan for teaching treatment planning.…

  8. MO-A-BRD-10: A Fast and Accurate GPU-Based Proton Transport Monte Carlo Simulation for Validating Proton Therapy Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Chan Tseung, H; Ma, J; Beltran, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To build a GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of proton transport with detailed modeling of elastic and non-elastic (NE) protonnucleus interactions, for use in a very fast and cost-effective proton therapy treatment plan verification system. Methods: Using the CUDA framework, we implemented kernels for the following tasks: (1) Simulation of beam spots from our possible scanning nozzle configurations, (2) Proton propagation through CT geometry, taking into account nuclear elastic and multiple scattering, as well as energy straggling, (3) Bertini-style modeling of the intranuclear cascade stage of NE interactions, and (4) Simulation of nuclear evaporation. To validate our MC, we performed: (1) Secondary particle yield calculations in NE collisions with therapeutically-relevant nuclei, (2) Pencil-beam dose calculations in homogeneous phantoms, (3) A large number of treatment plan dose recalculations, and compared with Geant4.9.6p2/TOPAS. A workflow was devised for calculating plans from a commercially available treatment planning system, with scripts for reading DICOM files and generating inputs for our MC. Results: Yields, energy and angular distributions of secondaries from NE collisions on various nuclei are in good agreement with the Geant4.9.6p2 Bertini and Binary cascade models. The 3D-gamma pass rate at 2%–2mm for 70–230 MeV pencil-beam dose distributions in water, soft tissue, bone and Ti phantoms is 100%. The pass rate at 2%–2mm for treatment plan calculations is typically above 98%. The net computational time on a NVIDIA GTX680 card, including all CPU-GPU data transfers, is around 20s for 1×10{sup 7} proton histories. Conclusion: Our GPU-based proton transport MC is the first of its kind to include a detailed nuclear model to handle NE interactions on any nucleus. Dosimetric calculations demonstrate very good agreement with Geant4.9.6p2/TOPAS. Our MC is being integrated into a framework to perform fast routine clinical QA of pencil

  9. Implant treatment planning considerations.

    PubMed

    Kao, Richard T

    2008-04-01

    As dental implants become a more accepted treatment modality, there is a need for all parties involved with implant dentistry to be familiar with various treatment planning issues. Though the success can be highly rewarding, failure to forecast treatment planning issues can result in an increase of surgical needs, surgical cost, and even case failure. In this issue, the focus is on implant treatment planning considerations.

  10. Careful Planning Key to Accurate Fixed Reports Assets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MaRous, Arnold M.

    1986-01-01

    Only with careful planning can school business managers develop fixed asset information and good recordkeeping. Use of a simple inventory system and discussion with school districts already utilizing this system will assist planning. (CJH)

  11. [Definition of accurate planning target volume margins for esophageal cancer radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Lesueur, P; Servagi-Vernat, S

    2016-10-01

    More than 4000 cases of esophagus neoplasms are diagnosed every year in France. Radiotherapy, which can be delivered in preoperative or exclusive with a concomitant chemotherapy, plays a central role in treatment of esophagus cancer. Even if efficacy of radiotherapy no longer has to be proved, the prognosis of esophagus cancer remains unfortunately poor with a high recurrence rate. Toxicity of esophageal radiotherapy is correlated with the irradiation volume, and limits dose escalation and local control. Esophagus is a deep thoracic organ, which undergoes cardiac and respiratory motion, making the radiotherapy delivery more difficult and increasing the planning target volume margins. Definition of accurate planning target volume margins, taking into account the esophagus' intrafraction motion and set up margins is very important to be sure to cover the clinical target volume and restrains acute and late radiotoxicity. In this article, based on a review of the literature, we propose planning target volume margins adapted to esophageal radiotherapy.

  12. Complete, accurate, mammalian phylogenies aid conservation planning, but not much.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ana S L; Grenyer, Richard; Baillie, Jonathan E M; Bininda-Emonds, Olaf R P; Gittlemann, John L; Hoffmann, Michael; Safi, Kamran; Schipper, Jan; Stuart, Simon N; Brooks, Thomas

    2011-09-27

    In the face of unprecedented global biodiversity loss, conservation planning must balance between refining and deepening knowledge versus acting on current information to preserve species and communities. Phylogenetic diversity (PD), a biodiversity measure that takes into account the evolutionary relationships between species, is arguably a more meaningful measure of biodiversity than species diversity, but cannot yet be applied to conservation planning for the majority of taxa for which phylogenetic trees have not yet been developed. Here, we investigate how the quality of data on the taxonomy and/or phylogeny of species affects the results of spatial conservation planning in terms of the representation of overall mammalian PD. The results show that the better the quality of the biodiversity data the better they can serve as a basis for conservation planning. However, decisions based on incomplete data are remarkably robust across different levels of degrading quality concerning the description of new species and the availability of phylogenetic information. Thus, given the level of urgency and the need for action, conservation planning can safely make use of the best available systematic data, limited as these data may be.

  13. [Failures regarding the treatment plan].

    PubMed

    Lecocq, Guillaume

    2016-03-01

    Who has never had a treatment failure? Who has never regretted launching into a treatment plan? And who has never vowed to avoid falling again into the same trap? All of us, of course. Which simply allowed us to fall into other traps once we'd pulled ourselves out of our previous failures. And to start with, do we believe that a successful outcome means achieving a molar and canine bilateral Class I, a normal overjet and overbite, and centered and coinciding midlines? So, does that make any other kind of treatment plan a recipe for failure? In more realistic mode, we should consider a treatment plan a failure when we are unable to achieve the objectives we set ourselves at the beginning of treatment, due to a lack of realism, or excessive optimism...

  14. Three-dimensional treatment planning for central lymphatic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J; Bryant, C; Ha, C S; Cox, J D; Antolak, J A

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the applicability of 3-dimensional (3D) treatment planning for central lymphatic irradiation (CLI). CLI requires more than 1 course of treatment with large, highly blocked, overlapping beams, and careful planning is required to ensure that such treatments are delivered safely and effectively. Three patients were selected for this study. Each patient completed at least 1 course of radiation therapy for CLI and was scheduled to receive irradiation to an adjacent area with overlapping beams. Two treatment plans were generated for each patient: a standard, 2-dimensional (2D) treatment plan and a 3D treatment plan designed to mimic the standard plan, taking advantage of unique 3D features. The time required to complete the treatment plans and differences in the treatment planning processes were noted. The time required to generate a 3D treatment plan was approximately the same as the time required to generate a standard 2D treatment plan; however, the 3D planning process required less redundancy of data entry than the 2D process. The 3D treatment plan was qualitatively similar to the standard 2D treatment plan; however, differences in beam penumbra and beam junctions were noted, and are most likely due to differences in the dose-calculation models used in these 2 treatment planning systems. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were calculated for the spinal cord and were found to be useful to the physicians for quickly and accurately evaluating the presence or absence of hot spots in the junction region. 3D treatment-planning has some advantages over 2D treatment planning for CLI; the main advantage of the 3D treatment plan is that it provides a single plan for each patient with multiple views of the data, including different planar cross-sections and DVHs. For the 2D system, a separate plan was generated for each view, requiring redundant data entry. The quality of the output of the 3D treatment plans is superior to that of 2D

  15. Automatic planning of head and neck treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Hazell, Irene; Bzdusek, Karl; Kumar, Prashant; Hansen, Christian R; Bertelsen, Anders; Eriksen, Jesper G; Johansen, Jørgen; Brink, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Treatment planning is time-consuming and the outcome depends on the person performing the optimization. A system that automates treatment planning could potentially reduce the manual time required for optimization and could also provide a method to reduce the variation between persons performing radiation dose planning (dosimetrist) and potentially improve the overall plan quality. This study evaluates the performance of the Auto-Planning module that has recently become clinically available in the Pinnacle(3) radiation therapy treatment planning system. Twenty-six clinically delivered head and neck treatment plans were reoptimized with the Auto-Planning module. Comparison of the two types of treatment plans were performed using DVH metrics and a blinded clinical evaluation by two senior radiation oncologists using a scale from one to six. Both evaluations investigated dose coverage of target and dose to healthy tissues. Auto-Planning was able to produce clinically acceptable treatment plans in all 26 cases. Target coverages in the two types of plans were similar, but automatically generated plans had less irradiation of healthy tissue. In 94% of the evaluations, the autoplans scored at least as high as the previously delivered clinical plans. For all patients, the Auto-Planning tool produced clinically acceptable head and neck treatment plans without any manual intervention, except for the initial target and OAR delineations. The main benefit of the method is the likely improvement in the overall treatment quality since consistent, high-quality plans are generated which even can be further optimized, if necessary. This makes it possible for the dosimetrist to focus more time on difficult dose planning goals and to spend less time on the more tedious parts of the planning process. PACS number: 87.55.de.

  16. Automatic planning of head and neck treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Hazell, Irene; Bzdusek, Karl; Kumar, Prashant; Hansen, Christian R; Bertelsen, Anders; Eriksen, Jesper G; Johansen, Jørgen; Brink, Carsten

    2016-01-08

    Treatment planning is time-consuming and the outcome depends on the person performing the optimization. A system that automates treatment planning could potentially reduce the manual time required for optimization and could also provide a method to reduce the variation between persons performing radiation dose planning (dosimetrist) and potentially improve the overall plan quality. This study evaluates the performance of the Auto-Planning module that has recently become clinically available in the Pinnacle3 radiation therapy treatment planning system. Twenty-six clinically delivered head and neck treatment plans were reoptimized with the Auto-Planning module. Comparison of the two types of treatment plans were performed using DVH metrics and a blinded clinical evaluation by two senior radiation oncologists using a scale from one to six. Both evaluations investigated dose coverage of target and dose to healthy tissues. Auto-Planning was able to produce clinically acceptable treatment plans in all 26 cases. Target coverages in the two types of plans were similar, but automatically generated plans had less irradiation of healthy tissue. In 94% of the evaluations, the autoplans scored at least as high as the previously delivered clinical plans. For all patients, the Auto-Planning tool produced clinically acceptable head and neck treatment plans without any manual intervention, except for the initial target and OAR delineations. The main benefit of the method is the likely improvement in the overall treatment quality since consistent, high-quality plans are generated which even can be further optimized, if necessary. This makes it possible for the dosimetrist to focus more time on difficult dose planning goals and to spend less time on the more tedious parts of the planning process.

  17. Screening with MRI for Accurate and Rapid Stroke Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shreyansh; Luby, Marie; Poole, Karen; Morella, Teresa; Keller, Elizabeth; Benson, Richard T.; Lynch, John K.; Nadareishvili, Zurab

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of timely multimodal MRI screening before thrombolysis in acute stroke patients. Methods: Quality improvement processes were initiated in 2013 to reduce door-to-needle (DTN) time at the 2 hospitals where the NIH stroke team provides clinical care. Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients who received IV tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) ≤4.5 hours from last known normal were identified. Demographic and clinical characteristics and timing metrics were analyzed comparing the time periods before, during, and after the quality improvement processes. Results: There were 157 patients treated with IV tPA for AIS during 2012–2013, of whom 135 (86%) were screened with MRI. DTN time was significantly reduced by 40% during this period from a median of 93 minutes in the first half of 2012 to 55 minutes in the last half of 2013 (p < 0.0001) with a significant 4-fold increase in the proportion of treated patients with DTN time ≤60 minutes from 13.0% to 61.5%, respectively (p < 0.00001). Improvement in DTN time was associated with reduced door-to-MRI time, and there were no differences in demographic or clinical characteristics (p = 0.21–0.76). Conclusions: It is feasible and practical to consistently and rapidly deliver IV tPA to AIS patients within national benchmark times using MRI as the routine screening modality. The processes used in the SMART (Screening with MRI for Accurate and Rapid Stroke Treatment) Study to reduce DTN time have the potential to be widely applicable to other hospitals. PMID:25972494

  18. The NASA MERIT program - Developing new concepts for accurate flight planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, R.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that the rising cost of aviation fuel has necessitated the development of a new approach to upper air forecasting for flight planning. It is shown that the spatial resolution of the present weather forecast models used in fully automated computer flight planning is an important accuracy-limiting factor, and it is proposed that man be put back into the system, although not in the way he has been used in the past. A new approach is proposed which uses the application of man-computer interactive display techniques to upper air forecasting to retain the fine scale features of the atmosphere inherent in the present data base in order to provide a more accurate and cost effective flight plan. It is pointed out that, as a result of NASA research, the hardware required for this approach already exists.

  19. Objective evaluation of radiation treatment plans.

    PubMed Central

    Jain, N. L.; Kahn, M. G.

    1993-01-01

    The evaluation of radiation treatment plans involves making trade-offs among doses delivered to the tumor volumes and nearby normal tissues. Evaluating state-of-the-art three-dimensional (3D) plans is a difficult task because of the huge amount of planning data that needs to be deciphered. Multiattribute utility theory provides a methodology for specifying trade-offs and selecting the optimal plan from many competing plans. Using multiattribute utility theory, we are developing a clinically meaningful objective plan-evaluation model for 3D radiation treatment plans. Our model incorporates three of the factors involved in radiation treatment evaluation--treatment preferences of the radiation oncologist, clinical condition of the patient, and complexity of the treatment plan. PMID:8130449

  20. Accurate stone analysis: the impact on disease diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Neil S; Mandel, Ian C; Kolbach-Mandel, Ann M

    2017-02-01

    This manuscript reviews the requirements for acceptable compositional analysis of kidney stones using various biophysical methods. High-resolution X-ray powder diffraction crystallography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are the only acceptable methods in our labs for kidney stone analysis. The use of well-constructed spectral reference libraries is the basis for accurate and complete stone analysis. The literature included in this manuscript identify errors in most commercial laboratories and in some academic centers. We provide personal comments on why such errors are occurring at such high rates, and although the work load is rather large, it is very worthwhile in providing accurate stone compositions. We also provide the results of our almost 90,000 stone analyses and a breakdown of the number of components we have observed in the various stones. We also offer advice on determining the method used by the various FTIR equipment manufacturers who also provide a stone analysis library so that the FTIR users can feel comfortable in the accuracy of their reported results. Such an analysis on the accuracy of the individual reference libraries could positively influence the reduction in their respective error rates.

  1. Strategies for automatic online treatment plan reoptimization using clinical treatment planning system: A planning parameters study

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Taoran; Wu, Qiuwen; Zhang, You; Vergalasova, Irina; Lee, W. Robert; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Q. Jackie

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Adaptive radiation therapy for prostate cancer using online reoptimization provides an improved control of interfractional anatomy variations. However, the clinical implementation of online reoptimization is currently limited by the low efficiency of current strategies and the difficulties associated with integration into the current treatment planning system. This study investigates the strategies for performing fast (∼2 min) automatic online reoptimization with a clinical fluence-map-based treatment planning system; and explores the performance with different input parameters settings: dose-volume histogram (DVH) objective settings, starting stage, and iteration number (in the context of real time planning).Methods: Simulated treatments of 10 patients were reoptimized daily for the first week of treatment (5 fractions) using 12 different combinations of optimization strategies. Options for objective settings included guideline-based RTOG objectives, patient-specific objectives based on anatomy on the planning CT, and daily-CBCT anatomy-based objectives adapted from planning CT objectives. Options for starting stages involved starting reoptimization with and without the original plan's fluence map. Options for iteration numbers were 50 and 100. The adapted plans were then analyzed by statistical modeling, and compared both in terms of dosimetry and delivery efficiency.Results: All online reoptimized plans were finished within ∼2 min with excellent coverage and conformity to the daily target. The three input parameters, i.e., DVH objectives, starting stage, and iteration number, contributed to the outcome of optimization nearly independently. Patient-specific objectives generally provided better OAR sparing compared to guideline-based objectives. The benefit in high-dose sparing from incorporating daily anatomy into objective settings was positively correlated with the relative change in OAR volumes from planning CT to daily CBCT. The use of the

  2. Treatment planning for conformal proton radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Bussière, Mark R; Adams, Judith A

    2003-10-01

    Clinical results from various trials have demonstrated the viability of protons in radiation therapy and radiosurgery. This has motivated a few large medical centers to design and build expensive hospital based proton facilities based proton facilities (current cost estimates for a proton facility is around 100 million US dollars). Until this development proton therapy was done using retrofitted equipment originally designed for nuclear experiments. There are presently only three active proton therapy centers in the United States, 22 worldwide. However, more centers are under construction and being proposed in the US and abroad. The important difference between proton and x-ray therapy is in the dose distribution. X-rays deposit most of their dose at shallow depths of a few centimeters with a gradual decay with depth in the patient. Protons deliver most of their dose in the Bragg peak, which can be delivered at most clinically required depths followed by a sharp fall-off. This sharp falloff makes protons sensitive to variations in treatment depths within patients. Treatment planning incorporates all the knowledge of protons into a process, which allows patients to be treated accurately and reliably. This process includes patient immobilization, imaging, targeting, and modeling of planned dose distributions. Although the principles are similar to x-ray therapy some significant differences exist in the planning process, which described in this paper. Target dose conformality has recently taken on much momentum with the advent of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with photon beams. Proton treatments provide a viable alternative to IMRT because they are inherently conformal avoiding normal tissue while irradiating the intended targets. Proton therapy will soon bring conformality to a new high with the development of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Future challenges include keeping the cost down, increasing access to conventional proton therapy as

  3. Tolerance doses for treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Lyman, J.T.

    1985-10-01

    Data for the tolerance of normal tissues or organs to (low-LET) radiation has been compiled from a number of sources which are referenced at the end of this document. This tolerance dose data are ostensibly for uniform irradiation of all or part of an organ, and are for either 5% (TD/sub 5/) or 50% (TD/sub 50/) complication probability. The ''size'' of the irradiated organ is variously stated in terms of the absolute volume or the fraction of the organ volume irradiated, or the area or the length of the treatment field. The accuracy of these data is questionable. Much of the data represents doses that one or several experienced therapists have estimated could be safely given rather than quantitative analyses of clinical observations. Because these data have been obtained from multiple sources with possible different criteria for the definition of a complication, there are sometimes different values for what is apparently the same endpoint. The data from some sources shows a tendancy to be quantized in 5 Gy increments. This reflects the size of possible round off errors. It is believed that all these data have been accumulated without the benefit of 3-D dose distributions and therefore the estimates of the size of the volume and/or the uniformity of the irradiation may be less accurate than is now possible. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Diagnostic reasoning and treatment planning: II. Treatment.

    PubMed

    Nurcombe, B

    1987-12-01

    The concepts of therapy-oriented and problem-oriented plans are discussed and their advantages and disadvantages considered. Goal-directed planning is proposed as an alternative to intuitive decision making. Goal-directed planning involves the abstraction of pivotal problems from a diagnostic formulation, the restatement of problems as goals, the selection of appropriate therapy, the designation of a target date, the stipulation of objectives, the selection of methods of evaluation and the monitoring of progress. Systematic goal-directed planning fosters teamwork, promotes accountability, obviates therapeutic drift and enhances outcome evaluation. Its chief disadvantage is its unfamiliarity.

  5. Treatment planning for the pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    McWhorter, Alton G

    2010-12-01

    Treatment planning for pediatric dental patients is a multifactorial, complex process that requires careful consideration of three distinct areas: the patient's caries risk status, the available treatment options and the child's behavior. Components of a caries risk assessment include: a review of the child's medical and dental history in combination with the findings of the clinical and radiographic examination. All decisions regarding appropriate treatment options for the patient are guided by the outcome of the caries risk assessment. The child's behavior is another overriding consideration as it determines how the treatment can be rendered. Information obtained through careful evaluation of each area results in a treatment plan specifically designed for each child's circumstance.

  6. Patient-specific dosimetric endpoints based treatment plan quality control in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Song, Ting; Staub, David; Chen, Mingli; Lu, Weiguo; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Li, Yongbao; Zhou, Linghong; Jiang, Steve B; Gu, Xuejun

    2015-11-07

    In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the optimal plan for each patient is specific due to unique patient anatomy. To achieve such a plan, patient-specific dosimetric goals reflecting each patient's unique anatomy should be defined and adopted in the treatment planning procedure for plan quality control. This study is to develop such a personalized treatment plan quality control tool by predicting patient-specific dosimetric endpoints (DEs). The incorporation of patient specific DEs is realized by a multi-OAR geometry-dosimetry model, capable of predicting optimal DEs based on the individual patient's geometry. The overall quality of a treatment plan is then judged with a numerical treatment plan quality indicator and characterized as optimal or suboptimal. Taking advantage of clinically available prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans, we built and evaluated our proposed plan quality control tool. Using our developed tool, six of twenty evaluated plans were identified as sub-optimal plans. After plan re-optimization, these suboptimal plans achieved better OAR dose sparing without sacrificing the PTV coverage, and the dosimetric endpoints of the re-optimized plans agreed well with the model predicted values, which validate the predictability of the proposed tool. In conclusion, the developed tool is able to accurately predict optimally achievable DEs of multiple OARs, identify suboptimal plans, and guide plan optimization. It is a useful tool for achieving patient-specific treatment plan quality control.

  7. Patient-specific dosimetric endpoints based treatment plan quality control in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ting; Staub, David; Chen, Mingli; Lu, Weiguo; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Li, Yongbao; Zhou, Linghong; Jiang, Steve B.; Gu, Xuejun

    2015-11-01

    In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the optimal plan for each patient is specific due to unique patient anatomy. To achieve such a plan, patient-specific dosimetric goals reflecting each patient’s unique anatomy should be defined and adopted in the treatment planning procedure for plan quality control. This study is to develop such a personalized treatment plan quality control tool by predicting patient-specific dosimetric endpoints (DEs). The incorporation of patient specific DEs is realized by a multi-OAR geometry-dosimetry model, capable of predicting optimal DEs based on the individual patient’s geometry. The overall quality of a treatment plan is then judged with a numerical treatment plan quality indicator and characterized as optimal or suboptimal. Taking advantage of clinically available prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans, we built and evaluated our proposed plan quality control tool. Using our developed tool, six of twenty evaluated plans were identified as sub-optimal plans. After plan re-optimization, these suboptimal plans achieved better OAR dose sparing without sacrificing the PTV coverage, and the dosimetric endpoints of the re-optimized plans agreed well with the model predicted values, which validate the predictability of the proposed tool. In conclusion, the developed tool is able to accurately predict optimally achievable DEs of multiple OARs, identify suboptimal plans, and guide plan optimization. It is a useful tool for achieving patient-specific treatment plan quality control.

  8. Improving treatment plan evaluation with automation

    PubMed Central

    Covington, Elizabeth L.; Chen, Xiaoping; Younge, Kelly C.; Lee, Choonik; Matuszak, Martha M.; Kessler, Marc L.; Keranen, Wayne; Acosta, Eduardo; Dougherty, Ashley M.; Filpansick, Stephanie E.; Moran, Jean M.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this work is to evaluate the effectiveness of Plan-Checker Tool (PCT) which was created to improve first-time plan quality, reduce patient delays, increase the efficiency of our electronic workflow, and standardize and automate the physics plan review in the treatment planning system (TPS). PCT uses an application programming interface to check and compare data from the TPS and treatment management system (TMS). PCT includes a comprehensive checklist of automated and manual checks that are documented when performed by the user as part of a plan readiness check for treatment. Prior to and during PCT development, errors identified during the physics review and causes of patient treatment start delays were tracked to prioritize which checks should be automated. Nineteen of 33checklist items were automated, with data extracted with PCT. There was a 60% reduction in the number of patient delays in the six months after PCT release. PCT was successfully implemented for use on all external beam treatment plans in our clinic. While the number of errors found during the physics check did not decrease, automation of checks increased visibility of errors during the physics check, which led to decreased patient delays. The methods used here can be applied to any TMS and TPS that allows queries of the database. PMID:27929478

  9. Improving treatment plan evaluation with automation.

    PubMed

    Covington, Elizabeth L; Chen, Xiaoping; Younge, Kelly C; Lee, Choonik; Matuszak, Martha M; Kessler, Marc L; Keranen, Wayne; Acosta, Eduardo; Dougherty, Ashley M; Filpansick, Stephanie E; Moran, Jean M

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this work is to evaluate the effectiveness of Plan-Checker Tool (PCT) which was created to improve first-time plan quality, reduce patient delays, increase the efficiency of our electronic workflow, and standardize and automate the physics plan review in the treatment planning system (TPS). PCT uses an application programming interface to check and compare data from the TPS and treatment management system (TMS). PCT includes a comprehensive checklist of automated and manual checks that are documented when performed by the user as part of a plan readiness check for treatment. Prior to and during PCT development, errors identified during the physics review and causes of patient treatment start delays were tracked to prioritize which checks should be automated. Nineteen of 33 checklist items were automated, with data extracted with PCT. There was a 60% reduction in the number of patient delays in the six months after PCT release. PCT was successfully implemented for use on all external beam treatment plans in our clinic. While the number of errors found during the physics check did not decrease, automation of checks increased visibility of errors during the physics check, which led to decreased patient delays. The methods used here can be applied to any TMS and TPS that allows queries of the database. PACS number(s): 87.55.-x, 87.55.N-, 87.55.Qr, 87.55.tm, 89.20.Bb.

  10. Improving treatment plan evaluation with automation.

    PubMed

    Covington, Elizabeth L; Chen, Xiaoping; Younge, Kelly C; Lee, Choonik; Matuszak, Martha M; Kessler, Marc L; Keranen, Wayne; Acosta, Eduardo; Dougherty, Ashley M; Filpansick, Stephanie E; Moran, Jean M

    2016-11-08

    The goal of this work is to evaluate the effectiveness of Plan-Checker Tool (PCT) which was created to improve first-time plan quality, reduce patient delays, increase the efficiency of our electronic workflow, and standardize and automate the phys-ics plan review in the treatment planning system (TPS). PCT uses an application programming interface to check and compare data from the TPS and treatment management system (TMS). PCT includes a comprehensive checklist of automated and manual checks that are documented when performed by the user as part of a plan readiness check for treatment. Prior to and during PCT development, errors identified during the physics review and causes of patient treatment start delays were tracked to prioritize which checks should be automated. Nineteen of 33checklist items were automated, with data extracted with PCT. There was a 60% reduction in the number of patient delays in the six months after PCT release. PCT was suc-cessfully implemented for use on all external beam treatment plans in our clinic. While the number of errors found during the physics check did not decrease, automation of checks increased visibility of errors during the physics check, which led to decreased patient delays. The methods used here can be applied to any TMS and TPS that allows queries of the database.

  11. Planning for mARC treatments with the Eclipse treatment planning system.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Vikren; Huang, Long; Rassiah-Szegedi, Prema; Zhao, Hui; Huang, Jessica; Szegedi, Martin; Salter, Bill J

    2015-03-08

    While modulated arc (mARC) capabilities have been available on Siemens linear accelerators for almost two years now, there was, until recently, only one treatment planning system capable of planning these treatments. The Eclipse treatment planning system now offers a module that can plan for mARC treatments. The purpose of this work was to test the module to determine whether it is capable of creating clinically acceptable plans. A total of 23 plans were created for various clinical sites and all plans delivered without anomaly. The average 3%/3 mm gamma pass rate for the plans was 98.0%, with a standard deviation of 1.7%. For a total of 14 plans, an equivalent static gantry IMRT plan was also created to compare delivery time. In all but two cases, the mARC plans delivered significantly faster than the static gantry plan. We have confirmed the successful creation of mARC plans that are deliverable with high fidelity on an ARTISTE linear accelerator, thus demonstrating the successful implementation of the Eclipse mARC module.

  12. Strategies for microwave thermal treatment planning, navigation, and assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Thomas P.

    2011-03-01

    Thermal treatment is commonly performed interstitially in either surgical or percutaneous procedures, using microwave antenna sources at 915 or 2540 MHz. There are a number of tools or aids as well as challenges for clinicians performing these procedures in the course of patient treatment. These challenges will be present whether the procedure is surgical, laparoscopic, or percutaneous, and include treatment planning, image guidance, navigation, coregistration in 3D, and treatment assessment. Treatment planning has been used historically in hyperthermia for microwave antenna arrays, but has yet to be properly applied in thermal ablation. Image assessment of thermal treatment is not typically performed in real time, although these tools will provide the clinician with further information to understand the extent of treatment and whether further treatment is needed. 3D imaging is available, but not coregistered to patient space. Navigation has been used in many medical specialties, but is also not in the clinician's toolbox in thermal treatment. Although treatment planning will lay out the skin entry and trajectory for each antenna placed, subsequently, each antenna needs to be tracked to accurately show placement in the patient and overlaid in patient space, along with the tumor target location. Some patient treatments may consist of multiple, but sequential single placements of an antenna, and guidance is even more critical to track positions and plan for the next insertion. Lastly, real-time image assessment will show the extent and shape of the coagulated lesion and which targets may have been undertreated. If used synchronously in arrays, MW power steering may also aid in filling in the ablation as the treatment progresses. This paper will analyze the present state-of-the art as well as a strategy to incorporate the various facets of planning, guidance, and assessment of treatment. The integration of thermal treatment planning, navigation and guidance, robotics

  13. Towards the Validation of a Commercial Hyperthermia Treatment Planning System.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Vogel, Martin; Maccarini, Paolo F; Arabe, Omar A; Stakhursky, Vadim; Crawford, Devin; Joines, Williams T; Stauffer, Paul R

    2008-01-01

    Recent developments have reinvigorated clinical investigations of hyperthermia (HT) as a viable adjuvant treatment in the fight against cancer. Researchers are placing a greater emphasis on multi-modal approaches that include mild temperatures (40°C - 43°C) and standard therapies like radiation and chemotherapy than on achieving higher temperature treatments (43°C-45°C) which were pursued in the past. The emergence of robust computer simulation tools for accurate hyperthermia treatment planning has aided this resurgence by helping improve the quality of heating. This article outlines a recent collaborative study at Duke University to demonstrate the capabilities of a new suite of 3D electromagnetic and thermodynamic simulation tools for treatment planning of external hyperthermia treatments with a radio frequency (RF) phased array heat applicator. Following a brief introduction to the rationale for moderate temperature hyperthermia and current methodology for heating tissue at depth in the body, the article will present a new approach for improved heating based on treatment planning with electromagnetic simulation software tools. Procedures, benefits, and a comparison of simulated heating patterns with those measured in two clinical hyperthermia treatments of advanced fibrous histiocytoma (soft-tissue sarcoma) tumors will be presented.

  14. Automatic Treatment Planning with Convex Imputing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayre, G. A.; Ruan, D.

    2014-03-01

    Current inverse optimization-based treatment planning for radiotherapy requires a set of complex DVH objectives to be simultaneously minimized. This process, known as multi-objective optimization, is challenging due to non-convexity in individual objectives and insufficient knowledge in the tradeoffs among the objective set. As such, clinical practice involves numerous iterations of human intervention that is costly and often inconsistent. In this work, we propose to address treatment planning with convex imputing, a new-data mining technique that explores the existence of a latent convex objective whose optimizer reflects the DVH and dose-shaping properties of previously optimized cases. Using ten clinical prostate cases as the basis for comparison, we imputed a simple least-squares problem from the optimized solutions of the prostate cases, and show that the imputed plans are more consistent than their clinical counterparts in achieving planning goals.

  15. Planning of electroporation-based treatments using Web-based treatment-planning software.

    PubMed

    Pavliha, Denis; Kos, Bor; Marčan, Marija; Zupanič, Anže; Serša, Gregor; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2013-11-01

    Electroporation-based treatment combining high-voltage electric pulses and poorly permanent cytotoxic drugs, i.e., electrochemotherapy (ECT), is currently used for treating superficial tumor nodules by following standard operating procedures. Besides ECT, another electroporation-based treatment, nonthermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE), is also efficient at ablating deep-seated tumors. To perform ECT or N-TIRE of deep-seated tumors, following standard operating procedures is not sufficient and patient-specific treatment planning is required for successful treatment. Treatment planning is required because of the use of individual long-needle electrodes and the diverse shape, size and location of deep-seated tumors. Many institutions that already perform ECT of superficial metastases could benefit from treatment-planning software that would enable the preparation of patient-specific treatment plans. To this end, we have developed a Web-based treatment-planning software for planning electroporation-based treatments that does not require prior engineering knowledge from the user (e.g., the clinician). The software includes algorithms for automatic tissue segmentation and, after segmentation, generation of a 3D model of the tissue. The procedure allows the user to define how the electrodes will be inserted. Finally, electric field distribution is computed, the position of electrodes and the voltage to be applied are optimized using the 3D model and a downloadable treatment plan is made available to the user.

  16. The development and verification of a highly accurate collision prediction model for automated noncoplanar plan delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Tran, Angelia; Nguyen, Dan; Cao, Minsong; Ruan, Dan; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Significant dosimetric benefits had been previously demonstrated in highly noncoplanar treatment plans. In this study, the authors developed and verified an individualized collision model for the purpose of delivering highly noncoplanar radiotherapy and tested the feasibility of total delivery automation with Varian TrueBeam developer mode. Methods: A hand-held 3D scanner was used to capture the surfaces of an anthropomorphic phantom and a human subject, which were positioned with a computer-aided design model of a TrueBeam machine to create a detailed virtual geometrical collision model. The collision model included gantry, collimator, and couch motion degrees of freedom. The accuracy of the 3D scanner was validated by scanning a rigid cubical phantom with known dimensions. The collision model was then validated by generating 300 linear accelerator orientations corresponding to 300 gantry-to-couch and gantry-to-phantom distances, and comparing the corresponding distance measurements to their corresponding models. The linear accelerator orientations reflected uniformly sampled noncoplanar beam angles to the head, lung, and prostate. The distance discrepancies between measurements on the physical and virtual systems were used to estimate treatment-site-specific safety buffer distances with 0.1%, 0.01%, and 0.001% probability of collision between the gantry and couch or phantom. Plans containing 20 noncoplanar beams to the brain, lung, and prostate optimized via an in-house noncoplanar radiotherapy platform were converted into XML script for automated delivery and the entire delivery was recorded and timed to demonstrate the feasibility of automated delivery. Results: The 3D scanner measured the dimension of the 14 cm cubic phantom within 0.5 mm. The maximal absolute discrepancy between machine and model measurements for gantry-to-couch and gantry-to-phantom was 0.95 and 2.97 cm, respectively. The reduced accuracy of gantry-to-phantom measurements was

  17. The development and verification of a highly accurate collision prediction model for automated noncoplanar plan delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Tran, Angelia; Nguyen, Dan; Cao, Minsong; Ruan, Dan; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Significant dosimetric benefits had been previously demonstrated in highly noncoplanar treatment plans. In this study, the authors developed and verified an individualized collision model for the purpose of delivering highly noncoplanar radiotherapy and tested the feasibility of total delivery automation with Varian TrueBeam developer mode. Methods: A hand-held 3D scanner was used to capture the surfaces of an anthropomorphic phantom and a human subject, which were positioned with a computer-aided design model of a TrueBeam machine to create a detailed virtual geometrical collision model. The collision model included gantry, collimator, and couch motion degrees of freedom. The accuracy of the 3D scanner was validated by scanning a rigid cubical phantom with known dimensions. The collision model was then validated by generating 300 linear accelerator orientations corresponding to 300 gantry-to-couch and gantry-to-phantom distances, and comparing the corresponding distance measurements to their corresponding models. The linear accelerator orientations reflected uniformly sampled noncoplanar beam angles to the head, lung, and prostate. The distance discrepancies between measurements on the physical and virtual systems were used to estimate treatment-site-specific safety buffer distances with 0.1%, 0.01%, and 0.001% probability of collision between the gantry and couch or phantom. Plans containing 20 noncoplanar beams to the brain, lung, and prostate optimized via an in-house noncoplanar radiotherapy platform were converted into XML script for automated delivery and the entire delivery was recorded and timed to demonstrate the feasibility of automated delivery. Results: The 3D scanner measured the dimension of the 14 cm cubic phantom within 0.5 mm. The maximal absolute discrepancy between machine and model measurements for gantry-to-couch and gantry-to-phantom was 0.95 and 2.97 cm, respectively. The reduced accuracy of gantry-to-phantom measurements was

  18. [Planning guidelines for prosthodontic treatment].

    PubMed

    Shiga, Hiroshi; Terada, Yoshihiro; Shinya, Akiyoshi; Ikebe, Kazunori; Tamazawa, Yoshinori; Nagadome, Hatsumi; Akagawa, Yasumasa

    2008-01-01

    In recent years "practice guidelines" based on EBM techniques have even been attracting attention at a societal level, and guidelines modeled after the procedure for preparing practice guideline (described at http://www.niph.go.jp/glgl-4.3rev.htm) have begun to be drafted and made public. With the aim of ensuring the quality and presenting the basic concepts of prosthodontic therapy, the Japan Prosthodontic Society, which bears a great obligation and responsibility toward society and the Japanese public, has decided to undertake the formulation of guidelines related to prosthodontic therapy, and decided to first undertake the formulation of "Practice guideline for denture relining and rebasing", and to prepare a guideline model. We tried to prepare the guidelines according to the "Procedure for preparing practice guidelines", but because of the scientific uniqueness of prosthodontic treatment and dentistry, research to elucidate the basis of treatment has been insufficient, and we ultimately reconfirmed the current state of affairs in which it is difficult to perform. We therefore prepared the guidelines based on the limited evidence obtained in a search of the scientific literature and on the consensus of experts. The Japan Prosthodontic Society has investigated and prepared a Society guideline "model" to the extent possible at the present time, and it has prepared "Guidelines for adhesion bridge" and "Practice guidelines for denture prosthodontics" based on it. Nevertheless, the fact of the matter is that we are faced with numerous problems, and we think that in the future new bases and clinical knowledge will be accumulated by promoting scientific clinical research, and that the guidelines should be revised regularly based on them.

  19. [Understanding and implementing the Party's policies on family planning accurately in an all-around way].

    PubMed

    Liang, J; Peng, Z

    1984-05-29

    Recently, the Party's Central Committee held numerous meetings to study the problem of family planning. The main goal of these meetings was to find a correct family planning policy, which should be based on common sense, support from the people, and reasonable work from the cadres. Family planning policies and regulations should be realistic and creative. In the implementation of policies, different methods should be adopted for varied situations, and there should also be appropriate guiding principles for different categories. To cope with a new situation, creative methods and approaches should be chosen in order to implement the family planning policy. The correct method will ensure complete implementation of the policy. In family planning work, the first step is the improvement of ideological education, so that the people may have a correct understanding of the need for family planning. In the technical management work of family planning, a constant improvement in the quality of service should be the goal. Through practical working experience in family planning, some rules and regulations will be found, and they should be used to promote the management level and the level of family planning work in general.

  20. Improvements in patient treatment planning systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, F.J.; Wessol, D.E.; Nigg, D.W.; Atkinson, C.A.; Babcock, R.; Evans, J.

    1995-01-01

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, Radiation treatment planning environment (BNCT-Rtpe) software system is used to develop treatment planning information. In typical use BNCT-Rtpe consists of three main components: (1) Semi-automated geometric modeling of objects (brain, target, eyes, sinus) derived from MRI, CT, and other medical imaging modalities, (2) Dose computations for these geometric models with rtt-MC, the INEL Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code, and (3) Dose contouring overlaid on medical images as well as generation of other dose displays. We continue to develop a planning system based on three-dimensional image-based reconstructions using Bspline surfaces. Even though this software is in an experimental state, it has been applied for large animal research and for an isolated case of treatment for a human glioma. Radiation transport is based on Monte Carlo, however there will be implementations of faster methods (e.g. diffusion theory) in the future. The important thing for treatment planning is the output which must convey, to the radiologist, the deposition of dose to healthy and target tissue. Many edits are available such that one can obtain contours registered to medical image, dose/volume histograms and most information required for treatment planning and response assessment. Recent work has been to make the process more automatic and easier to use. The interface, now implemented for contouring and reconstruction, utilizes the Xwindowing system and the MOTIF graphical users interface for effective interaction with the planner. Much work still remains before the tool can be applied in a routine clinical setting.

  1. Cost-Effective Fuel Treatment Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreitler, J.; Thompson, M.; Vaillant, N.

    2014-12-01

    The cost of fighting large wildland fires in the western United States has grown dramatically over the past decade. This trend will likely continue with growth of the WUI into fire prone ecosystems, dangerous fuel conditions from decades of fire suppression, and a potentially increasing effect from prolonged drought and climate change. Fuel treatments are often considered the primary pre-fire mechanism to reduce the exposure of values at risk to wildland fire, and a growing suite of fire models and tools are employed to prioritize where treatments could mitigate wildland fire damages. Assessments using the likelihood and consequence of fire are critical because funds are insufficient to reduce risk on all lands needing treatment, therefore prioritization is required to maximize the effectiveness of fuel treatment budgets. Cost-effectiveness, doing the most good per dollar, would seem to be an important fuel treatment metric, yet studies or plans that prioritize fuel treatments using costs or cost-effectiveness measures are absent from the literature. Therefore, to explore the effect of using costs in fuel treatment planning we test four prioritization algorithms designed to reduce risk in a case study examining fuel treatments on the Sisters Ranger District of central Oregon. For benefits we model sediment retention and standing biomass, and measure the effectiveness of each algorithm by comparing the differences among treatment and no treat alternative scenarios. Our objective is to maximize the averted loss of net benefits subject to a representative fuel treatment budget. We model costs across the study landscape using the My Fuel Treatment Planner software, tree list data, local mill prices, and GIS-measured site characteristics. We use fire simulations to generate burn probabilities, and estimate fire intensity as conditional flame length at each pixel. Two prioritization algorithms target treatments based on cost-effectiveness and show improvements over those

  2. Collision avoidance in computer optimized treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Humm, J L

    1994-07-01

    Of major concern in fully automated computerized treatment delivery is the possibility of gantry/couch or gantry/patient collisions. In this work, software has been developed to detect collisions between gantry and couch or patient for both transaxial and noncoplanar treatment fields during the treatment planning process. The code uses the gantry angles, turntable angles, and position of the couch surface relative to the isocenter supplied by the planner for the prescribed radiation fields. In addition, the maximum patient anterior-posterior and lateral separations are entered in order to model the patient outline by a conservative cylindrical ellipse. By accessing a database containing the precise mechanical dimensions of the therapy equipment, 3D analytical geometry is used to test for collisions between gantry/patient and gantry/couch for each treatment field. When collisions are detected, the software inspects the use of an extended distance treatment, by recalculating and testing for collisions, with the couch at a greater distance from the collimator along the direction of the central axis. If a collision is avoided at extended distance, the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical motions of the couch are recorded for entry into the treatment plan, or else a warning message is printed, together with the nearest permissible collision-free gantry angle. Upon inspection, the planner can either elect to use the calculated closest permissible gantry angle or reject the plan. The software verifies that each proposed treatment field is safe, but also that the transition between fields is collision-free. This requires that the sequence of the treatment fields be ordered, preferably into a sequence which minimizes the delivery time compatible with patient safety.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Automatic liver contouring for radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dengwang; Liu, Li; Kapp, Daniel S.; Xing, Lei

    2015-09-01

    To develop automatic and efficient liver contouring software for planning 3D-CT and four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) for application in clinical radiation therapy treatment planning systems. The algorithm comprises three steps for overcoming the challenge of similar intensities between the liver region and its surrounding tissues. First, the total variation model with the L1 norm (TV-L1), which has the characteristic of multi-scale decomposition and an edge-preserving property, is used for removing the surrounding muscles and tissues. Second, an improved level set model that contains both global and local energy functions is utilized to extract liver contour information sequentially. In the global energy function, the local correlation coefficient (LCC) is constructed based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix both of the initial liver region and the background region. The LCC can calculate the correlation of a pixel with the foreground and background regions, respectively. The LCC is combined with intensity distribution models to classify pixels during the evolutionary process of the level set based method. The obtained liver contour is used as the candidate liver region for the following step. In the third step, voxel-based texture characterization is employed for refining the liver region and obtaining the final liver contours. The proposed method was validated based on the planning CT images of a group of 25 patients undergoing radiation therapy treatment planning. These included ten lung cancer patients with normal appearing livers and ten patients with hepatocellular carcinoma or liver metastases. The method was also tested on abdominal 4D-CT images of a group of five patients with hepatocellular carcinoma or liver metastases. The false positive volume percentage, the false negative volume percentage, and the dice similarity coefficient between liver contours obtained by a developed algorithm and a current standard delineated by the expert group

  4. Automatic liver contouring for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Li, Dengwang; Liu, Li; Kapp, Daniel S; Xing, Lei

    2015-10-07

    To develop automatic and efficient liver contouring software for planning 3D-CT and four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) for application in clinical radiation therapy treatment planning systems.The algorithm comprises three steps for overcoming the challenge of similar intensities between the liver region and its surrounding tissues. First, the total variation model with the L1 norm (TV-L1), which has the characteristic of multi-scale decomposition and an edge-preserving property, is used for removing the surrounding muscles and tissues. Second, an improved level set model that contains both global and local energy functions is utilized to extract liver contour information sequentially. In the global energy function, the local correlation coefficient (LCC) is constructed based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix both of the initial liver region and the background region. The LCC can calculate the correlation of a pixel with the foreground and background regions, respectively. The LCC is combined with intensity distribution models to classify pixels during the evolutionary process of the level set based method. The obtained liver contour is used as the candidate liver region for the following step. In the third step, voxel-based texture characterization is employed for refining the liver region and obtaining the final liver contours.The proposed method was validated based on the planning CT images of a group of 25 patients undergoing radiation therapy treatment planning. These included ten lung cancer patients with normal appearing livers and ten patients with hepatocellular carcinoma or liver metastases. The method was also tested on abdominal 4D-CT images of a group of five patients with hepatocellular carcinoma or liver metastases. The false positive volume percentage, the false negative volume percentage, and the dice similarity coefficient between liver contours obtained by a developed algorithm and a current standard delineated by the expert group

  5. Evaluation of plan quality assurance models for prostate cancer patients based on fully automatically generated Pareto-optimal treatment plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yibing; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Heijmen, Ben; Petit, Steven F.

    2016-06-01

    IMRT planning with commercial Treatment Planning Systems (TPSs) is a trial-and-error process. Consequently, the quality of treatment plans may not be consistent among patients, planners and institutions. Recently, different plan quality assurance (QA) models have been proposed, that could flag and guide improvement of suboptimal treatment plans. However, the performance of these models was validated using plans that were created using the conventional trail-and-error treatment planning process. Consequently, it is challenging to assess and compare quantitatively the accuracy of different treatment planning QA models. Therefore, we created a golden standard dataset of consistently planned Pareto-optimal IMRT plans for 115 prostate patients. Next, the dataset was used to assess the performance of a treatment planning QA model that uses the overlap volume histogram (OVH). 115 prostate IMRT plans were fully automatically planned using our in-house developed TPS Erasmus-iCycle. An existing OVH model was trained on the plans of 58 of the patients. Next it was applied to predict DVHs of the rectum, bladder and anus of the remaining 57 patients. The predictions were compared with the achieved values of the golden standard plans for the rectum D mean, V 65, and V 75, and D mean of the anus and the bladder. For the rectum, the prediction errors (predicted-achieved) were only  -0.2  ±  0.9 Gy (mean  ±  1 SD) for D mean,-1.0  ±  1.6% for V 65, and  -0.4  ±  1.1% for V 75. For D mean of the anus and the bladder, the prediction error was 0.1  ±  1.6 Gy and 4.8  ±  4.1 Gy, respectively. Increasing the training cohort to 114 patients only led to minor improvements. A dataset of consistently planned Pareto-optimal prostate IMRT plans was generated. This dataset can be used to train new, and validate and compare existing treatment planning QA models, and has been made publicly available. The OVH model was highly accurate

  6. Evaluation of plan quality assurance models for prostate cancer patients based on fully automatically generated Pareto-optimal treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yibing; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Heijmen, Ben; Petit, Steven F

    2016-06-07

    IMRT planning with commercial Treatment Planning Systems (TPSs) is a trial-and-error process. Consequently, the quality of treatment plans may not be consistent among patients, planners and institutions. Recently, different plan quality assurance (QA) models have been proposed, that could flag and guide improvement of suboptimal treatment plans. However, the performance of these models was validated using plans that were created using the conventional trail-and-error treatment planning process. Consequently, it is challenging to assess and compare quantitatively the accuracy of different treatment planning QA models. Therefore, we created a golden standard dataset of consistently planned Pareto-optimal IMRT plans for 115 prostate patients. Next, the dataset was used to assess the performance of a treatment planning QA model that uses the overlap volume histogram (OVH). 115 prostate IMRT plans were fully automatically planned using our in-house developed TPS Erasmus-iCycle. An existing OVH model was trained on the plans of 58 of the patients. Next it was applied to predict DVHs of the rectum, bladder and anus of the remaining 57 patients. The predictions were compared with the achieved values of the golden standard plans for the rectum D mean, V 65, and V 75, and D mean of the anus and the bladder. For the rectum, the prediction errors (predicted-achieved) were only  -0.2  ±  0.9 Gy (mean  ±  1 SD) for D mean,-1.0  ±  1.6% for V 65, and  -0.4  ±  1.1% for V 75. For D mean of the anus and the bladder, the prediction error was 0.1  ±  1.6 Gy and 4.8  ±  4.1 Gy, respectively. Increasing the training cohort to 114 patients only led to minor improvements. A dataset of consistently planned Pareto-optimal prostate IMRT plans was generated. This dataset can be used to train new, and validate and compare existing treatment planning QA models, and has been made publicly available. The OVH model was highly accurate

  7. Review of Fast Monte Carlo Codes for Dose Calculation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Keyvan

    2011-01-01

    An important requirement in radiation therapy is a fast and accurate treatment planning system. This system, using computed tomography (CT) data, direction, and characteristics of the beam, calculates the dose at all points of the patient's volume. The two main factors in treatment planning system are accuracy and speed. According to these factors, various generations of treatment planning systems are developed. This article is a review of the Fast Monte Carlo treatment planning algorithms, which are accurate and fast at the same time. The Monte Carlo techniques are based on the transport of each individual particle (e.g., photon or electron) in the tissue. The transport of the particle is done using the physics of the interaction of the particles with matter. Other techniques transport the particles as a group. For a typical dose calculation in radiation therapy the code has to transport several millions particles, which take a few hours, therefore, the Monte Carlo techniques are accurate, but slow for clinical use. In recent years, with the development of the ‘fast’ Monte Carlo systems, one is able to perform dose calculation in a reasonable time for clinical use. The acceptable time for dose calculation is in the range of one minute. There is currently a growing interest in the fast Monte Carlo treatment planning systems and there are many commercial treatment planning systems that perform dose calculation in radiation therapy based on the Monte Carlo technique. PMID:22606661

  8. A treatment planning system for pleural PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandell, Julia; Chang, Chang; Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2010-02-01

    Uniform light fluence distribution for patients undergoing photodynamic therapy (PDT) is critical to ensure predictable PDT outcome. However, common practice uses a point source to deliver light to the pleural cavity. To improve the uniformity of light fluence rate distribution, we have developed a treatment planning system using an infrared camera to track the movement of the point source. This study examines the light fluence (rate) delivered to chest phantom to simulate a patient undergoing pleural PDT. Fluence rate (mW/cm2) and cumulative fluence (J/cm2) was monitored at 7 different sites during the entire light treatment delivery. Isotropic detectors were used for in-vivo light dosimetry. Light fluence rate in the pleural cavity is also calculated using the diffusion approximation with a finite-element model. We have established a correlation between the light fluence rate distribution and the light fluence rate measured on the selected points based on a spherical cavity model. Integrating sphere theory is used to aid the calculation of light fluence rate on the surface of the sphere as well as inside tissue assuming uniform optical properties. The resulting treatment planning tool can be valuable as a clinical guideline for future pleural PDT treatment.

  9. MR Imaging Based Treatment Planning for Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    treatment planning for radiotherapy : Dosimetric verification for prostate IiMRT" and " Dosimetric evaluation of MRI-based treatment planning for...Shawn M, Ma C-M, Freedman GM and Pollack A. MRI-Based Treatment Planning for Radiotherapy : Dosimetric Verification for Prostate IMRT. International...Freedman GM and Pollack A. MRI- Based Treatment Planning for Radiotherapy : Dosimetric Verification for Prostate ]IMRT. International Journal of Radiation

  10. Essential components of written behavior treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Williams, Don E; Vollmer, Timothy R

    2014-11-12

    For the last 25 years, the only empirically determined system to evaluate the content of written behavior analysis plans was developed by Vollmer et al. (1992). For the current study, the content of that earlier system was revised by the first author and submitted to 48 members of the editorial board of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and seven (7) other acknowledged experts on the editorial boards of Behavioral Interventions and Research in Developmental Disabilities. Of 55 recipients, 36 responded. The thirty-six (36) respondents rated each of 28 items from essential to non-essential using a five-point Likert scale. After reviewing the expert panel members' evaluations, we reduced the 28 items to 20 essential components of written behavior treatment plans. The implications of the results were discussed.

  11. Nevada Test Site Treatment Plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    Treatment Plans (STPS) are required for facilities at which the US Department of Energy (DOE) or stores mixed waste, defined by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct) as waste containing both a hazardous waste subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and a radioactive material subject to the Atomic Energy Act. On April 6, 1993, DOE published a Federal Register notice (58 FR 17875) describing its proposed process for developing the STPs in three phases including a Conceptual, a Draft, and a Proposed Site Treatment Plan (PSTP). All of the DOE Nevada Operations Office STP iterations have been developed with the state of Nevada`s input. The options and schedules reflect a ``bottoms-up`` approach and have been evaluated for impacts on other DOE sites, as well as impacts to the overall DOE program. Changes may have occurred in the preferred option and associated schedules between the PSTP, which was submitted to the state of Nevada and US Environmental Protection Agency April 1995, and the Final STP (hereafter referred to as the STP) as treatment evaluations progressed. The STP includes changes that have occurred since the submittal of the PSTP as a result of state-to-state and DOE-to-state discussions.

  12. Accurate combination of CT and MR data of the head: validation and applications in surgical and therapy planning.

    PubMed

    Hill, D L; Hawkes, D J; Hussain, Z; Green, S E; Ruff, C F; Robinson, G P

    1993-01-01

    A method is presented for the accurate combination of magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomographic (CT) images of the head. Our technique is based on user identified 3D landmarks followed by data combination and display as adjacent slices, a single fused slice representation, colour overlay and three-dimensional (3D) rendered scenes. Validation with a point phantom and computer simulation has established the relationship of registration accuracy with point location accuracy, the number of points used and their spatial distribution. The technique is in clinical use in the planning of skull base surgery, transferring MR images acquired without a stereotaxic frame to stereotaxic space, and staging and planning therapy of nasopharyngeal tumours.

  13. Alopecia areata: a new treatment plan

    PubMed Central

    Alsantali, Adel

    2011-01-01

    Many therapeutic modalities have been used to treat alopecia areata, with variable efficacy and safety profiles. Unfortunately, none of these agents is curative or preventive. Also, many of these therapeutic agents have not been subjected to randomized, controlled trials, and, except for topical immunotherapy, there are few published studies on long-term outcomes. The treatment plan is designed according to the patient’s age and extent of disease. In this paper, the therapeutic agents are organized according to their efficacy and safety profiles into first-line, second-line, and third-line options. PMID:21833161

  14. Simulation techniques in hyperthermia treatment planning

    PubMed Central

    Paulides, MM; Stauffer, PR; Neufeld, E; Maccarini, P; Kyriakou, A; Canters, RAM; Diederich, C; Bakker, JF; Van Rhoon, GC

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials have shown that hyperthermia (HT), i.e. an increase of tissue temperature to 39-44°C, significantly enhance radiotherapy and chemotherapy effectiveness (1). Driven by the developments in computational techniques and computing power, personalized hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) has matured and has become a powerful tool for optimizing treatment quality. Electromagnetic, ultrasound, and thermal simulations using realistic clinical setups are now being performed to achieve patient-specific treatment optimization. In addition, extensive studies aimed to properly implement novel HT tools and techniques, and to assess the quality of HT, are becoming more common. In this paper, we review the simulation tools and techniques developed for clinical hyperthermia, and evaluate their current status on the path from “model” to “clinic”. In addition, we illustrate the major techniques employed for validation and optimization. HTP has become an essential tool for improvement, control, and assessment of HT treatment quality. As such, it plays a pivotal role in the quest to establish HT as an efficacious addition to multi-modality treatment of cancer. PMID:23672453

  15. Toward optimizing patient-specific IMRT QA techniques in the accurate detection of dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable patient plans

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, Elizabeth M.; Balter, Peter A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Jones, Jimmy; Followill, David S.; Kry, Stephen F.

    2014-12-15

    was no significant difference in the performance of any device between gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm, 3%/3 mm, and 5%/3 mm. Finally, optimal cutoffs (e.g., percent of pixels passing gamma) were determined for each device and while clinical practice commonly uses a threshold of 90% of pixels passing for most cases, these results showed variability in the optimal cutoff among devices. Conclusions: IMRT QA devices have differences in their ability to accurately detect dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable plans. Field-by-field analysis with a MapCheck device and use of the MapCheck with a MapPhan phantom while delivering at planned rotational gantry angles resulted in a significantly poorer ability to accurately sort acceptable and unacceptable plans compared with the other techniques examined. Patient-specific IMRT QA techniques in general should be thoroughly evaluated for their ability to correctly differentiate acceptable and unacceptable plans. Additionally, optimal agreement thresholds should be identified and used as common clinical thresholds typically worked very poorly to identify unacceptable plans.

  16. Noncoplanar VMAT for nasopharyngeal tumors: Plan quality versus treatment time

    SciTech Connect

    Wild, Esther Bangert, Mark; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The authors investigated the potential of optimized noncoplanar irradiation trajectories for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatments of nasopharyngeal patients and studied the trade-off between treatment plan quality and delivery time in radiation therapy. Methods: For three nasopharyngeal patients, the authors generated treatment plans for nine different delivery scenarios using dedicated optimization methods. They compared these scenarios according to dose characteristics, number of beam directions, and estimated delivery times. In particular, the authors generated the following treatment plans: (1) a 4π plan, which is a not sequenced, fluence optimized plan that uses beam directions from approximately 1400 noncoplanar directions and marks a theoretical upper limit of the treatment plan quality, (2) a coplanar 2π plan with 72 coplanar beam directions as pendant to the noncoplanar 4π plan, (3) a coplanar VMAT plan, (4) a coplanar step and shoot (SnS) plan, (5) a beam angle optimized (BAO) coplanar SnS IMRT plan, (6) a noncoplanar BAO SnS plan, (7) a VMAT plan with rotated treatment couch, (8) a noncoplanar VMAT plan with an optimized great circle around the patient, and (9) a noncoplanar BAO VMAT plan with an arbitrary trajectory around the patient. Results: VMAT using optimized noncoplanar irradiation trajectories reduced the mean and maximum doses in organs at risk compared to coplanar VMAT plans by 19% on average while the target coverage remains constant. A coplanar BAO SnS plan was superior to coplanar SnS or VMAT; however, noncoplanar plans like a noncoplanar BAO SnS plan or noncoplanar VMAT yielded a better plan quality than the best coplanar 2π plan. The treatment plan quality of VMAT plans depended on the length of the trajectory. The delivery times of noncoplanar VMAT plans were estimated to be 6.5 min in average; 1.6 min longer than a coplanar plan but on average 2.8 min faster than a noncoplanar SnS plan with comparable

  17. Expert system for neurosurgical treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Andrew Y. S.; Chung, Sally S. Y.; Kwok, John C. K.

    1996-04-01

    A specially designed expert system is in development for neurosurgical treatment planning. The knowledge base contains knowledge and experiences on neurosurgical treatment planning from neurosurgeon consultants, who also determine the risks of different regions in human brains. When completed, the system can simulate the decision making process of neurosurgeons to determine the safest probing path for operation. The Computed Tomography (CT) or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scan images for each patient are grabbed as the input. The system also allows neurosurgeons to include for any particular patient the additional information, such as how the tumor affects its neighboring functional regions, which is also important for calculating the safest probing path. It can then consider all the relevant information and find the most suitable probing path on the patient's brain. A 3D brain model is constructed for each set of the CT/MRI scan images and is displayed real-time together with the possible probing paths found. The precise risk value of each path is shown as a number between 0 and 1, together with its possible damages in text. Neurosurgeons can view more than one possible path simultaneously, and make the final decision on the selected path for operation.

  18. Federal Facilities Compliance Act, Draft Site Treatment Plan: Compliance Plan Volume. Part 2, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-31

    This document presents the details of the implementation of the Site Treatment Plan developed by Ames Laboratory in compliance with the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Topics discussed in this document include: implementation of the plan; milestones; annual updates to the plan; inclusion of new waste streams; modifications of the plan; funding considerations; low-level mixed waste treatment plan and schedules; and TRU mixed waste streams.

  19. Oral diagnosis and treatment planning: part 6. Preventive and treatment planning for periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Corbet, E; Smales, R

    2012-09-01

    A high level of sustained personal plaque control is fundamental for successful treatment outcomes in patients with active periodontal disease and, hence, oral hygiene instructions are the cornerstone of periodontal treatment planning. Other risk factors for periodontal disease also should be identified and modified where possible. Many restorative dental treatments in particular require the establishment of healthy periodontal tissues for their clinical success. Failure by patients to control dental plaque because of inappropriate designs and materials for restorations and prostheses will result in the long-term failure of the restorations and the loss of supporting tissues. Periodontal treatment planning considerations are also very relevant to endodontic, orthodontic and osseointegrated dental implant conditions and proposed therapies.

  20. MO-B-BRB-00: Optimizing the Treatment Planning Process

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    The radiotherapy treatment planning process has evolved over the years with innovations in treatment planning, treatment delivery and imaging systems. Treatment modality and simulation technologies are also rapidly improving and affecting the planning process. For example, Image-guided-radiation-therapy has been widely adopted for patient setup, leading to margin reduction and isocenter repositioning after simulation. Stereotactic Body radiation therapy (SBRT) and Radiosurgery (SRS) have gradually become the standard of care for many treatment sites, which demand a higher throughput for the treatment plans even if the number of treatments per day remains the same. Finally, simulation, planning and treatment are traditionally sequential events. However, with emerging adaptive radiotherapy, they are becoming more tightly intertwined, leading to iterative processes. Enhanced efficiency of planning is therefore becoming more critical and poses serious challenge to the treatment planning process; Lean Six Sigma approaches are being utilized increasingly to balance the competing needs for speed and quality. In this symposium we will discuss the treatment planning process and illustrate effective techniques for managing workflow. Topics will include: Planning techniques: (a) beam placement, (b) dose optimization, (c) plan evaluation (d) export to RVS. Planning workflow: (a) import images, (b) Image fusion, (c) contouring, (d) plan approval (e) plan check (f) chart check, (g) sequential and iterative process Influence of upstream and downstream operations: (a) simulation, (b) immobilization, (c) motion management, (d) QA, (e) IGRT, (f) Treatment delivery, (g) SBRT/SRS (h) adaptive planning Reduction of delay between planning steps with Lean systems due to (a) communication, (b) limited resource, (b) contour, (c) plan approval, (d) treatment. Optimizing planning processes: (a) contour validation (b) consistent planning protocol, (c) protocol/template sharing, (d) semi

  1. SU-E-T-173: Clinical Comparison of Treatment Plans and Fallback Plans for Machine Downtime

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, W; Papanikolaou, P; Mavroidis, P; Stathakis, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical effectiveness and dosimetric quality of fallback planning in relation to machine downtime. Methods: Plans for a Varian Novalis TX were mimicked, and fallback plans using an Elekta VersaHD machine were generated using a dual arc template. Plans for thirty (n=30) patients of various treatment sites optimized and calculated using RayStation treatment planning system. For each plan, a fall back plan was created and compared to the original plan. A dosimetric evaluation was conducted using the homogeneity index, conformity index, as well as DVH analysis to determine the quality of the fallback plan on a different treatment machine. Fallback plans were optimized for 60 iterations using the imported dose constraints from the original plan DVH to give fallback plans enough opportunity to achieve the dose objectives. Results: The average conformity index and homogeneity index for the NovalisTX plans were 0.76 and 10.3, respectively, while fallback plan values were 0.73 and 11.4. (Homogeneity =1 and conformity=0 for ideal plan) The values to various organs at risk were lower in the fallback plans as compared to the imported plans across most organs at risk. Isodose difference comparisons between plans were also compared and the average dose difference across all plans was 0.12%. Conclusion: The clinical impact of fallback planning is an important aspect to effective treatment of patients. With the complexity of LINACS increasing every year, an option to continue treating during machine downtime remains an essential tool in streamlined treatment execution. Fallback planning allows the clinic to continue to run efficiently should a treatment machine become offline due to maintenance or repair without degrading the quality of the plan all while reducing strain on members of the radiation oncology team.

  2. Accurate and general treatment of electrostatic interaction in Hamiltonian adaptive resolution simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, M.; Cortes-Huerto, R.; Donadio, D.; Potestio, R.

    2016-10-01

    In adaptive resolution simulations the same system is concurrently modeled with different resolution in different subdomains of the simulation box, thereby enabling an accurate description in a small but relevant region, while the rest is treated with a computationally parsimonious model. In this framework, electrostatic interaction, whose accurate treatment is a crucial aspect in the realistic modeling of soft matter and biological systems, represents a particularly acute problem due to the intrinsic long-range nature of Coulomb potential. In the present work we propose and validate the usage of a short-range modification of Coulomb potential, the Damped shifted force (DSF) model, in the context of the Hamiltonian adaptive resolution simulation (H-AdResS) scheme. This approach, which is here validated on bulk water, ensures a reliable reproduction of the structural and dynamical properties of the liquid, and enables a seamless embedding in the H-AdResS framework. The resulting dual-resolution setup is implemented in the LAMMPS simulation package, and its customized version employed in the present work is made publicly available.

  3. Automated high-dose rate brachytherapy treatment planning for a single-channel vaginal cylinder applicator.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuhong; Klages, Peter; Tan, Jun; Chi, Yujie; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Yang, Ming; Hrycushko, Brian; Medin, Paul; Pompos, Arnold; Jiang, Steve; Albuquerque, Kevin; Jia, Xun

    2017-02-28

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning is conventionally performed manually and/or with aids of preplanned templates. In general the standard of care would be elevated by conducting an automated process to improve treatment planning efficiency, eliminate human error, and reduce plan quality variations. Thus, our group is developing AutoBrachy, an automated HDR brachytherapy planning suite of modules used to augment a clinical treatment planning system. This paper describes our proof-of-concept module for vaginal cylinder HDR planning that has been fully developed. After a patient CT scan is acquired, the cylinder applicator is automatically segmented using image-processing techniques. The target CTV is generated based on physician-specified treatment depth and length. Locations of the dose calculation point, apex point and vaginal surface point, as well as the central applicator channel coordinates, and the corresponding dwell positions are determined according to their geometric relationship with the applicator and written to a structure file. Dwell times are computed through iterative quadratic optimization techniques. The planning information is then transferred to the treatment planning system through a DICOM-RT interface. The entire process was tested for nine patients. The AutoBrachy cylindrical applicator module was able to generate treatment plans for these cases with clinical grade quality. Computation times varied between 1 to 3 minutes on an Intel Xeon CPU E3-1226 v3 processor. All geometric components in the automated treatment plans were generated accurately. The applicator channel tip positions agreed with the manually identified positions with submillimeter deviations and the channel orientations between the plans agreed within less than 1 degree. The automatically generated plans obtained clinically acceptable quality.

  4. Nonrigid Image Registration for Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy Treatment Planning With PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Ireland, Rob H. . E-mail: r.ireland@sheffield.ac.uk; Dyker, Karen E.; Barber, David C.; Wood, Steven M.; Hanney, Michael B.; Tindale, Wendy B.; Woodhouse, Neil; Hoggard, Nigel; Conway, John; Robinson, Martin H.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Head and neck radiotherapy planning with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) requires the images to be reliably registered with treatment planning CT. Acquiring PET/CT in treatment position is problematic, and in practice for some patients it may be beneficial to use diagnostic PET/CT for radiotherapy planning. Therefore, the aim of this study was first to quantify the image registration accuracy of PET/CT to radiotherapy CT and, second, to assess whether PET/CT acquired in diagnostic position can be registered to planning CT. Methods and Materials: Positron emission tomography/CT acquired in diagnostic and treatment position for five patients with head and neck cancer was registered to radiotherapy planning CT using both rigid and nonrigid image registration. The root mean squared error for each method was calculated from a set of anatomic landmarks marked by four independent observers. Results: Nonrigid and rigid registration errors for treatment position PET/CT to planning CT were 2.77 {+-} 0.80 mm and 4.96 {+-} 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.001. Applying the nonrigid registration to diagnostic position PET/CT produced a more accurate match to the planning CT than rigid registration of treatment position PET/CT (3.20 {+-} 1.22 mm and 4.96 {+-} 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.012). Conclusions: Nonrigid registration provides a more accurate registration of head and neck PET/CT to treatment planning CT than rigid registration. In addition, nonrigid registration of PET/CT acquired with patients in a standardized, diagnostic position can provide images registered to planning CT with greater accuracy than a rigid registration of PET/CT images acquired in treatment position. This may allow greater flexibility in the timing of PET/CT for head and neck cancer patients due to undergo radiotherapy.

  5. Intramolecular hydrogen migration in alkylperoxy and hydroperoxyalkylperoxy radicals: accurate treatment of hindered rotors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sandeep; Raman, Sumathy; Green, William H

    2010-05-13

    We have calculated the thermochemistry and rate coefficients for stable molecules and reactions in the title reaction families using CBS-QB3 and B3LYP/CBSB7 methods. The accurate treatment of hindered rotors for molecules having multiple internal rotors with potentials that are not independent of each other can be problematic, and a simplified scheme is suggested to treat them. This is particularly important for hydroperoxyalkylperoxy radicals (HOOQOO). Two new thermochemical group values are suggested in this paper, and with these values, the group additivity method for calculation of enthalpy as implemented in reaction mechanism generator (RMG) gives good agreement with CBS-QB3 predictions. The barrier heights follow the Evans-Polanyi relationship for each type of intramolecular hydrogen migration reaction studied.

  6. Reducing the sensitivity of IMPT treatment plans to setup errors and range uncertainties via probabilistic treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Unkelbach, Jan; Bortfeld, Thomas; Martin, Benjamin C.; Soukup, Martin

    2009-01-15

    Treatment plans optimized for intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) may be very sensitive to setup errors and range uncertainties. If these errors are not accounted for during treatment planning, the dose distribution realized in the patient may by strongly degraded compared to the planned dose distribution. The authors implemented the probabilistic approach to incorporate uncertainties directly into the optimization of an intensity modulated treatment plan. Following this approach, the dose distribution depends on a set of random variables which parameterize the uncertainty, as does the objective function used to optimize the treatment plan. The authors optimize the expected value of the objective function. They investigate IMPT treatment planning regarding range uncertainties and setup errors. They demonstrate that incorporating these uncertainties into the optimization yields qualitatively different treatment plans compared to conventional plans which do not account for uncertainty. The sensitivity of an IMPT plan depends on the dose contributions of individual beam directions. Roughly speaking, steep dose gradients in beam direction make treatment plans sensitive to range errors. Steep lateral dose gradients make plans sensitive to setup errors. More robust treatment plans are obtained by redistributing dose among different beam directions. This can be achieved by the probabilistic approach. In contrast, the safety margin approach as widely applied in photon therapy fails in IMPT and is neither suitable for handling range variations nor setup errors.

  7. Reducing the sensitivity of IMPT treatment plans to setup errors and range uncertainties via probabilistic treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Unkelbach, Jan; Bortfeld, Thomas; Martin, Benjamin C; Soukup, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Treatment plans optimized for intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) may be very sensitive to setup errors and range uncertainties. If these errors are not accounted for during treatment planning, the dose distribution realized in the patient may by strongly degraded compared to the planned dose distribution. The authors implemented the probabilistic approach to incorporate uncertainties directly into the optimization of an intensity modulated treatment plan. Following this approach, the dose distribution depends on a set of random variables which parameterize the uncertainty, as does the objective function used to optimize the treatment plan. The authors optimize the expected value of the objective function. They investigate IMPT treatment planning regarding range uncertainties and setup errors. They demonstrate that incorporating these uncertainties into the optimization yields qualitatively different treatment plans compared to conventional plans which do not account for uncertainty. The sensitivity of an IMPT plan depends on the dose contributions of individual beam directions. Roughly speaking, steep dose gradients in beam direction make treatment plans sensitive to range errors. Steep lateral dose gradients make plans sensitive to setup errors. More robust treatment plans are obtained by redistributing dose among different beam directions. This can be achieved by the probabilistic approach. In contrast, the safety margin approach as widely applied in photon therapy fails in IMPT and is neither suitable for handling range variations nor setup errors.

  8. A Monte Carlo-based treatment-planning tool for ion beam therapy

    PubMed Central

    Böhlen, T.T.; Bauer, J.; Dosanjh, M.; Ferrari, A.; Haberer, T.; Parodi, K.; Patera, V.; Mairani, A.

    2013-01-01

    Ion beam therapy, as an emerging radiation therapy modality, requires continuous efforts to develop and improve tools for patient treatment planning (TP) and research applications. Dose and fluence computation algorithms using the Monte Carlo (MC) technique have served for decades as reference tools for accurate dose computations for radiotherapy. In this work, a novel MC-based treatment-planning (MCTP) tool for ion beam therapy using the pencil beam scanning technique is presented. It allows single-field and simultaneous multiple-fields optimization for realistic patient treatment conditions and for dosimetric quality assurance for irradiation conditions at state-of-the-art ion beam therapy facilities. It employs iterative procedures that allow for the optimization of absorbed dose and relative biological effectiveness (RBE)-weighted dose using radiobiological input tables generated by external RBE models. Using a re-implementation of the local effect model (LEM), the MCTP tool is able to perform TP studies using ions with atomic numbers Z ≤ 8. Example treatment plans created with the MCTP tool are presented for carbon ions in comparison with a certified analytical treatment-planning system. Furthermore, the usage of the tool to compute and optimize mixed-ion treatment plans, i.e. plans including pencil beams of ions with different atomic numbers, is demonstrated. The tool is aimed for future use in research applications and to support treatment planning at ion beam facilities. PMID:23824131

  9. Evaluation of superficial dosimetry between treatment planning system and measurement for several breast cancer treatment techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Akino, Yuichi; Das, Indra J.; Bartlett, Gregory K.; Zhang Hualin; Thompson, Elizabeth; Zook, Jennifer E.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Dosimetric accuracy in radiation treatment of breast cancer is critical for the evaluation of cosmetic outcomes and survival. It is often considered that treatment planning systems (TPS) may not be able to provide accurate dosimetry in the buildup region. This was investigated in various treatment techniques such as tangential wedges, field-in-field (FF), electronic compensator (eComp), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods: Under Institutional Review Board (IRB) exemption, radiotherapy treatment plans of 111 cases were retrospectively analyzed. The distance between skin surface and 95% isodose line was measured. For measurements, Gafchromic EBT2 films were used on a humanoid unsliced phantom. Multiple layers of variable thickness of superflab bolus were placed on the breast phantom and CT scanned for planning. Treatment plans were generated using four techniques with two different grid sizes (1 Multiplication-Sign 1 and 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 2.5 mm{sup 2}) to provide optimum dose distribution. Films were placed at different depths and exposed with the selected techniques. A calibration curve for dose versus pixel values was also generated on the same day as the phantom measurement was conducted. The DICOM RT image, dose, and plan data were imported to the in-house software. On axial plane of CT slices, curves were drawn at the position where EBT2 films were placed, and the dose profiles on the lines were acquired. The calculated and measured dose profiles were separated by check points which were marked on the films before irradiation. The segments of calculated profiles were stretched to match their resolutions to that of film dosimetry. Results: On review of treatment plans, the distance between skin and 95% prescribed dose was up to 8 mm for plans of 27 patients. The film measurement revealed that the medial region of phantom surface received a mere 45%-50% of prescribed dose. For wedges, FF, and eComp techniques, region around the

  10. Federal Facilities Compliance Act, Conceptual Site Treatment Plan. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    1993-10-29

    This Conceptual Site Treatment Plan was prepared by Ames Laboratory to meet the requirements of the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Topics discussed in this document include: general discussion of the plan, including the purpose and scope; technical aspects of preparing plans, including the rationale behind the treatability groupings and a discussion of characterization issues; treatment technology needs and treatment options for specific waste streams; low-level mixed waste options; TRU waste options; and future waste generation from restoration activities.

  11. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Richard B.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Beard, Clair J.

    2012-07-15

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 Multiplication-Sign 1-2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior-posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior-posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  12. Inverse treatment planning for spinal robotic radiosurgery: an international multi-institutional benchmark trial.

    PubMed

    Blanck, Oliver; Wang, Lei; Baus, Wolfgang; Grimm, Jimm; Lacornerie, Thomas; Nilsson, Joakim; Luchkovskyi, Sergii; Cano, Isabel Palazon; Shou, Zhenyu; Ayadi, Myriam; Treuer, Harald; Viard, Romain; Siebert, Frank-Andre; Chan, Mark K H; Hildebrandt, Guido; Dunst, Jürgen; Imhoff, Detlef; Wurster, Stefan; Wolff, Robert; Romanelli, Pantaleo; Lartigau, Eric; Semrau, Robert; Soltys, Scott G; Schweikard, Achim

    2016-05-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is the accurate, conformal delivery of high-dose radiation to well-defined targets while minimizing normal structure doses via steep dose gradients. While inverse treatment planning (ITP) with computerized optimization algorithms are routine, many aspects of the planning process remain user-dependent. We performed an international, multi-institutional benchmark trial to study planning variability and to analyze preferable ITP practice for spinal robotic radiosurgery. 10 SRS treatment plans were generated for a complex-shaped spinal metastasis with 21 Gy in 3 fractions and tight constraints for spinal cord (V14Gy<2 cc, V18Gy<0.1 cc) and target (coverage >95%). The resulting plans were rated on a scale from 1 to 4 (excellent-poor) in five categories (constraint compliance, optimization goals, low-dose regions, ITP complexity, and clinical acceptability) by a blinded review panel. Additionally, the plans were mathematically rated based on plan indices (critical structure and target doses, conformity, monitor units, normal tissue complication probability, and treatment time) and compared to the human rankings. The treatment plans and the reviewers' rankings varied substantially among the participating centers. The average mean overall rank was 2.4 (1.2-4.0) and 8/10 plans were rated excellent in at least one category by at least one reviewer. The mathematical rankings agreed with the mean overall human rankings in 9/10 cases pointing toward the possibility for sole mathematical plan quality comparison. The final rankings revealed that a plan with a well-balanced trade-off among all planning objectives was preferred for treatment by most participants, reviewers, and the mathematical ranking system. Furthermore, this plan was generated with simple planning techniques. Our multi-institutional planning study found wide variability in ITP approaches for spinal robotic radiosurgery. The participants', reviewers', and mathematical match on

  13. Automated planning of ablation targets in atrial fibrillation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keustermans, Johannes; De Buck, Stijn; Heidbüchel, Hein; Suetens, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Catheter based radio-frequency ablation is used as an invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation. This procedure is often guided by the use of 3D anatomical models obtained from CT, MRI or rotational angiography. During the intervention the operator accurately guides the catheter to prespecified target ablation lines. The planning stage, however, can be time consuming and operator dependent which is suboptimal both from a cost and health perspective. Therefore, we present a novel statistical model-based algorithm for locating ablation targets from 3D rotational angiography images. Based on a training data set of 20 patients, consisting of 3D rotational angiography images with 30 manually indicated ablation points, a statistical local appearance and shape model is built. The local appearance model is based on local image descriptors to capture the intensity patterns around each ablation point. The local shape model is constructed by embedding the ablation points in an undirected graph and imposing that each ablation point only interacts with its neighbors. Identifying the ablation points on a new 3D rotational angiography image is performed by proposing a set of possible candidate locations for each ablation point, as such, converting the problem into a labeling problem. The algorithm is validated using a leave-one-out-approach on the training data set, by computing the distance between the ablation lines obtained by the algorithm and the manually identified ablation points. The distance error is equal to 3.8+/-2.9 mm. As ablation lesion size is around 5-7 mm, automated planning of ablation targets by the presented approach is sufficiently accurate.

  14. Health literacy in HIV treatment: accurate understanding of key biological treatment principles is not required for good ART adherence.

    PubMed

    Laws, M Barton; Danielewicz, Michael; Rana, Aadia; Kogelman, Laura; Wilson, Ira B

    2015-04-01

    Findings on the relationship between health literacy and outcomes in HIV have been inconsistent. Health literacy has previously been operationalized as general functional literacy, but has not included content knowledge about HIV disease and treatment. Semi-structured interviews with people living with HIV in 2 U.S. cities, including questions about the etiology, pathophysiology and treatment of HIV. We compared responses to biomedical conceptions. The 32 respondents were demographically diverse. Although most understood that HIV degrades the immune system, none could explain the nature of a virus, or the mechanism of antiretroviral (ARV) drug action. Fewer than half accurately reported that it is desirable to have a high CD4+ cell count and low viral load. A minority understood the concept of drug resistance. While most believed that strict adherence to ARV regimens was important to maintain health, three believed that periodic treatment interruption was beneficial, and three believed they should not take ARVs when they used alcohol or illicit drugs. Respondents generally had very limited, and often inaccurate biomedical understanding of HIV disease. Most reported good regimen adherence but did not have any mechanistic rationale for it. The failure to find a consistent relationship between health literacy and ARV adherence may be largely because most people simply follow their doctors' instructions, without the need for deep understanding.

  15. Health Literacy in HIV Treatment: Accurate Understanding of Key Biological Treatment Principles is Not Required for Good ART Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Laws, M. Barton; Danielewicz, Michael; Rana, Aadia; Kogelman, Laura; Wilson, Ira B.

    2016-01-01

    Findings on the relationship between health literacy and outcomes in HIV have been inconsistent. Health literacy has previously been operationalized as general functional literacy, but has not included content knowledge about HIV disease and treatment. Semi-structured interviews with people living with HIV in 2 U.S. cities, including questions about the etiology, pathophysiology and treatment of HIV. We compared responses to biomedical conceptions. The 32 respondents were demographically diverse. Although most understood that HIV degrades the immune system, none could explain the nature of a virus, or the mechanism of antiretroviral (ARV) drug action. Fewer than half accurately reported that it is desirable to have a high CD4+ cell count and low viral load. A minority understood the concept of drug resistance. While most believed that strict adherence to ARV regimens was important to maintain health, three believed that periodic treatment interruption was beneficial, and three believed they should not take ARVs when they used alcohol or illicit drugs. Respondents generally had very limited, and often inaccurate biomedical understanding of HIV disease. Most reported good regimen adherence but did not have any mechanistic rationale for it. The failure to find a consistent relationship between health literacy and ARV adherence may be largely because most people simply follow their doctors’ instructions, without the need for deep understanding. PMID:25354736

  16. CPR methodology with new steady-state criterion and more accurate statistical treatment of channel bow

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, S.; Bieli, R.; Bergmann, U. C.

    2012-07-01

    An overview is given of existing CPR design criteria and the methods used in BWR reload analysis to evaluate the impact of channel bow on CPR margins. Potential weaknesses in today's methodologies are discussed. Westinghouse in collaboration with KKL and Axpo - operator and owner of the Leibstadt NPP - has developed an optimized CPR methodology based on a new criterion to protect against dryout during normal operation and with a more rigorous treatment of channel bow. The new steady-state criterion is expressed in terms of an upper limit of 0.01 for the dryout failure probability per year. This is considered a meaningful and appropriate criterion that can be directly related to the probabilistic criteria set-up for the analyses of Anticipated Operation Occurrences (AOOs) and accidents. In the Monte Carlo approach a statistical modeling of channel bow and an accurate evaluation of CPR response functions allow the associated CPR penalties to be included directly in the plant SLMCPR and OLMCPR in a best-estimate manner. In this way, the treatment of channel bow is equivalent to all other uncertainties affecting CPR. Emphasis is put on quantifying the statistical distribution of channel bow throughout the core using measurement data. The optimized CPR methodology has been implemented in the Westinghouse Monte Carlo code, McSLAP. The methodology improves the quality of dryout safety assessments by supplying more valuable information and better control of conservatisms in establishing operational limits for CPR. The methodology is demonstrated with application examples from the introduction at KKL. (authors)

  17. Validation of OSLD and a treatment planning system for surface dose determination in IMRT treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Audrey H.; Olch, Arthur J.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of skin dose determination for composite multibeam 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments using optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) and Eclipse treatment planning system. Methods: Surface doses measured by OSLDs in the buildup region for open field 6 MV beams, either perpendicular or oblique to the surface, were evaluated by comparing against dose measured by Markus Parallel Plate (PP) chamber, surface diodes, and calculated by Monte Carlo simulations. The accuracy of percent depth dose (PDD) calculation in the buildup region from the authors’ Eclipse system (Version 10), which was precisely commissioned in the buildup region and was used with 1 mm calculation grid, was also evaluated by comparing to PP chamber measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom was CT scanned with OSLDs in place at three locations. A planning target volume (PTV) was defined that extended close to the surface. Both an 8 beam 3DCRT and IMRT plan were generated in Eclipse. OSLDs were placed at the CT scanned reference locations to measure the skin doses and were compared to diode measurements and Eclipse calculations. Efforts were made to ensure that the dose comparison was done at the effective measurement points of each detector and corresponding locations in CT images. Results: The depth of the effective measurement point is 0.8 mm for OSLD when used in the buildup region in a 6 MV beam and is 0.7 mm for the authors’ surface diode. OSLDs and Eclipse system both agree well with Monte Carlo and/or Markus PP ion chamber and/or diode in buildup regions in 6 MV beams with normal or oblique incidence and across different field sizes. For the multiple beam 3DCRT plan and IMRT plans, the differences between OSLDs and Eclipse calculations on the surface of the anthropomorphic phantom were within 3% and distance-to-agreement less than 0.3 mm

  18. Clinical application of multimodality imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan Yang; Zhe, Hong

    2013-12-11

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of rectal cancer. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy are mainstay techniques of radiotherapy for rectal cancer. However, the success of these techniques is heavily reliant on accurate target delineation and treatment planning. Computed tomography simulation is a cornerstone of rectal cancer radiotherapy, but there are limitations, such as poor soft-tissue contrast between pelvic structures and partial volume effects. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) can overcome these limitations and provide additional information for rectal cancer treatment planning. PET can also reduce the interobserver variation in the definition of rectal tumor volume. However, there is a long way to go before these image modalities are routinely used in the clinical setting. This review summarizes the most promising studies on clinical applications of multimodality imaging in target delineation and treatment planning for rectal cancer radiotherapy.

  19. WE-B-304-03: Biological Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, C.

    2015-06-15

    The ultimate goal of radiotherapy treatment planning is to find a treatment that will yield a high tumor control probability (TCP) with an acceptable normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Yet most treatment planning today is not based upon optimization of TCPs and NTCPs, but rather upon meeting physical dose and volume constraints defined by the planner. It has been suggested that treatment planning evaluation and optimization would be more effective if they were biologically and not dose/volume based, and this is the claim debated in this month’s Point/Counterpoint. After a brief overview of biologically and DVH based treatment planning by the Moderator Colin Orton, Joseph Deasy (for biological planning) and Charles Mayo (against biological planning) will begin the debate. Some of the arguments in support of biological planning include: this will result in more effective dose distributions for many patients DVH-based measures of plan quality are known to have little predictive value there is little evidence that either D95 or D98 of the PTV is a good predictor of tumor control sufficient validated outcome prediction models are now becoming available and should be used to drive planning and optimization Some of the arguments against biological planning include: several decades of experience with DVH-based planning should not be discarded we do not know enough about the reliability and errors associated with biological models the radiotherapy community in general has little direct experience with side by side comparisons of DVH vs biological metrics and outcomes it is unlikely that a clinician would accept extremely cold regions in a CTV or hot regions in a PTV, despite having acceptable TCP values Learning Objectives: To understand dose/volume based treatment planning and its potential limitations To understand biological metrics such as EUD, TCP, and NTCP To understand biologically based treatment planning and its potential limitations.

  20. A New Method for Accurate Treatment of Flow Equations in Cylindrical Coordinates Using Series Expansions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinescu, G.S.; Lele, S. K.

    2000-01-01

    The motivation of this work is the ongoing effort at the Center for Turbulence Research (CTR) to use large eddy simulation (LES) techniques to calculate the noise radiated by jet engines. The focus on engine exhaust noise reduction is motivated by the fact that a significant reduction has been achieved over the last decade on the other main sources of acoustic emissions of jet engines, such as the fan and turbomachinery noise, which gives increased priority to jet noise. To be able to propose methods to reduce the jet noise based on results of numerical simulations, one first has to be able to accurately predict the spatio-temporal distribution of the noise sources in the jet. Though a great deal of understanding of the fundamental turbulence mechanisms in high-speed jets was obtained from direct numerical simulations (DNS) at low Reynolds numbers, LES seems to be the only realistic available tool to obtain the necessary near-field information that is required to estimate the acoustic radiation of the turbulent compressible engine exhaust jets. The quality of jet-noise predictions is determined by the accuracy of the numerical method that has to capture the wide range of pressure fluctuations associated with the turbulence in the jet and with the resulting radiated noise, and by the boundary condition treatment and the quality of the mesh. Higher Reynolds numbers and coarser grids put in turn a higher burden on the robustness and accuracy of the numerical method used in this kind of jet LES simulations. As these calculations are often done in cylindrical coordinates, one of the most important requirements for the numerical method is to provide a flow solution that is not contaminated by numerical artifacts. The coordinate singularity is known to be a source of such artifacts. In the present work we use 6th order Pade schemes in the non-periodic directions to discretize the full compressible flow equations. It turns out that the quality of jet-noise predictions

  1. MINERVA - A Multi-Modal Radiation Treatment Planning System

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Wessol; C. A. Wemple; D. W. Nigg; J. J. Cogliati; M. L. Milvich; C. Frederickson; M. Perkins; G. A. Harkin

    2004-10-01

    Recently, research efforts have begun to examine the combination of BNCT with external beam photon radiotherapy (Barth et al. 2004). In order to properly prepare treatment plans for patients being treated with combinations of radiation modalities, appropriate planning tools must be available. To facilitiate this, researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL)and Montana State University (MSU) have undertaken development of a fully multi-modal radiation treatment planning system.

  2. Monte Carlo treatment planning with modulated electron radiotherapy: framework development and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Andrew William

    Within the field of medical physics, Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations are considered to be the most accurate method for the determination of dose distributions in patients. The McGill Monte Carlo treatment planning system (MMCTP), provides a flexible software environment to integrate Monte Carlo simulations with current and new treatment modalities. A developing treatment modality called energy and intensity modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) is a promising modality, which has the fundamental capabilities to enhance the dosimetry of superficial targets. An objective of this work is to advance the research and development of MERT with the end goal of clinical use. To this end, we present the MMCTP system with an integrated toolkit for MERT planning and delivery of MERT fields. Delivery is achieved using an automated "few leaf electron collimator" (FLEC) and a controller. Aside from the MERT planning toolkit, the MMCTP system required numerous add-ons to perform the complex task of large-scale autonomous Monte Carlo simulations. The first was a DICOM import filter, followed by the implementation of DOSXYZnrc as a dose calculation engine and by logic methods for submitting and updating the status of Monte Carlo simulations. Within this work we validated the MMCTP system with a head and neck Monte Carlo recalculation study performed by a medical dosimetrist. The impact of MMCTP lies in the fact that it allows for systematic and platform independent large-scale Monte Carlo dose calculations for different treatment sites and treatment modalities. In addition to the MERT planning tools, various optimization algorithms were created external to MMCTP. The algorithms produced MERT treatment plans based on dose volume constraints that employ Monte Carlo pre-generated patient-specific kernels. The Monte Carlo kernels are generated from patient-specific Monte Carlo dose distributions within MMCTP. The structure of the MERT planning toolkit software and

  3. SU-D-BRD-04: The Impact of Automatic Radiation Therapy Plan Checks in Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Gopan, O; Yang, F; Ford, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The physics plan check verifies various aspects of a treatment plan after dosimetrists have finished creating the plan. Some errors in the plan which are caught by the physics check could be caught earlier in the departmental workflow. The purpose of this project was to evaluate a plan checking script that can be run within the treatment planning system (TPS) by the dosimetrists prior to plan approval and export to the record and verify system. Methods: A script was created in the Pinnacle TPS to automatically check 15 aspects of a plan for clinical practice conformity. The script outputs a list of checks which the plan has passed and a list of checks which the plan has failed so that appropriate adjustments can be made. For this study, the script was run on a total of 108 plans: IMRT (46/108), VMAT (35/108) and SBRT (27/108). Results: Of the plans checked by the script, 77/108 (71%) failed at least one of the fifteen checks. IMRT plans resulted in more failed checks (91%) than VMAT (51%) or SBRT (63%), due to the high failure rate of an IMRT-specific check, which checks that no IMRT segment < 5 MU. The dose grid size and couch removal checks caught errors in 10% and 14% of all plans – errors that ultimately may have resulted in harm to the patient. Conclusion: Approximately three-fourths of the plans being examined contain errors that could be caught by dosimetrists running an automated script embedded in the TPS. The results of this study will improve the departmental workflow by cutting down on the number of plans that, due to these types of errors, necessitate re-planning and re-approval of plans, increase dosimetrist and physician workload and, in urgent cases, inconvenience patients by causing treatment delays.

  4. Recent developments and best practice in brachytherapy treatment planning

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Brachytherapy has evolved over many decades, but more recently, there have been significant changes in the way that brachytherapy is used for different treatment sites. This has been due to the development of new, technologically advanced computer planning systems and treatment delivery techniques. Modern, three-dimensional (3D) imaging modalities have been incorporated into treatment planning methods, allowing full 3D dose distributions to be computed. Treatment techniques involving online planning have emerged, allowing dose distributions to be calculated and updated in real time based on the actual clinical situation. In the case of early stage breast cancer treatment, for example, electronic brachytherapy treatment techniques are being used in which the radiation dose is delivered during the same procedure as the surgery. There have also been significant advances in treatment applicator design, which allow the use of modern 3D imaging techniques for planning, and manufacturers have begun to implement new dose calculation algorithms that will correct for applicator shielding and tissue inhomogeneities. This article aims to review the recent developments and best practice in brachytherapy techniques and treatments. It will look at how imaging developments have been incorporated into current brachytherapy treatment and how these developments have played an integral role in the modern brachytherapy era. The planning requirements for different treatments sites are reviewed as well as the future developments of brachytherapy in radiobiology and treatment planning dose calculation. PMID:24734939

  5. The Trimeric Model: A New Model of Periodontal Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Tarakji, Bassel

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of periodontal disease is a complex and multidisciplinary procedure, requiring periodontal, surgical, restorative, and orthodontic treatment modalities. Several authors attempted to formulate models for periodontal treatment that orders the treatment steps in a logical and easy to remember manner. In this article, we discuss two models of periodontal treatment planning from two of the most well-known textbook in the specialty of periodontics internationally. Then modify them to arrive at a new model of periodontal treatment planning, The Trimeric Model. Adding restorative and orthodontic interrelationships with periodontal treatment allows us to expand this model into the Extended Trimeric Model of periodontal treatment planning. These models will provide a logical framework and a clear order of the treatment of periodontal disease for general practitioners and periodontists alike. PMID:25177662

  6. A Treatment Planning Method for Sequentially Combining Radiopharmaceutical Therapy and External Radiation Therapy;External beam therapy; Radiopharmaceutical therapy; Three-dimensional dosimetry; Treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, Robert F.; McNutt, Todd; Baechler, Sebastien; He Bin; Esaias, Caroline E.; Frey, Eric C.; Loeb, David M.; Wahl, Richard L.; Shokek, Ori; Sgouros, George

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Effective cancer treatment generally requires combination therapy. The combination of external beam therapy (XRT) with radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT) requires accurate three-dimensional dose calculations to avoid toxicity and evaluate efficacy. We have developed and tested a treatment planning method, using the patient-specific three-dimensional dosimetry package 3D-RD, for sequentially combined RPT/XRT therapy designed to limit toxicity to organs at risk. Methods and Materials: The biologic effective dose (BED) was used to translate voxelized RPT absorbed dose (D{sub RPT}) values into a normalized total dose (or equivalent 2-Gy-fraction XRT absorbed dose), NTD{sub RPT} map. The BED was calculated numerically using an algorithmic approach, which enabled a more accurate calculation of BED and NTD{sub RPT}. A treatment plan from the combined Samarium-153 and external beam was designed that would deliver a tumoricidal dose while delivering no more than 50 Gy of NTD{sub sum} to the spinal cord of a patient with a paraspinal tumor. Results: The average voxel NTD{sub RPT} to tumor from RPT was 22.6 Gy (range, 1-85 Gy); the maximum spinal cord voxel NTD{sub RPT} from RPT was 6.8 Gy. The combined therapy NTD{sub sum} to tumor was 71.5 Gy (range, 40-135 Gy) for a maximum voxel spinal cord NTD{sub sum} equal to the maximum tolerated dose of 50 Gy. Conclusions: A method that enables real-time treatment planning of combined RPT-XRT has been developed. By implementing a more generalized conversion between the dose values from the two modalities and an activity-based treatment of partial volume effects, the reliability of combination therapy treatment planning has been expanded.

  7. Advance care treatment plan (ACT-Plan) for African American family caregivers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Gloria J; Wang, Edward; Wilkie, Diana J; Ferrans, Carol E; Dancy, Barbara; Watkins, Yashika

    2014-01-01

    Research is limited on end-of-life treatment decisions made by African American family caregivers. In a pilot study, we examined the feasibility of implementing an advance care treatment plan (ACT-Plan), a group-based education intervention, with African American dementia caregivers. Theoretically based, the ACT-Plan included strategies to enhance knowledge, self-efficacy, and behavioral skills to make end-of-life treatment plans in advance. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, mechanical ventilation, and tube feeding were end-of-life treatments discussed in the ACT-Plan. In a four-week pre/posttest two-group design at urban adult day care centers, 68 caregivers were assigned to the ACT-Plan or attention-control health promotion conditions. Findings strongly suggest that the ACT-Plan intervention is feasible and appropriate for African American caregivers. Self-efficacy and knowledge about dementia, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, mechanical ventilation, and tube feeding increased for ACT-Plan participants but not for the attention-control. More ACT-Plan than attention-control participants developed advance care plans for demented relatives. Findings warrant a randomized efficacy trial.

  8. Proposed Site Treatment Plan (PSTP). STP reference document

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-22

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by Section 3021(b) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct), to prepare a plan describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste (hazardous/radioactive waste). DOE decided to prepare its site treatment plan in a three phased approach. The first phase, called the Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP), was issued in October 1993. At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the CSTP described mixed waste streams generated at SRS and listed treatment scenarios for each waste stream utilizing an onsite, offsite DOE, and offsite or onsite commercial or vendor treatment option. The CSTP is followed by the Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP), due to be issued in August 1994. The DSTP, the current activity., will narrow the options discussed in the CSTP to a preferred treatment option, if possible, and will include waste streams proposed to be shipped to SRS from other DOE facilities as well as waste streams SRS may send offsite for treatment. The SRS DSTP process has been designed to address treatment options for each of the site`s mixed waste streams. The SRS Proposed Site Treatment Plan (PSTP) is due to be issued in February 1995. The compliance order would be derived from the PSTP.

  9. Automatic tissue segmentation of head and neck MR images for hyperthermia treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunati, Valerio; Verhaart, René F.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Veenland, Jifke F.; Paulides, Margarethus M.; van Walsum, Theo

    2015-08-01

    A hyperthermia treatment requires accurate, patient-specific treatment planning. This planning is based on 3D anatomical models which are generally derived from computed tomography. Because of its superior soft tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) information can be introduced to improve the quality of these 3D patient models and therefore the treatment planning itself. Thus, we present here an automatic atlas-based segmentation algorithm for MR images of the head and neck. Our method combines multiatlas local weighting fusion with intensity modelling. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using a leave-one-out cross validation experiment over a set of 11 patients for which manual delineation were available. The accuracy of the proposed method was high both in terms of the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the 95th percentile Hausdorff surface distance (HSD) with median DSC higher than 0.8 for all tissues except sclera. For all tissues, except the spine tissues, the accuracy was approaching the interobserver agreement/variability both in terms of DSC and HSD. The positive effect of adding the intensity modelling to the multiatlas fusion decreased when a more accurate atlas fusion method was used. Using the proposed approach we improved the performance of the approach previously presented for H&N hyperthermia treatment planning, making the method suitable for clinical application.

  10. Treatment planning for a small animal using Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, James C. L.; Leung, Michael K. K.

    2007-12-15

    The development of a small animal model for radiotherapy research requires a complete setup of customized imaging equipment, irradiators, and planning software that matches the sizes of the subjects. The purpose of this study is to develop and demonstrate the use of a flexible in-house research environment for treatment planning on small animals. The software package, called DOSCTP, provides a user-friendly platform for DICOM computed tomography-based Monte Carlo dose calculation using the EGSnrcMP-based DOSXYZnrc code. Validation of the treatment planning was performed by comparing the dose distributions for simple photon beam geometries calculated through the Pinnacle3 treatment planning system and measurements. A treatment plan for a mouse based on a CT image set by a 360-deg photon arc is demonstrated. It is shown that it is possible to create 3D conformal treatment plans for small animals with consideration of inhomogeneities using small photon beam field sizes in the diameter range of 0.5-5 cm, with conformal dose covering the target volume while sparing the surrounding critical tissue. It is also found that Monte Carlo simulation is suitable to carry out treatment planning dose calculation for small animal anatomy with voxel size about one order of magnitude smaller than that of the human.

  11. Treatment planning for a small animal using Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Chow, James C L; Leung, Michael K K

    2007-12-01

    The development of a small animal model for radiotherapy research requires a complete setup of customized imaging equipment, irradiators, and planning software that matches the sizes of the subjects. The purpose of this study is to develop and demonstrate the use of a flexible in-house research environment for treatment planning on small animals. The software package, called DOSCTP, provides a user-friendly platform for DICOM computed tomography-based Monte Carlo dose calculation using the EGSnrcMP-based DOSXYZnrc code. Validation of the treatment planning was performed by comparing the dose distributions for simple photon beam geometries calculated through the Pinnacle3 treatment planning system and measurements. A treatment plan for a mouse based on a CT image set by a 360-deg photon arc is demonstrated. It is shown that it is possible to create 3D conformal treatment plans for small animals with consideration of inhomogeneities using small photon beam field sizes in the diameter range of 0.5-5 cm, with conformal dose covering the target volume while sparing the surrounding critical tissue. It is also found that Monte Carlo simulation is suitable to carry out treatment planning dose calculation for small animal anatomy with voxel size about one order of magnitude smaller than that of the human.

  12. Criteria and techniques for three-dimensional treatment planning with pions

    SciTech Connect

    Berardo, P.; Zink, S.; Paciotti, M.; Bradbury, J.

    1981-01-01

    The ability to predict a pion dose distribution in a patient is a major objective of the clinical trials at LAMPF. Accurate predictions are essential for evaluation of pion therapy. But accuracy must be in the context of clinical utility. That is, reasonable approximations must be made in calculational methods so that treatment planning can proceed in a timely and efficient manner. A few of the techniques and current developments used to achieve that objective are presented here.

  13. Optimal partial-arcs in VMAT treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Wala, Jeremiah; Salari, Ehsan; Chen, Wei; Craft, David

    2012-09-21

    We present a method for improving the delivery efficiency of VMAT by extending the recently published VMAT treatment planning algorithm vmerge to automatically generate optimal partial-arc plans. A high-quality initial plan is created by solving a convex multicriteria optimization problem using 180 equi-spaced beams. This initial plan is used to form a set of dose constraints, and a set of partial-arc plans is created by searching the space of all possible partial-arc plans that satisfy these constraints. For each partial-arc, an iterative fluence map merging and sequencing algorithm (vmerge) is used to improve the delivery efficiency. Merging continues as long as the dose quality is maintained above a user-defined threshold. The final plan is selected as the partial-arc with the lowest treatment time. The complete algorithm is called pmerge. Partial-arc plans are created using pmerge for a lung, liver and prostate case, with final treatment times of 127, 245 and 147 . Treatment times using full arcs with vmerge are 211, 357 and 178 s. The mean doses to the critical structures for the vmerge and pmerge plans are kept within 5% of those in the initial plan, and the target volume covered by the prescription isodose is maintained above 98% for the pmerge and vmerge plans. Additionally, we find that the angular distribution of fluence in the initial plans is predictive of the start and end angles of the optimal partial-arc. We conclude that VMAT delivery efficiency can be improved by employing partial-arcs without compromising dose quality, and that partial-arcs are most applicable to cases with non-centralized targets.

  14. Optimal partial-arcs in VMAT treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wala, Jeremiah; Salari, Ehsan; Chen, Wei; Craft, David

    2012-09-01

    We present a method for improving the delivery efficiency of VMAT by extending the recently published VMAT treatment planning algorithm vmerge to automatically generate optimal partial-arc plans. A high-quality initial plan is created by solving a convex multicriteria optimization problem using 180 equi-spaced beams. This initial plan is used to form a set of dose constraints, and a set of partial-arc plans is created by searching the space of all possible partial-arc plans that satisfy these constraints. For each partial-arc, an iterative fluence map merging and sequencing algorithm (vmerge) is used to improve the delivery efficiency. Merging continues as long as the dose quality is maintained above a user-defined threshold. The final plan is selected as the partial-arc with the lowest treatment time. The complete algorithm is called pmerge. Partial-arc plans are created using pmerge for a lung, liver and prostate case, with final treatment times of 127, 245 and 147 s. Treatment times using full arcs with vmerge are 211, 357 and 178 s. The mean doses to the critical structures for the vmerge and pmerge plans are kept within 5% of those in the initial plan, and the target volume covered by the prescription isodose is maintained above 98% for the pmerge and vmerge plans. Additionally, we find that the angular distribution of fluence in the initial plans is predictive of the start and end angles of the optimal partial-arc. We conclude that VMAT delivery efficiency can be improved by employing partial-arcs without compromising dose quality, and that partial-arcs are most applicable to cases with non-centralized targets.

  15. A Guide to Planning Alcoholism Treatment Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGough, Dixie P.; Hindman, Margaret H.

    This guide contains information from the alcoholism literature and from interviews with people in state alcoholism agencies, major professional associations, and public and private service programs. It is designed to help readers plan and develop community alcoholism programs by providing an overview of the many considerations involved in starting…

  16. Manpower Planning for Wastewater Treatment Plants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, J. Kenneth; And Others

    This document discusses the components necessary in the development of a forecasting process by which manpower needs can be determined and the development of action programs by which the projected needs may be satisfied. The primary focus of this manual is directed at that person in a state agency who has the responsibility for planning the…

  17. Optical Dosimetry and Treatment Planning for Photodynamic Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Timothy M.

    Accurate dosimetry and treatment planning for photodynamic therapy (PDT) require knowledge of tissue optical properties and models of light propagation. We present techniques, based on reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy, to examine these problems using analytical approximations and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. We begin with studies that monitored PDT in mouse models using reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy. In the first, spectroscopy informed the optimization of treatment parameters for methylene blue PDT, with dependencies on injection vehicle, drug-light interval, and fluence found. In the second, fluorescence photobleaching during Pc 4 PDT was examined for correlation to tumor response. Irradiance-dependent photobleaching was demonstrated, but was not predictive of tumor response. Next we outline the graphics processing unit enhanced MC model that was used to simulate light propagation in tissue. We demonstrate a number of source models that were used in subsequent experiments. We then focus on the recovery of optical properties from diffuse reflectance measurements by examining two studies. In the first study, diffuse reflectance measurements were made at the surface of human kidneys to extract optical properties, which were then used in MC simulations of interstitial PDT. We found that the optical properties measured make PDT feasible in human kidneys. We then examined the interstitial recovery of optical properties using a custom optical probe. This recovery was based on a MC model of the probe used, with a mean error of 6.5% in the determination of absorption. We examined fluorescence detection by cylindrical diffusing fibers using a MC model. This model predicted heterogeneous fluorescence detection, which was verified experimentally. Recovery of intrinsic fluorescence from point, interstitial measurements was demonstrated. This technique did not require a prori knowledge of the tissue optical properties, and was used to determine these

  18. 300 Area waste acid treatment system closure plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This section provides a description of the Hanford Site, identifies the proposed method of 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System (WATS) closure, and briefly summarizes the contents of each chapter of this plan.

  19. Treatment Plan Adherence for Your Child With JA

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story into a Message of Hope Margo Deihl: Music is Medicine Liz Morasso: Flying High Brett Ishihara: ... Story into a Message of Hope Margo Deihl: Music is Medicine Liz Morasso: Flying High Treatment Plan ...

  20. Large-scale extraction of accurate drug-disease treatment pairs from biomedical literature for drug repurposing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A large-scale, highly accurate, machine-understandable drug-disease treatment relationship knowledge base is important for computational approaches to drug repurposing. The large body of published biomedical research articles and clinical case reports available on MEDLINE is a rich source of FDA-approved drug-disease indication as well as drug-repurposing knowledge that is crucial for applying FDA-approved drugs for new diseases. However, much of this information is buried in free text and not captured in any existing databases. The goal of this study is to extract a large number of accurate drug-disease treatment pairs from published literature. Results In this study, we developed a simple but highly accurate pattern-learning approach to extract treatment-specific drug-disease pairs from 20 million biomedical abstracts available on MEDLINE. We extracted a total of 34,305 unique drug-disease treatment pairs, the majority of which are not included in existing structured databases. Our algorithm achieved a precision of 0.904 and a recall of 0.131 in extracting all pairs, and a precision of 0.904 and a recall of 0.842 in extracting frequent pairs. In addition, we have shown that the extracted pairs strongly correlate with both drug target genes and therapeutic classes, therefore may have high potential in drug discovery. Conclusions We demonstrated that our simple pattern-learning relationship extraction algorithm is able to accurately extract many drug-disease pairs from the free text of biomedical literature that are not captured in structured databases. The large-scale, accurate, machine-understandable drug-disease treatment knowledge base that is resultant of our study, in combination with pairs from structured databases, will have high potential in computational drug repurposing tasks. PMID:23742147

  1. Orthovoltage radiation therapy treatment planning using Monte Carlo simulation: treatment of neuroendocrine carcinoma of the maxillary sinus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wanbao; Raeside, David E.

    1997-12-01

    Dose distributions that result from treating a patient with orthovoltage beams are best determined with a treatment planning system that uses the Monte Carlo method, and such systems are not readily available. In the present work, the Monte Carlo method was used to develop a computer code for determining absorbed dose distributions in orthovoltage radiation therapy. The code was used in planning treatment of a patient with a neuroendocrine carcinoma of the maxillary sinus. Two lateral high-energy photon beams supplemented by an anterior orthovoltage photon beam were utilized in the treatment plan. For the clinical case and radiation beams considered, a reasonably uniform dose distribution is achieved within the target volume, while the dose to the lens of each eye is 4 - 8% of the prescribed dose. Therefore, an orthovoltage photon beam, when properly filtered and optimally combined with megavoltage beams, can be effective in the treatment of cancers below the skin, providing that accurate treatment planning is carried out to establish with accuracy and precision the doses to critical structures.

  2. FoCa: a modular treatment planning system for proton radiotherapy with research and educational purposes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Parcerisa, D; Kondrla, M; Shaindlin, A; Carabe, A

    2014-12-07

    FoCa is an in-house modular treatment planning system, developed entirely in MATLAB, which includes forward dose calculation of proton radiotherapy plans in both active and passive modalities as well as a generic optimization suite for inverse treatment planning. The software has a dual education and research purpose. From the educational point of view, it can be an invaluable teaching tool for educating medical physicists, showing the insights of a treatment planning system from a well-known and widely accessible software platform. From the research point of view, its current and potential uses range from the fast calculation of any physical, radiobiological or clinical quantity in a patient CT geometry, to the development of new treatment modalities not yet available in commercial treatment planning systems. The physical models in FoCa were compared with the commissioning data from our institution and show an excellent agreement in depth dose distributions and longitudinal and transversal fluence profiles for both passive scattering and active scanning modalities. 3D dose distributions in phantom and patient geometries were compared with a commercial treatment planning system, yielding a gamma-index pass rate of above 94% (using FoCa's most accurate algorithm) for all cases considered. Finally, the inverse treatment planning suite was used to produce the first prototype of intensity-modulated, passive-scattered proton therapy, using 13 passive scattering proton fields and multi-leaf modulation to produce a concave dose distribution on a cylindrical solid water phantom without any field-specific compensator.

  3. FoCa: a modular treatment planning system for proton radiotherapy with research and educational purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Parcerisa, D.; Kondrla, M.; Shaindlin, A.; Carabe, A.

    2014-12-01

    FoCa is an in-house modular treatment planning system, developed entirely in MATLAB, which includes forward dose calculation of proton radiotherapy plans in both active and passive modalities as well as a generic optimization suite for inverse treatment planning. The software has a dual education and research purpose. From the educational point of view, it can be an invaluable teaching tool for educating medical physicists, showing the insights of a treatment planning system from a well-known and widely accessible software platform. From the research point of view, its current and potential uses range from the fast calculation of any physical, radiobiological or clinical quantity in a patient CT geometry, to the development of new treatment modalities not yet available in commercial treatment planning systems. The physical models in FoCa were compared with the commissioning data from our institution and show an excellent agreement in depth dose distributions and longitudinal and transversal fluence profiles for both passive scattering and active scanning modalities. 3D dose distributions in phantom and patient geometries were compared with a commercial treatment planning system, yielding a gamma-index pass rate of above 94% (using FoCa’s most accurate algorithm) for all cases considered. Finally, the inverse treatment planning suite was used to produce the first prototype of intensity-modulated, passive-scattered proton therapy, using 13 passive scattering proton fields and multi-leaf modulation to produce a concave dose distribution on a cylindrical solid water phantom without any field-specific compensator.

  4. Computational Dosimetry and Treatment Planning Considerations for Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, David Waler

    2003-03-01

    Specialized treatment planning software systems are generally required for neutron capture therapy (NCT) research and clinical applications. The standard simplifying approximations that work well for treatment planning computations in the case of many other modalities are usually not appropriate for application to neutron transport. One generally must obtain an explicit three-dimensional numerical solution of the governing transport equation, with energy-dependent neutron scattering completely taken into account. Treatment planning systems that have been successfully introduced for NCT applications over the past 15 years rely on the Monte Carlo stochastic simulation method for the necessary computations, primarily because of the geometric complexity of human anatomy. However, historically, there has also been interest in the application of deterministic methods, and there have been some practical developments in this area. Most recently, interest has turned toward the creation of treatment planning software that is not limited to any specific therapy modality, with NCT as only one of several applications. A key issue with NCT treatment planning has to do with boron quantification, and whether improved information concerning the spatial biodistribution of boron can be effectively used to improve the treatment planning process. Validation and benchmarking of computations for NCT are also of current developmental interest. Various institutions have their own procedures, but standard validation models are not yet in wide use.

  5. The evolution of computerized treatment planning for brachytherapy: American contributions

    PubMed Central

    Rivard, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To outline the evolution of computerized brachytherapy treatment planning in the United States through a review of technological developments and clinical practice refinements. Material and methods A literature review was performed and interviews were conducted with six participants in the development of computerized treatment planning for brachytherapy. Results Computerized brachytherapy treatment planning software was initially developed in the Physics Departments of New York's Memorial Hospital (by Nelson, Meurk and Balter), and Houston's M. D. Anderson Hospital (by Stovall and Shalek). These public-domain programs could be used by institutions with adequate computational resources; other clinics had access to them via Memorial's and Anderson's teletype-based computational services. Commercial brachytherapy treatment planning programs designed to run on smaller computers (Prowess, ROCS, MMS), were developed in the late 1980s and early 1990s. These systems brought interactive dosimetry into the clinic and surgical theatre. Conclusions Brachytherapy treatment planning has evolved from systems of rigid implant rules to individualized pre- and intra-operative treatment plans, and post-operative dosimetric assessments. Brachytherapy dose distributions were initially calculated on public domain programs on large regionally located computers. With the progression of computer miniaturization and increase in processor speeds, proprietary software was commercially developed for microcomputers that offered increased functionality and integration with clinical practice. PMID:25097560

  6. BOLD fMRI integration into radiosurgery treatment planning of cerebral vascular malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Stancanello, Joseph; Cavedon, Carlo; Francescon, Paolo; Causin, Francesco; Avanzo, Michele; Colombo, Federico; Cerveri, Pietro; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Uggeri, Fulvio

    2007-04-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is used to distinguish areas of the brain responsible for different tasks and functions. It is possible, for example, by using fMRI images, to identify particular regions in the brain which can be considered as 'functional organs at risk' (fOARs), i.e., regions which would cause significant patient morbidity if compromised. The aim of this study is to propose and validate a method to exploit functional information for the identification of fOARs in CyberKnife (Accuray, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) radiosurgery treatment planning; in particular, given the high spatial accuracy offered by the CyberKnife system, local nonrigid registration is used to reach accurate image matching. Five patients affected by arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and scheduled to undergo radiosurgery were scanned prior to treatment using computed tomography (CT), three-dimensional (3D) rotational angiography (3DRA), T2 weighted and blood oxygenation level dependent echo planar imaging MRI. Tasks were chosen on the basis of lesion location by considering those areas which could be potentially close to treatment targets. Functional data were superimposed on 3DRA and CT used for treatment planning. The procedure for the localization of fMRI areas was validated by direct cortical stimulation on 38 AVM and tumor patients undergoing conventional surgery. Treatment plans studied with and without considering fOARs were significantly different, in particular with respect to both maximum dose and dose volume histograms; consideration of the fOARs allowed quality indices of treatment plans to remain almost constant or to improve in four out of five cases compared to plans with no consideration of fOARs. In conclusion, the presented method provides an accurate tool for the integration of functional information into AVM radiosurgery, which might help to minimize undesirable side effects and to make radiosurgery less invasive.

  7. Predicting Next Year's Resources--Short-Term Enrollment Forecasting for Accurate Budget Planning. AIR Forum Paper 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salley, Charles D.

    Accurate enrollment forecasts are a prerequisite for reliable budget projections. This is because tuition payments make up a significant portion of a university's revenue, and anticipated revenue is the immediate constraint on current operating expenditures. Accurate forecasts are even more critical to revenue projections when a university's…

  8. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Treatment Planning for Superficial Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Zacarias, Albert S.; Brown, Mellonie F.; Mills, Michael D.

    2010-10-01

    The physician's planning objective is often a uniform dose distribution throughout the planning target volume (PTV), including superficial PTVs on or near the surface of a patient's body. Varian's Eclipse treatment planning system uses a progressive resolution optimizer (PRO), version 8.2.23, for RapidArc dynamic multileaf collimator volumetric modulated arc therapy planning. Because the PRO is a fast optimizer, optimization convergence errors (OCEs) produce dose nonuniformity in the superficial area of the PTV. We present a postsurgical cranial case demonstrating the recursive method our clinic uses to produce RapidArc treatment plans. The initial RapidArc treatment plan generated using one 360{sup o} arc resulted in substantial dose nonuniformity in the superficial section of the PTV. We demonstrate the use of multiple arcs to produce improved dose uniformity in this region. We also compare the results of this superficial dose compensation method to the results of a recursive method of dose correction that we developed in-house to correct optimization convergence errors in static intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment plans. The results show that up to 4 arcs may be necessary to provide uniform dose to the surface of the PTV with the current version of the PRO.

  9. 300 Area waste acid treatment system closure plan

    SciTech Connect

    LUKE, S.N.

    1999-05-17

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOERL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion includes closure plan documentation submitted for individual, treatment, storage, and/or disposal units undergoing closure, such as the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Whenever appropriate, 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. This 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System Closure Plan (Revision 2) includes a Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Part A, Form 3. Information provided in this closure plan is current as of April 1999.

  10. Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment, Applied Technology Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Lance Lauerhass; Vince C. Maio; S. Kenneth Merrill; Arlin L. Olson; Keith J. Perry

    2003-06-01

    Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho mandates treatment of sodium-bearing waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is to complete treatment of sodium-bearing waste by December 31, 2012. Applied technology activities are required to provide the data necessary to complete conceptual design of four identified alternative processes and to select the preferred alternative. To provide a technically defensible path forward for the selection of a treatment process and for the collection of needed data, an applied technology plan is required. This document presents that plan, identifying key elements of the decision process and the steps necessary to obtain the required data in support of both the decision and the conceptual design. The Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Applied Technology Plan has been prepared to provide a description/roadmap of the treatment alternative selection process. The plan details the results of risk analyzes and the resulting prioritized uncertainties. It presents a high-level flow diagram governing the technology decision process, as well as detailed roadmaps for each technology. The roadmaps describe the technical steps necessary in obtaining data to quantify and reduce the technical uncertainties associated with each alternative treatment process. This plan also describes the final products that will be delivered to the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office in support of the office's selection of the final treatment technology.

  11. Vega library for processing DICOM data required in Monte Carlo verification of radiotherapy treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Locke, C; Zavgorodni, S

    2008-12-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods provide the most accurate to-date dose calculations in heterogeneous media and complex geometries, and this spawns increasing interest in incorporating MC calculations into treatment planning quality assurance process. This involves MC dose calculations for clinically produced treatment plans. To perform these calculations, a number of treatment plan parameters specifying radiation beam and patient geometries need to be transferred to MC codes, such as BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc. Extracting these parameters from DICOM files is not a trivial task, one that has previously been performed mostly using Matlab-based software. This paper describes the DICOM tags that contain information required for MC modeling of conformal and IMRT plans, and reports the development of an in-house DICOM interface, through a library (named Vega) of platform-independent, object-oriented C++ codes. The Vega library is small and succinct, offering just the fundamental functions for reading/modifying/writing DICOM files in a C++ program. The library, however, is flexible enough to extract all MC required data from DICOM files, and write MC produced dose distributions into DICOM files that can then be processed in a treatment planning system environment. The library can be made available upon request to the authors.

  12. A Study of Treatment Planning: Periodontal Services for the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milgrom, Peter; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A study undertaken to explore how dentists use patient data to plan treatment is presented. Three hundred forty-six general dentists used oral and general health findings to determine periodontal treatment for seven prototypic elderly patients. The results indicated that oral hygiene and major medications best discriminated between treatment…

  13. SU-E-T-502: Initial Results of a Comparison of Treatment Plans Produced From Automated Prioritized Planning Method and a Commercial Treatment Planning System

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, P; Chen, Y; Hong, L; Apte, A; Yang, J; Mechalakos, J; Mageras, G; Hunt, M; Deasy, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose We developed an automated treatment planning system based on a hierarchical goal programming approach. To demonstrate the feasibility of our method, we report the comparison of prostate treatment plans produced from the automated treatment planning system with those produced by a commercial treatment planning system. Methods In our approach, we prioritized the goals of the optimization, and solved one goal at a time. The purpose of prioritization is to ensure that higher priority dose-volume planning goals are not sacrificed to improve lower priority goals. The algorithm has four steps. The first step optimizes dose to the target structures, while sparing key sensitive organs from radiation. In the second step, the algorithm finds the best beamlet weight to reduce toxicity risks to normal tissue while holding the objective function achieved in the first step as a constraint, with a small amount of allowed slip. Likewise, the third and fourth steps introduce lower priority normal tissue goals and beam smoothing. We compared with prostate treatment plans from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center developed using Eclipse, with a prescription dose of 72 Gy. A combination of liear, quadratic, and gEUD objective functions were used with a modified open source solver code (IPOPT). Results Initial plan results on 3 different cases show that the automated planning system is capable of competing or improving on expert-driven eclipse plans. Compared to the Eclipse planning system, the automated system produced up to 26% less mean dose to rectum and 24% less mean dose to bladder while having the same D95 (after matching) to the target. Conclusion We have demonstrated that Pareto optimal treatment plans can be generated automatically without a trial-and-error process. The solver finds an optimal plan for the given patient, as opposed to database-driven approaches that set parameters based on geometry and population modeling.

  14. Functional imaging in treatment planning in radiation therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Perez, Carlos A; Bradley, Jeffrey; Chao, Clifford K S; Grigsby, Perry W; Mutic, Sasa; Malyapa, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The remarkable technical developments obtained in radiation oncology have resulted in an increasing use of image-based treatment planning in radiation therapy for three-dimensional and intensity modulated radiation therapy, stereotactic irradiation and image-guided brachytherapy. There has been increased use of computer-based record and verify systems as well as electronic portal imaging to enhance treatment delivery. From the data presented it is evident that PET scanning and other functional imaging techniques play a major role in the definition of tumor extent and staging of patients with cancer. The recent introduction of a combined CT and PET scanner will substantially simplify image acquisition and treatment planning.

  15. Monitor Unit Checking in Heterogeneous Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, Patrick D.; Adolfson, Troy; Cho, L. Chinsoo; Saxena, Rishik

    2011-10-01

    Treatment of lung cancer using very-high-dose fractionation in small fields requires well-tested dose modeling, a method for density-averaging compound targets constructed from different parts of the breathing cycle, and monitor unit verification of the heterogeneity-corrected treatment plans. The quality and safety of each procedure are dependent on these factors. We have evaluated the dosimetry of our first 26 stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) patients, including 260 treatment fields, planned with the Pinnacle treatment planning system. All targets were combined from full expiration and inspiration computed tomography scans and planned on the normal respiration scan with 6-MV photons. Combined GTVs (cGTVs) have been density-averaged in different ways for comparison of the effect on total monitor units. In addition, we have compared planned monitor units against hand calculations using 2 classic 1D correction methods: (1) effective attenuation and (2) ratio of Tissue-Maximum Ratios (TMRs) to determine the range of efficacy of simple verification methods over difficult-to-perform measurements. Different methods of density averaging for combined targets have been found to have minimal impact on total dose as evidenced by the range of total monitor units generated for each method. Nondensity-corrected treatment plans for the same fields were found to require about 8% more monitor units on average. Hand calculations, using the effective attenuation method were found to agree with Pinnacle calculations for nonproblematic fields to within {+-}10% for >95% of the fields tested. The ratio of TMRs method was found to be unacceptable. Reasonable choices for density-averaging of cGTVs using full inspiration/expiration scans should not strongly affect the planning dose. Verification of planned monitor units, as a check for problematic fields, can be done for 6-MV fields with simple 1D effective attenuation-corrected hand calculations.

  16. Dosimetric feasibility of cone-beam CT-based treatment planning compared to CT-based treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Sua . E-mail: sua.yoo@duke.edu; Yin, F.-F.

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images are currently used for positioning verification. However, it is yet unknown whether CBCT could be used in dose calculation for replanning in adaptive radiation therapy. This study investigates the dosimetric feasibility of CBCT-based treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Hounsfield unit (HU) values and profiles of Catphan, homogeneous/inhomogeneous phantoms, and various tissue regions of patients in CBCT images were compared to those in CT. The dosimetric consequence of the HU variation was investigated by comparing CBCT-based treatment plans to conventional CT-based plans for both phantoms and patients. Results: The maximum HU difference between CBCT and CT of Catphan was 34 HU in the Teflon. The differences in other materials were less than 10 HU. The profiles for the homogeneous phantoms in CBCT displayed reduced HU values up to 150 HU in the peripheral regions compared to those in CT. The scatter and artifacts in CBCT became severe surrounding inhomogeneous tissues with reduced HU values up to 200 HU. The MU/cGy differences were less than 1% for most phantom cases. The isodose distributions between CBCT-based and CT-based plans agreed very well. However, the discrepancy was larger when CBCT was scanned without a bowtie filter than with bowtie filter. Also, up to 3% dosimetric error was observed in the plans for the inhomogeneous phantom. In the patient studies, the discrepancies of isodose lines between CT-based and CBCT-based plans, both 3D and IMRT, were less than 2 mm. Again, larger discrepancy occurred for the lung cancer patients. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the feasibility of CBCT-based treatment planning. CBCT-based treatment plans were dosimetrically comparable to CT-based treatment plans. Dosimetric data in the inhomogeneous tissue regions should be carefully validated.

  17. Assessment Interviewing for Treatment Planning: Trainer's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dendy, Robert F.; And Others

    The purpose of this trainer's manual is to teach drug abuse counselors: (1) the kinds of background information needed to assess a client; (2) how to interview clients to obtain the necessary information; (3) how to write up a case history; and (4) how to design individualized treatments. This trainer's manual is organized into three major…

  18. Accurate Measurement of Canal Length during Root Canal Treatment: An In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Sadaf, Durre; Ahmad, Muhammad Zubair

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the consistency and accuracy of Electronic Apex Locator (EAL) (Root ZXII) in individual canals and its association with other clinical variables. Study Design: Cross-Sectional study. Place of study: Dental section of the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. Materials and Methods: Working length was measured by EAL in 180 patients requiring endodontic therapy in molar and premolar teeth. The effects of clinical variables e.g. gender and pulpal status on the consistency and accuracy of EAL were recorded. Performance of apex locator was considered “Consistent” when the scale bar was stable and moved only in correspondence to the movement of file in the root canal. Accuracy was determined by inserting the file at the working length determined by the EAL and periapical view of radiograph was taken using paralleling technique. Estimated working length was considered accurate when the file tip was located 0-2mm short of the radiographic apex. If the file was overextended from the radiographic apex, it showed dysfunction of the EAL. Results: Consistency of EAL was found 97.6% in distobuccal canals, 91.1% in palatal canals, 73.7% in mesiolingual canals, 83.3% in mesiobuccal and 80.2% in distal canals. Accuracy of EAL was 91.4% in mesiolingual canal, 92% in mesiobuccal, and 90.2% in Palatal and 93.2% in distal canal. Conclusion: Consistency of electronic apex locator vary in different canals, however consistent measurements are highly accurate. No significant association was found between other clinical variables with the consistency and accuracy of EAL.

  19. The Effects of Self-Monitoring and Performance Feedback on the Treatment Integrity of Behavior Intervention Plan Implementation and Generalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouzakitis, Angela; Codding, Robin S.; Tryon, Georgiana

    2015-01-01

    Accurate implementation of individualized behavior intervention plans (BIPs) is a critical aspect of evidence-based practice. Research demonstrates that neither training nor consultation is sufficient to improve and maintain high rates of treatment integrity (TI). Therefore, evaluation of ongoing support strategies is needed. The purpose of this…

  20. Using branching simulations in treatment fidelity plans.

    PubMed

    Kovach, Christine R; Rababa, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a new approach to treatment fidelity using branching simulations. Branching simulations are case scenarios that require the user to generate a series of step-by-step decisions and actions. The user is given immediate feedback on the consequences of his or her decisions and actions. Branching simulations may be a particularly useful fidelity strategy for interventions that require clinical decision making represented in terms of a flow of critical thinking and action steps. Results of fidelity testing in the current study using branching simulations revealed that 15 (22%) of 67 interventionists scored below the study's a priori 80% criterion for full retraining and retesting. Thirty (45%) interventionists needed partial retraining in using specific components of the intervention. Potential threats to internal validity posed by inadequate or erroneous adherence to multicomponent intervention protocols can be decreased through treatment fidelity using branching simulations.

  1. An algorithm for independent verification of Gamma Knife{sup TM} treatment plans

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, James; Berndt, Anita

    2004-10-01

    A formalism for independent treatment verification has been developed for Gamma Knife{sup TM} radiosurgery in analogy to the second checks being performed routinely in the field of external beam radiotherapy. A verification algorithm is presented, and evaluated based on its agreement with treatment planning calculations for the first 40 Canadian Gamma Knife{sup TM} patients. The algorithm is used to calculate the irradiation time for each shot, and the value of the dose at the maximum dose point in each calculation matrix. Data entry consists of information included on the plan printout, and can be streamlined by using an optional plan import feature. Calculated shot times differed from those generated by the treatment planning software by an average of 0.3%, with a standard deviation of 1.4%. The agreement of dose maxima was comparable with an average of -0.2% and a standard deviation of 1.3%. Consistently accurate comparisons were observed for centrally located lesions treated with a small number of shots. Large discrepancies were almost all associated with dose plans utilizing a large number of collimator plugs, for which the simplifying approximations used by the program are known to break down.

  2. SU-D-BRD-03: Improving Plan Quality with Automation of Treatment Plan Checks

    SciTech Connect

    Covington, E; Younge, K; Chen, X; Lee, C; Matuszak, M; Kessler, M; Acosta, E; Orow, A; Filpansick, S; Moran, J; Keranen, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of an automated plan check tool to improve first-time plan quality as well as standardize and document performance of physics plan checks. Methods: The Plan Checker Tool (PCT) uses the Eclipse Scripting API to check and compare data from the treatment planning system (TPS) and treatment management system (TMS). PCT was created to improve first-time plan quality, reduce patient delays, increase efficiency of our electronic workflow, and to standardize and partially automate plan checks in the TPS. A framework was developed which can be configured with different reference values and types of checks. One example is the prescribed dose check where PCT flags the user when the planned dose and the prescribed dose disagree. PCT includes a comprehensive checklist of automated and manual checks that are documented when performed by the user. A PDF report is created and automatically uploaded into the TMS. Prior to and during PCT development, errors caught during plan checks and also patient delays were tracked in order to prioritize which checks should be automated. The most common and significant errors were determined. Results: Nineteen of 33 checklist items were automated with data extracted with the PCT. These include checks for prescription, reference point and machine scheduling errors which are three of the top six causes of patient delays related to physics and dosimetry. Since the clinical roll-out, no delays have been due to errors that are automatically flagged by the PCT. Development continues to automate the remaining checks. Conclusion: With PCT, 57% of the physics plan checklist has been partially or fully automated. Treatment delays have declined since release of the PCT for clinical use. By tracking delays and errors, we have been able to measure the effectiveness of automating checks and are using this information to prioritize future development. This project was supported in part by P01CA059827.

  3. Sampling and Analysis Plan - Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, Steve P.

    2006-05-26

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) describes planned data collection activities for four entry boreholes through the sediment overlying the basalt, up to three new deep rotary boreholes through the basalt and sedimentary interbeds, and one corehole through the basalt and sedimentary interbeds at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The SAP will be used in concert with the quality assurance plan for the project to guide the procedure development and data collection activities needed to support borehole drilling, geophysical measurements, and sampling. This SAP identifies the American Society of Testing Materials standards, Hanford Site procedures, and other guidance to be followed for data collection activities.

  4. Commissioning kilovoltage cone-beam CT beams in a radiation therapy treatment planning system.

    PubMed

    Alaei, Parham; Spezi, Emiliano

    2012-11-08

    The feasibility of accounting of the dose from kilovoltage cone-beam CT in treatment planning has been discussed previously for a single cone-beam CT (CBCT) beam from one manufacturer. Modeling the beams and computing the dose from the full set of beams produced by a kilovoltage cone-beam CT system requires extensive beam data collection and verification, and is the purpose of this work. The beams generated by Elekta X-ray volume imaging (XVI) kilovoltage CBCT (kV CBCT) system for various cassettes and filters have been modeled in the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS) and used to compute dose to stack and anthropomorphic phantoms. The results were then compared to measurements made using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The agreement between modeled and measured depth-dose and cross profiles is within 2% at depths beyond 1 cm for depth-dose curves, and for regions within the beam (excluding penumbra) for cross profiles. The agreements between TPS-calculated doses, TLD measurements, and Monte Carlo simulations are generally within 5% in the stack phantom and 10% in the anthropomorphic phantom, with larger variations observed for some of the measurement/calculation points. Dose computation using modeled beams is reasonably accurate, except for regions that include bony anatomy. Inclusion of this dose in treatment plans can lead to more accurate dose prediction, especially when the doses to organs at risk are of importance.

  5. Mangled extremity severity score: an accurate guide to treatment of the severely injured upper extremity.

    PubMed

    Slauterbeck, J R; Britton, C; Moneim, M S; Clevenger, F W

    1994-08-01

    The mangled extremity severity score (MESS) is a scoring system that can be applied to mangled extremities and help one determine which mangled limbs will eventually come to amputation. The MESS is a graduated grading system based on skeletal and soft tissue injury, shock, ischemia, and age. The records of 37 patients having sustained 43 open fractures or mangled upper extremity injuries, seen and treated at the University of New Mexico's Regional Trauma Center between April 1987 and September 1990, have been reviewed. All nine extremity injuries with a MESS of greater than or equal to seven were amputated, and 34 of 34 with a MESS of less than seven were salvaged. Nine Grade IIIC and six mangled extremities were identified in our study. Five of these Grade IIIC and four of the mangled extremities with a MESS of greater than or equal to seven were amputated. All Grade IIIC or mangled extremities with a MESS of less than seven were salvaged. In conclusion, the MESS is an early and accurate predictor for identifying the extremities that may be best treated by amputation.

  6. Maimonides: an early but accurate view on the treatment of haemorrhoids

    PubMed Central

    Magrill, Dan; Sekaran, Prabhu

    2007-01-01

    Moses Maimonides was not only one of the most influential religious figures of the middle ages, but also a pioneer in a wide variety of medical practices. A brief history of his life, and what is known about his medical education, is given here. His paper on haemorrhoids is summarised, as well as a review of the current understanding of the pathogenesis, prevention and treatment of this common condition. The comparison of Maimonides' writings to modern understanding of not only the prevention and treatment of haemorrhoids, but also his approach to the patient as a whole in terms of pre‐ and postoperative care, demonstrate how ahead of his time this great philosopher was. PMID:17488868

  7. Transrectal high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation of prostate cancer: effective treatment requiring accurate imaging.

    PubMed

    Rouvière, Olivier; Souchon, Rémi; Salomir, Rarès; Gelet, Albert; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lyonnet, Denis

    2007-09-01

    Transrectal HIFU ablation has become a reasonable option for the treatment of localized prostate cancer in non-surgical patients, with 5-year disease-free survival similar to that of radiation therapy. It is also a promising salvage therapy of local recurrence after radiation therapy. These favourable results are partly due to recent improvements in prostate cancer imaging. However, further improvements are needed in patient selection, pre-operative localization of the tumor foci, assessment of the volume treated and early detection of recurrence. A better knowledge of the factors influencing the HIFU-induced tissue destruction and a better pre-operative assessment of them by imaging techniques should improve treatment outcome. Whereas prostate HIFU ablation is currently performed under transrectal ultrasound guidance, MR guidance with real-time operative monitoring of temperature will be available in the near future. If this technique will give better targeting and more uniform tissue destruction, its cost-effectiveness will have to be carefully evaluated. Finally, a recently reported synergistic effect between HIFU ablation and chemotherapy opens possibilities for treatment in high-risk or clinically advanced tumors.

  8. Ion beams in radiotherapy - from tracks to treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, M.; Scifoni, E.; Wälzlein, C.; Durante, M.

    2012-07-01

    Several dozen clinical sites around the world apply beams of fast light ions for radiotherapeutical purposes. Thus there is a vested interest in the various physical and radiobiological processes governing the interaction of ion beams with matter, specifically living systems. We discuss the various modelling steps which lead from basic interactions to the application in actual patient treatment planning. The nano- and microscopic scale is covered by sample calculations with our TRAX code. On the macroscopic scale we feature the TRiP98 treatment planning system, which was clinically used in GSI's radiotherapy pilot project.

  9. Novel tools for stepping source brachytherapy treatment planning: Enhanced geometrical optimization and interactive inverse planning

    SciTech Connect

    Dinkla, Anna M. Laarse, Rob van der; Koedooder, Kees; Petra Kok, H.; Wieringen, Niek van; Pieters, Bradley R.; Bel, Arjan

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Dose optimization for stepping source brachytherapy can nowadays be performed using automated inverse algorithms. Although much quicker than graphical optimization, an experienced treatment planner is required for both methods. With automated inverse algorithms, the procedure to achieve the desired dose distribution is often based on trial-and-error. Methods: A new approach for stepping source prostate brachytherapy treatment planning was developed as a quick and user-friendly alternative. This approach consists of the combined use of two novel tools: Enhanced geometrical optimization (EGO) and interactive inverse planning (IIP). EGO is an extended version of the common geometrical optimization method and is applied to create a dose distribution as homogeneous as possible. With the second tool, IIP, this dose distribution is tailored to a specific patient anatomy by interactively changing the highest and lowest dose on the contours. Results: The combined use of EGO–IIP was evaluated on 24 prostate cancer patients, by having an inexperienced user create treatment plans, compliant to clinical dose objectives. This user was able to create dose plans of 24 patients in an average time of 4.4 min/patient. An experienced treatment planner without extensive training in EGO–IIP also created 24 plans. The resulting dose-volume histogram parameters were comparable to the clinical plans and showed high conformance to clinical standards. Conclusions: Even for an inexperienced user, treatment planning with EGO–IIP for stepping source prostate brachytherapy is feasible as an alternative to current optimization algorithms, offering speed, simplicity for the user, and local control of the dose levels.

  10. Automatic treatment plan re-optimization for adaptive radiotherapy guided with the initial plan DVHs.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Zarepisheh, Masoud; Uribe-Sanchez, Andres; Moore, Kevin; Tian, Zhen; Zhen, Xin; Graves, Yan Jiang; Gautier, Quentin; Mell, Loren; Zhou, Linghong; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve

    2013-12-21

    Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) can reduce normal tissue toxicity and/or improve tumor control through treatment adaptations based on the current patient anatomy. Developing an efficient and effective re-planning algorithm is an important step toward the clinical realization of ART. For the re-planning process, manual trial-and-error approach to fine-tune planning parameters is time-consuming and is usually considered unpractical, especially for online ART. It is desirable to automate this step to yield a plan of acceptable quality with minimal interventions. In ART, prior information in the original plan is available, such as dose-volume histogram (DVH), which can be employed to facilitate the automatic re-planning process. The goal of this work is to develop an automatic re-planning algorithm to generate a plan with similar, or possibly better, DVH curves compared with the clinically delivered original plan. Specifically, our algorithm iterates the following two loops. An inner loop is the traditional fluence map optimization, in which we optimize a quadratic objective function penalizing the deviation of the dose received by each voxel from its prescribed or threshold dose with a set of fixed voxel weighting factors. In outer loop, the voxel weighting factors in the objective function are adjusted according to the deviation of the current DVH curves from those in the original plan. The process is repeated until the DVH curves are acceptable or maximum iteration step is reached. The whole algorithm is implemented on GPU for high efficiency. The feasibility of our algorithm has been demonstrated with three head-and-neck cancer IMRT cases, each having an initial planning CT scan and another treatment CT scan acquired in the middle of treatment course. Compared with the DVH curves in the original plan, the DVH curves in the resulting plan using our algorithm with 30 iterations are better for almost all structures. The re-optimization process takes about 30 s using

  11. Automatic treatment plan re-optimization for adaptive radiotherapy guided with the initial plan DVHs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Zarepisheh, Masoud; Uribe-Sanchez, Andres; Moore, Kevin; Tian, Zhen; Zhen, Xin; Jiang Graves, Yan; Gautier, Quentin; Mell, Loren; Zhou, Linghong; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve

    2013-12-01

    Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) can reduce normal tissue toxicity and/or improve tumor control through treatment adaptations based on the current patient anatomy. Developing an efficient and effective re-planning algorithm is an important step toward the clinical realization of ART. For the re-planning process, manual trial-and-error approach to fine-tune planning parameters is time-consuming and is usually considered unpractical, especially for online ART. It is desirable to automate this step to yield a plan of acceptable quality with minimal interventions. In ART, prior information in the original plan is available, such as dose-volume histogram (DVH), which can be employed to facilitate the automatic re-planning process. The goal of this work is to develop an automatic re-planning algorithm to generate a plan with similar, or possibly better, DVH curves compared with the clinically delivered original plan. Specifically, our algorithm iterates the following two loops. An inner loop is the traditional fluence map optimization, in which we optimize a quadratic objective function penalizing the deviation of the dose received by each voxel from its prescribed or threshold dose with a set of fixed voxel weighting factors. In outer loop, the voxel weighting factors in the objective function are adjusted according to the deviation of the current DVH curves from those in the original plan. The process is repeated until the DVH curves are acceptable or maximum iteration step is reached. The whole algorithm is implemented on GPU for high efficiency. The feasibility of our algorithm has been demonstrated with three head-and-neck cancer IMRT cases, each having an initial planning CT scan and another treatment CT scan acquired in the middle of treatment course. Compared with the DVH curves in the original plan, the DVH curves in the resulting plan using our algorithm with 30 iterations are better for almost all structures. The re-optimization process takes about 30 s using

  12. Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP), Volumes I and II

    SciTech Connect

    D`Amelio, J.

    1994-08-30

    Site Treatment Plans (STP) are required for facilities at which the DOE generates or stores mixed waste. This Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP) the second step in a three-phase process, identifies the currently preferred options for treating mixed waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) or for developing treatment technologies where technologies do not exist or need modification. The DSTP reflects site-specific preferred options, developed with the state`s input and based on existing available information. To the extent possible, the DSTP identifies specific treatment facilities for treating the mixed waste and proposes schedules. Where the selection of specific treatment facilities is not possible, schedules for alternative activities such as waste characterization and technology assessment are provided. All schedule and cost information presented is preliminary and is subject to change. The DSTP is comprised of two volumes: this Compliance Plan Volume and the Background Volume. This Compliance Plan Volume proposes overall schedules with target dates for achieving compliance with the land disposal restrictions (LDR) of RCRA and procedures for converting the target dates into milestones to be enforced under the Order. The more detailed discussion of the options contained in the Background Volume is provided for informational purposes only.

  13. Temperature evolution, injury enhancement and treatment planning in cryosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rewcastle, John Cameron

    Cryosurgery is the in situ ablation of target tissues by exposing them to low subzero temperatures. The last ten years have seen a resurgence of the interest in low temperature medicine and an advancement in the technologies used to inflict a freezing injury. Based on a comparative study, a new Joule-Thompson based cryomachine was found to have superior control than the standard liquid nitrogen cryomachine tested. The ability of the new generation of machines to quickly change temperatures led to the hypothesis that Dynamic Cryosurgery, the generation of thermal waves by oscillating cryoprobe tip temperatures, may increase the direct injury to cells within a cryosurgical iceball. An alternative means of accomplishing the same goal is to hold the iceball at a constant size once the critical temperature has been reached by the target tissue thereby increasing the hold time of cells at subzero temperatures. This alternative was tested in-vivo with an AT-1 Dunning rat prostate model and was found to increase the lethality of the iceball. To further the understanding of the cell damage mechanisms occurring during cryosurgery freezing and thawing rates that would be experienced clinically were mimicked on a cryostage and an in-vitro map of cellular damage was created, again using the Dunning cell line. Single and double freeze-thaw cycle experiments were performed. No intracellular ice was observed during the first freeze thaw cycle and viable cells were found in all regions of the iceball. This finding supports the role of ischemia resulting from post-treatment vascular stasis as a major contributor to cell killing. Cryosurgery is currently preformed with the goal of enclosing the target tissue within a critical isotherm assumed to insure necrosis. A three dimensional model of temperatures about multiple cryoprobes was developed to predict temperatures during cryosurgery and compared to experimental data. Predictions of this model were found to be accurate within

  14. An MRI guided system for prostate laser ablation with treatment planning and multi-planar temperature monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Sheng; Agarwal, Harsh; Bernardo, Marcelino; Seifabadi, Reza; Turkbey, Baris; Partanen, Ari; Negussie, Ayele; Glossop, Neil; Choyke, Peter; Pinto, Peter; Wood, Bradford J.

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is often over treated with standard treatment options which impact the patients' quality of life. Laser ablation has emerged as a new approach to treat prostate cancer while sparing the healthy tissue around the tumor. Since laser ablation has a small treatment zone with high temperature, it is necessary to use accurate image guidance and treatment planning to enable full ablation of the tumor. Intraoperative temperature monitoring is also desirable to protect critical structures from being damaged in laser ablation. In response to these problems, we developed a navigation platform and integrated it with a clinical MRI scanner and a side firing laser ablation device. The system allows imaging, image guidance, treatment planning and temperature monitoring to be carried out on the same platform. Temperature sensing phantoms were developed to demonstrate the concept of iterative treatment planning and intraoperative temperature monitoring. Retrospective patient studies were also conducted to show the clinical feasibility of the system.

  15. A simple scoring ratio to index the conformity of radiosurgical treatment plans. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Paddick, I

    2000-12-01

    A conformity index is a measure of how well the volume of a radiosurgical dose distribution conforms to the size and shape of a target volume. Because the success of radiosurgery is related to the extremely conformal irradiation of the target, an accurate method for describing this parameter is important. Existing conformity ratios and indices used in radiosurgery are reviewed and criticized. It will be demonstrated that previously proposed measurements of conformity can, under certain conditions, give false perfect scores. A new conformity index is derived that gives an objective score of conformity for a treatment plan and gives no false scores. An analysis of five different treatment plans is made using both the existing scoring methods and the new conformity index.

  16. Treatment planning system and dose delivery accuracy in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy using Elekta body frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawod, Tamer; Bremer, Michael; Karstens, Johann H.; Werner, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the photon beam transmission through the Elekta Stereotactic Body Frame (ESBF) and treatment couch, to determine the dose calculations accuracy of the MasterPlan Treatment Planning System (TPS) using Pencil Beam (PBA) and Collapsed Cone (CCA) algorithms during the use of Elekta Stereotactic Body Frame (ESBF), and to demonstrate a simple calculation method to put this transmission into account during the treatment planning dose calculations. The dose was measured at the center of an in-house custom-built inhomogeneous PMMA thorax phantom with and without ‘the frame + treatment couch’. The phantom was CT-imaged inside the ESBF and planned with multiple 3D-CRT fields using PBA and CCA for photon beams of energies 6 MV and 10 MV. There were two treatment plans for dose calculations. In the first plan, the ‘frame + couch’ were included in the body contour and, therefore, included in the TPS dose calculations. In the second plan, the ‘frame + couch’ were not included in the body contour and, therefore, not included in the calculations. Transmission of the ‘frame + couch’ was determined by the ratio of the dose measurements with the ‘frame + couch’ to the measurements without them. To validate the accuracy of the calculation model, plans with and without the ‘frame + couch’ surrounding the phantoms were compared with their corresponding measurements. The transmission of the ‘frame + couch’ varies from 90.23-97.54% depending on the energy, field size, the angle of the beams and whether the beams also intercept them. The validation accuracy of the Pencil Beam (PBA) and Collapsed Cone (CCA) algorithms were within 5.33% and 4.04% respectively for the individual measurements for all gantry angles under this study. The results showed that both PBA and CCA algorithms can calculate the dose to the target within 4.25% and 1.95% of the average measured value. The attenuation caused by the ESBF and couch must be

  17. Assessing the quality of conformal treatment planning: a new tool for quantitative comparison.

    PubMed

    Menhel, J; Levin, D; Alezra, D; Symon, Z; Pfeffer, R

    2006-10-21

    We develop a novel radiotherapy plan comparison index, critical organ scoring index (COSI), which is a measure of both target coverage and critical organ overdose. COSI is defined as COSI=1-(V(OAR)>tol/TC), where V(OAR)>tol is the fraction of volume of organ at risk receiving more than tolerance dose, and TC is the target coverage, VT,PI/VT, where VT,PI is the target volume receiving at a least prescription dose and VT is the total target volume. COSI approaches unity when the critical structure is completely spared and the target coverage is unity. We propose a two-dimensional, graphical representation of COSI versus conformity index (CI), where CI is a measure of a normal tissue overdose. We show that this 2D representation is a reliable, visual quantitative tool for evaluating competing plans. We generate COSI-CI plots for three sites: head and neck, cavernous sinus, and pancreas, and evaluate competing non-coplanar 3D and IMRT treatment plans. For all three sites this novel 2D representation assisted the physician in choosing the optimal plan, both in terms of target coverage and in terms of critical organ sparing. We verified each choice by analysing individual DVHs and isodose lines. Comparing our results to the widely used conformation number, we found that in all cases where there were discrepancies in the choice of the best treatment plan, the COSI-CI choice was considered the correct one, in several cases indicating that a non-coplanar 3D plan was superior to the IMRT plans. The choice of plan was quick, simple and accurate using the new graphical representation.

  18. 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-01

    Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. The closure plan consists of a Part A Dangerous waste Permit Application and a RCRA Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Revision (Revision 1) submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. The closure plan consists of 9 chapters and 5 appendices. The chapters cover: introduction; facility description; process information; waste characteristics; groundwater; closure strategy and performance standards; closure activities; postclosure; and references.

  19. A simple planning technique of craniospinal irradiation in the eclipse treatment planning system.

    PubMed

    Athiyaman, Hemalatha; Mayilvaganan, Athiyaman; Singh, Daleep

    2014-10-01

    A new planning method for Craniospinal Irradiation by Eclipse treatment planning system using Field alignment, Field-in-Field technique was developed. Advantage of this planning method was also studied retrospectively for previously treated five patients of medulloblastoma with variable spine length. Plan consists of half beam blocked parallel opposed cranium, and a single posterior cervicospine field was created by sharing the same isocenter, which obviates divergence matching. Further, a single symmetrical field was created to treat remaining Lumbosacral spine. Matching between a inferior diverging edge of cervicospine field and superior diverging edge of a Lumbosacral field was done using the field alignment option. 'Field alignment' is specific option in the Eclipse Treatment Planning System, which automatically matches the field edge divergence as per field alignment rule. Multiple segments were applied in both the spine field to manage with hot and cold spots created by varying depth of spinal cord. Plan becomes fully computerized using this field alignment option and multiple segments. Plan evaluation and calculated mean modified Homogeneity Index (1.04 and 0.1) ensured that dose to target volume is homogeneous and critical organ doses were within tolerance. Dose variation at the spinal field junction was verified using ionization chamber array (I'MatriXX) for matched, overlapped and gap junction spine fields; the delivered dose distribution confirmed the ideal clinical match, over exposure and under exposure at the junction, respectively. This method is simple to plan, executable in Record and Verify mode and can be adopted for various length of spinal cord with only two isocenter in shorter treatment time.

  20. Mandibular symphyseal distraction osteogenesis: diagnosis and treatment planning considerations.

    PubMed

    Conley, Richard; Legan, Harry

    2003-02-01

    Treatment planning decisions in the transverse dimension have historically been based on the presenting mandibular arch width and form. Distraction osteogenesis (DO), originally developed by Russian orthopedic surgeon Ilizarov, has produced significant results in limb lengthening. Mandibular symphyseal DO was introduced by Guerrero, providing a new paradigm for patients whose treatment alternatives and results were previously limited. Orthodontic and surgical techniques and principles will be shown using completed and current cases.

  1. Monte Carlo verification of IMRT treatment plans on grid.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Andrés; Fernández Sánchez, Carlos; Mouriño Gallego, José Carlos; López Cacheiro, Javier; González Castaño, Francisco J; Rodríguez-Silva, Daniel; Domínguez Carrera, Lorena; González Martínez, David; Pena García, Javier; Gómez Rodríguez, Faustino; González Castaño, Diego; Pombar Cameán, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    The eIMRT project is producing new remote computational tools for helping radiotherapists to plan and deliver treatments. The first available tool will be the IMRT treatment verification using Monte Carlo, which is a computational expensive problem that can be executed remotely on a GRID. In this paper, the current implementation of this process using GRID and SOA technologies is presented, describing the remote execution environment and the client.

  2. [Endodontically treated teeth. Success--failure. Endorestorative treatment plan].

    PubMed

    Zabalegui, B

    1990-01-01

    More and more often the general dentist is finding the presence of endodontically treated teeth during his treatment planning procedure. He has to ask himself if the endo-treated tooth functions and will continue to function function successfully, when deciding which final endo-restorative procedure to apply. For this reason the dentist or the endodontist with whom he works should clinically evaluate these teeth, establish a diagnostic criteria of their success or failure and a treatment plan according to the prognosis. The purpose of this article is to offer an organized clinical view of the steps to follow when evaluating an endodontically treated tooth and how to establish a final endo-restorative plan.

  3. SU-E-T-626: Accuracy of Dose Calculation Algorithms in MultiPlan Treatment Planning System in Presence of Heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Moignier, C; Huet, C; Barraux, V; Loiseau, C; Sebe-Mercier, K; Batalla, A; Makovicka, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Advanced stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) treatments require accurate dose calculation for treatment planning especially for treatment sites involving heterogeneous patient anatomy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of dose calculation algorithms, Raytracing and Monte Carlo (MC), implemented in the MultiPlan treatment planning system (TPS) in presence of heterogeneities. Methods: First, the LINAC of a CyberKnife radiotherapy facility was modeled with the PENELOPE MC code. A protocol for the measurement of dose distributions with EBT3 films was established and validated thanks to comparison between experimental dose distributions and calculated dose distributions obtained with MultiPlan Raytracing and MC algorithms as well as with the PENELOPE MC model for treatments planned with the homogenous Easycube phantom. Finally, bones and lungs inserts were used to set up a heterogeneous Easycube phantom. Treatment plans with the 10, 7.5 or the 5 mm field sizes were generated in Multiplan TPS with different tumor localizations (in the lung and at the lung/bone/soft tissue interface). Experimental dose distributions were compared to the PENELOPE MC and Multiplan calculations using the gamma index method. Results: Regarding the experiment in the homogenous phantom, 100% of the points passed for the 3%/3mm tolerance criteria. These criteria include the global error of the method (CT-scan resolution, EBT3 dosimetry, LINAC positionning …), and were used afterwards to estimate the accuracy of the MultiPlan algorithms in heterogeneous media. Comparison of the dose distributions obtained in the heterogeneous phantom is in progress. Conclusion: This work has led to the development of numerical and experimental dosimetric tools for small beam dosimetry. Raytracing and MC algorithms implemented in MultiPlan TPS were evaluated in heterogeneous media.

  4. An Efficient and Accurate Formalism for the Treatment of Large Amplitude Intramolecular Motion.

    PubMed

    Reinisch, Guillaume; Miki, Kenji; Vignoles, Gérard L; Wong, Bryan M; Simmons, Chris S

    2012-08-14

    We propose a general approach to describe large amplitude motions (LAM) with multiple degrees of freedom (DOF) in molecules or reaction intermediates, which is useful for the computation of thermochemical or kinetic data. The kinetic part of the LAM Lagrangian is derived using a Z-matrix internal coordinate representation within a new numerical procedure. This derivation is exact for a classical system, and the uncertainties on the prediction of observable quantities largely arise from uncertainties on the LAM potential energy surface (PES) itself. In order to rigorously account for these uncertainties, we present an approach based on Bayesian theory to infer a parametrized physical model of the PES using ab initio calculations. This framework allows for quantification of uncertainties associated with a PES model as well as the forward propagation of these uncertainties to the quantity of interest. A selection and generalization of some treatments accounting for the coupling of the LAM with other internal or external DOF are also presented. Finally, we discuss and validate the approach with two applications: the calculation of the partition function of 1,3-butadiene and the calculation of the high-pressure reaction rate of the CH(3) + H → CH(4) recombination.

  5. An Efficient and Accurate Formalism for the Treatment of Large Amplitude Intramolecular Motion

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We propose a general approach to describe large amplitude motions (LAM) with multiple degrees of freedom (DOF) in molecules or reaction intermediates, which is useful for the computation of thermochemical or kinetic data. The kinetic part of the LAM Lagrangian is derived using a Z-matrix internal coordinate representation within a new numerical procedure. This derivation is exact for a classical system, and the uncertainties on the prediction of observable quantities largely arise from uncertainties on the LAM potential energy surface (PES) itself. In order to rigorously account for these uncertainties, we present an approach based on Bayesian theory to infer a parametrized physical model of the PES using ab initio calculations. This framework allows for quantification of uncertainties associated with a PES model as well as the forward propagation of these uncertainties to the quantity of interest. A selection and generalization of some treatments accounting for the coupling of the LAM with other internal or external DOF are also presented. Finally, we discuss and validate the approach with two applications: the calculation of the partition function of 1,3-butadiene and the calculation of the high-pressure reaction rate of the CH3 + H → CH4 recombination. PMID:22904694

  6. Brachytherapy treatment planning algorithm applied to prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-Rodríguez, M. R.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.

    2000-10-01

    An application of Genetic Algorithms (GAs) for treatment planning optimization in prostate brachytherapy is presented. The importance of multi-objective selection criteria based on the contour of the volume of interest and radiosensitive structures such as the rectum and urethra is discussed. First results are obtained for a simple test case which presents radial symmetry.

  7. A code for hadrontherapy treatment planning with the voxelscan method.

    PubMed

    Berga, S; Bourhaleb, F; Cirio, R; Derkaoui, J; Gallice, B; Hamal, M; Marchetto, F; Rolando, V; Viscomi, S

    2000-11-01

    A code for the implementation of treatment plannings in hadrontherapy with an active scan beam is presented. The package can determine the fluence and energy of the beams for several thousand voxels in a few minutes. The performances of the program have been tested with a full simulation.

  8. Savannah River Site approved site treatment plan, 2000 annual update

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, B.

    2000-04-20

    The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume 1) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions. Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume 2) and is provided for information.

  9. Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 1998 Annual Update

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, B.

    1999-04-20

    The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions. Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

  10. Evaluation of dose calculation accuracy of treatment planning systems at hip prosthesis interfaces.

    PubMed

    Paulu, David; Alaei, Parham

    2017-03-20

    There are an increasing number of radiation therapy patients with hip prosthesis. The common method of minimizing treatment planning inaccuracies is to avoid radiation beams to transit through the prosthesis. However, the beams often exit through them, especially when the patient has a double-prosthesis. Modern treatment planning systems employ algorithms with improved dose calculation accuracies but even these algorithms may not predict the dose accurately at high atomic number interfaces. The current study evaluates the dose calculation accuracy of three common dose calculation algorithms employed in two commercial treatment planning systems. A hip prosthesis was molded inside a cylindrical phantom and the dose at several points within the phantom at the interface with prosthesis was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. The measured doses were then compared to the predicted ones by the planning systems. The results of the study indicate all three algorithms underestimate the dose at the prosthesis interface, albeit to varying degrees, and for both low- and high-energy x rays. The measured doses are higher than calculated ones by 5-22% for Pinnacle Collapsed Cone Convolution algorithm, 2-23% for Eclipse Acuros XB, and 6-25% for Eclipse Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm. There are generally better agreements for AXB algorithm and the worst results are for the AAA.

  11. Comparison of selected dose calculation algorithms in radiotherapy treatment planning for tissues with inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woon, Y. L.; Heng, S. P.; Wong, J. H. D.; Ung, N. M.

    2016-03-01

    Inhomogeneity correction is recommended for accurate dose calculation in radiotherapy treatment planning since human body are highly inhomogeneous with the presence of bones and air cavities. However, each dose calculation algorithm has its own limitations. This study is to assess the accuracy of five algorithms that are currently implemented for treatment planning, including pencil beam convolution (PBC), superposition (SP), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), Monte Carlo (MC) and Acuros XB (AXB). The calculated dose was compared with the measured dose using radiochromic film (Gafchromic EBT2) in inhomogeneous phantoms. In addition, the dosimetric impact of different algorithms on intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was studied for head and neck region. MC had the best agreement with the measured percentage depth dose (PDD) within the inhomogeneous region. This was followed by AXB, AAA, SP and PBC. For IMRT planning, MC algorithm is recommended for treatment planning in preference to PBC and SP. The MC and AXB algorithms were found to have better accuracy in terms of inhomogeneity correction and should be used for tumour volume within the proximity of inhomogeneous structures.

  12. Optimizing global liver function in radiation therapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Victor W.; Epelman, Marina A.; Wang, Hesheng; Romeijn, H. Edwin; Feng, Mary; Cao, Yue; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Matuszak, Martha M.

    2016-09-01

    Liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) patients differ in both pre-treatment liver function (e.g. due to degree of cirrhosis and/or prior treatment) and radiosensitivity, leading to high variability in potential liver toxicity with similar doses. This work investigates three treatment planning optimization models that minimize risk of toxicity: two consider both voxel-based pre-treatment liver function and local-function-based radiosensitivity with dose; one considers only dose. Each model optimizes different objective functions (varying in complexity of capturing the influence of dose on liver function) subject to the same dose constraints and are tested on 2D synthesized and 3D clinical cases. The normal-liver-based objective functions are the linearized equivalent uniform dose (\\ell \\text{EUD} ) (conventional ‘\\ell \\text{EUD} model’), the so-called perfusion-weighted \\ell \\text{EUD} (\\text{fEUD} ) (proposed ‘fEUD model’), and post-treatment global liver function (GLF) (proposed ‘GLF model’), predicted by a new liver-perfusion-based dose-response model. The resulting \\ell \\text{EUD} , fEUD, and GLF plans delivering the same target \\ell \\text{EUD} are compared with respect to their post-treatment function and various dose-based metrics. Voxel-based portal venous liver perfusion, used as a measure of local function, is computed using DCE-MRI. In cases used in our experiments, the GLF plan preserves up to 4.6 % ≤ft(7.5 % \\right) more liver function than the fEUD (\\ell \\text{EUD} ) plan does in 2D cases, and up to 4.5 % ≤ft(5.6 % \\right) in 3D cases. The GLF and fEUD plans worsen in \\ell \\text{EUD} of functional liver on average by 1.0 Gy and 0.5 Gy in 2D and 3D cases, respectively. Liver perfusion information can be used during treatment planning to minimize the risk of toxicity by improving expected GLF; the degree of benefit varies with perfusion pattern. Although fEUD model optimization is computationally inexpensive and

  13. NOTE: A VMAT planning solution for prostate patients using a commercial treatment planning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boylan, C. J.; Golby, C.; Rowbottom, C. G.

    2010-07-01

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a rotational delivery technique which offers the potential of improved dose distributions and shorter treatment times when compared to fixed-beam intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This note describes the use of an existing treatment planning system (Philips Pinnacle3 v.8.0), supplemented by in-house software, to produce a single-arc VMAT prostate plan. While a number of planning systems for the Elekta VMAT platform are commercially available, the use of an in-house solution has allowed more detailed investigations of VMAT planning, as well as greater control over the optimization process. The solution presented here begins with a static step-and-shoot IMRT approach to provide initial segment shapes, which are then modified and sequenced into 60 equally spaced control points in a 360° arc. Dose-volume histogram comparisons demonstrate that this VMAT planning method offers multiple dose level target coverage comparable to that from a standard IMRT approach. The VMAT plans also show superior sparing of critical structures such as the rectum and bladder. Delivery times are reduced with the VMAT method, and the results of dosimetric verification, resilience and repeatability tests indicate that the solution is robust.

  14. Monte Carlo treatment planning for molecular targeted radiotherapy within the MINERVA system.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Joerg; Hartmann Siantar, Christine; Wessol, Daniel E; Wemple, Charles A; Nigg, David; Cogliati, Josh; Daly, Tom; Descalle, Marie-Anne; Flickinger, Terry; Pletcher, David; Denardo, Gerald

    2005-03-07

    The aim of this project is to extend accurate and patient-specific treatment planning to new treatment modalities, such as molecular targeted radiation therapy, incorporating previously crafted and proven Monte Carlo and deterministic computation methods. A flexible software environment is being created that allows planning radiation treatment for these new modalities and combining different forms of radiation treatment with consideration of biological effects. The system uses common input interfaces, medical image sets for definition of patient geometry and dose reporting protocols. Previously, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Montana State University (MSU) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) had accrued experience in the development and application of Monte Carlo based, three-dimensional, computational dosimetry and treatment planning tools for radiotherapy in several specialized areas. In particular, INEEL and MSU have developed computational dosimetry systems for neutron radiotherapy and neutron capture therapy, while LLNL has developed the PEREGRINE computational system for external beam photon-electron therapy. Building on that experience, the INEEL and MSU are developing the MINERVA (modality inclusive environment for radiotherapeutic variable analysis) software system as a general framework for computational dosimetry and treatment planning for a variety of emerging forms of radiotherapy. In collaboration with this development, LLNL has extended its PEREGRINE code to accommodate internal sources for molecular targeted radiotherapy (MTR), and has interfaced it with the plugin architecture of MINERVA. Results from the extended PEREGRINE code have been compared to published data from other codes, and found to be in general agreement (EGS4-2%, MCNP-10%) (Descalle et al 2003 Cancer Biother. Radiopharm. 18 71-9). The code is currently being benchmarked against experimental data. The interpatient variability of the

  15. Monte Carlo treatment planning for molecular targeted radiotherapy within the MINERVA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Joerg; Hartmann Siantar, Christine; Wessol, Daniel E.; Wemple, Charles A.; Nigg, David; Cogliati, Josh; Daly, Tom; Descalle, Marie-Anne; Flickinger, Terry; Pletcher, David; DeNardo, Gerald

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this project is to extend accurate and patient-specific treatment planning to new treatment modalities, such as molecular targeted radiation therapy, incorporating previously crafted and proven Monte Carlo and deterministic computation methods. A flexible software environment is being created that allows planning radiation treatment for these new modalities and combining different forms of radiation treatment with consideration of biological effects. The system uses common input interfaces, medical image sets for definition of patient geometry and dose reporting protocols. Previously, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Montana State University (MSU) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) had accrued experience in the development and application of Monte Carlo based, three-dimensional, computational dosimetry and treatment planning tools for radiotherapy in several specialized areas. In particular, INEEL and MSU have developed computational dosimetry systems for neutron radiotherapy and neutron capture therapy, while LLNL has developed the PEREGRINE computational system for external beam photon-electron therapy. Building on that experience, the INEEL and MSU are developing the MINERVA (modality inclusive environment for radiotherapeutic variable analysis) software system as a general framework for computational dosimetry and treatment planning for a variety of emerging forms of radiotherapy. In collaboration with this development, LLNL has extended its PEREGRINE code to accommodate internal sources for molecular targeted radiotherapy (MTR), and has interfaced it with the plugin architecture of MINERVA. Results from the extended PEREGRINE code have been compared to published data from other codes, and found to be in general agreement (EGS4—2%, MCNP—10%) (Descalle et al 2003 Cancer Biother. Radiopharm. 18 71-9). The code is currently being benchmarked against experimental data. The interpatient variability of

  16. Monte Carlo Treatment Planning for Molecular Targeted Radiotherapy within the MINERVA System

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, J; Siantar, C H; Wessol, D E; Wemple, C A; Nigg, D; Cogliati, J; Daly, T; Descalle, M; Flickinger, T; Pletcher, D; DeNardo, G

    2004-09-22

    The aim of this project is to extend accurate and patient-specific treatment planning to new treatment modalities, such as molecular targeted radiation therapy, incorporating previously crafted and proven Monte Carlo and deterministic computation methods. A flexible software environment is being created that allows planning radiation treatment for these new modalities and combining different forms of radiation treatment with consideration of biological effects. The system uses common input interfaces, medical image sets for definition of patient geometry, and dose reporting protocols. Previously, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Montana State University (MSU), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) had accrued experience in the development and application of Monte Carlo-based, three-dimensional, computational dosimetry and treatment planning tools for radiotherapy in several specialized areas. In particular, INEEL and MSU have developed computational dosimetry systems for neutron radiotherapy and neutron capture therapy, while LLNL has developed the PEREGRINE computational system for external beam photon-electron therapy. Building on that experience, the INEEL and MSU are developing the MINERVA (Modality Inclusive Environment for Radiotherapeutic Variable Analysis) software system as a general framework for computational dosimetry and treatment planning for a variety of emerging forms of radiotherapy. In collaboration with this development, LLNL has extended its PEREGRINE code to accommodate internal sources for molecular targeted radiotherapy (MTR), and has interfaced it with the plug-in architecture of MINERVA. Results from the extended PEREGRINE code have been compared to published data from other codes, and found to be in general agreement (EGS4 - 2%, MCNP - 10%)(Descalle et al. 2003). The code is currently being benchmarked against experimental data. The interpatient variability of the drug pharmacokinetics in MTR

  17. Shrinking the Psoriasis Assessment Gap: Early Gene-Expression Profiling Accurately Predicts Response to Long-Term Treatment.

    PubMed

    Correa da Rosa, Joel; Kim, Jaehwan; Tian, Suyan; Tomalin, Lewis E; Krueger, James G; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte

    2017-02-01

    There is an "assessment gap" between the moment a patient's response to treatment is biologically determined and when a response can actually be determined clinically. Patients' biochemical profiles are a major determinant of clinical outcome for a given treatment. It is therefore feasible that molecular-level patient information could be used to decrease the assessment gap. Thanks to clinically accessible biopsy samples, high-quality molecular data for psoriasis patients are widely available. Psoriasis is therefore an excellent disease for testing the prospect of predicting treatment outcome from molecular data. Our study shows that gene-expression profiles of psoriasis skin lesions, taken in the first 4 weeks of treatment, can be used to accurately predict (>80% area under the receiver operating characteristic curve) the clinical endpoint at 12 weeks. This could decrease the psoriasis assessment gap by 2 months. We present two distinct prediction modes: a universal predictor, aimed at forecasting the efficacy of untested drugs, and specific predictors aimed at forecasting clinical response to treatment with four specific drugs: etanercept, ustekinumab, adalimumab, and methotrexate. We also develop two forms of prediction: one from detailed, platform-specific data and one from platform-independent, pathway-based data. We show that key biomarkers are associated with responses to drugs and doses and thus provide insight into the biology of pathogenesis reversion.

  18. A treatment planning comparison of BPA- or BSH-based BNCT of malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Capala, J.; Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.

    1996-12-31

    Accurate delivery of the prescribed dose during clinical BNCT requires knowledge (or reasonably valid assumptions) about the boron concentrations in tumor and normal tissues. For conversion of physical dose (Gy) into photon-equivalent dose (Gy-Eq), relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and/or compound-adjusted biological effectiveness (CBE) factors are required for each tissue. The BNCT treatment planning software requires input of the following values: the boron concentration in blood and tumor, RBEs in brain, tumor and skin for the high-LET beam components, the CBE factors for brain, tumor, and skin, and the RBE for the gamma component.

  19. A treatment planning code for inverse planning and 3D optimization in hadrontherapy.

    PubMed

    Bourhaleb, F; Marchetto, F; Attili, A; Pittà, G; Cirio, R; Donetti, M; Giordanengo, S; Givehchi, N; Iliescu, S; Krengli, M; La Rosa, A; Massai, D; Pecka, A; Pardo, J; Peroni, C

    2008-09-01

    The therapeutic use of protons and ions, especially carbon ions, is a new technique and a challenge to conform the dose to the target due to the energy deposition characteristics of hadron beams. An appropriate treatment planning system (TPS) is strictly necessary to take full advantage. We developed a TPS software, ANCOD++, for the evaluation of the optimal conformal dose. ANCOD++ is an analytical code using the voxel-scan technique as an active method to deliver the dose to the patient, and provides treatment plans with both proton and carbon ion beams. The iterative algorithm, coded in C++ and running on Unix/Linux platform, allows the determination of the best fluences of the individual beams to obtain an optimal physical dose distribution, delivering a maximum dose to the target volume and a minimum dose to critical structures. The TPS is supported by Monte Carlo simulations with the package GEANT3 to provide the necessary physical lookup tables and verify the optimized treatment plans. Dose verifications done by means of full Monte Carlo simulations show an overall good agreement with the treatment planning calculations. We stress the fact that the purpose of this work is the verification of the physical dose and a next work will be dedicated to the radiobiological evaluation of the equivalent biological dose.

  20. Accurate treatments of electrostatics for computer simulations of biological systems: A brief survey of developments and existing problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Sha-Sha; Pan, Cong; Hu, Zhong-Han

    2015-12-01

    Modern computer simulations of biological systems often involve an explicit treatment of the complex interactions among a large number of molecules. While it is straightforward to compute the short-ranged Van der Waals interaction in classical molecular dynamics simulations, it has been a long-lasting issue to develop accurate methods for the longranged Coulomb interaction. In this short review, we discuss three types of methodologies for the accurate treatment of electrostatics in simulations of explicit molecules: truncation-type methods, Ewald-type methods, and mean-field-type methods. Throughout the discussion, we brief the formulations and developments of these methods, emphasize the intrinsic connections among the three types of methods, and focus on the existing problems which are often associated with the boundary conditions of electrostatics. This brief survey is summarized with a short perspective on future trends along the method developments and applications in the field of biological simulations. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91127015 and 21522304) and the Open Project from the State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, and the Innovation Project from the State Key Laboratory of Supramolecular Structure and Materials.

  1. Implementation of Monte Carlo Dose calculation for CyberKnife treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Li, J. S.; Deng, J.; Fan, J.

    2008-02-01

    Accurate dose calculation is essential to advanced stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) especially for treatment planning involving heterogeneous patient anatomy. This paper describes the implementation of a fast Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm in SRS/SRT treatment planning for the CyberKnife® SRS/SRT system. A superposition Monte Carlo algorithm is developed for this application. Photon mean free paths and interaction types for different materials and energies as well as the tracks of secondary electrons are pre-simulated using the MCSIM system. Photon interaction forcing and splitting are applied to the source photons in the patient calculation and the pre-simulated electron tracks are repeated with proper corrections based on the tissue density and electron stopping powers. Electron energy is deposited along the tracks and accumulated in the simulation geometry. Scattered and bremsstrahlung photons are transported, after applying the Russian roulette technique, in the same way as the primary photons. Dose calculations are compared with full Monte Carlo simulations performed using EGS4/MCSIM and the CyberKnife treatment planning system (TPS) for lung, head & neck and liver treatments. Comparisons with full Monte Carlo simulations show excellent agreement (within 0.5%). More than 10% differences in the target dose are found between Monte Carlo simulations and the CyberKnife TPS for SRS/SRT lung treatment while negligible differences are shown in head and neck and liver for the cases investigated. The calculation time using our superposition Monte Carlo algorithm is reduced up to 62 times (46 times on average for 10 typical clinical cases) compared to full Monte Carlo simulations. SRS/SRT dose distributions calculated by simple dose algorithms may be significantly overestimated for small lung target volumes, which can be improved by accurate Monte Carlo dose calculations.

  2. 3D treatment planning and intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Purdy, J A

    1999-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) image-based treatment planning and new delivery technologies have spurred the implementation of external beam radiation therapy techniques, in which the high-dose region is conformed much more closely to the target volume than previously possible, thus reducing the volume of normal tissues receiving a high dose. This form of external beam irradiation is referred to as 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT). 3DCRT is not just an add-on to the current radiation oncology process; it represents a radical change in practice, particularly for the radiation oncologist. Defining target volumes and organs at risk in 3D by drawing contours on CT images on a slice-by-slice basis, as opposed to drawing beam portals on a simulator radiograph, can be challenging, because radiation oncologists are generally not well trained in cross-sectional imaging. Currently, the 3DCRT approach will increase the time and effort required by physicians inexperienced with 3D treatment planning. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a more advanced form of 3DCRT, but there is considerable developmental work remaining. The instrumentation and methods used for IMRT quality assurance procedures and testing are not well established. Computer optimization cost functions are too simplistic, and thus time-consuming. Subjective plan evaluation by the radiation oncologist is still the norm. In addition, many fundamental questions regarding IMRT remain unanswered. For example, the radiobiophysical consequences of altered time-dose-fraction are unknown. Also, the fact that there is much greater dose heterogeneity for both the target and normal critical structures with IMRT compared to traditional irradiation techniques challenges current radiation oncology planning principles. However, this new process of planning and treatment delivery shows significant potential for improving the therapeutic ratio. In addition, while inefficient today, these systems, when fully developed

  3. The NUKDOS software for treatment planning in molecular radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kletting, Peter; Schimmel, Sebastian; Hänscheid, Heribert; Luster, Markus; Fernández, Maria; Nosske, Dietmar; Lassmann, Michael; Glatting, Gerhard

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this work was the development of a software tool for treatment planning prior to molecular radiotherapy, which comprises all functionality to objectively determine the activity to administer and the pertaining absorbed doses (including the corresponding error) based on a series of gamma camera images and one SPECT/CT or probe data. NUKDOS was developed in MATLAB. The workflow is based on the MIRD formalism For determination of the tissue or organ pharmacokinetics, gamma camera images as well as probe, urine, serum and blood activity data can be processed. To estimate the time-integrated activity coefficients (TIAC), sums of exponentials are fitted to the time activity data and integrated analytically. To obtain the TIAC on the voxel level, the voxel activity distribution from the quantitative 3D SPECT/CT (or PET/CT) is used for scaling and weighting the TIAC derived from the 2D organ data. The voxel S-values are automatically calculated based on the voxel-size of the image and the therapeutic nuclide ((90)Y, (131)I or (177)Lu). The absorbed dose coefficients are computed by convolution of the voxel TIAC and the voxel S-values. The activity to administer and the pertaining absorbed doses are determined by entering the absorbed dose for the organ at risk. The overall error of the calculated absorbed doses is determined by Gaussian error propagation. NUKDOS was tested for the operation systems Windows(®) 7 (64 Bit) and 8 (64 Bit). The results of each working step were compared to commercially available (SAAMII, OLINDA/EXM) and in-house (UlmDOS) software. The application of the software is demonstrated using examples form peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) and from radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases. For the example from PRRT, the calculated activity to administer differed by 4% comparing NUKDOS and the final result using UlmDos, SAAMII and OLINDA/EXM sequentially. The absorbed dose for the spleen and tumour differed by 7% and 8

  4. Use of written treatment plans for asthma by specialist physicians.

    PubMed

    Sheares, Beverley J; Du, Yunling; Vazquez, Tara L; Mellins, Robert B; Evans, David

    2007-04-01

    Few studies have addressed use of written treatment plans (WTPs) for asthma by specialist physicians. The purpose of this study is to characterize the attitudes, beliefs, and self-reported practice behaviors regarding asthma WTP use among specialist physicians. Structured interviews were conducted with pulmonologists and allergists who provide direct patient asthma care in two New York City medical centers. The interview covered five areas: (1) demographic information; (2) experiences with WTPs; (3) reported clinical practice behaviors; (4) factors influencing use of WTPs; and (5) physician-patient communication. Forty-five physicians were eligible to participate in the study. Sixty-eight percent of physicians treated adult patients while 32% were pediatric specialists. Forty-four physicians completed interviews, (response rate of 98%). Eighty-six percent indicated they use WTPs with at least some of their patients (71% of their patients had received a plan from them). Most reported handwriting plans on a blank piece of paper (66%). Most plans were symptom-based (47%) or combined symptoms with peak flow measurement (50%). Most plans supported patient autonomy. More than 80% of physicians believe the use of a WTP improves patient outcomes. The results suggest that asthma specialists in this survey utilize WTPs more frequently than reported in other studies. Physicians encourage patient autonomy and believe asthma self-management by patients improves their outcomes. Controlled studies of the efficacy of asthma management plans are needed to assess the impact of WTPs as used in clinical practice.

  5. Optimization of helical tomotherapy treatment plans for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorov, G.; Kron, T.; Wong, E.; Chen, J.; Sollazzo, J.; Rodrigues, G.

    2003-07-01

    Helical tomotherapy (HT) is a novel treatment approach where the ring gantry irradiation geometry of a helical CT scanner is combined with an intensity-modulated megavoltage x-ray fan beam. An inverse treatment planning system (TomoTherapy Inc., Madison) was used to optimize the treatment plans for ten randomly selected prostate patients. Five different sets of margins (2, 5, 7.5 and 10 mm uniform 3D margins and a non-uniform margin of 5 to 10 mm) were employed for the prostate (GTV2) and seminal vesicles (GTV1). The dose distribution was evaluated in targets, rectum, bladder and femoral heads. HT plans are characterized by a rapid dose fall off around the target in all directions resulting in low doses (less than 30% of the dose at ICRU reference point) to the femurs in all cases. Up to a margin of 5 mm for target structures, it was always possible to satisfy the requirements for dose delivery set by RTOG protocol P-0126. Using a 'class solution', HT plans require minimal operator interaction and result in excellent sparing of normal structures in prostate radiotherapy.

  6. Use Dose Bricks Concept to Implement Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jia-Ming; Yu, Tsan-Jung; Yeh, Shyh-An; Chao, Pei-Ju; Huang, Chih-Jou

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. A “dose bricks” concept has been used to implement nasopharyngeal carcinoma treatment plan; this method specializes particularly in the case with bell shape nasopharyngeal carcinoma case. Materials and Methods. Five noncoplanar fields were used to accomplish the dose bricks technique treatment plan. These five fields include (a) right superior anterior oblique (RSAO), (b) left superior anterior oblique (LSAO), (c) right anterior oblique (RAO), (d) left anterior oblique (LAO), and (e) superior inferior vertex (SIV). Nondivergence collimator central axis planes were used to create different abutting field edge while normal organs were blocked by multileaf collimators in this technique. Results. The resulting 92% isodose curves encompassed the CTV, while maximum dose was about 115%. Approximately 50% volume of parotid glands obtained 10–15% of total dose and 50% volume of brain obtained less than 20% of total dose. Spinal cord receives only 5% from the scatter dose. Conclusions. Compared with IMRT, the expenditure of planning time and costing, “dose bricks” may after all be accepted as an optional implementation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma conformal treatment plan; furthermore, this method also fits the need of other nonhead and neck lesions if organ sparing and noncoplanar technique can be executed. PMID:24967395

  7. Approved Site Treatment Plan, Volumes 1 and 2. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect

    Helmich, E.H.; Molen, G.; Noller, D.

    1996-03-22

    The US Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), has prepared the Site Treatment Plan (STP) for Savannah River Site (SRS) mixed wastes in accordance with RCRA Section 3021(b), and SCDHEC has approved the STP (except for certain offsite wastes) and issued an order enforcing the STP commitments in Volume 1. DOE-SR and SCDHEC agree that this STP fulfills the requirements contained in the FFCAct, RCRA Section 3021, and therefore, pursuant to Section 105(a) of the FFCAct (RCRA Section 3021(b)(5)), DOE`s requirements are to implement the plan for the development of treatment capacities and technologies pursuant to RCRA Section 3021. Emerging and new technologies not yet considered may be identified to manage waste more safely, effectively, and at lower cost than technologies currently identified in the plan. DOE will continue to evaluate and develop technologies that offer potential advantages in public acceptance, privatization, consolidation, risk abatement, performance, and life-cycle cost. Should technologies that offer such advantages be identified, DOE may request a revision/modification of the STP in accordance with the provisions of Consent Order 95-22-HW. The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume 1) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume 2) and is provided for information.

  8. Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 1998 Annual Update

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, B.; Berry, M.

    1998-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office (DOE- SR),has prepared the Site Treatment Plan (STP) for Savannah River Site (SRS) mixed wastes in accordance with RCRA Section 3021(b), and SCDHEC has approved the STP (except for certain offsite wastes) and issued an order enforcing the STP commitments in Volume I. DOE-SR and SCDHEC agree that this STP fulfills the requirements contained in the FFCAct, RCRA Section 3021, and therefore,pursuant to Section 105(a) of the FFCAct (RCRA Section 3021(b)(5)), DOE`s requirements are to implement the plan for the development of treatment capacities and technologies pursuant to RCRA Section 3021.Emerging and new technologies not yet considered may be identified to manage waste more safely, effectively, and at lower cost than technologies currently identified in the plan. DOE will continue to evaluate and develop technologies that offer potential advantages in public acceptance, privatization, consolidation, risk abatement, performance, and life-cycle cost. Should technologies that offer such advantages be identified, DOE may request a revision/modification of the STP in accordance with the provisions of Consent Order 95-22-HW.The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

  9. Modeling treatment couches in the Pinnacle treatment planning system: Especially important for arc therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Duggar, William Neil; Nguyen, Alex; Stanford, Jason; Morris, Bart; Yang, Claus C.

    2016-04-01

    This study is to demonstrate the importance and a method of properly modeling the treatment couch for dose calculation in patient treatment using arc therapy. The 2 treatment couch tops—Aktina AK550 and Elekta iBEAM evo—of Elekta LINACs were scanned using Philips Brilliance Big Bore CT Simulator. Various parts of the couch tops were contoured, and their densities were measured and recorded on the Pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS) using the established computed tomography density table. These contours were saved as organ models to be placed beneath the patient during planning. Relative attenuation measurements were performed following procedures outlined by TG-176 as well as absolute dose comparison of static fields of 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} that were delivered through the couch tops with that calculated in the TPS with the couch models. A total of 10 random arc therapy treatment plans (5 volumetric-modulated arc therapy [VMAT] and 5 stereotactic body radiation therapy [SBRT]), using 24 beams, were selected for this study. All selected plans were calculated with and without couch modeling. Each beam was evaluated using the Delta{sup 4} dosimetry system (Delta{sup 4}). The Student t-test was used to determine statistical significance. Independent reviews were exploited as per the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core head and neck credentialing phantom. The selected plans were calculated on the actual patient anatomies with and without couch modeling to determine potential clinical effects. Large relative beam attenuations were noted dependent on which part of the couch top beams were passing through. Substantial improvements were also noted for static fields both calculated with the TPS and delivered physically when the couch models were included in the calculation. A statistically significant increase in agreement was noted for dose difference, distance to agreement, and γ-analysis with the Delta{sup 4} on VMAT and SBRT plans. A credentialing review showed

  10. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-02: An Electronic Whiteboard Platform to Manage Treatment Planning Process

    SciTech Connect

    DiCostanzo, D; Woollard, J; Gupta, N; Ayan, A; Thompson, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In an effort to improve patient safety and streamline the radiotherapy treatment planning (TP) process, a software based whiteboard had been developed and put in use in our facility Methods: The electronic whiteboard developed using SQL database (DB) and PHP/JavaScript based web interface, is published via department intranet and login credentials. The DB stores data for each TP process such as patient information, plan type, simulation/start dates, physician, dosimetrist, QA and the current status in planning process. Users interact with the DB per plan and perform status updates in real time as the planning process progresses. All user interactions with the DB are recorded with timestamps so as to calculate statistical information for TP process management such as contouring times, planning and review times, dosimetry, physics and therapist QA times. External beam and brachytherapy plans are categorized according to complexity (ex: IMRT, 3D, HDR, LDR etc) and treatment types and applicators. Each plan category is assigned specific timelines for each planning process. When a plan approaches or passes the predetermined timeline, users are alerted via color coded graphical cues. When certain process items are not completed in time, pre-determined actions are triggered such as a delay in treatment start date. Results: Our institution has been using the electronic whiteboard for two years. Implementation of pre-determined actions based on the statistical information collected by the whiteboard improved our TP process. For example, the average time for normal tissue contouring decreased from 0.73±1.37 to 0.24±0.33 days. The average time for target volume contouring decreased from 3.2±2.84 to 2.37±2.54 days. This increase in efficiency allows more time for quality assurance processes, improving patient safety. Conclusion: The electronic whiteboard has been an invaluable tool for streamlining our TP processes. It facilitates timely and accurate communication

  11. Generalized Tumor Dose for Treatment Planning Decision Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuniga, Areli A.

    Modern radiation therapy techniques allow for improved target conformity and normal tissue sparing. These highly conformal treatment plans have allowed dose escalation techniques increasing the probability of tumor control. At the same time this conformation has introduced inhomogeneous dose distributions, making delivered dose characterizations more difficult. The concept of equivalent uniform dose (EUD) characterizes a heterogeneous dose distribution within irradiated structures as a single value and has been used in biologically based treatment planning (BBTP); however, there are no substantial validation studies on clinical outcome data supporting EUD's use and therefore has not been widely adopted as decision-making support. These highly conformal treatment plans have also introduced the need for safety margins around the target volume. These margins are designed to minimize geometrical misses, and to compensate for dosimetric and treatment delivery uncertainties. The margin's purpose is to reduce the chance of tumor recurrence. This dissertation introduces a new EUD formulation designed especially for tumor volumes, called generalized Tumor Dose (gTD). It also investigates, as a second objective, margins extensions for potential improvements in local control while maintaining or minimizing toxicity. The suitability of gTD to rank LC was assessed by means of retrospective studies in a head and neck (HN) squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cohorts. The formulation was optimized based on two datasets (one of each type) and then, model validation was assessed on independent cohorts. The second objective of this dissertation was investigated by ranking the probability of LC of the primary disease adding different margin sizes. In order to do so, an already published EUD formula was used retrospectively in a HN and a NSCLC datasets. Finally, recommendations for the viability to implement this new formulation into a routine treatment

  12. Radiation treatment planning techniques for lymphoma of the stomach

    SciTech Connect

    Della Biancia, Cesar; Hunt, Margie; Furhang, Eli; Wu, Elisa; Yahalom, Joachim . E-mail: yahalomj@mskcc.org

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: Involved-field radiation therapy of the stomach is often used in the curative treatment of gastric lymphoma. Yet, the optimal technique to irradiate the stomach with minimal morbidity has not been well established. This study was designed to evaluate treatment planning alternatives for stomach irradiation, including intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), to determine which approach resulted in improved dose distribution and to identify patient-specific anatomic factors that might influence a treatment planning choice. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with lymphoma of the stomach (14 mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas and 1 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) were categorized into 3 types, depending on the geometric relationship between the planning target volume (PTV) and kidneys. AP/PA and 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) plans were generated for each patient. IMRT was planned for 4 patients with challenging geometric relationship between the PTV and the kidneys to determine whether it was advantageous to use IMRT. Results: For type I patients (no overlap between PTV and kidneys), there was essentially no benefit from using 3DCRT over AP/PA. However, for patients with PTVs in close proximity to the kidneys (type II) or with high degree of overlap (type III), the 4-field 3DCRT plans were superior, reducing the kidney V {sub 15Gy} by approximately 90% for type II and 50% for type III patients. For type III, the use of a 3DCRT plan rather than an AP/PA plan decreased the V {sub 15Gy} by approximately 65% for the right kidney and 45% for the left kidney. In the selected cases, IMRT led to a further decrease in left kidney dose as well as in mean liver dose. Conclusions: The geometric relationship between the target and kidneys has a significant impact on the selection of the optimum beam arrangement. Using 4-field 3DCRT markedly decreases the kidney dose. The addition of IMRT led to further incremental improvements in the left kidney

  13. Automated Monte Carlo Simulation of Proton Therapy Treatment Plans.

    PubMed

    Verburg, Joost Mathijs; Grassberger, Clemens; Dowdell, Stephen; Schuemann, Jan; Seco, Joao; Paganetti, Harald

    2016-12-01

    Simulations of clinical proton radiotherapy treatment plans using general purpose Monte Carlo codes have been proven to be a valuable tool for basic research and clinical studies. They have been used to benchmark dose calculation methods, to study radiobiological effects, and to develop new technologies such as in vivo range verification methods. Advancements in the availability of computational power have made it feasible to perform such simulations on large sets of patient data, resulting in a need for automated and consistent simulations. A framework called MCAUTO was developed for this purpose. Both passive scattering and pencil beam scanning delivery are supported. The code handles the data exchange between the treatment planning system and the Monte Carlo system, which requires not only transfer of plan and imaging information but also translation of institutional procedures, such as output factor definitions. Simulations are performed on a high-performance computing infrastructure. The simulation methods were designed to use the full capabilities of Monte Carlo physics models, while also ensuring consistency in the approximations that are common to both pencil beam and Monte Carlo dose calculations. Although some methods need to be tailored to institutional planning systems and procedures, the described procedures show a general road map that can be easily translated to other systems.

  14. A comparison between anisotropic analytical and multigrid superposition dose calculation algorithms in radiotherapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Vincent W.C.; Tse, Teddy K.H.; Ho, Cola L.M.; Yeung, Eric C.Y.

    2013-07-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is currently the most accurate dose calculation algorithm in radiotherapy planning but requires relatively long processing time. Faster model-based algorithms such as the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) by the Eclipse treatment planning system and multigrid superposition (MGS) by the XiO treatment planning system are 2 commonly used algorithms. This study compared AAA and MGS against MC, as the gold standard, on brain, nasopharynx, lung, and prostate cancer patients. Computed tomography of 6 patients of each cancer type was used. The same hypothetical treatment plan using the same machine and treatment prescription was computed for each case by each planning system using their respective dose calculation algorithm. The doses at reference points including (1) soft tissues only, (2) bones only, (3) air cavities only, (4) soft tissue-bone boundary (Soft/Bone), (5) soft tissue-air boundary (Soft/Air), and (6) bone-air boundary (Bone/Air), were measured and compared using the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), which was a function of the percentage dose deviations from MC. Besides, the computation time of each treatment plan was recorded and compared. The MAPEs of MGS were significantly lower than AAA in all types of cancers (p<0.001). With regards to body density combinations, the MAPE of AAA ranged from 1.8% (soft tissue) to 4.9% (Bone/Air), whereas that of MGS from 1.6% (air cavities) to 2.9% (Soft/Bone). The MAPEs of MGS (2.6%±2.1) were significantly lower than that of AAA (3.7%±2.5) in all tissue density combinations (p<0.001). The mean computation time of AAA for all treatment plans was significantly lower than that of the MGS (p<0.001). Both AAA and MGS algorithms demonstrated dose deviations of less than 4.0% in most clinical cases and their performance was better in homogeneous tissues than at tissue boundaries. In general, MGS demonstrated relatively smaller dose deviations than AAA but required longer computation time.

  15. Advantages of multiple algorithm support in treatment planning system for external beam dose calculations.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    The complexity of interactions and the nature of the approximations made in the formulation of the algorithm require that the user be familiar with the limitations of various models. As computer power keeps growing, calculation algorithms are tending more towards physically based models. The nature and quantity of the data required varies according to the model which may be either measurement based models or physical based models. Multiple dose calculation algorithm support found in XiO Treatment Planning System can be used to advantage when choice is to be made between speed and accuracy. Thus XiO allows end users generate plans accurately and quickly to optimize the delivery of radiation therapy.

  16. Fusiform Lenticulostriate Artery Aneurysm with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: The Role for Superselective Angiography in Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Kochar, P.S.; Morrish, W.F.; Hudon, M.E.; Wong, J.H.; Goyal, M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Aneurysms of the lenticulostriatal perforating arteries are rare and either involve the middle cerebral artery-perforator junction or are located distally in basal ganglia. We describe a rare ruptured fusiform lenticulostriatal perforating artery aneurysm arising from a proximal M2 MCA branch, discerned on superselective microcatheter angiography, presenting solely with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A 50-year-old previously healthy man presented with diffuse SAH and negative CT angiogram. Cerebral angiogram demonstrated a 2 mm fusiform aneurysm presumably arising from the right lateral lenticulostriate perforator but the exact origin of the perforator was unclear. Superselective angiography was required to precisely delineate the aneurysm and its vessel of origin and directly influenced treatment planning (surgical trapping). Superselective microcatheter angiography provides both an option for endovascular therapy as well as more accurate delineation for surgical planning for these rare aneurysms. PMID:20977857

  17. Incorporating Model Parameter Uncertainty into Prostate IMRT Treatment Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    Distribution Unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author( s ) and should not be construed as an...Incorporating Model Parameter Uncertainty into Prostate DAMD17-03-1-0019 IMRT Treatment Planning 6. AUTHOR( S ) David Y. Yang, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZA TION...NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION Stanford University REPORT NUMBER Stanford, California 94305-5401 E-Mail: yong@reyes .stanford

  18. Treatment Integrity Assessment in the Schools: An Evaluation of the Treatment Integrity Planning Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanetti, Lisa M. Hagermoser; Kratochwill, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    The Treatment Integrity Planning Protocol (TIPP) provides a structured process for collaboratively creating a treatment integrity assessment within a consultation framework. The authors evaluated the effect of the TIPP on the implementation of an intervention designed to improve the consistency of students' mathematics performance. Treatment…

  19. Ultrafast treatment plan optimization for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Men Chunhua; Romeijn, H. Edwin; Jia Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel aperture-based algorithm for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plan optimization with high quality and high efficiency. Methods: The VMAT optimization problem is formulated as a large-scale convex programming problem solved by a column generation approach. The authors consider a cost function consisting two terms, the first enforcing a desired dose distribution and the second guaranteeing a smooth dose rate variation between successive gantry angles. A gantry rotation is discretized into 180 beam angles and for each beam angle, only one MLC aperture is allowed. The apertures are generated one by one in a sequential way. At each iteration of the column generation method, a deliverable MLC aperture is generated for one of the unoccupied beam angles by solving a subproblem with the consideration of MLC mechanic constraints. A subsequent master problem is then solved to determine the dose rate at all currently generated apertures by minimizing the cost function. When all 180 beam angles are occupied, the optimization completes, yielding a set of deliverable apertures and associated dose rates that produce a high quality plan. Results: The algorithm was preliminarily tested on five prostate and five head-and-neck clinical cases, each with one full gantry rotation without any couch/collimator rotations. High quality VMAT plans have been generated for all ten cases with extremely high efficiency. It takes only 5-8 min on CPU (MATLAB code on an Intel Xeon 2.27 GHz CPU) and 18-31 s on GPU (CUDA code on an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 GPU card) to generate such plans. Conclusions: The authors have developed an aperture-based VMAT optimization algorithm which can generate clinically deliverable high quality treatment plans at very high efficiency.

  20. Quality assurance methodology for Varian RapidArc treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Iftimia, Ileana; Cirino, Eileen T; Xiong, Li; Mower, Herbert W

    2010-09-01

    With the commercial introduction of the Varian RapidArc, a new modality for treatment planning and delivery, the need has arisen for consistent and efficient techniques for performing patient-specific quality assurance (QA) tests. In this paper we present our methodology for a RapidArc treatment plan QA procedure. For our measurements we used a 2D diode array (MapCHECK) embedded at 5 cm water equivalent depth in MapPHAN 5 phantom and an Exradin A16 ion chamber placed in six different positions in a cylindrical homogeneous phantom (QUASAR). We also checked the MUs for the RapidArc plans by using independent software (RadCalc). The agreement between Eclipse calculations and MapCHECK/MapPHAN5 measurements was evaluated using both absolute distance-to-agreement (DTA) and gamma index with 10% dose threshold (TH), 3% dose difference (DD), and 3 mm DTA. The average agreement was 94.4% for the DTA approach and 96.3% for the gamma index approach. In high-dose areas, the discrepancy between calculations and ion chamber measurements using the QUASAR phantom was within 4.5% for prostate cases. For the RadCalc calculations, we used the average SSD along the arc; however, for some patients the agreement for the MUs obtained with RadCalc versus Eclipse was inadequate (discrepancy > 5%). In these cases, the plan was divided into partial arc plans so that RadCalc could perform a better estimation of the MUs. The discrepancy was further reduced to within ~4% using this approach. Regardless of the variation in prescribed dose and location of the treated areas, we obtained very good results for all patients studied in this paper.

  1. MO-D-BRB-01: Pediatric Treatment Planning I: Overview of Planning Strategies and Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Olch, A.

    2015-06-15

    Most Medical Physicists working in radiotherapy departments see few pediatric patients. This is because, fortunately, children get cancer at a rate nearly 100 times lower than adults. Children have not smoked, abused alcohol, or been exposed to environmental carcinogens for decades, and of course, have not fallen victim to the aging process. Children get very different cancers than adults. Breast or prostate cancers, typical in adults, are rarely seen in children but instead a variety of tumors occur in children that are rarely seen in adults; examples are germinomas, ependymomas and primitive neuroectodermal tumors, which require treatment of the child’s brain or neuroblastoma, requiring treatment in the abdomen. The treatment of children with cancer using radiation therapy is one of the most challenging planning and delivery problems facing the physicist. This is because bones, brain, breast tissue, and other organs are more sensitive to radiation in children than in adults. Because most therapy departments treat mostly adults, when the rare 8 year-old patient comes to the department for treatment, the physicist may not understand the clinical issues of his disease which drive the planning and delivery decisions. Additionally, children are more prone than adults to developing secondary cancers after radiation. For bilateral retinoblastoma for example, an irradiated child has a 40% chance of developing a second cancer by age 50. The dosimetric tradeoffs made during the planning process are complex and require careful consideration for children treated with radiotherapy. In the first presentation, an overview of childhood cancers and their corresponding treatment techniques will be given. These can be some of the most complex treatments that are delivered in the radiation therapy department. These cancers include leukemia treated with total body irradiation, medulloblastoma, treated with craniospinal irradiation plus a conformal boost to the posterior fossa

  2. Automated medial axis seeding and guided evolutionary simulated annealing for optimization of gamma knife radiosurgery treatment plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengpeng

    The Leksell Gamma KnifeRTM (LGK) is a tool for providing accurate stereotactic radiosurgical treatment of brain lesions, especially tumors. Currently, the treatment planning team "forward" plans radiation treatment parameters while viewing a series of 2D MR scans. This primarily manual process is cumbersome and time consuming because the difficulty in visualizing the large search space for the radiation parameters (i.e., shot overlap, number, location, size, and weight). I hypothesize that a computer-aided "inverse" planning procedure that utilizes tumor geometry and treatment goals could significantly improve the planning process and therapeutic outcome of LGK radiosurgery. My basic observation is that the treatment team is best at identification of the location of the lesion and prescribing a lethal, yet safe, radiation dose. The treatment planning computer is best at determining both the 3D tumor geometry and optimal LGK shot parameters necessary to deliver a desirable dose pattern to the tumor while sparing adjacent normal tissue. My treatment planning procedure asks the neurosurgeon to identify the tumor and critical structures in MR images and the oncologist to prescribe a tumoricidal radiation dose. Computer-assistance begins with geometric modeling of the 3D tumor's medial axis properties. This begins with a new algorithm, a Gradient-Phase Plot (G-P Plot) decomposition of the tumor object's medial axis. I have found that medial axis seeding, while insufficient in most cases to produce an acceptable treatment plan, greatly reduces the solution space for Guided Evolutionary Simulated Annealing (GESA) treatment plan optimization by specifying an initial estimate for shot number, size, and location, but not weight. They are used to generate multiple initial plans which become initial seed plans for GESA. The shot location and weight parameters evolve and compete in the GESA procedure. The GESA objective function optimizes tumor irradiation (i.e., as close to

  3. MO-C-BRF-01: Pediatric Treatment Planning I: Overview of Planning Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Olch, A; Hua, C

    2014-06-15

    Most Medical Physicists working in radiotherapy departments see few pediatric patients. This is because, fortunately, children get cancer at a rate nearly 100 times lower than adults. Children have not smoked, abused alcohol, or been exposed to environmental carcinogens for decades, and of course, have not fallen victim to the aging process. Children get very different cancers than adults. Breast or prostate cancers, typical in adults, are rarely seen in children but instead a variety of tumors occur in children that are rarely seen in adults; examples are germinomas, ependymomas and primitive neuroectodermal tumors, which require treatment of the child's brain or neuroblastoma, requiring treatment in the abdomen. The treatment of children with cancer using radiation therapy is one of the most challenging planning and delivery problems facing the physicist. This is because bones, brain, breast tissue, and other organs are more sensitive to radiation in children than in adults. Because most therapy departments treat mostly adults, when the rare 8 year-old patient comes to the department for treatment, the physicist may not understand the clinical issues of his disease which drive the planning and delivery decisions. Additionally, children are more prone than adults to developing secondary cancers after radiation. This fact has important implications for the choice of delivery techniques, especially when considering IMRT. For bilateral retinoblastoma for example, an irradiated child has a 50% chance of developing a second cancer by age 50. In the first presentation, an overview of childhood cancers and their corresponding treatment techniques will be given. These can be some of the most complex treatments that are delivered in the radiation therapy department. These cancers include leukemia treated with total body irradiation, medulloblastoma, treated with craniospinal irradiation plus a conformal boost to the posterior fossa, neuroblastoma, requiring focal abdominal

  4. Proton energy and scattering angle radiographs to improve proton treatment planning: a Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biegun, A. K.; Takatsu, J.; Nakaji, T.; van Goethem, M. J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Koffeman, E. N.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.

    2016-12-01

    The novel proton radiography imaging technique has a large potential to be used in direct measurement of the proton energy loss (proton stopping power, PSP) in various tissues in the patient. The uncertainty of PSPs, currently obtained from translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (xCT) images, should be minimized from 3-5% or higher to less than 1%, to make the treatment plan with proton beams more accurate, and thereby better treatment for the patient. With Geant4 we simulated a proton radiography detection system with two position-sensitive and residual energy detectors. A complex phantom filled with various materials (including tissue surrogates), was placed between the position sensitive detectors. The phantom was irradiated with 150 MeV protons and the energy loss radiograph and scattering angles were studied. Protons passing through different materials in the phantom lose energy, which was used to create a radiography image of the phantom. The multiple Coulomb scattering of a proton traversing different materials causes blurring of the image. To improve image quality and material identification in the phantom, we selected protons with small scattering angles. A good quality proton radiography image, in which various materials can be recognized accurately, and in combination with xCT can lead to more accurate relative stopping powers predictions.

  5. SU-E-T-595: Design of a Graphical User Interface for An In-House Monte Carlo Based Treatment Planning System: Planning and Contouring Tools

    SciTech Connect

    EMAM, M; Eldib, A; Lin, M; Li, J; Chibani, O; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: An in-house Monte Carlo based treatment planning system (MC TPS) has been developed for modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT). Our preliminary MERT planning experience called for a more user friendly graphical user interface. The current work aimed to design graphical windows and tools to facilitate the contouring and planning process. Methods: Our In-house GUI MC TPS is built on a set of EGS4 user codes namely MCPLAN and MCBEAM in addition to an in-house optimization code, which was named as MCOPTIM. Patient virtual phantom is constructed using the tomographic images in DICOM format exported from clinical treatment planning systems (TPS). Treatment target volumes and critical structures were usually contoured on clinical TPS and then sent as a structure set file. In our GUI program we developed a visualization tool to allow the planner to visualize the DICOM images and delineate the various structures. We implemented an option in our code for automatic contouring of the patient body and lungs. We also created an interface window displaying a three dimensional representation of the target and also showing a graphical representation of the treatment beams. Results: The new GUI features helped streamline the planning process. The implemented contouring option eliminated the need for performing this step on clinical TPS. The auto detection option for contouring the outer patient body and lungs was tested on patient CTs and it was shown to be accurate as compared to that of clinical TPS. The three dimensional representation of the target and the beams allows better selection of the gantry, collimator and couch angles. Conclusion: An in-house GUI program has been developed for more efficient MERT planning. The application of aiding tools implemented in the program is time saving and gives better control of the planning process.

  6. Reducing the Need for Accurate Stream Flow Forecasting for Water Supply Planning by Augmenting Reservoir Operations with Seawater Desalination and Wastewater Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, R.; Ng, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate stream flow forecasts are critical for reservoir operations for water supply planning. As the world urban population increases, the demand for water in cities is also increasing, making accurate forecasts even more important. However, accurate forecasting of stream flows is difficult owing to short- and long-term weather variations. We propose to reduce this need for accurate stream flow forecasts by augmenting reservoir operations with seawater desalination and wastewater recycling. We develop a robust operating policy for the joint operation of the three sources. With the joint model, we tap into the unlimited reserve of seawater through desalination, and make use of local supplies of wastewater through recycling. However, both seawater desalination and recycling are energy intensive and relatively expensive. Reservoir water on the other hand, is generally cheaper but is limited and variable in its availability, increasing the risk of water shortage during extreme climate events. We operate the joint system by optimizing it using a genetic algorithm to maximize water supply reliability and resilience while minimizing vulnerability subject to a budget constraint and for a given stream flow forecast. To compute the total cost of the system, we take into account the pumping cost of transporting reservoir water to its final destination, and the capital and operating costs of desalinating seawater and recycling wastewater. We produce results for different hydro climatic regions based on artificial stream flows we generate using a simple hydrological model and an autoregressive time series model. The artificial flows are generated from precipitation and temperature data from the Canadian Regional Climate model for present and future scenarios. We observe that the joint operation is able to effectively minimize the negative effects of stream flow forecast uncertainty on system performance at an overall cost that is not significantly greater than the cost of a

  7. SU-C-17A-07: The Development of An MR Accelerator-Enabled Planning-To-Delivery Technique for Stereotactic Palliative Radiotherapy Treatment of Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogcarspel, S J; Kontaxis, C; Velden, J M van der; Bol, G H; Vulpen, M van; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an MR accelerator-enabled online planning-todelivery technique for stereotactic palliative radiotherapy treatment of spinal metastases. The technical challenges include; automated stereotactic treatment planning, online MR-based dose calculation and MR guidance during treatment. Methods: Using the CT data of 20 patients previously treated at our institution, a class solution for automated treatment planning for spinal bone metastases was created. For accurate dose simulation right before treatment, we fused geometrically correct online MR data with pretreatment CT data of the target volume (TV). For target tracking during treatment, a dynamic T2-weighted TSE MR sequence was developed. An in house developed GPU based IMRT optimization and dose calculation algorithm was used for fast treatment planning and simulation. An automatically generated treatment plan developed with this treatment planning system was irradiated on a clinical 6 MV linear accelerator and evaluated using a Delta4 dosimeter. Results: The automated treatment planning method yielded clinically viable plans for all patients. The MR-CT fusion based dose calculation accuracy was within 2% as compared to calculations performed with original CT data. The dynamic T2-weighted TSE MR Sequence was able to provide an update of the anatomical location of the TV every 10 seconds. Dose calculation and optimization of the automatically generated treatment plans using only one GPU took on average 8 minutes. The Delta4 measurement of the irradiated plan agreed with the dose calculation with a 3%/3mm gamma pass rate of 86.4%. Conclusions: The development of an MR accelerator-enabled planning-todelivery technique for stereotactic palliative radiotherapy treatment of spinal metastases was presented. Future work will involve developing an intrafraction motion adaptation strategy, MR-only dose calculation, radiotherapy quality-assurance in a magnetic field, and streamlining the entire treatment

  8. IMRT treatment plans and functional planning with functional lung imaging from 4D-CT for thoracic cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Currently, the inhomogeneity of the pulmonary function is not considered when treatment plans are generated in thoracic cancer radiotherapy. This study evaluates the dose of treatment plans on highly-functional volumes and performs functional treatment planning by incorporation of ventilation data from 4D-CT. Materials and methods Eleven patients were included in this retrospective study. Ventilation was calculated using 4D-CT. Two treatment plans were generated for each case, the first one without the incorporation of the ventilation and the second with it. The dose of the first plans was overlapped with the ventilation and analyzed. Highly-functional regions were avoided in the second treatment plans. Results For small targets in the first plans (PTV < 400 cc, 6 cases), all V5, V20 and the mean lung dose values for the highly-functional regions were lower than that of the total lung. For large targets, two out of five cases had higher V5 and V20 values for the highly-functional regions. All the second plans were within constraints. Conclusion Radiation treatments affect functional lung more seriously in large tumor cases. With compromise of dose to other critical organs, functional treatment planning to reduce dose in highly-functional lung volumes can be achieved PMID:23281734

  9. SU-F-BRD-07: Fast Monte Carlo-Based Biological Optimization of Proton Therapy Treatment Plans for Thyroid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Chan Tseung, H; Ma, J; Ma, D; Beltran, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of fast Monte Carlo (MC) based biological planning for the treatment of thyroid tumors in spot-scanning proton therapy. Methods: Recently, we developed a fast and accurate GPU-based MC simulation of proton transport that was benchmarked against Geant4.9.6 and used as the dose calculation engine in a clinically-applicable GPU-accelerated IMPT optimizer. Besides dose, it can simultaneously score the dose-averaged LET (LETd), which makes fast biological dose (BD) estimates possible. To convert from LETd to BD, we used a linear relation based on cellular irradiation data. Given a thyroid patient with a 93cc tumor volume, we created a 2-field IMPT plan in Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems). This plan was re-calculated with our MC to obtain the BD distribution. A second 5-field plan was made with our in-house optimizer, using pre-generated MC dose and LETd maps. Constraints were placed to maintain the target dose to within 25% of the prescription, while maximizing the BD. The plan optimization and calculation of dose and LETd maps were performed on a GPU cluster. The conventional IMPT and biologically-optimized plans were compared. Results: The mean target physical and biological doses from our biologically-optimized plan were, respectively, 5% and 14% higher than those from the MC re-calculation of the IMPT plan. Dose sparing to critical structures in our plan was also improved. The biological optimization, including the initial dose and LETd map calculations, can be completed in a clinically viable time (∼30 minutes) on a cluster of 25 GPUs. Conclusion: Taking advantage of GPU acceleration, we created a MC-based, biologically optimized treatment plan for a thyroid patient. Compared to a standard IMPT plan, a 5% increase in the target’s physical dose resulted in ∼3 times as much increase in the BD. Biological planning was thus effective in escalating the target BD.

  10. AutoLock: a semiautomated system for radiotherapy treatment plan quality control.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, Joseph M; Lowe, Matthew; Hardy, Mark J; Boylan, Christopher J; Whitehurst, Philip; Rowbottom, Carl G

    2015-05-08

    A semiautomated system for radiotherapy treatment plan quality control (QC), named AutoLock, is presented. AutoLock is designed to augment treatment plan QC by automatically checking aspects of treatment plans that are well suited to computational evaluation, whilst summarizing more subjective aspects in the form of a checklist. The treatment plan must pass all automated checks and all checklist items must be acknowledged by the planner as correct before the plan is finalized. Thus AutoLock uniquely integrates automated treatment plan QC, an electronic checklist, and plan finalization. In addition to reducing the potential for the propagation of errors, the integration of AutoLock into the plan finalization workflow has improved efficiency at our center. Detailed audit data are presented, demonstrating that the treatment plan QC rejection rate fell by around a third following the clinical introduction of AutoLock.

  11. Glioblastoma Multiforme: The Genetic Perspective of the Treatment Planning.

    PubMed

    Kalkan, Rasime

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is divided into two distinct disease entities called primary and secondary GBM. The genetic and the epigenetic background of these tumors are highly variable. These tumors are not successfully treated because of their cellular heterogeneity and intrinsic ability of the tumor cells to invade healthy tissues. The fatal outcomes of these tumors promote researchers to find new markers associated with prognosis and treatment planning. A better understanding of stem-like cells and the genetic and the epigenetic background of GBM are necessary for designing new effective treatments and developing novel molecular strategies to target tumor cells and glioblastoma stem cells. In this review, we discuss the new therapeutic targets. Focusing on inhibiting the signaling pathways, which are associated with hypoxia-mediated maintenance of glioblastoma stem cells or the knockdown of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF1α), may help to the develop new target-specific treatments.

  12. Hemangiomas of the maxillofacial area: Case Report, Classification and Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Cortese, Antonio; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; D’Alessio, Giuseppe; Garzi, Alfredo; Amato, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the maxillofacial area are even more challenging than in other different body district, because of the high aesthetic and functional relevance of this area for the sense organs presence like eye, brain, tongue, ear and nose. For these reasons, we propose an accurate classification based on hemodynamic and histologic aspects usefulthat is for diagnostic and therapeutic planning. A female, 60 years old patient came to our observation showing a vascular lesion of the lower left lip, and complaining for aesthetical and functional impairment. To confirm the diagnosis of vascular malformation and to detect lesion flow rate or other possible localization, a Tc red blood cell scintigraphy was carried out. Result was a venous low flow lesion; hence, sclerotherapy by a 3% Polidocanol solution (Atossisclerol) followed by surgery was planned. The aim of this work was to propose a diagnostic and therapeutic scheme with an integration of ISSVA and a flow rate classifications for a three-step planning based on 1) the biological findings in an early age at the lesion discover with a pharmacological treatment; 2) Hemodynamic study of the lesions at growing age followed by sclerotherapy or embolization; 3) Imaging study of these lesions for patients candidate to surgery when after step 1 and step 2 diagnostic and therapeutic planning results were incompletely successful. PMID:28352749

  13. An active set algorithm for treatment planning optimization.

    PubMed

    Hristov, D H; Fallone, B G

    1997-09-01

    An active set algorithm for optimization of radiation therapy dose planning by intensity modulated beams has been developed. The algorithm employs a conjugate-gradient routine for subspace minimization in order to achieve a higher rate of convergence than the widely used constrained steepest-descent method at the expense of a negligible amount of overhead calculations. The performance of the new algorithm has been compared to that of the constrained steepest-descent method for various treatment geometries and two different objectives. The active set algorithm is found to be superior to the constrained steepest descent, both in terms of its convergence properties and the residual value of the cost functions at termination. Its use can significantly accelerate the design of conformal plans with intensity modulated beams by decreasing the number of time-consuming dose calculations.

  14. Developing an open platform for evidence-based microwave ablation treatment planning and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshazer, Garron; Dupuy, Damian E.; Walsh, Edward; Prakash, Punit; Fairchild, Dillon; Glidden, David; Collins, Scott A.; Cook, Madeleine L.; Ryan, Thomas P.; Merck, Derek

    2015-03-01

    The clinical utility of current thermal ablation planning tools is severely limited by treatment variability. We discuss the development of an open platform for evidence-based thermal ablation treatment planning and validation. Improved predictive treatment modeling and consistent outcome analysis are crucial components for useful planning and guidance tools.

  15. Planning and executing a lampricide treatment of the St. Marys River using georeferenced data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fodale, Michael F.; Bergstedt, Roger A.; Cuddy, Douglas W.; Adams, Jean V.; Stolyarenko, Dimitri A.

    2003-01-01

    The St. Marys River is believed to be the primary source of sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) in Lake Huron. Planning or evaluating lampricide treatments required knowing where lampricides could effectively be placed and where larvae were located. Accurate maps of larval density were therefore critical to formulating or evaluating management strategies using lampricides. Larval abundance was systematically assessed with a deepwater electrofishing device at 12,000 georeferenced locations during 1993 to 1996. Maps were produced from catches at those locations, providing georeferenced detail previously unavailable. Catches were processed with a geographic information system (GIS), to create a map of larval density. Whole-river treatment scenarios using TFM (3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol) were evaluated by combining the map with one of lethal conditions predicted by a lampricide-transport model. The map was also used to evaluate spot treatment scenarios with a granular, bottom-release formulation of another lampricide, Bayluscide (2',5-dichloro-4'-nitro-salicylanilide). Potential high-density plots for Bayluscide treatment were selected from the map and estimates of area, cost, and larval population were developed using the GIS. Plots were ranked by the cost per larva killed. Spot treatments were found to be more cost effective than a conventional TFM treatment and Bayluscide was applied to 82 ha in 1998 and 759 ha in 1999. Effectiveness was estimated with stratified-random sampling before and after treatment in 1999 at 35%. Ten percent already had been removed in 1998, for a total reduction of 45% percent. This marked a change in how research and planning were combined in sea lamprey management to minimize treatment costs and evaluate success.

  16. Dosimetric comparisons of helical tomotherapy treatment plans and step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiosurgery treatment plans in intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Han Chunhui . E-mail: chan@coh.org; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Pezner, Richard D.; Chen Yijen; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dose conformity, dose homogeneity, and dose gradient in helical tomotherapy treatment plans for stereotactic radiosurgery, and compare results with step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) treatment plans. Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients were selected with a mean tumor size of 14.65 {+-} 11.2 cm{sup 3}. Original step-and-shoot IMRS treatment plans used coplanar fields because of the constraint of the beam stopper. Retrospective step-and-shoot IMRS plans were generated using noncoplanar fields. Helical tomotherapy treatment plans were generated using the tomotherapy planning station. Dose conformity index, dose gradient score index, and homogeneity index were used in plan intercomparisons. Results: Noncoplanar IMRS plans increased dose conformity and dose gradient, but not dose homogeneity, compared with coplanar IMRS plans. Tomotherapy plans increased dose conformity and dose gradient, yet increased dose heterogeneity compared with noncoplanar IMRS plans. The average dose conformity index values were 1.53 {+-} 0.38, 1.35 {+-} 0.15, and 1.26 {+-} 0.10 in coplanar IMRS, noncoplanar IMRS, and tomotherapy plans, respectively. The average dose homogeneity index values were 1.15 {+-} 0.05, 1.13 {+-} 0.04, and 1.18 {+-} 0.09 in coplanar IMRS, noncoplanar IMRS, and tomotherapy plans, respectively. The mean dose gradient score index values were 1.37 {+-} 19.08, 22.32 {+-} 19.20, and 43.28 {+-} 13.78 in coplanar IMRS, noncoplanar IMRS, and tomotherapy plans, respectively. The mean treatment time in tomotherapy was 42 {+-} 16 min. Conclusions: We were able to achieve better dose conformity and dose gradient in tomotherapy plans compared with step-and-shoot IMRS plans for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery. However, tomotherapy treatment time was significantly larger than that in step-and-shoot IMRS.

  17. Development and clinical introduction of automated radiotherapy treatment planning for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkel, D.; Bol, G. H.; van Asselen, B.; Hes, J.; Scholten, V.; Kerkmeijer, L. G. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2016-12-01

    To develop an automated radiotherapy treatment planning and optimization workflow to efficiently create patient specifically optimized clinical grade treatment plans for prostate cancer and to implement it in clinical practice. A two-phased planning and optimization workflow was developed to automatically generate 77Gy 5-field simultaneously integrated boost intensity modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT) plans for prostate cancer treatment. A retrospective planning study (n  =  100) was performed in which automatically and manually generated treatment plans were compared. A clinical pilot (n  =  21) was performed to investigate the usability of our method. Operator time for the planning process was reduced to  <5 min. The retrospective planning study showed that 98 plans met all clinical constraints. Significant improvements were made in the volume receiving 72Gy (V72Gy) for the bladder and rectum and the mean dose of the bladder and the body. A reduced plan variance was observed. During the clinical pilot 20 automatically generated plans met all constraints and 17 plans were selected for treatment. The automated radiotherapy treatment planning and optimization workflow is capable of efficiently generating patient specifically optimized and improved clinical grade plans. It has now been adopted as the current standard workflow in our clinic to generate treatment plans for prostate cancer.

  18. PREFACE: First European Workshop on Monte Carlo Treatment Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynaert, Nick

    2007-07-01

    The "First European Workshop on Monte Carlo treatment planning", was an initiative of the European working group on Monte Carlo treatment planning (EWG-MCTP). It was organised at Ghent University (Belgium) on 22-25October 2006. The meeting was very successful and was attended by 150 participants. The impressive list of invited speakers and the scientific contributions (posters and oral presentations) have led to a very interesting program, that was well appreciated by all attendants. In addition, the presence of seven vendors of commercial MCTP software systems provided serious added value to the workshop. For each vendor, a representative has given a presentation in a dedicated session, explaining the current status of their system. It is clear that, for "traditional" radiotherapy applications (using photon or electron beams), Monte Carlo dose calculations have become the state of the art, and are being introduced into almost all commercial treatment planning systems. Invited lectures illustrated that scientific challenges are currently associated with 4D applications (e.g. respiratory motion) and the introduction of MC dose calculations in inverse planning. But it was striking that the Monte Carlo technique is also becoming very important in more novel treatment modalities such as BNCT, hadron therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, Tomotherapy, etc. This emphasizes the continuous growing interest in MCTP. The people who attended the dosimetry session will certainly remember the high level discussion on the determination of correction factors for different ion chambers, used in small fields. The following proceedings will certainly confirm the high scientific level of the meeting. I would like to thank the members of the local organizing committee for all the hard work done before, during and after this meeting. The organisation of such an event is not a trivial task and it would not have been possible without the help of all my colleagues. I would also like to thank

  19. Current state of the art brachytherapy treatment planning dosimetry algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Pantelis, E; Karaiskos, P

    2014-01-01

    Following literature contributions delineating the deficiencies introduced by the approximations of conventional brachytherapy dosimetry, different model-based dosimetry algorithms have been incorporated into commercial systems for 192Ir brachytherapy treatment planning. The calculation settings of these algorithms are pre-configured according to criteria established by their developers for optimizing computation speed vs accuracy. Their clinical use is hence straightforward. A basic understanding of these algorithms and their limitations is essential, however, for commissioning; detecting differences from conventional algorithms; explaining their origin; assessing their impact; and maintaining global uniformity of clinical practice. PMID:25027247

  20. Treatment planning in the radiation therapy of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vaeth, J.M.; Meyer, J.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides an overview of aspects involved in the most advanced radiotherapy techniques, and examines in detail their application in planning and delivering optimal treatments in a large number of different forms of cancer. Coverage is given to squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, carcinoma of the lung, breast cancer, cancers of the genitourinary system, tumors of the central nervous system, cancer of the esophagus, pancreas, stomach and rectum, soft tissue sarcomas, pediatric radiotherapy, Hodgkin's disease, and finally non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. A general discussion concludes the text.

  1. SU-E-T-268: Differences in Treatment Plan Quality and Delivery Between Two Commercial Treatment Planning Systems for Volumetric Arc-Based Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S; Zhang, H; Zhang, B; D’Souza, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To clinically evaluate the differences in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plan and delivery between two commercial treatment planning systems. Methods: Two commercial VMAT treatment planning systems with different VMAT optimization algorithms and delivery approaches were evaluated. This study included 16 clinical VMAT plans performed with the first system: 2 spine, 4 head and neck (HN), 2 brain, 4 pancreas, and 4 pelvis plans. These 16 plans were then re-optimized with the same number of arcs using the second treatment planning system. Planning goals were invariant between the two systems. Gantry speed, dose rate modulation, MLC modulation, plan quality, number of monitor units (MUs), VMAT quality assurance (QA) results, and treatment delivery time were compared between the 2 systems. VMAT QA results were performed using Mapcheck2 and analyzed with gamma analysis (3mm/3% and 2mm/2%). Results: Similar plan quality was achieved with each VMAT optimization algorithm, and the difference in delivery time was minimal. Algorithm 1 achieved planning goals by highly modulating the MLC (total distance traveled by leaves (TL) = 193 cm average over control points per plan), while maintaining a relatively constant dose rate (dose-rate change <100 MU/min). Algorithm 2 involved less MLC modulation (TL = 143 cm per plan), but greater dose-rate modulation (range = 0-600 MU/min). The average number of MUs was 20% less for algorithm 2 (ratio of MUs for algorithms 2 and 1 ranged from 0.5-1). VMAT QA results were similar for all disease sites except HN plans. For HN plans, the average gamma passing rates were 88.5% (2mm/2%) and 96.9% (3mm/3%) for algorithm 1 and 97.9% (2mm/2%) and 99.6% (3mm/3%) for algorithm 2. Conclusion: Both VMAT optimization algorithms achieved comparable plan quality; however, fewer MUs were needed and QA results were more robust for Algorithm 2, which more highly modulated dose rate.

  2. Skin mechanics measured in vivo using torsion: a new and accurate model more sensitive to age, sex and moisturizing treatment.

    PubMed

    Salter, D C; McArthur, H C; Crosse, J E; Dickens, A D

    1993-10-01

    Summary Measurements of skin mechanics are required to understand better cracking and flaking of the epidermis and loss of 'elasticity'with age in the dermis. Improvements in torsional testing are described here. The resulting data was fitted to algebraic models, the parameters of which can serve both as a concise description of the responses and as a means of relating them to skin structure and physiology. This investigation looks into the suitability of seven such algebraic models. Five of the models examined here appear to be new. Using the commercially available Dia-Stron DTM Torque Meter with our own software, model parameters were studied as indicators of the effects of age and sex in 41 people, and of skin moisturizing treatments in a further 10 people. The two models in the literature were both found to be substantially less accurate and sensitive representations of experimental data than one of the new models proposed here based on the Weibull distribution. This 'WB model'was consistently the one best able to distinguish differences and detect changes which were statistically significant. The WB model appears to be the most powerful and efficient available. Use of this model makes it possible to demonstrate in vivo a statistically significant mechanical difference between male and pre-menopausal female skin using only one parameter (p= 0.0163, with 18 males and 19 females) and to demonstrate a statistically significant mechanical difference between successive decades of age in female skin using only one parameter (p= 0.0124, n= 24). The two parameters of the model most sensitive to skin structure, function and treatment have been combined to form the axes of a 'Skin condition chart'. Any person can be located on this chart at a point indicating their overall skin condition in mechanical terms and any changes in that condition can be clearly demonstrated by movement across the plot.

  3. Sampling and Analysis Plan Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project.

    SciTech Connect

    Brouns, Thomas M.

    2007-07-15

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) describes planned data collection activities for four entry boreholes through the sediment overlying the Saddle Mountains Basalt, up to three new deep rotary boreholes through the Saddle Mountains Basalt and sedimentary interbeds, and one corehole through the Saddle Mountains Basalt and sedimentary interbeds at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The SAP will be used in concert with the quality assurance plan for the project to guide the procedure development and data collection activities needed to support borehole drilling, geophysical measurements, and sampling. This SAP identifies the American Society of Testing Materials standards, Hanford Site procedures, and other guidance to be followed for data collection activities. Revision 3 incorporates all interim change notices (ICN) that were issued to Revision 2 prior to completion of sampling and analysis activities for the WTP Seismic Boreholes Project. This revision also incorporates changes to the exact number of samples submitted for dynamic testing as directed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Revision 3 represents the final version of the SAP.

  4. A strategic plan to accelerate development of acute stroke treatments.

    PubMed

    Marler, John R

    2012-09-01

    In order to reenergize acute stroke research and accelerate the development of new treatments, we need to transform the usual design and conduct of clinical trials to test for small but significant improvements in effectiveness, and treat patients as soon as possible after stroke onset when treatment effects are most detectable. This requires trials that include thousands of acute stroke patients. A plan to make these trials possible is proposed. There are four components: (1) free access to the electronic medical record; (2) a large stroke emergency network and clinical trial coordinating center connected in real time to hundreds of emergency departments; (3) a clinical trial technology development center; and (4) strategic leadership to raise funds, motivate clinicians to participate, and interact with politicians, insurers, legislators, and other national and international organizations working to advance the quality of stroke care.

  5. Treatment planning for radiotherapy with very high-energy electron beams and comparison of VHEE and VMAT plans

    SciTech Connect

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Qu, Bradley; Palma, Bianey; Jensen, Christopher; Maxim, Peter G. E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu; Loo, Billy W. E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu; Hårdemark, Björn; Hynning, Elin

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to develop a treatment planning workflow for rapid radiotherapy delivered with very high-energy electron (VHEE) scanning pencil beams of 60–120 MeV and to study VHEE plans as a function of VHEE treatment parameters. Additionally, VHEE plans were compared to clinical state-of-the-art volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) photon plans for three cases. Methods: VHEE radiotherapy treatment planning was performed by linking EGSnrc Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations with inverse treatment planning in a research version of RayStation. In order to study the effect of VHEE treatment parameters on VHEE dose distributions, a MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI) for calculation of VHEE MC pencil beam doses was developed. Through the GUI, pediatric case MC simulations were run for a number of beam energies (60, 80, 100, and 120 MeV), number of beams (13, 17, and 36), pencil beam spot (0.1, 1.0, and 3.0 mm) and grid (2.0, 2.5, and 3.5 mm) sizes, and source-to-axis distance, SAD (40 and 50 cm). VHEE plans for the pediatric case calculated with the different treatment parameters were optimized and compared. Furthermore, 100 MeV VHEE plans for the pediatric case, a lung, and a prostate case were calculated and compared to the clinically delivered VMAT plans. All plans were normalized such that the 100% isodose line covered 95% of the target volume. Results: VHEE beam energy had the largest effect on the quality of dose distributions of the pediatric case. For the same target dose, the mean doses to organs at risk (OARs) decreased by 5%–16% when planned with 100 MeV compared to 60 MeV, but there was no further improvement in the 120 MeV plan. VHEE plans calculated with 36 beams outperformed plans calculated with 13 and 17 beams, but to a more modest degree (<8%). While pencil beam spacing and SAD had a small effect on VHEE dose distributions, 0.1–3 mm pencil beam sizes resulted in identical dose distributions. For the 100 MeV VHEE pediatric

  6. SU-D-BRD-01: Cloud-Based Radiation Treatment Planning: Performance Evaluation of Dose Calculation and Plan Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Y; Kapp, D; Kim, Y; Xing, L; Suh, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To report the first experience on the development of a cloud-based treatment planning system and investigate the performance improvement of dose calculation and treatment plan optimization of the cloud computing platform. Methods: A cloud computing-based radiation treatment planning system (cc-TPS) was developed for clinical treatment planning. Three de-identified clinical head and neck, lung, and prostate cases were used to evaluate the cloud computing platform. The de-identified clinical data were encrypted with 256-bit Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) algorithm. VMAT and IMRT plans were generated for the three de-identified clinical cases to determine the quality of the treatment plans and computational efficiency. All plans generated from the cc-TPS were compared to those obtained with the PC-based TPS (pc-TPS). The performance evaluation of the cc-TPS was quantified as the speedup factors for Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations and large-scale plan optimizations, as well as the performance ratios (PRs) of the amount of performance improvement compared to the pc-TPS. Results: Speedup factors were improved up to 14.0-fold dependent on the clinical cases and plan types. The computation times for VMAT and IMRT plans with the cc-TPS were reduced by 91.1% and 89.4%, respectively, on average of the clinical cases compared to those with pc-TPS. The PRs were mostly better for VMAT plans (1.0 ≤ PRs ≤ 10.6 for the head and neck case, 1.2 ≤ PRs ≤ 13.3 for lung case, and 1.0 ≤ PRs ≤ 10.3 for prostate cancer cases) than for IMRT plans. The isodose curves of plans on both cc-TPS and pc-TPS were identical for each of the clinical cases. Conclusion: A cloud-based treatment planning has been setup and our results demonstrate the computation efficiency of treatment planning with the cc-TPS can be dramatically improved while maintaining the same plan quality to that obtained with the pc-TPS. This work was supported in part by the National Cancer Institute (1

  7. Integrated Waste Treatment Unit GFSI Risk Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    W. A. Owca

    2007-06-21

    This GFSI Risk Management Plan (RMP) describes the strategy for assessing and managing project risks for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) that are specifically within the control and purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and identifies the risks that formed the basis for the DOE contingency included in the performance baseline. DOE-held contingency is required to cover cost and schedule impacts of DOE activities. Prior to approval of the performance baseline (Critical Decision-2) project cost contingency was evaluated during a joint meeting of the Contractor Management Team and the Integrated Project Team for both contractor and DOE risks to schedule and cost. At that time, the contractor cost and schedule risk value was $41.3M and the DOE cost and schedule risk contingency value is $39.0M. The contractor cost and schedule risk value of $41.3M was retained in the performance baseline as the contractor's management reserve for risk contingency. The DOE cost and schedule risk value of $39.0M has been retained in the performance baseline as the DOE Contingency. The performance baseline for the project was approved in December 2006 (Garman 2006). The project will continue to manage to the performance baseline and change control thresholds identified in PLN-1963, ''Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Project Execution Plan'' (PEP).

  8. Development and validation of a treatment planning model for magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stigliano, Robert Vincent

    The use of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) to induce local hyperthermia has been emerging in recent years as a promising cancer therapy, in both a stand-alone and combination treatment setting, including surgery radiation and chemotherapy. The mNP solution can be injected either directly into the tumor, or administered intravenously. Studies have shown that some cancer cells associate with, internalize, and aggregate mNPs more preferentially than normal cells, with and without antibody targeting. Once the mNPs are delivered inside the cells, a low frequency (30-300kHz) alternating electromagnetic field is used to activate the mNPs. The nanoparticles absorb the applied field and provide localized heat generation at nano-micron scales. Treatment planning models have been shown to improve treatment efficacy in radiation therapy by limiting normal tissue damage while maximizing dose to the tumor. To date, there does not exist a clinical treatment planning model for magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia which is robust, validated, and commercially available. The focus of this research is on the development and experimental validation of a treatment planning model, consisting of a coupled electromagnetic and thermal model that predicts dynamic thermal distributions during treatment. When allowed to incubate, the mNPs are often sequestered by cancer cells and packed into endosomes. The proximity of the mNPs has a strong influence on their ability to heat due to interparticle magnetic interaction effects. A model of mNP heating which takes into account the effects of magnetic interaction was developed, and validated against experimental data. An animal study in mice was conducted to determine the effects of mNP solution injection duration and PEGylation on macroscale mNP distribution within the tumor, in order to further inform the treatment planning model and future experimental technique. In clinical applications, a critical limiting factor for the maximum applied field is

  9. Coverage-based treatment planning to accommodate delineation uncertainties in prostate cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huijun; Gordon, J. James; Siebers, Jeffrey V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare two coverage-based planning (CP) techniques with fixed margin-based (FM) planning for high-risk prostate cancer treatments, with the exclusive consideration of the dosimetric impact of delineation uncertainties of target structures and normal tissues. Methods: In this work, 19-patient data sets were involved. To estimate structure dose for each delineated contour under the influence of interobserver contour variability and CT image quality limitations, 1000 alternative structures were simulated by an average-surface-of-standard-deviation model, which utilized the patient-specific information of delineated structure and CT image contrast. An IMRT plan with zero planning-target-volume (PTV) margin on the delineated prostate and seminal vesicles [clinical-target-volume (CTVprostate) and CTVSV] was created and dose degradation due to contour variability was quantified by the dosimetric consequences of 1000 alternative structures. When D98 failed to achieve a 95% coverage probability objective D98,95 ≥ 78 Gy (CTVprostate) or D98,95 ≥ 66 Gy (CTVSV), replanning was performed using three planning techniques: (1) FM (PTVprostate margin = 4,5,6 mm and PTVSV margin = 4,5,7 mm for RL, PA, and SI directions, respectively), (2) CPOM which optimized uniform PTV margins for CTVprostate and CTVSV to meet the D98,95 objectives, and (3) CPCOP which directly optimized coverage-based objectives for all the structures. These plans were intercompared by computing percentile dose-volume histograms and tumor-control probability/normal tissue complication probability (TCP/NTCP) distributions. Results: Inherent contour variability resulted in unacceptable CTV coverage for the zero-PTV-margin plans for all patients. For plans designed to accommodate contour variability, 18/19 CP plans were most favored by achieving desirable D98,95 and TCP/NTCP values. The average improvement of probability of complication free control was 9.3% for CPCOP plans and 3.4% for CPOM plans

  10. A DVH-guided IMRT optimization algorithm for automatic treatment planning and adaptive radiotherapy replanning

    SciTech Connect

    Zarepisheh, Masoud; Li, Nan; Long, Troy; Romeijn, H. Edwin; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel algorithm that incorporates prior treatment knowledge into intensity modulated radiation therapy optimization to facilitate automatic treatment planning and adaptive radiotherapy (ART) replanning. Methods: The algorithm automatically creates a treatment plan guided by the DVH curves of a reference plan that contains information on the clinician-approved dose-volume trade-offs among different targets/organs and among different portions of a DVH curve for an organ. In ART, the reference plan is the initial plan for the same patient, while for automatic treatment planning the reference plan is selected from a library of clinically approved and delivered plans of previously treated patients with similar medical conditions and geometry. The proposed algorithm employs a voxel-based optimization model and navigates the large voxel-based Pareto surface. The voxel weights are iteratively adjusted to approach a plan that is similar to the reference plan in terms of the DVHs. If the reference plan is feasible but not Pareto optimal, the algorithm generates a Pareto optimal plan with the DVHs better than the reference ones. If the reference plan is too restricting for the new geometry, the algorithm generates a Pareto plan with DVHs close to the reference ones. In both cases, the new plans have similar DVH trade-offs as the reference plans. Results: The algorithm was tested using three patient cases and found to be able to automatically adjust the voxel-weighting factors in order to generate a Pareto plan with similar DVH trade-offs as the reference plan. The algorithm has also been implemented on a GPU for high efficiency. Conclusions: A novel prior-knowledge-based optimization algorithm has been developed that automatically adjust the voxel weights and generate a clinical optimal plan at high efficiency. It is found that the new algorithm can significantly improve the plan quality and planning efficiency in ART replanning and automatic treatment

  11. MO-B-BRB-02: Maintain the Quality of Treatment Planning for Time-Constraint Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.

    2015-06-15

    The radiotherapy treatment planning process has evolved over the years with innovations in treatment planning, treatment delivery and imaging systems. Treatment modality and simulation technologies are also rapidly improving and affecting the planning process. For example, Image-guided-radiation-therapy has been widely adopted for patient setup, leading to margin reduction and isocenter repositioning after simulation. Stereotactic Body radiation therapy (SBRT) and Radiosurgery (SRS) have gradually become the standard of care for many treatment sites, which demand a higher throughput for the treatment plans even if the number of treatments per day remains the same. Finally, simulation, planning and treatment are traditionally sequential events. However, with emerging adaptive radiotherapy, they are becoming more tightly intertwined, leading to iterative processes. Enhanced efficiency of planning is therefore becoming more critical and poses serious challenge to the treatment planning process; Lean Six Sigma approaches are being utilized increasingly to balance the competing needs for speed and quality. In this symposium we will discuss the treatment planning process and illustrate effective techniques for managing workflow. Topics will include: Planning techniques: (a) beam placement, (b) dose optimization, (c) plan evaluation (d) export to RVS. Planning workflow: (a) import images, (b) Image fusion, (c) contouring, (d) plan approval (e) plan check (f) chart check, (g) sequential and iterative process Influence of upstream and downstream operations: (a) simulation, (b) immobilization, (c) motion management, (d) QA, (e) IGRT, (f) Treatment delivery, (g) SBRT/SRS (h) adaptive planning Reduction of delay between planning steps with Lean systems due to (a) communication, (b) limited resource, (b) contour, (c) plan approval, (d) treatment. Optimizing planning processes: (a) contour validation (b) consistent planning protocol, (c) protocol/template sharing, (d) semi

  12. MO-B-BRB-01: Optimize Treatment Planning Process in Clinical Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, W.

    2015-06-15

    The radiotherapy treatment planning process has evolved over the years with innovations in treatment planning, treatment delivery and imaging systems. Treatment modality and simulation technologies are also rapidly improving and affecting the planning process. For example, Image-guided-radiation-therapy has been widely adopted for patient setup, leading to margin reduction and isocenter repositioning after simulation. Stereotactic Body radiation therapy (SBRT) and Radiosurgery (SRS) have gradually become the standard of care for many treatment sites, which demand a higher throughput for the treatment plans even if the number of treatments per day remains the same. Finally, simulation, planning and treatment are traditionally sequential events. However, with emerging adaptive radiotherapy, they are becoming more tightly intertwined, leading to iterative processes. Enhanced efficiency of planning is therefore becoming more critical and poses serious challenge to the treatment planning process; Lean Six Sigma approaches are being utilized increasingly to balance the competing needs for speed and quality. In this symposium we will discuss the treatment planning process and illustrate effective techniques for managing workflow. Topics will include: Planning techniques: (a) beam placement, (b) dose optimization, (c) plan evaluation (d) export to RVS. Planning workflow: (a) import images, (b) Image fusion, (c) contouring, (d) plan approval (e) plan check (f) chart check, (g) sequential and iterative process Influence of upstream and downstream operations: (a) simulation, (b) immobilization, (c) motion management, (d) QA, (e) IGRT, (f) Treatment delivery, (g) SBRT/SRS (h) adaptive planning Reduction of delay between planning steps with Lean systems due to (a) communication, (b) limited resource, (b) contour, (c) plan approval, (d) treatment. Optimizing planning processes: (a) contour validation (b) consistent planning protocol, (c) protocol/template sharing, (d) semi

  13. MO-B-BRB-03: Systems Engineering Tools for Treatment Planning Process Optimization in Radiation Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Kapur, A.

    2015-06-15

    The radiotherapy treatment planning process has evolved over the years with innovations in treatment planning, treatment delivery and imaging systems. Treatment modality and simulation technologies are also rapidly improving and affecting the planning process. For example, Image-guided-radiation-therapy has been widely adopted for patient setup, leading to margin reduction and isocenter repositioning after simulation. Stereotactic Body radiation therapy (SBRT) and Radiosurgery (SRS) have gradually become the standard of care for many treatment sites, which demand a higher throughput for the treatment plans even if the number of treatments per day remains the same. Finally, simulation, planning and treatment are traditionally sequential events. However, with emerging adaptive radiotherapy, they are becoming more tightly intertwined, leading to iterative processes. Enhanced efficiency of planning is therefore becoming more critical and poses serious challenge to the treatment planning process; Lean Six Sigma approaches are being utilized increasingly to balance the competing needs for speed and quality. In this symposium we will discuss the treatment planning process and illustrate effective techniques for managing workflow. Topics will include: Planning techniques: (a) beam placement, (b) dose optimization, (c) plan evaluation (d) export to RVS. Planning workflow: (a) import images, (b) Image fusion, (c) contouring, (d) plan approval (e) plan check (f) chart check, (g) sequential and iterative process Influence of upstream and downstream operations: (a) simulation, (b) immobilization, (c) motion management, (d) QA, (e) IGRT, (f) Treatment delivery, (g) SBRT/SRS (h) adaptive planning Reduction of delay between planning steps with Lean systems due to (a) communication, (b) limited resource, (b) contour, (c) plan approval, (d) treatment. Optimizing planning processes: (a) contour validation (b) consistent planning protocol, (c) protocol/template sharing, (d) semi

  14. Treatment planning for patients with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Aman, Michael G

    2005-01-01

    Patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) can present with extremely heterogeneous issues, and, therefore, their treatment can be very challenging. Most patients with ASDs will benefit from contact with a multitude of disciplines. In this article, treatment planning is structured in terms of the patient's life stages. Early on, assessment of developmental milestones, metabolic conditions, and hearing; making the diagnosis of ASD; and providing genetic counseling are salient. As the child grows, speech and language therapy, early intensive intervention, special education, parent training, and neurologic assessment become important. With greater age, behavior therapy, pharmacotherapy, occupational therapy, and sexuality issues are often in ascendancy. As the patient approaches and proceeds through adulthood, transition training, housing options, and guardianship issues may be priorities. Advocacy is relevant throughout the life span. Professionals have an obligation to familiarize parents with interventions likely to be fruitful or unhelpful. There is growing evidence that early intensive behavior intervention, though expensive, may produce lifelong gains in functioning. A variety of experimental and/or unproven treatments are identified; mental health professionals can help families with members who have ASDs by guiding them toward effective treatments and away from therapies of unknown value but with potential risks and/or costs.

  15. PDT in the thoracic cavity: Spectroscopic methods and fluence modeling for treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meo, Julia Lauren

    oxygenation (reflectance measurements) and drug concentration (fluorescence measurements) of different tissues in vivo, before and after treatment, in patients enrolled the Phase I HPPH study ongoing at the University of Pennsylvania. This work aims to provide the building blocks essential to pleural PDT treatment planning by more accurately calculating the required fluence using a model that accounts for the effects of treatment geometry and optical properties measured in vivo.

  16. High resolution X-ray fluorescence imaging for a microbeam radiation therapy treatment planning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chtcheprov, Pavel; Inscoe, Christina; Burk, Laurel; Ger, Rachel; Yuan, Hong; Lu, Jianping; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto

    2014-03-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) uses an array of high-dose, narrow (~100 μm) beams separated by a fraction of a millimeter to treat various radio-resistant, deep-seated tumors. MRT has been shown to spare normal tissue up to 1000 Gy of entrance dose while still being highly tumoricidal. Current methods of tumor localization for our MRT treatments require MRI and X-ray imaging with subject motion and image registration that contribute to the measurement error. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel form of imaging to quickly and accurately assist in high resolution target positioning for MRT treatments using X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The key to this method is using the microbeam to both treat and image. High Z contrast media is injected into the phantom or blood pool of the subject prior to imaging. Using a collimated spectrum analyzer, the region of interest is scanned through the MRT beam and the fluorescence signal is recorded for each slice. The signal can be processed to show vascular differences in the tissue and isolate tumor regions. Using the radiation therapy source as the imaging source, repositioning and registration errors are eliminated. A phantom study showed that a spatial resolution of a fraction of microbeam width can be achieved by precision translation of the mouse stage. Preliminary results from an animal study showed accurate iodine profusion, confirmed by CT. The proposed image guidance method, using XRF to locate and ablate tumors, can be used as a fast and accurate MRT treatment planning system.

  17. Automation and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Individualized High-Quality Tangent Breast Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Purdie, Thomas G.; Dinniwell, Robert E.; Fyles, Anthony; Sharpe, Michael B.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the large-scale clinical implementation and performance of an automated treatment planning methodology for tangential breast intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Automated planning was used to prospectively plan tangential breast IMRT treatment for 1661 patients between June 2009 and November 2012. The automated planning method emulates the manual steps performed by the user during treatment planning, including anatomical segmentation, beam placement, optimization, dose calculation, and plan documentation. The user specifies clinical requirements of the plan to be generated through a user interface embedded in the planning system. The automated method uses heuristic algorithms to define and simplify the technical aspects of the treatment planning process. Results: Automated planning was used in 1661 of 1708 patients receiving tangential breast IMRT during the time interval studied. Therefore, automated planning was applicable in greater than 97% of cases. The time for treatment planning using the automated process is routinely 5 to 6 minutes on standard commercially available planning hardware. We have shown a consistent reduction in plan rejections from plan reviews through the standard quality control process or weekly quality review multidisciplinary breast rounds as we have automated the planning process for tangential breast IMRT. Clinical plan acceptance increased from 97.3% using our previous semiautomated inverse method to 98.9% using the fully automated method. Conclusions: Automation has become the routine standard method for treatment planning of tangential breast IMRT at our institution and is clinically feasible on a large scale. The method has wide clinical applicability and can add tremendous efficiency, standardization, and quality to the current treatment planning process. The use of automated methods can allow centers to more rapidly adopt IMRT and enhance access to the documented

  18. Voxel-based dose prediction with multi-patient atlas selection for automated radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Chris; Purdie, Thomas G.

    2017-01-01

    Automating the radiotherapy treatment planning process is a technically challenging problem. The majority of automated approaches have focused on customizing and inferring dose volume objectives to be used in plan optimization. In this work we outline a multi-patient atlas-based dose prediction approach that learns to predict the dose-per-voxel for a novel patient directly from the computed tomography planning scan without the requirement of specifying any objectives. Our method learns to automatically select the most effective atlases for a novel patient, and then map the dose from those atlases onto the novel patient. We extend our previous work to include a conditional random field for the optimization of a joint distribution prior that matches the complementary goals of an accurately spatially distributed dose distribution while still adhering to the desired dose volume histograms. The resulting distribution can then be used for inverse-planning with a new spatial dose objective, or to create typical dose volume objectives for the canonical optimization pipeline. We investigated six treatment sites (633 patients for training and 113 patients for testing) and evaluated the mean absolute difference in all DVHs for the clinical and predicted dose distribution. The results on average are favorable in comparison to our previous approach (1.91 versus 2.57). Comparing our method with and without atlas-selection further validates that atlas-selection improved dose prediction on average in whole breast (0.64 versus 1.59), prostate (2.13 versus 4.07), and rectum (1.46 versus 3.29) while it is less important in breast cavity (0.79 versus 0.92) and lung (1.33 versus 1.27) for which there is high conformity and minimal dose shaping. In CNS brain, atlas-selection has the potential to be impactful (3.65 versus 5.09), but selecting the ideal atlas is the most challenging.

  19. Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-08-01

    Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

  20. SU-E-T-580: Comparison of Cervical Carcinoma IMRT Plans From Four Commercial Treatment Planning Systems (TPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y; Li, R; Chi, Z; Zhu, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Different treatment planning systems (TPS) use different treatment optimization and leaf sequencing algorithms. This work compares cervical carcinoma IMRT plans optimized with four commercial TPSs to investigate the plan quality in terms of target conformity and delivery efficiency. Methods: Five cervical carcinoma cases were planned with the Corvus, Monaco, Pinnacle and Xio TPSs by experienced planners using appropriate optimization parameters and dose constraints to meet the clinical acceptance criteria. Plans were normalized for at least 95% of PTV to receive the prescription dose (Dp). Dose-volume histograms and isodose distributions were compared. Other quantities such as Dmin(the minimum dose received by 99% of GTV/PTV), Dmax(the maximum dose received by 1% of GTV/PTV), D100, D95, D90, V110%, V105%, V100% (the volume of GTV/PTV receiving 110%, 105%, 100% of Dp), conformity index(CI), homogeneity index (HI), the volume of receiving 40Gy and 50 Gy to rectum (V40,V50) ; the volume of receiving 30Gy and 50 Gy to bladder (V30,V50) were evaluated. Total segments and MUs were also compared. Results: While all plans meet target dose specifications and normal tissue constraints, the maximum GTVCI of Pinnacle plans was up to 0.74 and the minimum of Corvus plans was only 0.21, these four TPSs PTVCI had significant difference. The GTVHI and PTVHI of Pinnacle plans are all very low and show a very good dose distribution. Corvus plans received the higer dose of normal tissue. The Monaco plans require significantly less segments and MUs to deliver than the other plans. Conclusion: To deliver on a Varian linear-accelerator, the Pinnacle plans show a very good dose distribution. Corvus plans received the higer dose of normal tissue. The Monaco plans have faster beam delivery.

  1. Image guidance, treatment planning and evaluation of cancer interstitial focal therapy using liposomal radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Steve William

    Focally ablative therapy of cancer has gained significant interest recently. Improvements in diagnostic techniques have created possibilities for treatment which were once clinically unfeasible. Imaging must be capable of allowing accurate diagnosis, staging and planning upon initiation of therapy. Recent improvements in MRI and molecular imaging techniques have made it possible to accurately localize lesions and in so doing, improve the accuracy of proposed focal treatments. Using multimodality imaging it is now possible to target, plan and evaluate interstitial focal treatment using liposome encapsulated beta emitting radionuclides in a variety of cancer types. Since most absorbed dose is deposited early and heterogeneously in beta-radionuclide therapy, investigation of the resultant molecular and cellular events during this time is important for evaluating treatment efficacy. Additionally, investigating a multifocal entity such as prostate cancer is helpful for determining whether MRI is capable of discriminating the proper lesion for therapy. Correlation of MRI findings with histopathology can further improve the accuracy of interstitial focal radionuclide therapy by providing non-invasive surrogates for tissue compartment sizes. In the application of such therapies, compartmental sizes are known to heavily influence the distribution of injected agents. This has clear dosimetric implications with the potential to significantly alter the efficacy of treatment. The hypothesis of this project was that multimodality imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), autoradiography (AR), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could be used to target, plan, and evaluate interstitial focal therapy with non-sealed source, liposome-encapsulated 186Re beta emitting radionuclides. The specific aims of this project were to 1) Identify suitable targets for interstitial focal therapy. This was done by retrospectively analyzing MRI data to characterize the tumor

  2. SU-C-BRB-03: Novel Technique to Implement GRID Therapy in a Commercial Treatment Planning System

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Mohiuddin, M; Yaldo, D; Tom, B; Worlikar, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Due to the difficulty of creating an accurate multi-aperture block in treatment planning systems (TPS), spatially fractionated radiation therapy (GRID Therapy) is limited to clinical setups using simple monitor unit calculations. In this work, we present a novel approach to accurately model a grid block in a TPS and evaluate its dosimetric accuracy. Methods: An acrylic GRID block was fashioned such that the hole size and spacing were the same dimensions of the brass GRID block (dotDecimal) at isocenter. Holes were non-divergent and drilled 1 cm deep. CT scans (RT Lightspeed, GE Healthcare) of the block were acquired using axial slices with a thickness of 0.625 mm. These were imported into Eclipse (version 11, Varian Medical Systems) and holes were auto-contoured into structures. The GRID block was created in Eclipse by forming apertures around the hole structures using a simple three step process. Treatment plans were created in a water-equivalent phantom using 6 and 10 MV beams, delivered with a linear accelerator (Clinac iX, Varian Medical Systems) and measured using a water tank, film and a diode array. Results: Comparisons of percent depth dose curves and profiles at depths of maximum dose, 5cm, and 10cm for field sizes ranging from 5 cm{sup 2} to 25 cm{sup 2} using water and film were within 3% of their respective positions in Eclipse. GRID plans utilizing various jaw sizes and MLC blocking measured with film and a diode array showed pass rates with an average of 97% using Gamma analysis at 3%/ 3 mm and no lower than 93%. Conclusion: We have developed a simple yet accurate method of incorporating a GRID block into a commercially available TPS and demonstrated that the TPS accurately reflects the dose delivered. This will allow for real-time planning using patient scans and encourage new methods for GRID therapy. Support provided by dotDecimal, Sanford, FL.

  3. The Potential for an Enhanced Role for MRI in Radiation-therapy Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, P.; Liney, G. P.; Holloway, L.; Walker, A.; Barton, M.; Delaney, G. P.; Vinod, S.; Tomé, W.

    2013-01-01

    The exquisite soft-tissue contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has meant that the technique is having an increasing role in contouring the gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk (OAR) in radiation therapy treatment planning systems (TPS). MRI-planning scans from diagnostic MRI scanners are currently incorporated into the planning process by being registered to CT data. The soft-tissue data from the MRI provides target outline guidance and the CT provides a solid geometric and electron density map for accurate dose calculation on the TPS computer. There is increasing interest in MRI machine placement in radiotherapy clinics as an adjunct to CT simulators. Most vendors now offer 70 cm bores with flat couch inserts and specialised RF coil designs. We would refer to these devices as MR-simulators. There is also research into the future application of MR-simulators independent of CT and as in-room image-guidance devices. It is within the background of this increased interest in the utility of MRI in radiotherapy treatment planning that this paper is couched. The paper outlines publications that deal with standard MRI sequences used in current clinical practice. It then discusses the potential for using processed functional diffusion maps (fDM) derived from diffusion weighted image sequences in tracking tumor activity and tumor recurrence. Next, this paper reviews publications that describe the use of MRI in patient-management applications that may, in turn, be relevant to radiotherapy treatment planning. The review briefly discusses the concepts behind functional techniques such as dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE), diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI sequences and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). Significant applications of MR are discussed in terms of the following treatment sites: brain, head and neck, breast, lung, prostate and cervix. While not yet routine, the use of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map analysis indicates an exciting future

  4. A System for Continual Quality Improvement of Normal Tissue Delineation for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Breunig, Jennifer; Hernandez, Sophy; Lin, Jeffrey; Alsager, Stacy; Dumstorf, Christine; Price, Jennifer; Steber, Jennifer; Garza, Richard; Nagda, Suneel; Melian, Edward; Emami, Bahman; Roeske, John C.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To implement the 'plan-do-check-act' (PDCA) cycle for the continual quality improvement of normal tissue contours used for radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: The CT scans of patients treated for tumors of the brain, head and neck, thorax, pancreas and prostate were selected for this study. For each scan, a radiation oncologist and a diagnostic radiologist, outlined the normal tissues ('gold' contours) using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) guidelines. A total of 30 organs were delineated. Independently, 5 board-certified dosimetrists and 1 trainee then outlined the same organs. Metrics used to compare the agreement between the dosimetrists' contours and the gold contours included the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), and a penalty function using distance to agreement. Based on these scores, dosimetrists were re-trained on those organs in which they did not receive a passing score, and they were subsequently re-tested. Results: Passing scores were achieved on 19 of 30 organs evaluated. These scores were correlated to organ volume. For organ volumes <8 cc, the average DSC was 0.61 vs organ volumes {>=}8 cc, for which the average DSC was 0.91 (P=.005). Normal tissues that had the lowest scores included the lenses, optic nerves, chiasm, cochlea, and esophagus. Of the 11 organs that were considered for re-testing, 10 showed improvement in the average score, and statistically significant improvement was noted in more than half of these organs after education and re-assessment. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate the feasibility of applying the PDCA cycle to assess competence in the delineation of individual organs, and to identify areas for improvement. With testing, guidance, and re-evaluation, contouring consistency can be obtained across multiple dosimetrists. Our expectation is that continual quality improvement using the PDCA approach will ensure more accurate treatments and dose assessment in radiotherapy

  5. Treatment Planning with Ivis Imaging and Monte Carlo Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novario, Raffaele; Lorusso, Rita; Bianchi, Carla; Tanzi, Fabio; Vescovi, Mario; Rovere, Marco; Cappellini, Chiara; Caccia, Massimo; Conte, Leopoldo

    2006-04-01

    The vessel wall is the planned target volume in intracoronary brachytherapy. The success of the treatment is based on the need of delivering doses possibly not lower than 8 and not higher than 30 Gy. An automatic procedure in order to acquire intravascular ultrasound images of the whole volume to be irradiated is pointed out; a motor driven pullback device, with velocity of the catheter of 0.5 and 1 mm/s allows to acquire the entire target volume of the vessel with a number of slices normally ranging from 400 to 1600. A semiautomatic segmentation and classification of the different structures in each slice of the vessel is proposed. The segmentation and the classification of the structures allows the calculation of their volume; this is very useful in particular for plaque volume assessment in the follow-up of the patients. A 3D analyzer tool was developed in order to visualize the walls and the lumen of the vessel. The knowledge, for each axial slice, of the source position (in the center of the catheter) and the target position (vessel walls) allows the calculation of a set of source-target distances. Given a time of irradiation, and a type of source a dose volume histogram (DVH) describing the dose distribution in the whole target can be obtained with a Monte Carlo simulation. The whole procedure takes few minutes and then is compatible with a safe treatment of the patient, giving an important indication about the quality of the radiation treatment selected.

  6. Concurrent multimodality image segmentation by active contours for radiotherapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    El Naqa, Issam; Yang Deshan; Apte, Aditya; Khullar, Divya; Mutic, Sasa; Zheng Jie; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Grigsby, Perry; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2007-12-15

    Multimodality imaging information is regularly used now in radiotherapy treatment planning for cancer patients. The authors are investigating methods to take advantage of all the imaging information available for joint target registration and segmentation, including multimodality images or multiple image sets from the same modality. In particular, the authors have developed variational methods based on multivalued level set deformable models for simultaneous 2D or 3D segmentation of multimodality images consisting of combinations of coregistered PET, CT, or MR data sets. The combined information is integrated to define the overall biophysical structure volume. The authors demonstrate the methods on three patient data sets, including a nonsmall cell lung cancer case with PET/CT, a cervix cancer case with PET/CT, and a prostate patient case with CT and MRI. CT, PET, and MR phantom data were also used for quantitative validation of the proposed multimodality segmentation approach. The corresponding Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) was 0.90{+-}0.02 (p<0.0001) with an estimated target volume error of 1.28{+-}1.23% volume. Preliminary results indicate that concurrent multimodality segmentation methods can provide a feasible and accurate framework for combining imaging data from different modalities and are potentially useful tools for the delineation of biophysical structure volumes in radiotherapy treatment planning.

  7. Changes in treatment plan for carpal tunnel syndrome based on electrodiagnostic test results.

    PubMed

    Becker, S J E; Makanji, H S; Ring, D

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluated how often the treatment plan for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) changed based on electrodiagnostic test results. Secondly, we assessed factors associated with a change in the treatment plan for CTS. One-hundred-and-thirty English-speaking adult patients underwent electrodiagnostic testing in a prospective cohort study. Treatment plan was recorded before and after testing. Treatment plan changed in 25 patients (19%) based on electrodiagnostic test results. The plan for operative treatment before testing decreased significantly after testing (83% versus 72%). The best logistic regression model for no change in treatment plan included a prolonged or non-recordable median distal sensory latency (normal, prolonged, or non-recordable), and explained 24% of the variation. For surgeons that manage CTS on the basis of objective pathophysiology rather than symptoms, electrodiagnostic test results often lead to changes in recommended treatment.

  8. BNCT-RTPE: BNCT radiation treatment planning environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wessol, D.E.; Wheeler, F.J.; Babcock, R.S.

    1995-11-01

    Several improvements have been developed for the BNCT radiation treatment planning environment (BNCT-Rtpe) during 1994. These improvements have been incorporated into Version 1.0 of BNCT-Rtpe which is currently installed at the INEL, BNL, Japanese Research Center (JRC), and Finland`s Technical Research Center. Platforms supported by this software include Hewlett-Packard (HP), SUN, International Business Machines (IBM), and Silicon Graphics Incorporated (SGI). A draft version of the BNCT-Rtpe user manual is available. Version 1.1 of BNCT-Rtpe is scheduled for release in March 1995. It is anticipated that Version 2.x of BNCT-Rtpe, which includes the nonproprietary NURBS library and data structures, will be released in September 1995.

  9. Accuracy of Breath-hold CT in Treatment Planning for Lung Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Charles; Campeau, Marie-Pierre; Filion, Édith; Roberge, David; Bahig, Houda; Vu, Toni; Lambert, Louise; Boudam, Karim; Carrier, Jean-Francois

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study are (1) to measure concordance of tumor position on breath-hold (BH) computed tomography (CT) scans relative to the natural tumor path during free breathing (FB) and (2) to evaluate the benefits of the breathing monitoring device Abches (Apex Medical, Tokyo) for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) treatment planning. Methods: In 53 lung cancer patients treated with CyberKnife™ robotic radiosurgery system, FB four-dimensional computerized tomography (4DCT) and end-expiration (EE) BH CT images were obtained. Extent of natural tumor motion was assessed with rigid registration derived from end-inspiration (EI) and EE phases of the 4DCT. Tumor displacement in BH scans relative to the natural tumor path was measured relative to the EE 4DCT phase. Results: Mean tumor motion (+/- 1 SD) during natural FB was 1 ± 1 mm, 2 ± 2 mm, and 6 ± 6 mm in medio-lateral, anterior-posterior, and cranio-caudal directions, respectively. Tumor position on BH CT scan was closer to EE than EI 4DCT phase for 35/53 patients (66%). Difference of BH tumor position vs. EE state was 4 ± 3 mm. Gross tumor displacements perpendicular to natural tumor path were as great as 11 mm (anterior-posterior) and were seen with or without the breathing monitoring device. Conclusion: Tumor position during BH CT may not accurately correspond to positions observed on FB 4DCT. Hence, accurate and custom 4D analysis for each individual patient is recommended for treatment planning, especially those involving BH acquisitions. PMID:28003937

  10. The effect of bruxism on treatment planning for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Misch, Carl E

    2002-09-01

    Bruxism is a potential risk factor for implant failure. Excessive force is the primary cause of late implant complications. An appreciation of the etiology of crestal bone loss, failure of implants, failure to retain implant restorations, and fracture of components will lead the practitioner to develop a treatment plan that reduces force on implants and their restorations. The forces are considered in terms of magnitude, duration, direction, type, and magnification. Once the dentist has identified the source(s) of additional force on the implant system, the treatment plan is altered to contend with and reduce the negative sequelae on the bone, implant, and final restoration. One viable approach is to increase the implant-bone surface area. Additional implants can be placed to decrease stress on any one implant, and implants in molar regions should have an increased width. Use of more and wider implants decreases the strain on the prosthesis and also dissipates stress to the bone, especially at the crest. The additional implants should be positioned with intent to eliminate cantilevers when possible. Greater surface area implant designs made of titanium alloy and with an external hex design can also prove advantageous. Anterior guidance in mandibular excursions further decreases force and eliminates or reduces lateral posterior force. Metal occlusal surfaces decrease the risk of porcelain fracture and do not require as much abutment reduction, which in turn enhances prosthesis retention. The retention of the final prosthesis or super-structure is also improved with additional implant abutments. Night guards designed with specific features also are a benefit to initially diagnose the influence of occlusal factors for the patient, and as importantly, to reduce the influence of extraneous stress on implants and implant-retained restorations.

  11. Generalizable Class Solutions for Treatment Planning of Spinal Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weksberg, David C.; Palmer, Matthew B.; Vu, Khoi N.; Rebueno, Neal C.; Sharp, Hadley J.; Luo, Dershan; Yang, James N.; Shiu, Almon S.; Rhines, Laurence D.; McAleer, Mary Frances; Brown, Paul D.; Chang, Eric L.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) continues to emerge as an effective therapeutic approach to spinal metastases; however, treatment planning and delivery remain resource intensive at many centers, which may hamper efficient implementation in clinical practice. We sought to develop a generalizable class solution approach for spinal SBRT treatment planning that would allow confidence that a given plan provides optimal target coverage, reduce integral dose, and maximize planning efficiency. Methods and Materials: We examined 91 patients treated with spinal SBRT at our institution. Treatment plans were categorized by lesion location, clinical target volume (CTV) configuration, and dose fractionation scheme, and then analyzed to determine the technically achievable dose gradient. A radial cord expansion was subtracted from the CTV to yield a planning CTV (pCTV) construct for plan evaluation. We reviewed the treatment plans with respect to target coverage, dose gradient, integral dose, conformality, and maximum cord dose to select the best plans and develop a set of class solutions. Results: The class solution technique generated plans that maintained target coverage and improved conformality (1.2-fold increase in the 95% van't Riet Conformation Number describing the conformality of a reference dose to the target) while reducing normal tissue integral dose (1.3-fold decrease in the volume receiving 4 Gy (V{sub 4Gy}) and machine output (19% monitor unit (MU) reduction). In trials of planning efficiency, the class solution technique reduced treatment planning time by 30% to 60% and MUs required by {approx}20%: an effect independent of prior planning experience. Conclusions: We have developed a set of class solutions for spinal SBRT that incorporate a pCTV metric for plan evaluation while yielding dosimetrically superior treatment plans with increased planning efficiency. Our technique thus allows for efficient, reproducible, and high-quality spinal

  12. SU-E-T-175: Clinical Evaluations of Monte Carlo-Based Inverse Treatment Plan Optimization for Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Y; Li, Y; Tian, Z; Gu, X; Jiang, S; Jia, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Pencil-beam or superposition-convolution type dose calculation algorithms are routinely used in inverse plan optimization for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). However, due to their limited accuracy in some challenging cases, e.g. lung, the resulting dose may lose its optimality after being recomputed using an accurate algorithm, e.g. Monte Carlo (MC). It is the objective of this study to evaluate the feasibility and advantages of a new method to include MC in the treatment planning process. Methods: We developed a scheme to iteratively perform MC-based beamlet dose calculations and plan optimization. In the MC stage, a GPU-based dose engine was used and the particle number sampled from a beamlet was proportional to its optimized fluence from the previous step. We tested this scheme in four lung cancer IMRT cases. For each case, the original plan dose, plan dose re-computed by MC, and dose optimized by our scheme were obtained. Clinically relevant dosimetric quantities in these three plans were compared. Results: Although the original plan achieved a satisfactory PDV dose coverage, after re-computing doses using MC method, it was found that the PTV D95% were reduced by 4.60%–6.67%. After re-optimizing these cases with our scheme, the PTV coverage was improved to the same level as in the original plan, while the critical OAR coverages were maintained to clinically acceptable levels. Regarding the computation time, it took on average 144 sec per case using only one GPU card, including both MC-based beamlet dose calculation and treatment plan optimization. Conclusion: The achieved dosimetric gains and high computational efficiency indicate the feasibility and advantages of the proposed MC-based IMRT optimization method. Comprehensive validations in more patient cases are in progress.

  13. Toward a web-based real-time radiation treatment planning system in a cloud computing environment.

    PubMed

    Na, Yong Hum; Suh, Tae-Suk; Kapp, Daniel S; Xing, Lei

    2013-09-21

    To exploit the potential dosimetric advantages of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), an in-depth approach is required to provide efficient computing methods. This needs to incorporate clinically related organ specific constraints, Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations, and large-scale plan optimization. This paper describes our first steps toward a web-based real-time radiation treatment planning system in a cloud computing environment (CCE). The Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) with a master node (named m2.xlarge containing 17.1 GB of memory, two virtual cores with 3.25 EC2 Compute Units each, 420 GB of instance storage, 64-bit platform) is used as the backbone of cloud computing for dose calculation and plan optimization. The master node is able to scale the workers on an 'on-demand' basis. MC dose calculation is employed to generate accurate beamlet dose kernels by parallel tasks. The intensity modulation optimization uses total-variation regularization (TVR) and generates piecewise constant fluence maps for each initial beam direction in a distributed manner over the CCE. The optimized fluence maps are segmented into deliverable apertures. The shape of each aperture is iteratively rectified to be a sequence of arcs using the manufacture's constraints. The output plan file from the EC2 is sent to the simple storage service. Three de-identified clinical cancer treatment plans have been studied for evaluating the performance of the new planning platform with 6 MV flattening filter free beams (40 × 40 cm(2)) from the Varian TrueBeam(TM) STx linear accelerator. A CCE leads to speed-ups of up to 14-fold for both dose kernel calculations and plan optimizations in the head and neck, lung, and prostate cancer cases considered in this study. The proposed system relies on a CCE that is able to provide an infrastructure for parallel and distributed computing. The resultant plans from the cloud computing are

  14. SU-E-T-575: Isocenter Shifts in Treatment Planning and Its Clinical Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Y; Damiani, S; Cao, Y; Jamshidi, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate causes of isocenter shifts in treatment planning and its clinical impact on patient treatment efficiency and safety. Methods/Materials: Treatment planning data of 340 patients under treatment over 8 weeks period were gathered to identify isocenter shifts according to site of the treatment, types of treatment plan or types of the machine used. Treatment plans included inversed and forward IMRT, as well as 3D plans. Treatment sites included pelvis, chest, abdomen, breasts, head and necks and extremities. Re-planning were performed without the isocenter shift for pelvis and chest plans, the dosimetric parameters such as PTV coverage, and dose sparing of OARs of these plans were analyzed and compared. Results/Discussions: Results showed that the isocenter shift was always necessary for some of sites such as breasts, two or more distinctive PTVs, or special cases such as large PTV treated with enhanced dynamic wedge. Many other cases, the re-planning results indicated 53% of the plans that the same quality of the plan can be achieved without the shift of the isocenter. Repositioning patients on a daily basis demanded unambiguous instructions for therapists for patient setups, and additional time to perform the shifts before treatment. Opportunities for error propagation exist during the communication and hand-over of such plans. Conclusion: Isocenter shifts demanded unambiguous instructions and times for therapists for daily patient setups, therefore it impacted both safety and efficiency of the patient treatment. Based on the analysis, the isocenter shifts were unavoidable for cases such as treatment of multiple sites, overcoming limitations of treatment machines, and/or sometime better dosimetry. However, we found many initially proposed shifts may have been eliminated either by careful planning or by improved CT simulation process such as detailed review of the images and localization of the PTV during simulation.

  15. Application of Multimodality Imaging Fusion Technology in Diagnosis and Treatment of Malignant Tumors under the Precision Medicine Plan

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shun-Yi; Chen, Xian-Xia; Li, Yi; Zhang, Yu-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The arrival of precision medicine plan brings new opportunities and challenges for patients undergoing precision diagnosis and treatment of malignant tumors. With the development of medical imaging, information on different modality imaging can be integrated and comprehensively analyzed by imaging fusion system. This review aimed to update the application of multimodality imaging fusion technology in the precise diagnosis and treatment of malignant tumors under the precision medicine plan. We introduced several multimodality imaging fusion technologies and their application to the diagnosis and treatment of malignant tumors in clinical practice. Date Sources: The data cited in this review were obtained mainly from the PubMed database from 1996 to 2016, using the keywords of “precision medicine”, “fusion imaging”, “multimodality”, and “tumor diagnosis and treatment”. Study Selection: Original articles, clinical practice, reviews, and other relevant literatures published in English were reviewed. Papers focusing on precision medicine, fusion imaging, multimodality, and tumor diagnosis and treatment were selected. Duplicated papers were excluded. Results: Multimodality imaging fusion technology plays an important role in tumor diagnosis and treatment under the precision medicine plan, such as accurate location, qualitative diagnosis, tumor staging, treatment plan design, and real-time intraoperative monitoring. Multimodality imaging fusion systems could provide more imaging information of tumors from different dimensions and angles, thereby offing strong technical support for the implementation of precision oncology. Conclusion: Under the precision medicine plan, personalized treatment of tumors is a distinct possibility. We believe that multimodality imaging fusion technology will find an increasingly wide application in clinical practice. PMID:27958232

  16. MO-D-BRB-02: Pediatric Treatment Planning II: Applications of Proton Beams for Pediatric Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, C.

    2015-06-15

    Most Medical Physicists working in radiotherapy departments see few pediatric patients. This is because, fortunately, children get cancer at a rate nearly 100 times lower than adults. Children have not smoked, abused alcohol, or been exposed to environmental carcinogens for decades, and of course, have not fallen victim to the aging process. Children get very different cancers than adults. Breast or prostate cancers, typical in adults, are rarely seen in children but instead a variety of tumors occur in children that are rarely seen in adults; examples are germinomas, ependymomas and primitive neuroectodermal tumors, which require treatment of the child’s brain or neuroblastoma, requiring treatment in the abdomen. The treatment of children with cancer using radiation therapy is one of the most challenging planning and delivery problems facing the physicist. This is because bones, brain, breast tissue, and other organs are more sensitive to radiation in children than in adults. Because most therapy departments treat mostly adults, when the rare 8 year-old patient comes to the department for treatment, the physicist may not understand the clinical issues of his disease which drive the planning and delivery decisions. Additionally, children are more prone than adults to developing secondary cancers after radiation. For bilateral retinoblastoma for example, an irradiated child has a 40% chance of developing a second cancer by age 50. The dosimetric tradeoffs made during the planning process are complex and require careful consideration for children treated with radiotherapy. In the first presentation, an overview of childhood cancers and their corresponding treatment techniques will be given. These can be some of the most complex treatments that are delivered in the radiation therapy department. These cancers include leukemia treated with total body irradiation, medulloblastoma, treated with craniospinal irradiation plus a conformal boost to the posterior fossa

  17. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® external-beam radiation therapy treatment planning for clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, May; Mahmoud, Omar; Merrick, Gregory; Hsu, I-Chow Joe; Arterbery, V Elayne; Ciezki, Jay P; Frank, Steven J; Mohler, James Lloyd; Moran, Brian J; Rosenthal, Seth A; Rossi, Carl J; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2012-04-01

    Image-based radiation treatment planning and localization have contributed to better targeting of the prostate and sparing of normal tissues. Guidelines are needed to address radiation dose delivery, including patient setup and immobilization, target volume definition, treatment planning, treatment delivery methods, and target localization. Guidelines for external-beam radiation treatment planning have been updated and are presented here. The use of appropriate doses, simulation techniques, and verification of field setup are essential for the accurate delivery of radiation therapy. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria(®) are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  18. Register data in the evaluation and program planning of addiction treatment programs: using Sweden as an example.

    PubMed

    Blom, Björn; Dukes, Kimberly A; Lundgren, Lena; Sullivan, Lisa M

    2015-04-01

    Data from large-scale registers is often underutilized when evaluating addiction treatment programs. Since many programs collect register data regarding clients and interventions, there is a potential to make greater use of such records for program evaluation. The purpose of this article is to discuss the value of using large-scale registers in the evaluation and program planning of addiction treatment systems and programs. Sweden is used as an example of a country where register data is both available and is starting to be used in national evaluation and program planning efforts. The article focuses on possibilities, limitations and practicalities when using large-scale register data to conduct evaluations and program planning of addiction treatment programs. Main conclusions are that using register data for evaluation provides large amounts of data at low cost, limitations associated to the use of register data may be handled statistically, register data can answer important questions in planning of addiction treatment programs, and more accurate measures are needed to account for the diversity of client populations.

  19. Validation of in-house treatment planning system software for cobalt-60 teletherapy unit at two radiotherapy installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu'minah, I. A. S.; Toresano, L. O. H. Z.; Wibowo, W. E.; Sugiyantari; Pawiro, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    DSSuperDose v.1.0 is an in-house treatment planning system (TPS) developed by Medical Physics and Biophysics Laboratory (LFMB) Universitas Indonesia as a treatment planning software for Cobalt-60 teletherapy unit. The main objective of this study was the validation of in-house TPS calculation as an essential part in quality assurance (QA) of radiotherapy. Validation of an in-house TPS was performed with two Cobalt-60 teletherapy units by comparison between in-house TPS and ISIS TPS and by measurements of absorbed dose. Mean dose deviations between in-house TPS and measurement were (1.97 ± 2.42)% for open field, (1.32 ± 1.30)% for tray field, and (2.91 ± 2.36)% for wedge field treatments. In-house TPS provide optimal planning for open and tray beam conditions with depth fewer than 10 cm (≤ 10 cm) and field sizes up to 20×20 cm2, while for wedge beam conditions with field sizes fewer than the physical size of the wedge. Comparison of in-house TPS and ISIS TPS demonstrated a good match of 96%. From the results, it is concluded that DSSuperDose v.1.0 is adequately accurate for treatment planning of radiotherapy.

  20. PyCMSXiO: an external interface to script treatment plans for the Elekta® CMS XiO treatment planning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Aitang; Arumugam, Sankar; Holloway, Lois; Goozee, Gary

    2014-03-01

    Scripting in radiotherapy treatment planning systems not only simplifies routine planning tasks but can also be used for clinical research. Treatment planning scripting can only be utilized in a system that has a built-in scripting interface. Among the commercially available treatment planning systems, Pinnacle (Philips) and Raystation (Raysearch Lab.) have inherent scripting functionality. CMS XiO (Elekta) is a widely used treatment planning system in radiotherapy centres around the world, but it does not have an interface that allows the user to script radiotherapy plans. In this study an external scripting interface, PyCMSXiO, was developed for XiO using the Python programming language. The interface was implemented as a python package/library using a modern object-oriented programming methodology. The package was organized as a hierarchy of different classes (objects). Each class (object) corresponds to a plan object such as the beam of a clinical radiotherapy plan. The interface of classes was implemented as object functions. Scripting in XiO using PyCMSXiO is comparable with Pinnacle scripting. This scripting package has been used in several research projects including commissioning of a beam model, independent three-dimensional dose verification for IMRT plans and a setup-uncertainty study. Ease of use and high-level functions provided in the package achieve a useful research tool. It was released as an open-source tool that may benefit the medical physics community.

  1. Feasibility assessment of the interactive use of a Monte Carlo algorithm in treatment planning for intraoperative electron radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Pedro; Udías, José M.; Herranz, Elena; Santos-Miranda, Juan Antonio; Herraiz, Joaquín L.; Valdivieso, Manlio F.; Rodríguez, Raúl; Calama, Juan A.; Pascau, Javier; Calvo, Felipe A.; Illana, Carlos; Ledesma-Carbayo, María J.; Santos, Andrés

    2014-12-01

    This work analysed the feasibility of using a fast, customized Monte Carlo (MC) method to perform accurate computation of dose distributions during pre- and intraplanning of intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) procedures. The MC method that was implemented, which has been integrated into a specific innovative simulation and planning tool, is able to simulate the fate of thousands of particles per second, and it was the aim of this work to determine the level of interactivity that could be achieved. The planning workflow enabled calibration of the imaging and treatment equipment, as well as manipulation of the surgical frame and insertion of the protection shields around the organs at risk and other beam modifiers. In this way, the multidisciplinary team involved in IOERT has all the tools necessary to perform complex MC dosage simulations adapted to their equipment in an efficient and transparent way. To assess the accuracy and reliability of this MC technique, dose distributions for a monoenergetic source were compared with those obtained using a general-purpose software package used widely in medical physics applications. Once accuracy of the underlying simulator was confirmed, a clinical accelerator was modelled and experimental measurements in water were conducted. A comparison was made with the output from the simulator to identify the conditions under which accurate dose estimations could be obtained in less than 3 min, which is the threshold imposed to allow for interactive use of the tool in treatment planning. Finally, a clinically relevant scenario, namely early-stage breast cancer treatment, was simulated with pre- and intraoperative volumes to verify that it was feasible to use the MC tool intraoperatively and to adjust dose delivery based on the simulation output, without compromising accuracy. The workflow provided a satisfactory model of the treatment head and the imaging system, enabling proper configuration of the treatment planning

  2. Feasibility assessment of the interactive use of a Monte Carlo algorithm in treatment planning for intraoperative electron radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Pedro; Udías, José M; Herranz, Elena; Santos-Miranda, Juan Antonio; Herraiz, Joaquín L; Valdivieso, Manlio F; Rodríguez, Raúl; Calama, Juan A; Pascau, Javier; Calvo, Felipe A; Illana, Carlos; Ledesma-Carbayo, María J; Santos, Andrés

    2014-12-07

    This work analysed the feasibility of using a fast, customized Monte Carlo (MC) method to perform accurate computation of dose distributions during pre- and intraplanning of intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) procedures. The MC method that was implemented, which has been integrated into a specific innovative simulation and planning tool, is able to simulate the fate of thousands of particles per second, and it was the aim of this work to determine the level of interactivity that could be achieved. The planning workflow enabled calibration of the imaging and treatment equipment, as well as manipulation of the surgical frame and insertion of the protection shields around the organs at risk and other beam modifiers. In this way, the multidisciplinary team involved in IOERT has all the tools necessary to perform complex MC dosage simulations adapted to their equipment in an efficient and transparent way. To assess the accuracy and reliability of this MC technique, dose distributions for a monoenergetic source were compared with those obtained using a general-purpose software package used widely in medical physics applications. Once accuracy of the underlying simulator was confirmed, a clinical accelerator was modelled and experimental measurements in water were conducted. A comparison was made with the output from the simulator to identify the conditions under which accurate dose estimations could be obtained in less than 3 min, which is the threshold imposed to allow for interactive use of the tool in treatment planning. Finally, a clinically relevant scenario, namely early-stage breast cancer treatment, was simulated with pre- and intraoperative volumes to verify that it was feasible to use the MC tool intraoperatively and to adjust dose delivery based on the simulation output, without compromising accuracy. The workflow provided a satisfactory model of the treatment head and the imaging system, enabling proper configuration of the treatment planning

  3. Rational design of antibiotic treatment plans: a treatment strategy for managing evolution and reversing resistance.

    PubMed

    Mira, Portia M; Crona, Kristina; Greene, Devin; Meza, Juan C; Sturmfels, Bernd; Barlow, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    The development of reliable methods for restoring susceptibility after antibiotic resistance arises has proven elusive. A greater understanding of the relationship between antibiotic administration and the evolution of resistance is key to overcoming this challenge. Here we present a data-driven mathematical approach for developing antibiotic treatment plans that can reverse the evolution of antibiotic resistance determinants. We have generated adaptive landscapes for 16 genotypes of the TEM β-lactamase that vary from the wild type genotype "TEM-1" through all combinations of four amino acid substitutions. We determined the growth rate of each genotype when treated with each of 15 β-lactam antibiotics. By using growth rates as a measure of fitness, we computed the probability of each amino acid substitution in each β-lactam treatment using two different models named the Correlated Probability Model (CPM) and the Equal Probability Model (EPM). We then performed an exhaustive search through the 15 treatments for substitution paths leading from each of the 16 genotypes back to the wild type TEM-1. We identified optimized treatment paths that returned the highest probabilities of selecting for reversions of amino acid substitutions and returning TEM to the wild type state. For the CPM model, the optimized probabilities ranged between 0.6 and 1.0. For the EPM model, the optimized probabilities ranged between 0.38 and 1.0. For cyclical CPM treatment plans in which the starting and ending genotype was the wild type, the probabilities were between 0.62 and 0.7. Overall this study shows that there is promise for reversing the evolution of resistance through antibiotic treatment plans.

  4. Treatment planning using MRI data: an analysis of the dose calculation accuracy for different treatment regions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Because of superior soft tissue contrast, the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a complement to computed tomography (CT) in the target definition procedure for radiotherapy is increasing. To keep the workflow simple and cost effective and to reduce patient dose, it is natural to strive for a treatment planning procedure based entirely on MRI. In the present study, we investigate the dose calculation accuracy for different treatment regions when using bulk density assignments on MRI data and compare it to treatment planning that uses CT data. Methods MR and CT data were collected retrospectively for 40 patients with prostate, lung, head and neck, or brain cancers. Comparisons were made between calculations on CT data with and without inhomogeneity corrections and on MRI or CT data with bulk density assignments. The bulk densities were assigned using manual segmentation of tissue, bone, lung, and air cavities. Results The deviations between calculations on CT data with inhomogeneity correction and on bulk density assigned MR data were small. The maximum difference in the number of monitor units required to reach the prescribed dose was 1.6%. This result also includes effects of possible geometrical distortions. Conclusions The dose calculation accuracy at the investigated treatment sites is not significantly compromised when using MRI data when adequate bulk density assignments are made. With respect to treatment planning, MRI can replace CT in all steps of the treatment workflow, reducing the radiation exposure to the patient, removing any systematic registration errors that may occur when combining MR and CT, and decreasing time and cost for the extra CT investigation. PMID:20591179

  5. An efficient framework for photon Monte Carlo treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Fix, Michael K; Manser, Peter; Frei, Daniel; Volken, Werner; Mini, Roberto; Born, Ernst J

    2007-10-07

    Currently photon Monte Carlo treatment planning (MCTP) for a patient stored in the patient database of a treatment planning system (TPS) can usually only be performed using a cumbersome multi-step procedure where many user interactions are needed. This means automation is needed for usage in clinical routine. In addition, because of the long computing time in MCTP, optimization of the MC calculations is essential. For these purposes a new graphical user interface (GUI)-based photon MC environment has been developed resulting in a very flexible framework. By this means appropriate MC transport methods are assigned to different geometric regions by still benefiting from the features included in the TPS. In order to provide a flexible MC environment, the MC particle transport has been divided into different parts: the source, beam modifiers and the patient. The source part includes the phase-space source, source models and full MC transport through the treatment head. The beam modifier part consists of one module for each beam modifier. To simulate the radiation transport through each individual beam modifier, one out of three full MC transport codes can be selected independently. Additionally, for each beam modifier a simple or an exact geometry can be chosen. Thereby, different complexity levels of radiation transport are applied during the simulation. For the patient dose calculation, two different MC codes are available. A special plug-in in Eclipse providing all necessary information by means of Dicom streams was used to start the developed MC GUI. The implementation of this framework separates the MC transport from the geometry and the modules pass the particles in memory; hence, no files are used as the interface. The implementation is realized for 6 and 15 MV beams of a Varian Clinac 2300 C/D. Several applications demonstrate the usefulness of the framework. Apart from applications dealing with the beam modifiers, two patient cases are shown. Thereby

  6. Integration of second cancer risk calculations in a radiotherapy treatment planning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, M.; Schneider, U.

    2014-03-01

    Second cancer risk in patients, in particular in children, who were treated with radiotherapy is an important side effect. It should be minimized by selecting an appropriate treatment plan for the patient. The objectives of this study were to integrate a risk model for radiation induced cancer into a treatment planning system which allows to judge different treatment plans with regard to second cancer induction and to quantify the potential reduction in predicted risk. A model for radiation induced cancer including fractionation effects which is valid for doses in the radiotherapy range was integrated into a treatment planning system. From the three-dimensional (3D) dose distribution the 3D-risk equivalent dose (RED) was calculated on an organ specific basis. In addition to RED further risk coefficients like OED (organ equivalent dose), EAR (excess absolute risk) and LAR (lifetime attributable risk) are computed. A risk model for radiation induced cancer was successfully integrated in a treatment planning system. Several risk coefficients can be viewed and used to obtain critical situations were a plan can be optimised. Risk-volume-histograms and organ specific risks were calculated for different treatment plans and were used in combination with NTCP estimates for plan evaluation. It is concluded that the integration of second cancer risk estimates in a commercial treatment planning system is feasible. It can be used in addition to NTCP modelling for optimising treatment plans which result in the lowest possible second cancer risk for a patient.

  7. An Analysis of Image Segmentation Time in Beam’s-Eye-View Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chun; Spelbring, D.R.; Chen, George T.Y.

    2015-01-15

    In this work we tabulate and histogram the image segmentation time for beam’s eye view (BEV) treatment planning in our center. The average time needed to generate contours on CT images delineating normal structures and treatment target volumes is calculated using a data base containing over 500 patients’ BEV plans. The average number of contours and total image segmentation time needed for BEV plans in three common treatment sites, namely, head/neck, lung/chest, and prostate, were estimated.

  8. Fast treatment planning with IVUS imaging in intravascular brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novario, Raffaele; Bianchi, Carla; Lorusso, Rita; Sampietro, Chiara; Tanzi, Fabio; Conte, Leopoldo; Vescovi, Mario; Caccia, Massimo; Alemi, Mario; Cappellini, Chiara

    2004-05-01

    The planned target volume in intracoronary brachytherapy is the vessel wall. The success of the treatment is based on the need of delivering doses possibly not lower than 8 and not higher than 30 Gy. An automatic procedure in order to acquire intravascular ultrasound images of the whole volume to be irradiated is pointed out; a motor driven pullback device, with velocity of the catheter of 0.5 and 1 mm/s allows to acquire the entire target volume of the vessel with a number of slices normally ranging from 400 to 1600. A semiautomatic segmentation and classification of the different structures in each slice of the vessel is proposed. The segmentation and the classification of the structures allows the calculation of their volume; this is very useful in particular for plaque volume assessment in the follow-up of the patients. A 3D analyser tool was developed in order to visualize the walls and the lumen of the vessel. The knowledge, for each axial slice, of the position of the source (in the centre of the catheter) and the position of the target (vessel walls) allows the calculation of a set of source-target distances. Given a time of irradiation, and a type of source a dose volume histogram (DVH) describing the distribution of the doses in the whole target can be obtained. The whole procedure takes few minutes and then is compatible with a safe treatment of the patient, giving an important indication about the quality of the radiation treatment selected.

  9. Assessments for High Dose Radionuclide Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Darrell R.

    2003-10-01

    Advances in the biotechnology of cell-specific targeting of cancer, and the increased number of clinical trials involving treatment of cancer patients with radiolabeled antibodies, peptides, and similar delivery vehicles have led to an increase in the number of high-dose radionuclide therapy procedures. Optimized radionuclide therapy for cancer treatment is based on the concept of absorbed dose to the dose-limiting normal organ or tissue. The limiting normal tissue is often the red marrow, but it may sometimes be lungs, liver, intestinal tract, or kidneys. Appropriate treatment planning requires assessment of radiation dose to several internal organs and tissues, and usually involves biodistribution studies in the patient using a tracer amount of radionuclide bound to the targeting agent and imaged at sequential time points using a planar gamma camera. Time-activity curves are developed from the imaging data for the major organs tissues of concern, for the whole body, and sometimes for selected tumors. Patient-specific factors often require that dose estimates be customized for each patient. The Food and Drug Administration regulates the experimental use of investigational new drugs and requires reasonable calculation of radiation absorbed dose to the whole body and to critical organs using methods prescribed by the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. Review of high-dose studies in the U.S. and elsewhere shows that 1) some studies are conducted with minimal dosimetry, 2) the marrow dose is difficult to establish and is subject to large uncertainties, and 3) despite the general availability of MIRD software, internal dosimetry methods are often inconsistent from one clinical center to another.

  10. Brachytherapy optimization using radiobiological-based planning for high dose rate and permanent implants for prostate cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeley, Kaelyn; Cunha, J. Adam; Hong, Tae Min

    2017-01-01

    We discuss an improvement in brachytherapy--a prostate cancer treatment method that directly places radioactive seeds inside target cancerous regions--by optimizing the current standard for delivering dose. Currently, the seeds' spatiotemporal placement is determined by optimizing the dose based on a set of physical, user-defined constraints. One particular approach is the ``inverse planning'' algorithms that allow for tightly fit isodose lines around the target volumes in order to reduce dose to the patient's organs at risk. However, these dose distributions are typically computed assuming the same biological response to radiation for different types of tissues. In our work, we consider radiobiological parameters to account for the differences in the individual sensitivities and responses to radiation for tissues surrounding the target. Among the benefits are a more accurate toxicity rate and more coverage to target regions for planning high-dose-rate treatments as well as permanent implants.

  11. An investigation into positron emission tomography contouring methods across two treatment planning systems

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Tony; Som, Seu; Sathiakumar, Chithradevi; Holloway, Lois

    2013-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to provide additional information regarding patient tumor location, size, and staging for radiotherapy treatment planning purposes. This additional information reduces interobserver variability and produces more consistent contouring. It is well recognized that different contouring methodology for PET data results in different contoured volumes. The goal of this study was to compare the difference in PET contouring methods for 2 different treatment planning systems using a phantom dataset and a series of patient datasets. Contouring methodology was compared on the ADAC Pinnacle Treatment Planning System and the CMS XiO Treatment Planning System. Contours were completed on the phantom and patient datasets using a number of PET contouring methods—the standardized uptake value 2.5 method, 30%, 40%, and 50% of the maximum uptake method and the signal to background ratio method. Differences of >15% were observed for PET-contoured volumes between the different treatment planning systems for the same data and the same PET contouring methodology. Contoured volume differences between treatment planning systems were caused by differences in data formatting and display and the different contouring tools available. Differences in treatment planning system as well as contouring methodology should be considered carefully in dose-volume contouring and reporting, especially between centers that may use different treatment planning systems or those that have several different treatment planning systems.

  12. Can megavoltage computed tomography reduce proton range uncertainties in treatment plans for patients with large metal implants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhauser, Wayne D.; Giebeler, Annelise; Langen, Katja M.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Mohan, Radhe

    2008-05-01

    Treatment planning calculations for proton therapy require an accurate knowledge of radiological path length, or range, to the distal edge of the target volume. In most cases, the range may be calculated with sufficient accuracy using kilovoltage (kV) computed tomography (CT) images. However, metal implants such as hip prostheses can cause severe streak artifacts that lead to large uncertainties in proton range. The purposes of this study were to quantify streak-related range errors and to determine if they could be avoided by using artifact-free megavoltage (MV) CT images in treatment planning. Proton treatment plans were prepared for a rigid, heterogeneous phantom and for a prostate cancer patient with a metal hip prosthesis using corrected and uncorrected kVCT images alone, uncorrected MVCT images and a combination of registered MVCT and kVCT images (the hybrid approach). Streak-induced range errors of 5-12 mm were present in the uncorrected kVCT-based patient plan. Correcting the streaks by manually assigning estimated true Hounsfield units improved the range accuracy. In a rigid heterogeneous phantom, the implant-related range uncertainty was estimated at <3 mm for both the corrected kVCT-based plan and the uncorrected MVCT-based plan. The hybrid planning approach yielded the best overall result. In this approach, the kVCT images provided good delineation of soft tissues due to high-contrast resolution, and the streak-free MVCT images provided smaller range uncertainties because they did not require artifact correction.

  13. IMRT vs. 3D Noncoplanar Treatment Plans for Maxillary Sinus Tumors: A New Tool for Quantitative Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Daphne Menhel, Janna; Alezra, Dror; Pfeffer, Raphael

    2008-01-01

    We compared 9-field, equispaced intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), 4- to 5-field, directionally optimized IMRT, and 3-dimensional (3D) noncoplanar planning approaches for tumors of the maxillary sinus. Ten patients were planned retrospectively to compare the different treatment techniques. Prescription doses were 60 to 70 Gy. Critical structures contoured included optic nerves and chiasm, lacrimal glands, lenses, and retinas. As an aid for plan assessment, we introduced a new tool: Critical Organ Scoring Index (COSI), which allows quantitative evaluation of the tradeoffs between target coverage and critical organ sparing. This index was compared with other, commonly used conformity indices. For a reliable assessment of both tumor coverage and dose to critical organs in the different planning techniques, we introduced a 2D, graphical representation of COSI vs. conformity index (CI). Dose-volume histograms and mean, maximum, and minimum organ doses were also compared. IMRT plans delivered lower doses to ipsilateral structures, but were unable to spare them. 3D plans delivered less dose to contralateral structures, and were more homogeneous, as well. Both IMRT approaches gave similar results. In cases where choice of optimal plan was difficult, the novel 2D COSI-CI representation gave an accurate picture of the tradeoffs between target coverage and organ sparing, even in cases where other conformity indices failed. Due to their unique anatomy, maxillary sinus tumors may benefit more from a noncoplanar approach than from IMRT. The new graphical representation proposed is a quick, visual, reliable tool, which may facilitate the physician's choice of best treatment plan for a given patient.

  14. Optimal Treatment Planning for Skull Base Chordoma: Photons, Protons, or a Combination of Both?

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Mylin A.; Chang, Eric L.; Mahajan, Anita; Lege, David G.; Riley, Beverly A. C.; Zhang Xiaodong; Lii, M.F.; Kornguth, David G.; Pelloski, Christopher E.; Woo, Shiao Y.

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: We compared dosimetry of proton (PR), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) photon (PH), and combined PR and IMRT PH (PP) irradiation of skull base chordomas to determine the most optimal technique. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography simulation scans of 5 patients with skull base chordoma were used to generate four treatment plans: an IMRT PH plan with 1-mm planning target volume (PTV; PH1) for stereotactic treatment, an IMRT PH plan with 3-mm PTV (PH3) for routine treatment, a PR plan with beam-specific expansion margins on the clinical target volume, and a PP plan combining PR and PH treatment. All plans were prescribed 74 Gy/Cobalt Gray equivalents (CGE) to the PTV. To facilitate comparison, the primary objective of all plans was 95% or greater PTV prescribed dose coverage. Plans then were optimized to limit dose to normal tissues. Results: PTVs ranged from 4.4 to 36.7 cc in size (mean, 21.6 cc). Mean % PTV receiving 74 Gy was highest in the PP plans (98.4%; range, 96.5-99.2%) and lowest in the PH3 plans (96.1%; range, 95.1-96.7%). PR plans were the least homogeneous and conformal. PH3 plans had the highest mean % volume (V) of brain, brainstem, chiasm, and temporal lobes greater than tolerance doses. The PH1 plans had the lowest brainstem mean % V receiving 67 Gy (V{sub 67Gy}; 2.3 Gy; range, 0-7.8 Gy) and temporal lobe mean % V{sub 65Gy} (4.3 Gy; range, 0.1-7.7 Gy). Global evaluation of the plans based on objective parameters revealed that PH1 and PP plans were more optimal than either single-modality PR or PH3 plans. Conclusions: There are dosimetric advantages to using either PH1 or PP plans, with the latter yielding the best target coverage and conformality.

  15. Energy Dependence of Measured CT Numbers on Substituted Materials Used for CT Number Calibration of Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Reza; Jabbari, Nasrollah; aghdasi, Mehdi; Khalkhali, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction For accurate dose calculations, it is necessary to provide a correct relationship between the CT numbers and electron density in radiotherapy treatment planning systems (TPSs). The purpose of this study was to investigate the energy dependence of measured CT numbers on substituted materials used for CT number calibration of radiotherapy TPSs and the resulting errors in the treatment planning calculation doses. Materials and Methods In this study, we designed a cylindrical water phantom with different materials used as tissue equivalent materials for the simulation of tissues and obtaining the related CT numbers. For evaluating the effect of CT number variations of substituted materials due to energy changing of scanner (kVp) on the dose calculation of TPS, the slices of the scanned phantom at three kVp's were imported into the desired TPSs (MIRS and CorePLAN). Dose calculations were performed on two TPSs. Results The mean absolute percentage differences between the CT numbers of CT scanner and two treatment planning systems for all the samples were 3.22%±2.57% for CorePLAN and 2.88%±2.11% for MIRS. It was also found that the maximum absolute percentage difference between all of the calculated doses from each photon beam of linac (6 and 15 MV) at three kVp's was less than 1.2%. Discussion The present study revealed that, for the materials with effective low atomic number, the mean CT number increased with increasing energy, which was opposite for the materials with an effective high atomic number. We concluded that the tissue substitute materials had a different behavior in the energy ranges from 80 to 130 kVp. So, it is necessary to consider the energy dependence of the substitute materials used for the measurement or calibration of CT number for radiotherapy treatment planning systems. PMID:27391672

  16. Determining thyroid {sup 131}I effective half-life for the treatment planning of Graves' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Willegaignon, Jose; Sapienza, Marcelo T.; Barberio Coura Filho, George; Buchpiguel, Carlos A.; Traino, Antonio C.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Thyroid {sup 131}I effective half-life (T{sub eff}) is an essential parameter in patient therapy when accurate radiation dose is desirable for producing an intended therapeutic outcome. Multiple {sup 131}I uptake measurements and resources from patients themselves and from nuclear medicine facilities are requisites for determining T{sub eff}, these being limiting factors when implementing the treatment planning of Graves' disease (GD) in radionuclide therapy. With the aim of optimizing this process, this study presents a practical, propitious, and accurate method of determining T{sub eff} for dosimetric purposes. Methods: A total of 50 patients with GD were included in this prospective study. Thyroidal {sup 131}I uptake was measured at 2-h, 6-h, 24-h, 48-h, 96-h, and 220-h postradioiodine administration. T{sub eff} was calculated by considering sets of two measured points (24-48-h, 24-96-h, and 24-220-h), sets of three (24-48-96-h, 24-48-220-h, and 24-96-220-h), and sets of four (24-48-96-220-h). Results: When considering all the measured points, the representative T{sub eff} for all the patients was 6.95 ({+-}0.81) days, whereas when using such sets of points as (24-220-h), (24-96-220-h), and (24-48-220-h), this was 6.85 ({+-}0.81), 6.90 ({+-}0.81), and 6.95 ({+-}0.81) days, respectively. According to the mean deviations 2.2 ({+-}2.4)%, 2.1 ({+-}2.0)%, and 0.04 ({+-}0.09)% found in T{sub eff}, calculated based on all the measured points in time, and with methods using the (24-220-h), (24-48-220-h), and (24-96-220-h) sets, respectively, no meaningful statistical difference was noted among the three methods (p > 0.500, t test). Conclusions: T{sub eff} obtained from only two thyroid {sup 131}I uptakes measured at 24-h and 220-h, besides proving to be sufficient, accurate enough, and easily applicable, attributes additional major cost-benefits for patients, and facilitates the application of the method for dosimetric purposes in the treatment planning of

  17. Treatment planning for multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy of breast cancer – from Paris system to anatomy-based inverse planning

    PubMed Central

    Polgár, Csaba

    2017-01-01

    In the last decades, treatment planning for multicatheter interstitial breast brachytherapy has evolved considerably from fluoroscopy-based 2D to anatomy-based 3D planning. To plan the right positions of the catheters, ultrasound or computed tomography (CT) imaging can be used, but the treatment plan is always based on postimplant CT images. With CT imaging, the 3D target volume can be defined more precisely and delineation of the organs at risk volumes is also possible. Consequently, parameters calculated from dose-volume histogram can be used for quantitative plan evaluation. The catheter reconstruction is also easier and faster on CT images compared to X-ray films. In high dose rate brachytherapy, using a stepping source, a number of forward dose optimization methods (manual, geometrical, on dose points, graphical) are available to shape the dose distribution to the target volume, and these influence dose homogeneities to different extent. Currently, inverse optimization algorithms offer new possibilities to improve dose distributions further considering the requirements for dose coverage, dose homogeneity, and dose to organs at risk simultaneously and automatically. In this article, the evolvement of treatment planning for interstitial breast implants is reviewed, different forward optimization methods are discussed, and dose-volume parameters used for quantitative plan evaluation are described. Finally, some questions of the inverse optimization method are investigated and initial experiences of the authors are presented. PMID:28344609

  18. Deliverable navigation for multicriteria step and shoot IMRT treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craft, David; Richter, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We consider Pareto surface based multi-criteria optimization for step and shoot IMRT planning. By analyzing two navigation algorithms, we show both theoretically and in practice that the number of plans needed to form convex combinations of plans during navigation can be kept small (much less than the theoretical maximum number needed in general, which is equal to the number of objectives for on-surface Pareto navigation). Therefore a workable approach for directly deliverable navigation in this setting is to segment the underlying Pareto surface plans and then enforce the mild restriction that only a small number of these plans are active at any time during plan navigation, thus limiting the total number of segments used in the final plan.

  19. Dose perturbation in the presence of metallic implants: treatment planning system versus Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieslander, Elinore; Knöös, Tommy

    2003-10-01

    An increasing number of patients receiving radiation therapy have metallic implants such as hip prostheses. Therefore, beams are normally set up to avoid irradiation through the implant; however, this cannot always be accomplished. In such situations, knowledge of the accuracy of the used treatment planning system (TPS) is required. Two algorithms, the pencil beam (PB) and the collapsed cone (CC), are implemented in the studied TPS. Comparisons are made with Monte Carlo simulations for 6 and 18 MV. The studied materials are steel, CoCrMo, Orthinox® (a stainless steel alloy and registered trademark of Stryker Corporation), TiAlV and Ti. Monte Carlo simulated depth dose curves and dose profiles are compared to CC and PB calculated data. The CC algorithm shows overall a better agreement with Monte Carlo than the PB algorithm. Thus, it is recommended to use the CC algorithm to get the most accurate dose calculation both for the planning target volume and for tissues adjacent to the implants when beams are set up to pass through implants.

  20. Lung cancer: Morphological and functional approach to screening, staging and treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Coche, Emmanuel; Lonneux, Max; Geets, Xavier

    2010-03-01

    Lung cancer is a major problem in public health and constitutes the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world. Lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography is promising but needs to overcome many difficulties, such as the large number of incidentally discovered nodules, the radiation dose delivered to the patient during a whole screening program and its cost. The ultimate target point represented by the reduction of lung cancer-related mortality needs to be proved in large, well-designed, randomized, multicenter, prospective trials. Lung cancer staging by morphological tools seems to be limited owing to the presence of metastases in normal-sized lymph nodes. In this context, multidetector computed tomography cannot be used alone but is useful in conjunction with molecular imaging and MRI. Today, flurodeoxglucose PET-CT appears to be the most accurate method for lung cancer staging and may prevent unnecessary thoracotomies. For treatment planning, flurodeoxglucose PET-CT is playing an increasing role in radiotherapy planning at the target selection and definition steps.

  1. Monte Carlo simulations to support start-up and treatment planning of scanned proton and carbon ion therapy at a synchrotron-based facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parodi, K.; Mairani, A.; Brons, S.; Hasch, B. G.; Sommerer, F.; Naumann, J.; Jäkel, O.; Haberer, T.; Debus, J.

    2012-06-01

    Reliable treatment planning of highly conformal scanned ion beam therapy demands accurate tools for the determination and characterization of the individual pencil-like beams building up the integral dose delivery and related mixed radiation field. At present, clinically practicable inverse treatment planning systems (TPSs) can only rely on fast-performing analytical algorithms. However, the rapidly emerging though more computationally intensive Monte Carlo (MC) methods can be employed to complement analytical TPS, e.g., via accurate calculations of the input beam-model data, together with a considerable reduction of the measuring time. Here we present the work done for the application of the FLUKA MC code to support several aspects of scanned ion beam delivery and treatment planning at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT). Emphasis is given to the generation of the accelerator library and of experimentally validated TPS input basic data which are now in clinical use for proton and carbon ion therapy. Additionally, MC dose calculations of planned treatments in water are shown to represent a valuable tool for supporting treatment plan verification in comparison to dosimetric measurements. This paper can thus provide useful information and guidelines for the start-up and clinical operation of forthcoming ion beam therapy facilities similar to HIT.

  2. Coordinate transformations for BEAM/EGSnrc Monte Carlo dose calculations of non-coplanar fields received from a DICOM-compliant treatment planning system.

    PubMed

    Thebaut, J; Zavgorodni, S

    2006-12-07

    The Monte Carlo (MC) method provides the most accurate to-date dose calculations in heterogeneous media and complex geometries, and this spawns increasing interest in incorporating MC calculations in the treatment planning quality assurance process. This process involves MC dose calculations for the treatment plans produced clinically. Commonly used in radiotherapy, MC codes are BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc, which transport particles in a coordinate system (c.s.) that has been established historically and does not correspond to the c.s. of treatment planning systems (TPSs). Relative rotations of these c.s. are not straightforward, especially for non-coplanar treatments. Transformation equations are therefore required to re-calculate a treatment plan using BEAM/DOSXYZnrc codes. This paper presents such transformations for beam angles defined in a DICOM-compliant treatment planning coordinate system. Verification of the derived transformations with two three-field plans simulated on a phantom using TPS as well as MC codes has been performed demonstrating exact geometrical agreement of the MC treatment fields' placement.

  3. NOTE: Coordinate transformations for BEAM/EGSnrc Monte Carlo dose calculations of non-coplanar fields received from a DICOM-compliant treatment planning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thebaut, J.; Zavgorodni, S.

    2006-12-01

    The Monte Carlo (MC) method provides the most accurate to-date dose calculations in heterogeneous media and complex geometries, and this spawns increasing interest in incorporating MC calculations in the treatment planning quality assurance process. This process involves MC dose calculations for the treatment plans produced clinically. Commonly used in radiotherapy, MC codes are BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc, which transport particles in a coordinate system (c.s.) that has been established historically and does not correspond to the c.s. of treatment planning systems (TPSs). Relative rotations of these c.s. are not straightforward, especially for non-coplanar treatments. Transformation equations are therefore required to re-calculate a treatment plan using BEAM/DOSXYZnrc codes. This paper presents such transformations for beam angles defined in a DICOM-compliant treatment planning coordinate system. Verification of the derived transformations with two three-field plans simulated on a phantom using TPS as well as MC codes has been performed demonstrating exact geometrical agreement of the MC treatment fields' placement.

  4. Case report of a near medical event in stereotactic radiotherapy due to improper units of measure from a treatment planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Gladstone, D. J.; Li, S.; Jarvis, L. A.; Hartford, A. C.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The authors hereby notify the Radiation Oncology community of a potentially lethal error due to improper implementation of linear units of measure in a treatment planning system. The authors report an incident in which a patient was nearly mistreated during a stereotactic radiotherapy procedure due to inappropriate reporting of stereotactic coordinates by the radiation therapy treatment planning system in units of centimeter rather than in millimeter. The authors suggest a method to detect such errors during treatment planning so they are caught and corrected prior to the patient positioning for treatment on the treatment machine. Methods: Using pretreatment imaging, the authors found that stereotactic coordinates are reported with improper linear units by a treatment planning system. The authors have implemented a redundant, independent method of stereotactic coordinate calculation. Results: Implementation of a double check of stereotactic coordinates via redundant, independent calculation is simple and accurate. Use of this technique will avoid any future error in stereotactic treatment coordinates due to improper linear units, transcription, or other similar errors. Conclusions: The authors recommend an independent double check of stereotactic treatment coordinates during the treatment planning process in order to avoid potential mistreatment of patients.

  5. Towards integration of PET/MR hybrid imaging into radiation therapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Paulus, Daniel H.; Thorwath, Daniela; Schmidt, Holger; Quick, Harald H.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Multimodality imaging has become an important adjunct of state-of-the-art radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning. Recently, simultaneous PET/MR hybrid imaging has become clinically available and may also contribute to target volume delineation and biological individualization in RT planning. For integration of PET/MR hybrid imaging into RT treatment planning, compatible dedicated RT devices are required for accurate patient positioning. In this study, prototype RT positioning devices intended for PET/MR hybrid imaging are introduced and tested toward PET/MR compatibility and image quality. Methods: A prototype flat RT table overlay and two radiofrequency (RF) coil holders that each fix one flexible body matrix RF coil for RT head/neck imaging have been evaluated within this study. MR image quality with the RT head setup was compared to the actual PET/MR setup with a dedicated head RF coil. PET photon attenuation and CT-based attenuation correction (AC) of the hardware components has been quantitatively evaluated by phantom scans. Clinical application of the new RT setup in PET/MR imaging was evaluated in anin vivo study. Results: The RT table overlay and RF coil holders are fully PET/MR compatible. MR phantom and volunteer imaging with the RT head setup revealed high image quality, comparable to images acquired with the dedicated PET/MR head RF coil, albeit with 25% reduced SNR. Repositioning accuracy of the RF coil holders was below 1 mm. PET photon attenuation of the RT table overlay was calculated to be 3.8% and 13.8% for the RF coil holders. With CT-based AC of the devices, the underestimation error was reduced to 0.6% and 0.8%, respectively. Comparable results were found within the patient study. Conclusions: The newly designed RT devices for hybrid PET/MR imaging are PET and MR compatible. The mechanically rigid design and the reproducible positioning allow for straightforward CT-based AC. The systematic evaluation within this study provides the

  6. Radiation therapy treatment plan optimization accounting for random and systematic patient setup uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Joseph Andrew

    2011-12-01

    External-beam radiotherapy is one of the primary methods for treating cancer. Typically a radiotherapy treatment course consists of radiation delivered to the patient in multiple daily treatment fractions over 6--8 weeks. Each fraction requires the patient to be aligned with the image acquired before the treatment course used in treatment planning. Unfortunately, patient alignment is not perfect and results in residual errors in patient setup. The standard technique for dealing with errors in patient setup is to expand the volume of the target by some margin to ensure the target receives the planned dose in the presence of setup errors. This work develops an alternative to margins for accommodating setup errors in the treatment planning process by directly including patient setup uncertainty in IMRT plan optimization. This probabilistic treatment planning (PTP) operates directly on the planning structure and develops a dose distribution robust to variations in the patient position. Two methods are presented. The first method includes only random setup uncertainty in the planning process by convolving the fluence of each beam with a Gaussian model of the distribution of random setup errors. The second method builds upon this by adding systematic uncertainty to optimization by way of a joint optimization over multiple probable patient positions. To assess the benefit of PTP methods, a PTP plan and a margin-based plan are developed for each of the 28 patients used in this study. Comparisons of plans show that PTP plans generally reduce the dose to normal tissues while maintaining a similar dose to the target structure when compared to margin-based plans. Physician assessment indicates that PTP plans are generally preferred over margin-based plans. PTP methods shows potential for improving patient outcome due to reduced complications associated with treatment.

  7. Development of Advanced Multi-Modality Radiation Treatment Planning Software

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D W; Hartmann Siantar, C

    2002-02-19

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has long been active in development of advanced Monte-Carlo based computational dosimetry and treatment planning methods and software for advanced radiotherapy, with a particular focus on Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) and, to a somewhat lesser extent, Fast-Neutron Therapy. The most recent INEEL software product system of this type is known as SERA, Simulation Environment for Radiotherapy Applications. SERA is at a mature level in its life cycle, it has been licensed for research use worldwide, and it has become well established as a computational tool for research. However, along with its strengths, SERA also has some limitations in its structure and computational methodologies. More specifically, it is optimized only for neutron-based applications. Although photon transport can be computed with SERA, the simplified model that is used is designed primarily for photons produced in the neutron transport process. Thus SERA is not appropriate for applications to, for example, standard external-beam photon radiotherapy, which is by far more commonly used in the clinic than neutron based therapy.

  8. A comparison of three inverse treatment planning algorithms.

    PubMed

    Holmes, T; Mackie, T R

    1994-01-01

    Three published inverse treatment planning algorithms for physical optimization of external beam radiotherapy are compared. All three algorithms attempt to minimize a quadratic objective function of the dose distribution. It is shown that the algorithms are based on the common framework of Newton's method of multi-dimensional function minimization. The approximations used within this framework to obtain the different algorithms are described. The use of these algorithms requires that the number of weights of elemental dose distributions be equal to the number of sample points taken in the dose volume. The primary factor in determining how the algorithms are implemented is the dose computation model. Two of the algorithms use pencil beam dose models and therefore directly optimize individual pencil beam weights, whereas the third algorithm is implemented to optimize groups of pencil beams, each group converging upon a common point. All dose computation models assume that the irradiated medium is homogeneous. It is shown that the two different implementations produce similar results for the simple optimization problem of conforming dose to a convex target shape. Complex optimization problems consisting of non-convex target shapes and dose limiting structures are shown to require a pencil beam optimization method.

  9. Partial differential equations-based segmentation for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Gibou, Frederic; Levy, Doron; Cardenas, Carlos; Liu, Pingyu; Boyer, Arthur

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop automatic algorithms for the segmentation phase of radiotherapy treatment planning. We develop new image processing techniques that are based on solving a partial diferential equation for the evolution of the curve that identifies the segmented organ. The velocity function is based on the piecewise Mumford-Shah functional. Our method incorporates information about the target organ into classical segmentation algorithms. This information, which is given in terms of a three- dimensional wireframe representation of the organ, serves as an initial guess for the segmentation algorithm. We check the performance of the new algorithm on eight data sets of three diferent organs: rectum, bladder, and kidney. The results of the automatic segmentation were compared with a manual seg- mentation of each data set by radiation oncology faculty and residents. The quality of the automatic segmentation was measured with the k-statistics", and with a count of over- and undersegmented frames, and was shown in most cases to be very close to the manual segmentation of the same data. A typical segmentation of an organ with sixty slices takes less than ten seconds on a Pentium IV laptop.

  10. Orthodontics: computer-aided diagnosis and treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Yaxing; Li, Zhongke; Wei, Suyuan; Deng, Fanglin; Yao, Sen

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the outline of our newly developed computer-aided 3D dental cast analyzing system with laser scanning, and its preliminary clinical applications. The system is composed of a scanning device and a personal computer as a scanning controller and post processor. The scanning device is composed of a laser beam emitter, two sets of linear CCD cameras and a table which is rotatable by two-degree-of-freedom. The rotating is controlled precisely by a personal computer. The dental cast is projected and scanned with a laser beam. Triangulation is applied to determine the location of each point. Generation of 3D graphics of the dental cast takes approximately 40 minutes. About 170,000 sets of X,Y,Z coordinates are store for one dental cast. Besides the conventional linear and angular measurements of the dental cast, we are also able to demonstrate the size of the top surface area of each molar. The advantage of this system is that it facilitates the otherwise complicated and time- consuming mock surgery necessary for treatment planning in orthognathic surgery.

  11. Planning and execution of Raft River stimulation treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Verity, R.V.; Crichlow, H.B.

    1980-02-07

    The following topics are discussed for two Raft River Valley wells: well characteristics and treatment objectives, treatment selection and design, treatment history, mechanical arrangements and job costs. (MHR)

  12. IMRT treatment planning on 4D geometries for the era of dynamic MLC tracking.

    PubMed

    Suh, Yelin; Murray, Walter; Keall, Paul J

    2014-12-01

    The problem addressed here was to obtain optimal and deliverable dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf sequences from four-dimensional (4D) geometries for dynamic MLC tracking delivery. The envisaged scenario was where respiratory phase and position information of the target was available during treatment, from which the optimal treatment plan could be further adapted in real time. A tool for 4D treatment plan optimization was developed that integrates a commercially available treatment planning system and a general-purpose optimization system. The 4D planning method was applied to the 4D computed tomography planning scans of three lung cancer patients. The optimization variables were MLC leaf positions as a function of monitor units and respiratory phase. The objective function was the deformable dose-summed 4D treatment plan score. MLC leaf motion was constrained by the maximum leaf velocity between control points in terms of monitor units for tumor motion parallel to the leaf travel direction and between phases for tumor motion parallel to the leaf travel direction. For comparison and a starting point for the 4D optimization, three-dimensional (3D) optimization was performed on each of the phases. The output of the 4D IMRT planning process is a leaf sequence which is a function of both monitor unit and phase, which can be delivered to a patient whose breathing may vary between the imaging and treatment sessions. The 4D treatment plan score improved during 4D optimization by 34%, 4%, and 50% for Patients A, B, and C, respectively, indicating 4D optimization generated a better 4D treatment plan than the deformable sum of individually optimized phase plans. The dose-volume histograms for each phase remained similar, indicating robustness of the 4D treatment plan to respiratory variations expected during treatment delivery. In summary, 4D optimization for respiratory phase-dependent treatment planning with dynamic MLC motion tracking improved the 4D treatment plan

  13. Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Cory, K.; Sterling, J.; Taylor, M.; McLaren, J.

    2014-01-01

    Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. Through interviews and a questionnaire, the authors gathered information on utility supply planning and how solar is represented. Utilities were asked to provide their resource planning process details, key assumptions (e.g. whether DG is represented as supply or negative load), modeling methodology (e.g. type of risk analytics and candidate portfolio development), capacity expansion and production simulation model software, and solar project representation (project size, capacity value and integration cost adder). This presentation aims to begin the exchange of information between utilities, regulators and other stakeholders by capturing utility-provided information about: 1) how various utilities approach long-range resource planning; 2) methods and tools utilities use to conduct resource planning; and, 3) how solar technologies are considered in the resource planning process.

  14. Radiotherapy treatment planning based on Monte Carlo techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juste, Belén; Miró, Rafael; Campayo, Juan M.; Díez, Sergio; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2010-07-01

    At the present, treatment planning systems (TPS) used in radiotherapy treatments use determinist correlations based on measurements in water to evaluate doses in the volume of interest and dose distributions around it. Nevertheless, it is well known that doses assigned with this type of planner can be problematic, especially in the presence of heterogeneities. The present work has developed a computational model using the Monte Carlo (MC) code MCNP5 (Monte Carlo N-Particle) for the simulation of a 6 MeV photon beam emitted by Elekta Precise medical linear accelerator treatment head. The model includes the major components of the accelerator head and the cube-shaped heterogeneous water tank " RFA-300". A low-density heterogeneity has been placed inside this water tank. It consists of a extruded polystyrene piece (97% air and 3% polystyrene) whose dimensions are 30 cm×10 cm×8 cm and with a density of 0.0311 g/cm 3. Calculations were performed for a photon beam setting 10 cm×10 cm and 20 cm×20 cm irradiation field sizes at 100 cm distance from source. The MC simulation is able to predict the absorbed dose distribution within the water tank using the *F8 or FMESH4 tally. These results have been compared with experimental values measured at the Hospital Clínic Universitari de Valencia. Dosimetric parameters calculated by simulation at the water tank and the experimental measures agreed, with an average deviation inside the heterogeneity region of 3%. Simulation results have been also compared with dose curves predicted by a commercial TPS in the same irradiation conditions, focusing attention on the accuracy that both systems reach in the dose calculation at the interphase zone and inside the heterogeneity. In contrast, TPS results overestimate the dose inside the heterogeneity and after it, with a maximum deviation of 7% for the 6 MeV photon beam and a field size of 20 cm×20 cm. We can conclude that the algorithms of computation of the TPS are not able to predict

  15. MR Imaging Based Treatment Planning for Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    recomputing MRI- based IMRT plans using patient CT data and an IMRT QA phantom . The differences in dose distributions between MRI plans and the...corresponding recomputed plans were generally within 3%/3mm. The differences in isocenter doses between MRI dose calculation and phantom measurements were...GDC correction due to system induced distortion. We performed phantom measurements to calibrate/quantify MRI distortion at different axial planes to

  16. MR Imaging Based Treatment Planning for Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    after the GDC could be quantified by phantom measurements and further reduced by our point-by-point correction technique. The effective field of view...plans using patient CT data and an IMRT QA phantom . The differences in dose distributions between MRI plans and the corresponding recomputed plans...were generally within 3%/3mm. The differences in isocenter doses between MRI dose calculation and phantom measurements were within our clinical

  17. A comparison of measurement techniques for quality assurance of RapidArc treatment plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konieczny, Jeff

    in a high level of variation. After calibration, the original five plans and their modified MLC gap variants were tested. A comparison of the Eclipse plans with changes in leaf position to the original plan with 0 mm change in gap shows that the film should have the least sensitivity to changes in average gamma. When looking at the measured results with changes in MLC gap compared to the measured plan with 0 mm change in leaf position, we see that film incorrectly appears to have the highest sensitivity. The cause of this was due to the large variation in average gamma discovered during the repeatability tests. By comparing the repeatability value of 0.31 ± 0.13 to the sensitivity curve generated by Eclipse, it is estimated that film cannot accurately measure changes in systematic gap less than 2 mm. A similar value was found by Yan et al. 15 when using the 2 % / 2 mm γ <= 1 pass rate. The EPID and ArcCheck displayed significantly less variation in average gamma during static tests (0.07 ± 0.03 and 0.10 ± 0.04 respectively). Using the Eclipse calculated graph showing changes in average gamma compared to changes in MLC gap, we find that the EPID and ArcCheck should be able to measure systematic MLC errors of greater than 0.3mm. Previous analysis on MLC motion indicates that most positional errors are below 0.5 mm16 , which makes it difficult to conclude if the repeatability of the device is limited by the detector, or by actual errors in MLC leaf position on the treatment machine. For systematic gap width changes in the range of 0 to 1 mm, the EPID and ArcCheck show similar sensitivity. This thesis has focused on how the average gamma value changes when comparing systematic changes in MLC gap to their original unchanged plan. Although the results are not conclusive, they do indicate that further testing may be warranted. Future testing should involve other treatment sites with steeper dose gradients such as head and neck plans. To ensure clinical relevancy

  18. Federal Facilities Compliance Act, Draft Site Treatment Plan: Background Volume, Part 2, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-31

    This Draft Site Treatment Plan was prepared by Ames Laboratory to meet the requirements of the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Topics discussed include: purpose and scope of the plan; site history and mission; draft plant organization; waste minimization; waste characterization; preferred option selection process; technology for treating low-level radioactive wastes and TRU wastes; future generation of mixed waste streams; funding; and process for evaluating disposal issues in support of the site treatment plan.

  19. Automatic liver tumor segmentation on computed tomography for patient treatment planning and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Moghbel, Mehrdad; Mashohor, Syamsiah; Mahmud, Rozi; Saripan, M Iqbal Bin

    2016-01-01

    Segmentation of liver tumors from Computed Tomography (CT) and tumor burden analysis play an important role in the choice of therapeutic strategies for liver diseases and treatment monitoring. In this paper, a new segmentation method for liver tumors from contrast-enhanced CT imaging is proposed. As manual segmentation of tumors for liver treatment planning is both labor intensive and time-consuming, a highly accurate automatic tumor segmentation is desired. The proposed framework is fully automatic requiring no user interaction. The proposed segmentation evaluated on real-world clinical data from patients is based on a hybrid method integrating cuckoo optimization and fuzzy c-means algorithm with random walkers algorithm. The accuracy of the proposed method was validated using a clinical liver dataset containing one of the highest numbers of tumors utilized for liver tumor segmentation containing 127 tumors in total with further validation of the results by a consultant radiologist. The proposed method was able to achieve one of the highest accuracies reported in the literature for liver tumor segmentation compared to other segmentation methods with a mean overlap error of 22.78 % and dice similarity coefficient of 0.75 in 3Dircadb dataset and a mean overlap error of 15.61 % and dice similarity coefficient of 0.81 in MIDAS dataset. The proposed method was able to outperform most other tumor segmentation methods reported in the literature while representing an overlap error improvement of 6 % compared to one of the best performing automatic methods in the literature. The proposed framework was able to provide consistently accurate results considering the number of tumors and the variations in tumor contrast enhancements and tumor appearances while the tumor burden was estimated with a mean error of 0.84 % in 3Dircadb dataset.

  20. Automatic liver tumor segmentation on computed tomography for patient treatment planning and monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Moghbel, Mehrdad; Mashohor, Syamsiah; Mahmud, Rozi; Saripan, M. Iqbal Bin

    2016-01-01

    Segmentation of liver tumors from Computed Tomography (CT) and tumor burden analysis play an important role in the choice of therapeutic strategies for liver diseases and treatment monitoring. In this paper, a new segmentation method for liver tumors from contrast-enhanced CT imaging is proposed. As manual segmentation of tumors for liver treatment planning is both labor intensive and time-consuming, a highly accurate automatic tumor segmentation is desired. The proposed framework is fully automatic requiring no user interaction. The proposed segmentation evaluated on real-world clinical data from patients is based on a hybrid method integrating cuckoo optimization and fuzzy c-means algorithm with random walkers algorithm. The accuracy of the proposed method was validated using a clinical liver dataset containing one of the highest numbers of tumors utilized for liver tumor segmentation containing 127 tumors in total with further validation of the results by a consultant radiologist. The proposed method was able to achieve one of the highest accuracies reported in the literature for liver tumor segmentation compared to other segmentation methods with a mean overlap error of 22.78 % and dice similarity coefficient of 0.75 in 3Dircadb dataset and a mean overlap error of 15.61 % and dice similarity coefficient of 0.81 in MIDAS dataset. The proposed method was able to outperform most other tumor segmentation methods reported in the literature while representing an overlap error improvement of 6 % compared to one of the best performing automatic methods in the literature. The proposed framework was able to provide consistently accurate results considering the number of tumors and the variations in tumor contrast enhancements and tumor appearances while the tumor burden was estimated with a mean error of 0.84 % in 3Dircadb dataset. PMID:27540353

  1. HTGR Spent Fuel Treatment Program. HTGR Spent Fuel Treatment Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    The spent fuel treatment (SFT) program plan addresses spent fuel volume reduction, packaging, storage, transportation, fuel recovery, and disposal to meet the needs of the HTGR Lead Plant and follow-on plants. In the near term, fuel refabrication will be addressed by following developments in fresh fuel fabrication and will be developed in the long term as decisions on the alternatives dictate. The formulation of this revised program plan considered the implications of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) which, for the first time, established a definitive national policy for management and disposal of nuclear wastes. Although the primary intent of the program is to address technical issues, the divergence between commercial and government interests, which arises as a result of certain provisions of the NWPA, must be addressed in the economic assessment of technically feasible alternative paths in the management of spent HTGR fuel and waste. This new SFT program plan also incorporates a significant cooperative research and development program between the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany. The major objective of this international program is to reduce costs by avoiding duplicate efforts.

  2. Comparison of treatment plans: a retrospective study by the method of radiobiological evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzhakkal, Niyas; Kallikuzhiyil Kochunny, Abdullah; Manthala Padannayil, Noufal; Singh, Navin; Elavan Chalil, Jumanath; Kulangarakath Umer, Jamshad

    2016-09-01

    There are many situations in radiotherapy where multiple treatment plans need to be compared for selection of an optimal plan. In this study we performed the radiobiological method of plan evaluation to verify the treatment plan comparison procedure of our clinical practice. We estimated and correlated various radiobiological dose indices with physical dose metrics for a total of 30 patients representing typical cases of head and neck, prostate and brain tumors. Three sets of plans along with a clinically approved plan (final plan) treated by either Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) or Rapid Arc (RA) techniques were considered. The study yielded improved target coverage for final plans, however, no appreciable differences in doses and the complication probabilities of organs at risk were noticed. Even though all four plans showed adequate dose distributions, from dosimetric point of view, the final plan had more acceptable dose distribution. The estimated biological outcome and dose volume histogram data showed least differences between plans for IMRT when compared to RA. Our retrospective study based on 120 plans, validated the radiobiological method of plan evaluation. The tumor cure or normal tissue complication probabilities were found to be correlated with the corresponding physical dose indices.

  3. Manpower Planning for Municipal Wastewater Treatment in Texas, LP-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Dept. of Water Resources, Austin.

    This report presents the implementation results of a pilot test of a manpower planning methodology developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Office of Water Programs. Project outputs and projections are described and illustrated in sections of the report dealing with work to be done, organizational staffing plan, transfers and…

  4. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-05: SQL Database Queries to Determine Treatment Planning Resource Usage

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, C; Gladstone, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A radiation oncology clinic’s treatment capacity is traditionally thought to be limited by the number of machines in the clinic. As the number of fractions per course decrease and the number of adaptive plans increase, the question of how many treatment plans a clinic can plan becomes increasingly important. This work seeks to lay the ground work for assessing treatment planning resource usage. Methods: Care path templates were created using the Aria 11 care path interface. Care path tasks included key steps in the treatment planning process from the completion of CT simulation through the first radiation treatment. SQL Server Management Studio was used to run SQL queries to extract task completion time stamps along with care path template information and diagnosis codes from the Aria database. 6 months of planning cycles were evaluated. Elapsed time was evaluated in terms of work hours within Monday – Friday, 7am to 5pm. Results: For the 195 validated treatment planning cycles, the average time for planning and MD review was 22.8 hours. Of those cases 33 were categorized as urgent. The average planning time for urgent plans was 5 hours. A strong correlation between diagnosis code and range of elapsed planning time was as well as between elapsed time and select diagnosis codes was observed. It was also observed that tasks were more likely to be completed on the date due than the time that they were due. Follow-up confirmed that most users did not look at the due time. Conclusion: Evaluation of elapsed planning time and other tasks suggest that care paths should be adjusted to allow for different contouring and planning times for certain diagnosis codes and urgent cases. Additional clinic training around task due times vs dates or a structuring of care paths around due dates is also needed.

  5. SU-E-T-337: Treatment Planning Study of Craniospinal Irradiation with Spot Scanning Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tasson, A; Beltran, C; Laack, N; Childs, S; Tryggestad, E; Whitaker, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a treatment planning technique that achieves optimal robustness against systematic position and range uncertainties, and interfield position errors for craniospinal irradiation (CSI) using spot scanning proton radiotherapy. Methods: Eighteen CSI patients who had previously been treated using photon radiation were used for this study. Eight patients were less than 10 years old. The prescription dose was 23.4Gy in 1.8Gy fractions. Two different field arrangement types were investigated: 1 posterior field per isocenter and 2 posterior oblique fields per isocenter. For each field type, two delivery configurations were used: 5cm bolus attached to the treatment table and a 4.5cm range shifter located inside the nozzle. The target for each plan was the whole brain and thecal sac. For children under the age of 10, all plan types were repeated with an additional dose of 21Gy prescribed to the vertebral bodies. Treatment fields were matched by stepping down the dose in 10% increments over 9cm. Robustness against 3% and 3mm uncertainties, as well as a 3mm inter-field error was analyzed. Dose coverage of the target and critical structure sparing for each plan type will be considered. Ease of planning and treatment delivery was also considered for each plan type. Results: The mean dose volume histograms show that the bolus plan with posterior beams gave the best overall plan, and all proton plans were comparable to or better than the photon plans. The plan type that was the most robust against the imposed uncertainties was also the bolus plan with posterior beams. This is also the plan configuration that is the easiest to deliver and plan. Conclusion: The bolus plan with posterior beams achieved optimal robustness against systematic position and range uncertainties, as well as inter-field position errors.

  6. A Monte Carlo investigation of lung brachytherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, J. G. H.; Furutani, K. M.; Thomson, R. M.

    2013-07-01

    Iodine-125 (125I) and Caesium-131 (131Cs) brachytherapy have been used in conjunction with sublobar resection to reduce the local recurrence of stage I non-small cell lung cancer compared with resection alone. Treatment planning for this procedure is typically performed using only a seed activity nomogram or look-up table to determine seed strand spacing for the implanted mesh. Since the post-implant seed geometry is difficult to predict, the nomogram is calculated using the TG-43 formalism for seeds in a planar geometry. In this work, the EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose is used to recalculate nomograms using a variety of tissue models for 125I and 131Cs seeds. Calculated prescription doses are compared to those calculated using TG-43. Additionally, patient CT and contour data are used to generate virtual implants to study the effects that post-implant deformation and patient-specific tissue heterogeneity have on perturbing nomogram-derived dose distributions. Differences of up to 25% in calculated prescription dose are found between TG-43 and Monte Carlo calculations with the TG-43 formalism underestimating prescription doses in general. Differences between the TG-43 formalism and Monte Carlo calculated prescription doses are greater for 125I than for 131Cs seeds. Dose distributions are found to change significantly based on implant deformation and tissues surrounding implants for patient-specific virtual implants. Results suggest that accounting for seed grid deformation and the effects of non-water media, at least approximately, are likely required to reliably predict dose distributions in lung brachytherapy patients.

  7. Functional anatomy of the prostate: Implications for treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, Patrick W. . E-mail: mclaughb@umich.edu; Troyer, Sara; Berri, Sally; Narayana, Vrinda; Meirowitz, Amichay; Roberson, Peter L.; Montie, James

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: To summarize the functional anatomy relevant to prostate cancer treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Coronal, axial, and sagittal T2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRI angiography were fused by mutual information and registered with computed tomography (CT) scan data sets to improve definition of zonal anatomy of the prostate and critical adjacent structures. Results: The three major prostate zones (inner, outer, and anterior fibromuscular) are visible by T2 MRI imaging. The bladder, bladder neck, and internal (preprostatic) sphincter are a continuous muscular structure and clear definition of the preprostatic sphincter is difficult by MRI. Transition zone hypertrophy may efface the bladder neck and internal sphincter. The external 'lower' sphincter is clearly visible by T2 MRI with wide variations in length. The critical erectile structures are the internal pudendal artery (defined by MRI angiogram or T2 MRI), corpus cavernosum, and neurovascular bundle. The neurovascular bundle is visible along the posterior lateral surface of the prostate on CT and MRI, but its terminal branches (cavernosal nerves) are not visible and must be defined by their relationship to the urethra within the genitourinary diaphragm. Visualization of the ejaculatory ducts within the prostate is possible on sagittal MRI. The anatomy of the prostate-rectum interface is clarified by MRI, as is the potentially important distinction of rectal muscle and rectal mucosa. Conclusion: Improved understanding of functional anatomy and imaging of the prostate and critical adjacent structures will improve prostate radiation therapy by improvement of dose and toxicity correlation, limitation of dose to critical structures, and potential improvement in post therapy quality of life.

  8. Computed tomography imaging parameters for inhomogeneity correction in radiation treatment planning

    PubMed Central

    Das, Indra J.; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Cao, Minsong; Johnstone, Peter A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Modern treatment planning systems provide accurate dosimetry in heterogeneous media (such as a patient' body) with the help of tissue characterization based on computed tomography (CT) number. However, CT number depends on the type of scanner, tube voltage, field of view (FOV), reconstruction algorithm including artifact reduction and processing filters. The impact of these parameters on CT to electron density (ED) conversion had been subject of investigation for treatment planning in various clinical situations. This is usually performed with a tissue characterization phantom with various density plugs acquired with different tube voltages (kilovoltage peak), FOV reconstruction and different scanners to generate CT number to ED tables. This article provides an overview of inhomogeneity correction in the context of CT scanning and a new evaluation tool, difference volume dose-volume histogram (DVH), dV-DVH. It has been concluded that scanner and CT parameters are important for tissue characterizations, but changes in ED are minimal and only pronounced for higher density materials. For lungs, changes in CT number are minimal among scanners and CT parameters. Dosimetric differences for lung and prostate cases are usually insignificant (<2%) in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and < 5% for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with CT parameters. It could be concluded that CT number variability is dependent on acquisition parameters, but its dosimetric impact is pronounced only in high-density media and possibly in IMRT. In view of such small dosimetric changes in low-density medium, the acquisition of additional CT data for financially difficult clinics and countries may not be warranted. PMID:27051164

  9. Attenuation Estimation and Temperature Imaging Using Backscatter for Extracorporeal HIFU Treatment Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civale, John; Bamber, Jeff; Miller, Naomi; Rivens, Ian; ter Haar, Gail

    2007-05-01

    For HIFU to be widely applicable in the clinic, problems relating to treatment planning, delivery and monitoring need to be resolved. The characterisation of the acoustic and thermal properties of specific tissues is an important pre-requisite to determining the optimal exposure parameters for individual treatments. We describe a preliminary evaluation of two methods that may be of use in deriving such planning information prior to HIFU. Both methods have been implemented on a diagnostic ultrasound scanner. One is backscatter attenuation estimation (BAE), which uses pulse-echo data and an axial beam translation substitution method to estimate the average attenuation coefficient of tissue overlying the region to be treated. The second method is backscatter temperature imaging (BTI) applied to a non-lesioning test exposure, which is normally used to determine the focal position but here the observed peak temperature rise is employed to provide an estimate of all case-specific losses involved in delivering a dose of thermal energy. HIFU lesioning experiments were performed in ex vivo bovine liver tissue, and used to test the ability of BAE and BTI to provide accurate information for adjusting the HIFU power so as to compensate for varying ultrasonic attenuation by overlying tissues (mimicked by gels with different attenuation properties). HIFU-induced lesions were made according to two types of exposure regime, (a) without regard for the differing attenuation coefficients of gels placed between the HIFU transducer and the tissue to be treated, and (b) after adjusting the HIFU drive power according to corrections derived from BAE and BTI measurements. Both correction methods were found to improve lesion size reproducibility, as measured from cut lesioned tissue specimens, although BTI performed better than BAE. The paper discusses likely reasons for this, as well as problems to be overcome if either method is to be clinically useful.

  10. A semiautomatic tool for prostate segmentation in radiotherapy treatment planning

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Delineation of the target volume is a time-consuming task in radiotherapy treatment planning, yet essential for a successful treatment of cancers such as prostate cancer. To facilitate the delineation procedure, the paper proposes an intuitive approach for 3D modeling of the prostate by slice-wise best fitting ellipses. Methods The proposed estimate is initialized by the definition of a few control points in a new patient. The method is not restricted to particular image modalities but assumes a smooth shape with elliptic cross sections of the object. A training data set of 23 patients was used to calculate a prior shape model. The mean shape model was evaluated based on the manual contour of 10 test patients. The patient records of training and test data are based on axial T1-weighted 3D fast-field echo (FFE) sequences. The manual contours were considered as the reference model. Volume overlap (Vo), accuracy (Ac) (both ratio, range 0-1, optimal value 1) and Hausdorff distance (HD) (mm, optimal value 0) were calculated as evaluation parameters. Results The median and median absolute deviation (MAD) between manual delineation and deformed mean best fitting ellipses (MBFE) was Vo (0.9 ± 0.02), Ac (0.81 ± 0.03) and HD (4.05 ± 1.3)mm and between manual delineation and best fitting ellipses (BFE) was Vo (0.96 ± 0.01), Ac (0.92 ± 0.01) and HD (1.6 ± 0.27)mm. Additional results show a moderate improvement of the MBFE results after Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) method. Conclusions The results emphasize the potential of the proposed method of modeling the prostate by best fitting ellipses. It shows the robustness and reproducibility of the model. A small sample test on 8 patients suggest possible time saving using the model. PMID:24460666

  11. Determining the incident electron fluence for Monte Carlo-based photon treatment planning using a standard measured data set.

    PubMed

    Keall, Paul J; Siebers, Jeffrey V; Libby, Bruce; Mohan, Radhe

    2003-04-01

    An accurate dose calculation in phantom and patient geometries requires an accurate description of the radiation source. Errors in the radiation source description are propagated through the dose calculation. With the emergence of linear accelerators whose dosimetric characteristics are similar to within measurement uncertainty, the same radiation source description can be used as the input to dose calculation for treatment planning at many institutions with the same linear accelerator model. Our goal in the current research was to determine the initial electron fluence above the linear accelerator target for such an accelerator to allow a dose calculation in water to within 1% or 1 mm of the measured data supplied by the manufacturer. The method used for both the radiation source description and the patient transport was Monte Carlo. The linac geometry was input into the Monte Carlo code using the accelerator's manufacturer's specifications. Assumptions about the initial electron source above the target were made based on previous studies. The free parameters derived for the calculations were the mean energy and radial Gaussian width of the initial electron fluence and the target density. A combination of the free parameters yielded an initial electron fluence that, when transported through the linear accelerator and into the phantom, allowed a dose-calculation agreement to the experimental ion chamber data to within the specified criteria at both 6 and 18 MV nominal beam energies, except near the surface, particularly for the 18 MV beam. To save time during Monte Carlo treatment planning, the initial electron fluence was transported through part of the treatment head to a plane between the monitor chambers and the jaws and saved as phase-space files. These files are used for clinical Monte Carlo-based treatment planning and are freely available from the authors.

  12. Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, J.; McLaren, J.; Taylor, M.; Cory, K.

    2013-10-01

    Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. State and federal support policies, solar photovoltaic (PV) price declines, and the introduction of new business models for solar PV 'ownership' are leading to increasing interest in solar technologies (especially PV); however, solar introduces myriad new variables into the utility resource planning decision. Most, but not all, utility planners have less experience analyzing solar than conventional generation as part of capacity planning, portfolio evaluation, and resource procurement decisions. To begin to build this knowledge, utility staff expressed interest in one effort: utility exchanges regarding data, methods, challenges, and solutions for incorporating solar in the planning process. Through interviews and a questionnaire, this report aims to begin this exchange of information and capture utility-provided information about: 1) how various utilities approach long-range resource planning; 2) methods and tools utilities use to conduct resource planning; and, 3) how solar technologies are considered in the resource planning process.

  13. 42 CFR 485.916 - Condition of participation: Treatment team, person-centered active treatment plan, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND.... The active treatment plan must take into consideration client recovery goals and the issues identified... addressing environmental factors such as housing and employment....

  14. An Automated Treatment Plan Quality Control Tool for Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Using a Voxel-Weighting Factor-Based Re-Optimization Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Song, Ting; Li, Nan; Zarepisheh, Masoud; Li, Yongbao; Gautier, Quentin; Zhou, Linghong; Mell, Loren; Jiang, Steve; Cerviño, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) currently plays an important role in radiotherapy, but its treatment plan quality can vary significantly among institutions and planners. Treatment plan quality control (QC) is a necessary component for individual clinics to ensure that patients receive treatments with high therapeutic gain ratios. The voxel-weighting factor-based plan re-optimization mechanism has been proved able to explore a larger Pareto surface (solution domain) and therefore increase the possibility of finding an optimal treatment plan. In this study, we incorporated additional modules into an in-house developed voxel weighting factor-based re-optimization algorithm, which was enhanced as a highly automated and accurate IMRT plan QC tool (TPS-QC tool). After importing an under-assessment plan, the TPS-QC tool was able to generate a QC report within 2 minutes. This QC report contains the plan quality determination as well as information supporting the determination. Finally, the IMRT plan quality can be controlled by approving quality-passed plans and replacing quality-failed plans using the TPS-QC tool. The feasibility and accuracy of the proposed TPS-QC tool were evaluated using 25 clinically approved cervical cancer patient IMRT plans and 5 manually created poor-quality IMRT plans. The results showed high consistency between the QC report quality determinations and the actual plan quality. In the 25 clinically approved cases that the TPS-QC tool identified as passed, a greater difference could be observed for dosimetric endpoints for organs at risk (OAR) than for planning target volume (PTV), implying that better dose sparing could be achieved in OAR than in PTV. In addition, the dose-volume histogram (DVH) curves of the TPS-QC tool re-optimized plans satisfied the dosimetric criteria more frequently than did the under-assessment plans. In addition, the criteria for unsatisfied dosimetric endpoints in the 5 poor-quality plans could typically be

  15. A Knowledge-Based Approach to Improving and Homogenizing Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning Quality Among Treatment Centers: An Example Application to Prostate Cancer Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Good, David; Lo, Joseph; Lee, W. Robert; Wu, Q. Jackie; Yin, Fang-Fang; Das, Shiva K.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning can have wide variation among different treatment centers. We propose a system to leverage the IMRT planning experience of larger institutions to automatically create high-quality plans for outside clinics. We explore feasibility by generating plans for patient datasets from an outside institution by adapting plans from our institution. Methods and Materials: A knowledge database was created from 132 IMRT treatment plans for prostate cancer at our institution. The outside institution, a community hospital, provided the datasets for 55 prostate cancer cases, including their original treatment plans. For each “query” case from the outside institution, a similar “match” case was identified in the knowledge database, and the match case’s plan parameters were then adapted and optimized to the query case by use of a semiautomated approach that required no expert planning knowledge. The plans generated with this knowledge-based approach were compared with the original treatment plans at several dose cutpoints. Results: Compared with the original plan, the knowledge-based plan had a significantly more homogeneous dose to the planning target volume and a significantly lower maximum dose. The volumes of the rectum, bladder, and femoral heads above all cutpoints were nominally lower for the knowledge-based plan; the reductions were significantly lower for the rectum. In 40% of cases, the knowledge-based plan had overall superior (lower) dose–volume histograms for rectum and bladder; in 54% of cases, the comparison was equivocal; in 6% of cases, the knowledge-based plan was inferior for both bladder and rectum. Conclusions: Knowledge-based planning was superior or equivalent to the original plan in 95% of cases. The knowledge-based approach shows promise for homogenizing plan quality by transferring planning expertise from more experienced to less experienced institutions.

  16. IMRT head and neck treatment planning with a commercially available Monte Carlo based planning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreau, C.; Heath, E.; Seuntjens, J.; Ballivy, O.; Parker, W.

    2005-03-01

    The PEREGRINE Monte Carlo dose-calculation system (North American Scientific, Cranberry Township, PA) is the first commercially available Monte Carlo dose-calculation code intended specifically for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning and quality assurance. In order to assess the impact of Monte Carlo based dose calculations for IMRT clinical cases, dose distributions for 11 head and neck patients were evaluated using both PEREGRINE and the CORVUS (North American Scientific, Cranberry Township, PA) finite size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm with equivalent path-length (EPL) inhomogeneity correction. For the target volumes, PEREGRINE calculations predict, on average, a less than 2% difference in the calculated mean and maximum doses to the gross tumour volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV). An average 16% ± 4% and 12% ± 2% reduction in the volume covered by the prescription isodose line was observed for the GTV and CTV, respectively. Overall, no significant differences were noted in the doses to the mandible and spinal cord. For the parotid glands, PEREGRINE predicted a 6% ± 1% increase in the volume of tissue receiving a dose greater than 25 Gy and an increase of 4% ± 1% in the mean dose. Similar results were noted for the brainstem where PEREGRINE predicted a 6% ± 2% increase in the mean dose. The observed differences between the PEREGRINE and CORVUS calculated dose distributions are attributed to secondary electron fluence perturbations, which are not modelled by the EPL correction, issues of organ outlining, particularly in the vicinity of air cavities, and differences in dose reporting (dose to water versus dose to tissue type).

  17. SU-E-T-143: Automatic PBS Treatment Planning for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J; Durci, M; Wu, H; Rosen, L; Ding, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study presents a novel idea of using automated planning technique for parallel-opposed prostate plans with pencil beam scanning proton therapy. Methods: A random 5 clinical prostate patients treated with parallel-opposed modulated-scanning proton beam in our proton center were selected in this study. All of the 5 cases were re-planned with in-house developed python scripts integrated into RayStation 4.0 clinical version. This automatic tool was designed to perform patient DICOM data import, external structure contours, CT density assignment, prescription to PTV assignment, beam placement, optimization, and dose calculation. Results: The mean time to generate a complete treatment plan was 1 minute per plan. For the automatically generated plans, 5 out of 5 plans (100%) were deemed clinically acceptable by one experienced radiation oncologist. In addition, the automated plans were overall dosimetrically equivalent to the clinical plans when scored for target coverage, rectum and bladder dose. Mann-Whitney U tests did not show significant dosimetric differences for normal tissue structures between the clinical and automated plans. Conclusion: We have developed a robust and automated method for fully inversed planned paralleled-opposed prostate proton treatment planning. This efficient method can be readily integrated into clinical practice. The tool produces clinically acceptable plans using only manually contoured anatomic structures and simulation CT data set. We anticipate that this tool will not only improve patient access to high-quality proton treatment by simplifying the planning process and will also reduce the effort and cost of incorporating more advanced planning into clinical practice in the near future.

  18. Evaluating an Integrated Support Model for Increasing Treatment Plan Implementation Following Consultation in Schools.

    PubMed

    Noell, George H; Volz, Jennifer R; Henderson, Marie Y; Williams, Kashunda L

    2017-02-20

    This study examined the percentage of steps implemented from treatment plans following consultation with teachers. Interventions were implemented for 39 elementary school students referred for consultation and treatment for challenging behavior or academic deficits. An integrated support model that included antecedent social influence and planning combined with follow-up performance feedback was compared to weekly structured follow-up interviews. Participating teacher-student dyads were randomly assigned to conditions. Integrated support produced superior treatment implementation and child outcomes compared to weekly follow-up meetings. In contrast, teachers' ratings of consultants' effectiveness, treatment acceptability, and treatment implementation were undifferentiated across conditions. Treatment plan implementation and child behavioral outcomes were statistically significantly correlated. Treatment acceptability and implementation were not correlated at a statistically significant level. The implications of these findings for consultation and treatment research and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  19. Characterization of the transmission of the Elekta Stereotactic Body Frame (ESBF) and accounting for it during treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stewart J; Jozsef, Gabor; DeWyngaert, J Keith

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the transmission of the Elekta Stereotactic Body Frame (ESBF) and treatment table, to calculate the transmission of the frame in the Eclipse Treatment Planning System (TPS) using analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA), and to demonstrate a simple method of accounting for this transmission in treatment planning. A solid water body phantom was imaged inside the ESBF and planned with multiple 3D-CRT fields using AAA using both 6-MV and 16-MV energies. In the first set of plans, the frame and table were included in the "Body" contour and, therefore, used in the dose calculations. In the second set of plans, the frame and the table were not included in the "Body" contour and, therefore, were not incorporated in the calculations. The latter simulated a setup in which there was no frame or table. Eclipse TPS will only incorporate data from the CT set in calculations, if it is included in the "Body" contour. The plans were treated under two conditions: one with the phantom in the ESBF and one without the frame on a specially designed table. This table allows all the beams to enter the phantom without passing through any attenuating material (i.e., table or frame). Transmission of the frame and table was determined by the ratio of the measurements with the frame and table to the measurements without them. To validate the accuracy of the calculation model, plans with homogeneous phantom and a heterogeneous plan were compared with the measurements. The transmission of the frame varies from 89-94% depending on the angle of the beams and whether they also intercept the table. The AAA algorithm calculated the transmission of the frame and table to within 2% of the measurements for all gantry angles. Validation results showed that AAA can calculate the dose to the target to within 2% of the measured value. The attenuation caused by the ESBF must be accounted for in the planning process. For Eclipse, the frame should be contoured and

  20. Treatment planning for SBRT using automated field delivery: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, Timothy A.; Owen, Dawn; Brooks, Cassandra M.; Stenmark, Matthew H.

    2015-04-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment planning and delivery can be accomplished using a variety of techniques that achieve highly conformal dose distributions. Herein, we describe a template-based automated treatment field approach that enables rapid delivery of more than 20 coplanar fields. A case study is presented to demonstrate how modest adaptations to traditional SBRT planning can be implemented to take clinical advantage of this technology. Treatment was planned for a left-sided lung lesion adjacent to the chest wall using 25 coplanar treatment fields spaced at 11° intervals. The plan spares the contralateral lung and is in compliance with the conformality standards set forth in Radiation Therapy and Oncology Group protocol 0915, and the dose tolerances found in the report of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 101. Using a standard template, treatment planning was accomplished in less than 20 minutes, and each 10 Gy fraction was delivered in approximately 5.4 minutes. For those centers equipped with linear accelerators capable of automated treatment field delivery, the use of more than 20 coplanar fields is a viable SBRT planning approach and yields excellent conformality and quality combined with rapid planning and treatment delivery. Although the case study discusses a laterally located lung lesion, this technique can be applied to centrally located tumors with similar results.

  1. Intensity modulated proton therapy treatment planning using single-field optimization: The impact of monitor unit constraints on plan quality

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X. R.; Sahoo, N.; Zhang, X.; Robertson, D.; Li, H.; Choi, S.; Lee, A. K.; Gillin, M. T.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of monitor unit (MU) constraints on the dose distribution created by intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment planning using single-field optimization (SFO). Methods: Ninety-four energies between 72.5 and 221.8 MeV are available for scanning beam IMPT delivery at our institution. The minimum and maximum MUs for delivering each pencil beam (spot) are 0.005 and 0.04, respectively. These MU constraints are not considered during optimization by the treatment planning system; spots are converted to deliverable MUs during postprocessing. Treatment plans for delivering uniform doses to rectangular volumes with and without MU constraints were generated for different target doses, spot spacings, spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) widths, and ranges in a homogeneous phantom. Four prostate cancer patients were planned with and without MU constraints using different spot spacings. Rounding errors were analyzed using an in-house software tool. Results: From the phantom study, the authors have found that both the number of spots that have rounding errors and the magnitude of the distortion of the dose distribution from the ideally optimized distribution increases as the field dose, spot spacing, and range decrease and as the SOBP width increases. From our study of patient plans, it is clear that as the spot spacing decreases the rounding error increases, and the dose coverage of the target volume becomes unacceptable for very small spot spacings. Conclusions: Constraints on deliverable MU for each spot could create a significant distortion from the ideally optimized dose distributions for IMPT fields using SFO. To eliminate this problem, the treatment planning system should incorporate the MU constraints in the optimization process and the delivery system should reliably delivery smaller minimum MUs.

  2. Brachytherapy for the next century: use of image-based treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Martel, M K; Narayana, V

    1998-11-01

    Three-dimensional treatment planning systems used extensively for external-beam treatments have recently been applied for use in brachytherapy. Localization of structures in 3D from imaging studies integrated into computerized systems for planning of implants and evaluation allows 3D dose distributions to be indexed to the patient's anatomy. Correlation of target volume and dose distribution permits planning of conformal dose distributions, which maximizes the dose to the target volume while avoiding dose to normal tissue. Imaging during the implantation process can improve the delivery of the dose distribution planned prior to implantation, which may translate into improved outcome. Postimplant imaging scans can be compared to preimplant planning, providing feedback on the error in source placement and ultimately improving implantation. Application of image-based planning and delivery for ultrasound-guided transperineal prostate implantation is widespread. The first part of this report will discuss in detail a major research effort at our institution to understand and improve the prostate implant process. In the last half of our report, we will describe 3D treatment planning for gynecological implants. Problems with traditional implant planning and delivery procedures (perhaps still used today) and how image-based treatment planning and delivery can improve the implant process will be presented.

  3. Automatic treatment planning implementation using a database of previously treated patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. A.; Evans, K.; Yang, W.; Herman, J.; McNutt, T.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Using a database of prior treated patients, it is possible to predict the dose to critical structures for future patients. Automatic treatment planning speeds the planning process by generating a good initial plan from predicted dose values. Methods: A SQL relational database of previously approved treatment plans is populated via an automated export from Pinnacle3. This script outputs dose and machine information and selected Regions of Interests as well as its associated Dose-Volume Histogram (DVH) and Overlap Volume Histograms (OVHs) with respect to the target structures. Toxicity information is exported from Mosaiq and added to the database for each patient. The SQL query is designed to ask the system for the lowest achievable dose for a specified region of interest (ROI) for each patient with a given volume of that ROI being as close or closer to the target than the current patient. Results: The additional time needed to calculate OVHs is approximately 1.5 minutes for a typical patient. Database lookup of planning objectives takes approximately 4 seconds. The combined additional time is less than that of a typical single plan optimization (2.5 mins). Conclusions: An automatic treatment planning interface has been successfully used by dosimetrists to quickly produce a number of SBRT pancreas treatment plans. The database can be used to compare dose to individual structures with the toxicity experienced and predict toxicities before planning for future patients.

  4. Dosimetric verification and clinical evaluation of a new commercially available Monte Carlo-based dose algorithm for application in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragoso, Margarida; Wen, Ning; Kumar, Sanath; Liu, Dezhi; Ryu, Samuel; Movsas, Benjamin; Munther, Ajlouni; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2010-08-01

    Modern cancer treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), have greatly increased the demand for more accurate treatment planning (structure definition, dose calculation, etc) and dose delivery. The ability to use fast and accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose calculations within a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) in the clinical setting is now becoming more of a reality. This study describes the dosimetric verification and initial clinical evaluation of a new commercial MC-based photon beam dose calculation algorithm, within the iPlan v.4.1 TPS (BrainLAB AG, Feldkirchen, Germany). Experimental verification of the MC photon beam model was performed with film and ionization chambers in water phantoms and in heterogeneous solid-water slabs containing bone and lung-equivalent materials for a 6 MV photon beam from a Novalis (BrainLAB) linear accelerator (linac) with a micro-multileaf collimator (m3 MLC). The agreement between calculated and measured dose distributions in the water phantom verification tests was, on average, within 2%/1 mm (high dose/high gradient) and was within ±4%/2 mm in the heterogeneous slab geometries. Example treatment plans in the lung show significant differences between the MC and one-dimensional pencil beam (PB) algorithms within iPlan, especially for small lesions in the lung, where electronic disequilibrium effects are emphasized. Other user-specific features in the iPlan system, such as options to select dose to water or dose to medium, and the mean variance level, have been investigated. Timing results for typical lung treatment plans show the total computation time (including that for processing and I/O) to be less than 10 min for 1-2% mean variance (running on a single PC with 8 Intel Xeon X5355 CPUs, 2.66 GHz). Overall, the iPlan MC algorithm is demonstrated to be an accurate and efficient dose algorithm, incorporating robust tools for MC

  5. A Monte Carlo-based treatment planning tool for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mairani, A.; Böhlen, T. T.; Schiavi, A.; Tessonnier, T.; Molinelli, S.; Brons, S.; Battistoni, G.; Parodi, K.; Patera, V.

    2013-04-01

    In the field of radiotherapy, Monte Carlo (MC) particle transport calculations are recognized for their superior accuracy in predicting dose and fluence distributions in patient geometries compared to analytical algorithms which are generally used for treatment planning due to their shorter execution times. In this work, a newly developed MC-based treatment planning (MCTP) tool for proton therapy is proposed to support treatment planning studies and research applications. It allows for single-field and simultaneous multiple-field optimization in realistic treatment scenarios and is based on the MC code FLUKA. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE)-weighted dose is optimized either with the common approach using a constant RBE of 1.1 or using a variable RBE according to radiobiological input tables. A validated reimplementation of the local effect model was used in this work to generate radiobiological input tables. Examples of treatment plans in water phantoms and in patient-CT geometries together with an experimental dosimetric validation of the plans are presented for clinical treatment parameters as used at the Italian National Center for Oncological Hadron Therapy. To conclude, a versatile MCTP tool for proton therapy was developed and validated for realistic patient treatment scenarios against dosimetric measurements and commercial analytical TP calculations. It is aimed to be used in future for research and to support treatment planning at state-of-the-art ion beam therapy facilities.

  6. Application of dose kernel calculation using a simplified Monte Carlo method to treatment plan for scanned proton beams.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Shohei; Takada, Yoshihisa; Kohno, Ryosuke; Hotta, Kenji; Tansho, Ryohei; Akimoto, Tetsuo

    2016-03-01

    Full Monte Carlo (FMC) calculation of dose distribution has been recognized to have superior accuracy, compared with the pencil beam algorithm (PBA). However, since the FMC methods require long calculation time, it is difficult to apply them to routine treatment planning at present. In order to improve the situation, a simplified Monte Carlo (SMC) method has been introduced to the dose kernel calculation applicable to dose optimization procedure for the proton pencil beam scanning. We have evaluated accuracy of the SMC calculation by comparing a result of the dose kernel calculation using the SMC method with that using the FMC method in an inhomogeneous phantom. The dose distribution obtained by the SMC method was in good agreement with that obtained by the FMC method. To assess the usefulness of SMC calculation in clinical situations, we have compared results of the dose calculation using the SMC with those using the PBA method for three clinical cases of tumor treatment. The dose distributions calculated with the PBA dose kernels appear to be homogeneous in the planning target volumes (PTVs). In practice, the dose distributions calculated with the SMC dose kernels with the spot weights optimized with the PBA method show largely inhomogeneous dose distributions in the PTVs, while those with the spot weights optimized with the SMC method have moderately homogeneous distributions in the PTVs. Calculation using the SMC method is faster than that using the GEANT4 by three orders of magnitude. In addition, the graphic processing unit (GPU) boosts the calculation speed by 13 times for the treatment planning using the SMC method. Thence, the SMC method will be applicable to routine clinical treatment planning for reproduction of the complex dose distribution more accurately than the PBA method in a reasonably short time by use of the GPU-based calculation engine. PACS number(s): 87.55.Gh.

  7. Application of dose kernel calculation using a simplified Monte Carlo method to treatment plan for scanned proton beams.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Shohei; Takada, Yoshihisa; Kohno, Ryosuke; Hotta, Kenji; Tansho, Ryohei; Akimoto, Tetsuo

    2016-03-08

    Full Monte Carlo (FMC) calculation of dose distribution has been recognized to have superior accuracy, compared with the pencil beam algorithm (PBA). However, since the FMC methods require long calculation time, it is difficult to apply them to routine treatment planning at present. In order to improve the situation, a simplified Monte Carlo (SMC) method has been introduced to the dose kernel calculation applicable to dose optimization procedure for the proton pencil beam scanning. We have evaluated accuracy of the SMC calculation by comparing a result of the dose kernel calculation using the SMC method with that using the FMC method in an inhomogeneous phantom. The dose distribution obtained by the SMC method was in good agreement with that obtained by the FMC method. To assess the usefulness of SMC calculation in clinical situations, we have compared results of the dose calculation using the SMC with those using the PBA method for three clinical cases of tumor treatment. The dose distributions calculated with the PBA dose kernels appear to be homogeneous in the planning target volumes (PTVs). In practice, the dose distributions calculated with the SMC dose kernels with the spot weights optimized with the PBA method show largely inhomogeneous dose distributions in the PTVs, while those with the spot weights optimized with the SMC method have moderately homogeneous distributions in the PTVs. Calculation using the SMC method is faster than that using the GEANT4 by three orders of magnitude. In addition, the graphic processing unit (GPU) boosts the calculation speed by 13 times for the treatment planning using the SMC method. Thence, the SMC method will be applicable to routine clinical treatment planning for reproduction of the complex dose distribution more accurately than the PBA method in a reasonably short time by use of the GPU-based calculation engine.

  8. Methods to model and predict the ViewRay treatment deliveries to aid patient scheduling and treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shi; Wu, Yu; Wooten, H Omar; Green, Olga; Archer, Brent; Li, Harold; Yang, Deshan

    2016-03-01

    A software tool is developed, given a new treatment plan, to predict treatment delivery time for radiation therapy (RT) treatments of patients on ViewRay magnetic resonance image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) delivery system. This tool is necessary for managing patient treatment scheduling in our clinic. The predicted treatment delivery time and the assessment of plan complexities could also be useful to aid treatment planning. A patient's total treatment delivery time, not including time required for localization, is modeled as the sum of four components: 1) the treatment initialization time; 2) the total beam-on time; 3) the gantry rotation time; and 4) the multileaf collimator (MLC) motion time. Each of the four components is predicted separately. The total beam-on time can be calculated using both the planned beam-on time and the decay-corrected dose rate. To predict the remain-ing components, we retrospectively analyzed the patient treatment delivery record files. The initialization time is demonstrated to be random since it depends on the final gantry angle of the previous treatment. Based on modeling the relationships between the gantry rotation angles and the corresponding rotation time, linear regression is applied to predict the gantry rotation time. The MLC motion time is calculated using the leaves delay modeling method and the leaf motion speed. A quantitative analysis was performed to understand the correlation between the total treatment time and the plan complexity. The proposed algorithm is able to predict the ViewRay treatment delivery time with the average prediction error 0.22 min or 1.82%, and the maximal prediction error 0.89 min or 7.88%. The analysis has shown the correlation between the plan modulation (PM) factor and the total treatment delivery time, as well as the treatment delivery duty cycle. A possibility has been identified to significantly reduce MLC motion time by optimizing the positions of closed MLC pairs. The accuracy of

  9. Methods to model and predict the ViewRay treatment deliveries to aid patient scheduling and treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shi; Wu, Yu; Wooten, H Omar; Green, Olga; Archer, Brent; Li, Harold; Yang, Deshan

    2016-03-08

    A software tool is developed, given a new treatment plan, to predict treatment delivery time for radiation therapy (RT) treatments of patients on ViewRay magnetic resonance image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) delivery system. This tool is necessary for managing patient treatment scheduling in our clinic. The predicted treatment delivery time and the assessment of plan complexities could also be useful to aid treatment planning. A patient's total treatment delivery time, not including time required for localization, is modeled as the sum of four components: 1) the treatment initialization time; 2) the total beam-on time; 3) the gantry rotation time; and 4) the multileaf collimator (MLC) motion time. Each of the four components is predicted separately. The total beam-on time can be calculated using both the planned beam-on time and the decay-corrected dose rate. To predict the remain-ing components, we retrospectively analyzed the patient treatment delivery record files. The initialization time is demonstrated to be random since it depends on the final gantry angle of the previous treatment. Based on modeling the relationships between the gantry rotation angles and the corresponding rotation time, linear regression is applied to predict the gantry rotation time. The MLC motion time is calculated using the leaves delay modeling method and the leaf motion speed. A quantitative analysis was performed to understand the correlation between the total treatment time and the plan complexity. The proposed algorithm is able to predict the ViewRay treatment delivery time with the average prediction error 0.22min or 1.82%, and the maximal prediction error 0.89 min or 7.88%. The analysis has shown the correlation between the plan modulation (PM) factor and the total treatment delivery time, as well as the treatment delivery duty cycle. A possibility has been identified to significantly reduce MLC motion time by optimizing the positions of closed MLC pairs. The accuracy of

  10. Utility of Megavoltage Fan-Beam CT for Treatment Planning in a Head-And-Neck Cancer Patient with Extensive Dental Fillings Undergoing Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Claus; Liu Tianxiao; Jennelle, Richard L.; Ryu, Janice K.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.; Chen, Allen M.

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the potential utility of megavoltage fan-beam computed tomography (MV-FBCT) for treatment planning in a patient undergoing helical tomotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the presence of extensive dental artifact. A 28-year-old female with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma presented for radiation therapy. Due to the extensiveness of the dental artifact present in the oral cavity kV-CT scan acquired at simulation, which made treatment planning impossible on tomotherapy planning system, MV-FBCT imaging was obtained using the HI-ART tomotherapy treatment machine, with the patient in the treatment position, and this information was registered with her original kV-CT scan for the purposes of structure delineation, dose calculation, and treatment planning. To validate the feasibility of the MV-FBCT-generated treatment plan, an electron density CT phantom (model 465, Gammex Inc., Middleton, WI) was scanned using MV-FBCT to obtain CT number to density table. Additionally, both a 'cheese' phantom (which came with the tomotherapy treatment machine) with 2 inserted ion chambers and a generic phantom called Quasar phantom (Modus Medical Devices Inc., London, ON, Canada) with one inserted chamber were used to confirm dosimetric accuracy. The MV-FBCT could be used to clearly visualize anatomy in the region of the dental artifact and provide sufficient soft-tissue contrast to assist in the delineation of normal tissue structures and fat planes. With the elimination of the dental artifact, the MV-FBCT images allowed more accurate dose calculation by the tomotherapy system. It was confirmed that the phantom material density was determined correctly by the tomotherapy MV-FBCT number to density table. The ion chamber measurements agreed with the calculations from the MV-FBCT generated phantom plan within 2%. MV-FBCT may be useful in radiation treatment planning for nasopharyngeal cancer patients in the setting of extensive

  11. Total variation superiorization in dual-energy CT reconstruction for proton therapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiahua; Penfold, Scott

    2017-04-01

    Proton therapy is a precise form of radiotherapy in which the range of an energetic beam of protons within a patient must be accurately known. The current approach based on single-energy computed tomography (SECT) can lead to uncertainties in the proton range of approximately 3%. This range of uncertainty may lead to under-dosing of the tumour or over-dosing of healthy tissues. Dual-energy CT (DECT) theoretically has the potential to reduce these range uncertainties by quantifying electron density and the effective atomic number. In practice, however, DECT images reconstructed with filtered backprojection (FBP) tend to suffer from high levels of noise. The objective of the current work was to examine the effect of total variation superiorization (TVS) on proton therapy planning accuracy when compared with FBP. A virtual CT scanner was created with the Monte Carlo toolkit Geant4. Tomographic images were reconstructed with FBP and TVS combined with diagonally relaxed orthogonal projections (TVS-DROP). A total variation minimization (TVM) filter was also applied to the image reconstructed with FBP (FBP-TVM). Quantitative accuracy and variance of proton relative stopping power (RSP) derived from each image set was assessed. Mean RSPs were comparable with each image; however, the standard deviation of pixel values with TVS-DROP was reduced by a factor of 0.44 compared with the FBP image and a factor of 0.66 when compared with the FBP-TVM image. Proton doses calculated with the TVS-DROP image set were also better able to predict a reference dose distribution when compared with the FBP and FBP-TVM image sets. The study demonstrated the potential advantages of TVS-DROP as an image reconstruction method for DECT applied to proton therapy treatment planning.

  12. Federal Facility Compliance Act: Conceptual Site Treatment Plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by section 3021(b) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (the Act), to prepare plans describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste. The Act requires site treatment plans (STPs or plans) to be developed for each site at which DOE generates or stores mixed waste and submitted to the State or EPA for approval, approval with modification, or disapproval. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) is the preliminary version of the plan required by the Act and is being provided to California, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and others for review. A list of the other DOE sites preparing CSTPs is included in Appendix 1.1 of this document. Please note that Appendix 1.1 appears as Appendix A, pages A-1 and A-2 in this document.

  13. Automated generation of IMRT treatment plans for prostate cancer patients with metal hip prostheses: Comparison of different planning strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Voet, Peter W. J.; Dirkx, Maarten L. P.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Heijmen, Ben J. M.

    2013-07-15

    sparing. Noncoplanar beam arrangements and, to a larger extent, increasing the number of treatment beams further improved plan quality.

  14. Interactive approach to segment organs at risk in radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolz, Jose; Kirisli, Hortense A.; Viard, Romain; Massoptier, Laurent

    2014-03-01

    Accurate delineation of organs at risk (OAR) is required for radiation treatment planning (RTP). However, it is a very time consuming and tedious task. The use in clinic of image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) becomes more and more popular, thus increasing the need of (semi-)automatic methods for delineation of the OAR. In this work, an interactive segmentation approach to delineate OAR is proposed and validated. The method is based on the combination of watershed transformation, which groups small areas of similar intensities in homogeneous labels, and graph cuts approach, which uses these labels to create the graph. Segmentation information can be added in any view - axial, sagittal or coronal -, making the interaction with the algorithm easy and fast. Subsequently, this information is propagated within the whole volume, providing a spatially coherent result. Manual delineations made by experts of 6 OAR - lungs, kidneys, liver, spleen, heart and aorta - over a set of 9 computed tomography (CT) scans were used as reference standard to validate the proposed approach. With a maximum of 4 interactions, a Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) higher than 0.87 was obtained, which demonstrates that, with the proposed segmentation approach, only few interactions are required to achieve similar results as the ones obtained manually. The integration of this method in the RTP process may save a considerable amount of time, and reduce the annotation complexity.

  15. Treatment Planning and Fracture Prediction in Patients with Skeletal Metastasis with CT-based Rigidity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nazarian, Ara; Entezari, Vahid; Zurakowski, David; Calderon, Nathan; Hipp, John A.; Villa-Camacho, Juan C.; Lin, Patrick P.; Cheung, Felix H.; Aboulafia, Albert J.; Turcotte, Robert; Anderson, Megan E.; Gebhardt, Mark C.; Cheng, Edward Y.; Terek, Richard M.; Yaszemski, Michael; Damron, Timothy A.; Snyder, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pathological fractures could be prevented if reliable methods of fracture risk assessment were available. A multi-center, prospective study was conducted to identify significant predictors of physicians' treatment plan for skeletal metastasis based on clinical fracture risk assessments and the proposed CT-based Rigidity Analysis (CTRA). Methods Orthopaedic oncologists selected a treatment plan for 124 patients with 149 metastatic lesions based on Mirels method. Then, CTRA was performed and the results were provided to the physicians, who were asked to reassess their treatment plan. The pre- and post-CTRA treatment plans were compared to identify cases where the treatment plan was changed based on the CTRA report. Patients were followed for a 4 month period to establish the incidence of pathological fractures. Results Pain, lesion type and lesion size were significant predictors of the pre-CTRA plan. After providing the CTRA results, physicians changed their plan for 36 patients. CTRA results, pain and primary source of metastasis were significant predictors of the post-CTRA plan. Follow up of patients who did not undergo fixation resulted in 7 fractures; CTRA predicted these fractures with 100% sensitivity and 90% specificity, whereas the Mirels method was 71% sensitive and 50% specific. Conclusions Lesion type and size and pain level influenced the physicians’ plans for management of metastatic lesions. Physicians’ treatment plans and fracture risk predictions were significantly influenced by the availability of CTRA results. Due to its high sensitivity and specificity. CTRA could potentially be used as a screening method for pathological fractures. PMID:25724521

  16. SU-E-T-527: Prior Knowledge Guided TomoTherapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, J; Yuan, L; Wu, Q; Zhu, X; Chera, B; Chang, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The quality and efficiency of radiotherapy treatment planning are highly planer dependent. Previously we have developed a statistical model to correlate anatomical features with dosimetry features of head and neck Tomotherapy treatment. The model enables us to predict the best achievable dosimetry for individual patient prior to treatment planning. The purpose of this work is to study if the prediction model can facilitate the treatment planning in both the efficiency and dosimetric quality. Methods: The anatomy-dosimetry correlation model was used to calculate the expected DVH for nine patients formerly treated. In Group A (3 patients), the model prediction agreed with the clinic plan; in Group B (3 patients), the model predicted lower larynx mean dose than the clinic plan; in Group C (3 patients), the model suggested the brainstem could be further spared. Guided by the prior knowledge, we re-planned all 9 cases. The number of interactions during the optimization process and dosimetric endpoints between the original clinical plan and model-guided re-plan were compared. Results: For Group A, the difference of target coverage and organs-at-risk sparing is insignificant (p>0.05) between the replan and the clinical plan. For Group B, the clinical plan larynx median dose is 49.4±4.7 Gy, while the prediction suggesting 40.0±6.2 Gy (p<0.05). The re-plan achieved 41.5±6.6 Gy, with similar dose on other structures as clinical plan. For Group C, the clinical plan brainstem maximum dose is 44.7±5.5 Gy. The model predicted lower value 32.2±3.8 Gy (p<0.05). The re-plans reduced brainstem maximum dose to 31.8±4.1 Gy without affecting the dosimetry of other structures. In the replanning of the 9 cases, the times operator interacted with TPS are reduced on average about 50% compared to the clinical plan. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that the prior expert knowledge embedded model improved the efficiency and quality of Tomotherapy treatment planning.

  17. Forensic focused treatment planning: a new standard for forensic mental health systems.

    PubMed

    Schaufenbil, Robert J; Kornbluh, Rebecca; Stahl, Stephen M; Warburton, Katherine D

    2015-06-01

    Almost no literature addresses treatment planning for the forensic psychiatric patient. In the absence of such guidance, recovery-oriented multifocal treatment planning has been imported into forensic mental health systems from community psychiatric settings, despite the fact that conditions of admission and discharge are vastly different for forensic psychiatry inpatients. We propose that instead of focusing on recovery, forensic treatment planning should prioritize forensic outcomes, such as restoration of trial competence or mitigation of violence risk, as the first steps in a continuum of care that eventually leads to the patient's ability to resolve forensic issues and return to the community for recovery-oriented care. Here we offer a model for treatment planning in the forensic setting.

  18. Automated treatment planning for a dedicated multi-source intracranial radiosurgery treatment unit using projected gradient and grassfire algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Ghobadi, Kimia; Ghaffari, Hamid R.; Aleman, Dionne M.; Jaffray, David A.; Ruschin, Mark

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to develop a framework to the inverse problem for radiosurgery treatment planning on the Gamma Knife{sup Registered-Sign} Perfexion Trade-Mark-Sign (PFX) for intracranial targets. Methods: The approach taken in the present study consists of two parts. First, a hybrid grassfire and sphere-packing algorithm is used to obtain shot positions (isocenters) based on the geometry of the target to be treated. For the selected isocenters, a sector duration optimization (SDO) model is used to optimize the duration of radiation delivery from each collimator size from each individual source bank. The SDO model is solved using a projected gradient algorithm. This approach has been retrospectively tested on seven manually planned clinical cases (comprising 11 lesions) including acoustic neuromas and brain metastases. Results: In terms of conformity and organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, the quality of plans achieved with the inverse planning approach were, on average, improved compared to the manually generated plans. The mean difference in conformity index between inverse and forward plans was -0.12 (range: -0.27 to +0.03) and +0.08 (range: 0.00-0.17) for classic and Paddick definitions, respectively, favoring the inverse plans. The mean difference in volume receiving the prescribed dose (V{sub 100}) between forward and inverse plans was 0.2% (range: -2.4% to +2.0%). After plan renormalization for equivalent coverage (i.e., V{sub 100}), the mean difference in dose to 1 mm{sup 3} of brainstem between forward and inverse plans was -0.24 Gy (range: -2.40 to +2.02 Gy) favoring the inverse plans. Beam-on time varied with the number of isocenters but for the most optimal plans was on average 33 min longer than manual plans (range: -17 to +91 min) when normalized to a calibration dose rate of 3.5 Gy/min. In terms of algorithm performance, the isocenter selection for all the presented plans was performed in less than 3 s, while the SDO was performed in an

  19. Statistical control process to compare and rank treatment plans in radiation oncology: impact of heterogeneity correction on treatment planning in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balosso, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Background This study proposes a statistical process to compare different treatment plans issued from different irradiation techniques or different treatment phases. This approach aims to provide arguments for discussion about the impact on clinical results of any condition able to significantly alter dosimetric or ballistic related data. Methods The principles of the statistical investigation are presented in the framework of a clinical example based on 40 fields of radiotherapy for lung cancers. Two treatment plans were generated for each patient making a change of dose distribution due to variation of lung density correction. The data from 2D gamma index (γ) including the pixels having γ≤1 were used to determine the capability index (Cp) and the acceptability index (Cpk) of the process. To measure the strength of the relationship between the γ passing rates and the Cp and Cpk indices, the Spearman’s rank non-parametric test was used to calculate P values. Results The comparison between reference and tested plans showed that 95% of pixels have γ≤1 with criteria (6%, 6 mm). The values of the Cp and Cpk indices were lower than one showing a significant dose difference. The data showed a strong correlation between γ passing rates and the indices with P>0.8. Conclusions The statistical analysis using Cp and Cpk, show the significance of dose differences resulting from two plans in radiotherapy. These indices can be used for adaptive radiotherapy to measure the difference between initial plan and daily delivered plan. The significant changes of dose distribution could raise the question about the continuity to treat the patient with the initial plan or the need for adjustments. PMID:28149763

  20. Clinical Realization of Sector Beam Intensity Modulation for Gamma Knife Radiosurgery: A Pilot Treatment Planning Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Lijun; Mason, Erica; Sneed, Penny K.; McDermott, Michael; Polishchuk, Alexei; Larson, David A.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the clinical feasibility and potential benefits of sector beam intensity modulation (SBIM) specific to Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). Methods and Materials: SBIM is based on modulating the confocal beam intensities from individual sectors surrounding an isocenter in a nearly 2π geometry. This is in contrast to conventional GKSRS delivery, in which the beam intensities from each sector are restricted to be either 0% or 100% and must be identical for any given isocenter. We developed a SBIM solution based on available clinical planning tools, and we tested it on a cohort of 12 clinical cases as a proof of concept study. The SBIM treatment plans were compared with the original clinically delivered treatment plans to determine dosimetric differences. The goal was to investigate whether SBIM would improve the dose conformity for these treatment plans without prohibitively lengthening the treatment time. Results: A SBIM technique was developed. On average, SBIM improved the Paddick conformity index (PCI) versus the clinically delivered plans (clinical plan PCI = 0.68 ± 0.11 vs SBIM plan PCI = 0.74 ± 0.10, P=.002; 2-tailed paired t test). The SBIM plans also resulted in nearly identical target volume coverage (mean, 97 ± 2%), total beam-on times (clinical plan 58.4 ± 38.9 minutes vs SBIM 63.5 ± 44.7 minutes, P=.057), and gradient indices (clinical plan 3.03 ± 0.27 vs SBIM 3.06 ± 0.29, P=.44) versus the original clinical plans. Conclusion: The SBIM method is clinically feasible with potential dosimetric gains when compared with conventional GKSRS.

  1. Treatment planning with the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R).

    PubMed

    Loving, James L

    2002-06-01

    The Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) is an essential component of any assessment protocol within forensic and correctional settings. Both nomothetic and idiographic interpretations aid the clinician in screening and treatment planning. Whereas the PCL-R can be effective in identifying those who are at highest risk of disrupting treatment efforts and jeopardizing the safety of those around them, through item analysis, it also provides clues to the nonpsychopath's unique treatment needs. Specific recommendations are offered regarding the implementation of the PCL-R for screening and treatment planning, and illustrative case examples are provided to enliven essential points.

  2. A 'learning-by-doing' treatment planning tutorial for medical physicists.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J; Hartmann, B; Kalet, I

    2009-06-01

    A framework for a tutorial for treatment planning in radiation oncology physics was developed, based on the University of Washington treatment planning system Prism. The tutorial is aimed at students in Medical Physics to accompany the lectures on treatment planning to enhance their theoretical knowledge. A web-based layout was chosen to allow independent work of the students. The tutorial guides the students through three different learning modules, designed mainly to enhance their understanding of the processes involved in treatment planning but also to learn the specific features of a modern treatment planning system. Each of the modules contains four units, with the aim to introduce the relevant Prism features, practice skills in different tasks and finally check the learning outcomes with a challenge and a self-scoring quiz. A survey for students' feedback completes the tutorial. Various tools and learning methods help to create an interactive, appealing learning environment, in which the emphasis is shifted from teacher-centred to student-centred learning paradigms. In summary, Prism lends itself well for educational purposes. The tutorial covers all main aspects of treatment planning. In its current form the tutorial is self-contained but still adjustable and expandable. The tutorial can be made available upon request to the authors.

  3. SU-E-T-151: Breathing Synchronized Delivery (BSD) Planning for RapicArc Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W; Chen, M; Jiang, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a workflow for breathing synchronized delivery (BSD) planning for RapicArc treatment. Methods: The workflow includes three stages: screening/simulation, planning, and delivery. In the screening/simulation stage, a 4D CT with the corresponding breathing pattern is acquired for each of the selected patients, who are able to follow their own breathing pattern. In the planning stage, one breathing phase is chosen as the reference, and contours are delineated on the reference image. Deformation maps to other phases are performed along with contour propagation. Based on the control points of the initial 3D plan for the reference phase and the respiration trace, the correlation with respiration phases, the leaf sequence and gantry angles is determined. The beamlet matrices are calculated with the corresponding breathing phase and deformed to the reference phase. Using the 4D dose evaluation tool and the original 3D plan DVHs criteria, the leaf sequence is further optimized to meet the planning objectives and the machine constraints. In the delivery stage, the patients are instructed to follow the programmed breathing patterns of their own, and all other parts are the same as the conventional Rapid-Arc delivery. Results: Our plan analysis is based on comparison of the 3D plan with a static target (SD), 3D plan with motion delivery (MD), and the BSD plan. Cyclic motion of range 0 cm to 3 cm was simulated for phantoms and lung CT. The gain of the BSD plan over MD is significant and concordant for both simulation and lung 4DCT, indicating the benefits of 4D planning. Conclusion: Our study shows that the BSD plan can approach the SD plan quality. However, such BSD scheme relies on the patient being able to follow the same breathing curve that is used in the planning stage during radiation delivery. Funded by Varian Medical Systems.

  4. MR Imaging Based Treatment Planning for Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    after the gradient distortion correction (GDC) could be quantified by phantom measurements and further reduced by our point-by-point correction...oncologists on the fused CT-MR images. A special computer code was developed to convert the patient CT and MR image data from the DICOM format to... phantoms and perform dose calculations to determine monitor units (MU) for IMRT plans and then compare with ion chamber measurements. We will integrate

  5. Role of nutrition planning in the treatment for obesity.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, R L

    1996-12-01

    The most sensible eating plans are those that involve a wide selection of foods with a modest percentage of kilocalories as fat. The dietary pyramid developed by the US Government is an excellent basis for the construction of an eating plan for life. Patients should be encouraged to develop healthy eating habits that they can maintain indefinitely, as the early inevitable consequence of finishing a diet is regain of any weight that has been lost when the patient goes back to their old eating habits. The unfortunate fact is that individuals with the disease of obesity must behave differently than those who do not. This usually means that obese persons must eat differently than lean persons, and they must do this for their entire lives. Food is a critical part of the social fabric of our society. The physician, usually in combination with a knowledgeable and empathetic dietitian or other nutritional education resource, can help obese patients choose the series of compromises in eating plans and activity levels that can be maintained for life but still allow a reasonable quality of life.

  6. Initial experience of ArcCHECK and 3DVH software for RapidArc treatment plan verification.

    PubMed

    Infusino, Erminia; Mameli, Alessandra; Conti, Roberto; Gaudino, Diego; Stimato, Gerardina; Bellesi, Luca; D'Angelillo, Rolando Maria; Ramella, Sara; Benassi, Marcello; Trodella, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform delivery quality assurance with ArcCHECK and 3DVH system (Sun Nuclear, FL) and to evaluate the suitability of this system for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) (RapidArc [RA]) verification. This software calculates the delivered dose distributions in patients by perturbing the calculated dose using errors detected in fluence or planar dose measurements. The device is tested to correlate the gamma passing rate (%GP) and the composite dose predicted by 3DVH software. A total of 28 patients with prostate cancer who were treated with RA were analyzed. RA treatments were delivered to a diode array phantom (ArcCHECK), which was used to create a planned dose perturbation (PDP) file. The 3DVH analysis used the dose differences derived from comparing the measured dose with the treatment planning system (TPS)-calculated doses to perturb the initial TPS-calculated dose. The 3DVH then overlays the resultant dose on the patient's structures using the resultant "PDP" beams. Measured dose distributions were compared with the calculated ones using the gamma index (GI) method by applying the global (Van Dyk) normalization and acceptance criteria, i.e., 3%/3mm. Paired differences tests were used to estimate statistical significance of the differences between the composite dose calculated using 3DVH and %GP. Also, statistical correlation by means of logistic regression analysis has been analyzed. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis for patient plans revealed small differences between treatment plan calculations and 3DVH results for organ at risk (OAR), whereas planning target volume (PTV) of the measured plan was systematically higher than that predicted by the TPS. The t-test results between the planned and the estimated DVH values showed that mean values were incomparable (p < 0.05). The quality assurance (QA) gamma analysis 3%/3mm showed that in all cases there were only weak-to-moderate correlations (Pearson r: 0.12 to 0

  7. Initial experience of ArcCHECK and 3DVH software for RapidArc treatment plan verification

    SciTech Connect

    Infusino, Erminia; Mameli, Alessandra Conti, Roberto; Gaudino, Diego; Stimato, Gerardina; Bellesi, Luca; D’Angelillo, Rolando Maria; Ramella, Sara; Benassi, Marcello; Trodella, Lucio

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform delivery quality assurance with ArcCHECK and 3DVH system (Sun Nuclear, FL) and to evaluate the suitability of this system for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) (RapidArc [RA]) verification. This software calculates the delivered dose distributions in patients by perturbing the calculated dose using errors detected in fluence or planar dose measurements. The device is tested to correlate the gamma passing rate (%GP) and the composite dose predicted by 3DVH software. A total of 28 patients with prostate cancer who were treated with RA were analyzed. RA treatments were delivered to a diode array phantom (ArcCHECK), which was used to create a planned dose perturbation (PDP) file. The 3DVH analysis used the dose differences derived from comparing the measured dose with the treatment planning system (TPS)-calculated doses to perturb the initial TPS-calculated dose. The 3DVH then overlays the resultant dose on the patient's structures using the resultant “PDP” beams. Measured dose distributions were compared with the calculated ones using the gamma index (GI) method by applying the global (Van Dyk) normalization and acceptance criteria, i.e., 3%/3 mm. Paired differences tests were used to estimate statistical significance of the differences between the composite dose calculated using 3DVH and %GP. Also, statistical correlation by means of logistic regression analysis has been analyzed. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis for patient plans revealed small differences between treatment plan calculations and 3DVH results for organ at risk (OAR), whereas planning target volume (PTV) of the measured plan was systematically higher than that predicted by the TPS. The t-test results between the planned and the estimated DVH values showed that mean values were incomparable (p < 0.05). The quality assurance (QA) gamma analysis 3%/3 mm showed that in all cases there were only weak-to-moderate correlations (Pearson r: 0.12 to 0

  8. SU-E-T-633: Preparation and Planning of a VMAT Multi - Arc Radiation Therapy Technique for Full Scalp Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Araujo, C; Bardock, A; Berkelaar, S; Gillund, D; McGee, K; Mohamed, I; Lapointe, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The target volume for angiosarcoma of the scalp encompasses the entire scalp. Full scalp radiotherapy (FSRT) requires careful design of required bolus, immobilization and marking of the field before the patient CT is acquired. A VMAT multi-arc technique was designed to deliver FSRT for a patient with angiosarcoma of the scalp to a dose of 6000cGy in 25 fractions. Methods: A custom bolus helmet was fabricated from a 0.5 cm thick sheet of aquaplast material, which was molded to the patient’s head. With the bolus helmet in place the patient was then positioned supine on a H&N immobilization board. A custom vaclock bag positioned on a standard headrest and a thermoplastic mask were used to immobilize the patient. Additional bolus to cover the remaining treatment area was attached to the mask. We acquired two CT scans of the patient’s head, one in treatment position and an additional scan without the immobilization mask with wires marking the treatment area that the oncologist had delineated on the patient’s skin. The second scan was registered to the first and used to define the treatment CTV. A four-arc VMAT treatment planned using Varian-Eclipse was optimized to cover the skin with a PTV margin while sparing the brain and limiting the dose to the optic apparatus and lacrimal glands. Daily treatment setup was verified using anterior and lateral kV on-board-imaging. To verify the treated dose, TLDs were positioned on the patient’s scalp during one fraction. Results: With full dose coverage to the PTV, the mean dose to the brain was less than 24 Gy. The dose measured by the TLDs (mean difference 1%, standard deviation 4%)showed excellent agreement with the treatment planning calculation. Conclusion: FSRT delivered with a bolus helmet and a VMAT multi-arc technique can be accurately delivered with high dose uniformity and conformality.

  9. TU-AB-BRB-01: Coverage Evaluation and Probabilistic Treatment Planning as a Margin Alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Siebers, J.

    2015-06-15

    The accepted clinical method to accommodate targeting uncertainties inherent in fractionated external beam radiation therapy is to utilize GTV-to-CTV and CTV-to-PTV margins during the planning process to design a PTV-conformal static dose distribution on the planning image set. Ideally, margins are selected to ensure a high (e.g. >95%) target coverage probability (CP) in spite of inherent inter- and intra-fractional positional variations, tissue motions, and initial contouring uncertainties. Robust optimization techniques, also known as probabilistic treatment planning techniques, explicitly incorporate the dosimetric consequences of targeting uncertainties by including CP evaluation into the planning optimization process along with coverage-based planning objectives. The treatment planner no longer needs to use PTV and/or PRV margins; instead robust optimization utilizes probability distributions of the underlying uncertainties in conjunction with CP-evaluation for the underlying CTVs and OARs to design an optimal treated volume. This symposium will describe CP-evaluation methods as well as various robust planning techniques including use of probability-weighted dose distributions, probability-weighted objective functions, and coverage optimized planning. Methods to compute and display the effect of uncertainties on dose distributions will be presented. The use of robust planning to accommodate inter-fractional setup uncertainties, organ deformation, and contouring uncertainties will be examined as will its use to accommodate intra-fractional organ motion. Clinical examples will be used to inter-compare robust and margin-based planning, highlighting advantages of robust-plans in terms of target and normal tissue coverage. Robust-planning limitations as uncertainties approach zero and as the number of treatment fractions becomes small will be presented, as well as the factors limiting clinical implementation of robust planning. Learning Objectives: To understand

  10. Fundus image fusion in EYEPLAN software: An evaluation of a novel technique for ocular melanoma radiation treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Daftari, Inder K.; Mishra, Kavita K.; O'Brien, Joan M.; and others

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate a novel approach for treatment planning using digital fundus image fusion in EYEPLAN for proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) planning for ocular melanoma. The authors used a prototype version of EYEPLAN software, which allows for digital registration of high-resolution fundus photographs. The authors examined the improvement in tumor localization by replanning with the addition of fundus photo superimposition in patients with macular area tumors. Methods: The new version of EYEPLAN (v3.05) software allows for the registration of fundus photographs as a background image. This is then used in conjunction with clinical examination, tantalum marker clips, surgeon's mapping, and ultrasound to draw the tumor contour accurately. In order to determine if the fundus image superimposition helps in tumor delineation and treatment planning, the authors identified 79 patients with choroidal melanoma in the macular location that were treated with PBRT. All patients were treated to a dose of 56 GyE in four fractions. The authors reviewed and replanned all 79 macular melanoma cases with superimposition of pretreatment and post-treatment fundus imaging in the new EYEPLAN software. For patients with no local failure, the authors analyzed whether fundus photograph fusion accurately depicted and confirmed tumor volumes as outlined in the original treatment plan. For patients with local failure, the authors determined whether the addition of the fundus photograph might have benefited in terms of more accurate tumor volume delineation. Results: The mean follow-up of patients was 33.6{+-}23 months. Tumor growth was seen in six eyes of the 79 macular lesions. All six patients were marginal failures or tumor miss in the region of dose fall-off, including one patient with both in-field recurrence as well as marginal. Among the six recurrences, three were managed by enucleation and one underwent retreatment with proton therapy. Three

  11. Stereotactic Arrhythmia Radioablation (STAR) of Ventricular Tachycardia: A Treatment Planning Study

    PubMed Central

    Fahimian, Benjamin; Soltys, Scott G; Zei, Paul; Lo, Anthony; Gardner, Edward A; Maguire, Patrick J; Loo Jr., Billy W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The first stereotactic arrhythmia radioablation (STAR) of ventricular tachycardia (VT) was delivered at Stanford on a robotic radiosurgery system (CyberKnife® G4) in 2012. The results warranted further investigation of this treatment. Here we compare dosimetrically three possible treatment delivery platforms for STAR. Methods The anatomy and target volume of the first treated patient were used for this study. A dose of 25 Gy in one fraction was prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV). Treatment plans were created on three treatment platforms: CyberKnife® G4 system with Iris collimator (Multiplan, V. 4.6)(Plan #1), CyberKnife® M6 system with InCise 2TM multileaf collimator (Multiplan V. 5.3)(Plan #2) and Varian TrueBeamTM STx with HD 120TM MLC and 10MV flattening filter free (FFF) beam (Eclipse planning system, V.11) (Plan #3 coplanar and #4 noncoplanar VMAT plans). The four plans were compared by prescription isodose line, plan conformity index, dose gradient, as well as dose to the nearby critical structures. To assess the delivery efficiency, planned monitor units (MU) and estimated treatment time were evaluated. Results Plans #1-4 delivered 25 Gy to the PTV to the 75.0%, 83.0%, 84.3%, and 84.9% isodose lines and with conformity indices of 1.19, 1.16, 1.05, and 1.05, respectively. The dose gradients for plans #1-4 were 3.62, 3.42, 3.93, and 3.73 with the CyberKnife® MLC plan (Plan #2) the best, and the TrueBeamTM STx co-planar plan (Plan #3) the worst. The dose to nearby critical structures (lung, stomach, bowel, and esophagus) were all well within tolerance. The MUs for plans #1-4 were 27671, 16522, 6275, and 6004 for an estimated total-treatment-time/beam-delivery-time of 99/69, 65/35, 37/7, and 56/6 minutes, respectively, under the assumption of 30 minutes pretreatment setup time. For VMAT gated delivery, a 40% duty cycle, 2400MU/minute dose rate, and an extra 10 minutes per extra arc were assumed. Conclusion Clinically acceptable plans were

  12. Development and validation of MCNPX-based Monte Carlo treatment plan verification system

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Iraj; Monadi, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    A Monte Carlo treatment plan verification (MCTPV) system was developed for clinical treatment plan verification (TPV), especially for the conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans. In the MCTPV, the MCNPX code was used for particle transport through the accelerator head and the patient body. MCTPV has an interface with TiGRT planning system and reads the information which is needed for Monte Carlo calculation transferred in digital image communications in medicine-radiation therapy (DICOM-RT) format. In MCTPV several methods were applied in order to reduce the simulation time. The relative dose distribution of a clinical prostate conformal plan calculated by the MCTPV was compared with that of TiGRT planning system. The results showed well implementation of the beams configuration and patient information in this system. For quantitative evaluation of MCTPV a two-dimensional (2D) diode array (MapCHECK2) and gamma index analysis were used. The gamma passing rate (3%/3 mm) of an IMRT plan was found to be 98.5% for total beams. Also, comparison of the measured and Monte Carlo calculated doses at several points inside an inhomogeneous phantom for 6- and 18-MV photon beams showed a good agreement (within 1.5%). The accuracy and timing results of MCTPV showed that MCTPV could be used very efficiently for additional assessment of complicated plans such as IMRT plan. PMID:26170554

  13. Development and validation of MCNPX-based Monte Carlo treatment plan verification system.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Iraj; Monadi, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    A Monte Carlo treatment plan verification (MCTPV) system was developed for clinical treatment plan verification (TPV), especially for the conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans. In the MCTPV, the MCNPX code was used for particle transport through the accelerator head and the patient body. MCTPV has an interface with TiGRT planning system and reads the information which is needed for Monte Carlo calculation transferred in digital image communications in medicine-radiation therapy (DICOM-RT) format. In MCTPV several methods were applied in order to reduce the simulation time. The relative dose distribution of a clinical prostate conformal plan calculated by the MCTPV was compared with that of TiGRT planning system. The results showed well implementation of the beams configuration and patient information in this system. For quantitative evaluation of MCTPV a two-dimensional (2D) diode array (MapCHECK2) and gamma index analysis were used. The gamma passing rate (3%/3 mm) of an IMRT plan was found to be 98.5% for total beams. Also, comparison of the measured and Monte Carlo calculated doses at several points inside an inhomogeneous phantom for 6- and 18-MV photon beams showed a good agreement (within 1.5%). The accuracy and timing results of MCTPV showed that MCTPV could be used very efficiently for additional assessment of complicated plans such as IMRT plan.

  14. Forward treatment planning for modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) employing Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect

    Henzen, D. Manser, P.; Frei, D.; Volken, W.; Born, E. J.; Lössl, K.; Aebersold, D. M.; Fix, M. K.; Neuenschwander, H.; Stampanoni, M. F. M.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: This paper describes the development of a forward planning process for modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT). The approach is based on a previously developed electron beam model used to calculate dose distributions of electron beams shaped by a photon multi leaf collimator (pMLC). Methods: As the electron beam model has already been implemented into the Swiss Monte Carlo Plan environment, the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) can be included in the planning process for MERT. In a first step, CT data are imported into Eclipse and a pMLC shaped electron beam is set up. This initial electron beam is then divided into segments, with the electron energy in each segment chosen according to the distal depth of the planning target volume (PTV) in beam direction. In order to improve the homogeneity of the dose distribution in the PTV, a feathering process (Gaussian edge feathering) is launched, which results in a number of feathered segments. For each of these segments a dose calculation is performed employing the in-house developed electron beam model along with the macro Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm. Finally, an automated weight optimization of all segments is carried out and the total dose distribution is read back into Eclipse for display and evaluation. One academic and two clinical situations are investigated for possible benefits of MERT treatment compared to standard treatments performed in our clinics and treatment with a bolus electron conformal (BolusECT) method. Results: The MERT treatment plan of the academic case was superior to the standard single segment electron treatment plan in terms of organs at risk (OAR) sparing. Further, a comparison between an unfeathered and a feathered MERT plan showed better PTV coverage and homogeneity for the feathered plan, with V{sub 95%} increased from 90% to 96% and V{sub 107%} decreased from 8% to nearly 0%. For a clinical breast boost irradiation, the MERT plan

  15. A moment-based approach for DVH-guided radiotherapy treatment plan optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarepisheh, M.; Shakourifar, M.; Trigila, G.; Ghomi, P. S.; Couzens, S.; Abebe, A.; Noreña, L.; Shang, W.; Jiang, Steve B.; Zinchenko, Y.

    2013-03-01

    The dose-volume histogram (DVH) is a clinically relevant criterion to evaluate the quality of a treatment plan. It is hence desirable to incorporate DVH constraints into treatment plan optimization for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Yet, the direct inclusion of the DVH constraints into a treatment plan optimization model typically leads to great computational difficulties due to the non-convex nature of these constraints. To overcome this critical limitation, we propose a new convex-moment-based optimization approach. Our main idea is to replace the non-convex DVH constraints by a set of convex moment constraints. In turn, the proposed approach is able to generate a Pareto-optimal plan whose DVHs are close to, or if possible even outperform, the desired DVHs. In particular, our experiment on a prostate cancer patient case demonstrates the effectiveness of this approach by employing two and three moment formulations to approximate the desired DVHs.

  16. Development of Advanced Multi-Modality Radiation Treatment Planning Software for Neutron Radiotherapy and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D; Wessol, D; Wemple, C; Harkin, G; Hartmann-Siantar, C

    2002-08-20

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has long been active in development of advanced Monte-Carlo based computational dosimetry and treatment planning methods and software for advanced radiotherapy, with a particular focus on Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) and, to a somewhat lesser extent, Fast-Neutron Therapy. The most recent INEEL software system of this type is known as SERA, Simulation Environment for Radiotherapy Applications. As a logical next step in the development of modern radiotherapy planning tools to support the most advanced research, INEEL and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the developers of the PEREGRTNE computational engine for radiotherapy treatment planning applications, have recently launched a new project to collaborate in the development of a ''next-generation'' multi-modality treatment planning software system that will be useful for all modern forms of radiotherapy.

  17. Re-envisioning Addiction Treatment: A Six-Point Plan

    PubMed Central

    Kellogg, Scott H.

    2012-01-01

    This article is focused on improving the quality of addiction treatment. Based on observations that patients are leaving treatment too early and/or are continuing to use substances during their care, the authors propose six actions that could help reorient and revitalize this kind of clinical work: (1) conceptualize and treat addictive disorders within a psychiatric/mental health framework; (2) make the creation of a strong therapeutic alliance a core part of the healing process; (3) understand patients’ addictions and other problems using models based on multiple internal parts, voices, or modes; (4) make contingency management and the use of positive reinforcement systems a standard and central practice in all treatment settings; (5) envision long-term change and healing through the lens of identity theory; and (6) integrate the growing developments in recovery culture with formal treatment. PMID:22754086

  18. Helical Tomotherapy-Based STAT Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Dosimetric Evaluation for a Real-Time SBRT Treatment Planning and Delivery Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlap, Neal; McIntosh, Alyson; Sheng Ke; Yang Wensha; Turner, Benton; Shoushtari, Asal; Sheehan, Jason; Jones, David R.; Lu Weigo; Ruchala, Keneth; Olivera, Gustavo; Parnell, Donald; Larner, James L.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Read, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    iterations or 135 sec for STAT RT liver and lung SBRT plans and 7 iterations or 315 sec for STAT RT spine SBRT plans. Helical TomoTherapy-based STAT RT treatment planning with the 'full scatter' algorithm provides levels of dosimetric conformality, heterogeneity, and OAR avoidance for SBRT treatments that are clinically equivalent to those generated with the Helical TomoTherapy 'beamlet' algorithm. STAT RT calculation times for simple SBRT treatments are fast enough to warrant further investigation into their potential incorporation into an SBRT program with daily real-time planning. Development of methods for accurate target and OAR determination on megavoltage computed tomography scans incorporating high-resolution diagnostic image co-registration software and CT detector-based exit dose measurement for quality assurance are necessary to build a real-time SBRT planning and delivery program.

  19. Robustness of IPSA optimized high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy treatment plans to catheter displacements

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, May

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) optimized brachytherapy treatment plans are characterized with large isolated dwell times at the first or last dwell position of each catheter. The potential of catheter shifts relative to the target and organs at risk in these plans may lead to a more significant change in delivered dose to the volumes of interest relative to plans with more uniform dwell times. Material and methods This study aims to determine if the Nucletron Oncentra dwell time deviation constraint (DTDC) parameter can be optimized to improve the robustness of high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy plans to catheter displacements. A set of 10 clinically acceptable prostate plans were re-optimized with a DTDC parameter of 0 and 0.4. For each plan, catheter displacements of 3, 7, and 14 mm were retrospectively applied and the change in dose volume histogram (DVH) indices and conformity indices analyzed. Results The robustness of clinically acceptable prostate plans to catheter displacements in the caudal direction was found to be dependent on the DTDC parameter. A DTDC value of 0 improves the robustness of planning target volume (PTV) coverage to catheter displacements, whereas a DTDC value of 0.4 improves the robustness of the plans to changes in hotspots. Conclusions The results indicate that if used in conjunction with a pre-treatment catheter displacement correction protocol and a tolerance of 3 mm, a DTDC value of 0.4 may produce clinically superior plans. However, the effect of the DTDC parameter in plan robustness was not observed to be as strong as initially suspected. PMID:27504129

  20. Interactive dose shaping part 1: a new paradigm for IMRT treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegenhein, Peter; Kamerling, Cornelis Ph; Oelfke, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present a novel treatment planning technique called interactive dose shaping (IDS) to be employed for the optimization of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). IDS does not rely on a Newton-based optimization algorithm which is driven by an objective function formed of dose volume constraints on pre-segmented volumes of interest (VOIs). Our new planning technique allows for direct, interactive adaptation of localized planning features. This is realized by a dose modification and recovery (DMR) planning engine which implements a two-step approach: firstly, the desired localized plan adaptation is imposed on the current plan (modification) while secondly inevitable, undesired disturbances of the dose pattern elsewhere are compensated for automatically by the recovery module. Together with an ultra-fast dose update calculation method the DMR engine has been implemented in a newly designed 3D therapy planning system Dynaplan enabling true real-time interactive therapy planning. Here we present the underlying strategy and algorithms of the DMR based planning concept. The functionality of the IDS planning approach is demonstrated for a phantom geometry of clinical resolution and size.

  1. Impact of grid size on uniform scanning and IMPT plans in XiO treatment planning system for brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Rana, Suresh; Zheng, Yuanshui

    2015-09-01

    The main purposes of this study are to: 1) evaluate the accuracy of XiO treatment planning system (TPS) for different dose calculation grid size based on head phantom measurements in uniform scanning proton therapy (USPT); and 2) compare the dosimetric results for various dose calculation grid sizes based on real computed tomography (CT) dataset of pediatric brain cancer treatment plans generated by USPT and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) techniques. For phantom study, we have utilized the anthropomorphic head proton phantom provided by Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC). The imaging, treatment planning, and beam delivery were carried out following the guidelines provided by the IROC. The USPT proton plan was generated in the XiO TPS, and dose calculations were performed for grid size ranged from 1 to 3 mm. The phantom containing thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLDs) and films was irradiated using uniform scanning proton beam. The irradiated TLDs were read by the IROC. The calculated doses from the XiO for different grid sizes were compared to the measured TLD doses provided by the IROC. Gamma evaluation was done by comparing calculated planar dose distribution of 3 mm grid size with measured planar dose distribution. Additionally, IMPT plan was generated based on the same CT dataset of the IROC phantom, and IMPT dose calculations were performed for grid size ranged from 1 to 3 mm. For comparative purpose, additional gamma analysis was done by comparing the planar dose distributions of standard grid size (3 mm) with that of other grid sizes (1, 1.5, 2, and 2.5 mm) for both the USPT and IMPT plans. For patient study, USPT plans of three pediatric brain cancer cases were selected. IMPT plans were generated for each of three pediatric cases. All patient treatment plans (USPT and IMPT) were generated in the XiO TPS for a total dose of 54 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]). Treatment plans (USPT and IMPT) of each case was recalculated for grid

  2. Impact of grid size on uniform scanning and IMPT plans in XiO treatment planning system for brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Rana, Suresh; Zheng, Yuanshui

    2015-09-08

    The main purposes of this study are to: 1) evaluate the accuracy of XiO treatment planning system (TPS) for different dose calculation grid size based on head phan-tom measurements in uniform scanning proton therapy (USPT); and 2) compare the dosimetric results for various dose calculation grid sizes based on real computed tomography (CT) dataset of pediatric brain cancer treatment plans generated by USPT and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) techniques. For phantom study, we have utilized the anthropomorphic head proton phantom provided by Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC). The imaging, treatment planning, and beam delivery were carried out following the guidelines provided by the IROC. The USPT proton plan was generated in the XiO TPS, and dose calculations were performed for grid size ranged from 1 to 3 mm. The phantom containing thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLDs) and films was irradiated using uniform scanning proton beam. The irradiated TLDs were read by the IROC. The calculated doses from the XiO for different grid sizes were compared to the measured TLD doses provided by the IROC. Gamma evaluation was done by comparing calculated planar dose distribution of 3 mm grid size with measured planar dose distribution. Additionally, IMPT plan was generated based on the same CT dataset of the IROC phantom, and IMPT dose calculations were performed for grid size ranged from 1 to 3 mm. For comparative purpose, additional gamma analysis was done by comparing the planar dose distributions of standard grid size (3 mm) with that of other grid sizes (1, 1.5, 2, and 2.5 mm) for both the USPT and IMPT plans. For patient study, USPT plans of three pediatric brain cancer cases were selected. IMPT plans were generated for each of three pediatric cases. All patient treatment plans (USPT and IMPT) were generated in the XiO TPS for a total dose of 54 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]). Treatment plans (USPT and IMPT) of each case was recalculated for grid

  3. SU-E-T-628: Predicted Risk of Post-Irradiation Cerebral Necrosis in Pediatric Brain Cancer Patients: A Treatment Planning Comparison of Proton Vs. Photon Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, D; Zhang, R; Sanders, M; Newhauser, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Post-irradiation cerebral necrosis (PICN) is a severe late effect that can Result from brain cancers treatment using radiation therapy. The purpose of this study was to compare the treatment plans and predicted risk of PICN after volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to the risk after passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) in a cohort of pediatric patients. Methods: Thirteen pediatric patients with varying age and sex were selected for this study. A clinical treatment volume (CTV) was constructed for 8 glioma patients and 5 ependymoma patients. Prescribed dose was 54 Gy over 30 fractions to the planning volume. Dosimetric endpoints were compared between VMAT and proton plans. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) following VMAT and proton therapy planning was also calculated using PICN as the biological endpoint. Sensitivity tests were performed to determine if predicted risk of PICN was sensitive to positional errors, proton range errors and selection of risk models. Results: Both PSPT and IMPT plans resulted in a significant increase in the maximum dose and reduction in the total brain volume irradiated to low doses compared with the VMAT plans. The average ratios of NTCP between PSPT and VMAT were 0.56 and 0.38 for glioma and ependymoma patients respectively and the average ratios of NTCP between IMPT and VMAT were 0.67 and 0.68 for glioma and ependymoma plans respectively. Sensitivity test revealed that predicted ratios of risk were insensitive to range and positional errors but varied with risk model selection. Conclusion: Both PSPT and IMPT plans resulted in a decrease in the predictive risk of necrosis for the pediatric plans studied in this work. Sensitivity analysis upheld the qualitative findings of the risk models used in this study, however more accurate models that take into account dose and volume are needed.

  4. A planning study investigating dual-gated volumetric arc stereotactic treatment of primary renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Devereux, Thomas; Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Supple, Jeremy; Siva, Shankar

    2015-04-01

    This is a planning study investigating the dosimetric advantages of gated volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to the end-exhale and end-inhale breathing phases for patients undergoing stereotactic treatment of primary renal cell carcinoma. VMAT plans were developed from the end-inhale (VMATinh) and the end-exhale (VMATexh) phases of the breathing cycle as well as a VMAT plan and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy plan based on an internal target volume (ITV) (VMATitv). An additional VMAT plan was created by giving the respective gated VMAT plan a 50% weighting and summing the inhale and exhale plans together to create a summed gated plan. Dose to organs at risk (OARs) as well as comparison of intermediate and low-dose conformity was evaluated. There was no difference in the volume of healthy tissue receiving the prescribed dose for the planned target volume (PTV) (CI100%) for all the VMAT plans; however, the mean volume of healthy tissue receiving 50% of the prescribed dose for the PTV (CI50%) values were 4.7 (± 0.2), 4.6 (± 0.2), and 4.7 (± 0.6) for the VMATitv, VMATinh, and VMATexh plans, respectively. The VMAT plans based on the exhale and inhale breathing phases showed a 4.8% and 2.4% reduction in dose to 30 cm{sup 3} of the small bowel, respectively, compared with that of the ITV-based VMAT plan. The summed gated VMAT plans showed a 6.2% reduction in dose to 30 cm{sup 3} of the small bowel compared with that of the VMAT plans based on the ITV. Additionally, when compared with the inhale and the exhale VMAT plans, a 4% and 1.5%, respectively, reduction was observed. Gating VMAT was able to reduce the amount of prescribed, intermediate, and integral dose to healthy tissue when compared with VMAT plans based on an ITV. When summing the inhale and exhale plans together, dose to healthy tissue and OARs was optimized. However, gating VMAT plans would take longer to treat and is a factor that needs to be considered.

  5. Treatment planning of electroporation-based medical interventions: electrochemotherapy, gene electrotransfer and irreversible electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zupanic, Anze; Kos, Bor; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2012-09-01

    In recent years, cancer electrochemotherapy (ECT), gene electrotransfer for gene therapy and DNA vaccination (GET) and tissue ablation with irreversible electroporation (IRE) have all entered clinical practice. We present a method for a personalized treatment planning procedure for ECT, GET and IRE, based on medical image analysis, numerical modelling of electroporation and optimization with the genetic algorithm, and several visualization tools for treatment plan assessment. Each treatment plan provides the attending physician with optimal positions of electrodes in the body and electric pulse parameters for optimal electroporation of the target tissues. For the studied case of a deep-seated tumour, the optimal treatment plans for ECT and IRE require at least two electrodes to be inserted into the target tissue, thus lowering the necessary voltage for electroporation and limiting damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. In GET, it is necessary to place the electrodes outside the target tissue to prevent damage to target cells intended to express the transfected genes. The presented treatment planning procedure is a valuable tool for clinical and experimental use and evaluation of electroporation-based treatments.

  6. Determination of CT-to-density conversion relationship for image-based treatment planning systems.

    PubMed

    Saw, Cheng B; Loper, Alphonse; Komanduri, Krishna; Combine, Tony; Huq, Saiful; Scicutella, Carol

    2005-01-01

    The implementation of tissue inhomogeneity correction in image-based treatment planning will improve the accuracy of radiation dose calculations for patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy. Before the tissue inhomogeneity correction can be applied, the relationship between the computed tomography (CT) value and density must be established. This tissue characterization relationship allows the conversion of CT value in each voxel of the CT images into density for use in the dose calculations. This paper describes the proper procedure of establishing the CT value to density conversion relationship. A tissue characterization phantom with 17 inserts made of different materials was scanned using a GE Lightspeed Plus CT scanner (120 kVp). These images were then downloaded into the Eclipse and Pinnacle treatment planning systems. At the treatment planning workstation, the axial images were retrieved to determine the CT value of the inserts. A region of interest was drawn on the central portion of the insert and the mean CT value and its standard deviation were determined. The mean CT value was plotted against the density of the tissue inserts and fitted with bilinear equations. A new set of CT values vs. densities was generated from the bilinear equations and then entered into the treatment planning systems. The need to obtain CT values through the treatment planning system is very clear. The 2 treatment planning systems use different CT value ranges, one from -1024 to 3071 and the other from 0 to 4096. If the range is correct, it would result in inappropriate use of the conversion curve. In addition to the difference in the range of CT values, one treatment planning system uses physical density, while the other uses relative electron density.

  7. Technical aspects of image-based treatment planning of rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Myerson, Robert; Drzymala, Robert

    2003-10-01

    The role of 3-dimensional treatment planning in the management of rectal cancer is not well defined. This report reviews technical guidelines for simulation, defining target volumes, and suggested beam configurations. Outcome from pilot clinical trials, with emphasis on the impact of volume and dose on tumor response and treatment morbidity is discussed.

  8. Using Performance Feedback to Improve Treatment Integrity of Classwide Behavior Plans: An Investigation of Observer Reactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Codding, Robin S.; Livanis, Andrew; Pace, Gary M.; Vaca, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The current study replicated the positive effects of performance feedback on treatment integrity and extended previous work by examining reactivity using a multiple baseline design with alternating treatments for observer-present and observer-absent conditions on teachers' implementation of a classwide behavior plan. No differences were found…

  9. TH-A-9A-08: Knowledge-Based Quality Control of Clinical Stereotactic Radiosurgery Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, S; Moore, K L; Tan, J; Olsen, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a quality control tool to reduce stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) planning variability using models that predict achievable plan quality metrics (QMs) based on individual patient anatomy. Methods: Using a knowledge-based methodology that quantitatively correlates anatomical geometric features to resultant organ-at-risk (OAR) dosimetry, we developed models for predicting achievable OAR dose-volume histograms (DVHs) by training with a cohort of previously treated SRS patients. The DVH-based QMs used in this work are the gradient measure, GM=(3/4pi)^1/3*[V50%^1/3−V100%^1/3], and V10Gy of normal brain. As GM quantifies the total rate of dose fall-off around the planning target volume (PTV), all voxels inside the patient's body contour were treated as OAR for DVH prediction. 35 previously treated SRS plans from our institution were collected; all were planned with non-coplanar volumetric-modulated arc therapy to prescription doses of 12–25 Gy. Of the 35-patient cohort, 15 were used for model training and 20 for model validation. Accuracies of the predictions were quantified by the mean and the standard deviation of the difference between clinical and predicted QMs, δQM=QM-clin−QM-pred. Results: Best agreement between predicted and clinical QMs was obtained when models were built separately for V-PTV<2.5cc and V-PTV>2.5cc. Eight patients trained the V-PTV<2.5cc model and seven patients trained the V-PTV>2.5cc models, respectively. The mean and the standard deviation of δGM were 0.3±0.4mm for the training sets and −0.1±0.6mm for the validation sets, demonstrating highly accurate GM predictions. V10Gy predictions were also highly accurate, with δV10Gy=0.8±0.7cc for the training sets and δV10Gy=0.7±1.4cc for the validation sets. Conclusion: The accuracy of the models in predicting two key SRS quality metrics highlights the potential of this technique for quality control for SRS treatments. Future investigations will seek to determine

  10. A Computer-Assisted Interactive Treatment Planning System for Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Kenric W.; Munnecke, Thomas H.

    1981-01-01

    The authors describe a MUMPS based system capable of assisting clinicians in developing written psychiatric treatment plans in inpatient and outpatient services in a VA hospital. This interactive system relies upon a series of hierarchically arranged topical frames addressing a broad range of psychosocial and medical problems, treatment goals, and methods. It speeds multi-disciplinary treatment planning, employs objective language, serves an educational purpose, and structures hierarchically organized entry of detailed information into the data base. Significantly, this system is compatible with other MUMPS applications developed in the VA. Future modifications, expansions, and export of methodology can be accomplished without extensive reworking of existing software or data storage design.

  11. Radiotoxic model for three-dimensional treatment planning. Part 1: Theoretical basis

    SciTech Connect

    Caudry, M.; Causse, N.; Trouette, R.; Recaldini, L.; Maire, J.P.; Demeaux, H. )

    1993-04-02

    Since recent treatment planning systems calculate volumetric dose distribution, an objective evaluation of potential toxicity in the main critical organs may be helpful in treatment optimization. Modeling the toxicity of radiotherapy must at least account for: (a) specific risks in every critical organ; (b) total dose and dose per fraction; (c) partial irradiation of critical organs; (d) heterogeneous dose distribution. The Radiation Damage Factor formula is aimed at estimating the delayed toxicity of a given treatment plan on every critical organ concerned. The formulation uses a double exponential function: RDF = 100 e[sup [minus]Ke[sup [minus](a+bd)DV[sup c

  12. Matlab Tools: An Alternative to Planning Systems in Brachytherapy Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Higmar

    2006-09-08

    This work proposes the use of the Matlab environment to obtain the treatment dose based on the reported data by Krishnaswamy and Liu et al. The comparison with reported measurements is showed for the Amersham source model. For the 3M source model, measurements with TLDs and a Monte Carlo simulation are compared to the data obtained by Matlab. The difference for the Amersham model is well under the 15% recommended by the IAEA and for the 3M model, although the difference is greater, the results are consistent. The good agreement to the reported data allows the Matlab calculations to be used in daily brachytherapy treatments.

  13. Dynamic Underground Stripping Post-Treatment Characterization Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Vangelas, K.M.

    2001-04-17

    The A/M-Area of the Savannah River Site is a known area of solvent release to the subsurface. The Solvent Storage Tank Area is an area of documented dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) in the subsurface. June 30, 2000 a remediation using the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) treatment technology commenced. This technology injects steam into the subsurface through a series of injection wells located within the treatment zone. The steam is pulled through the subsurface to an extraction well where it is removed. The heating of the subsurface causes the DNAPL present to be volatilized and removed through the extraction well.

  14. Human applications of the INEL patient treatment planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, F.; Wessol, D.; Atkinson, C.; Nigg, D.

    1995-11-01

    During the past few years, murine and large animal research, as well as human studies have provided data to the point where human clinical trials have been initiated at the BMRR using BPA-F for gliomas and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR) using BPA for melanomas of the extremeties. It is expected that glioma trials using BSH will proceed soon at the Petten High Flux Reactor (HFR) in the Netherlands. The first human glioma epithermal boron neutron capture therapy application was performed at the BMRR in the fall of 1994. This was a collaborative effort by BNL, Beth Israel Manhattan hospital, and INEL. The INEL planning system was chosen to perform dose predictions for this application.

  15. Dosimetric evaluation of PLATO and Oncentra treatment planning systems for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy gynecological treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Hardev; Herman, Tania De La Fuente; Showalter, Barry; Thompson, Spencer J.; Syzek, Elizabeth J.; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2012-10-01

    This study compares the dosimetric differences in HDR brachytherapy treatment plans calculated with Nucletron's PLATO and Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning systems (TPS). Ten patients (1 T1b, 1 T2a, 6 T2b, 2 T4) having cervical carcinoma, median age of 43.5 years (range, 34-79 years) treated with tandem & ring applicator in our institution were selected retrospectively for this study. For both Plato and Oncentra TPS, the same orthogonal films anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral were used to manually draw the prescription and anatomical points using definitions from the Manchester system and recommendations from the ICRU report 38. Data input for PLATO was done using a digitizer and Epson Expression 10000XL scanner was used for Oncentra where the points were selected on the images in the screen. The prescription doses for these patients were 30 Gy to points right A (RA) and left A (LA) delivered in 5 fractions with Ir-192 HDR source. Two arrangements: one dwell position and two dwell positions on the tandem were used for dose calculation. The doses to the patient points right B (RB) and left B (LB), and to the organs at risk (OAR), bladder and rectum for each patient were calculated. The mean dose and the mean percentage difference in dose calculated by the two treatment planning systems were compared. Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences in mean RB, LB, bladder and rectum doses were found with p-values > 0.14. The mean percent difference of doses in RB, LB, bladder and rectum are found to be less than 2.2%, 1.8%, 1.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Dose calculations based on the two different treatment planning systems were found to be consistent and the treatment plans can be made with either system in our department without any concern.

  16. Dosimetric evaluation of PLATO and Oncentra treatment planning systems for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy gynecological treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Hardev; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Showalter, Barry; Thompson, Spencer J.; Syzek, Elizabeth J.; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2012-10-23

    This study compares the dosimetric differences in HDR brachytherapy treatment plans calculated with Nucletron's PLATO and Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning systems (TPS). Ten patients (1 T1b, 1 T2a, 6 T2b, 2 T4) having cervical carcinoma, median age of 43.5 years (range, 34-79 years) treated with tandem and ring applicator in our institution were selected retrospectively for this study. For both Plato and Oncentra TPS, the same orthogonal films anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral were used to manually draw the prescription and anatomical points using definitions from the Manchester system and recommendations from the ICRU report 38. Data input for PLATO was done using a digitizer and Epson Expression 10000XL scanner was used for Oncentra where the points were selected on the images in the screen. The prescription doses for these patients were 30 Gy to points right A (RA) and left A (LA) delivered in 5 fractions with Ir-192 HDR source. Two arrangements: one dwell position and two dwell positions on the tandem were used for dose calculation. The doses to the patient points right B (RB) and left B (LB), and to the organs at risk (OAR), bladder and rectum for each patient were calculated. The mean dose and the mean percentage difference in dose calculated by the two treatment planning systems were compared. Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences in mean RB, LB, bladder and rectum doses were found with p-values > 0.14. The mean percent difference of doses in RB, LB, bladder and rectum are found to be less than 2.2%, 1.8%, 1.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Dose calculations based on the two different treatment planning systems were found to be consistent and the treatment plans can be made with either system in our department without any concern.

  17. WE-F-BRB-00: New Developments in Knowledge-Based Treatment Planning and Automation

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    Advancements in informatics in radiotherapy are opening up opportunities to improve our ability to assess treatment plans. Models on individualizing patient dose constraints from prior patient data and shape relationships have been extensively researched and are now making their way into commercial products. New developments in knowledge based treatment planning involve understanding the impact of the radiation dosimetry on the patient. Akin to radiobiology models that have driven intensity modulated radiotherapy optimization, toxicity and outcome predictions based on treatment plans and prior patient experiences may be the next step in knowledge based planning. In order to realize these predictions, it is necessary to understand how the clinical information can be captured, structured and organized with ontologies and databases designed for recall. Large databases containing radiation dosimetry and outcomes present the opportunity to evaluate treatment plans against predictions of toxicity and disease response. Such evaluations can be based on dose volume histogram or even the full 3-dimensional dose distribution and its relation to the critical anatomy. This session will provide an understanding of ontologies and standard terminologies used to capture clinical knowledge into structured databases; How data can be organized and accessed to utilize the knowledge in planning; and examples of research and clinical efforts to incorporate that clinical knowledge into planning for improved care for our patients. Learning Objectives: Understand the role of standard terminologies, ontologies and data organization in oncology Understand methods to capture clinical toxicity and outcomes in a clinical setting Understand opportunities to learn from clinical data and its application to treatment planning Todd McNutt receives funding from Philips, Elekta and Toshiba for some of the work presented.

  18. American Association of Physicists in Medicine Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group 53: quality assurance for clinical radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Fraass, B; Doppke, K; Hunt, M; Kutcher, G; Starkschall, G; Stern, R; Van Dyke, J

    1998-10-01

    In recent years, the sophistication and complexity of clinical treatment planning and treatment planning systems has increased significantly, particularly including three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning systems, and the use of conformal treatment planning and delivery techniques. This has led to the need for a comprehensive set of quality assurance (QA) guidelines that can be applied to clinical treatment planning. This document is the report of Task Group 53 of the Radiation Therapy Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. The purpose of this report is to guide and assist the clinical medical physicist in developing and implementing a comprehensive but viable program of quality assurance for modern radiotherapy treatment planning. The scope of the QA needs for treatment planning is quite broad, encompassing image-based definition of patient anatomy, 3D beam descriptions for complex beams including multileaf collimator apertures, 3D dose calculation algorithms, and complex plan evaluation tools including dose volume histograms. The Task Group recommends an organizational framework for the task of creating a QA program which is individualized to the needs of each institution and addresses the issues of acceptance testing, commissioning the planning system and planning process, routine quality assurance, and ongoing QA of the planning process. This report, while not prescribing specific QA tests, provides the framework and guidance to allow radiation oncology physicists to design comprehensive and practical treatment planning QA programs for their clinics.

  19. [The contribution of PET to radiation treatment planning].

    PubMed

    Belkacémi, Yazid; Lartigau, Eric; Kerrou, Khaldoun; Carpentier, Philippe; Taïeb, Sophie; Giraud, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Advances in medical imaging have greatly enhanced the speciality of radiation oncology by allowing more healthy tissue to be speared for better tumour coverage. Positron emission tomography (PET) with the glucose analogue [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is a functional imaging method that has become widely used in oncology over the last decade. It has been rapidly incorporated in the staging and treatment planing of many patients with cancer in several anatomic sites such as non-small cell lung carcinomas. However, the initial data were controversial by the use of non dedicated PET units, the lack of patient immobilisation for radiation therapy, or the lack of image registration for fusion PET images with computed tomography (CT). The increased number of combined PET/CT units installed and the development of new isotopes that allow advances in biological and molecular tumour and healthy tissue imaging should lead to enhanced target definition for highly conformal radiation therapy. Such developments might also allow tumour viability or healthy tissue function to be imaged, which could be used during treatment as early indicators of tumour response or healthy tissue injury, possibly leading to a change in treatment strategy based on functional and biological imaging. The contribution of PET imaging advances using FDG or new tracers for treatment planing in the new era of image guided radiation therapy will be discussed in this review.

  20. Cobalt-60 tomotherapy: Clinical treatment planning and phantom dose delivery studies

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanesar, Sandeep; Darko, Johnson; Joshi, Chandra P.; Kerr, Andrew; John Schreiner, L.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Investigations have shown that a Cobalt-60 (Co-60) radioactive source has the potential to play a role in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In this paper, Co-60 tomotherapy's conformal dose delivery potential is evaluated by delivering conformal dose plans on a cylindrical homogeneous phantom containing clinical structures similar to those found in a typical head and neck (H and N) cancer. Also, the clinical potential of Co-60 tomotherapy is investigated by generating 2D clinical treatment plans for H and N and prostate anatomical regions. These plans are compared with the 6 MV based treatment plans for modalities such as linear accelerator-based tomotherapy and broad beam IMRT, and 15 MV based 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT).Methods: For experimental validation studies, clinical and nonclinical conformal dose patterns were delivered on circular, homogeneous phantoms containing GafChromic film. For clinical planning study, dose calculations were performed with the EGSnrc Monte Carlo program, where a Theratronics 780C Co-60 unit and a 6 MV linear accelerator were modeled with a MIMiC binary multileaf collimator. An inhouse inverse treatment planning system was used to optimize tomotherapy plans using the same optimization parameters for both Co-60 and 6 MV beams. The IMRT and 3DCRT plans for the clinical cases were generated entirely in the Eclipse treatment planning system based on inhouse IMRT and 3DCRT site specific protocols.Results: The doses delivered to the homogeneous phantoms agreed with the calculations, indicating that it is possible to deliver highly conformal doses with the Co-60 unit. The dose distributions for Co-60 tomotherapy clinical plans for both clinical cases were similar to those obtained with 6 MV based tomotherapy and IMRT, and much more conformal compared to 3DCRT plans. The dose area histograms showed that the Co-60 plans achieve the dose objectives for the targets and organs at risk.Conclusions: These results

  1. Waste Treatment Technology Process Development Plan For Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.

    2013-08-29

    The purpose of this Process Development Plan is to summarize the objectives and plans for the technology development activities for an alternative path for disposition of the recycle stream that will be generated in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility (LAW Recycle). This plan covers the first phase of the development activities. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to recycle it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be concentrated by evaporation and returned to the LAW vitrification facility. Because this stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are also problematic for the glass waste form, they accumulate in the Recycle stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and reducing the halides in the Recycle is a key component of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, this stream does not have a proven disposition path, and resolving this gap becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and to develop a process that will remove radionuclides from this stream and allow its diversion to another disposition path, greatly decreasing the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. The origin of this LAW Recycle stream will be from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover or precipitates of scrubbed components (e.g. carbonates). The soluble

  2. Intelligence-guided beam angle optimization in treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Dai, Jian-Rong

    2016-10-01

    An intelligence guided approach based on fuzzy inference system (FIS) was proposed to automate beam angle optimization in treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The model of FIS is built on inference rules in describing the relationship between dose quality of IMRT plan and irradiated region of anatomical structure. Dose quality of IMRT plan is quantified by the difference between calculated and constraint doses of the anatomical structures in an IMRT plan. Irradiated region of anatomical structure is characterized by the metric, covered region of interest, which is the region of an anatomical structure under radiation field while beam's eye-view is conform to target volume. Initially, an IMRT plan is created with a single beam. The dose difference is calculated for the input of FIS and the output of FIS is obtained with processing of fuzzy inference. Later, a set of candidate beams is generated for replacing the current beam. This process continues until no candidate beams is found. Then the next beam is added to the IMRT plan and optimized in the same way as the previous beam. The new beam keeps adding to the IMRT plan until the allowed beam number is reached. Two spinal cases were investigated in this study. The preliminary results show that dose quality of IMRT plans achieved by this approach is better than those achieved by the default approach with equally spaced beam setting. It is effective to find the optimal beam combination of IMRT plan with the intelligence-guided approach.

  3. Comparative study of old and new versions of treatment planning system using dose volume histogram indices of clinical plans

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Gangarapu Sri; Srinivas, Vuppu; Ayyangar, K. M.; Reddy, Palreddy Yadagiri

    2016-01-01

    Recently, Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) version 8.8 was upgraded to the latest version 13.6. It is customary that the vendor gives training on how to upgrade the existing software to the new version. However, the customer is provided less inner details about changes in the new software version. According to manufacturer, accuracy of point dose calculations and irregular treatment planning is better in the new version (13.6) compared to the old version (8.8). Furthermore, the new version uses voxel-based calculations while the earlier version used point dose calculations. Major difference in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans was observed between the two versions after re-optimization and re-calculations. However, minor difference was observed for IMRT cases after performing only re-calculations. It is recommended TPS quality assurance to be performed after any major upgrade of software. This can be done by performing dose calculation comparisons in TPS. To assess the difference between the versions, 25 clinical cases from the old version were compared keeping all the patient data intact including the monitor units and comparing the differences in dose calculations using dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Along with DVH analysis, uniformity index, conformity index, homogeneity index, and dose spillage index were also compared for both versions. The results of comparative study are presented in this paper. PMID:27651566

  4. Decision theoretic steering and genetic algorithm optimization: application to stereotactic radiosurgery treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Schell, M C; Zhang, J B

    1997-11-01

    Treatment planning for stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated radiotherapy is currently a labor intensive, operator-dependent process. Many degrees of freedom exist to make rigorous optimization intractable except by computationally intelligent techniques. The quality of a given plan is determined by an aggregate of clinical objectives, most of which are subject to competing tradeoffs. In this work, we present an autonomous scheme that couples decision theoretic guidance with a genetic algorithm for optimization. Ordinal ranking among a population of viable treatment plans is based on a generalized distance metric, which promotes a decreasing hyperfrontier of the efficient solution set. The solution set is driven toward efficiency by the genetic algorithm, which uses the tournament selection mechanism based on the ordinal ranking. Goals and satisficing conditions can be defined to signal the ultimate and the minimum achievement levels in a given objective. A conventionally challenging case in radiosurgery was used to demonstrate the practical utility and the problem-solving power of the decision theoretic genetic algorithm. Treatment plans with one isocenter and four isocenters were derived under the autonomous scheme and compared to the actual treatment plan manually optimized by the expert planner. Quality assessment based on dose-volume histograms and normal tissue complication probabilities suggested that computational optimization could be driven to offer varying degrees of dosimetric improvement over a human-guided optimization effort. Furthermore, it was possible to achieve a high degree of isodose conformity to the target volume in computational optimization by increasing the degree of freedom in the treatment parameters. The time taken to derive an efficient planning solution was comparable and usually shorter than in the manual planning process, and can be scaled down almost linearly with the number of processors. Overall, the autonomous genetic

  5. The role of Cobalt-60 source in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: From modeling finite sources to treatment planning and conformal dose delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanesar, Sandeep Kaur

    Cobalt-60 (Co-60) units played an integral role in radiation therapy from the mid-1950s to the 1970s. Although they continue to be used to treat cancer in some parts of the world, their role has been significantly reduced due to the invention of medical linear accelerators. A number of groups have indicated a strong potential for Co-60 units in modern radiation therapy. The Medical Physics group at the Cancer Center of the Southeastern Ontario and Queen's University has shown the feasibility of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) via simple conformal treatment planning and dose delivery using a Co-60 unit. In this thesis, initial Co-60 tomotherapy planning investigations on simple uniform phantoms are extended to actual clinical cases based on patient CT data. The planning is based on radiation dose data from a clinical Co-60 unit fitted with a multileaf collimator (MLC) and modeled in the EGSnrc Monte Carlo system. An in house treatment planning program is used to calculate IMRT dose distributions. Conformal delivery in a single slice on a uniform phantom based on sequentially delivered pencil beams is verified by Gafchromic film. Volumetric dose distributions for Co-60 serial tomotherapy are then generated for typical clinical sites that had been treated at our clinic by conventional 6MV IMRT using Varian Eclipse treatment plans. The Co-60 treatment plans are compared with the clinical IMRT plans using conventional matrices such as dose volume histograms (DVH). Dose delivery based on simultaneously opened MLC leaves is also explored and a novel MLC segmentation method is proposed. In order to increase efficiency of dose calculations, a novel convolution based fluence model for treatment planning is also proposed. The ion chamber measurements showed that the Monte Carlo modeling of the beam data under the MIMiC MLC is accurate. The film measurements from the uniform phantom irradiations confirm that IMRT plans from our in-house treatment planning system

  6. Multi-Case Knowledge-Based IMRT Treatment Planning in Head and Neck Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzetic, Shelby Mariah

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) IMRT treatment planning is a challenging process that relies heavily on the planner's experience. Previously, we used the single, best match from a library of manually planned cases to semi-automatically generate IMRT plans for a new patient. The current multi-case Knowledge Based Radiation Therapy (MC-KBRT) study utilized different matching cases for each of six individual organs-at-risk (OARs), then combined those six cases to create the new treatment plan. From a database of 103 patient plans created by experienced planners, MC-KBRT plans were created for 40 (17 unilateral and 23 bilateral) HNC "query" patients. For each case, 2D beam's-eye-view images were used to find similar geometric "match" patients separately for each of 6 OARs. Dose distributions for each OAR from the 6 matching cases were combined and then warped to suit the query case's geometry. The dose-volume constraints were used to create the new query treatment plan without the need for human decision-making throughout the IMRT optimization. The optimized MC-KBRT plans were compared against the clinically approved plans and Version 1 (previous KBRT using only one matching case with dose warping) using the dose metrics: mean, median, and maximum (brainstem and cord+5mm) doses. Compared to Version 1, MC-KBRT had no significant reduction of the dose to any of the OARs in either unilateral or bilateral cases. Compared to the manually planned unilateral cases, there was significant reduction of the oral cavity mean/median dose (>2Gy) at the expense of the contralateral parotid. Compared to the manually planned bilateral cases, reduction of dose was significant in the ipsilateral parotid, larynx, and oral cavity (>3Gy mean/median) while maintaining PTV coverage. MC-KBRT planning in head and neck cancer generates IMRT plans with better dose sparing than manually created plans. MC-KBRT using multiple case matches does not show significant dose reduction compared to using a

  7. Women who conceived with infertility treatment were more likely to receive planned cesarean deliveries in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chien, Li-Yin; Lee, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Yu-Hung; Tai, Chen-Jei

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of conception with infertility treatment on planned cesarean delivery. The participants were from a panel of primiparous pregnant women in northern Taiwan. The data analysis included 771 women with a singleton pregnancy, of whom 160 had a planned cesarean delivery and 611 who had a vaginal delivery. The study women answered structured questionnaires during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, and at one-month postpartum. Women who conceived with infertility treatment were more likely to have planned cesarean deliveries than women who conceived without it (44.7% versus 18.1%, p < 0.001; crude odds ratio: 3.66, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.24-5.98). After adjustment for maternal age over 35 years, whether they were currently unmarried, selection of time for birth in advance, gestational hypertension, and birthweight < 2500 g, women who conceived with infertility treatment were 2.95 times (95% CI: 1.47-5.92) more likely to have planned cesarean deliveries. The increased risk for planned cesarean deliveries among singleton women who conceived with infertility treatment cannot be explained by older maternal age or higher number of morbidities during pregnancy. Counseling for women who conceive with infertility treatments may be needed to decrease unnecessary cesarean deliveries.

  8. A new column-generation-based algorithm for VMAT treatment plan optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Fei; Jia, Xun; Gu, Xuejun; Epelman, Marina A.; Romeijn, H. Edwin; Jiang, Steve B.

    2012-07-01

    We study the treatment plan optimization problem for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). We propose a new column-generation-based algorithm that takes into account bounds on the gantry speed and dose rate, as well as an upper bound on the rate of change of the gantry speed, in addition to MLC constraints. The algorithm iteratively adds one aperture at each control point along the treatment arc. In each iteration, a restricted problem optimizing intensities at previously selected apertures is solved, and its solution is used to formulate a pricing problem, which selects an aperture at another control point that is compatible with previously selected apertures and leads to the largest rate of improvement in the objective function value of the restricted problem. Once a complete set of apertures is obtained, their intensities are optimized and the gantry speeds and dose rates are adjusted to minimize treatment time while satisfying all machine restrictions. Comparisons of treatment plans obtained by our algorithm to idealized IMRT plans of 177 beams on five clinical prostate cancer cases demonstrate high quality with respect to clinical dose-volume criteria. For all cases, our algorithm yields treatment plans that can be delivered in around 2 min. Implementation on a graphic processing unit enables us to finish the optimization of a VMAT plan in 25-55 s.

  9. Clinical applications of positron emission tomography/computed tomography treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Macapinlac, Homer A

    2008-03-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has provided an incremental dimension to the management of cancer patients by allowing the incorporation of important molecular images in radiotherapy treatment planning, ie, direct evaluation of tumor metabolism, cell proliferation, apoptosis, hypoxia, and angiogenesis. The CT component allows 4D imaging techniques, allowing improvements in the accuracy of treatment delivery by compensating for tumor/normal organ motion, improving PET quantification, and correcting PET and CT image misregistration. The combination of PET and CT in a single imaging system to obtain a fused anatomical and functional image data is now emerging as a promising tool in radiotherapy departments for improved delineation of tumor volumes and optimization of treatment plans. PET has the potential to improve radiotherapy planning by minimizing unnecessary irradiation of normal tissues and by reducing the risk of geographic miss. PET influences treatment planning in a high proportion of cases and therefore radiotherapy dose escalation without PET may be futile. This article examines the increasing role of hybrid PET/CT imaging techniques in process of improving treatment planning in oncology with emphasis on non small cell lung cancer.

  10. A Unifying Probabilistic Bayesian Approach to Derive Electron Density from MRI for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Gudur, Madhu Sudhan Reddy; Hara, Wendy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Wang, Lei; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-01-01

    MRI significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of target delineation in radiation therapy for certain tumors due to its superior soft tissue contrast compared to CT. A treatment planning process with MRI as the sole imaging modality will eliminate systematic CT/MRI co-registration errors, reduce cost and radiation exposure, and simplify clinical workflow. However, MRI lacks the key electron density information necessary for accurate dose calculation and generating reference images for patient setup. The purpose of this work is to develop a unifying method to derive electron density from standard T1-weighted MRI. We propose to combine both intensity and geometry information into a unifying probabilistic Bayesian framework for electron density mapping. For each voxel, we compute two conditional probability density functions (PDFs) of electron density given its: (1) T1-weighted MRI intensity, and (2) geometry in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration between the MRI of the atlas and test patient. The two conditional PDFs containing intensity and geometry information are combined into a unifying posterior PDF, whose mean value corresponds to the optimal electron density value under the mean-square error criterion. We evaluated the algorithm's accuracy of electron density mapping and its ability to detect bone in the head for 8 patients, using an additional patient as the atlas or template. Mean absolute HU error between the estimated and true CT, as well as ROC's for bone detection (HU>200) were calculated. The performance was compared with a global intensity approach based on T1 and no density correction (set whole head to water). The proposed technique significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute HU error of 126, compared with 139 for deformable registration (p=2×10-4), 283 for the intensity approach (p=2×10-6) and 282 without density correction (p=5×10-6). For 90% sensitivity in bone

  11. A unifying probabilistic Bayesian approach to derive electron density from MRI for radiation therapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Gudur, Madhu Sudhan Reddy; Hara, Wendy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Wang, Lei; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-11-07

    MRI significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of target delineation in radiation therapy for certain tumors due to its superior soft tissue contrast compared to CT. A treatment planning process with MRI as the sole imaging modality will eliminate systematic CT/MRI co-registration errors, reduce cost and radiation exposure, and simplify clinical workflow. However, MRI lacks the key electron density information necessary for accurate dose calculation and generating reference images for patient setup. The purpose of this work is to develop a unifying method to derive electron density from standard T1-weighted MRI. We propose to combine both intensity and geometry information into a unifying probabilistic Bayesian framework for electron density mapping. For each voxel, we compute two conditional probability density functions (PDFs) of electron density given its: (1) T1-weighted MRI intensity, and (2) geometry in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration between the MRI of the atlas and test patient. The two conditional PDFs containing intensity and geometry information are combined into a unifying posterior PDF, whose mean value corresponds to the optimal electron density value under the mean-square error criterion. We evaluated the algorithm's accuracy of electron density mapping and its ability to detect bone in the head for eight patients, using an additional patient as the atlas or template. Mean absolute HU error between the estimated and true CT, as well as receiver operating characteristics for bone detection (HU > 200) were calculated. The performance was compared with a global intensity approach based on T1 and no density correction (set whole head to water). The proposed technique significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute HU error of 126, compared with 139 for deformable registration (p = 2  ×  10(-4)), 283 for the intensity approach (p = 2  ×  10(-6)) and 282 without density

  12. A unifying probabilistic Bayesian approach to derive electron density from MRI for radiation therapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhan Reddy Gudur, Madhu; Hara, Wendy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Wang, Lei; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-11-01

    MRI significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of target delineation in radiation therapy for certain tumors due to its superior soft tissue contrast compared to CT. A treatment planning process with MRI as the sole imaging modality will eliminate systematic CT/MRI co-registration errors, reduce cost and radiation exposure, and simplify clinical workflow. However, MRI lacks the key electron density information necessary for accurate dose calculation and generating reference images for patient setup. The purpose of this work is to develop a unifying method to derive electron density from standard T1-weighted MRI. We propose to combine both intensity and geometry information into a unifying probabilistic Bayesian framework for electron density mapping. For each voxel, we compute two conditional probability density functions (PDFs) of electron density given its: (1) T1-weighted MRI intensity, and (2) geometry in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration between the MRI of the atlas and test patient. The two conditional PDFs containing intensity and geometry information are combined into a unifying posterior PDF, whose mean value corresponds to the optimal electron density value under the mean-square error criterion. We evaluated the algorithm’s accuracy of electron density mapping and its ability to detect bone in the head for eight patients, using an additional patient as the atlas or template. Mean absolute HU error between the estimated and true CT, as well as receiver operating characteristics for bone detection (HU > 200) were calculated. The performance was compared with a global intensity approach based on T1 and no density correction (set whole head to water). The proposed technique significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute HU error of 126, compared with 139 for deformable registration (p = 2  ×  10-4), 283 for the intensity approach (p = 2  ×  10-6) and 282 without density

  13. More Ions for Radiotherapy: About Treatment Planning and Track Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, M.

    2017-03-01

    In the recent years, irradiation with swift light ions - from protons up to oxygen -has become an established method in tumour radiotherapy.A prerequisite for successful treatment is the sufficient knowledge of physical and radiobiological processes down to the microscopic or even nanoscopic scale. This report summarizes recent developments. In particular the application of ions other than protons and carbon will be addressed, as well as modelling approaches on the nanoscale.

  14. International dosimetry: an evaluation of treatment planning in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Grant, W; Davis, M J

    1975-08-01

    A tissue-equivalent phantom containing thermoluminescent dosimeters was mailed in succession to Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex, England, to Groote Schuur Hospital, Capetown, South Africa, and to Winnipeg General Hospital, Winnipeg, Canada, to determine the accuracy and consistency in treatment for carcinoma of the cervix under hyperbaric oxygen conditions. (Protocol of the Medical Research Council's Working Party on Radiotherapy and Hyperbaric Oxygen.) The data were analysed by the Radiological Physics Center, Houston, Texas, and substantiate uniformity at and between the participating institutions.

  15. Comparison of Radiation Treatment Plans for Breast Cancer between 3D Conformal in Prone and Supine Positions in Contrast to VMAT and IMRT Supine Positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejarano Buele, Ana Isabel

    positioning due to the difference in target geometry and nature of the immobilization device. IMRT and VMAT plans offer sparing of OARs from high dose regions with an increase of irradiated volume in the low dose regions. Skin flash incorporation was found to be accurate with the use of virtual bolus in the TPS for inverse modulated plans. Various factors influencing dose delivery in breast cancer radiation treatments were examined and quantified. Practical recommendations developed in the course of this project can improve our current techniques and provide alternatives to treat unique and challenging clinical cases.

  16. The adaptation of megavoltage cone beam CT for use in standard radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Thomas, T Hannah Mary; Devakumar, D; Purnima, S; Ravindran, B Paul

    2009-04-07

    Potential areas where megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) could be used are second- and third-phase treatment planning in 3D conformal radiotherapy and IMRT, adaptive radiation therapy, single fraction palliative treatment and for the treatment of patients with metal prostheses. A feasibility study was done on using MV cone beam CT (CBCT) images generated by proprietary 3D reconstruction software based on the FDK algorithm for megavoltage treatment planning. The reconstructed images were converted to a DICOM file set. The pixel values of megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) were rescaled to those of kV CT for use with a treatment planning system. A calibration phantom was designed and developed for verification of geometric accuracy and CT number calibration. The distance measured between two marker points on the CBCT image and the physical dimension on the phantom were in good agreement. Point dose verification for a 10 cm x 10 cm beam at a gantry angle of 0 degrees and SAD of 100 cm were performed for a 6 MV beam for both kV and MV CBCT images. The point doses were found to vary between +/-6.1% of the dose calculated from the kV CT image. The isodose curves for 6 MV for both kV CT and MV CBCT images were within 2% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement. A plan with three beams was performed on MV CBCT, simulating a treatment plan for cancer of the pituitary. The distribution obtained was compared with those corresponding to that obtained using the kV CT. This study has shown that treatment planning with MV cone beam CT images is feasible.

  17. The adaptation of megavoltage cone beam CT for use in standard radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, T. Hannah Mary; Devakumar, D.; Purnima, S.; Ravindran, B. Paul

    2009-04-01

    Potential areas where megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) could be used are second- and third-phase treatment planning in 3D conformal radiotherapy and IMRT, adaptive radiation therapy, single fraction palliative treatment and for the treatment of patients with metal prostheses. A feasibility study was done on using MV cone beam CT (CBCT) images generated by proprietary 3D reconstruction software based on the FDK algorithm for megavoltage treatment planning. The reconstructed images were converted to a DICOM file set. The pixel values of megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) were rescaled to those of kV CT for use with a treatment planning system. A calibration phantom was designed and developed for verification of geometric accuracy and CT number calibration. The distance measured between two marker points on the CBCT image and the physical dimension on the phantom were in good agreement. Point dose verification for a 10 cm × 10 cm beam at a gantry angle of 0° and SAD of 100 cm were performed for a 6 MV beam for both kV and MV CBCT images. The point doses were found to vary between ±6.1% of the dose calculated from the kV CT image. The isodose curves for 6 MV for both kV CT and MV CBCT images were within 2% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement. A plan with three beams was performed on MV CBCT, simulating a treatment plan for cancer of the pituitary. The distribution obtained was compared with those corresponding to that obtained using the kV CT. This study has shown that treatment planning with MV cone beam CT images is feasible.

  18. Records Needed for Orthodontic Diagnosis and Treatment Planning: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Rischen, Robine J.; Breuning, K. Hero; Bronkhorst, Ewald M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Background Traditionally, dental models, facial and intra-oral photographs and a set of two-dimensional radiographs are used for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. As evidence is lacking, the discussion is ongoing which specific records are needed for the process of making an orthodontic treatment plan. Objective To estimate the contribution and importance of different diagnostic records for making an orthodontic diagnosis and treatment plan. Data sources An electronic search in PubMed (1948–July 2012), EMBASE Excerpta Medica (1980–July 2012), CINAHL (1982–July 2012), Web of Science (1945–July 2012), Scopus (1996–July 2012), and Cochrane Library (1993–July 2012) was performed. Additionally, a hand search of the reference lists of included studies was performed to identify potentially eligible studies. There was no language restriction. Study selection The patient, intervention, comparator, outcome (PICO) question formulated for this study was as follows: for patients who need orthodontic treatment (P), will the use of record set X (I) compared with record set Y (C) change the treatment plan (O)? Only primary publications were included. Data extraction Independent extraction of data and quality assessment was performed by two observers. Results Of the 1041 publications retrieved, 17 met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 4 studies were of high quality. Because of the limited number of high quality studies and the differences in study designs, patient characteristics, and reference standard or index test, a meta-analysis was not possible. Conclusion Cephalograms are not routinely needed for orthodontic treatment planning in Class II malocclusions, digital models can be used to replace plaster casts, and cone-beam computed tomography radiographs can be indicated for impacted canines. Based on the findings of this review, the minimum record set required for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning could not be defined. Systematic review

  19. Sequential FDG-PET brachytherapy treatment planning in carcinoma of the cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lilie L.; Mutic, Sasa M.S.; Malyapa, Robert S.; Low, Daniel A.; Miller, Tom R.; Vicic, Milos; LaForest, Richard; Zoberi, Imran; Grigsby, Perry W. . E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of sequential {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging for brachytherapy treatment planning in patients with carcinoma of the cervix. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients with carcinoma of the cervix were included in this prospective study. The clinical stage of their disease was Ib (7), IIa (1), IIb (7), and IIIb (9). Patients were treated with irradiation and brachytherapy, with the majority receiving concurrent weekly cisplatin chemotherapy. Patients underwent diagnostic FDG-PET imaging before treatment, sequential FDG-PET brachytherapy imaging during treatment, and diagnostic FDG-PET 3 months after treatment completion. Delineation of the gross tumor volume, bladder, and rectum was performed for all scans using a commercially available treatment-planning system. Actual treatment delivery was based on two-dimensional orthogonal planning. Results: The mean gross tumor volume and percent coverage by the target isodose surface for the initial, mid, and last implant were 37 cm{sup 3}, 17 cm{sup 3}, and 10 cm{sup 3} and 68%, 76%, and 79%, respectively. Nine of 11 patients were found to have continued decrease in tumor volume as measured by FDG-PET, with 3 patients having complete regression of their tumor before treatment was completed. The maximal bladder and rectal doses obtained from three-dimensional dose-volume histograms were significantly higher than the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 38 bladder and rectal points obtained by two-dimensional treatment-planning. Conclusions: Sequential FDG-PET brachytherapy imaging identifies the tumor response in individual patients, potentially making patient-specific brachytherapy treatment planning possible.

  20. WE-G-16A-01: Evolution of Radiation Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenberg, L; Mohan, R; Van Dyk, J; Fraass, B; Bortfeld, T

    2014-06-15

    Welcome and Introduction - Lawrence N. Rothenberg This symposium is one a continuing series of presentations at AAPM Annual Meetings on the historical aspects of medical physics, radiology, and radiation oncology that have been organized by the AAPM History Committee. Information on previous presentations including “Early Developments in Teletherapy” (Indianapolis 2013), “Historical Aspects of Cross-Sectional Imaging” (Charlotte 2012), “Historical Aspects of Brachytherapy” (Vancouver 2011), “50 Years of Women in Medical Physics” (Houston 2008), and “Roentgen's Early Investigations” (Minneapolis 2007) can be found in the Education Section of the AAPM Website. The Austin 2014 History Symposium will be on “Evolution of Radiation Treatment Planning.” Overview - Radhe Mohan Treatment planning is one of the most critical components in the chain of radiation therapy of cancers. Treatment plans of today contain a wide variety of sophisticated information conveying the potential clinical effectiveness of the designed treatment to practitioners. Examples of such information include dose distributions superimposed on three- or even four-dimensional anatomic images; dose volume histograms, dose, dose-volume and dose-response indices for anatomic structures of interest; etc. These data are used for evaluating treatment plans and for making treatment decisions. The current state-of-the-art has evolved from the 1940s era when the dose to the tumor and normal tissues was estimated approximately by manual means. However, the symposium will cover the history of the field from the late-1950's, when computers were first introduced for treatment planning, to the present state involving the use of high performance computing and advanced multi-dimensional anatomic, functional and biological imaging, focusing only on external beam treatment planning. The symposium will start with a general overview of the treatment planning process including imaging, structure

  1. Considerations and Protocols in Virtual Surgical Planning of Reconstructive Surgery for More Accurate and Esthetic Neomandible with Deep Circumflex Iliac Artery Free Flap

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam-Kyoo; Kim, Hyun Young; Kim, Hyung Jun; Cha, In-Ho; Nam, Woong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The reconstruction of mandibular defects poses many difficulties due to the unique, complex shape of the mandible and the temporomandibular joints. With development of microvascular anastomosis, free tissue transplantation techniques, such as deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) flap and fibular free flap (FFF), were developed. The DCIA offers good quality and quantity of bone tissue for mandibular segmental defect and implant for dental rehabilitation. Virtual surgical planning (VSP) and stereolithography-guided osteotomy are currently successfully applied in three-dimensional mandibular reconstruction, but most use FFF. There are only a few articles on reconstruction with the DCIA that assess the postoperative results. Methods: Three patients admitted during a five month period (April of 2013 to August of 2013) underwent resection of mandible and DCIA musculo-osseous reconstruction using a VSP and stereolithographic modeling and assessment of outcomes included technical accuracy, esthetic contour, and functional outcomes. Results: This technique yielded iliac bone segment with excellent apposition and duplication of the preoperative plan. Flap survival was 100 percent and all patients maintained preoperative occlusion and contour. Conclusion: Based on our experience, we offer considerations and logically consistent protocols by classification of mandibular defects, and demonstrate the benefits in VSP and stereolithographic modeling of mandibular reconstructive surgery with DCIA flap. PMID:27489828

  2. Interactive Dose Shaping - efficient strategies for CPU-based real-time treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegenhein, P.; Kamerling, C. P.; Oelfke, U.

    2014-03-01

    Conventional intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning is based on the traditional concept of iterative optimization using an objective function specified by dose volume histogram constraints for pre-segmented VOIs. This indirect approach suffers from unavoidable shortcomings: i) The control of local dose features is limited to segmented VOIs. ii) Any objective function is a mathematical measure of the plan quality, i.e., is not able to define the clinically optimal treatment plan. iii) Adapting an existing plan to changed patient anatomy as detected by IGRT procedures is difficult. To overcome these shortcomings, we introduce the method of Interactive Dose Shaping (IDS) as a new paradigm for IMRT treatment planning. IDS allows for a direct and interactive manipulation of local dose features in real-time. The key element driving the IDS process is a two-step Dose Modification and Recovery (DMR) strategy: A local dose modification is initiated by the user which translates into modified fluence patterns. This also affects existing desired dose features elsewhere which is compensated by a heuristic recovery process. The IDS paradigm was implemented together with a CPU-based ultra-fast dose calculation and a 3D GUI for dose manipulation and visualization. A local dose feature can be implemented via the DMR strategy within 1-2 seconds. By imposing a series of local dose features, equal plan qualities could be achieved compared to conventional planning for prostate and head and neck cases within 1-2 minutes. The idea of Interactive Dose Shaping for treatment planning has been introduced and first applications of this concept have been realized.

  3. Feasibility of using glass-bead thermoluminescent dosimeters for radiotherapy treatment plan verification

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Tom J; Distefano, Gail; Bradley, David A; Spyrou, Nicholas M; Nisbet, Andrew; Clark, Catharine H

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of using glass beads as novel thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) for radiotherapy treatment plan verification. Methods: Commercially available glass beads with a size of 1-mm thickness and 2-mm diameter were characterized as TLDs. Five clinical treatment plans including a conventional larynx, a conformal prostate, an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) prostate and two stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) lung plans were transferred onto a CT scan of a water-equivalent phantom (Solid Water®, Gammex, Middleton, WI) and the dose distribution recalculated. The number of monitor units was maintained from the clinical plan and delivered accordingly. The doses determined by the glass beads were compared with those measured by a graphite-walled ionization chamber, and the respective expected doses were determined by the treatment-planning system (TPS) calculation. Results: The mean percentage difference between measured dose with the glass beads and TPS was found to be 0.3%, −0.1%, 0.4%, 1.8% and 1.7% for the conventional larynx, conformal prostate, IMRT prostate and each of the SBRT delivery techniques, respectively. The percentage difference between measured dose with the ionization chamber and glass bead was found to be −1.2%, −1.4%, −0.1%, −0.9% and 2.4% for the above-mentioned plans, respectively. The results of measured doses with the glass beads and ionization chamber in comparison with expected doses from the TPS were analysed using a two-sided paired t-test, and there was no significant difference at p < 0.05. Conclusion: It is feasible to use glass-bead TLDs as dosemeters in a range of clinical plan verifications. Advances in knowledge: Commercial glass beads are utilized as low-cost novel TLDs for treatment-plan verification. PMID:26258442

  4. TH-A-9A-04: Incorporating Liver Functionality in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, V; Epelman, M; Feng, M; Cao, Y; Wang, H; Romeijn, E; Matuszak, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Liver SBRT patients have both variable pretreatment liver function (e.g., due to degree of cirrhosis and/or prior treatments) and sensitivity to radiation, leading to high variability in potential liver toxicity with similar doses. This work aims to explicitly incorporate liver perfusion into treatment planning to redistribute dose to preserve well-functioning areas without compromising target coverage. Methods: Voxel-based liver perfusion, a measure of functionality, was computed from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Two optimization models with different cost functions subject to the same dose constraints (e.g., minimum target EUD and maximum critical structure EUDs) were compared. The cost functions minimized were EUD (standard model) and functionality-weighted EUD (functional model) to the liver. The resulting treatment plans delivering the same target EUD were compared with respect to their DVHs, their dose wash difference, the average dose delivered to voxels of a particular perfusion level, and change in number of high-/low-functioning voxels receiving a particular dose. Two-dimensional synthetic and three-dimensional clinical examples were studied. Results: The DVHs of all structures of plans from each model were comparable. In contrast, in plans obtained with the functional model, the average dose delivered to high-/low-functioning voxels was lower/higher than in plans obtained with its standard counterpart. The number of high-/low-functioning voxels receiving high/low dose was lower in the plans that considered perfusion in the cost function than in the plans that did not. Redistribution of dose can be observed in the dose wash differences. Conclusion: Liver perfusion can be used during treatment planning potentially to minimize the risk of toxicity during liver SBRT, resulting in better global liver function. The functional model redistributes dose in the standard model from higher to lower functioning voxels, while achieving the same target EUD

  5. The impact of breathing motion versus heterogeneity effects in lung cancer treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Rosu, Mihaela; Chetty, Indrin J.; Tatro, Daniel S.; Haken, Randall K. ten

    2007-04-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of tissue heterogeneity and breathing-induced motion/deformation on conformal treatment planning for pulmonary tumors and to compare the magnitude and the clinical importance of changes induced by these effects. Treatment planning scans were acquired at normal exhale/inhale breathing states for fifteen patients. The internal target volume (ITV) was defined as the union of exhale and inhale gross tumor volumes uniformly expanded by 5 mm. Anterior/posterior opposed beams (AP/PA) and three-dimensional (3D)-conformal plans were designed using the unit-density exhale (''static'') dataset. These plans were further used to calculate (a) density-corrected (''heterogeneous'') static dose and (b) heterogeneous cumulative dose, including breathing deformations. The DPM Monte Carlo code was used for dose computations. For larger than coin-sized tumors, relative to unit-density plans, tumor and lung doses increased in the heterogeneity-corrected plans. In comparing cumulative and static plans, larger normal tissue complication probability changes were observed for tumors with larger motion amplitudes and uncompensated breathing-induced hot/cold spots in lung. Accounting for tissue heterogeneity resulted in average increases of 9% and 7% in mean lung dose (MLD) for the 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams, respectively. Breathing-induced effects resulted in approximately 1% and 2% average decreases in MLD from the static value, for the 6 and 15 MV photon beams, respectively. The magnitude of these effects was not found to correlate with the treatment plan technique, i.e., AP/PA versus 3D-CRT. Given a properly designed ITV, tissue heterogeneity effects are likely to have a larger clinical significance on tumor and normal lung treatment evaluation metrics than four-dimensional respiratory-induced changes.

  6. TH-A-BRF-01: A Probabilistic Bayesian Approach to Derive Electron Density From MRI for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Gudur, M; Hara, W; Wang, L; Xing, L; Li, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: MRI significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of target delineation for patient simulation and treatment planning in radiation therapy, due to its superior soft tissue contrast as compared to CT. An MRI based simulation will reduce cost and simplify clinical workflow with zero ionizing radiation. However, MRI lacks the key electron density information. The purpose of this work is to develop a reliable method to derive electron density from MRI. Methods: We adopt a probabilistic Bayesian approach for electron density mapping based on T1-weighted head MRI. For each voxel, we compute conditional probability of electron densities given its: (1) T1 intensity and (2) geometry in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration between the MRI of test patient and atlas. Intensity and geometry information are combined into a unifying posterior probability density function whose mean gives the electron density. Mean absolute HU error between the estimated and true CT, as well as ROC's for bone detection (HU>200) were calculated for 8 patients. The performance was compared with a global intensity approach based on T1 and no density correction (set whole head to water). Results: The proposed technique significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute HU error of 132, compared with 139 for deformable registration (p=10{sup −3}), 371 for the intensity approach (p=10{sup −5}) and 282 without density correction (p=2×10{sup −4}). For 90% sensitivity in bone detection, the proposed method had a specificity of 85% and that for deformable registration, intensity and without density correction are 80%, 24% and 10% respectively. Conclusion: The proposed unifying method provides accurate electron density estimation and bone detection from MRI of the head with highly heterogeneous regions. This paves the way for accurate dose calculation and generating reference images for patient setup in MRI-based treatment

  7. Amelogenesis imperfecta and the treatment plan - interdisciplinary team approach.

    PubMed

    Suchancova, B; Holly, D; Janska, M; Stebel, J; Lysy, J; Thurzo, A; Sasinek, S

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a set of hereditary defects representing mainly the development defects of enamel without the presence of whole-body symptoms. Developmental disorders can manifest a complete absence of enamel, which is caused by improper differentiation of ameloblasts. This article describes the diagnosis and treatment of a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta, as well as the need for interdisciplinary cooperation to achieve the best possible morphological, skeletal, functional and aesthetic rehabilitation of the patients with this diagnosis. Furthermore, the article reviews literature dealing with other anomalies occurring in association with amelogenesis imperfect (Fig. 12, Ref. 20).

  8. A Comparative Dosimetric Analysis of the Effect of Heterogeneity Corrections Used in Three Treatment Planning Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrick, Andrea Celeste

    Successful treatment in radiation oncology relies on the evaluation of a plan for each individual patient based on delivering the maximum dose to the tumor while sparing the surrounding normal tissue (organs at risk) in the patient. Organs at risk (OAR) typically considered include the heart, the spinal cord, healthy lung tissue, and any other organ in the vicinity of the target that is not affected by the disease being treated. Depending on the location of the tumor and its proximity to these OARs, several plans may be created and evaluated in order to assess which "solution" most closely meets all of the specified criteria. In order to successfully review a treatment plan and take the correct course of action, a physician needs to rely on the computer model (treatment planning algorithm) of dose distribution to reconstruct CT scan data to proceed with the plan that best achieves all of the goals. There are many available treatment planning systems from which a Radiation Oncology center can choose from. While the radiation interactions considered are identical among clinics, the way the chosen algorithm handles these interactions can vary immensely. The goal of this study was to provide a comparison between two commonly used treatment planning systems (Pinnacle and Eclipse) and their associated dose calculation algorithms. In order to this, heterogeneity correction models were evaluated via test plans, and the effects of going from heterogeneity uncorrected patient representation to a heterogeneity correction representation were studied. The results of this study indicate that the actual dose delivered to the patient varies greatly between treatment planning algorithms in areas of low density tissue such as in the lungs. Although treatment planning algorithms are attempting to come to the same result with heterogeneity corrections, the reality is that the results depend strongly on the algorithm used in the situations studied. While the Anisotropic Analytic Method

  9. Optimization of Carbon Ion Treatment Plans by Integrating Tissue Specific α/β-Values for Patients with Non-Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Christian; Pommer, Mira; Brons, Stephan; Prokesch, Hannah; Ecker, Swantje; Debus, Jürgen; Jäkel, Oliver; Combs, Stephanie E.; Habermehl, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the thesis is to improve treatment plans of carbon ion irradiation by integrating the tissues’ specific αβ-values for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Material and Methods Five patients with LAPC were included in this study. By the use of the treatment planning system Syngo RT Planning (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) treatment plans with carbon ion beams have been created. Dose calculation was based on αβ-values for both organs at risk (OAR) and the tumor. Twenty-five treatment plans and thirty-five forward calculations were created. With reference to the anatomy five field configurations were included. Single Beam Optimization (SBO) and Intensity Modulated Particle Therapy (IMPT) were used for optimization. The plans were analyzed with respect to both dose distributions and individual anatomy. The plans were evaluated using a customized index. Results With regard to the target, a field setup with one single posterior field achieves the highest score in our index. Field setups made up of three fields achieve good results in OAR sparing. Nevertheless, the field setup with one field is superior in complex topographic conditions. But, allocating an αβ-value of 2 Gy to the spinal cord leads to critical high maximum doses in the spinal cord. The evaluation of dose profiles showed significant dose peaks at borders of the αβ-gradient, especially in case of a single posterior field. Conclusion Optimization with specific αβ-values allows a more accurate view on dose distribution than previously. A field setup with one single posterior field achieves good results in case of difficult topographic conditions, but leads to high maximum doses to the spinal cord. So, field setups with multiple fields seem to be more adequate in case of LAPC, being surrounded by highly radiosensitive normal tissues. PMID:27736917

  10. Three-Dimensional Dose Optimization for Noncoplanar Treatment Planning with Conformal Fields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ying-Chang L.

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in imaging techniques, especially three dimensional reconstruction of CT images, have made precision tumor localization feasible. These imaging techniques along with developments in computer controlled radiation treatment machines have provided an important thrust in developing better techniques for cancer treatment. This often requires a complex noncoplanar beam arrangements and elaborate treatment planning, which, unfortunately, are time consuming, costly and dependent on operator expertise and experience. A reliable operator-independent dose optimization tool is therefore desirable, especially for 3D treatment planning. In this dissertation, several approaches (linear programming, quadratic programming, and direct search methods) of computer optimization using various criteria including least sire fitting on the 90% isodose to target periphery, dose uniformity, and integral dose are presented. All of these methods are subject to restrictions on the upper limit of the dose to critical organs. In the quadratic programming approach, Kuhn-Tucker theory was employed to convert the quadratic problem into one which permits application of the very powerful, revised simplex method. Several examples are used to analyze the effectiveness of these dose optimization approaches. The studies show that the quadratic programming approach with the criteria of least square fitting and critical organ constraints is superior in efficiency for dose optimization in 3D treatment planning, particularly for cases with a large number of beams. Use of least square fitting allows one to deduce optimized plans for irregularly shaped targets by employing a multi-isocentric technique. Our studies also illustrate the advantages of using irregular conformal fields, optimized beam energy, and noncoplanar beam arrangements in contrast to the conventional treatment which uses a symmetrical rectangular collimator, fixed beam energy, and coplanar beam arrangements. Optimized plans can

  11. Commercial Health Plan Coverage of Selected Treatments for Opioid Use Disorders from 2003 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Reif, Sharon; Creedon, Timothy B; Horgan, Constance M; Stewart, Maureen T; Garnick, Deborah W

    2017-03-28

    Opioid use disorders (OUDs) are receiving significant attention in the U.S. as a public health crisis. Access to treatment for OUDs is essential and was expected to improve following implementation of the federal parity law and the Affordable Care Act. This study examines changes in coverage and management of treatments for OUDs (opioid treatment programs (OTPs) as a covered service benefit, buprenorphine as a pharmacy benefit) before, during, and after parity and ACA implementation. Data are from three rounds of a nationally representative survey conducted with commercial health plans regarding behavioral health services in benefit years 2003, 2010, and 2014. Data were weighted to be representative of health plans' commercial products in the continental United States (2003 weighted N = 7,469, 83% response rate; 2010 N = 8,431, 89% response rate; and 2014 N = 6,974, 80% response rate). Results showed treatment for OUDs was covered by nearly all health plan products in each year of the survey, but the types and patterns varied by year. Prior authorization requirements for OTPs have decreased over time. Despite the promise of expanded access to OUD treatment suggested by parity and the ACA, improved health plan coverage for treatment of OUDs, while essential, is not sufficient to address the opioid crisis.

  12. Clinical applications of a CT-simulator: precision treatment planning and portal marking in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Heidtman, C M

    1990-01-01

    Breast cancer is frequently treated with radiation using opposed tangent portals to the involved breast, including the chest wall. Presented is a method for simulating such treatment fields on a CT simulator. A short series of CT images provides a three dimensional model for treatment planning prior to marking the patient. Gantry and collimator angles, as well as wedges or custom blocks, are determined in the planning stage. Upon receipt of an approved treatment plan, the portals are available for simulation. The cross-hair laser and computerized bed movement in the CT simulator aid in marking the entrance of the radiation fields on the patient's skin. Discussion of the clinical application of the described technique is included.

  13. Interim Status Closure Plan Open Burning Treatment Unit Technical Area 16-399 Burn Tray

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R.

    2012-05-07

    This closure plan describes the activities necessary to close one of the interim status hazardous waste open burning treatment units at Technical Area (TA) 16 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Facility), hereinafter referred to as the 'TA-16-399 Burn Tray' or 'the unit'. The information provided in this closure plan addresses the closure requirements specified in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 265, Subparts G and P for the thermal treatment units operated at the Facility under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act. Closure of the open burning treatment unit will be completed in accordance with Section 4.1 of this closure plan.

  14. Shared Decision-Making in Youth Mental Health Care: Using the Evidence to Plan Treatments Collaboratively.

    PubMed

    Langer, David A; Jensen-Doss, Amanda

    2016-12-02

    The shared decision-making (SDM) model is one in which providers and consumers of health care come together as collaborators in determining the course of care. The model is especially relevant to youth mental health care, when planning a treatment frequently entails coordinating both youth and parent perspectives, preferences, and goals. The present article first provides the historical context of the SDM model and the rationale for increasing our field's use of SDM when planning psychosocial treatments for youth and families. Having established the potential utility of SDM, the article then discusses how to apply the SDM model to treatment planning for youth psychotherapy, proposing a set of steps consistent with the model and considerations when conducting SDM with youth and families.

  15. Dosimetric differences in flattened and flattening filter-free beam treatment plans

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yue; Yadav, Poonam; Bassetti, Michael; Du, Kaifang; Saenz, Daniel; Harari, Paul; Paliwal, Bhudatt R.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the dosimetric differences in treatment plans from flattened and flattening filter-free (FFF) beams from the TrueBeam System. A total of 104 treatment plans with static (sliding window) intensity-modulated radiotherapy beams and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) beams were generated for 15 patients involving three cancer sites. In general, the FFF beam provides similar target coverage as the flattened beam with improved dose sparing to organ-at-risk (OAR). Among all three cancer sites, the head and neck showed more important differences between the flattened beam and FFF beam. The maximum reduction of the FFF beam in the mean dose reached up to 2.82 Gy for larynx in head and neck case. Compared to the 6 MV flattened beam, the 10 MV FFF beam provided improved dose sparing to certain OARs, especially for VMAT cases. Thus, 10 MV FFF beam could be used to improve the treatment plan. PMID:27217620

  16. A treatment planning approach to spatially fractionated megavoltage grid therapy for bulky lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Costlow, Heather N.; Zhang, Hualin; Das, Indra J.

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the treatment planning methods of spatially fractionated megavoltage grid therapy for treating bulky lung tumors using multileaf collimator (MLC). A total of 5 patients with lung cancer who had gross tumor volumes ranging from 277 to 635 cm{sup 3} were retrospectively chosen for this study. The tumors were from 6.5 to 9.6 cm at shortest dimension. Several techniques using either electronic compensation or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were used to create a variety of grid therapy plans on the Eclipse treatment planning system. The dose prescription point was calculated to the volume, and a dose of 20 Gy with 6-MV/15-MV beams was used in each plan. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) curves were obtained to evaluate dosimetric characteristics. In addition, DVH curves from a commercially available cerrobend grid collimator were also used for comparison. The linear-quadratic radiobiological response model was used to assess therapeutic ratios (TRs) and equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for all generated plans. A total of 6 different grid therapy plans were created for each patient. Overall, 4 plans had different electronic compensation techniques: Ecomps-Tubes, Ecomps-Circles, Ecomps-Squares, and Ecomps-Weave; the other 2 plans used IMRT and IMRT-Weave techniques. The DVH curves and TRs demonstrated that these MLC-based grid therapy plans can achieve dosimetric properties very similar to those of the cerrobend grid collimator. However, the MLC-based plans have larger EUDs than those with the cerrobend grid collimator. In addition, the field shaping can be performed for targets of any shape in MLC-based plans. Thus, they can deliver a more conformal dose to the targets and spare normal structures better than the cerrobend grid collimator can. The plans generated by the MLC technique demonstrated the advantage over the standard cerrobend grid collimator on accommodating targets and sparing normal structures. Overall, 6

  17. Automated gamma knife radiosurgery treatment planning with image registration, data-mining, and Nelder-Mead simplex optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kuan J.; Barber, David C.; Walton, Lee

    2006-07-15

    Gamma knife treatments are usually planned manually, requiring much expertise and time. We describe a new, fully automatic method of treatment planning. The treatment volume to be planned is first compared with a database of past treatments to find volumes closely matching in size and shape. The treatment parameters of the closest matches are used as starting points for the new treatment plan. Further optimization is performed with the Nelder-Mead simplex method: the coordinates and weight of the isocenters are allowed to vary until a maximally conformal plan specific to the new treatment volume is found. The method was tested on a randomly selected set of 10 acoustic neuromas and 10 meningiomas. Typically, matching a new volume took under 30 seconds. The time for simplex optimization, on a 3 GHz Xeon processor, ranged from under a minute for small volumes (<1000 cubic mm, 2-3 isocenters), to several tens of hours for large volumes (>30 000 cubic mm,>20 isocenters). In 8/10 acoustic neuromas and 8/10 meningiomas, the automatic method found plans with conformation number equal or better than that of the manual plan. In 4/10 acoustic neuromas and 5/10 meningiomas, both overtreatment and undertreatment ratios were equal or better in automated plans. In conclusion, data-mining of past treatments can be used to derive starting parameters for treatment planning. These parameters can then be computer optimized to give good plans automatically.

  18. Automated gamma knife radiosurgery treatment planning with image registration, data-mining, and Nelder-Mead simplex optimization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuan J; Barber, David C; Walton, Lee

    2006-07-01

    Gamma knife treatments are usually planned manually, requiring much expertise and time. We describe a new, fully automatic method of treatment planning. The treatment volume to be planned is first compared with a database of past treatments to find volumes closely matching in size and shape. The treatment parameters of the closest matches are used as starting points for the new treatment plan. Further optimization is performed with the Nelder-Mead simplex method: the coordinates and weight of the isocenters are allowed to vary until a maximally conformal plan specific to the new treatment volume is found. The method was tested on a randomly selected set of 10 acoustic neuromas and 10 meningiomas. Typically, matching a new volume took under 30 seconds. The time for simplex optimization, on a 3 GHz Xeon processor, ranged from under a minute for small volumes (<1000 cubic mm, 2-3 isocenters), to several tens of hours for large volumes (>30,000 cubic mm, >20 isocenters). In 8/10 acoustic neuromas and 8/10 meningiomas, the automatic method found plans with conformation number equal or better than that of the manual plan. In 4/10 acoustic neuromas and 5/10 meningiomas, both overtreatment and undertreatment ratios were equal or better in automated plans. In conclusion, data-mining of past treatments can be used to derive starting parameters for treatment planning. These parameters can then be computer optimized to give good plans automatically.

  19. The VACS Index Accurately Predicts Mortality and Treatment Response among Multi-Drug Resistant HIV Infected Patients Participating in the Options in Management with Antiretrovirals (OPTIMA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Sheldon T.; Tate, Janet P.; Kyriakides, Tassos C.; Kirkwood, Katherine A.; Holodniy, Mark; Goulet, Joseph L.; Angus, Brian J.; Cameron, D. William; Justice, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The VACS Index is highly predictive of all-cause mortality among HIV infected individuals within the first few years of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). However, its accuracy among highly treatment experienced individuals and its responsiveness to treatment interventions have yet to be evaluated. We compared the accuracy and responsiveness of the VACS Index with a Restricted Index of age and traditional HIV biomarkers among patients enrolled in the OPTIMA study. Methods Using data from 324/339 (96%) patients in OPTIMA, we evaluated associations between indices and mortality using Kaplan-Meier estimates, proportional hazards models, Harrel’s C-statistic and net reclassification improvement (NRI). We also determined the association between study interventions and risk scores over time, and change in score and mortality. Results Both the Restricted Index (c = 0.70) and VACS Index (c = 0.74) predicted mortality from baseline, but discrimination was improved with the VACS Index (NRI = 23%). Change in score from baseline to 48 weeks was more strongly associated with survival for the VACS Index than the Restricted Index with respective hazard ratios of 0.26 (95% CI 0.14–0.49) and 0.39(95% CI 0.22–0.70) among the 25% most improved scores, and 2.08 (95% CI 1.27–3.38) and 1.51 (95%CI 0.90–2.53) for the 25% least improved scores. Conclusions The VACS Index predicts all-cause mortality more accurately among multi-drug resistant, treatment experienced individuals and is more responsive to changes in risk associated with treatment intervention than an index restricted to age and HIV biomarkers. The VACS Index holds promise as an intermediate outcome for intervention research. PMID:24667813

  20. Treatment plan for integrating evidence-based decision making into dental education.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Jane L

    2006-03-01

    The aims of this paper are to present the findings from the scientific literature that discuss strategies that can contribute to a "best practices" treatment plan model for effectively integrating Evidence-Based Decision Making (EBDM) into curricula. MEDLINE, CINAHL, and HealthSTAR databases were searched, as was the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Studies and articles, ranging from systematic reviews to articles proposing models and recommendations for how to implement EBDM into curricula and faculty development were reviewed. Several common themes emerged and form the basis for a treatment plan model. The first step in developing any treatment plan is a thorough assessment of the current situation or problem. Recognizing that there are multiple phases to the assessment of an educational system, the focus of this paper will be to understand which teaching and learning strategies are most effective. These, in turn, will inform faculty of needed curricular changes and skill development training, requisites in order for them to prepare students to be successful in providing patient care using the best available evidence. Elements of a suggested treatment plan will be presented with the caveat that each dental school will need to develop an implementation plan based on an assessment of its own environment and needs.

  1. Dose distribution transfer from CyberKnife to Varian treatment planning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osewski, W.; Ślosarek, K.; Karaszewska, B.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this paper was to introduce one of the options of the locally developed DDcon.exe which gives the possibility to transfer the dose distribution from CyberKnife (Accuray) treatment planning system (CK TPS) to Varian treatment planning system (Eclipse TPS, Varian). DICOM format is known as a universal format for medical data. The dose distribution is stored as RTdose file in DICOM format, so there should be a possibility to transfer it between different treatment planning systems. Trying to transfer RTdose file from CK TPS to Eclipse TPS the error message occurs. That's because the RTdose file in CK TPS is connected with Structure_Set_Sequence against Eclipse TPS where it's connected with RT_Plan_Sequence. To make it transferable RTdose file from CK TPS have to be 'disconnected' from Structure_Set_Sequence and 'connected' with RT_Plan_Sequence. This is possible thanks DDcon software which creates new RTdose file by changing proper DICOM tags in original RTdose file. New homemade software gives us an opportunity to transfer dose distribution from CyberKnife TPS to TPS Eclipse. This method opens new possibilities to combine or compare different treatment techniques in Varian TPS.

  2. An integrated Monte Carlo dosimetric verification system for radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Mizowaki, T.; Miyabe, Y.; Takegawa, H.; Narita, Y.; Yano, S.; Nagata, Y.; Teshima, T.; Hiraoka, M.

    2007-04-01

    An integrated Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation system, MCRTV (Monte Carlo for radiotherapy treatment plan verification), has been developed for clinical treatment plan verification, especially for routine quality assurance (QA) of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans. The MCRTV system consists of the EGS4/PRESTA MC codes originally written for particle transport through the accelerator, the multileaf collimator (MLC), and the patient/phantom, which run on a 28-CPU Linux cluster, and the associated software developed for the clinical implementation. MCRTV has an interface with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) (Eclipse, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) and reads the information needed for MC computation transferred in DICOM-RT format. The key features of MCRTV have been presented in detail in this paper. The phase-space data of our 15 MV photon beam from a Varian Clinac 2300C/D have been developed and several benchmarks have been performed under homogeneous and several inhomogeneous conditions (including water, aluminium, lung and bone media). The MC results agreed with the ionization chamber measurements to within 1% and 2% for homogeneous and inhomogeneous conditions, respectively. The MC calculation for a clinical prostate IMRT treatment plan validated the implementation of the beams and the patient/phantom configuration in MCRTV.

  3. The significance of the choice of radiobiological (NTCP) models in treatment plan objective functions.

    PubMed

    Miller, J; Fuller, M; Vinod, S; Suchowerska, N; Holloway, L

    2009-06-01

    A Clinician's discrimination between radiation therapy treatment plans is traditionally a subjective process, based on experience and existing protocols. A more objective and quantitative approach to distinguish between treatment plans is to use radiobiological or dosimetric objective functions, based on radiobiological or dosimetric models. The efficacy of models is not well understood, nor is the correlation of the rank of plans resulting from the use of models compared to the traditional subjective approach. One such radiobiological model is the Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP). Dosimetric models or indicators are more accepted in clinical practice. In this study, three radiobiological models, Lyman NTCP, critical volume NTCP and relative seriality NTCP, and three dosimetric models, Mean Lung Dose (MLD) and the Lung volumes irradiated at 10Gy (V10) and 20Gy (V20), were used to rank a series of treatment plans using, harm to normal (Lung) tissue as the objective criterion. None of the models considered in this study showed consistent correlation with the Radiation Oncologists plan ranking. If radiobiological or dosimetric models are to be used in objective functions for lung treatments, based on this study it is recommended that the Lyman NTCP model be used because it will provide most consistency with traditional clinician ranking.

  4. SU-E-T-106: An Institutional Review of Using Commercially Available Software to Evaluate Treatment Plan Quality for Various Treatment Sites and Beam Deliveries

    SciTech Connect

    Esquivel, C; Patton, L; Walker, S; Lawson, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Use Sun Nuclear Quality Reports™ with PlanIQ™ to evaluate different treatment delivery techniques for various treatment sites. Methods: Fifteen random patients with different treatment sites were evaluated. These include the Head/Neck, prostate, pelvis, lung, esophagus, axilla, bladder and abdomen. Initially, these sites were planned on the Pinnacle {sup 3} V9.6 treatment planning system and utilized nine 6MV step-n-shoot IMRT fields. The RT plan, dose and structure sets were sent to Quality Reports™ where a DVH was recreated and the plans were compared to a unique Plan Algorithm for each treatment site. Each algorithm has its own plan quality metrics and objectives, which include the PTV coverage, PTV maximum dose, the prescription dose outside the target, doses to the critical structures, and the global maximum dose and its location. Each plan was scored base on meeting each objective. Plans may have been reoptimized and reevaluated with Quality Reports™ based on the initial score. PlanIQ™ was used to evaluate if any objective not met was achievable or difficult to obtain. A second plan using VMAT delivery was created for each patient and scored with Quality Reports™. Results: There were a wide range of scores for the different treatment sites with some scoring better for IMRT plans and some better for the VMAT deliveries. The variation in the scores could be attributed to the treatment site, location, and shape of the target. Most deliveries were chosen for the VMAT due to the short treatment times and quick patient throughput with acceptable plan scores. Conclusion: The tools are provided for both physician and dosimetrist to objectively evaluate the use of VMAT delivery versus the step-n-shoot IMRT delivery for various sites. PlanIQ validates if objectives can be met. For the physicist, a concise pass/fail report is created for plan evaluation.

  5. Water: from the source to the treatment plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baude, I.; Marquet, V.

    2012-04-01

    Isabelle BAUDE isa.baude@free.fr Lycee français de Vienne Liechtensteinstrasse 37AVienna As a physics and chemistry teacher, I have worked on water from the source to the treatment plant with 27 pupils between 14 and 15 years old enrolled in the option "Science and laboratory". The objectives of this option are to interest students in science, to introduce them to practical methods of laboratory analyses, and let them use computer technology. Teaching takes place every two weeks and lasts 1.5 hours. The theme of water is a common project with the biology and geology teacher, Mrs. Virginie Marquet. Lesson 1: Introduction: The water in Vienna The pupils have to consider why the water is so important in Vienna (history, economy etc.) and where tap water comes from. Activities: Brainstorming about where and why we use water every day and why the water is different in Vienna. Lesson 2: Objectives of the session: What are the differences between mineral waters? Activities: Compare water from different origins (France: Evian, Vittel, Contrex. Austria: Vöslauer, Juvina, Gasteiner and tap water from Vienna) by tasting and finding the main ions they contain. Testing ions: Calcium, magnesium, sulphate, chloride, sodium, and potassium Lesson 3: Objectives of the session: Build a hydrometer Activities: Producing a range of calibration solutions, build and calibrate the hydrometer with different salt-water solutions. Measure the density of the Dead Sea's water and other mineral waters. Lesson 4: Objectives of the session: How does a fountain work? Activities: Construction of a fountain as Heron of Alexandria with simple equipment and try to understand the hydrostatic principles. Lesson 5: Objectives of the session: Study of the physical processes of water treatment (decantation, filtration, screening) Activities: Build a natural filter with sand, stone, carbon, and cotton wool. Retrieve the filtered water to test it during lesson 7. Lesson 6: Visit of the biggest treatment

  6. Implementation of a volumetric modulated arc therapy treatment planning solution for kidney and adrenal stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sonier, Marcus; Chu, William; Lalani, Nafisha; Erler, Darby; Cheung, Patrick; Korol, Renee

    2016-01-01

    To develop a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning solution in the treatment of primary renal cell carcinoma and oligometastatic adrenal lesions with stereotactic body radiation therapy. Single-arc VMAT plans (n = 5) were compared with clinically delivered step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with planning target volume coverage normalized between techniques. Target volume conformity, organ-at-risk (OAR) dose, treatment time, and monitor units were compared. A VMAT planning solution, created from a combination of arc settings and optimization constraints, auto-generated treatment plans in a single optimization. The treatment planning solution was evaluated on 15 consecutive patients receiving kidney and adrenal stereotactic body radiation therapy. Treatment time was reduced from 13.0 ± 2.6 to 4.0 ± 0.9 minutes for IMRT and VMAT, respectively. The VMAT planning solution generated treatment plans with increased target homogeneity, improved 95% conformity index, and a reduced maximum point dose to nearby OARs but with increased intermediate dose to distant OARs. The conformity of the 95% isodose improved from 1.32 ± 0.39 to 1.12 ± 0.05 for IMRT and VMAT treatment plans, respectively. Evaluation of the planning solution showed clinically acceptable dose distributions for 13 of 15 cases with tight conformity of the prescription isodose to the planning target volume of 1.07 ± 0.04, delivering minimal dose to OARs. The introduction of a stereotactic body radiation therapy VMAT treatment planning solution improves the efficiency of planning and delivery time, producing treatment plans of comparable or superior quality to IMRT in the case of primary renal cell carcinoma and oligometastatic adrenal lesions.

  7. Periodontal trauma and mobility. Diagnosis and treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Serio, F G; Hawley, C E

    1999-01-01

    With the dearth of well-controlled human clinical studies, it is still impossible to answer the question of whether occlusal trauma modifies the progression of attachment loss resulting from inflammatory periodontal disease and the companion questions related to the treatment of occlusal trauma and mobility. Teeth with stable mobility are apparently at no greater risk of attachment loss than nonmobile teeth. Increasing mobility is a concern that must be addressed by inflammatory control, occlusal adjustment, and perhaps some type of stabilization or splinting of the tooth in question. In addition, greater attachment gains have been noted when occlusal adjustment was included as part of surgical therapy. There is no question that aspects of occlusal therapy have an empiric base. It is incumbent on the clinician to examine for, diagnose, and treat trauma from occlusion to stabilize the dentition. Proper occlusal management assists in maintaining the patient's natural dentition in a state of health and comfortable function.

  8. Ichthyosis with confetti: a rare diagnosis and treatment plan

    PubMed Central

    Long, Myra C

    2014-01-01

    Congenital ichthyosis includes a group of rare skin disorders known for tiles of hyperkeratotic skin resembling fish scales. With age, the hyperkeratosis generally becomes more concentrated around joints which increases impairment. Ichthyosis with confetti, also known as ichthyosis variegata or congenital reticular ichthyosiform erythroderma, is an extremely rare form of ichthyosis. It usually begins as non-bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma with the expected scaling. However, with time patients develop widespread ‘confetti-like’ patches of healthy skin. The healthy skin reflects clonal expansion of ‘normal’ or reverted cells. Cell reversion has potential for future therapies using revertant stem cells. Controlling symptoms with emollients is the goal of treatment for ichthyosis since it has no cure. PMID:25012887

  9. Development of computer algorithms for radiation treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, J R

    1989-06-01

    As a result of an analysis of data relating tissue response to radiation absorbed dose the ICRU has recommended a target for accuracy of +/- 5 for dose delivery in radiation therapy. This is a difficult overall objective to achieve because of the many steps that make up a course of radiotherapy. The calculation of absorbed dose is only one of the steps and so to achieve an overall accuracy of better than +/- 5% the accuracy in dose calculation must be better yet. The physics behind the problem is sufficiently complicated so that no exact method of calculation has been found and consequently approximate solutions must be used. The development of computer algorithms for this task involves the search for better and better approximate solutions. To achieve the desired target of accuracy a fairly sophisticated calculation procedure must be used. Only when this is done can we hope to further improve our knowledge of the way in which tissues respond to radiation treatments.

  10. Quantification of beam complexity in intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment plans

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Weiliang Cho, Sang Hyun; Zhang, Xiaodong; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Hoffman, Karen E.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Excessive complexity in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans increases the dose uncertainty, prolongs the treatment time, and increases the susceptibility to changes in patient or target geometry. To date, the tools for quantitative assessment of IMRT beam complexity are still lacking. In this study, The authors have sought to develop metrics to characterize different aspects of beam complexity and investigate the beam complexity for IMRT plans of different disease sites. Methods: The authors evaluated the beam complexity scores for 65 step-and-shoot IMRT plans from three sites (prostate, head and neck, and spine) and 26 volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for the prostate. On the basis of the beam apertures and monitor unit weights of all segments, the authors calculated the mean aperture area, extent of aperture shape irregularity, and degree of beam modulation for each beam. Then the beam complexity values were averaged to obtain the complexity metrics of the IMRT plans. The authors studied the correlation between the beam complexity metrics and the quality assurance (QA) results. Finally, the effects of treatment planning parameters on beam complexity were studied. Results: The beam complexity scores were not uniform among the prostate IMRT beams from different gantry angles. The lateral beams had larger monitor units and smaller shape irregularity, while the anterior-posterior beams had larger modulation values. On average, the prostate IMRT plans had the smallest aperture irregularity, beam modulation, and normalized monitor units; the head and neck IMRT plans had large beam irregularity and beam modulation; and the spine stereotactic radiation therapy plans often had small beam apertures, which may have been associated with the relatively large discrepancies between planned and QA measured doses. There were weak correlations between the beam complexity scores and the measured dose errors. The prostate VMAT beams showed

  11. The Need for Accurate Risk Prediction Models for Road Mapping, Shared Decision Making and Care Planning for the Elderly with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Stryckers, Marijke; Nagler, Evi V; Van Biesen, Wim

    2016-11-01

    As people age, chronic kidney disease becomes more common, but it rarely leads to end-stage kidney disease. When it does, the choice between dialysis and conservative care can be daunting, as much depends on life expectancy and personal expectations of medical care. Shared decision making implies adequately informing patients about their options, and facilitating deliberation of the available information, such that decisions are tailored to the individual's values and preferences. Accurate estimations of one's risk of progression to end-stage kidney disease and death with or without dialysis are essential for shared decision making to be effective. Formal risk prediction models can help, provided they are externally validated, well-calibrated and discriminative; include unambiguous and measureable variables; and come with readily applicable equations or scores. Reliable, externally validated risk prediction models for progression of chronic kidney disease to end-stage kidney disease or mortality in frail elderly with or without chronic kidney disease are scant. Within this paper, we discuss a number of promising models, highlighting both the strengths and limitations physicians should understand for using them judiciously, and emphasize the need for external validation over new development for further advancing the field.

  12. Segmentation of hepatic vessels from MRI images for planning of electroporation-based treatments in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Marcan, Marija; Pavliha, Denis; Music, Maja Marolt; Fuckan, Igor; Magjarevic, Ratko; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Electroporation-based treatments rely on increasing the permeability of the cell membrane by high voltage electric pulses delivered to tissue via electrodes. To ensure that the whole tumor is covered by the sufficiently high electric field, accurate numerical models are built based on individual patient geometry. For the purpose of reconstruction of hepatic vessels from MRI images we searched for an optimal segmentation method that would meet the following initial criteria: identify major hepatic vessels, be robust and work with minimal user input. Materials and methods. We tested the approaches based on vessel enhancement filtering, thresholding, and their combination in local thresholding. The methods were evaluated on a phantom and clinical data. Results Results show that thresholding based on variance minimization provides less error than the one based on entropy maximization. Best results were achieved by performing local thresholding of the original de-biased image in the regions of interest which were determined through previous vessel-enhancement filtering. In evaluation on clinical cases the proposed method scored in average sensitivity of 93.68%, average symmetric surface distance of 0.89 mm and Hausdorff distance of 4.04 mm. Conclusions The proposed method to segment hepatic vessels from MRI images based on local thresholding meets all the initial criteria set at the beginning of the study and necessary to be used in treatment planning of electroporation-based treatments: it identifies the major vessels, provides results with consistent accuracy and works completely automatically. Whether the achieved accuracy is acceptable or not for treatment planning models remains to be verified through numerical modeling of effects of the segmentation error on the distribution of the electric field. PMID:25177241

  13. Benchmarking of a treatment planning system for spot scanning proton therapy: Comparison and analysis of robustness to setup errors of photon IMRT and proton SFUD treatment plans of base of skull meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, R.; Trnková, P.; Lomax, A. J.; Weston, S. J.; Lilley, J.; Thompson, C. M.; Cosgrove, V. P.; Short, S. C.; Loughrey, C.; Thwaites, D. I.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Base of skull meningioma can be treated with both intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and spot scanned proton therapy (PT). One of the main benefits of PT is better sparing of organs at risk, but due to the physical and dosimetric characteristics of protons, spot scanned PT can be more sensitive to the uncertainties encountered in the treatment process compared with photon treatment. Therefore, robustness analysis should be part of a comprehensive comparison between these two treatment methods in order to quantify and understand the sensitivity of the treatment techniques to uncertainties. The aim of this work was to benchmark a spot scanning treatment planning system for planning of base of skull meningioma and to compare the created plans and analyze their robustness to setup errors against the IMRT technique. Methods: Plans were produced for three base of skull meningioma cases: IMRT planned with a commercial TPS [Monaco (Elekta AB, Sweden)]; single field uniform dose (SFUD) spot scanning PT produced with an in-house TPS (PSI-plan); and SFUD spot scanning PT plan created with a commercial TPS [XiO (Elekta AB, Sweden)]. A tool for evaluating robustness to random setup errors was created and, for each plan, both a dosimetric evaluation and a robustness analysis to setup errors were performed. Results: It was possible to create clinically acceptable treatment plans for spot scanning proton therapy of meningioma with a commercially available TPS. However, since each treatment planning system uses different methods, this comparison showed different dosimetric results as well as different sensitivities to setup uncertainties. The results confirmed the necessity of an analysis tool for assessing plan robustness to provide a fair comparison of photon and proton plans. Conclusions: Robustness analysis is a critical part of plan evaluation when comparing IMRT plans with spot scanned proton therapy plans.

  14. Water: from the source to the treatment plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquet, V.; Baude, I.

    2012-04-01

    As a biology and geology teacher, I have worked on water, from the source to the treatment plant, with pupils between 14 and 15 years old. Lesson 1. Introduction, the water in Vienna Aim: The pupils have to consider why the water is so important in Vienna (history, economy etc.) Activities: Brainstorming about where and why we use water every day and why the water is different in Vienna. Lesson 2. Soil, rock and water Aim: Permeability/ impermeability of the different layers of earth Activities: The pupils have measure the permeability and porosity of different stones: granite, clay, sand, carbonate and basalt. Lesson 3. Relationship between water's ion composition and the stone's mineralogy Aim: Each water source has the same ion composition as the soil where the water comes from. Activities: Comparison between the stone's mineralogy and ions in water. They had a diagram with the ions of granite, clay, sand, carbonate and basalt and the label of different water. They had to make hypotheses about the type of soil where the water came from. They verified this with a geology map of France and Austria. They have to make a profile of the area where the water comes from. They had to confirm or reject their hypothesis. Lesson 4 .Water-catchment and reservoir rocks Aim: Construction of a confined aquifer and artesian well Activities: With sand, clay and a basin, they have to model a confined aquifer and make an artesian well, using what they have learned in lesson 2. Lesson 5. Organic material breakdown and it's affect on the oxygen levels in an aquatic ecosystem Aim: Evaluate the relationship between oxygen levels and the amount of organic matter in an aquatic ecosystem. Explain the relationship between oxygen levels, bacteria and the breakdown of organic matter using an indicator solution. Activities: Put 5 ml of a different water sample in each tube with 20 drops of methylene blue. Observe the tubes after 1 month. Lesson 6. Visit to the biggest water treatment plant in

  15. SU-E-T-437: Four-Dimensional Treatment Planning for Lung VMAT-SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, M; Takashina, M; Koizumi, M; Oohira, S; Ueda, Y; Miyazaki, M; Isono, M; Masaoka, A; Teshima, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess optimal treatment planning approach of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (VMAT-SBRT). Methods: Subjects were 10 patients with lung cancer who had undergone 4DCT. The internal target volume (ITV) volume ranged from 2.6 to 16.5cm{sup 3} and the tumor motion ranged from 0 to 2cm. From 4DCT, which was binned into 10 respiratory phases, 4 image data sets were created; maximum intensity projection (MIP), average intensity projection (AIP), AIP with the ITV replaced by 0HU (RITV-AIP) and RITV-AIP with the planning target volume (PTV) minus the internal target volume was set to −200 HU (HR-AIP). VMAT-SBRT plans were generated on each image set for a patient. 48Gy was prescribed to 95% of PTV. The plans were recalculated on all phase images of 4DCT and the dose distributions were accumulated using a deformable image registration software MIM Maestro™ as the 4D calculated dose to the gross tumor volume (GTV). The planned dose to the ITV and 4D calculated dose to the GTV were compared. Results: In AIP plan, 10 patients average of all dose parameters (D1%, D-mean, and D99%) discrepancy were 1Gy or smaller. MIP and RITV-AIP plans resulted in having common tendency and larger discrepancy than AIP plan. The 4D dose was lower than the planned dose, and 10 patients average of all dose parameters discrepancy were in range 1.3 to 2.6Gy. HR-AIP plan had the largest discrepancy in our trials. 4D calculated D1%, D-mean, and D99% were resulted in 3.0, 4.1, and 6.1Gy lower than the expected in plan, respectively. Conclusion: For all patients, the dose parameters expected in AIP plan approximated to 4D calculated. Using AIP image set seems optimal treatment planning approach of VMAT-SBRT for a mobile tumor. Funding Support: This work was supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Core-to-Core program (No. 23003)

  16. Treatment Planning for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Maria S.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andres J.

    2010-08-04

    Glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma are frequent brain tumors in adults and presently still incurable diseases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising alternative for this kind of pathologies. Accelerators have been proposed for BNCT as a way to circumvent the problem of siting reactors in hospitals and for their relative simplicity and lower cost among other advantages. Considerable effort is going into the development of accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources in Argentina. Epithermal neutron beams will be produced through appropriate proton-induced nuclear reactions and optimized beam shaping assemblies. Using these sources, computational dose distributions were evaluated in a real patient with diagnosed glioblastoma treated with BNCT. The simulated irradiation was delivered in order to optimize dose to the tumors within the normal tissue constraints. Using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, dose distributions were generated for brain, skin and tumor. Also, the dosimetry was studied by computing cumulative dose-volume histograms for volumes of interest. The results suggest acceptable skin average dose and a significant dose delivered to tumor with low average whole brain dose for irradiation times less than 60 minutes, indicating a good performance of an accelerator-based BNCT treatment.

  17. Patient specific optimization-based treatment planning for catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia and thermal ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Punit; Chen, Xin; Wootton, Jeffery; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.-Chow; Diederich, Chris J.

    2009-02-01

    A 3D optimization-based thermal treatment planning platform has been developed for the application of catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia in conjunction with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for treating advanced pelvic tumors. Optimal selection of applied power levels to each independently controlled transducer segment can be used to conform and maximize therapeutic heating and thermal dose coverage to the target region, providing significant advantages over current hyperthermia technology and improving treatment response. Critical anatomic structures, clinical target outlines, and implant/applicator geometries were acquired from sequential multi-slice 2D images obtained from HDR treatment planning and used to reconstruct patient specific 3D biothermal models. A constrained optimization algorithm was devised and integrated within a finite element thermal solver to determine a priori the optimal applied power levels and the resulting 3D temperature distributions such that therapeutic heating is maximized within the target, while placing constraints on maximum tissue temperature and thermal exposure of surrounding non-targeted tissue. This optimizationbased treatment planning and modeling system was applied on representative cases of clinical implants for HDR treatment of cervix and prostate to evaluate the utility of this planning approach. The planning provided significant improvement in achievable temperature distributions for all cases, with substantial increase in T90 and thermal dose (CEM43T90) coverage to the hyperthermia target volume while decreasing maximum treatment temperature and reducing thermal dose exposure to surrounding non-targeted tissues and thermally sensitive rectum and bladder. This optimization based treatment planning platform with catheter-based ultrasound applicato