Science.gov

Sample records for accurate unpowered reentry

  1. Unpowered wireless analog resistance sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andringa, Matthew M.; Neikirk, Dean P.; Wood, Sharon L.

    2004-07-01

    Our society depends heavily on a network of buildings, bridges and roadways. In order to properly maintain this civil infrastructure and avoid damage and costly repairs due to structural failure, it is necessary to monitor the health of these structures. Sensors must frequently be placed in inaccessible locations under harsh conditions and should ideally last the lifetime of the structure the sensors are monitoring. This paper presents the development of a low cost, passive, un-powered wireless analog resistance sensor. The sensor was originally designed for monitoring corrosion in concrete, but there are many other potential applications including remote temperature monitoring, embedded accelerometers, and embedded strain gauges. The passive wireless nature makes the sensor ideally suited for embedding in inaccessible locations under harsh conditions. The sensor consists of a resonant inductor-capacitor circuit containing a resistive transducer. The sensor is interrogated by measuring the impedance through a remote, magnetically coupled reader loop. The width of the resonance is directly related to the resistance of the transducer. The sensor has been simulated under a variety of conditions using a circuit model and compared to actual test sensors built and evaluated in the laboratory.

  2. Unpowered wireless ultrasound tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedi, Farshad; Huang, Haiying

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, an unpowered wireless ultrasound tomography system is presented. The system consists of two subsystems; the wireless interrogation unit (WIU) and three wireless nodes installed on the structure. Each node is designed to work in generation and sensing modes, but operates at a specific microwave frequency. Wireless transmission of the ultrasound signals between the WIU and the wireless nodes is achieved by converting ultrasound signals to microwave signals and vice versa, using a microwave carrier signal. In the generation mode, both a carrier signal and an ultrasound modulated microwave signal are transmitted to the sensor nodes. Only the node whose operating frequency matches the carrier signal will receive these signals and demodulate them to recover the original ultrasound signal. In the sensing mode, a microwave carrier signal with two different frequency components matching the operating frequencies of the sensor nodes is broadcasted by the WIU. The sensor nodes, in turn, receive the corresponding carrier signals, modulate it with the ultrasound sensing signal, and wirelessly transmit the modulated signal back to the WIU. The demodulation of the sensing signals is performed in the WIU using a digital signal processing. Implementing a software receiver significantly reduces the complexity and the cost of the WIU. A wireless ultrasound tomography system is realized by interchanging the carrier frequencies so that the wireless transducers can take turn to serve as the actuator and sensors.

  3. Reentry analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Biehl, F.A.

    1984-05-01

    This paper presents the criteria, previous nuclear experience in space, analysis techniques, and possible breakup enhancement devices applicable to an acceptable SP-100 reentry from space. Reactor operation in nuclear-safe orbit will minimize the radiological risk; the remaining safeguards criteria need to be defined. A simple analytical point mass reentry technique and a more comprehensive analysis method that considers vehicle dynamics and orbit insertion malfunctions are presented. Vehicle trajectory, attitude, and possible breakup enhancement devices will be integrated in the simulation as required to ensure an adequate representation of the reentry process.

  4. 14 CFR 91.309 - Towing: Gliders and unpowered ultralight vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... civil aircraft towing a glider or unpowered ultralight vehicle unless— (1) The pilot in command of the... glider or unpowered ultralight vehicle and not more than twice this operating weight. However, the... glider or unpowered ultralight vehicle if— (i) A safety link is installed at the point of attachment...

  5. 14 CFR 91.309 - Towing: Gliders and unpowered ultralight vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... civil aircraft towing a glider or unpowered ultralight vehicle unless— (1) The pilot in command of the... glider or unpowered ultralight vehicle and not more than twice this operating weight. However, the... glider or unpowered ultralight vehicle if— (i) A safety link is installed at the point of attachment...

  6. 14 CFR 61.69 - Glider and unpowered ultralight vehicle towing: Experience and training requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Glider and unpowered ultralight vehicle towing: Experience and training requirements. 61.69 Section 61.69 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... GROUND INSTRUCTORS Aircraft Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.69 Glider and unpowered...

  7. 14 CFR 435.35 - Acceptable reentry risk for reentry of a reentry vehicle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Acceptable reentry risk for reentry of a reentry vehicle. 435.35 Section 435.35 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Safety...

  8. 14 CFR 435.35 - Acceptable reentry risk for reentry of a reentry vehicle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... reentry vehicle. 435.35 Section 435.35 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Safety Review and Approval for Reentry of a Reentry Vehicle §...

  9. 14 CFR 435.35 - Acceptable reentry risk for reentry of a reentry vehicle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... reentry vehicle. 435.35 Section 435.35 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Safety Review and Approval for Reentry of a Reentry Vehicle §...

  10. 14 CFR 435.35 - Acceptable reentry risk for reentry of a reentry vehicle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... reentry vehicle. 435.35 Section 435.35 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Safety Review and Approval for Reentry of a Reentry Vehicle §...

  11. 14 CFR 435.35 - Acceptable reentry risk for reentry of a reentry vehicle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... reentry vehicle. 435.35 Section 435.35 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Safety Review and Approval for Reentry of a Reentry Vehicle §...

  12. 14 CFR 91.309 - Towing: Gliders and unpowered ultralight vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Towing: Gliders and unpowered ultralight vehicles. 91.309 Section 91.309 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES...

  13. 14 CFR 91.309 - Towing: Gliders and unpowered ultralight vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Towing: Gliders and unpowered ultralight vehicles. 91.309 Section 91.309 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Special Flight Operations § 91.309...

  14. Reentry Experiment SAT-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Maurice; Kuhns, Casey; Honda, Motoaki; Shiely, Robert; Adamson, Aaron; Aken, Jordan; Walch, Robert; Galovich, Cynthia; Semak, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    The challenge of reentering the Earth's atmosphere is not new. For years, NASA has successfully designed vessels that have endured the harsh process of reentry. However, in most cases, this is made possible only through the act of over-engineering; designing to withstand conditions far beyond what is expected to be encountered. Though this method has been effective, there would be benefit in knowing more precisely what to expect upon atmospheric reentry. The University of Northern Colorado Reentry Experiment SAT-X project, launched from Wallops Island, Virginia on July 21, 2011, was designed to shed light on the reentry process by collecting motion data for a capsule ejected from a rocket. Moreover, a secondary objective was to test the capability of the prototype capsule to serve as a platform for future reentry experiments. The mission and preliminary results from the launch will be described.

  15. Direct optimization method for reentry trajectory design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jallade, S.; Huber, P.; Potti, J.; Dutruel-Lecohier, G.

    The software package called `Reentry and Atmospheric Transfer Trajectory' (RATT) was developed under ESA contract for the design of atmospheric trajectories. It includes four software TOP (Trajectory OPtimization) programs, which optimize reentry and aeroassisted transfer trajectories. 6FD and 3FD (6 and 3 degrees of freedom Flight Dynamic) are devoted to the simulation of the trajectory. SCA (Sensitivity and Covariance Analysis) performs covariance analysis on a given trajectory with respect to different uncertainties and error sources. TOP provides the optimum guidance law of a three degree of freedom reentry of aeroassisted transfer (AAOT) trajectories. Deorbit and reorbit impulses (if necessary) can be taken into account in the optimization. A wide choice of cost function is available to the user such as the integrated heat flux, or the sum of the velocity impulses, or a linear combination of both of them for trajectory and vehicle design. The crossrange and the downrange can be maximized during reentry trajectory. Path constraints are available on the load factor, the heat flux and the dynamic pressure. Results on these proposed options are presented. TOPPHY is the part of the TOP software corresponding to the definition and the computation of the optimization problemphysics. TOPPHY can interface with several optimizes with dynamic solvers: TOPOP and TROPIC using direct collocation methods and PROMIS using direct multiple shooting method. TOPOP was developed in the frame of this contract, it uses Hermite polynomials for the collocation method and the NPSOL optimizer from the NAG library. Both TROPIC and PROMIS were developed by the DLR (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt) and use the SLSQP optimizer. For the dynamic equation resolution, TROPIC uses a collocation method with Splines and PROMIS uses a multiple shooting method with finite differences. The three different optimizers including dynamics were tested on the reentry trajectory of the

  16. GOCE Re-Entry Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastida, B.; Flohrer, T.; Lemmens, S.; Krag, H.

    2015-03-01

    Every year ESA, through the Space Debris Office, participates to an Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC) Re-entry Test Campaign.. For the campaign of 2013, ESA’s proposal to select GOCE's re-entry was accepted. The campaign opened on the 21st October 2013 after fuel depletion of the drag-compensating ion propulsion. GOCE was expected to enter into a phase of attitude-controlled fine-pointing mode (FPM) until the attitude controllers would be unable to cope with the atmospheric torques and then the satellite would enter in a phase of fully uncontrolled flight. In this paper, we present the evolution of ESA’s daily predictions on the re-entry epoch using different sources of orbital information. The uncertainties on the spacecraft operability (i.e. the physical limits of the attitude controller) led to a non-standard re-entry scenario were different attitudes had to be considered (instead of the commonly assumed random tumbling mode case that is used whenever no information on the physical properties of a re-entering object is available). A daily assessment of the status, in coordination with the flight control team, was required and implied a continuous update on the predicted failure point of the attitude controller. This in turn imposed the need for considering an asymmetric re-entry window. These operation-bound uncertainties were simulated to predict the attitude evolution after failure at different altitudes and their effects evaluated to be taken into account for the re-entry predictions. We present ESA’s re-entry prediction activities for GOCE, internally, and within the IADC, and address specific technical aspects and challenges for re-entry predictions, which are related to the expected and occurred attitude of GOCE during the final re-entry phase.

  17. Re-entry Experiment Launch

    NASA Video Gallery

    On August 10, 2009, NASA successfully launched the Inflatable Re-entry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE) and proved that spacecraft can use inflatable heat shields to reduce speed and provide protection du...

  18. Satellite reentry predictions for the Italian civil protection authorities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmo, Luciano; Pardini, Carmen

    2013-06-01

    In just 5 months, from September 2011 to January 2012, three campaigns of reentry predictions were carried out in support of the Italian civil protection authorities. The satellites involved were UARS, ROSAT and Fobos-Grunt, which received widespread attention for the marginal risk on the ground associated with their uncontrolled reentry. From the technical point of view, the three reentry campaigns offered the occasion to compare some semi-empirical thermospheric density models under varying solar and geomagnetic activity conditions, dealing with spacecraft characterized by quite different configurations, shapes, masses and attitude control. However, what made the experience substantially different from usual reentry test campaigns was the strict interaction with the civil protection community and the public. In fact, in order to provide understandable and unambiguous information useful for civil protection planning and applications, the nominal reentry time predictions were of no use, while a particular care was devoted to the definition of appropriate reentry uncertainty windows. The attention of the civil protection authorities was focused, of course, on the Italian territory, so the relevant question for any planning was the following: given a certain uncertainty window, where and when a fragment might have crossed the national airspace and hit the ground? In order to meet this demand, during the last 3-4 days of satellite residual lifetime, reentries where simulated over Italy to obtain quite accurate ground tracks, debris swaths and air space crossing time windows associated with the critical passes over the national territory still included in the current uncertainty window. This information was updated, if needed, but remained relatively stable and accurate until the reentry, not much affected by the actual trajectory evolution due to the varying air drag. In other words, it was easy to understand for people not familiar with orbital dynamics, unambiguous

  19. 14 CFR 435.3 - Types of reentry licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV... authorizes a licensee to reenter one model or type of reentry vehicle, other than an RLV, to a reentry...

  20. 14 CFR 435.9 - Issuance of a reentry license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV... reentry license authorizes a licensee to reenter a reentry vehicle and payload, if any, in accordance...

  1. 14 CFR 435.9 - Issuance of a reentry license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV... reentry license authorizes a licensee to reenter a reentry vehicle and payload, if any, in accordance...

  2. 14 CFR 435.3 - Types of reentry licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV... authorizes a licensee to reenter one model or type of reentry vehicle, other than an RLV, to a reentry...

  3. 14 CFR 435.3 - Types of reentry licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV... authorizes a licensee to reenter one model or type of reentry vehicle, other than an RLV, to a reentry...

  4. 14 CFR 435.9 - Issuance of a reentry license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV... reentry license authorizes a licensee to reenter a reentry vehicle and payload, if any, in accordance...

  5. 14 CFR 435.3 - Types of reentry licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV... authorizes a licensee to reenter one model or type of reentry vehicle, other than an RLV, to a reentry...

  6. 14 CFR 435.9 - Issuance of a reentry license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV... reentry license authorizes a licensee to reenter a reentry vehicle and payload, if any, in accordance...

  7. In Vitro Ultrasound Measurements of Powered and Unpowered Total Cavopulmonary Connection

    PubMed Central

    Iliff, BP; Kerlo, AEM; Chen, J; Rodefeld, MD; Goergen, CJ

    2015-01-01

    Three-staged Fontan palliation is performed on children suffering from single ventricle congenital heart disease. The series of surgical procedures reroutes blood from the vena cavae directly to the pulmonary arteries, creating a total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC). A viscous impeller pump (VIP) is currently being developed as a cavopulmonary assist device that can modestly augment cavopulmonary flow, reduce systemic venous pressure, and improve ventricular preload. This study used ultrasound to visualize complex flow patterns in powered and unpowered in vitro mock Fontan circulations. The idealized TCPC was modeled with a silicone mold and blood analog made of water and glycerol that was seeded with 10-μm glass beads. B-mode, color Doppler, and pulsed-wave Doppler images were used to visualize complex flow patterns in the idealized TCPC with (1) no VIP, (2) static VIP, and powered VIP rotation rates of (3) 500 and (4) 2,000 rotations per minute (RPM). Pulsed-wave Doppler data showed higher mean velocities and greater variance in the outlets relative to the larger inlets. The maximum inlet velocity ± SD increased from 10.9 ± 3.53 cm/s with no VIP to 15.9 ± 1.03 when the VIP was rotating at 2,000 RPM. Likewise, the maximum outlet velocity increased from 14.9 ± 11.2 cm/s to 18.9 ± 7.25 cm/s at 2,000 RPM. The faster mean velocities with the VIP rotating suggest that the pump augments cavopulmonary flow. The results of this study suggest that measuring complex flow patterns with ultrasound in vivo could be used clinically to optimize VIP positioning and rotation rate during and after implantation. PMID:25621311

  8. Reducing the energy cost of human walking using an unpowered exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Collins, Steven H; Wiggin, M Bruce; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2015-06-11

    With efficiencies derived from evolution, growth and learning, humans are very well-tuned for locomotion. Metabolic energy used during walking can be partly replaced by power input from an exoskeleton, but is it possible to reduce metabolic rate without providing an additional energy source? This would require an improvement in the efficiency of the human-machine system as a whole, and would be remarkable given the apparent optimality of human gait. Here we show that the metabolic rate of human walking can be reduced by an unpowered ankle exoskeleton. We built a lightweight elastic device that acts in parallel with the user's calf muscles, off-loading muscle force and thereby reducing the metabolic energy consumed in contractions. The device uses a mechanical clutch to hold a spring as it is stretched and relaxed by ankle movements when the foot is on the ground, helping to fulfil one function of the calf muscles and Achilles tendon. Unlike muscles, however, the clutch sustains force passively. The exoskeleton consumes no chemical or electrical energy and delivers no net positive mechanical work, yet reduces the metabolic cost of walking by 7.2 ± 2.6% for healthy human users under natural conditions, comparable to savings with powered devices. Improving upon walking economy in this way is analogous to altering the structure of the body such that it is more energy-effective at walking. While strong natural pressures have already shaped human locomotion, improvements in efficiency are still possible. Much remains to be learned about this seemingly simple behaviour. PMID:25830889

  9. Re-entry vehicle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, F. J.

    The present book has the objective to provide the practicing engineer with a senior-level introduction to the dynamics of reentry vehicles. A description is provided of an atmospheric model, and the earth's form and gravity field are examined, taking into account basic atmospheric relationships, the development of an analytic atmospheric model, a simple atmospheric model for closed-form solutions, the geocentric position vector, the deviation of the vertical, the earth's radius, and a computer program for calculating the gravitational acceleration. Force equations are considered along with aspects of Keplerian motion, reentry body particle mechanics, moment equations, axis transformations, a flowfield description, moment equations in a constant density atmosphere, boost trajectories, angular motion during the Keplerian phase, angular motion during reentry, and the inverse method. Attention is also given to first-order linear differential equations with variable coefficients, ring laser gyros and pendulous accelerometers, the calculation of the real roots of a polynomial, quaternions.

  10. Simulated Reentry Heating by Torching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Gale A.

    2008-01-01

    The two first order reentry heating parameters are peak heating flux (W/square cm) and peak heat load (kJ/square cm). Peak heating flux (and deceleration, gs) is higher for a ballistic reentry and peak heat load is higher for a lifting reentry. Manned vehicle reentries are generally lifting reentries at nominal 1-5 gs so that personnel will not be crushed by high deceleration force. A few off-nominal manned reentries have experienced 8 or more gs with corresponding high heating flux (but below nominal heat load). The Shuttle Orbiter reentries provide about an order of magnitude difference in peak heating flux at mid-bottom (TPS tiles, approximately 6 W/square cm or 5 BTU/square ft - sec) and leading edge (RCC, approximately 60 W/square cm or 50 BTU/square ft- sec). Orion lunar return and Mars sample lander are of the same order of magnitude as orbiter leading edge peak heat loads. Flight temperature measurements are available for some orbiter TPS tile and RCC locations. Return-to-Flight on-orbit tile-repair-candidate-material-heating performance was evaluated by matching propane torch heating of candidate-materials temperatures at several depths to orbiter TPS tile flight-temperatures. Char and ash characteristics, heat expansion, and temperature histories at several depths of the cure-in-place ablator were some of the TPS repair material performance characteristics measured. The final char surface was above the initial surface for the primary candidate (silicone based) material, in contrast to a receded surface for the Apollo-type ablative heat shield material. Candidate TPS materials for Orion CEV (LEO and lunar return), and for Mars sample lander (MSL) are now being evaluated. Torching of a candidate ablator material, PICA, was performed to match the ablation experienced by the STARDUST PICA heat shield. Torching showed that the carbon fiberform skeleton in a sample of PICA was inhomogeneous in that sample, and allowed measurements (of the clumps and voids) of

  11. Simulated Reentry Heating by Torching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Gale A.

    2008-01-01

    The two first order reentry heating parameters are peak heating flux (W/cm2) and peak heat load (kJ/cm2). Peak heating flux (and deceleration, gs) is higher for a ballistic reentry and peak heat load is higher for a lifting reentry. Manned vehicle reentries are generally lifting reentries at nominal 1-5 gs so that personnel will not be crushed by high deceleration force. A few off-nominal manned reentries have experienced 8 or more gs with corresponding high heating flux (but below nominal heat load). The Shuttle Orbiter reentries provide about an order of magnitude difference in peak heating flux at mid-bottom (TPS tiles, approximately 6 W/cm2 or 5 BTU/ft2- sec) and leading edge (RCC, approximately 60 W/cm2 or 50 BTU/ft2- sec). Orion lunar return and Mars sample lander are of the same order of magnitude as orbiter leading edge peak heat loads. Flight temperature measurements are available for some orbiter TPS tile and RCC locations. Return-to-Flight on-orbit tile-repair-candidate-material-heating performance was evaluated by matching propane torch heating of candidate-materials temperatures at several depths to orbiter TPS tile flight-temperatures. Char and ash characteristics, heat expansion, and temperature histories at several depths of the cure-in-place ablator were some of the TPS repair material performance characteristics measured. The final char surface was above the initial surface for the primary candidate (silicone based) material, in contrast to a receded surface for the Apollo-type ablative heat shield material. Candidate TPS materials for Orion CEV (LEO and lunar return), and for Mars sample lander are now being evaluated. Torching of a candidate ablator material, PICA, was performed to match the ablation experienced by the STARDUST PICA heat shield. Torching showed that the carbon fiberform skeleton in a sample of PICA was inhomogeneous in that sample, and allowed measurements (of the clumps and voids) of the inhomogeneity. Additional reentry

  12. Understanding Columbia's Reentry Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Soon after the Space Shuttle Columbia accident occurred last year, a group of CFD analysts from NASA centers and private industry was organized to help determine the cause of the accident. This group was under the direction of the Applied Aeroscience and CFD Branch of the Aeroscience and Flight Mechanics Division at the Johnson Space Center. For external flow simulations, noncommercia2 CFD codes that specialize in hypersonic or high Mach number flows were used. These tools were used to determine heating rates, pressures, and temperatures for a large number of vehicle damage scenarios. Lockheed Martin Space Operations was called upon to provide CFD support in the area of internal flows within the shuttle wing cavity, and for these simulations, FLUENT 6.1 was chosen. Two large-scale, simplified models were m to understand the flow patterns once a breach of the internal wing cavity was initiated. The results were primarily used to visualize flow patterns within the wing cavity. The first CFD model included the entire lee wing without the wheel well cavity. The purpose of the first model, which did not include the reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) cavity along the wing leading edge, was to visualize the flow field within the wing cavity immediately after the leading edge spar breach, This model assumed that the flow coming into the wing cavity was normal to the spar. It included all of the primary vents that allow for flow between the main cavities of the wing. A six-inch diameter hole was modeled in the spar at the approximate location where the spar breach was judged to have occurred, which was between RCC panels 8 and 9. The results of the modeling showed that at this location, the high temperature, high velocity gas stream entering the wing cavity impinged on the outboard wheel well cavity. Instrumentation in the Shuttle wheel well cavity registered abnormal temperatures during reentry, so the FLUENT results helped support the conclusion of the accident investigation

  13. Pico Reentry Probes: Affordable Options for Reentry Measurements and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ailor, William H.; Kapoor, Vinod B.; Allen, Gay A., Jr.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Arnold, James O.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2005-01-01

    It is generally very costly to perform in-space and atmospheric entry experiments. This paper presents a new platform - the Pico Reentry Probe (PREP) - that we believe will make targeted flight-tests and planetary atmospheric probe science missions considerably more affordable. Small, lightweight, self-contained, it is designed as a "launch and forget" system, suitable for experiments that require no ongoing communication with the ground. It contains a data recorder, battery, transmitter, and user-customized instrumentation. Data recorded during reentry or space operations is returned at end-of-mission via transmission to Iridium satellites (in the case of earth-based operations) or a similar orbiting communication system for planetary missions. This paper discusses possible applications of this concept for Earth and Martian atmospheric entry science. Two well-known heritage aerodynamic shapes are considered as candidates for PREP: the shape developed for the Planetary Atmospheric Experiment Test (PAET) and that for the Deep Space II Mars Probe.

  14. Test Cases for Reentry Survivability Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ailor, W.; Hallman, W.; Steckel, G.; Weaver, M.

    2012-01-01

    One approved approach for minimizing the long-term hazards posed by space debris is to reenter space hardware into the atmosphere at end-of-mission or to place hardware in an orbit with a relatively short lifetime. Selection of a short lifetime orbit vice a deorbited reentry into a safe area depends on predictions of the hazards posed by random reentry of the object. If the object is left in orbit, what is the casualty expectation associated with its eventual reentry? Clearly, having high confidence in reentry hazard prediction tools is important to this decision-making process and the final choice can have significant mission and cost impacts. This paper describes a set of test cases that can be used to validate reentry hazard models. The test cases were assembled from reentry cases where "known" and tracked objects reentered the atmosphere and debris from the reentries was subsequently found on the ground and was analyzed. The test cases include best estimates of the state, mass properties, and physical description of each object prior to reentry, the wind profile through which the debris fell (for one case), and the impact location and physical description of each surviving object. The report also summarizes results of metallurgical analyses conducted on surviving debris, which places limits on the maximum temperatures reached during reentry. Details on a specific reentry are included as an example.

  15. GOCE Re-Entry Predictions for the Italian Civil Protection Authorities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardini, Carmen; Anselmo, Luciano

    2015-03-01

    The uncommon nature of the GOCE reentry campaign, sharing an uncontrolled orbital decay with a finely controlled attitude along the atmospheric drag direction, made the reentry predictions for this satellite an interesting case study, especially because nobody was able to say a priori if and when the attitude control would have failed, leading to an unrestrained tumbling and a sudden variation of the orbital decay rate. As in previous cases, ISTI/CNR was in charge of reentry predictions for the Italian civil protection authorities, monitoring also the satellite decay in the frame of an international reentry campaign promoted by the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC). Due to the peculiar nature of the GOCE reentry, the definition of reliable uncertainty windows was not easy, especially considering the critical use of this information for civil protection evaluations. However, after an initial period of test and analysis, reasonable and conservative criteria were elaborated and applied, with good and consistent results through the end of the reentry campaign. In the last three days of flight, reentries were simulated over Italy to obtain quite accurate ground tracks, debris swaths and air space crossing time windows associated with the critical passes over the national territory still included in the global uncertainty windows.

  16. Incarceration, Prisoner Reentry, and Communities.

    PubMed

    Morenoff, Jeffrey D; Harding, David J

    2014-07-01

    Since the mid-1970s the United States has experienced an enormous rise in incarceration and accompanying increases in returning prisoners and in post-release community correctional supervision. Poor urban communities are disproportionately impacted by these phenomena. This review focuses on two complementary questions regarding incarceration, prisoner reentry, and communities:(1) whether and how mass incarceration has affected the social and economic structure of American communities, and (2) how residential neighborhoods affect the social and economic reintegration of returning prisoners. These two questions can be seen as part of a dynamic process involving a pernicious "feedback" loop, in which mass incarceration undermines the structure and social organization of some communities, thus creating more criminogenic environments for returning prisoners and further diminishing their prospects for successful reentry and reintegration. PMID:25400321

  17. Incarceration, Prisoner Reentry, and Communities

    PubMed Central

    Morenoff, Jeffrey D.; Harding, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Since the mid-1970s the United States has experienced an enormous rise in incarceration and accompanying increases in returning prisoners and in post-release community correctional supervision. Poor urban communities are disproportionately impacted by these phenomena. This review focuses on two complementary questions regarding incarceration, prisoner reentry, and communities:(1) whether and how mass incarceration has affected the social and economic structure of American communities, and (2) how residential neighborhoods affect the social and economic reintegration of returning prisoners. These two questions can be seen as part of a dynamic process involving a pernicious “feedback” loop, in which mass incarceration undermines the structure and social organization of some communities, thus creating more criminogenic environments for returning prisoners and further diminishing their prospects for successful reentry and reintegration. PMID:25400321

  18. Preventing re-entry to foster care.

    PubMed

    Carnochan, Sarah; Rizik-Baer, Daniel; Austin, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Re-entry to foster care generally refers to circumstances in which children who have been discharged from foster care to be reunified with their family of origin, adopted, or provided kinship guardianship are returned to foster care. In the context of the federal performance measurement system, re-entry refers specifically to a return to foster care following an unsuccessful reunification. The federal Children and Family Services Review measures re-entry to foster care with a single indicator, called the permanency of reunification indicator, one of four indicators comprising the reunification composite measure. This review focuses on research related to the re-entry indicator, including the characteristics of children, caregivers and families, as well as case and child welfare services that are associated with a higher or lower risk of re-entry to foster care. Promising post-reunification services designed to prevent re-entry to foster care are described. PMID:23705650

  19. Genesis Reentry Observations and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, R. M.; Swift, W. R.

    2005-01-01

    The Genesis spacecraft reentry represented a unique opportunity to observe a "calibrated meteor" from northern Nevada. Knowing its speed, mass, composition, and precise trajectory made it a good subject to test some of the algorithms used to determine meteoroid mass from observed brightness. It was also a good test of an inexpensive set of cameras that could be deployed to observe future shuttle reentries. The utility of consumer-grade video cameras was evident during the STS-107 accident investigation, and the Genesis reentry gave us the opportunity to specify and test commercially available cameras that could be used during future reentries. This Technical Memorandum describes the video observations and their analysis, compares the results with a simple photometric model, describes the forward scatter radar experiment, and lists lessons learned from the expedition and implications for the Stardust reentry in January 2006 as well as future shuttle reentries.

  20. UARS Re-Entry Prediction and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansbery, Eugene G.; Johnson, N. L.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) deployed the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) from the Space Shuttle payload bay during the STS-48 mission in September, 1991. The 5700 kg satellite was decommissioned in December, 2005 and was maneuvered into a lower altitude orbit to shorten its on-orbit lifetime to reduce the probability of a debris producing accidental collision. The satellite reentered the Earth s atmosphere over the Pacific Ocean on September 24, 2011. Analysis by NASA s Orbital Debris Program Office using the ORSAT software predicted that approximately two dozen fragments from UARS would survive reentry to reach the ground. This presentation will discuss the reentry predictions made in the days prior to the reentry and compare the UARS reentry with other historical reentries. It will also present the results of the ORSAT analysis showing predicted surviving reentry objects

  1. Risk Assessment for Destructive Re-Entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lips, T.; Koppenwallner, G.; Bianchi, L.; Klinkrad, H.

    2009-03-01

    From 2007 to 2008, Hypersonic Technology Göttingen (HTG) worked on a study called Risk Assessment for Destructive Re-entry (RADR). The main purposes of this study were to identify and to quantify the inherent uncertainties of re-entry analysis tools, and to provide possible risk mitigation measures. For these purposes, three basic risk scenarios were specified: a 1-ton-class satellite without propulsion for uncontrolled re-entry, a 6-ton-class satellite with propulsion and the capability to perform a controlled re-entry, and a 1-ton-class launcher upper stage re-entering uncontrolled. Based on the identified uncertainty parameters, variation analyses were conducted for these scenarios with the two ESA tools for re-entry analysis SCARAB (Spacecraft Atmospheric Reentry and Aerothermal Breakup) and SESAM (Spacecraft Entry Survival Analysis Module). This paper describes the major results of the RADR study.

  2. Optimum reentry trajectories of a lifting vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, J. S.; Vinh, N. X.

    1980-01-01

    Research results are presented of an investigation of the optimum maneuvers of advanced shuttle type spacecraft during reentry. The equations are formulated by means of modified Chapman variables resulting in a general set of equations for flight analysis which are exact for reentry and for flight in a vacuum. Four planar flight typical optimum manuevers are investigated. For three-dimensional flight the optimum trajectory for maximum cross range is discussed in detail. Techniques for calculating reentry footprints are presented.

  3. 75 FR 75621 - Office of Commercial Space Transportation; Waiver of Autonomous Reentry Restriction for a Reentry...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-06

    ... Commercial Space Transportation Reusable Launch Vehicle and Reentry Licensing Regulations, 64 FR 19626, 19645... the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) by Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX): A petition... initiation of reentry in the absence of active human control. Reentry NPRM, 64 FR at 19645. The FAA...

  4. PREDICTION OF AGRICULTURAL WORKER SAFETY REENTRY TIMES FOR ORGANOPHOSPHATE INSECTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concepts and current methods of determining worker safety reentry times are reviewed. Comparison of human monitoring studies, factors in a worker reentry episode and exposure estimation methods illustrate the advantages of estimation methods. Research needs for worker reentry tim...

  5. 14 CFR 435.7 - Payload reentry determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV... transport a payload to Earth on a reentry vehicle unless the proposed payload is exempt from payload...

  6. 14 CFR 435.7 - Payload reentry determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV... transport a payload to Earth on a reentry vehicle unless the proposed payload is exempt from payload...

  7. 14 CFR 435.7 - Payload reentry determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV... transport a payload to Earth on a reentry vehicle unless the proposed payload is exempt from payload...

  8. 14 CFR 435.7 - Payload reentry determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV... transport a payload to Earth on a reentry vehicle unless the proposed payload is exempt from payload...

  9. Heat source reentry vehicle design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    The design details are presented of a flight-type heat source reentry vehicle and heat exchanger compatible with the isotope Brayton power conversion system. The reference reentry vehicle and heat exchanger were modified, orbital and superorbital capability was assessed, and a complete set of detail design layout drawings were provided.

  10. Attracting Reentry Women to Engineering and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Society for Engineering Education, Washington, DC.

    Three papers on attracting reentry women to engineering and technology are presented. The first paper, "Encouraging Older Women as Engineering Students," discusses the opportunities, the problems, and suggested actions for women pursuing engineering careers. The second paper, "Industrial Programs for Reentry Opportunities for Women as Engineers,"…

  11. Guiding Principles for Physician Reentry Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenagy, Gretchen P.; Schneidman, Barbara S.; Barzansky, Barbara; Dalton, Claudette; Sirio, Carl A.; Skochelak, Susan E.

    2011-01-01

    Physician reentry is defined by the American Medical Association (AMA) as: "A return to clinical practice in the discipline in which one has been trained or certified following an extended period of clinical inactivity not resulting from discipline or impairment." Physician reentry programs are creating an avenue for physicians who have left…

  12. 14 CFR 435.3 - Types of reentry licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Types of reentry licenses. 435.3 Section 435.3 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 435.3 Types of reentry licenses....

  13. STS-30 deorbit and reentry ground track

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Rockwell International (RI) supplied artist concept titled 'STS-30 Deorbit and Reentry Track' shows Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, deorbit and reentry ground track. Ground track and map portray OV-104's deorbit over Madagascar, atmospheric reentry maneuvers, approach to the California coast, and landing at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. the transport trailer of the Payload Environmental Transportation System (PETS). Magellan, destined for unprecedented studies of Venusian topographic features, will be deployed by the crew of NASA's STS-30 mission in April 1989. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-88PC-1086.

  14. Torque equilibrium attitude control for Skylab reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, J. R.; Kennel, H. F.

    1979-01-01

    All the available torque equilibrium attitudes (most were useless from the standpoint of lack of electrical power) and the equilibrium seeking method are presented, as well as the actual successful application during the 3 weeks prior to Skylab reentry.

  15. Re-Entry Platform for Radiation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailet, G. B.; Bourgoing, A. B.; Magin, T. M.; Laux, C. O. L.

    2014-06-01

    Based on an emission spectrometer, the payload developed by ECP and VKI will permit through newly developed methodology to characterize the reentry plasma and some ablation behaviors including recession rate in a plug concept to be flown by 2015.

  16. Reentry analysis for low Earth orbiting spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Lauri Kraft; Folta, David C.; Ross, Brian P.; Bouslog, Stanley A.

    As a result of recent National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Management Instruction (NMI), NASA spacecraft programs must limit orbital debris by design and/or by operational procedures. To fulfill this requirement, spacecraft may be required to be removed from their operational orbit after mission completion. Spacecraft disposal by atmospheric reentry is a means to accomplish this task. To assess the risk to man, an analysis must be done to determine which parts of the spacecraft are likely to survive a reentry of the Earth's atmosphere and where those parts will land. These issues are currently being examined for the Earth Observing System (EOS-AM1). The Johnson Space Center (JSC) Aeroscience Branch, supported by the Lockheed Engineering and Sciences Co., has developed a tool which permits the analysis of the thermal effects of reentry on individual spacecraft components to determine which components are expected to survive reentry. This paper presents an examination of the burnup and reentry of EOS-AM1 and describes a method for other spacecraft to use in analyzing similar reentry issues.

  17. GOCE SSTI GNSS Receiver Re-Entry Phase Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zin, A.; Zago, S.; Scaciga, L.; Marradi, L.; Floberghagen, R.; Fehringer, M.; Bigazzi, A.; Piccolo, A.; Luini, L.

    2015-03-01

    Gravity field and Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) was an ESA Earth Explorer mission dedicated to the measure of the Earth Gravity field. The Spacecraft has been launched in 2009 and the re-entry in atmosphere happened at the end of 2013 [1]. The mean orbit altitude was set to 260 km to maximize the ultra-sensitive accelerometers on board. GOCE was equipped with two main payloads: the Electrostatic Gravity Gradiometer (EGG), a set of six 3-axis accelerometers able to measure the gravity field with unrivalled precision and then to produce the most accurate shape of the ‘geoid’ and two GPS receivers (nominal and redundant), used as a Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking Instrument (SSTI) to geolocate the gradiometer measurements and to measure the long wavelength components of the gravity field with an accuracy never reached before. Previous analyses have shown that the Precise Orbit Determination (POD) of the GOCE satellite, derived by processing the dual-frequency SSTI data (carrier phases and pseudoranges) are at the “state-of-art” of the GPS based POD: kinematic Orbits Average of daily 3D-RMS is 2,06 cm [2]. In most cases the overall accuracy is better than 2 cm 3D RMS. Moreover, the “almost continuous” [2] 1 Hz data availability from the SSTI receiver is unique and allows for a time series of kinematic positions with only 0.5% of missing epochs [2]. In October 2013 GOCE mission was concluded and in November the GOCE spacecraft re-entered in the atmosphere. During the re-entry phase the two SSTI receivers have been switched on simultaneously in order to maximize the data availability. In summer 2013, the SSTI firmware was tailored in order to sustain additional dynamic error (tracking loops robustness), expected during the re-entry phase. The SW was uploaded on SSTI-B (and purposely not on SSTI-A). Therefore this was an unique opportunity to compare a “standard” receiver behaviour (SSTI-A) with an improved one (SSTI-B) in the challenging reentry phase

  18. Women offenders and reentry issues.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S D

    1996-01-01

    Women parallel men in their profile of physical disease, psychosocial configuration, addictive patterns, and criminal deviance. For women offenders in particular, the prison environment reinforces a victim role that originated in childhood and adolescence. In addition, such settings discourage both emotional expression (except for aggression) and responsibility, since basic needs such as food, lodging, and clothing are provided. Incarcerated women have significant treatment issues, including the lack of social and vocational role definition, psychological dependence and psychic craving, poorly developed social skills, and conflicts in social, family, and intimate relationships. This article describes the unique psychoeducational and skills-training needs of women offenders as they adjust to community living, and outlines specific treatment interventions that have proven to effect successful patient outcomes. Case studies are used to illustrate the reentry experiences of three women offenders with distinct backgrounds. One example illustrates how a woman who had been involved in the criminal justice system for 24 years overcame her addiction and self-confidence issues. A second case study profiles an offender with three children who had experienced sexual trauma during her childhood and adult years. A third case reports on an African-American woman whose crack-cocaine addiction resulted in the birth of a drug-exposed son. The treatment model tested in all three cases emphasized the practical and often overlooked treatment issues of incarcerated women. PMID:8714337

  19. 75 FR 75619 - Waiver of Acceptable Mission Risk Restriction for Reentry and a Reentry Vehicle

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-06

    ... Vehicle and Reentry Licensing Regulations, Final Rule, 65 FR 56618 (Sep. 19, 2000). When discussing the...) (defining ``reentry'' as a purposeful act); see also 65 FR at 56624 (clarifying that, under Chapter 701.... See 49 U.S.C. at 70102(12); 65 FR at 56624. Under the above rationale, the total E c for the...

  20. A Strengths-Based Approach to Prisoner Reentry: The Fresh Start Prisoner Reentry Program.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Bronwyn A; Lanza, A Stephen; Lawlor, Mike; Dyson, William; Gordon, Derrick M

    2016-08-01

    Scholars have called for a strengths-based approach to prisoner reentry, yet there are few available program models that outline how to integrate this approach into the current reentry program landscape. The present article highlights a strengths-based prisoner reentry program that provided services to men both pre- and post-release from prison to the community in the United States. Qualitative findings from focus groups provide preliminary support for the strengths-based approach and highlight men's strengths and needs as well as challenges related to the program's implementation. The reentry program then drew from participants' reports to inform program development activities. Implications and recommendations for integrating strengths-based approaches into prisoner reentry interventions are discussed. PMID:25805715

  1. Feasibility of Structural and Functional MRI Acquisition with Unpowered Implants in Argus II Retinal Prosthesis Patients: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Samantha I.; Shi, Yonggang; Weiland, James D.; Falabella, Paulo; Olmos de Koo, Lisa C.; Zacks, David N.; Tjan, Bosco S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can measure the effects of vision loss and recovery on brain function and structure. In this case study, we sought to determine the feasibility of acquiring anatomical and functional MRI data in recipients of the Argus II epiretinal prosthesis system. Methods Following successful implantation with the Argus II device, two retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients completed MRI scans with their implant unpowered to measure primary visual cortex (V1) functional responses to a tactile task, whole-brain morphometry, V1 cortical thickness, and diffusion properties of the optic tract and optic radiation. Measurements in the subjects with the Argus II implant were compared to measurements obtained previously from RP patients and sighted individuals. Results The presence of the Argus II implant resulted in artifacts that were localized around the patient's implanted eye and did not extend into cortical regions or white matter tracts associated with the visual system. Structural data on V1 cortical thickness and the retinofugal tract obtained from the two Argus II subjects fell within the ranges of sighted and RP groups. When compared to the RP and sighted subjects, Argus II patients' tactile-evoked cross-modal functional MRI (fMRI) blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses in V1 also fell within the range of either sighted or RP groups, apparently depending on time since implantation. Conclusions This study demonstrates that successful acquisition and quantification of structural and functional MR images are feasible in the presence of the inactive implant and provides preliminary information on functional changes in the brain that may follow sight restoration treatments. Transitional Relevance Successful MRI and fMRI acquisition in Argus II recipients demonstrates feasibility of using MRI to study the effect of retinal prosthesis use on brain structure and function. PMID:26693097

  2. Effect of Counterflow Jet on a Supersonic Reentry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Cheng, Gary C.

    2006-01-01

    Recent NASA initiatives for space exploration have reinvigorated research on Apollo-like capsule vehicles. Aerothermodynamic characteristics of these capsule configurations during reentry play a crucial role in the performance and safety of the planetary entry probes and the crew exploration vehicles. At issue are the forebody thermal shield protection and afterbody aeroheating predictions. Due to the lack of flight or wind tunnel measurements at hypersonic speed, design decisions on such vehicles would rely heavily on computational results. Validation of current computational tools against experimental measurement thus becomes one of the most important tasks for general hypersonic research. This paper is focused on time-accurate numerical computations of hypersonic flows over a set of capsule configurations, which employ a counterflow jet to offset the detached bow shock. The accompanying increased shock stand-off distance and modified heat transfer characteristics associated with the counterflow jet may provide guidance for future design of hypersonic reentry capsules. The newly emerged space-time conservation element solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate, unstructured mesh Navier-Stokes computations for all cases investigated. The results show good agreement between experimental and numerical Schlieren pictures. Surface heat flux and aerodynamic force predictions of the capsule configurations are discussed in detail.

  3. 14 CFR 435.15 - Rights not conferred by reentry license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 435.15 Rights not conferred by reentry license. Issuance of a reentry license...

  4. 14 CFR 435.15 - Rights not conferred by reentry license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 435.15 Rights not conferred by reentry license. Issuance of a reentry license...

  5. 14 CFR 435.15 - Rights not conferred by reentry license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 435.15 Rights not conferred by reentry license. Issuance of a reentry license...

  6. 14 CFR 435.15 - Rights not conferred by reentry license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 435.15 Rights not conferred by reentry license. Issuance of a reentry license...

  7. German experiments developed for reentry missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auweter-Kurtz, M.; Hald, H.; Koppenwallner, G.; Speckmann, H.-D.

    1996-01-01

    For the development of reentry technology it is essential that the knowledge gained from ground test facilities and numerical methods is tested and broadened in real reentry flights. The first of such projects was the space reentry capsule EXPRESS, which was designed as a German—Japanese enterprise for both microgravity research and reentry experiments. The capsule was built by the Russian company DB Saljut as part of the Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center and modified by DASA. The capsule was launched from Kagoshima by a Japanese M-3 SII rocket in January 1995. Due to a failure of the rocket, the nominal orbital altitude could not be reached, which led to an early reentry of the capsule in Ghana after two and a half orbits. In the stagnation region of the reentry module an experiment was planned with a fibre reinforced ceramic tile of 300 mm in diameter integrated in the ablative heat shield. This experiment, called "CETEX", was designed by the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR) in Stuttgart. The aim of CETEX is to qualify lightweight fibre reinforced ceramics and related structural concepts in terms of heat shield applications for space vehicles as well as to compare the erosion behaviour shown in flight experiments and ground tests. An integral part of the CETEX experiment is the PYREX experiment of the University of Stuttgart. With PYREX a pyrometer shall be qualified, which is designed for high precision temperature measurement of heat shield materials made of fibre reinforced ceramic compounds during the reentry phase of space vehicles and probes. A third German experiment, RAFLEX, projected by Hyperschall Technologie Göttingen (HTG), was also integrated in the CETEX tile. RAFLEX is designed for the measurement of dynamic and static pressures and heat transfer at various positions on the EXPRESS capsule. Two small SiC tubes are fed through the CETEX tile for the RAFLEX and RTEX experiments. RTEX is a Japanese spectroscopy

  8. Measuring Public Support for Prisoner Reentry Options.

    PubMed

    Garland, Brett; Wodahl, Eric; Cota, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    Few topics have been discussed more extensively or feverishly within correctional academic and professional circles in the past few decades than prisoner reentry. Although program and policy evaluations have been conducted, a lack of public support for prisoner reentry initiatives could undermine the sustainability of prisoner reentry as a large-scale movement. Interestingly, no multivariate, explanatory analyses of the correlates of support for prisoner reentry policies could be found in the literature. This omission is due in part to the absence of clear psychometric measures to assess support. The current study examines the data obtained from a sample of residents in a Midwestern state to determine the dimensionality of support for prisoner reentry interventions using both exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and ordinary least squares (OLS) regression. Specifically, our expectation is that the following three-factor structure will be identified: (a) support for transitional programs aimed at building skills and knowledge to handle the obstacles of the prison-to-community transitional process, (b) support for post-release transitional housing units, and (c) opposition to denying offenders housing opportunities. Our results support a three-factor model. The implications of these findings for future research are discussed. PMID:25816814

  9. Rescue Shuttle Flight Re-Entry: Controlling Astronaut Thermal Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, David B.; Hamilton, Douglas; Ilcus, Stana; Stepaniak, Phil; Polk, J. D.; Son, Chang; Bue, Grant

    2008-01-01

    A rescue mission for the STS-125 Hubble Telescope Repair Mission requires reentry from space with 11 crew members aboard, exceeding past cabin thermal load experience and risking crew thermal stress potentially causing cognitive performance and physiological decrements. The space shuttle crew cabin air revitalization system (ARS) was designed to support a nominal crew complement of 4 to 7 crew and 10 persons in emergencies, all in a shirt-sleeve environment. Subsequent to the addition of full pressure suits with individual cooling units, the ARS cannot maintain a stable temperature in the crew cabin during reentry thermal loads. Bulk cabin thermal models, used for rescue mission planning and analysis of crew cabin air, were unable to accurately represent crew workstation values of air flow, carbon dioxide, and heat content for the middeck. Crew temperature models suggested significantly elevated core temperatures. Planning for an STS-400 potential rescue of seven stranded crew utilized computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models to demonstrate inhomogeneous cabin thermal properties and improve analysis compared to bulk models. In the absence of monitoring of crew temperature, heart rate, metabolic rate and incomplete engineering data on the performance of the integrated cooling garment/cooling unit (ICG/CU) at cabin temperatures above 75 degrees F, related systems & models were reevaluated and tests conducted with humans in the loop. Changes to the cabin ventilation, ICU placement, crew reentry suit-donning procedures, Orbiter Program wave-off policy and post-landing power down and crew extraction were adopted. A second CFD and core temperature model incorporated the proposed changes and confirmed satisfactory cabin temperature, improved air distribution, and estimated core temperatures within safe limits. CONCLUSIONS: These changes in equipment, in-flight and post-landing procedures, and policy were implemented for the STS-400 rescue shuttle & will be implemented in

  10. Estimation of decayed satellite reentry trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, R. H., Jr.

    1981-12-01

    A technique was developed for estimation of decayed Earth satellite reentry trajectories to provide impact locations for debris search requirements. The technique used a linearized differential-corrector as an extension of existing orbit estimation methods. The reentry observations consisted of angular, infrared measurements from orbital sensors. An eight dimension state vector was used with components for position, velocity, a ballistic parameter, and the scale height from an isothermal density model. Simulated data runs identified the uncertain dynamics of the true reentry process as the most significant impact on estimator performance. The uncertain dynamics pose significant problems for standard model compensation methods such as adaptive pseudo-noise compensation or more sophisticated techniques such as statistical linearization or higher order filters. The adaptive determination of an 'ad hoc' scalar fading memory parameter was used to modify the estimator-computed state covariance matrix. The bias in the state estimates were well within the variance from this modified covariance matrix.

  11. 14 CFR 435.43 - Payload reentry review requirements and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Payload Reentry Review and Determination § 435.43 Payload reentry review requirements and... shall apply to the payload reentry review conducted for a license to reenter a reentry vehicle...

  12. 14 CFR 435.43 - Payload reentry review requirements and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Payload Reentry Review and Determination § 435.43 Payload reentry review requirements and... shall apply to the payload reentry review conducted for a license to reenter a reentry vehicle...

  13. 14 CFR 435.43 - Payload reentry review requirements and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Payload Reentry Review and Determination § 435.43 Payload reentry review requirements and... shall apply to the payload reentry review conducted for a license to reenter a reentry vehicle...

  14. 14 CFR 435.43 - Payload reentry review requirements and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Payload Reentry Review and Determination § 435.43 Payload reentry review requirements and... shall apply to the payload reentry review conducted for a license to reenter a reentry vehicle...

  15. YPF uses horizontal reentry to aid thin bed production

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, M.R.; Leiro, F.A.; Sesano, G.S.; Hill, D.

    1997-01-01

    Reentry and horizontal drilling/completion techniques have proven themselves useful in exploiting thin beds. A pilot horizontal reentry contracted by Yacimiento Petroliferos Fiscales (YPF) for a marginal well in its Lomita Sur field resulted in decreased water coning and production rates four times greater than expected. Further horizontal reentries in this thin-bed field are planned.

  16. 14 CFR 435.13 - Transfer of a reentry license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Transfer of a reentry license. 435.13 Section 435.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 435.13 Transfer of a...

  17. 14 CFR 435.13 - Transfer of a reentry license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Transfer of a reentry license. 435.13 Section 435.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE...

  18. 14 CFR 431.59 - Issuance of payload reentry determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Issuance of payload reentry determination. 431.59 Section 431.59 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Payload Reentry Review and Determination...

  19. 14 CFR 435.7 - Payload reentry determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Payload reentry determination. 435.7 Section 435.7 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 435.7 Payload...

  20. 14 CFR 435.13 - Transfer of a reentry license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transfer of a reentry license. 435.13 Section 435.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE...

  1. 14 CFR 435.9 - Issuance of a reentry license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Issuance of a reentry license. 435.9 Section 435.9 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 435.9 Issuance of a...

  2. 14 CFR 435.13 - Transfer of a reentry license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Transfer of a reentry license. 435.13 Section 435.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE...

  3. 14 CFR 435.13 - Transfer of a reentry license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Transfer of a reentry license. 435.13 Section 435.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE...

  4. 14 CFR 431.55 - Payload reentry review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Payload reentry review. 431.55 Section 431.55 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Payload Reentry Review and Determination § 431.55 Payload...

  5. Robust adaptive backstepping control for reentry reusable launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Wu, Zhong; Du, Yijiang

    2016-09-01

    During the reentry process of reusable launch vehicles (RLVs), the large range of flight envelope will not only result in high nonlinearities, strong coupling and fast time-varying characteristics of the attitude dynamics, but also result in great uncertainties in the atmospheric density, aerodynamic coefficients and environmental disturbances, etc. In order to attenuate the effects of these problems on the control performance of the reentry process, a robust adaptive backstepping control (RABC) strategy is proposed for RLV in this paper. This strategy consists of two-loop controllers designed via backstepping method. Both the outer and the inner loop adopt a robust adaptive controller, which can deal with the disturbances and uncertainties by the variable-structure term with the estimation of their bounds. The outer loop can track the desired attitude by the design of virtual control-the desired angular velocity, while the inner one can track the desired angular velocity by the design of control torque. Theoretical analysis indicates that the closed-loop system under the proposed control strategy is globally asymptotically stable. Even if the boundaries of the disturbances and uncertainties are unknown, the attitude can track the desired value accurately. Simulation results of a certain RLV demonstrate the effectiveness of the control strategy.

  6. Assessment of the ATV-1 Re-Entry Observation Campaign for Future Re-Entry Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lips, T.; Lohle, S.; Marynowsky, T.; Rees, D.; Stenbeak-Nielsen, H. C.; Beks, M. L.; Hatton, J.

    2010-09-01

    This paper summarizes the midterm results of the currently ongoing ESA study “Assessment of the ATV-1 Reentry Observation Campaign for Future Re-entry Missions”. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the data obtained during a joint ESA/NASA airborne observation campaign of the destructive re-entry of ATV-1 Jules Verne which occurred on September 29, 2008. The presented results are focused on spectroscopic fragment characterization(material identification), frame-by-frame fragment tracking(manual and automatic) for various video recordings, 3D triangulation of the tracked fragments, and fragment propagation until complete demise or ground impact, including the actual size and location of the ATV-1 debris footprint. Fragment propagation analyses comprise also the derivation of aerodynamic fragment properties and potential delta velocities. These parameters are of high importance for the re-entry safety analysis for ATV-2 Johannes Kepler.

  7. Reentry Programs for Female Scientists. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lantz, Alma E.; And Others

    This is the final report of research oriented to determine the problems and successes associated with women scientists who reenter the labor force. The report deals with the assessment of the strategies used in the National Science Foundation (NSF) Career Facilitation Projects for reentry women. The evaluation focuses on the successful approaches…

  8. School Reentry Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deidrick, Kathleen K. M.; Farmer, Janet E.

    2005-01-01

    Successful school reentry following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is critical to recovery. Physical, cognitive, behavioral, academic, and social problems can affect a child's school performance after a TBI. However, early intervention has the potential to improve child academic outcomes and promote effective coping with any persistent changes in…

  9. System specification for the reusable reentry satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The RRS design shall provide a relatively inexpensive method of access to micro and fractional gravity space environments for an extended period of time, with eventual intact recovery on the surface of the Earth. This specification establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) system.

  10. Prisoner Reentry Programming: Who Recidivates and when?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severson, Margaret E.; Bruns, Kimberly; Veeh, Christopher; Lee, Jaehoon

    2011-01-01

    This article provides the results of a multi-year evaluation of one state's prison reentry program and its impact on the success of offender participants as measured by certain recidivism outcomes, defined here as yielding a positive urinalysis, returning to prison, and having a new conviction. Using propensity score matching, the recidivism…

  11. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS): Launch tradeoff study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A goal of the Phase B study is to define the launch system interfaces for the reusable reentry satellite (RRS) program. The focus of the launch tradeoff study, documented in this report, is to determine which expendable launch vehicles (ELV's) are best suited for the RRS application by understanding the impact of all viable launch systems on RRS design and operation.

  12. REENTRY OF RADON FROM MITIGATION SYSTEM OUTLETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of the measurement of reentry rates for radon released at roof level and at ground level near a house, to determine whether or not exhaust is necessary above the roof. (NOTE: Some radon mitigation systems draw air with a high radon concentration from under...

  13. Structural Considerations of Inflatable Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Robert W.; Brooks, George W.; McComb, Harvey G., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    The state of the design art for inflated structures applicable to reentry vehicles is discussed. Included are material properties, calculations of buckling and collapse loads, and calculations of deflections and vibration frequencies. A new theory for the analysis of inflated plates is presented and compared with experiment.

  14. An activation-repolarization time metric to predict localized regions of high susceptibility to re-entry

    PubMed Central

    Child, Nicholas; Bishop, Martin J.; Hanson, Ben; Coronel, Ruben; Opthof, Tobias; Bourkens, Bastiaan; Walton, Richard; Efimov, Igor; Bostock, Julian; Hill, Yolanda; Rinaldi, Christopher A; Razavi, Reza; Gill, Jaswinder; Taggart, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Initiation of re-entrant ventricular tachycardia (VT) involves complex interactions between activation and repolarization wavefronts. Recent experimental work has identified the time interval between S2 repolarization proximal to a line of functional block and the activation at the adjacent distal side, as a critical determinant of re-entry. Objective We hypothesized: (1) an algorithm could be developed which would generate a spatial map of this interval (designated the “re-entry vulnerability index”-RVI); (2) that this would accurately identify a pathway of re-entry as well as rotor formation in animal experiments and in a computational model; and, (3) that it would be possible to generate an RVI map in humans during routine clinical procedures and co-register with anatomical and electrophysiological features. Methods and Results An algorithm was developed which sampled all points on a multielectrode grid and calculated RVI between all pairs of electrodes within a given radius. The algorithm successfully identified the spatial region with increased susceptibility to re-entry in an established Langendorff pig heart model and the site of re-entry and rotor formation in an optically mapped sheep heart model and corresponding computational simulations. The feasibility of RVI mapping was evaluated during a clinical procedure by co-registering with the anatomy and physiology in a patient undergoing a VT ablation. Conclusions We developed an algorithm to calculate a re-entry vulnerability index from intervals between local repolarization and activation times at all adjacent points over a multielectrode grid. The algorithm accurately identified the region of re-entry in two animal models of functional re-entry. The possibility of clinical application was demonstrated in a patient with VT. PMID:25863160

  15. Shadowgraph Images of Re-entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    These four shadowgraph images represent early re-entry vehicle concepts. A shadowgraph is a process that makes visible the disturbances that occur in a fluid flow at high velocity, in which light passing through a flowing fluid is refracted by the density gradients in the fluid resulting in bright and dark areas on a screen placed behind the fluid.H. Julian Allen pioneered and developed the Blunt Body Theory which made possible the heat shield designs that were embodied in the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo space capsules, enabling astronauts to survive the firey re-entry into Earth's atmosphere. A blunt body produces a shockwave in front of the vehicle--visible in the photo--that actually shields the vehicle from excessive heating. As a result, blunt body vehicles can stay cooler than pointy, low drag vehicles.

  16. Landing Energy Dissipation for Manned Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    Landing Energy Dissipation for Manned Reentry Vehicles. The film shows experimental investigations to determine the landing-energy-dissipation characteristics for several types of landing gear for manned reentry vehicles. The landing vehicles are considered in two categories: those having essentially vertical-descent paths, the parachute-supported vehicles, and those having essentially horizontal paths, the lifting vehicles. The energy-dissipation devices include crushable materials such as foamed plastics and honeycomb for internal application in couch-support systems, yielding metal elements as part of the structure of capsules or as alternates for oleos in landing-gear struts, inflatable bags, braking rockets, and shaped surfaces for water impact. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030945. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  17. Analysis of reentry survivability of UARS spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochelle, W. C.; Marichalar, J. J.; Johnson, N. L.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis of reentry survivability of the NASA Goddard space flight center (GSFC) upper atmosphere research satellite (UARS) was performed by Lockheed Martin space operations (LMSO), Houston, TX. The objective of this study was to use the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson space center (JSC)/LMSO object reentry survival analysis tool (ORSAT) to investigate reentry, breakup, demise, and impact of approximately 160 specific components of the UARS. This paper contains descriptions of the UARS spacecraft as modeled by ORSAT, method of approach (including assumptions), and results obtained. The analysis showed that about 150 component types, including the parent body, will demise, and 12 types (26 counting multiple components) will survive. The components that survive produce a debris casualty area of 22 m 2, a surviving mass of 532 kg, a casualty risk of 1:2800, and a debris footprint length of nearly 800 km. The 22 m 2 debris casualty area reflects the results of a parametric assessment; otherwise the casualty area would have been larger.

  18. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS): Configuration trade study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The overall Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) Phase B Study objective is to design a relatively inexpensive satellite to access space for extended periods of time, with eventual recovery of experiments on Earth. The expected principal use for such a system is research on the effects of variable gravity (0-1.5 g) and radiation on small animals, plants, lower life forms, tissue samples, and materials processes. The RRS will be capable of: (1) being launched by a variety of expendable launch vehicles; (2) operating in low earth orbit as a free flying unmanned laboratory; and (3) executing independent atmospheric reentry and soft landing. The RRS will be designed to be refurbished and reused up to three times a year for a period of 10 years. The information provided in this report describes the process involved in the evolution of the RRS overall configuration. This process considered reentry aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, internal equipment layout, and vehicle mass properties. This report delineates the baseline design decisions that were used to initiate the RRS design effort. As a result, there will be deviations between this report and the RRS Final Report. In those instances, the RRS Final Report shall be considered to be the definitive reference.

  19. The IADC Re-Entry Test Campaigns of EAS at PMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Jianning; Zhao, Changyin; Zhang, Xiaoxiang; Zhang, Wei

    2009-03-01

    In November 2008, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences took part in the IADC reentry test campaign 2008/1 representing China, which is called EAS.This paper presents a new reentry prediction method which estimates the reentry time. By this method 20 reentry predictions were carried out and the results were uploaded to the IADC Common and Reentry Database.

  20. EV13 Genesis Reentry Observations and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley R.; Suggs, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    The Genesis spacecraft reentry represented a unique opportunity to observe a "calibrated meteor" from northern Nevada. Knowing its speed, mass, composition, and precise trajectory made it a good subject to test some of the algorithms used to determine meteoroid mass from observed brightness. It was also a good test of an inexpensive set of cameras which could be deployed to observe future shuttle reentries. The utility of consumer grade video cameras was evident during the STS-107 accident investigation and the Genesis reentry gave us the opportunity to specify and test commercially available cameras which could be used during future reentries. This report describes the video observations and their analysis, compares the results with a simple photometric model, describes the forward scatter radar experiment, and lists lessons learned from the expedition and implications for the Stardust reentry in January 2006 as well as future shuttle reentries.

  1. Relational vulnerabilities of incarcerated and reentry mothers: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Few-Demo, April L; Arditti, Joyce A

    2014-11-01

    A qualitative study involving a follow-up interview with 10 incarcerated and reentry mothers in rural southwest and central Virginia was conducted to explore the influence that women's close relationships have on their reentry experiences with their families. The Vulnerability Conceptual Model (VCM) was used to sensitize an examination of how incarcerated and reentry mothers negotiate relational vulnerabilities in the context of varying situational vulnerability. Grounded theory analysis revealed three themes that characterized relational vulnerabilities. Given our focus on close relationships and the potential of the VCM to identify opportunities for resilience and vulnerability, we highlighted the influence of ambiguous and ambivalent relationships and unresolved loss and grief due to relationship dissolution or the death of a parent, sibling, child, or intimate partner in the reentry process. The data revealed two types of reentry mothers with divergent trajectories for social reintegration. Implications of these types for therapeutic treatment approaches for reentry women are discussed. PMID:23847275

  2. Analysis of Reentry Survivability for UARS Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochelle, W.; Marichalar, J.; Johnson, N.

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), which was launched September 12, 1991 by the Space Shuttle STS-48, will be decommissioned in 2002-2003. It is currently planned to allow the spacecraft to reenter in an orbital decay mode. An analysis of reentry survivability of the UARS in this orbital decay mode was performed by Lockheed Martin Space Operations (LMSO), Houston, TX. The objective of this study was to use the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC)/LMSO Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool (ORSAT) to investigate reentry, breakup, demise, and impact of over 160 UARS components. The ORSAT code contains six general models of operation, including trajectory, atmosphere, aerodynamics, aeroheating, thermal, and debris casualty/ground impact risk. Objects are computed to demise in the code at the altitude at which the object's absorbed heat (defined as net heat rate integrated over time multiplied by surface area) becomes greater than the material heat of ablation. An updated version of ORSAT (Version 5.5) was used in this UARS analysis. This version enables objects to be evaluated in which parameters such as initial surface temperature, oxidation efficiency, mode of tumbling, breakup altitude, or other factors can be varied in a single object reentry simulation. The survivability factor (ratio of total absorbed heat on the object to its material heat of ablation) can be plotted as a function of some of these parameters. This information was used to make good engineering decisions of whether a borderline object (at the knee of the demise altitude/downrange plot) would demise or survive. This paper contains descriptions of the UARS spacecraft as modeled by ORSAT, method of approach (including assumptions), and results obtained. Plots showing such component reentry profiles as altitude, velocity, ballistic coefficient, heating rate, absorbed heat, surface temperature, and demise altitude are included. The analysis showed that

  3. Low-Speed Wind-Tunnel Test of an Unpowered High-Speed Stoppable Rotor Concept in Fixed-Wing Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, Michael B.; Sung, Daniel Y.; Stroub, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the M85, a High Speed Rotor Concept, was conducted at the NASA Langley 14 x 22 foot Subsonic Tunnel, assisted by NASA-Ames. An unpowered 1/5 scale model of the XH-59A helicopter fuselage with a large circular hub fairing, two rotor blades, and a shaft fairing was used as a baseline configuration. The M85 is a rotor wing hybrid aircraft design, and the model was tested with the rotor blade in the fixed wing mode. Assessments were made of the aerodynamic characteristics of various model rotor configurations. Variation in configurations were produced by changing the rotor blade sweep angle and the blade chord length. The most favorable M85 configuration tested included wide chord blades at 0 deg sweep, and it attained a system lift to drag ratio of 8.4.

  4. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS): Propulsion system trade study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) Propulsion System Trade Study described in this summary report was to investigate various propulsion options available for incorporation on the RRS and to select the option best suited for RRS application. The design requirements for the RRS propulsion system were driven by the total impulse requirements necessary to operate within the performance envelope specified in the RRS System Requirements Documents. These requirements were incorporated within the Design Reference Missions (DRM's) identified for use in this and other subsystem trade studies. This study investigated the following propulsion systems: solid rocket, monopropellant, bipropellant (monomethyl hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide or MMH/NTO), dual-mode bipropellant (hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide or N2H4/NTO), liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen (LO2/LH2), and an advanced design propulsion system using SDI-developed components. A liquid monopropellant blowdown propulsion system was found to be best suited for meeting the RRS requirements and is recommended as the baseline system. This system was chosen because it is the simplest of all investigated, has the fewest components, and is the most cost effective. The monopropellant system meets all RRS performance requirements and has the capability to provide a very accurate deorbit burn which minimizes reentry dispersions. In addition, no new hardware qualification is required for a monopropellant system. Although the bipropellant systems offered some weight savings capability for missions requiring large deorbit velocities, the advantage of a lower mass system only applies if the total vehicle design can be reduced to allow a cheaper launch vehicle to be used. At the time of this trade study, the overall RRS weight budget and launch vehicle selection were not being driven by the propulsion system selection. Thus, the added cost and complexity of more advanced systems did not warrant application.

  5. Effective reentry methods reduce costs and optimize production

    SciTech Connect

    Szutiak, G.; Walker, D.

    1996-10-21

    Favorable oil prices and tax incentives have spawned an increase in reentry drilling, adding new life to fields once abandoned in Canada. (The provincial government in Alberta has stimulated reentry drilling in western Canada by its tax royalty relief and incentives.) A review of four reentry projects covering 19 horizontal wells in western Canada illustrates a number of planning considerations that can save an operator money while ensuring optimization of the production. The paper recommends several standard steps in planning and executing slim hole reentries drawn from these projects.

  6. Orbital decay analysis, reentry predictions and risk assessment for the GOCE satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardini, Carmen; Anselmo, Luciano

    the critical use of this information for civil protection evaluations. However, after an initial period of test and analysis, reasonably conservative criteria were elaborated and applied, with good and consistent results through the end of the reentry prediction campaign. Being the attention of the Italian civil protection authorities focused on the national territory, during the last three days of satellite residual lifetime, reentries where simulated over Italy to obtain quite accurate ground tracks, debris swaths and air space crossing time windows associated with the critical passes over the national territory still included in the current uncertainty windows. Only 14 hours before reentry it was possible to exclude any residual risk of debris fall on the Italian territory and the GOCE fragments eventually plunged into the Southern Atlantic Ocean, between the Falkland Islands and the coast of Argentina, on 11 November 2013, around 00:24 - 00:40 UTC.

  7. Reentry Works: The Implementation and Effectiveness of a Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouffard, Jeffrey A.; Bergeron, Lindsey E.

    2006-01-01

    Spurred by large increases in prison populations and other recent sentencing and correctional trends, the federal government has supported the development and implementation of Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiatives (SVORI) nationwide. While existing research demonstrates the effectiveness of the separate components of these programs…

  8. 14 CFR 431.61 - Incorporation of payload reentry determination in license application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Payload Reentry Review and Determination § 431.61 Incorporation of...

  9. 14 CFR 431.61 - Incorporation of payload reentry determination in license application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Payload Reentry Review and Determination § 431.61 Incorporation of...

  10. 14 CFR 431.57 - Information requirements for payload reentry review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Payload Reentry Review and Determination § 431.57 Information requirements for...

  11. 14 CFR 431.61 - Incorporation of payload reentry determination in license application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Payload Reentry Review and Determination § 431.61 Incorporation of...

  12. 14 CFR 431.61 - Incorporation of payload reentry determination in license application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Payload Reentry Review and Determination § 431.61 Incorporation of...

  13. 14 CFR 431.57 - Information requirements for payload reentry review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Payload Reentry Review and Determination § 431.57 Information requirements for...

  14. 14 CFR 431.57 - Information requirements for payload reentry review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Payload Reentry Review and Determination § 431.57 Information requirements for...

  15. 14 CFR 431.57 - Information requirements for payload reentry review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Payload Reentry Review and Determination § 431.57 Information requirements for...

  16. Kiernan reentry measurements system on Kwajalein atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, K.R.; Austin, M.E.; Frediani, D.J.; Knittel, G.H.; Mrstik, A.V.

    1989-01-01

    The Kiernan Reentry Measurements System (KREMS), located on Kwajalein Atoll in the Pacific, is the United States' most sophisticated and important research and development radar site. Consisting of four one-of-a-kind instrumentation radars, KREMS has played a major role for the past 25 years in the collection of data associated with ICBM testing. Furthermore, it has served as an important space-surveillance facility that provides an early U.S. view of many Soviet and Chinese satellite launches. Finally, the system is slated to play a key role in Strategic Defense Initiative experiments.

  17. Landing Energy Dissipation for Manned Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Loyd. L.

    1960-01-01

    The film shows experimental investigations to determine the landing-energy-dissipation characteristics for several types of landing gear for manned reentry vehicles. The landing vehicles are considered in two categories: those having essentially vertical-descent paths, the parachute-supported vehicles, and those having essentially horizontal paths, the lifting vehicles. The energy-dissipation devices include crushable materials such as foamed plastics and honeycomb for internal application in couch-support systems, yielding metal elements as part of the structure of capsules or as alternates for oleos in landing-gear struts, inflatable bags, braking rockets, and shaped surfaces for water impact.

  18. 40 CFR 161.390 - Reentry protection data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reentry protection data requirements. 161.390 Section 161.390 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PESTICIDES Data Requirement Tables § 161.390 Reentry protection data requirements....

  19. Re-Entry: Managing Cross-Cultural Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Nancy J.

    1981-01-01

    Studied the re-entry process of corporate and governmental employees (N=200) returning to Canada after working overseas. Research found re-entry into the original culture was a more difficult transition than moving to the foreign culture. Home-country managers tended to exhibit xenophobia in assessing the potential and actual effectiveness of…

  20. Gender Differences and Offender Reentry: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spjeldnes, Solveig; Goodkind, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Historically, men have been incarcerated at rates far greater than women. As a result, reentry and reintegration programs have focused mainly on men's needs. The Second Chance Act of 2007 authorized funding for offender reentry programs and research on special populations--including about women and parents acknowledging the importance of…

  1. 14 CFR 431.59 - Issuance of payload reentry determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Issuance of payload reentry determination. 431.59 Section 431.59 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE...

  2. 14 CFR 431.7 - Payload and payload reentry determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Payload and payload reentry determinations. 431.7 Section 431.7 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 431.7 Payload and payload...

  3. 14 CFR 431.59 - Issuance of payload reentry determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Issuance of payload reentry determination. 431.59 Section 431.59 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE...

  4. 14 CFR 431.55 - Payload reentry review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Payload reentry review. 431.55 Section 431.55 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Payload...

  5. 14 CFR 431.55 - Payload reentry review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Payload reentry review. 431.55 Section 431.55 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Payload...

  6. 14 CFR 431.59 - Issuance of payload reentry determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Issuance of payload reentry determination. 431.59 Section 431.59 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE...

  7. 14 CFR 431.55 - Payload reentry review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Payload reentry review. 431.55 Section 431.55 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Payload...

  8. 14 CFR 431.55 - Payload reentry review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payload reentry review. 431.55 Section 431.55 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Payload...

  9. 14 CFR 431.59 - Issuance of payload reentry determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Issuance of payload reentry determination. 431.59 Section 431.59 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE...

  10. Reentry and Renegotiating Motherhood: Maternal Identity and Success on Parole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Marilyn; Bloom, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Parenting women emerging from prison on parole face numerous challenges to their successful reentry into the community. Along with finding housing, employment, and satisfying the conditions of their supervision, parenting women must also reassume their roles as mothers. This article adds to the literature on reentry by placing women's maternal…

  11. Female Arab-Muslim nursing students' reentry transitions.

    PubMed

    McDermott-Levy, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    As nursing students are increasingly studying abroad and returning to their home countries to practice, it is important to identify international nursing students' reentry transition to understand their reentry needs. Phenomenological inquiry was used to describe the reentry experience of seven Omani nurses after studying in the United States. The nurses' reentry experience was influenced by the personal and professional transformation from studying abroad and included themes of adaptation to cultural differences and service to themselves, their profession, and their nation. These nurses returned home to resume previous roles; they were changed and this required them to redefine and adapt to their roles within their families and workplace. Nurses returning from international study could benefit from a formal reentry program to assist their transition to family, community, and professional life and to enhance the nurses' contribution from their international education. PMID:23832951

  12. Statistical Issues for Calculating Reentry Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, John B.; Matney, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A number of statistical tools have been developed over the years for assessing the risk of reentering object to human populations. These tools make use of the characteristics (e.g., mass, shape, size) of debris that are predicted by aerothermal models to survive reentry. This information, combined with information on the expected ground path of the reentry, is used to compute the probability that one or more of the surviving debris might hit a person on the ground and cause one or more casualties. The statistical portion of this analysis relies on a number of assumptions about how the debris footprint and the human population are distributed in latitude and longitude, and how to use that information to arrive at realistic risk numbers. This inevitably involves assumptions that simplify the problem and make it tractable, but it is often difficult to test the accuracy and applicability of these assumptions. This paper builds on previous IAASS work to re-examine one of these theoretical assumptions.. This study employs empirical and theoretical information to test the assumption of a fully random decay along the argument of latitude of the final orbit, and makes recommendations how to improve the accuracy of this calculation in the future.

  13. Statistical Issues for Calculating Reentry Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark; Bacon, John

    2016-01-01

    A number of statistical tools have been developed over the years for assessing the risk of reentering object to human populations. These tools make use of the characteristics (e.g., mass, shape, size) of debris that are predicted by aerothermal models to survive reentry. This information, combined with information on the expected ground path of the reentry, is used to compute the probability that one or more of the surviving debris might hit a person on the ground and cause one or more casualties. The statistical portion of this analysis relies on a number of assumptions about how the debris footprint and the human population are distributed in latitude and longitude, and how to use that information to arrive at realistic risk numbers. This inevitably involves assumptions that simplify the problem and make it tractable, but it is often difficult to test the accuracy and applicability of these assumptions. This paper builds on previous IAASS work to re-examine many of these theoretical assumptions, including the mathematical basis for the hazard calculations, and outlining the conditions under which the simplifying assumptions hold. This study also employs empirical and theoretical information to test these assumptions, and makes recommendations how to improve the accuracy of these calculations in the future.

  14. Orbit re-entry experiment vehicle development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masataka; Yamawaki, Kouji; Akimoto, Toshio; Murakami, Atsushi; Inaba, Motoyuki; Kaneko, Yutaka; Shimoda, Takayuki; Ishii, Yasuo; Izumi, Tatsushi; Kawano, Isao

    1992-08-01

    An overview of the Orbital Re-entry Experiment (OREX) vehicle development, including detail design, analyses on the overall system, guidance and control, propulsion, and data acquisition systems is presented. The outline of the experiment vehicle is shown. OREX flight is analyzed and the splash down point variance ellipse is shown. Vehicle body aerodynamic characteristics were analyzed and validated by supersonic wind tunnel and dynamically balanced wind tunnel tests. Analyses on onboard equipment environmental resistance, controllability from on orbit to re-entry phases and navigation and guidance of the space plane were conducted. It was confirmed that there was no problem on the guidance and control system. Review on the propellant volume and analyses on the propulsion system performance, propulsion system heat exchanger performance, and thruster and piping system temperature were conducted and possibility of hard starting of the 150 N hydrazine thruster was noticed. RF (Radio Frequency) link analyses were conducted around Tanegashima, Ogasawara, and the splash down area and prospect of continuously acquiring good link margin for 300 seconds was obtained. Semi unitized structure of truncated cone shape with main body made of aluminum alloy, which has application record for rockets, laid with skin, stringers, and frames was employed for the structure. Data acquisition systems for tracking and operation, including those at Tanegashima, Ogasawara, Christmas, down range ship, and airplane tracking stations were studied.

  15. Torque equilibrium attitude control for Skylab reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, J. R.; Kennel, H. F.

    1980-01-01

    The method of torque equilibrium attitude control used to control the reentry of Skylab to an altitude below 150 km without the use of thruster fuel once the attitude was established is discussed. The Skylab attitude and pointing control system, which included rate gyros, sun sensors, star tracker, the Apollo telescope mount digital computer, control moment gyros and cold-gas attitude thrusters, is presented. The 12 torque equilibrium attitudes found at which aerodynamic, gravity gradient and gyroscopic torques would balance are indicated, and the three of those at which the solar power supply would be adequate for attitude control are illustrated. The equilibrium seeking method employed is then examined, and the operation and performance of the torque equilibrium attitude control system during the three weeks prior to Skylab reentry are discussed. It is concluded that the torque equilibrium attitude control method developed for Skylab was successful in performing its assigned mission, and will be valuable for the design of future, low-altitude spacecraft or tethered vehicles.

  16. Advanced validation of CFD-FDTD combined method using highly applicable solver for reentry blackout prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    An analysis model of plasma flow and electromagnetic waves around a reentry vehicle for radio frequency blackout prediction during aerodynamic heating was developed in this study. The model was validated based on experimental results from the radio attenuation measurement program. The plasma flow properties, such as electron number density, in the shock layer and wake region were obtained using a newly developed unstructured grid solver that incorporated real gas effect models and could treat thermochemically non-equilibrium flow. To predict the electromagnetic waves in plasma, a frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method was used. Moreover, the complicated behaviour of electromagnetic waves in the plasma layer during atmospheric reentry was clarified at several altitudes. The prediction performance of the combined model was evaluated with profiles and peak values of the electron number density in the plasma layer. In addition, to validate the models, the signal losses measured during communication with the reentry vehicle were directly compared with the predicted results. Based on the study, it was suggested that the present analysis model accurately predicts the radio frequency blackout and plasma attenuation of electromagnetic waves in plasma in communication.

  17. Statistical Issues for Uncontrolled Reentry Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark

    2008-01-01

    A number of statistical tools have been developed over the years for assessing the risk of reentering objects to human populations. These tools make use of the characteristics (e.g., mass, shape, size) of debris that are predicted by aerothermal models to survive reentry. The statistical tools use this information to compute the probability that one or more of the surviving debris might hit a person on the ground and cause one or more casualties. The statistical portion of the analysis relies on a number of assumptions about how the debris footprint and the human population are distributed in latitude and longitude, and how to use that information to arrive at realistic risk numbers. This inevitably involves assumptions that simplify the problem and make it tractable, but it is often difficult to test the accuracy and applicability of these assumptions. This paper looks at a number of these theoretical assumptions, examining the mathematical basis for the hazard calculations, and outlining the conditions under which the simplifying assumptions hold. In addition, this paper will also outline some new tools for assessing ground hazard risk in useful ways. Also, this study is able to make use of a database of known uncontrolled reentry locations measured by the United States Department of Defense. By using data from objects that were in orbit more than 30 days before reentry, sufficient time is allowed for the orbital parameters to be randomized in the way the models are designed to compute. The predicted ground footprint distributions of these objects are based on the theory that their orbits behave basically like simple Kepler orbits. However, there are a number of factors - including the effects of gravitational harmonics, the effects of the Earth's equatorial bulge on the atmosphere, and the rotation of the Earth and atmosphere - that could cause them to diverge from simple Kepler orbit behavior and change the ground footprints. The measured latitude and longitude

  18. Re-Entry Mission Analysis of the Advanced Re-entry Vehicle (ARV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, D.; Haya Ramos, R.; Strauch, H.; Bottacini, M.

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents the results of the DEIMOS Space S.L.U. Re-entry Mission Analysis activities obtained in the frame of the Phase A up to PRR milestone of the Advanced Re-entry Vehicle (ARV) ESA project leaded by ASTRIUM. Results presented show how the trajectory and the vehicle design are strictly related and how a feasible and robust solution can be efficiently obtained by considering since the beginning several constraints limiting the design. The process implemented combines the design of key vehicle and trajectory parameters. Once the vehicle design parameters and the conditions at the EIP are fixed, the Mission Analysis is completed by the definition of the optimal trajectory from the deorbiting to the EIP that allow the correct targeting of the EIP conditions but also a safe separation of the different modules and the correct targeting of the desired landing site.

  19. Re-Entry Mission Analysis Of The Advanced Re-Entry Vehicle (ARV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, Davide; Haya Ramos, Rodrigo; Strauch, Hans; Bottacini, Massimiliano

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents the results of the DEIMOS Space S.L.U. Re-entry Mission Analysis activities obtained in the frame of the Phase A up to PRR milestone of the Advanced Re-entry Vehicle (ARV) ESA project leaded by ASTRIUM. Results presented show how the trajectory and the vehicle design are strictly related and how a feasible and robust solution can be efficiently obtained by considering since the beginning several constraints limiting the design. The process implemented combines the design of key vehicle and trajectory parameters. Once the vehicle design parameters and the conditions at the EIP are fixed, the Mission Analysis is completed by the definition of the optimal trajectory from the de- orbiting to the EIP that allow the correct targeting of the EIP conditions but also a safe separation of the different modules and the correct targeting of the desired landing site.

  20. Rising above Reality: The Voices of Reentry Black Mothers and Their Daughters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sealey-Ruiz, Yolanda

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the following three themes present in the educational narratives of a group of Black reentry (returning to college) mothers: (a) reentry as a response to a critical moment, (b) reentry as a strategy for coping with challenges, and (c) reentry as a practical step toward getting their daughters into college. Cursory reviews of…

  1. Reentry of radon from mitigation system outlets

    SciTech Connect

    Yuill, G.K.; Coughlin, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    Some radon mitigation systems draw air with a high radon concentration from under the basement floors of houses and exhaust it outdoors. The objective of this project was to measure the reentry rates of radon released at roof level and at ground level near a house to determine whether exhaust above the roof is necessary. This was done by using a portable mockup of a radon mitigation system exhaust, with sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) as a tracer gas. The roof-level exhaust produced maximum indoor sulfur hexafluoride concentrations that were significantly lower than those from the ground-level exhaust. This suggests that the better radon discharge location is on the roof of a house.

  2. Investigating a Novel Activation-Repolarisation Time Metric to Predict Localised Vulnerability to Reentry Using Computational Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Yolanda R.; Child, Nick; Hanson, Ben; Wallman, Mikael; Coronel, Ruben; Plank, Gernot; Rinaldi, Christopher A.; Gill, Jaswinder; Smith, Nicolas P.; Taggart, Peter; Bishop, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Exit sites associated with scar-related reentrant arrhythmias represent important targets for catheter ablation therapy. However, their accurate location in a safe and robust manner remains a significant clinical challenge. We recently proposed a novel quantitative metric (termed the Reentry Vulnerability Index, RVI) to determine the difference between activation and repolarisation intervals measured from pairs of spatial locations during premature stimulation to accurately locate the critical site of reentry formation. In the clinic, the method showed potential to identify regions of low RVI corresponding to areas vulnerable to reentry, subsequently identified as ventricular tachycardia (VT) circuit exit sites. Here, we perform an in silico investigation of the RVI metric in order to aid the acquisition and interpretation of RVI maps and optimise its future usage within the clinic. Within idealised 2D sheet models we show that the RVI produces lower values under correspondingly more arrhythmogenic conditions, with even low resolution (8 mm electrode separation) recordings still able to locate vulnerable regions. When applied to models of infarct scars, the surface RVI maps successfully identified exit sites of the reentrant circuit, even in scenarios where the scar was wholly intramural. Within highly complex infarct scar anatomies with multiple reentrant pathways, the identified exit sites were dependent upon the specific pacing location used to compute the endocardial RVI maps. However, simulated ablation of these sites successfully prevented the reentry re-initiation. We conclude that endocardial surface RVI maps are able to successfully locate regions vulnerable to reentry corresponding to critical exit sites during sustained scar-related VT. The method is robust against highly complex and intramural scar anatomies and low resolution clinical data acquisition. Optimal location of all relevant sites requires RVI maps to be computed from multiple pacing

  3. Investigating a Novel Activation-Repolarisation Time Metric to Predict Localised Vulnerability to Reentry Using Computational Modelling.

    PubMed

    Hill, Yolanda R; Child, Nick; Hanson, Ben; Wallman, Mikael; Coronel, Ruben; Plank, Gernot; Rinaldi, Christopher A; Gill, Jaswinder; Smith, Nicolas P; Taggart, Peter; Bishop, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Exit sites associated with scar-related reentrant arrhythmias represent important targets for catheter ablation therapy. However, their accurate location in a safe and robust manner remains a significant clinical challenge. We recently proposed a novel quantitative metric (termed the Reentry Vulnerability Index, RVI) to determine the difference between activation and repolarisation intervals measured from pairs of spatial locations during premature stimulation to accurately locate the critical site of reentry formation. In the clinic, the method showed potential to identify regions of low RVI corresponding to areas vulnerable to reentry, subsequently identified as ventricular tachycardia (VT) circuit exit sites. Here, we perform an in silico investigation of the RVI metric in order to aid the acquisition and interpretation of RVI maps and optimise its future usage within the clinic. Within idealised 2D sheet models we show that the RVI produces lower values under correspondingly more arrhythmogenic conditions, with even low resolution (8 mm electrode separation) recordings still able to locate vulnerable regions. When applied to models of infarct scars, the surface RVI maps successfully identified exit sites of the reentrant circuit, even in scenarios where the scar was wholly intramural. Within highly complex infarct scar anatomies with multiple reentrant pathways, the identified exit sites were dependent upon the specific pacing location used to compute the endocardial RVI maps. However, simulated ablation of these sites successfully prevented the reentry re-initiation. We conclude that endocardial surface RVI maps are able to successfully locate regions vulnerable to reentry corresponding to critical exit sites during sustained scar-related VT. The method is robust against highly complex and intramural scar anatomies and low resolution clinical data acquisition. Optimal location of all relevant sites requires RVI maps to be computed from multiple pacing

  4. Joint computational/experimental aerodynamics research on a reentry vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Aeschliman, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    Although computational aerodynamics simulation has been taking more responsibility during recent years, wind tunnel experimentation has continued to play the major role in flight vehicle analysis and design.This role, however, is changing because of the great strides in the capability and confidence in numerical simulations. For a small, well defined, class of supersonic and hypersonic flow problems, high quality numerical solutions are now believed to represent the physics of the problem more accurately than a wind tunnel experimental can simulate the free flight conditions. An example of this is the supersonic or hypersonic, laminar, perfect gas flow over a spherically blunted cone at low angle of attack. In this paper, aerodynamic force and moment measurements and flow visualization results are presented for a reentry vehicle configuration at Mach 8. All of the results were obtained in the Sandia Mach 8 long duration, blow-down, hypersonic wind tunnel. The basic vehicle configuration is a spherically blunted cone with a slice parallel with the axis of the vehicle. Onto the slice portion of the vehicle can be attached flaps with three different deflection angles, 10, 20 and 30 deg. Flow visualization results include surface oil flow, spark Schlieren, and liquid crystal photographs. 1 ref., 7 figs.

  5. Magnetic field applied to thermochemical non-equilibrium reentry flows in 2D - five species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sávio de Góes Maciel, Edisson

    2015-07-01

    In this work, a study involving magnetic field actuation over reentry flows in thermochemical non-equilibrium is performed. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are studied. The proposed numerical algorithm is centred and second-order accurate. The hypersonic flow around a blunt body is simulated. Three time integration methods are tested. The reactive simulations involve Earth atmosphere of five species. The work of Gaitonde is the reference to couple the fluid dynamics and Maxwell equations of electromagnetism. The results have indicated that the Maciel scheme, using the Mavriplis dissipation model, yields the best prediction of the stagnation pressure.

  6. Planned Flight of the Terrestrial HIAD Orbital Reentry (THOR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillman, R. A.; Hughes, S. J.; DiNonno, J. M.; Bodkin, R. J.; White, J. P.; Del Corso, J. A.; Cheatwood, F. M.

    2014-06-01

    This paper discusses the mission concept for the Terrestrial HIAD Orbital Reentry (THOR), planned for flight in 2016 as a secondary payload on an orbital sciences commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station.

  7. Critical role of inhomogeneities in pacing termination of cardiac reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sitabhra; Stein, Kenneth M.; Christini, David J.

    2002-09-01

    Reentry around nonconducting ventricular scar tissue, a cause of lethal arrhythmias, is typically treated by rapid electrical stimulation from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. However, the dynamical mechanisms of termination (success and failure) are poorly understood. To elucidate such mechanisms, we study the dynamics of pacing in one- and two-dimensional models of anatomical reentry. In a crucial realistic difference from previous studies of such systems, we have placed the pacing site away from the reentry circuit. Our model-independent results suggest that with such off-circuit pacing, the existence of inhomogeneity in the reentry circuit is essential for successful termination of tachycardia under certain conditions. Considering the critical role of such inhomogeneities may lead to more effective pacing algorithms.

  8. Reentry trajectory optimization based on a multistage pseudospectral method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiang; Zhou, Rui; Jin, Xuelian

    2014-01-01

    Of the many direct numerical methods, the pseudospectral method serves as an effective tool to solve the reentry trajectory optimization for hypersonic vehicles. However, the traditional pseudospectral method is time-consuming due to large number of discretization points. For the purpose of autonomous and adaptive reentry guidance, the research herein presents a multistage trajectory control strategy based on the pseudospectral method, capable of dealing with the unexpected situations in reentry flight. The strategy typically includes two subproblems: the trajectory estimation and trajectory refining. In each processing stage, the proposed method generates a specified range of trajectory with the transition of the flight state. The full glide trajectory consists of several optimal trajectory sequences. The newly focused geographic constraints in actual flight are discussed thereafter. Numerical examples of free-space flight, target transition flight, and threat avoidance flight are used to show the feasible application of multistage pseudospectral method in reentry trajectory optimization. PMID:24574929

  9. Reentry Trajectory Optimization Based on a Multistage Pseudospectral Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rui; Jin, Xuelian

    2014-01-01

    Of the many direct numerical methods, the pseudospectral method serves as an effective tool to solve the reentry trajectory optimization for hypersonic vehicles. However, the traditional pseudospectral method is time-consuming due to large number of discretization points. For the purpose of autonomous and adaptive reentry guidance, the research herein presents a multistage trajectory control strategy based on the pseudospectral method, capable of dealing with the unexpected situations in reentry flight. The strategy typically includes two subproblems: the trajectory estimation and trajectory refining. In each processing stage, the proposed method generates a specified range of trajectory with the transition of the flight state. The full glide trajectory consists of several optimal trajectory sequences. The newly focused geographic constraints in actual flight are discussed thereafter. Numerical examples of free-space flight, target transition flight, and threat avoidance flight are used to show the feasible application of multistage pseudospectral method in reentry trajectory optimization. PMID:24574929

  10. ISS Update: ATV-3 ReEntry Breakup Recorder

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update Commentator Pat Ryan talks with Dr. William Ailor, Principal Investigator for the ReEntry Breakup Recorder (REBR) for The Aerospace Corporation. Ailor talks about capturing data as Europ...

  11. Inadvertent Earth Reentry Breakup Analysis for the New Horizons Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Lisa M.; Salama, Ahmed; Ivanov, Mark; McRonald, Angus

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons (NH) spacecraft was launched in January 2006 aboard an Atlas V launch vehicle, in a mission to explore Pluto, its moons, and other bodies in the Kuiper Belt. The NH spacecraft is powered by a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) which encases multiple General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. Thus, a pre-launch vehicle breakup analysis for an inadvertent atmospheric reentry in the event of a launch failure was required to assess aerospace nuclear safety and for launch contingency planning. This paper addresses potential accidental Earth reentries analyzed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) which may arise during the ascent to parking orbit, resulting in a suborbital reentry, as well as a departure from parking orbit, resulting in an orbital reentry.

  12. 14 CFR 431.7 - Payload and payload reentry determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV... launch a payload unless the proposed payload is exempt from payload review under § 415.53 of this...

  13. 14 CFR 431.7 - Payload and payload reentry determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV... launch a payload unless the proposed payload is exempt from payload review under § 415.53 of this...

  14. 14 CFR 431.7 - Payload and payload reentry determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV... launch a payload unless the proposed payload is exempt from payload review under § 415.53 of this...

  15. 14 CFR 431.7 - Payload and payload reentry determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV... launch a payload unless the proposed payload is exempt from payload review under § 415.53 of this...

  16. Flight Performance of the Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillman, Robert; DiNonno, John; Bodkin, Richard; Gsell, Valerie; Miller, Nathanael; Olds, Aaron; Bruce, Walter

    2013-01-01

    The Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment 3 (IRVE-3) launched July 23, 2012, from NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) on a Black Brant XI suborbital sounding rocket and successfully performed its mission, demonstrating the survivability of a hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerator (HIAD) in the reentry heating environment and also illustrating the effect of an offset center of gravity on the HIAD's lift-to-drag ratio. IRVE-3 was a follow-on to 2009's IRVE-II mission, which demonstrated exo-atmospheric inflation, reentry survivability - without significant heating - and the aerodynamic stability of a HIAD down to subsonic flight conditions. NASA Langley Research Center is leading the development of HIAD technology for use on future interplanetary and Earth reentry missions.

  17. Reentry trajectories and their optimization by an evolution algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bade, A.; Voegt, S.; Axmann, J. K.; Rex, D.

    The descent of a winged space vehicle from an orbit and the following re-entry into denser atmospheric layers is a rather complex physical process. To get insight into some of the fundamental phenomena, as a first step, the re-entry of simple shaped bodies has to be simulated. In order to improve the understanding of the physics, in this paper, a stepwise approach is presented: re-entry of balls, of capsules and of winged vehicles. For the re-entry of winged space vehicles, the equations of motion are not formulated in Keplerian elements but in earth-oriented coordinate systems, with the help of spherical polar coordinates in the most general form. They include thrust and aerodynamic forces (in three components). The atmosphere is regarded as fixed with the rotating oblate earth. This set of differential equations is solved by numerical integration. The influence of the angle of attack and of the bank angle upon the re-entry trajectory is discussed, also with respect to constraints (e.g., surface temperature). In all practical applications, various optimization problems arise, e.g. if for a required lateral range the heat load for the vehicle has to be minimized. The Institute of Space Technology and Reactor Technology has developed a method based on the evolution strategy, which will shortly be described here. Optimal re-entry trajectories for a preliminary configuration similar to HORUS are presented.

  18. Water Landing Characteristics of a Reentry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1958-01-01

    Water Landing Characteristics of a Reentry Capsule. Experimental and theoretical investigations have been made to determine the water-landing characteristics of a conical-shaped reentry capsule having a segment of a sphere as the bottom. For the experimental portion of the investigation, a 1/12-scale model capsule and a full-scale capsule were tested for nominal flight paths of 65 deg and 90 deg (vertical), a range of contact attitudes from -30 deg to 30 deg, and a full-scale vertical velocity of 30 feet per second at contact. Accelerations were measured by accelerometers installed at the centers of gravity of the model and full-scale capsules. For the model test the accelerations were measured along the X-axis (roll) and Z-axis (yaw) and for the full-scale test they were measured along the X-axis (roll), Y-axis (pitch), and Z-axis (yaw). Motions and displacements of the capsules that occurred after contact were determined from high-speed motion pictures. The theoretical investigation was conducted to determine the accelerations that might occur along the X-axis when the capsule contacted the water from a 90 deg flight path at a 0 deg attitude. Assuming a rigid body, computations were made from equations obtained by utilizing the principle of the conservation of momentum. The agreement among data obtained from the model test, the full-scale test, and the theory was very good. The accelerations along the X-axis, for a vertical flight path and 0 deg attitude, were in the order of 40g. For a 65 deg flight path and 0 deg attitude, the accelerations along the X-axis were in the order of 50g. Changes in contact attitude, in either the positive or negative direction from 0 deg attitude, considerably reduced the magnitude of the accelerations measured along the X-axis. Accelerations measured along the Y- and Z-axes were relatively small at all test conditions. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030955. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  19. Landing Energy Dissipation for Manned Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Lloyd J., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations have been made to determine the landing-energy-dissipation characteristics for several types of landing gear for manned reentry vehicles. The landing vehicles are considered in two categories: those having essentially vertical-descent paths, the parachute-supported vehicles, and those having essentially horizontal paths, the lifting vehicles. The energy-dissipation devices discussed are crushable materials such as foamed plastics and honeycomb for internal application in couch-support systems, yielding metal elements as part of the structure of capsules or as alternates for oleos in landing-gear struts, inflatable bags, braking rockets, and shaped surfaces for water impact. It appears feasible to readily evaluate landing-gear systems for internal or external application in hard-surface or water landings by using computational procedures and free-body landing techniques with dynamic models. The systems investigated have shown very interesting energy-dissipation characteristics over a considerable range of landing parameters. Acceptable gear can be developed along lines similar to those presented if stroke requirements and human-tolerance limits are considered.

  20. Thermal Protection Materials for Reentry Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia M.; Stackpoole, Mairead; Gusman, Mike; Loehman, Ron; Kotula, Paul; Ellerby, Donald; Arnold, James; Wercinski, Paul; Reuthers, James; Kontinos, Dean

    2001-01-01

    Thermal protection materials and systems (IRS) are used to protect spacecraft during reentry into Earth's atmosphere or entry into planetary atmospheres. As such, these materials are subject to severe environments with high heat fluxes and rapid heating. Catalytic effects can increase the temperatures substantially. These materials are also subject to impact damage from micrometeorites or other debris during ascent, orbit, and descent, and thus must be able to withstand damage and to function following damage. Thermal protection materials and coatings used in reusable launch vehicles will be reviewed, including the needs and directions for new materials to enable new missions that require faster turnaround and much greater reusability. The role of ablative materials for use in high heat flux environments, especially for non-reusable applications and upcoming planetary missions, will be discussed. New thermal protection system materials may enable the use of sharp nose caps and leading edges on future reusable space transportation vehicles. Vehicles employing this new technology would have significant increases in maneuverability and out-of-orbit cross range compared to current vehicles, leading to increased mission safety in the event of the need to abort during ascent or from orbit. Ultrahigh temperature ceramics, a family of materials based on HfB2 and ZrB2 with SiC, will be discussed. The development, mechanical and thermal properties, and uses of these materials will be reviewed.

  1. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) system design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) is intended to provide investigators in several biological disciplines with a relatively inexpensive method to access space for up to 60 days with eventual recovery on Earth. The RRS will permit totally intact, relatively soft, recovery of the vehicle, system refurbishment, and reflight with new and varied payloads. The RRS is to be capable of three reflights per year over a 10-year program lifetime. The RRS vehicle will have a large and readily accessible volume near the vehicle center of gravity for the Payload Module (PM) containing the experiment hardware. The vehicle is configured to permit the experimenter late access to the PM prior to launch and rapid access following recovery. The RRS will operate in one of two modes: (1) as a free-flying spacecraft in orbit, and will be allowed to drift in attitude to provide an acceleration environment of less than 10(exp -5) g. the acceleration environment during orbital trim maneuvers will be less than 10(exp -3) g; and (2) as an artificial gravity system which spins at controlled rates to provide an artificial gravity of up to 1.5 Earth g. The RRS system will be designed to be rugged, easily maintained, and economically refurbishable for the next flight. Some systems may be designed to be replaced rather than refurbished, if cost effective and capable of meeting the specified turnaround time. The minimum time between recovery and reflight will be approximately 60 days. The PMs will be designed to be relatively autonomous, with experiments that require few commands and limited telemetry. Mass data storage will be accommodated in the PM. The hardware development and implementation phase is currently expected to start in 1991 with a first launch in late 1993.

  2. Water Landing Characteristics of a Reentry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1958-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations have been made to determine the water-landing characteristics of a conical-shaped reentry capsule having a segment of a sphere as the bottom. For the experimental portion of the investigation, a 1/12-scale model capsule and a full-scale capsule were tested for nominal flight paths of 65 deg and 90 deg (vertical), a range of contact attitudes from -30 deg to 30 deg, and a full-scale vertical velocity of 30 feet per second at contact. Accelerations were measured by accelerometers installed at the centers of gravity of the model and full-scale capsules. For the model test the accelerations were measured along the X-axis (roll) and Z-axis (yaw) and for the full-scale test they were measured along the X-axis (roll), Y-axis (pitch), and Z-axis (yaw). Motions and displacements of the capsules that occurred after contact were determined from high-speed motion pictures. The theoretical investigation was conducted to determine the accelerations that might occur along the X-axis when the capsule contacted the water from a 90 deg flight path at a 0 deg attitude. Assuming a rigid body, computations were made from equations obtained by utilizing the principle of the conservation of momentum. The agreement among data obtained from the model test, the full-scale test, and the theory was very good. The accelerations along the X-axis, for a vertical flight path and 0 deg attitude, were in the order of 40g. For a 65 deg flight path and 0 deg attitude, the accelerations along the X-axis were in the order of 50g. Changes in contact attitude, in either the positive or negative direction from 0 deg attitude, considerably reduced the magnitude of the accelerations measured along the X-axis. Accelerations measured along the Y- and Z-axes were relatively small at all test conditions.

  3. Pesticides re-entry dermal exposure of workers in greenhouses.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, V; Conte, E; Correnti, A; Gatti, R; Musmeci, F; Morali, G; Spagnoli, G; Tranfo, G; Triolo, L; Vita, M; Zappa, G

    2004-01-01

    This research has the aim to evaluate the risk of pesticide dermal exposure for workers in greenhouses. We considered the following crops: tomato, cucumber and strawberry, largely spread in Bracciano lake district. The pesticides monitored were: tetradifon on strawberry: metalaxyl, azoxystrobin and fenarimol on cucumber; acrinathrin, azoxystrobin and chlorpyrifos ethyl on tomato. The dermal exposure was evaluated by Dislodgeable Foliar Residue (DFR) measurements employing transfer coefficients got from literature. For risk evaluation, we have compared the dermal exposures with Acceptable Operator Exposure Levels (AOEL). The re-entry time were obtained intercepting the dose decay curves with AOEL values. The re-entry times result higher than two days in the cases of chlorpyrifos on tomato (re-entry time: 3 days), azoxystrobin on tomato (4 days), and tetradifon on strawberry (8 days). The need of measuring specific transfer coefficients is pointed out. PMID:15756864

  4. Predictions of cardiovascular responses during STS reentry using mathematical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.; Srinivasan, R.

    1985-01-01

    The physiological adaptation to weightless exposure includes cardiovascular deconditioning arising in part from a loss of total circulating blood volume and resulting in a reduction of orthostatic tolerance. The crew of the Shuttle orbiter are less tolerant to acceleration forces in the head-to-foot direction during the reentry phase of the flight at a time they must function at a high level of performance. The factors that contribute to orthostatic intolerance during and following reentry and to predict the likelihood of impaired crew performance are evaluated. A computer simulation approach employing a mathematical model of the cardiovascular system is employed. It is shown that depending on the severity of blood volume loss, the reentry acceleration stress may be detrimental to physiologic function and may place the physiologic status of the crew near the borderline of some type of impairment. They are in agreement with conclusions from early ground-based experiments and from observations of early Shuttle flights.

  5. Maternal distress and women's reentry into family and community life.

    PubMed

    Arditti, Joyce; Few, April

    2008-09-01

    This paper advances conceptualization of maternal distress following incarceration. We utilized a multiple case study methodology based on interviews with 10 mothers who demonstrated various permutations of "the triple threat" (depression, domestic violence, and substance abuse; Arditti & Few, 2006). Findings suggest that depressive symptomology persisted and worsened for mothers in our study and that maternal distress was indicative not only of women's psychological state, but also a relational and situational construct that embodied women's core experience. Maternal distress was largely characterized by health challenges, dysfunctional intimate relationships, loss related trauma, guilt and worry over children, and economic inadequacy. Further, maternal distress seemed to be intensified by the punitive traumatic context of prison and lessened by rehabilitation opportunities as well as support by kin and probation officers after reentry. Recommendations for clinicians and professionals who work with reentry mothers center around the need to alleviate maternal distress and better address women's emotional and physical health needs during incarceration and reentry. PMID:18831309

  6. School reentry for children with acquired central nervous systems injuries.

    PubMed

    Carney, Joan; Porter, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Onset of acquired central nervous system (CNS) injury during the normal developmental process of childhood can have impact on cognitive, behavioral, and motor function. This alteration of function often necessitates special education programming, modifications, and accommodations in the education setting for successful school reentry. Special education is not necessarily a special classroom, but an individualized set of educational needs, determined by a multidisciplinary school team, to promote educational success. The purpose of this article is to inform those pediatricians and pediatric allied health professionals treating children with CNS injury of the systems in place to support successful school reentry and their role in contributing to developing an appropriate educational plan. PMID:19489086

  7. Radiation and Ablation Cooling for Manned Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, L.

    1960-01-01

    The necessity of reducing heat transfer to reentry vehicles has led I to the consideration of both radiative and ablation shields. The paper reviews briefly the heating problems for manned vehicles and the means whereby ablation and radiation afford thermal protection. The principal energy disposal and weight parameters are then presented and their relation to the vehicle and trajectory parameters is discussed. A comparative analysis of three types of ablation shield is made and broad conclusions are drawn as to the type of shield most appropriate to manned reentry vehicles.

  8. Reentry: a key mechanism for integration of brain function

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Gerald M.; Gally, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Reentry in nervous systems is the ongoing bidirectional exchange of signals along reciprocal axonal fibers linking two or more brain areas. The hypothesis that reentrant signaling serves as a general mechanism to couple the functioning of multiple areas of the cerebral cortex and thalamus was first proposed in 1977 and 1978 (Edelman, 1978). A review of the amount and diversity of supporting experimental evidence accumulated since then suggests that reentry is among the most important integrative mechanisms in vertebrate brains (Edelman, 1993). Moreover, these data prompt testable hypotheses regarding mechanisms that favor the development and evolution of reentrant neural architectures. PMID:23986665

  9. Missile Aerodynamics for Ascent and Re-entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Gaines L.; McCarter, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Aerodynamic force and moment equations are developed for 6-DOF missile simulations of both the ascent phase of flight and a tumbling re-entry. The missile coordinate frame (M frame) and a frame parallel to the M frame were used for formulating the aerodynamic equations. The missile configuration chosen as an example is a cylinder with fixed fins and a nose cone. The equations include both the static aerodynamic coefficients and the aerodynamic damping derivatives. The inclusion of aerodynamic damping is essential for simulating a tumbling re-entry. Appended information provides insight into aerodynamic damping.

  10. From the Classroom to the Community: Exploring the Role of Education during Incarceration and Reentry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brazzell, Diana; Crayton, Anna; Mukamal, Debbie A.; Solomon, Amy L.; Lindahl, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Recognizing the pressing need to explore the issues surrounding education, incarceration, and reentry, the Prisoner Reentry Institute at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the Urban Institute hosted the Reentry Roundtable on Education on March 31 and April 1, 2008, at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City. The two-day…

  11. 14 CFR 433.3 - Issuance of a license to operate a reentry site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... site. 433.3 Section 433.3 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A REENTRY SITE § 433.3 Issuance of a license to operate a reentry site. (a) The FAA issues a license to operate a reentry site when...

  12. 14 CFR 433.3 - Issuance of a license to operate a reentry site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Issuance of a license to operate a reentry site. 433.3 Section 433.3 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A REENTRY SITE § 433.3 Issuance of a license to operate a reentry site....

  13. 14 CFR 433.3 - Issuance of a license to operate a reentry site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... site. 433.3 Section 433.3 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A REENTRY SITE § 433.3 Issuance of a license to operate a reentry site. (a) The FAA issues a license to operate a reentry site when...

  14. 14 CFR 433.3 - Issuance of a license to operate a reentry site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... site. 433.3 Section 433.3 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A REENTRY SITE § 433.3 Issuance of a license to operate a reentry site. (a) The FAA issues a license to operate a reentry site when...

  15. 14 CFR 433.3 - Issuance of a license to operate a reentry site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... site. 433.3 Section 433.3 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A REENTRY SITE § 433.3 Issuance of a license to operate a reentry site. (a) The FAA issues a license to operate a reentry site when...

  16. Exploring Inmate Reentry in a Local Jail Setting: Implications for Outreach, Service Use, and Recidivism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Michael D.; Saunders, Jessica; Fisher, Christopher; Mellow, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Although prisoner reentry has taken center stage in correctional research and policy discussions, there has been little emphasis on reentry among jail populations. This paper examines a jail-based reentry program in New York City that begins while individuals are incarcerated and includes 90 days of postrelease services. This article explores…

  17. Controlling Violent Offenders Released to the Community: An Evaluation of the Boston Reentry Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braga, Anthony A.; Piehl, Anne M.; Hureau, David

    2009-01-01

    Despite the high level of funding and policy interest in prisoner reentry, there is still little rigorous scientific evidence to guide jurisdictions in developing reentry programs to enhance public safety, particularly for managing those who pose the greatest safety risks. The Boston Reentry Initiative (BRI) is an interagency initiative to help…

  18. 14 CFR 435.43 - Payload reentry review requirements and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Payload reentry review requirements and procedures. 435.43 Section 435.43 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Payload...

  19. 14 CFR 435.15 - Rights not conferred by reentry license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rights not conferred by reentry license. 435.15 Section 435.15 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING REENTRY OF A REENTRY VEHICLE OTHER THAN A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) General § 435.15 Rights...

  20. 14 CFR 431.57 - Information requirements for payload reentry review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Information requirements for payload reentry review. 431.57 Section 431.57 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Payload Reentry Review...

  1. Who Goes Back to Prison; Who Does Not: A Multiyear View of Reentry Program Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severson, Margaret E.; Veeh, Christopher; Bruns, Kimberly; Lee, Jaehoon

    2012-01-01

    Existing studies of reentry programs in the United States focus on the successes and failures of reentering offenders when compared to matched reentering offenders who did not receive structured reentry services. Little attention has been focused solely on the reentry participants themselves, and on how the level of program exposure may be related…

  2. Processing ground-based near-infrared imagery of space shuttle re-entries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spisz, Thomas S.; Taylor, Jeff C.; Kennerly, Stephen W.; Osei-Wusu, Kwame; Gibson, David M.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Kerns, Robert V.; Shea, Edward J.; Mercer, C. David; Schwartz, Richard J.; Dantowitz, Ronald F.; Kozubal, Marek J.

    2012-06-01

    Ground-based high-resolution, calibrated, near-infrared (NIR) imagery of the Space Shuttle STS-134 Endeavour during reentry has been obtained as part of NASA's HYTHIRM (Hypersonic Thermodynamic InfraRed Measurements) project. The long-range optical sensor package called MARS (Mobile Aerospace Reconnaissance System) was positioned in advance to acquire and track part of the shuttle re-entry. Imagery was acquired during a few minutes, with the best imagery being processed when the shuttle was at 133 kft at Mach 5.8. This paper describes the processing of the NIR imagery, building upon earlier work from the airborne imagery collections of several prior shuttle missions. Our goal is to calculate the temperature distribution of the shuttle's bottom surface as accurately as possible, considering both random and systematic errors, while maintaining all physical features in the imagery, especially local intensity variations. The processing areas described are: 1) radiometric calibration, 2) improvement of image quality, 3) atmospheric compensation, and 4) conversion to temperature. The computed temperature image will be shown, as well as comparisons with thermocouples at different positions on the shuttle. A discussion of the uncertainties of the temperature estimates using the NIR imagery is also given.

  3. Using Navier-Stokes to Characterize Re-Entry of Microscale Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiruvenkadam, Sudharsan; Ben, Harris

    2013-11-01

    Atmospheric reentry vehicles experience different flow regimes during flight due to the change in atmospheric density. This change in density creates non-equilibrium regions on the order of one mean free path, called as Knudsen layer. In the design of atmospheric reentry vehicles, the flux variations near solid surface are of critical importance. The traditional CFD simulations which use Navier Stokes equations fail to predict the flow in Knudsen layer. These areas where the rarefaction effects begin to dominate can be quantified by the Knudsen breakdown parameter. The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, although accurate for all flow regimes, it is computationally expensive as the number of simulating molecules increases. We developed a method that models the Knudsen Layer by using Navier Stokes equations with Maxwell-Smoluchowski slip boundary conditions and DSMC for low (Kn < 0.1) and high (Kn > 0.1) Knudsen numbers respectively. This study investigates the surface properties of a flat plate with Nitrogen gas flow from continuum to rarefied regimes. Computational fluid dynamics and DSMC results are obtained for different test conditions. The results demonstrate that the Knudsen layer can be predicted with DSMC and continuum approach for all flow regimes.

  4. Reentry Vehicle Flight Controls Design Guidelines: Dynamic Inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, Daigoro; Georgie, Jennifer; Valasek, John; Ward, Donald T.

    2002-01-01

    This report addresses issues in developing a flight control design for vehicles operating across a broad flight regime and with highly nonlinear physical descriptions of motion. Specifically it addresses the need for reentry vehicles that could operate through reentry from space to controlled touchdown on Earth. The latter part of controlled descent is achieved by parachute or paraglider - or by all automatic or a human-controlled landing similar to that of the Orbiter. Since this report addresses the specific needs of human-carrying (not necessarily piloted) reentry vehicles, it deals with highly nonlinear equations of motion, and then-generated control systems must be robust across a very wide range of physics. Thus, this report deals almost exclusively with some form of dynamic inversion (DI). Two vital aspects of control theory - noninteracting control laws and the transformation of nonlinear systems into equivalent linear systems - are embodied in DI. Though there is no doubt that the mathematical tools and underlying theory are widely available, there are open issues as to the practicality of using DI as the only or primary design approach for reentry articles. This report provides a set of guidelines that can be used to determine the practical usefulness of the technique.

  5. Orbiter Gap Filler Bending Model for Re-entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Charles H.

    2007-01-01

    Pressure loads on a protruding gap filler during an Orbiter reentry are investigated to evaluate the likelihood of extraction due to pressure loads, and to ascertain how much bending will be induced by re-entry pressure loads. Oblique shock wave theory is utilized to develop a representation of the pressure loads induced on a gap filler for the ISSHVFW trajectory, representative of a heavy weight ISS return. A free body diagram is utilized to react the forces induced by the pressure forces. Preliminary results developed using these methods demonstrate that pressure loads, alone, are not likely causes of gap filler extraction during reentry. Assessment of the amount a gap filler will bend over is presented. Implications of gap filler bending during re-entry include possible mitigation of early boundary layer transition concerns, uncertainty in ground based measurement of protruding gap fillers from historical Orbiter flight history, and uncertainty in the use of Orbiter gap fillers for boundary layer prediction calibration. Authors will be added to the author list as appropriate.

  6. 38 CFR 21.8022 - Entry and reentry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Training and Rehabilitation for Certain Children of... reentry. (a) Date of program entry. VA may not enter a child into a vocational training program or provide... receives an application for a vocational training program filed in accordance with § 21.8014....

  7. School Reentry for Children with Acquired Central Nervous Systems Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carney, Joan; Porter, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Onset of acquired central nervous system (CNS) injury during the normal developmental process of childhood can have impact on cognitive, behavioral, and motor function. This alteration of function often necessitates special education programming, modifications, and accommodations in the education setting for successful school reentry. Special…

  8. Astronauts McNair and Stewart prepare for reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronauts Ronald E. McNair and Robert L. Stewart prepare for the re-entry phase of the shuttle Challenger near the end of the 41-B mission. The are stationed behind the crew commander and pilot. Stewart is already wearing his helmet. McNair is stowing some of his gear.

  9. Estimates of nitric oxide production for lifting spacecraft reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.

    1971-01-01

    The amount of nitric oxide which may be produced by heating of air during an atmospheric reentry of a lifting spacecraft is estimated by three different methods. Two assume nitrogen fixation by the process of sudden freezing, and the third is a computer calculation using chemical rate equations.

  10. Reentry Issues upon Returning from Study Abroad Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wielkiewicz, Richard M.; Turkowski, Laura W.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of returning from studying abroad was surveyed in 669 college students. Students who studied abroad scored significantly higher on a Reentry Shock scale, reflecting skepticism toward U.S. culture, than those who did not. They were also more likely to consume alcohol. Study abroad had no detectable influence on students' romantic…

  11. 38 CFR 21.8022 - Entry and reentry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Entry and reentry. 21.8022 Section 21.8022 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Training and Rehabilitation for Certain Children of Vietnam Veterans and Veterans with...

  12. Planned Flight of the Terrestrial HIAD Orbital Reentry (THOR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillman, Robert; Hughes, Stephen; DiNonno, John; Bodkin, Richard; White, Joseph; DelCorso, Joseph; Cheatwood, F. M.

    2014-01-01

    The Terrestrial HIAD Orbital Reentry (THOR) is planned for flight in 2016 as a secondary payload on an Orbital Sciences commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station. THOR will launch with its Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) stowed as a small cylinder between the second stage motor and the launch vehicle fairing. Once the Cygnus cargo vehicle has separated from the second stage, THOR will likewise separate, autonomously re-orient itself, perform a deorbit burn, then inflate the HIAD to a 3.5m diameter cone before atmospheric interface. THOR is a follow-on mission to the IRVE-3 flight test of 2012. The high energy of orbital reentry will allow THOR to demonstrate the performance of its improved, second-generation inflatable structure and flexible TPS materials, in a more energetic entry environment than previous suborbital test flights.This paper discusses the sequence of events planned to occur as part of the THOR mission. Specific topics will include the THOR mission concept, reentry vehicle design for the expected flight environment, the on-board sensors that will allow quantification of vehicle performance, and how we intend to retrieve the flight data from a reentry vehicle splashing down in international waters.

  13. Study Abroad Reentry: Behavior, Affect, and Cultural Distance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Kelsey M.; Savicki, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Reentry has become a more focused aspect of study abroad in recent years as the field has moved away from a laissez-faire approach and toward an emphasis on intervention and support of study abroad students in their efforts to make sense of their experiences (Vande Berg, Paige & Lou, 2012). Although not a new concept (Brathurst & La Brack,…

  14. STS-107 Debris Characterization Using Re-entry Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raiche, George A.

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of amateur video of the early reentry phases of the Columbia accident is discussed. With poor video quality and little theoretical guidance, the analysis team estimated mass and acceleration ranges for the debris shedding events observed in the video. Camera calibration and optical performance issues are also described.

  15. Sensors measure surface ablation rate of reentry vehicle heat shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russel, J. M., III

    1966-01-01

    Sensors measure surface erosion rate of ablating material in reentry vehicle heat shield. Each sensor, which is placed at precise depths in the heat shield is activated when the ablator surface erodes to the location of a sensing point. Sensor depth and activation time determine ablator surface erosion rate.

  16. Calibration of Radar Based Re-Entry Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmens, S.; Bastida Virgili, B.; Flohrer, T.; Gini, F.; Krag, H.; Steiger, C.

    2015-03-01

    The availability of GPS observations via the telemetry during GOCE’s (Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer) entire re-entry campaign enabled the generation of high quality orbit products which can be used as input to re-entry predictions. These high precision orbits can be used as reference to assess the quality of orbits generated from other sources. Here we verify the accuracy of orbits based on radar tracking data, obtained by dedicated observations with the Tracking & Imaging Radar system from the Fraunhofer High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques institute, with respect to the a post-processed GPS based reference orbit. This leads to time-depended quantification of the orbit determination uncertainties on the re-entry predictions. Furthermore, the ballistic coefficient determined by the orbit determination and its time dependent evolution can be used to a priori estimate the attitude behaviour of GOCE, which can be compared to the telemetry. The attitude behaviour can be analysed by the use of inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) images, also obtained by dedicated observation by TIRA. The effect of adding this knowledge on the attitude evolution to the re-entry predictions is evaluated.

  17. Young Men's Reentry after Incarceration: A Developmental Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arditti, Joyce A.; Parkman, Tiffaney

    2011-01-01

    We apply a life course perspective to study young men's transition to adulthood within the context of their return to family after a period of incarceration. Our phenomenological analysis was based on 9 in-depth, semi-structured interviews with formerly incarcerated men between the age of 18 and 24. Our findings revealed that reentry was a…

  18. An Assessment of a Community College Reentry Program for Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, Joy Davis

    In 1980, a study was conducted to determine the characteristics, attitudes, and subsequent experiences of women who had completed the Women's Education Development Incentive (WENDI) re-entry program at Brevard Community College, Florida, in 1977. From the original mailing of 79 questionnaires, 33 usable responses were returned. Two-thirds of the…

  19. Retinal progenitor cells, differentiation, and barriers to cell cycle reentry.

    PubMed

    Davis, Denise M; Dyer, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    Neurogenesis in the retina occurs via the coordination of proliferation, cell cycle exit and differentiation of retinal progenitor cells. Until recently, it was widely assumed that once a retinal progenitor cell produced a postmitotic neuron, there was no possibility for cell-cycle re-entry. However, recent studies have shown that mature differentiated horizontal neurons with reduced Rb pathway function can re-enter the cell cycle and proliferate while maintaining their differentiated features. This chapter will explore the molecular and cellular mechanisms that help to keep differentiated retinal neurons and glia postmitotic. We propose that there are cell-type specific barriers to cell-cycle re-entry by differentiated neurons and these may include apoptosis, chromatin/epigenetics mechanisms, cellular morphology and/or metabolic demands that are distinct across cell populations. Our data suggest that differentiated neurons span a continuum of cellular properties related to their ability to re-enter the cell cycle and undergo cytokinesis while maintaining their differentiated features. A deeper understanding of these processes may allow us to begin to explain the cell type specificity of neuronal cell death and tumor susceptibility. For example, neurons that have more barriers to cell-cycle re-entry may be less likely to form tumors but more likely to undergo degeneration. Conversely, neurons that have fewer barriers to cell-cycle re-entry may be more likely to form tumors but less likely to undergo degeneration. PMID:20959166

  20. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS): Thermal control trade study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Clark

    1990-01-01

    The design and assessment work performed in defining the on-orbit Thermal Control Subsystem (TCS) requirements for the Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) is discussed. Specifically, it describes the hardware and design measures necessary for maintaining the Payload Module (PM) Environmental Control Life Support System (ECLSS) heat exchanger, the hydrazine propellant, and PM water supply within their required temperature limits.

  1. Orbit, reentry, and landing attachment for globes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, E. B.

    1970-01-01

    Navigational device, invented to aid recovery of spacecraft from any orbit, also illustrates motions of satellites relative to earth and their entry-ranging requirements. Device rapidly and accurately defines lateral range requirements for spacecraft returning to any desired site without manual or computerized calculation of orbital equations of motion.

  2. The Role of Prevention in Promoting Continuity of Health Care in Prisoner Reentry Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Lanza, A. Stephen; Dyson, William; Gordon, Derrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Most incarcerated individuals will return to the community, and their successful reentry requires consideration of their health and how their health will affect their families and communities. We propose the use of a prevention science framework that integrates universal, selective, and indicated strategies to facilitate the successful reentry of men released from prison. Understanding how health risks and disparities affect the transition from prison to the community will enhance reentry intervention efforts. To explore the application of the prevention rubric, we evaluated a community-based prisoner reentry initiative. The findings challenge all involved in reentry initiatives to reconceptualize prisoner reentry from a program model to a prevention model that considers multilevel risks to and facilitators of successful reentry. PMID:23488516

  3. A real-time digital computer program for the simulation of automatic spacecraft reentries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaylor, J. T.; Powell, L. F.; Powell, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The automatic reentry flight dynamics simulator, a nonlinear, six-degree-of-freedom simulation, digital computer program, has been developed. The program includes a rotating, oblate earth model for accurate navigation calculations and contains adjustable gains on the aerodynamic stability and control parameters. This program uses a real-time simulation system and is designed to examine entries of vehicles which have constant mass properties whose attitudes are controlled by both aerodynamic surfaces and reaction control thrusters, and which have automatic guidance and control systems. The program has been used to study the space shuttle orbiter entry. This report includes descriptions of the equations of motion used, the control and guidance schemes that were implemented, the program flow and operation, and the hardware involved.

  4. Analysis of Damped Oscillations during Reentry: A New Approach to Evaluate Cardiac Restitution☆

    PubMed Central

    Munteanu, Adelina; Kondratyev, Aleksandar A.; Kucera, Jan P.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Reentry is a mechanism underlying numerous cardiac arrhythmias. During reentry, head-tail interactions of the action potential can cause cycle length (CL) oscillations and affect the stability of reentry. We developed a method based on a difference-delay equation to determine the slopes of the action potential duration and conduction velocity restitution functions, known to be major determinants of reentrant arrhythmogenesis, from the spatial period P and the decay length D of damped CL oscillations. Using this approach, we analyzed CL oscillations after the induction of reentry and the resetting of reentry with electrical stimuli in rings of cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes grown on microelectrode arrays and in corresponding simulations with the Luo-Rudy model. In the experiments, P was larger and D was smaller after resetting impulses compared to the induction of reentry, indicating that reentry became more stable. Both restitution slopes were smaller. Consistent with the experimental findings, resetting of simulated reentry caused oscillations with gradually increasing P, decreasing D, and decreasing restitution slopes. However, these parameters remained constant when ion concentrations were clamped, revealing that intracellular ion accumulation stabilizes reentry. Thus, the analysis of CL oscillations during reentry opens new perspectives to gain quantitative insight into action potential restitution. PMID:17921218

  5. Reentry survival analysis of tumbling metallic hollow cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Hyung-seok; Kim, Kyu-hong

    2011-09-01

    The survival of orbital debris reentering the Earth's atmosphere is considered. The numerical approach of NASA's Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool (ORSAT) is reviewed, and a new equation accounting for reradiation heat loss of hollow cylindrical objects is presented. Based on these, a code called Survivability Analysis Program for Atmospheric Reentry (SAPAR) has been developed, and the new equation for reradiation heat loss is validated. Using this equation in conjunction with the formulation used in ORSAT, a comparative case study on the Delta-II second stage cylindrical tank is given, demonstrating that the analysis using the proposed equation is in good agreement with the actual recovered object when a practical value for thermal emissivity is used. A detailed explanation of the revised formulation is given, and additional simulation results are presented. Finally, discussions are made to address the applicability of the proposed equation to be incorporated in future survival analyses of orbital debris.

  6. Radioactive satellites - Intact reentry and breakup by debris impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anz-Meador, P. D.; Potter, A. E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    There is a substantial mass of radioactive material in nuclear reactors or radioisotope thermal generators (RTGs) in orbit about the earth. This paper examines the reentry of intact nuclear fuel cores and RTGs and the fragmentation and subsequent radioactive debris cloud deposition and evolution resulting from the impact of orbital debris upon an orbiting reactor, fuel core, or RTG. To assess the intact reentry, decay rates and a predicted decay date using historical and projected orbital decay data, are estimated. The current NASA debris environment model is utilized to estimate impact rates and debris cloud evolution of a fragmentation event. Results of these analyses are compared and concepts are tendered which would tend to minimize the radiological debris hazard to personnel and structures both on the earth's surface and in low earth orbit.

  7. Inflatable Re-entry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE-4) Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litton, Daniel K.; Bose, David M.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Hughes, Stephen; Wright, Henry S.; Lindell, Michael C.; Derry, Stephen D.; Olds, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    The suite of Inflatable Re-Entry Vehicle Experiments (IRVE) is designed to further our knowledge and understanding of Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (HIADs). Before infusion into a future mission, three challenges need to be addressed: surviving the heat pulse during re-entry, demonstrating system performance at relevant scales, and demonstrating controllability in the atmosphere. IRVE-4 will contribute to a better understanding of controllability by characterizing how a HIAD responds to a set of controlled inputs. The ability to control a HIAD is vital for missions that are g-limited, require precision targeting and guidance for aerocapture or entry, descent, and landing. The IRVE-4 flight test will focus on taking a first look into controlling a HIAD. This paper will give an overview of the IRVE-4 mission including the control response portion of the flight test sequence, and will provide a review of the mission s development.

  8. Design of a recovery system for a reentry vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Eckroth, Wulf; Garrard, William L.; Miller, Norman

    1993-01-01

    Engineers are often required to design decelerator systems which are deployed in cross-wind orientations. If the system is not designed to minimize 'line sail', damage to the parachutes could result. A Reentry Vehicle Analysis Code (RVAC) and an accompanying graphics animation software program (DISPLAY) are presented in this paper. These computer codes allow the user to quickly apply the Purvis line sail modeling technique to any vehicle and then observe the relative motion of the vehicle, nose cap, suspension lines, pilot and drogue bags and canopies on a computer screen. Data files are created which allow plots of velocities, spacial positions, and dynamic pressures versus time to be generated. The code is an important tool for the design engineer because it integrates two degrees of freedom (DOF) line sail equations with a three DOF model of the reentry body and jettisoned nose cap to provide an animated output.

  9. EXPERT: An atmospheric re-entry test-bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massobrio, F.; Viotto, R.; Serpico, M.; Sansone, A.; Caporicci, M.; Muylaert, J.-M.

    2007-06-01

    In recognition of the importance of an independent European access to the International Space Station (ISS) and in preparation for the future needs of exploration missions, ESA is conducting parallel activities to generate flight data using atmospheric re-entry test-beds and to identify vehicle design solutions for human and cargo transportation vehicles serving the ISS and beyond. The EXPERT (European eXPErimental Re-entry Test-bed) vehicle represents the major on-going development in the first class of activities. Its results may also benefit in due time scientific missions to planets with an atmosphere and future reusable launcher programmes. The objective of EXPERT is to provide a test-bed for the validation of aerothermodynamics models, codes and ground test facilities in a representative flight environment, to improve the understanding of issues related to analysis, testing and extrapolation to flight. The vehicle will be launched on a sub-orbital trajectory using a Volna missile. The EXPERT concept is based on a symmetrical re-entry capsule whose shape is composed of simple geometrical elements. The suborbital trajectory will reach 120 km altitude and a re-entry velocity of 5 6km/s. The dimensions of the capsule are 1.6 m high and 1.3 m diameter; the overall mass is in the range of 250 350kg, depending upon the mission parameters and the payload/instrumentation complement. A consistent number of scientific experiments are foreseen on-board, from innovative air data system to shock wave/boundary layer interaction, from sharp hot structures characterisation to natural and induced regime transition. Currently the project is approaching completion of the phase B, with Alenia Spazio leading the industrial team and CIRA coordinating the scientific payload development under ESA contract.

  10. RITD - Re-entry: Inflatable Technology Development in Russian Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilimo, J.; Harri, A.-M.; Aleksashkin, S.; Koryanov, V.; Arruego, I.; Schmidt, W.; Haukka, H.; Finchenko, V.; Martynov, M.; Ostresko, B.; Ponomarenko, A.; Kazakovtsev, V.; Martin, S.; Siili, T.

    2014-04-01

    A new generation of inflatable Entry, Descent and Landing System (EDLS) for Mars has been developed. It is used in both the initial atmospheric entry and atmospheric descent before the semi-hard impact of the penetrator into Martian surface. The EDLS applicability to Earth's atmosphere is studied by the EU/RITD [1] project. Project focuses on the analysis and tests of the transonic behaviour of this compact and light weight payload entry system at the Earth re-entry.

  11. Ares I-X Separation and Reentry Trajectory Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tartabini, Paul V.; Starr, Brett R.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle was launched on October 28, 2009 and was the first and only test flight of NASA s two-stage Ares I launch vehicle design. The launch was successful and the flight test met all of its primary and secondary objectives. This paper discusses the stage separation and reentry trajectory analysis that was performed in support of the Ares I-X test flight. Pre-flight analyses were conducted to assess the risk of stage recontact during separation, to evaluate the first stage flight dynamics during reentry, and to define the range safety impact ellipses of both stages. The results of these pre-flight analyses were compared with available flight data. On-board video taken during flight showed that the flight test vehicle successfully separated without any recontact. Reconstructed trajectory data also showed that first stage flight dynamics were well characterized by pre-flight Monte Carlo results. In addition, comparisons with flight data indicated that the complex interference aerodynamic models employed in the reentry simulation were effective in capturing the flight dynamics during separation. Finally, the splash-down locations of both stages were well within predicted impact ellipses.

  12. Displacements of Metallic Thermal Protection System Panels During Reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Blosser, Max L.; Wurster, Kathryn E.

    2006-01-01

    Bowing of metallic thermal protection systems for reentry of a previously proposed single-stage-to-orbit reusable launch vehicle was studied. The outer layer of current metallic thermal protection system concepts typically consists of a honeycomb panel made of a high temperature nickel alloy. During portions of reentry when the thermal protection system is exposed to rapidly varying heating rates, a significant temperature gradient develops across the honeycomb panel thickness, resulting in bowing of the honeycomb panel. The deformations of the honeycomb panel increase the roughness of the outer mold line of the vehicle, which could possibly result in premature boundary layer transition, resulting in significantly higher downstream heating rates. The aerothermal loads and parameters for three locations on the centerline of the windward side of this vehicle were calculated using an engineering code. The transient temperature distributions through a metallic thermal protection system were obtained using 1-D finite volume thermal analysis, and the resulting displacements of the thermal protection system were calculated. The maximum deflection of the thermal protection system throughout the reentry trajectory was 6.4 mm. The maximum ratio of deflection to boundary layer thickness was 0.032. Based on previously developed distributed roughness correlations, it was concluded that these defections will not result in tripping the hypersonic boundary layer.

  13. High performance modeling of atmospheric re-entry vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Alexandre; Scalabrin, Leonardo C.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2012-02-01

    Re-entry vehicles designed for space exploration are usually equipped with thermal protection systems made of ablative material. In order to properly model and predict the aerothermal environment of the vehicle, it is imperative to account for the gases produced by ablation processes. In the case of charring ablators, where an inner resin is pyrolyzed at a relatively low temperature, the composition of the gas expelled into the boundary layer is complex and may lead to thermal chemical reactions that cannot be captured with simple flow chemistry models. In order to obtain better predictions, an appropriate gas flow chemistry model needs to be included in the CFD calculations. Using a recently developed chemistry model for ablating carbon-phenolic-in-air species, a CFD calculation of the Stardust re-entry at 71 km is presented. The code used for that purpose has been designed to take advantage of the nature of the problem and therefore remains very efficient when a high number of chemical species are involved. The CFD result demonstrates the need for such chemistry model when modeling the flow field around an ablative material. Modeling of the nonequilibrium radiation spectra is also presented, and compared to the experimental data obtained during Stardust re-entry by the Echelle instrument. The predicted emission from the CN lines compares quite well with the experimental results, demonstrating the validity of the current approach.

  14. Reentry safety for the Topaz II Space Reactor: Issues and analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Connell, L.W.; Trost, L.C.

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the reentry safety analyses conducted for the TOPAZ II Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP). Scoping calculations were performed on the reentry aerothermal breakup and ground footprint of reactor core debris. The calculations were used to assess the risks associated with radiologically cold reentry accidents and to determine if constraints should be placed on the core configuration for such accidents. Three risk factors were considered: inadvertent criticality upon reentry impact, atmospheric dispersal of U-235 fuel, and the Special Nuclear Material Safeguards risks. Results indicate that the risks associated with cold reentry are very low regardless of the core configuration. Core configuration constraints were therefore not established for radiologically cold reentry accidents.

  15. An integrated approach for risk object re-entry predictions in terms of KS elements and genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, R. K.; Anil Kumar, A. K.; Xavier James Raj, M.

    The accurate estimation of the orbital lifetime of decaying near-Earth objects is of considerable importance for prediction of risk object re-entry time and proper planning of mitigation strategies and hazard assessment. It has become necessary to use extremely complex force models to match with the present operational requirements and observational techniques. The problem becomes all the more complicated in the near-Earth environment due to the fact that the object is influenced by the non-spherical effects of the Earth's gravitational field as well as the dissipative effects of the Earth's atmosphere. The database available for the re-entry time or orbital lifetime prediction of the debris objects is based on the set of Two Line Elements (TLEs) provided by the agencies like NORAD. These TLEs provide information regarding the orbital parameters together with rate of mean motion decay and an equivalent ballistic coefficient B*. The objects physical parameters like mass, area of cross section, shape and dimensions are not available accurately and the modelling of the atmosphere in which objects decay takes place is also uncertain. Besides, the tumbling effect of the body and gas molecular interaction, further makes the prediction of re-entry time a very complicated exercise. The method of the K-S total-energy element equations (Stiefel & Scheifele 1971) is a powerful method for numerical solution with respect to any type of perturbing forces, as the equations are less sensitive to round-off and truncation errors in the numerical algorithm. The equations are everywhere regular in contrast with the classical Newtonian equations, which are singular at the collision of the two bodies. The equations are smoothed for eccentric orbits because eccentric anomaly is the independent variable. Genetic Algorithms (Deb 1995) has received a great deal of attention regarding their potential as an optimisation technique for complex functions. This paper highlights the implementation

  16. Spectroscopy of Project Fire 1, April 14, 1964. [comparison of reentry vehicle and meteor spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millman, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    The Fire 1 test was designed to study the heating of an Apollo-type reentry vehicle. The total reentry complex weighed approximately 230 kg and entered the upper atmosphere at a velocity of 11.5 km/s. The spectrum of the reentry complex has been studied in the wavelength range 3700 to 8800 A, where 102 multiplets of 21 atoms and the band systems of 5 diatomic molecules have been identified. Comparisons with meteor spectra are made.

  17. Re-Entry of Women to the Labour Market After an Interruption in Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seear, B. N.

    The problems involved in the re-entry of women into employment were studied, and the extent to which there exists a demand for employment for re-entry women was examined. A growing number of women are seeking re-entry in a wide range of income levels. The demand for part-time work appears to exceed supply. Official machinery for assisting re-entry…

  18. Sonic boom measurement test plan for Space Shuttle STS-3 reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The lateral area from the reentry ground track affected by sonic boom overpressure levels is determined. Four data acquisition stations are deployed laterally to the STS-3 reentry flight track. These stations provide six intermediate band FM channels of sonic boom data, universal time synchronization, and voice annotation. All measurements are correlated with the vehicle reentry flight track information along with atmospheric and vehicle operation conditions.

  19. In Depth Analysis of AVCOAT TPS Response to a Reentry Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, E. V.; Kumar, Rakesh; Levin, D. A.

    2011-05-01

    Modeling of the high altitude portion of reentry vehicle trajectories with DSMC or statistical BGK solvers requires accurate evaluation of the boundary conditions at the ablating TPS surface. Presented in this article is a model which takes into account the complex ablation physics including the production of pyrolysis gases, and chemistry at the TPS surface. Since the ablation process is time dependent the modeling of the material response to the high energy reentry flow starts with the solution of the rarefied flow over the vehicle and then loosely couples with the material response. The objective of the present work is to carry out conjugate thermal analysis by weakly coupling a flow solver to a material thermal response model. The latter model solves the one dimensional heat conduction equation accounting for the pyrolysis process that takes place in the reaction zone of an ablative thermal protection system (TPS) material. An estimate of the temperature range within which the pyrolysis reaction (decomposition and volatilization) takes place is obtained from Ref. [1]. The pyrolysis reaction results in the formation of char and the release of gases through the porous charred material. These gases remove additional amount of heat as they pass through the material, thus cooling the material (the process known as transpiration cooling). In the present work, we incorporate the transpiration cooling model in the material thermal response code in addition to the pyrolysis model. The flow in the boundary layer and in the vicinity of the TPS material is in the transitional flow regime. Therefore, we use a previously validated statistical BGK method [2] to model the flow physics in the vicinity of the micro-cracks, since the BGK method allows simulations of flow at pressures higher than can be computed using DSMC.

  20. In Depth Analysis of AVCOAT TPS Response to a Reentry Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Titov, E. V.; Kumar, Rakesh; Levin, D. A.

    2011-05-20

    Modeling of the high altitude portion of reentry vehicle trajectories with DSMC or statistical BGK solvers requires accurate evaluation of the boundary conditions at the ablating TPS surface. Presented in this article is a model which takes into account the complex ablation physics including the production of pyrolysis gases, and chemistry at the TPS surface. Since the ablation process is time dependent the modeling of the material response to the high energy reentry flow starts with the solution of the rarefied flow over the vehicle and then loosely couples with the material response. The objective of the present work is to carry out conjugate thermal analysis by weakly coupling a flow solver to a material thermal response model. The latter model solves the one dimensional heat conduction equation accounting for the pyrolysis process that takes place in the reaction zone of an ablative thermal protection system (TPS) material. An estimate of the temperature range within which the pyrolysis reaction (decomposition and volatilization) takes place is obtained from Ref. [1]. The pyrolysis reaction results in the formation of char and the release of gases through the porous charred material. These gases remove additional amount of heat as they pass through the material, thus cooling the material (the process known as transpiration cooling). In the present work, we incorporate the transpiration cooling model in the material thermal response code in addition to the pyrolysis model. The flow in the boundary layer and in the vicinity of the TPS material is in the transitional flow regime. Therefore, we use a previously validated statistical BGK method to model the flow physics in the vicinity of the micro-cracks, since the BGK method allows simulations of flow at pressures higher than can be computed using DSMC.

  1. Analysis of reentry into the White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) for the LifeSat mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hametz, M.; Roszman, L.; Snow, F.; Cooley, J.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigates the reentry of the LifeSat vehicles into the WSMR. The LifeSat mission consists of two reusable reentry satellites, each carrying a removable payload module, which scientists will use to study long-term effects of microgravity, Van Allen belt radiation, and galactic cosmic rays on living organisms. A series of missions is planned for both low-Earth circular orbits and highly elliptic orbits. To recover the payload module with the specimens intact, a soft parachute landing and recovery at the WSMR is planned. This analysis examines operational issues surrounding the reentry scenario to assess the feasibility of the reentry.

  2. Coronas-F Orbit Monitoring and Re-Entry Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, N. M.; Kolyuka, Yu. F.; Afanasieva, T. I.; Gridchina, T. A.

    2007-01-01

    Russian scientific satellite CORONAS-F was launched on July, 31, 2001. The object was inserted in near-circular orbit with the inclination 82.5deg and a mean altitude approx. 520 km. Due to the upper atmosphere drag CORONAS-F was permanently descended and as a result on December, 6, 2005 it has finished the earth-orbital flight, having lifetime in space approx. 4.5 years. The satellite structural features and its flight attitude control led to the significant variations of its ballistic coefficient during the flight. It was a cause of some specific difficulties in the fulfillment of the ballistic and navigation support of this space vehicle flight. Besides the main mission objective CORONAS-F also has been selected by the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC) as a target object for the next regular international re-entry test campaign on a program of surveillance and re-entry prediction for the hazard space objects within their de-orbiting phases. Spacecraft (S/C) CORONAS-F kept its working state right up to the end of the flight - down to the atmosphere entry. This fact enabled to realization of the additional research experiments, concerning with an estimation of the atmospheric density within the low earth orbits (LEO) of the artificial satellites, and made possible to continue track the S/C during final phase of its flight by means of Russian regular command & tracking system, used for it control. Thus there appeared a unique possibility of using for tracking S/C at its de-orbiting phase not only passive radar facilities, belonging to the space surveillance systems and traditionally used for support of the IADC re-entry test campaigns, but also more precise active trajectory radio-tracking facilities from the ground control complex (GCC) applied for this object. Under the corresponding decision of the Russian side such capability of additional high-precise tracking control of the CORONAS-F flight in this period of time has been implemented

  3. Reentry Thermal Analysis of a Generic Crew Exploration Vehicle Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Gong, Leslie; Quinn, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    Comparative studies were performed on the heat-shielding characteristics of honeycomb-core sandwich panels fabricated with different materials for possible use as wall panels for the proposed crew exploration vehicle. Graphite/epoxy sandwich panel was found to outperform aluminum sandwich panel under the same geometry due to superior heat-shielding qualities and lower material density. Also, representative reentry heat-transfer analysis was performed on the windward wall structures of a generic crew exploration vehicle. The Apollo low Earth orbit reentry trajectory was used to calculate the reentry heating rates. The generic crew exploration vehicle has a graphite/epoxy composite honeycomb sandwich exterior wall and an aluminum honeycomb sandwich interior wall, and is protected with the Apollo thermal protection system ablative material. In the thermal analysis computer program used, the TPS ablation effect was not yet included; however, the results from the nonablation heat-transfer analyses were used to develop a "virtual ablation" method to estimate the ablation heat loads and the thermal protection system recession thicknesses. Depending on the severity of the heating-rate time history, the virtual ablation period was found to last for 87 to 107 seconds and the ablation heat load was estimated to be in the range of 86 to 88 percent of the total heat load for the ablation time period. The thermal protection system recession thickness was estimated to be in the range of 0.08 to 0.11 inches. For the crew exploration vehicle zero-tilt and 18-degree-tilt stagnation points, thermal protection system thicknesses of h = {0.717, 0.733} inches were found to be adequate to keep the substructural composite sandwich temperature below the limit of 300 F.

  4. Ukrainian prisoners and community reentry challenges: implications for transitional care

    PubMed Central

    Morozova, Olga; Azbel, Lyuba; Grishaev, Yevgeny; Dvoryak, Sergii; Wickersham, Jeffrey A.; Altice, Frederick L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The study aims to assess reentry challenges faced by Ukrainian prisoners and to determine the factors associated with having a greater number of challenges in order to suggest pre- and post-release interventions with the aim of facilitating community reintegration. Design/methodology/approach A representative national cross-sectional study with a sample size of 402 prisoners was conducted among imprisoned adults within six months of release. The study consisted of interviews and biological testing for infectious diseases. Anticipated reentry challenges were assessed using a structured questionnaire. Findings The most difficult and relatively important challenges identified were finding a job or a stable source of income and staying out of prison following release. Risk-specific challenges pertinent to drug users and HIV-infected individuals were assessed as difficult, but generally less important. Similarly, challenges associated with reducing drug relapse were ranked as less important, with only 0.6 percent identifying opioid substitution therapy as a helpful measure. In the multivariate analysis, having a greater number of challenges is associated with previous incarcerations, drug use immediately before incarceration and lower levels of social support. Practical implications To facilitate community re-integration, it is vital to design interventions aimed at reducing recidivism and improvement of social support through comprehensive case management as well as to improve understanding about and address drug dependence issues among inmates by implementing evidence-based treatment both within prisons and after release. Originality/value This is the first comprehensive assessment of community reentry challenges by prisoners in the former Soviet Union. PMID:25152767

  5. Flap effectiveness appraisal for winged re-entry vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rosa, Donato; Pezzella, Giuseppe; Donelli, Raffaele S.; Viviani, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The interactions between shock waves and boundary layer are commonplace in hypersonic aerodynamics. They represent a very challenging design issue for hypersonic vehicle. A typical example of shock wave boundary layer interaction is the flowfield past aerodynamic surfaces during control. As a consequence, such flow interaction phenomena influence both vehicle aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics. In this framework, the present research effort describes the numerical activity performed to simulate the flowfield past a deflected flap in hypersonic flowfield conditions for a winged re-entry vehicle.

  6. Reentry thermal protection from Pioneer F RTG insulation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorreiter, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Ablation tests were performed on the insulation material used in the Pioneer F radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) in the Ames Arc-Heated Planetary-Gas Wind Tunnel. Test results indicate that the material, trade name Min-K 1301, should experience little ablation for heat transfer rates below 40 BTU/sq ft-sec. If the current design were to be changed so that the various pieces of Min-K were fastened or interlocked together the total amount of heat delivered to the RTG heat source during an earth orbital decay reentry would be reduced by at least 22.7%.

  7. Successful Reentry: The Perspective of Private Correctional Health Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Greifinger, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    Due to public health and safety concerns, discharge planning is increasingly prioritized by correctional systems when preparing prisoners for their reintegration into the community. Annually, private correctional health care vendors provide $3 billion of health care services to inmates in correctional facilities throughout the U.S., but rarely are contracted to provide transitional health care. A discussion with 12 people representing five private nationwide correctional health care providers highlighted the barriers they face when implementing transitional health care and what templates of services health care companies could provide to state and counties to enhance the reentry process. PMID:17131191

  8. A conceptual design study of the reusable reentry satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, Byron L.; Mascy, Alfred C.; Carter, Bruce; Cartledge, Alan; Corridan, Robert E.; Edsinger, Larry E.; Jackson, Robert W.; Keller, Robert; Murbach, Marcus S.; Wercinski, Paul F.

    1988-01-01

    Experimentation leading to an understanding of life processes under reduced and extremely low gravitational forces will profoundly contribute to the success of future space missions involving humans. In addition to research on gravitational biology, research on the effects of cosmic radiation and the interruption and change of circadian rhythms on life systems is also of prime importance. Research in space, however, is currently viewed by biological scientists as an arena that is essential, yet largely inaccessible to them for their experimentation. To fulfill this need, a project and spacecraft system described as the Reusuable Reentry Satellite or Lifesat has been proposed by NASA.

  9. Hypersonic Pitching-Moment Shift for Stardust Reentry Capsule Forebody

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.

    1997-01-01

    Aerodynamic coefficients are presented for perfect-gas and equilibrium-air solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations about the Stardust reentry-capsule forebody at Mach numbers of 4.6, 7, 8.5, and 10. A comparison with Newtonian-flow assumptions indicates a divergence of the aerodynamic coefficients from Newtonian-flow for Mach numbers less than 10. The static stability of the forebody is reduced by a factor of 2.5 with decreasing freestream Mach number between Mach 10 and 7.

  10. Some Landing Studies Pertinent to Glider-Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houbolt, John C.; Batterson, Sidney A.

    1960-01-01

    Results are presented of some landing studies that may serve as guidelines in the consideration of landing problems of glider-reentry configurations. The effect of the initial conditions of sinking velocity, angle of attack, and pitch rate on impact severity and the effect of locating the rear gear in various positions are discussed. Some information is included regarding the influence of landing-gear location on effective masses. Preliminary experimental results on the slideout phase of landing include sliding and rolling friction coefficients that have been determined from tests of various skids and all-metal wheels.

  11. Continuing Medical Education, Maintenance of Certification, and Physician Reentry

    PubMed Central

    Luchtefeld, Martin; Kerwel, Therese G.

    2012-01-01

    Continuing medical education serves a central role in the licensure and certification for practicing physicians. This chapter explores the different modalities that constitute CME along with their effectiveness, including simulation and best education practices. The evolution to maintenance of certification and the requirements for both the American Board of Surgery and the American Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery are delineated. Further progress in the education of practicing surgeons is evidenced through the introduction of laparoscopic colectomy and the improvements made from the introduction of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Finally, reentry of physicians into practice following a voluntary leave of absence, a new and challenging issue for surgeons, is also discussed. PMID:23997673

  12. Social Support, Motivation, and the Process of Juvenile Reentry: An Exploratory Analysis of Desistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panuccio, Elizabeth A.; Christian, Johnna; Martinez, Damian J.; Sullivan, Mercer L.

    2012-01-01

    Many scholarly works and studies have explored the experience of reentry and desistance for adult offenders, but fewer studies have focused on these processes among juvenile offenders. Using qualitative case studies of juveniles released from secure confinement, this study explores the desistance process during juvenile reentry by examining how…

  13. Balancing Act: The Adaptation of Traditional Judicial Roles in Reentry Court

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Caitlin J.

    2012-01-01

    While research has confirmed their role adaptation and importance in reducing recidivism in drug courts, little research has documented the role of the judge in reentry courts. Based on interviews with participants and the workgroup, court observations, and a document analysis, this study revealed that judges in a federal reentry court program…

  14. Reflections on Reentry after Teaching in China. Occasional Papers in Intercultural Learning, Number 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Marcia D.

    The shock of reentry for any sojourner upon returning to their native land may be as great, if not greater, than the initial adjustment period that occurs upon arrival in the foreign country. Intercultural travelers should prepare for the reentry process and the resultant cultural lag upon their return home with the same care that they practiced…

  15. Community-Based Juvenile Reentry Services: The Effects of Service Dosage on Juvenile and Adult Recidivism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Laura S.; Terry, Diane; Franke, Todd M.

    2011-01-01

    In this study the authors examined the influence of length of participation in a community-based reentry program on the odds of reconviction in the juvenile and adult criminal justice systems. A structured telephone survey of reentry program alumni was conducted with 75 transition-age (18-25 year-old) young men. Binary logistic regression analysis…

  16. Exploring Career Decision-Making Experiences of Mexican American Re-Entry Community College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominguez, Cecilia Sophia

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological investigation was to increase understanding of the career perspectives of 12 Mexican American, re-entry women who were attending a community college. The questions guiding this investigation were: (a) How do Mexican American re-entry college women describe their career decision-making experiences, (b) What do…

  17. Recidivism among Participants of a Reentry Program for Prisoners Released without Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wikoff, Nora; Linhorst, Donald M.; Morani, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    As higher numbers of individuals are released from prison and rejoin society, reentry programs can help former offenders reintegrate into society without continuing to engage in crime. This quasi-experimental study examined whether participation in reentry programming was associated with reduced recidivism among offenders who were no longer under…

  18. Gender Differences in the Perceived Needs and Barriers of Youth Offenders Preparing for Community Reentry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Diane; Abrams, Laura S.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored how gender differences may influence the community reentry experiences of incarcerated youth. Structured surveys assessing risk factors for re-offending, perceived reentry needs, and anticipated barriers to meeting these needs were administered to a convenience sample of males (n = 36) and females (n = 35) who were within 60…

  19. 14 CFR 431.61 - Incorporation of payload reentry determination in license application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Incorporation of payload reentry determination in license application. 431.61 Section 431.61 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH AND REENTRY OF A REUSABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE (RLV) Payload...

  20. A Randomized Trial of a Multimodal Community-Based Prisoner Reentry Program Emphasizing Substance Abuse Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grommon, Eric; Davidson, William S., II; Bynum, Timothy S.

    2013-01-01

    Prisoner reentry programs continue to be developed and implemented to ease the process of transition into the community and to curtail fiscal pressures. This study describes and provides relapse and recidivism outcome findings related to a randomized trial evaluating a multimodal, community-based reentry program that prioritized substance abuse…

  1. A Cooperative Endeavor for Integrating Re-Entry Adults in a 4-Year University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawlins, Melanie E.; Lenihan, Genie O.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a cooperative venture between a counselor educator and a university counseling center in providing a program for reentry adults. Counseling graduate students participated in organizing and conducting workshops for reentry students and providing a noontime information series organized around psychological life adjustment themes.…

  2. Statistical Issues for Uncontrolled Reentry Hazards - Empirical Tests of the Predicted Footprint for Uncontrolled Satellite Reentry Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matney, M.

    2012-01-01

    A number of statistical tools have been developed over the years for assessing the risk of reentering objects to human populations. These tools make use of the characteristics (e.g., mass, material, shape, size) of debris that are predicted by aerothermal models to survive reentry. The statistical tools use this information to compute the probability that one or more of the surviving debris might hit a person on the ground and cause one or more casualties. The statistical portion of the analysis relies on a number of assumptions about how the debris footprint and the human population are distributed in latitude and longitude, and how to use that information to arrive at realistic risk numbers. Because this information is used in making policy and engineering decisions, it is important that these assumptions be tested using empirical data. This study uses the latest database of known uncontrolled reentry locations measured by the United States Department of Defense. The predicted ground footprint distributions of these objects are based on the theory that their orbits behave basically like simple Kepler orbits. However, there are a number of factors in the final stages of reentry - including the effects of gravitational harmonics, the effects of the Earth's equatorial bulge on the atmosphere, and the rotation of the Earth and atmosphere - that could cause them to diverge from simple Kepler orbit behavior and possibly change the probability of reentering over a given location. In this paper, the measured latitude and longitude distributions of these objects are directly compared with the predicted distributions, providing a fundamental empirical test of the model assumptions.

  3. Statistical Issues for Uncontrolled Reentry Hazards Empirical Tests of the Predicted Footprint for Uncontrolled Satellite Reentry Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A number of statistical tools have been developed over the years for assessing the risk of reentering objects to human populations. These tools make use of the characteristics (e.g., mass, material, shape, size) of debris that are predicted by aerothermal models to survive reentry. The statistical tools use this information to compute the probability that one or more of the surviving debris might hit a person on the ground and cause one or more casualties. The statistical portion of the analysis relies on a number of assumptions about how the debris footprint and the human population are distributed in latitude and longitude, and how to use that information to arrive at realistic risk numbers. Because this information is used in making policy and engineering decisions, it is important that these assumptions be tested using empirical data. This study uses the latest database of known uncontrolled reentry locations measured by the United States Department of Defense. The predicted ground footprint distributions of these objects are based on the theory that their orbits behave basically like simple Kepler orbits. However, there are a number of factors in the final stages of reentry - including the effects of gravitational harmonics, the effects of the Earth s equatorial bulge on the atmosphere, and the rotation of the Earth and atmosphere - that could cause them to diverge from simple Kepler orbit behavior and possibly change the probability of reentering over a given location. In this paper, the measured latitude and longitude distributions of these objects are directly compared with the predicted distributions, providing a fundamental empirical test of the model assumptions.

  4. Gender Differences in the Perceived Needs and Barriers of Youth Offenders Preparing for Community Reentry

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Laura S.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored how gender differences may influence the community reentry experiences of incarcerated youth. Structured surveys assessing risk factors for re-offending, perceived reentry needs, and anticipated barriers to meeting these needs were administered to a convenience sample of males (n = 36) and females (n = 35) who were within 60 days of release from two probation camps in Southern California. Bivariate analyses found significant gender differences in prior risk factors, educational aspirations, expressed mental health needs, anticipated use of services, and reentry concerns. Minimal gender differences were detected in perceived employment needs and barriers and self-efficacy to avoid recidivism. The findings support the need for gender-specific reentry programming in some key areas and also draw attention to the importance of removing barriers to successful reentry for all incarcerated youth. PMID:20730108

  5. Investigations of Control Surface Seals for Re-entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Curry, Donald M.; DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Rivers, H. Kevin; Hsu, Su-Yuen

    2002-01-01

    Re-entry vehicles generally require control surfaces (e.g., rudders, body flaps) to steer them during flight. Control surface seals are installed along hinge lines and where control surface edges move close to the vehicle body. These seals must operate at high temperatures and limit heat transfer to underlying structures to prevent them from overheating and causing possible loss of vehicle structural integrity. This paper presents results for thermal analyses and mechanical testing conducted on the baseline rudder/fin seal design for the X-38 re-entry vehicle. Exposure of the seals in a compressed state at the predicted peak seal temperature of 1900 F resulted in loss of seal resiliency. The vertical Inconel rudder/fin rub surface was re-designed to account for this loss of resiliency. Room temperature compression tests revealed that seal unit loads and contact pressures were below limits set to protect Shuttle thermal tiles on the horizontal sealing surface. The seals survived an ambient temperature 1000 cycle scrub test over sanded Shuttle tiles and were able to disengage and re-engage the tile edges during testing. Arc jet tests confirmed the need for seals in the rudder/fin gap location because a single seal caused a large temperature drop (delta T = 1710 F) in the gap.

  6. Atomic and molecular data for spacecraft re-entry plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celiberto, R.; Armenise, I.; Cacciatore, M.; Capitelli, M.; Esposito, F.; Gamallo, P.; Janev, R. K.; Laganà, A.; Laporta, V.; Laricchiuta, A.; Lombardi, A.; Rutigliano, M.; Sayós, R.; Tennyson, J.; Wadehra, J. M.

    2016-06-01

    The modeling of atmospheric gas, interacting with the space vehicles in re-entry conditions in planetary exploration missions, requires a large set of scattering data for all those elementary processes occurring in the system. A fundamental aspect of re-entry problems is represented by the strong non-equilibrium conditions met in the atmospheric plasma close to the surface of the thermal shield, where numerous interconnected relaxation processes determine the evolution of the gaseous system towards equilibrium conditions. A central role is played by the vibrational exchanges of energy, so that collisional processes involving vibrationally excited molecules assume a particular importance. In the present paper, theoretical calculations of complete sets of vibrationally state-resolved cross sections and rate coefficients are reviewed, focusing on the relevant classes of collisional processes: resonant and non-resonant electron-impact excitation of molecules, atom–diatom and molecule–molecule collisions as well as gas-surface interaction. In particular, collisional processes involving atomic and molecular species, relevant to Earth (N2, O2, NO), Mars (CO2, CO, N2) and Jupiter (H2, He) atmospheres are considered.

  7. Investigations of Control Surface Seals for Re-Entry Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Curry, Donald M.; DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Rivers, H. Kevin; Hsu, Su-Yuen

    2002-07-01

    Re-entry vehicles generally require control surfaces (e.g., rudders, body flaps) to steer them during flight. Control surface seals are installed along hinge lines and where control surface edges move close to the vehicle body. These seals must operate at high temperatures and limit heat transfer to underlying structures to prevent them from overheating and causing possible loss of vehicle structural integrity. This paper presents results for thermal analyses and mechanical testing conducted on the baseline rudder/fin seal design for the X-38 re-entry vehicle. Exposure of the seals in a compressed state at the predicted peak seal temperature of 1900 F resulted in loss of seal resiliency. The vertical Inconel rudder/fin rub surface was re-designed to account for this loss of resiliency. Room temperature compression tests revealed that seal unit loads and contact pressures were below limits set to protect Shuttle thermal tiles on the horizontal sealing surface. The seals survived an ambient temperature 1000 cycle scrub test over sanded Shuttle tiles and were able to disengage and re-engage the tile edges during testing. Arc jet tests confirmed the need for seals in the rudder/fin gap location because a single seal caused a large temperature drop (delta T = 1710 F) in the gap.

  8. Atmospheric reentry flight test of winged space vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inatani, Yoshifumi; Akiba, Ryojiro; Hinada, Motoki; Nagatomo, Makoto

    A summary of the atmospheric reentry flight experiment of winged space vehicle is presented. The test was conducted and carried out by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) in Feb. 1992 in Kagoshima Space Center. It is the first Japanese atmospheric reentry flight of the controlled lifting vehicle. A prime objective of the flight is to demonstrate a high speed atmospheric entry flight capability and high-angle-of-attack flight capability in terms of aerodynamics, flight dynamics and flight control of these kind of vehicles. The launch of the winged vehicle was made by balloon and solid propellant rocket booster which was also the first trial in Japan. The vehicle accomplishes the lfight from space-equivalent condition to the atmospheric flight condition where reaction control system (RCS) attitude stabilization and aerodynamic control was used, respectively. In the flight, the vehicle's attitude was measured by both an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and an air data sensor (ADS) which were employed into an auto-pilot flight control loop. After completion of the entry transient flight, the vehicle experienced unexpected instability during the atmospheric decelerating flight; however, it recovered the attitude orientation and completed the transonic flight after that. The latest analysis shows that it is due to the ADS measurement error and the flight control gain scheduling; what happened was all understood. Some details of the test and the brief summary of the current status of the post flight analysis are presented.

  9. 8 CFR 211.3 - Expiration of immigrant visas, reentry permits, refugee travel documents, and Form I-551.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Expiration of immigrant visas, reentry... Expiration of immigrant visas, reentry permits, refugee travel documents, and Form I-551. An immigrant visa... holder embarked or enplaned before the expiration of his or her immigrant visa, reentry permit,...

  10. 8 CFR 211.3 - Expiration of immigrant visas, reentry permits, refugee travel documents, and Form I-551.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Expiration of immigrant visas, reentry... Expiration of immigrant visas, reentry permits, refugee travel documents, and Form I-551. An immigrant visa... holder embarked or enplaned before the expiration of his or her immigrant visa, reentry permit,...

  11. Comparison of ORSAT and SCARAB Reentry Analysis Tools for a Generic Satellite Test Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Robert L.; Hill, Nicole M.; Rochelle, W. C.; Johnson, Nicholas L.; Lips, T.

    2010-01-01

    Reentry analysis is essential to understanding the consequences of the full life cycle of a spacecraft. Since reentry is a key factor in spacecraft development, NASA and ESA have separately developed tools to assess the survivability of objects during reentry. Criteria such as debris casualty area and impact energy are particularly important to understanding the risks posed to people on Earth. Therefore, NASA and ESA have undertaken a series of comparison studies of their respective reentry codes for verification and improvements in accuracy. The NASA Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool (ORSAT) and the ESA Spacecraft Atmospheric Reentry and Aerothermal Breakup (SCARAB) reentry analysis tools serve as standard codes for reentry survivability assessment of satellites. These programs predict whether an object will demise during reentry and calculate the debris casualty area of objects determined to survive, establishing the reentry risk posed to the Earth's population by surviving debris. A series of test cases have been studied for comparison and the most recent uses "Testsat," a conceptual satellite composed of generic parts, defined to use numerous simple shapes and various materials for a better comparison of the predictions of these two codes. This study is an improvement on the others in this series because of increased consistency in modeling techniques and variables. The overall comparison demonstrated that the two codes arrive at similar results. Either most objects modeled resulted in close agreement between the two codes, or if the difference was significant, the variance could be explained as a case of semantics in the model definitions. This paper presents the main results of ORSAT and SCARAB for the Testsat case and discusses the sources of any discovered differences. Discussion of the results of previous comparisons is made for a summary of differences between the codes and lessons learned from this series of tests.

  12. Precise Orbit Determination of the GOCE Re-Entry Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gini, Francesco; Otten, Michiel; Springer, Tim; Enderle, Werner; Lemmens, Stijn; Flohrer, Tim

    2015-03-01

    During the last days of the GOCE mission, after the GOCE spacecraft ran out of fuel, it slowly decayed before finally re-entering the atmosphere on the 11th November 2013. As an integrated part of the AOCS, GOCE carried a GPS receiver that was in operations during the re-entry phase. This feature provided a unique opportunity for Precise Orbit Determination (POD) analysis. As part of the activities carried out by the Navigation Support Office (HSO-GN) at ESOC, precise ephemerides of the GOCE satellite have been reconstructed for the entire re-entry phase based on the available GPS observations of the onboard LAGRANGE receiver. All the data available from the moment the thruster was switched off on the 21st of October 2013 to the last available telemetry downlink on the 10th November 2013 have been processed, for a total of 21 daily arcs. For this period a dedicated processing sequence has been defined and implemented within the ESA/ESOC NAvigation Package for Earth Observation Satellites (NAPEOS) software. The computed results show a post-fit RMS of the GPS undifferenced carrier phase residuals (ionospheric-free linear combination) between 6 and 14 mm for the first 16 days which then progressively increases up to about 80 mm for the last available days. An orbit comparison with the Precise Science Orbits (PSO) generated at the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB, Bern, Switzerland) shows an average difference around 9 cm for the first 8 daily arcs and progressively increasing up to 17 cm for the following days. During this reentry phase (21st of October - 10th November 2013) a substantial drop in the GOCE altitude is observed, starting from about 230 km to 130 km where the last GPS measurements were taken. During this orbital decay an increment of a factor of 100 in the aerodynamic acceleration profile is observed. In order to limit the mis-modelling of the non-gravitational forces (radiation pressure and aerodynamic effects) the newly developed

  13. Spacecraft destruction during re-entry - latest results and development of the SCARAB software system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lips, T.; Fritsche, B.; Koppenwallner, G.; Klinkrad, H.

    2004-01-01

    The calculation of destructive re-entries and the prediction of the related ground risk potential due to fragment objects reaching the ground have become of high interest in the past years. This was also evident during the re-entry of the MIR space station in 2001. In 1995, under ESA contract, HTG started an international cooperation with other companies and institutes to develop the SCARAB software system (Spacecraft Atmospheric Re-Entry and Aerothermal Break-Up). SCARAB is a quasi-deterministic tool, modeling a re-entry object down to sub-system level. The resulting aerodynamic parameters and mass distribution allow calculating a realistic 6D re-entry trajectory. Geometry and mass are continuously updated during calculation. Multi-level fragmentations due to different destruction processes are considered. The SCARAB software has been applied to several projects, namely ATV (ESA), ROSAT (Germany), Ariane-5 (ESA) and BeppoSAX (Italy). The practical application of SCARAB to project work has been demonstrated. In addition SCARAB has been compared with NASA's ORSAT code. It has also been verified with experimental data gained from re-entry vehicles, break-up observations and wind-tunnel tests. SCARAB is now on the way to become the European standard software for re-entry destruction analysis.

  14. Reentry Preparedness among Soon-to-be-Released Inmates and the Role of Time Served

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Nancy; Shi, Jing; Schumann, Brooke E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose While reentry funding is flowing into states, its target efficiency and effectiveness depends on whether it goes to the right people in the right ways. The purpose of this study was to examine whether and how the amount of time incarcerated affects reentry readiness. Materials and Methods A population-based survey was conducted. Approximately 4000 soon-to-be-released male inmates were drawn from a state correctional system. Readiness is described in terms of feeling ready and material, social, and treatment resources available for reentry by time served on current conviction (episode effect) and since age 18 (cumulative effect). Generalized hierarchical linear models were used to estimate the effects of demographic, criminological, and time served variables on reentry readiness outcomes. Results Reentry vulnerability increased with time served since turning 18 (cumulative effect) but not with time served on the current conviction (episode effect). Inmates serving more than 10 years since turning 18 were at greatest reentry risk. Conclusions The findings indicate that inmates who have served more prison time over their lifetime have more pronounced needs and risks suggesting that reentry funding be targeted towards those who have served more time over the course of their lifetime. PMID:24431474

  15. Lunar Return Reentry Thermal Analysis of a Generic Crew Exploration Vehicle Wall Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Tran, Van T.; Bowles, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Thermostructural analysis was performed on generic crew exploration vehicle (GCEV) heat shielded wall structures subjected to reentry heating rates based on five potential lunar return reentry trajectories. The GCEV windward outer wall is fabricated with a graphite/epoxy composite honeycomb sandwich panel and the inner wall with an aluminum honeycomb sandwich panel. The outer wall is protected with an ablative Avcoat-5026-39H/CG thermal protection system (TPS). A virtual ablation method (a graphical approximation) developed earlier was further extended, and was used to estimate the ablation periods, ablation heat loads, and the TPS recession layer depths. It was found that up to 83 95 percent of the total reentry heat load was dissipated in the TPS ablation process, leaving a small amount (3-15 percent) of the remaining total reentry heat load to heat the virgin TPS and maintain the TPS surface at the ablation temperature, 1,200 F. The GCEV stagnation point TPS recession layer depths were estimated to be in the range of 0.280-0.910 in, and the allowable minimum stagnation point TPS thicknesses that could maintain the substructural composite sandwich wall at the limit temperature of 300 F were found to be in the range of 0.767-1.538 in. Based on results from the present analyses, the lunar return abort ballistic reentry was found to be quite attractive because it required less TPS weight than the lunar return direct, the lunar return skipping, or the low Earth orbit guided reentry, and only 11.6 percent more TPS weight than the low Earth orbit ballistic reentry that will encounter a considerable weight penalty to obtain the Earth orbit. The analysis also showed that the TPS weight required for the lunar return skipping reentry was much more than the TPS weight necessary for any of the other reentry trajectories considered.

  16. Seeker multispectral atmospheric reentry technology (SMART) window development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, G.; Herman, B.; Morrow, H.; Anderson, W.; Hsu, I.; Stubbs, D.

    1992-05-01

    Seeker Multispectral Atmospheric Reentry Technology (SMART) window development is concerned with the application of innovative technologies to develop an internally cooled window with minimum aperture size for a large field-of-regard (FOR) multispectral seeker installed in an endoatmospheric hypersonic kill vehicle. The window should be very small and lightweight and have a built-in scanner to cover the FOR. The design of such a window requires input from several critical areas, including system requirements, optical design, fabrication of micro-optical components, cooling, optomechanical design, mechanical stress analysis, and flow-field analysis. This paper describes our approach to the development of a SMART window and the current state of our design.

  17. Thermal response of Space Shuttle wing during reentry heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, L.; Ko, W. L.; Quinn, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    A structural performance and resizing (SPAR) finite element thermal analysis computer program was used in the heat transfer analysis of the space shuttle orbiter that was subjected to reentry aerodynamic heatings. One wing segment of the right wing (WS 240) and the whole left wing were selected for the thermal analysis. Results showed that the predicted thermal protection system (TPS) temperatures were in good agreement with the space transportation system, trajectory 5 (STS-5) flight-measured temperatures. In addition, calculated aluminum structural temperatures were in fairly good agreement with the flight data up to the point of touchdown. Results also showed that the internal free convection had a considerable effect on the change of structural temperatures after touchdown.

  18. Thermal response of Space Shuttle wing during reentry heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, L.; Ko, W. L.; Quinn, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    A structural performance and resizing (SPAR) finite element thermal analysis computer program was used in the heat transfer analysis of the Space Shuttle Orbiter that was subjected to reentry aerodynamic heatings. One wing segment of the right wing (WS 240) and the whole left wing were selected for the thermal analysis. Results showed that the predicted thermal protection system (TPS) temperatures were in good agreement with the space transportation system, trajectory 5 (STS-5) flight-measured temperatures. In addition, calculated aluminum structural temperatures were in fairly good agreement with flight data up to the point of touchdown. Results also showed that the internal free convection has a considerable effect on the change of structural temperatures after touchdown.

  19. High-Energy Atmospheric Reentry Test Aerothermodynamic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the aerothermodynamic environment around an 8.3 meter High Energy Atmospheric Reentry Test (HEART) vehicle. This study generated twelve nose shape configurations and compared their responses at the peak heating trajectory point against the baseline nose shape. The heat flux sensitivity to the angle of attack variations are also discussed. The possibility of a two-piece Thermal Protection System (TPS) design at the nose is also considered, as are the surface catalytic affects of the aeroheating environment of such configuration. Based on these analyses, an optimum nose shape is proposed to minimize the surface heating. A recommendation is also made for a two-piece TPS design, for which the surface catalytic uncertainty associated with the jump in heating at the nose-IAD juncture is reduced by a minimum of 93%. In this paper, the aeroshell is assumed to be rigid and the inflatable fluid interaction effect is left for future investigations

  20. MHD of Aircraft Re-entry: Limits and Perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Seller, G.; Capitelli, M.; Longo, S.; Armenise, I.; Bruno, D.

    2005-05-16

    In the present work, starting from classical MHD scheme, based on Maxwell equations, Euler fluid dynamic equations and generalised Ohm law, a critical study of fluid dynamics, electromagnetism, chemical and physical behaviour of plasma is carried out, and then a aircraft re-entry MHD numerical scheme is implemented. This scheme is used for MHD calculations in different conditions, in the range of low magnetic force and intermediate electrical conductivity. Initial imposed magnetic fields are uniform, but also some cases with coil generated magnetic fields are considered. Calculations of magnetic field and induced currents are extended also inside the blunt body. Results show interesting physical and electromagnetic effects. Comparison with other methods shows possible development in keeping into account other physical and chemical effects.

  1. A Flight Control Approach for Small Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevacqoa, Tim; Adams, Tony; Zhu. J. Jim; Rao, P. Prabhakara

    2004-01-01

    Flight control of small crew return vehicles during atmospheric reentry will be an important technology in any human space flight mission undertaken in the future. The control system presented in this paper is applicable to small crew return vehicles in which reaction control system (RCS) thrusters are the only actuators available for attitude control. The control system consists of two modules: (i) the attitude controller using the trajectory linearization control (TLC) technique, and (ii) the reaction control system (RCS) control allocation module using a dynamic table-lookup technique. This paper describes the design and implementation of the TLC attitude control and the dynamic table-lookup RCS control allocation for nonimal flight along with design verification test results.

  2. Re-Entry Guidance Using an Energy-State Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Akio; Shimada, Yuzo; Uchiyama, Kenji

    This paper presents a new guidance and control system for a re-entry vehicle. In the conventional drag acceleration control system employed for the present space shuttles, the velocity is an unobservable state variable and the associated pole tends to be unstable. Therefore, in this study, a condition which allows all the states to be observable is introduced using a state-space linearization method. It is also shown that energy and its rate are appropriate for the state variables. A guidance law is analytically derived on the basis of the obtained state equation with respect to the energy by solving a two-point boundary-value problem. Furthermore, a tracking control system is designed to make the position, velocity, and flight path angle of the vehicle track the reference states generated in the guidance system. Finally, numerical simulation is performed to verify the validity of the obtained plant expression, and the effectiveness of the proposed guidance and control system.

  3. Space shuttle rendezous, radiation and reentry analysis code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcglathery, D. M.

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary space shuttle mission design and analysis tool is reported emphasizing versatility, flexibility, and user interaction through the use of a relatively small computer (IBM-7044). The Space Shuttle Rendezvous, Radiation and Reentry Analysis Code is used to perform mission and space radiation environmental analyses for four typical space shuttle missions. Included also is a version of the proposed Apollo/Soyuz rendezvous and docking test mission. Tangential steering circle to circle low-thrust tug orbit raising and the effects of the trapped radiation environment on trajectory shaping due to solar electric power losses are also features of this mission analysis code. The computational results include a parametric study on single impulse versus double impulse deorbiting for relatively low space shuttle orbits as well as some definitive data on the magnetically trapped protons and electrons encountered on a particular mission.

  4. Reentry-F Flowfield Solutions at 80,000 ft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.; Riley, Christopher J.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil

    1997-01-01

    Three equilibrium-air numerical solutions are presented for the Reentry-F flight-test vehicle at Mach 20, 80,000 Ft. conditions, including turbulent flow predictions. The three solutions are from a thin-layer Navier-Stokes code, coupled thin-layer and parabolized Navier-Stokes codes, and an approximate viscous shock-layer code. Boundary-layer and shock-layer profiles are presented and compared between the three solutions, revealing close agreement between the three solution methods. Notable exceptions to the close agreement, with 7-10 percent discrepancies, occur in the density profiles at the boundary-layer edge, in the boundary-layer velocity profiles, and in the shock-layer profiles in regions influenced by the nose bluntness.

  5. Non-intrusive flow measurements on a reentry vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, R. B.; Satavicca, D. A.; Zimmermann, G. M.

    1983-01-01

    This study evaluates the utility of various non-intrusive techniques for the measurement of the flow field on the windward side of the Space Shuttle or a similar re-entry vehicle. Included are linear (Rayleigh, Raman, Mie, Laser Doppler Velocimetry, Resonant Doppler Velocimetry) and nonlinear (Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman, Laser Induced Fluorescence) light scattering, electron beam fluorescence, thermal emission and mass spectroscopy. Flow field properties are taken from a nonequilibrium flow model by Shinn, Moss and Simmonds at NASA Langley. Conclusions are, when possible, based on quantitative scaling of known laboratory results to the conditions projected. Detailed discussion with researchers in the field contributed further to these conclusions and provided valuable insights regarding the experimental feasibility of each of the techniques.

  6. Thermal Analysis of Small Re-Entry Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Chen, Y. K.

    2012-01-01

    The Small Probe Reentry Investigation for TPS Engineering (SPRITE) concept was developed at NASA Ames Research Center to facilitate arc-jet testing of a fully instrumented prototype probe at flight scale. Besides demonstrating the feasibility of testing a flight-scale model and the capability of an on-board data acquisition system, another objective for this project was to investigate the capability of simulation tools to predict thermal environments of the probe/test article and its interior. This paper focuses on finite-element thermal analyses of the SPRITE probe during the arcjet tests. Several iterations were performed during the early design phase to provide critical design parameters and guidelines for testing. The thermal effects of ablation and pyrolysis were incorporated into the final higher-fidelity modeling approach by coupling the finite-element analyses with a two-dimensional thermal protection materials response code. Model predictions show good agreement with thermocouple data obtained during the arcjet test.

  7. Landing Characteristics of a Lenticular-Shaped Reentry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Ulysse J.

    1961-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the landing characteristics of a 1/9-scale dynamic model of a lenticular-shaped reentry vehicle having extendible tail panels for control after reentry and for landing control (flare-out). The landing tests were made by catapulting a free model onto a hard-surface runway and onto water. A "belly-landing" technique in which the vehicle was caused to skid and rock on its curved undersurface (heat shield), converting sinking speed into angular energy, was investigated on a hard-surface runway. Landings were made in calm water and in waves both with and without auxiliary landing devices. Landing motions and acceleration data were obtained over a range of landing attitudes and initial sinking speeds during hard-surface landings and for several wave conditions during water landings. A few vertical landings (parachute letdown) were made in calm water. The hard-surface landing characteristics were good. Maximum landing accelerations on a hard surface were 5g and 18 radians per sq second over a range of landing conditions. Horizontal landings on water resulted in large violent rebounds and some diving in waves. Extreme attitude changes during rebound at initial impact made the attitude of subsequent impact random. Maximum accelerations for water landings were approximately 21g and 145 radians per sq second in waves 7 feet high. Various auxiliary water-landing devices produced no practical improvement in behavior. Reduction of horizontal speed and positive control of impact attitude did improve performance in calm water. During vertical landings in calm water maximum accelerations of 15g and 110 radians per sq second were measured for a contact attitude of -45 deg and a vertical velocity of 70 feet per second.

  8. Impact of tidal density variability on orbital and reentry predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, J. M.; Forbes, J. M.; Born, G. H.

    2012-12-01

    Since the first satellites entered Earth orbit in the late 1950's and early 1960's, the influences of solar and geomagnetic variability on the satellite drag environment have been studied, and parameterized in empirical density models with increasing sophistication. However, only within the past 5 years has the realization emerged that "troposphere weather" contributes significantly to the "space weather" of the thermosphere, especially during solar minimum conditions. Much of the attendant variability is attributable to upward-propagating solar tides excited by latent heating due to deep tropical convection, and solar radiation absorption primarily by water vapor and ozone in the stratosphere and mesosphere, respectively. We know that this tidal spectrum significantly modifies the orbital (>200 km) and reentry (60-150 km) drag environments, and that these tidal components induce longitude variability not yet emulated in empirical density models. Yet, current requirements for improvements in orbital prediction make clear that further refinements to density models are needed. In this paper, the operational consequences of longitude-dependent tides are quantitatively assessed through a series of orbital and reentry predictions. We find that in-track prediction differences incurred by tidal effects are typically of order 200 ± 100 m for satellites in 400-km circular orbits and 15 ± 10 km for satellites in 200-km circular orbits for a 24-hour prediction. For an initial 200-km circular orbit, surface impact differences of order 15° ± 15° latitude are incurred. For operational problems with similar accuracy needs, a density model that includes a climatological representation of longitude-dependent tides should significantly reduce errors due to this source.

  9. Application of Plasma on Reentry Vehicle Communication and Interplanetary Spacecraft Sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenstermacher, Jarrod J.

    In order to gain a better understanding of the reactions occurring during reentry at the gas-surface interface, a reactive ion etch (RIE) plasma device was augmented to more accurately represent how material may paralyze in the presence of plasma. The device inflow was augmented to include a nitrogen line, and the outflow augmented to allow chemical analysis. A nichrome resistor heater was added to raise sample temperatures to pyrolysis levels. Cryo-focusing was performed on pyrolysis gases in order to test the ability to quantify compounds released during heating. This was done using liquid nitrogen prior to compounds entering the gas chromatography column. The nitrogen line also allowed initial study into the use of the RIE machine for planetary protection experiments due to the biocidal properties of Nitrogen/Oxygen plasma. This included static build-up experiments on equipment sensitive to electrostatic discharge. Experiments were also carried out using George Washington University's Vacuum Arc Thruster (VAT). The VAT was used in an attempt to catalyze spallation from a silicon phenolic thermal protection system material (TPS).

  10. CARINA - A space vehicle with re-entry capabilities for microgravity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borriello, G.; Sansone, A.; Ricciardi, A.

    1992-08-01

    An Italian autonomous space vehicle with recovery capabilities, named CARINA (Capsula di Rientro Non Abitata), is described with special attention given to the technological developments in areas pertaining to the reentry system, including reentry aerothermodynamics and the design of the thermal protection system. Consideration is also given to the configuration of the CARINA vehicle (comprised of the expendable Service Module and the Apollo-like Reentry Module), the subsystems and their performances, the mission life cycle, the microgravity utilization aspects, and the programmatic aspects.

  11. An Analysis of Ablation-Shield Requirements for Manned Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Leonard

    1960-01-01

    The problem of sublimation of material and accumulation of heat in an ablation shield is analyzed and the results are applied to the reentry of manned vehicles into the earth's atmosphere. The parameters which control the amount of sublimation and the temperature distribution within the ablation shield are determined and presented in a manner useful for engineering calculation. It is shown that the total mass loss from the shield during reentry and the insulation requirements may be given very simply in terms of the maximum deceleration of the vehicle or the total reentry time.

  12. NASA Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Re-Entry Prediction and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansbery, Eugene; Johnson, Nick L.

    2012-01-01

    No NASA or USG human casualty reentry risk limits existed when UARS was designed, built, and launched. Time of reentry estimates were within normal limits NASA, the USG, and some foreign space agencies now seek to limit human casualty risks from reentering space objects to less than 1 in 10,000. UARS was a moderate-sized space object. Uncontrolled reentries of objects more massive than UARS are not frequent, but neither are they unusual. Since the beginning of the space age, there has been no confirmed report of an injury resulting from reentering space objects.

  13. Model for oxygen recombination on silicon-dioxide surfaces. II - Implications toward reentry heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jumper, E. J.; Seward, W. A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the model for recombination of oxygen on a silicon-dioxide surface presented in detail in a previous paper. New data supporting the model is also presented. The ramifications of the model toward the production of excited molecular oxygen is examined as it pertains to surface heating. A reentry simulation is given and compared to STS-2 reentry data, and conclusions are drawn as to the implications of the recombination model toward reentry heating. A possible buffering of the heating above a critical temperature associated with the physics of the model is also discussed.

  14. The Development of a CO2 Test Capability in the NASA JSC ARCJet for Mars Reentry Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelPapa, Steven V.; Suess, Leonard; Shafer, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The Atmospheric Reentry Materials and Structures Evaluation Facility (ARMSEF) located at NASA Johnson Space Center is used for simulating the extreme environment experienced upon reentry for the development and certification of thermal protection systems (TPS). The facility supports a large variety of programs and was heavily leveraged for the certification and operational support of the TPS for the Orbiter and, more recently, the development of the heat shield for CEV. This paper will provide more detail into the heritage of the facility. Unique attributes of the facility include a modular aerodynamically stabilized arc heater and independently controlled O2 and N2 for the test gases. When combining the O2 and N2 in a 23:77 mass ratio respectively the Earth s atmosphere is accurately simulated and via modification of this ratio the investigation of the effects of atomic oxygen on a material s response is possible. In the summer of 2010 a development effort was started to add CO2 as a third independently controlled test gas such that, when combined with N2, opens up the possibility of accurately simulating a Martian reentry environment. This paper will discuss the test facility, especially the arc heater, in more detail. Initial testing involved relatively low concentrations of CO2 combined with N2 for the primary purpose of gathering data to answer two pressing safety concerns. The first being the rate of production of carbon monoxide (CO) within the ejector vacuum system. The main concern was that CO can be flammable and possibly explosive at high enough concentrations and pressures. The hazard control during the development phase involved the use of injecting N2 inside the test chamber diffuser to dilute and reduce the concentration of any and all CO present. A residual gas analyzer (RGA) was used to determine the relative amount of CO in the exhaust gas and provide a conversion rate of CO2 to CO. This paper will discuss in more detail the results of the RGA

  15. Pedagogy of Individual Choice and Female Inmate Reentry in the U.S. Southwest

    PubMed Central

    Kellett, Nicole Coffey; Willging, Cathleen Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Much of the mental health, substance use, and educational programming within a particular women’s prison in the southwestern United States promotes individual choice and agency. Incarcerated women from rural areas are told that their ability to succeed outside prison is primarily dependent upon their personal choices. Comparably little attention is given to preparing women for their upcoming release or to overcoming structural barriers that could undermine successful reentry within rural communities. As a result, these returning citizens, many of whom grapple with mental illness and alcohol or drug dependence, blame themselves for their inability to surmount these barriers. In this qualitative research, we draw upon the perspectives of 99 incarcerated women to clarify how ideologies of individual choice promulgated in reentry pedagogy clash with contextual factors within rural communities to derail the reentry process. We also consider community reentry from Amartya Sen’s capabilities framework and discuss how this model could inform needed interventions. PMID:21864909

  16. Segment Specification for the Payload Segment of the Reusable Reentry Satellite: Rodent Module Version

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) System is composed of the payload segment (PS), vehicle segment (VS), and mission support (MS) segments. This specification establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the RRS Rodent Module (RM).

  17. The Reentry Adult College Student: An Exploration of the Black Male Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosser-Mims, Dionne; Palmer, Glenn A.; Harroff, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    This chapter shares findings from a qualitative study on reentry adult Black males' postsecondary education experiences and identifies strategies to help this population matriculate through college and graduate.

  18. Assessment of the on-ground risk during re-entries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkrad, H.

    2001-10-01

    The present paper outlines methods which allow to quantify and monitor the on-ground population risk in the course of a hazardous re-entry event. The risk potential will be derived from an object related casualty cross-section, the endangered ground swath, and the underlying population density. Means will be described to perform a long-term risk assessment for a given latitude band, and a short-term risk assessment for a given nodal longitude of the final re-entry orbit. In case of residual manoeuvring capabilities strategies will be outlined to manage and reduce the risk potential by controlling the nodal longitude of the final orbit, and the impact footprint. The usefulness of these concepts will be demonstrated for the historic re-entries of Skylab and Salyut-7, and for the recent re-entry of the Mir space station.

  19. Mechanisms of Familial Influence on Reentry among Formerly Incarcerated Latino Men.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jane Jean-Hee; Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Lotz, Kevin; Bornheimer, Lindsay

    2016-07-01

    In the United States more than 10,000 people are released from state and federal prisons every week and often reenter the communities in which they were arrested. Formerly incarcerated individuals face considerable challenges to securing employment and housing. Subsequently, approximately two-thirds of former prisoners are rearrested within three years of their release. Latino men represent the fastest growing ethnic group of prisoners in the United States with unique cultural and social needs during the reentry process. The present study examined the role of the family in the reentry process through in-depth interviews (N = 16) with formerly incarcerated Latino men (FILM). The authors sought to identify familial processes specific to Latino men with potential to affect engagement and participation in reentry programs. Findings suggest that family mechanisms of social control and social support influence FILM's reentry. Social work practitioners who work with this growing population can engage familial processes to prevent recidivism and promote desistance. PMID:27501637

  20. Planet Earth Set to Broil: Thermal Radiation from Chicxulub Ejecta Reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldin, T. J.; Melosh, H. J.

    2009-03-01

    We model the thermal radiation transfer due to the atmospheric reentry of hypervelocity Chicxulub impact ejecta. Self-shielding of downward radiation by the spherules limits the magnitude and duration of the thermal pulse at the Earth’s surface.

  1. Segment specification for the payload segment of the reusable reentry satellite: Rodent module version

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-02-01

    The Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) System is composed of the payload segment (PS), vehicle segment (VS), and mission support (MS) segments. This specification establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the RRS Rodent Module (RM).

  2. Low-Subsonic-Speed Static Longitudinal Stability and Control Characteristics of a Winged Reentry-Vehicle Configuration Having Wingtip Panels that Fold up for High-Drag Reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ware, George M.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation of the low-subsonic-speed static longitudinal stability and control characteristics of a model of a manned reentry-vehicle configuration capable of high-drag reentry and glide landing has been a made in the Langley free-flight tunnel. The model had a modified 63 deg delta plan-form wing with a fuselage on the upper surface. This configuration had wingtip panels designed to fold up 90 deg for the high-drag reentry phase of the flight and to extend horizontally for the glide landing. Data for the basic configurations and modifications to determine the effects of plan form, wingtip panel incidence, dihedral, and vertical position of the wingtip panels are presented without analysis.

  3. An uncommon case of spontaneous conversion from AV re-entry tachycardia to AV nodal re-entry tachycardia in a patient with dual tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Zeljković, Ivan; Benko, Ivica; Manola, Šime; Radeljić, Vjekoslav; Pavlović, Nikola

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 46-year old patient in whom an electrophysiology study (EP) was performed due to paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia documented in 12-lead ECG. During the EP study, supraventricular tachycardia was induced easily and it corresponded to orthodromic AV reentry tachycardia (AVRT) using a concealed left free wall accessory pathway. However, during the study AVRT spontaneously and repeatedly converted to the typical slow-fast AV node reentry tachycardia (AVNRT). Both accessory and AV nodal slow pathways were ablated, due to the finding that both AVRT and AVNRT were independently inducible during the EP study. PMID:27134441

  4. Longitudinal stability analysis of a suborbital re-entry demonstrator for a deployable capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovazzo, Michele; Carandente, Valerio; Savino, Raffaele; Zuppardi, Gennaro

    2015-01-01

    In the field of atmospheric re-entry technology several research and industrial projects are based on the design of deployable, umbrella-like Thermal Protection Systems (TPSs) and aero-brakes. These systems are made of flexible, high temperature resistant fabrics, folded at launch and deployed in space for de-orbit and re-entry operations. This technology is very promising for low cost research and industrial applications, but requires to be validated by experimental flight tests. The University of Naples "Federico II" is currently working on the development of different down-scaled technological demonstrators for this kind of capsule to be launched by different classes of sounding rockets. In the present work an aerodynamic longitudinal stability analysis for a possible, suborbital re-entry demonstrator, has been performed in continuum and rarefied regimes. The longitudinal stability behavior of the capsule, along the entire re-entry path, has been investigated in the whole range of angle of attack and, in particular, around the nominal and the reverse equilibrium re-entry attitudes (i.e. around 0° and 180°, respectively) to implement a proper re-entry strategy able not to compromise the effectiveness of the flying system.

  5. Hayabusa Re-Entry: Trajectory Analysis and Observation Mission Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Alan M.; Winter, Michael W.; Allen, Gary A.; Grinstead, Jay H.; Antimisiaris, Manny E.; Albers, James; Jenniskens, Peter

    2011-01-01

    On June 13th, 2010, the Hayabusa sample return capsule successfully re-entered Earth s atmosphere over the Woomera Prohibited Area in southern Australia in its quest to return fragments from the asteroid 1998 SF36 Itokawa . The sample return capsule entered at a super-orbital velocity of 12.04 km/sec (inertial), making it the second fastest human-made object to traverse the atmosphere. The NASA DC-8 airborne observatory was utilized as an instrument platform to record the luminous portion of the sample return capsule re-entry (60 sec) with a variety of on-board spectroscopic imaging instruments. The predicted sample return capsule s entry state information at 200 km altitude was propagated through the atmosphere to generate aerothermodynamic and trajectory data used for initial observation flight path design and planning. The DC- 8 flight path was designed by considering safety, optimal sample return capsule viewing geometry and aircraft capabilities in concert with key aerothermodynamic events along the predicted trajectory. Subsequent entry state vector updates provided by the Deep Space Network team at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory were analyzed after the planned trajectory correction maneuvers to further refine the DC-8 observation flight path. Primary and alternate observation flight paths were generated during the mission planning phase which required coordination with Australian authorities for pre-mission approval. The final observation flight path was chosen based upon trade-offs between optimal viewing requirements, ground based observer locations (to facilitate post-flight trajectory reconstruction), predicted weather in the Woomera Prohibited Area and constraints imposed by flight path filing deadlines. To facilitate sample return capsule tracking by the instrument operators, a series of two racetrack flight path patterns were performed prior to the observation leg so the instruments could be pointed towards the region in the star background where

  6. GPK-2 re-entry and deepening -- a technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, J.; Gerard, A.; Barla, R.; Socomine, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    Between mid February to end of May 1999 (in 104 days) the well GPK2 at the Soultz HDR site was successfully re-entered and deepened from 3876 m to a final depth of 5084 m and fully completed. Re-entry included the pulling of the existing 321 1 m long internal 9 5/8-inch by 7-inch casing string, fishing of a submersible pump and some 150 m of 2 3/8-inch tubing, sealing of a major loss zone and opening of a 6 1/4-inch well section in granite (3211-3876 m) to 8 1/2-inch hole size. The well was extended to 5048 m in 8 1/2'' hole size and again completed with a floating 9 5/8-inch by 7-inch casing string. The casing shoe is at 4431 m. A bottom hole core was taken in the depth range 5048-5051 m. The core recovery was app. 40%. A pilot hole in 6 1/4-inch was drilled from 5051-5084 m for in situ stress measurements using the hydraulic fracturing technique. The re-entry and deepening of the well GPK2 was accompanied by several technical developments. New casing packer elements based on inflatable metal shells were developed in a close cooperation between SOCOMINE and MeSy GmbH (patent pending). These packer elements were successfully integrated into the completion of the well. The full weight of the casing string is supported by these elements which are filled with and imbedded in cement. High temperature cementing strategies (up to 170-190 C) for the complex saline fluids encountered in Soultz (High Magnesium Resistant Cements) were developed in a cooperation between Schlumberger Dowell (Vechta), SOCOMINE, SII of Houston, Ruhr-University Bochum, BGR Hannover and IFP Paris. The development of several high temperature logging tools (200 C range, 6-arm caliper, PTF probe) was initiated with CSMA (Cornwall) during the preparation of the deepening of GPK2. Initial scientific investigations included borehole logging (NGS, CLIPER, ARI, UBI, TEMPERATURE), geological investigations (cuttings, core) and seismic monitoring while drilling. During the first temperature log performed

  7. "The stress will kill you": prisoner reentry as experienced by family members and the urgent need for support services.

    PubMed

    Grieb, Suzanne M; Crawford, Amelia; Fields, Julie; Smith, Horace; Harris, Richard; Matson, Pamela

    2014-08-01

    The role of incarceration and community reentry after incarceration has been studied extensively for individual and community health; however, little attention has been given to the experiences of individuals who provide support to those in reentry. Through a community-academic partnership, seven focus groups were conducted with 39 individuals supporting a family member in reentry in the summer of 2012. The primary objectives of the focus groups were to explore community experiences and perspectives regarding providing support during a family member's reentry from a period of incarceration and any desired support for themselves during this time. Five themes emerged under a metatheme of stress, indicating that family members experience acute stress as a result of family reentry that adds to the chronic stress they already endure. Programs that acknowledge the difficult role of family members as supporters during an individual's reentry and provide support to them are desperately needed. PMID:25130233

  8. Initiation of reentry inside the vulnerable window of the heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudenbacher, Petra; Baudenbacher, Franz; Aliev, Rubin; Wikswo, John

    2000-03-01

    Cardiac vulnerability refers to the initiation of self-sustained waves after the application of a stimulus in the wake of a propagating pulse, which can lead to arrhythmias and fibrillation. We used optical mapping of the transmembrane potential on the epicardium of Langendorff-perfused, di-4-ANNEPS stained isolated rabbit hearts. After a planar wave was launched by an S1 stimulus with line electrodes perpendicular to the fiber direction, an S2 stimulus was applied with a point electrode at a different location at a time ΔT after S1. The S1 strength was 2-4×threshold S2=2×S1. The spatio-temporal dynamics of S2 responses shows three distinct excitation regions: For ΔT>160ms, a point shaped hypopolarized region (make excitation) leads to propagation symmetrical in both directions perpendicular to the wire. For ΔT<160ms, a dog-bone shaped hyperpolarized region is followed by a hypopolarized region (break excitation), leading to an asymmetrical curved wave due to partial functional block, and in some cases reentry, especially at shorter time intervals. For ΔT<115ms, break excitation occurs without propagation. Stimulating inside the vulnerable window results in multiple responses due to functional block and allows us to extract the propagation velocity as a function of refractoriness.

  9. Aerothermodynamic Analysis of Commercial Experiment Transporter (COMET) Reentry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Rault, Didier F. G.

    1996-01-01

    An aerothermodynamic analysis of the Commercial Experiment Transporter (COMET) reentry capsule has been performed using the laminar thin-layer Navier-Stokes solver Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm. Flowfield solutions were obtained at Mach numbers 1.5, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 27.5. Axisymmetric and 5, 10, and 20 degree angles of attack were considered across the Mach-number range, with the Mach 25 conditions taken to 90 degrees angle of attack and the Mach 27.5 cases taken to 60 degrees angle of attack. Detailed surface heat-transfer rates were computed at Mach 20 and 25, revealing that heating rates on the heat-shield shoulder ,can exceed the stagnation-point heating by 230 percent. Finite-rate chemistry solutions were performed above Mach 10, otherwise perfect gas computations were made. Drag, lift, and pitching moment coefficients are computed and details of a wake flow are presented. The effect of including the wake in the solution domain was investigated and base pressure corrections to forebody drag coefficients were numerically determined for the lower Mach numbers. Pitching moment comparisons are made with direct simulation Monte Carlo results in the more rarefied flow at the highest Mach numbers, showing agreement within two-percent. Thin-layer Navier-Stokes computations of the axial force are found to be 15 percent higher across the speed range than the empirical/Newtonian based results used during the initial trajectory analyses.

  10. Reentry heat transfer analysis of the space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.; Quinn, R. D.; Gong, L.

    1982-01-01

    A structural performance and resizing finite element thermal analysis computer program was used in the reentry heat transfer analysis of the space shuttle. Two typical wing cross sections and a midfuselage cross section were selected for the analysis. The surface heat inputs to the thermal models were obtained from aerodynamic heating analyses, which assumed a purely turbulent boundary layer, a purely laminar boundary layer, separated flow, and transition from laminar to turbulent flow. The effect of internal radiation was found to be quite significant. With the effect of the internal radiation considered, the wing lower skin temperature became about 39 C (70 F) lower. The results were compared with fight data for space transportation system, trajectory 1. The calculated and measured temperatures compared well for the wing if laminar flow was assumed for the lower surface and bay one upper surface and if separated flow was assumed for the upper surfaces of bays other than bay one. For the fuselage, good agreement between the calculated and measured data was obtained if laminar flow was assumed for the bottom surface. The structural temperatures were found to reach their peak values shortly before touchdown. In addition, the finite element solutions were compared with those obtained from the conventional finite difference solutions.

  11. The SRB heat shield: Aeroelastic stability during reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ventres, C. S.; Dowell, E. H.

    1977-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of a 3% scale model of the aft portion of the SRB equipped with partially scaled heat shields were conducted for the purpose of measuring fluctuating pressure levels in the aft skirt region. During these tests, the heat shields were observed to oscillate violently, the oscillations in some instances causing the heat shields to fail. High speed films taken during the tests reveal a regular pattern of waves in the fabric starting near the flow stagnation point and progressing around both sides of the annulus. The amplitude of the waves was too great, and their pattern too regular, for them to be attributed to the fluctuating pressure levels measured during the tests. The cause of the oscillations observed in the model heat shields, and whether or not similar oscillations will occur in the full scale SRB heat shield during reentry were investigated. Suggestions for modifying the heat shield so as to avoid the oscillations are provided, and recommendations are made for a program of vibration and wind tunnel tests of reduced-scale aeroelastic models of the heat shield.

  12. Reentry heat transfer analysis of the space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, W. L.; Quinn, R. D.; Gong, L.

    A structural performance and resizing finite element thermal analysis computer program was used in the reentry heat transfer analysis of the space shuttle. Two typical wing cross sections and a midfuselage cross section were selected for the analysis. The surface heat inputs to the thermal models were obtained from aerodynamic heating analyses, which assumed a purely turbulent boundary layer, a purely laminar boundary layer, separated flow, and transition from laminar to turbulent flow. The effect of internal radiation was found to be quite significant. With the effect of the internal radiation considered, the wing lower skin temperature became about 39 C (70 F) lower. The results were compared with fight data for space transportation system, trajectory 1. The calculated and measured temperatures compared well for the wing if laminar flow was assumed for the lower surface and bay one upper surface and if separated flow was assumed for the upper surfaces of bays other than bay one. For the fuselage, good agreement between the calculated and measured data was obtained if laminar flow was assumed for the bottom surface. The structural temperatures were found to reach their peak values shortly before touchdown. In addition, the finite element solutions were compared with those obtained from the conventional finite difference solutions.

  13. Spiral waves and reentry dynamics in an in vitro model of the healed infarct border-zone

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Marvin G.; Zhang, Yibing; Chang, Connie Y.; Xu, Linmiao; Emokpae, Roland; Tung, Leslie; Marbán, Eduardo; Abraham, M. Roselle

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Reentry underlies most ventricular tachycardias (VT) seen post-myocardial infarction (MI). Mapping studies reveal that the majority of VTs late post-MI arise from the infarct border-zone (IBZ). Objective To investigate reentry dynamics and the role of individual ion channels on reentry in in vitro models of the healed IBZ. Methods and Results We designed in vitro models of the healed IBZ by co-culturing skeletal myotubes (SkM) with neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) and performed optical mapping at high temporal and spatial resolution. In culture, NRVMs mature to form striated myocytes and electrically uncoupled SkMs simulate fibrosis seen in the healed IBZ. High resolution mapping revealed that SkMs produced localized slowing of conduction velocity (CV), increased dispersion of CV and directional-dependence of activation delay without affecting myocyte excitability. Reentry was easily induced by rapid pacing in co-cultures; treatment with lidocaine, a Na+ channel blocker, significantly decreased reentry rate and CV, increased reentry pathlength and terminated 30% of reentrant arrhythmias (n=18). In contrast, nitrendipine, an L-type Ca2+ channel (LTCC) blocker terminated 100% of reentry episodes while increasing reentry cycle length and pathlength and decreasing reentry CV (n=16). K+ channel blockers increased reentry APD, but infrequently terminated reentry (n=12). Conclusions Co-cultures reproduce several architectural and EP features of the healed IBZ. Reentry termination by LTCC, but not Na+ channel blockers suggests a greater Ca2+-dependence of propagation. These results may help explain the low efficacy of pure Na+ channel blockers in preventing and terminating clinical VTs late after MI. PMID:19815825

  14. Spacecraft destruction during re-entry - latest results and developments of the SCARAB software system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lips, T.; Fritsche, B.; Koppenwallner, G.; Klinkrad, H.

    Not only since the re-entry of the MIR space station in 2001 the calculation of destructive re-entry and the prediction of ground risk potential due to space debris objects reaching the ground have become of high interest. Already in 1995 HTG started in an international cooperation with other companies and institutes under ESA contract the development of the SCARAB software system (SpaceCraft Atmospheric Re-entry and Aerothermal Break-up). SCARAB is a deterministic tool. The re-entry object is completely modelled down to sub-system level. The resulting aerodynamic parameters and mass distribution allow calculating a realistic 6D re-entry trajectory. Geometry and mass are continuously updated during calculation. Multi-level fragmentations due to different destruction processes are considered. The SCARAB software has been applied to several projects, namely ATV (Europe), ROSAT (Germany), Ariane-5 (Europe) and BeppoSAX (Italy). The practical application of SCARAB to project work has been demonstrated. In addition SCARAB has been tested against the NASA ORSAT code. It has also been verified with experimental data gained from re-entry vehicles, break-up observations and wind-tunnel tests. SCARAB is now on the way to become the European standard software for re-entry destruction analysis. This paper will give an overview of the latest results of applications of the software and a description of the interactive development process to fit the different needs of each project. The key features of planned future releases will be presented.

  15. Early afterdepolarizations promote transmural reentry in ischemic human ventricles with reduced repolarization reserve

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sara; Mincholé, Ana; Zacur, Ernesto; Quinn, T. Alexander; Taggart, Peter; Rodriguez, Blanca

    2016-01-01

    Aims Acute ischemia is a major cause of sudden arrhythmic death, further promoted by potassium current blockers. Macro-reentry around the ischemic region and early afterdepolarizations (EADs) caused by electrotonic current have been suggested as potential mechanisms in animal and isolated cell studies. However, ventricular and human-specific arrhythmia mechanisms and their modulation by repolarization reserve remain unclear. The goal of this paper is to unravel multiscale mechanisms underlying the modulation of arrhythmic risk by potassium current (IKr) block in human ventricles with acute regional ischemia. Methods and results A human ventricular biophysically-detailed model, with acute regional ischemia is constructed by integrating experimental knowledge on the electrophysiological ionic alterations caused by coronary occlusion. Arrhythmic risk is evaluated by determining the vulnerable window (VW) for reentry following ectopy at the ischemic border zone. Macro-reentry around the ischemic region is the main reentrant mechanism in the ischemic human ventricle with increased repolarization reserve due to the ATP-sensitive potassium current (IK(ATP)) activation. Prolongation of refractoriness by 4% caused by 30% IKr reduction counteracts the establishment of macro-reentry and reduces the VW for reentry (by 23.5%). However, a further decrease in repolarization reserve (50% IKr reduction) is less anti-arrhythmic despite further prolongation of refractoriness. This is due to the establishment of transmural reentry enabled by electrotonically-triggered EADs in the ischemic border zone. EADs are produced by L-type calcium current (ICaL) reactivation due to prolonged low amplitude electrotonic current injected during the repolarization phase. Conclusions Electrotonically-triggered EADs are identified as a potential mechanism facilitating intramural reentry in a regionally-ischemic human ventricles model with reduced repolarization reserve. PMID:26850675

  16. The effects of bed rest on crew performance during simulated shuttle reentry. Volume 1: Study overview and physiological results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, A.; Vykukal, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    A centrifuge study was carried out to measure physiological stress and control task performance during simulated space shuttle orbiter reentry. Jet pilots were tested with, and without, anti-g-suit protection. The pilots were exposed to simulated space shuttle reentry acceleration profiles before, and after, ten days of complete bed rest, which produced physiological deconditioning similar to that resulting from prolonged exposure to orbital zero g. Pilot performance in selected control tasks was determined during simulated reentry, and before and after each simulation. Physiological stress during reentry was determined by monitoring heart rate, blood pressure, and respiration rate. Study results indicate: (1) heart rate increased during the simulated reentry when no g protection was given, and remained at or below pre-bed rest values when g-suits were used; (2) pilots preferred the use of g-suits to muscular contraction for control of vision tunneling and grayout during reentry; (3) prolonged bed rest did not alter blood pressure or respiration rate during reentry, but the peak reentry acceleration level did; and (4) pilot performance was not affected by prolonged bed rest or simulated reentry.

  17. A new technique for calculating reentry base heating. [analysis of laminar base flow field of two dimensional reentry body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, J. C. S.

    1973-01-01

    The laminar base flow field of a two-dimensional reentry body has been studied by Telenin's method. The flow domain was divided into strips along the x-axis, and the flow variations were represented by Lagrange interpolation polynomials in the transformed vertical coordinate. The complete Navier-Stokes equations were used in the near wake region, and the boundary layer equations were applied elsewhere. The boundary conditions consisted of the flat plate thermal boundary layer in the forebody region and the near wake profile in the downstream region. The resulting two-point boundary value problem of 33 ordinary differential equations was then solved by the multiple shooting method. The detailed flow field and thermal environment in the base region are presented in the form of temperature contours, Mach number contours, velocity vectors, pressure distributions, and heat transfer coefficients on the base surface. The maximum heating rate was found on the centerline, and the two-dimensional stagnation point flow solution was adquate to estimate the maximum heating rate so long as the local Reynolds number could be obtained.

  18. Inhibition of intercellular coupling stabilizes spiral-wave reentry, whereas enhancement of the coupling destabilizes the reentry in favor of early termination.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Yoshio; Takanari, Hiroki; Honjo, Haruo; Ueda, Norihiro; Harada, Masahide; Kato, Sara; Yamazaki, Masatoshi; Sakuma, Ichiro; Opthof, Tobias; Kodama, Itsuo; Kamiya, Kaichiro

    2012-09-01

    Spiral-wave (SW) reentry is a major organizing principle of ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation (VT/VF). We tested a hypothesis that pharmacological modification of gap junction (GJ) conductance affects the stability of SW reentry in a two-dimensional (2D) epicardial ventricular muscle layer prepared by endocardial cryoablation of Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts. Action potential signals were recorded and analyzed by high-resolution optical mapping. Carbenoxolone (CBX; 30 μM) and rotigaptide (RG, 0.1 μM) were used to inhibit and enhance GJ coupling, respectively. CBX decreased the space constant (λ) by 36%, whereas RG increased it by 22-24% (n = 5; P < 0.01). During centrifugal propagation, there was a linear relationship between the wavefront curvature (κ) and local conduction velocity (LCV): LCV = LCV(0) - D·κ (D, diffusion coefficient; LCV(0), LCV at κ = 0). CBX decreased LCV(0) and D by 27 ± 3 and 57 ± 3%, respectively (n = 5; P < 0.01). RG increased LCV(0) and D by 18 ± 3 and 54 ± 5%, respectively (n = 5, P < 0.01). The regression lines with and without RG crossed, resulting in a paradoxical decrease of LCV with RG at κ > ~60 cm(-1). SW reentry induced after CBX was stable, and the incidence of sustained VTs (>30 s) increased from 38 ± 4 to 85 ± 4% after CBX (n = 18; P < 0.01). SW reentry induced after RG was characterized by decremental conduction near the rotation center, prominent drift and self-termination by collision with the anatomical boundaries, and the incidence of sustained VTs decreased from 40 ± 5 to 17 ± 6% after RG (n = 13; P < 0.05). These results suggest that decreased intercellular coupling stabilizes SW reentry in 2D cardiac muscle, whereas increased coupling facilitates its early self-termination. PMID:22707561

  19. DEBRISK, a Tool for Re-Entry Risk Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omaly, P.; Spel, M.

    2012-01-01

    An act of French parliament, adopted in 2008, imposes satellite constructors to evaluate the end-of-life operations in order to assure the risk mitigation of their satellites. One important element in this evaluation is the estimation of the mass and impact energy of the satellite debris after atmospheric re-entry. For this purpose, CNES has developed the tool DEBRISK which allows the operator to simulate the re-entry phase and to study the demise altitudes or impact energy of the individual fragments of the original satellite. DEBRISK is based on the so called object based approach. Using this approach, a breakup altitude is assumed where the satellite disintegrates due to the pressure loads. This altitude is typically around 78 km. After breakup, the satellite structure is modelled by a parent-child approach, where each child has its birth criterion. In the simplest approach the child is born after demise of the parent object. This could be the case of an object A containing an object B which is in the interior of object A and thus not exposed to the atmosphere. Each object is defined by: - its shape, attitude and dimensions, - the material along with their physical properties - the state and velocity vectors. The shape, attitude and dimensions define the aerodynamic drag of the object which is input to the 3DOF trajectory modelling. The aerodynamic mass used in the equation of motion is defined as the sum of the object's own mass and the mass of the object's offspring. A new born object inherits the state vector of the parent object. The shape, attitude and dimensions also define the heating rates experienced by the object. The heating rate is integrated in time up to the point where the melting temperature is reached. The mass of melted material is computed from the excess heat and the material properties. After each step the amount of ablated material is determined using the lumped mass approach and is peeled off from the object, updating mass and shape of the

  20. Passivity analysis for a winged re-entry vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooij, E.

    2014-12-01

    Application of simple adaptive control (SAC) theory to the design of guidance and control systems for winged re-entry vehicles has been proven successful. To apply SAC to these non-linear and non-stationary systems, it needs to be Almost Strictly Passive (ASP), which is an extension of the Almost Strictly Positive Real (ASPR) condition for linear, time-invariant systems. To fulfill the ASP condition, the controlled, non-linear system has to be minimum-phase (i.e., the zero dynamics is stable), and there is a specific condition for the product of output and input matrix. Earlier studies indicate that even the linearised system is not ASPR. The two problems at hand are: 1) the system is non-minimum phase when flying with zero bank angle, and 2) whenever there is hybrid control, e.g., yaw control is established by combined reaction and aerodynamic control for the major part of flight, the second ASPR condition cannot be met. In this paper we look at both issues, the former related to the guidance system and the latter to the attitude-control system. It is concluded that whenever the nominal bank angle is zero, the passivity conditions can never be met, and guidance should be based on nominal commands and a redefinition of those whenever the error becomes too large. For the remaining part of the trajectory, the passivity conditions are marginally met, but it is proposed to add feedforward compensators to alleviate these conditions. The issue of hybrid control is avoided by redefining the controls with total control moments and adding a so-called control allocator. Deriving the passivity conditions for rotational motion, and evaluating these conditions along the trajectory shows that the (non-linear) winged entry vehicle is ASP. The sufficient conditions to apply SAC for attitude control are thus met.

  1. NOx production and rainout from Chicxulub impact ejecta reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkos, Devon; Alexeenko, Alina; Kulakhmetov, Marat; Johnson, Brandon C.; Melosh, H. Jay

    2015-12-01

    The Chicxulub impact 66.0 Ma ago initiated the second biggest extinction in the Phanerozoic Eon. The cause of the concurrent oceanic nitrogen isotopic anomaly, however, remains elusive. The Chicxulub impactor struck the Yucatán peninsula, ejecting 2 × 1015 kg of molten and vaporized rock that reentered globally as approximately 1023 microscopic spherules. Here we report that modern techniques indicate that this ejecta generates 1.5 × 1014 moles of NOx, which is enough to cause the observed nitrogen enrichment of the basal layer. Additionally, reentry-based NO production would explain the anomalously heavy isotopic composition of the observed nitrogen. We include N, O, N2, O2, and NO species in simulations of nonequilibrium chemically reacting flow around a reentering spherule. We then determine the net production of NO from all the spherules and use turbulence models to determine how quickly this yield diffuses through the atmosphere. Upon reaching the stratosphere and troposphere, cloud moisture absorbs the NOx and forms nitric acid. We model this process and determine the acidity of the resulting precipitation, which peaks about 1 year after the impact. The precipitation ultimately reaches the upper ocean, where we assume that the well-mixed surface layer is 100 m deep. We then model the naturally occurring carbonate/bicarbonate buffer and determine the net pH. We find that insufficient NOx reaches the ocean to directly cause the observed end-Cretaceous oceanic extinction via acidification and buffer removal. However, the resulting nitrates are sufficient to explain the concurrent nitrogen isotopic anomaly and facilitate an end-Cretaceous algae bloom.

  2. Passivity analysis for a winged re-entry vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Mooij, E.

    2014-12-10

    Application of simple adaptive control (SAC) theory to the design of guidance and control systems for winged re-entry vehicles has been proven successful. To apply SAC to these non-linear and non-stationary systems, it needs to be Almost Strictly Passive (ASP), which is an extension of the Almost Strictly Positive Real (ASPR) condition for linear, time-invariant systems. To fulfill the ASP condition, the controlled, non-linear system has to be minimum-phase (i.e., the zero dynamics is stable), and there is a specific condition for the product of output and input matrix. Earlier studies indicate that even the linearised system is not ASPR. The two problems at hand are: 1) the system is non-minimum phase when flying with zero bank angle, and 2) whenever there is hybrid control, e.g., yaw control is established by combined reaction and aerodynamic control for the major part of flight, the second ASPR condition cannot be met. In this paper we look at both issues, the former related to the guidance system and the latter to the attitude-control system. It is concluded that whenever the nominal bank angle is zero, the passivity conditions can never be met, and guidance should be based on nominal commands and a redefinition of those whenever the error becomes too large. For the remaining part of the trajectory, the passivity conditions are marginally met, but it is proposed to add feedforward compensators to alleviate these conditions. The issue of hybrid control is avoided by redefining the controls with total control moments and adding a so-called control allocator. Deriving the passivity conditions for rotational motion, and evaluating these conditions along the trajectory shows that the (non-linear) winged entry vehicle is ASP. The sufficient conditions to apply SAC for attitude control are thus met.

  3. Water-Landing Characteristics of a Reentry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGehee, John R.; Hathaway, Melvin E.; Vaughan, Victor L., Jr.

    1959-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations have been made to determine the water-landing characteristics of a conical-shaped reentry capsule having a segment of a sphere as the bottom. For the experimental portion of the investigation, a 1/12-scale model capsule and a full-scale capsule were tested for nominal flight paths of 65 deg and 90 deg (vertical), a range of contact attitudes from -30 deg to 30 deg, and a full-scale vertical velocity of 30 feet per second at contact. Accelerations were measured by accelerometers installed at the centers of gravity of the model and full-scale capsules. For the model test the accelerations were measured along the X-axis (roll) and Z-axis (yaw) and for the full-scale test they were measured along the X-axis (roll), Y-axis (pitch), and Z-axis (yaw). Motions and displacements of the capsules that occurred after contact were determined from high-speed motion pictures. The theoretical investigation was conducted to determine the accelerations that might occur along the X-axis when the capsule contacted the water from a 90 deg flight path at a 0 deg attitude. Assuming a rigid body, computations were made from equations obtained by utilizing the principle of the conservation of momentum. The agreement among data obtained from the model test, the full-scale test, and the theory was very good. The accelerations along the X-axis, for a vertical flight path and 0 deg attitude, were in the order of 40g. For a 65 deg flight path and 0 deg attitude, the accelerations along the X-axis were in the order of 50g. Changes in contact attitude, in either the positive or negative direction from 0 deg attitude, considerably reduced the magnitude of the accelerations measured along the X-axis. Accelerations measured along the Y- and Z-axes were relatively small at all test conditions.

  4. Fiber Optic High Temperature Sensors for Re-Entry Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, E.; Kruzelecky, R.; Zou, J.; Wong, B.; Jamroz, W.; Sayeed, F.; Muylaert, J.-M.; McKenzie, I.

    2009-01-01

    MPB, within an ESA contract, is developing high temperature Fiber sensors (up to 1100°C) for re- ntry experiments, with direct application to the Thermo Protection Surface (TPS) of SHEFEX II. It addresses the challenges of obtaining high reflectivity FBG sensors, and integrating the fiber sensors within the selected TPS host material (C/SiC). Feasibility was demonstrated using free fiber sensors that showed the formation of the Chemical Composition Grating (CCG), with 80 % reflection at temperatures >750°C. The CCG grating was stable at high temperature (1000°C) for more than 50 hours, as well as after cycling between room temperature and 1000°C, with better than 0.5 % temperature accuracy (FBG central wavelength). Small FBG sensor packages were prepared and attached to C/SiC tiles. The calibration of the packaged fibers showed similar response to temperature as the free fiber sensor. The fiber sensor package was designed to maximize contact with the C/SiC surface to provide fast response to transients. Three- imension modeling with Ansys finite element analysis shows a time constant of 15-20 ms to reach 1200°C. A modular design will be implemented where a dedicated fiber line with 3 sensors and its own connector is used for each C/SiC tile. Small coupons of packaged sensors attached to C/SiC tiles will be tested in a re-entry environment at Von Karman Institute (Belgium) In a recently completed project with ESA, MPB developed and ground qualified a fiber sensor network, the "Fiber Sensor Demonstrator", that was successfully integrated as a payload with ESA's Proba-2. The system includes a central interrogation system that can be used to measure multiple parameters including a high temperature sensor for the Proba-2 thruster (up to 500°C).

  5. Trajectory Design and Control for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Re-Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, Susan; Vaughn, Frank J., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) controlled re-entry operation was successfully conducted in June of 2000. The surviving parts of the spacecraft landed in the Pacific Ocean within the nominal impact target zone. The design of the maneuvers to control the trajectory to accomplish this re-entry presented several challenges. These challenges included the timing and duration of the maneuvers, propellant management, post-maneuver state determination, collision avoidance with other spacecraft, accounting for the break-up of the spacecraft into several pieces with a wide range of ballistic coefficients, and ensuring that the impact footprint would remain within the desired impact target zone in the event of contingencies. This paper presents the initial re-entry trajectory design and traces the evolution of that design into the maneuver sequence used for the re-entry. The paper also discusses the spacecraft systems and operational constraints imposed on the trajectory design and the required modifications to the initial design based on those constraints. Data from the reentry operation are also presented.

  6. Ongoing Capabilities and Developments of Re-Entry Plasma Ground Tests at EADS-ASTRIUM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jullien, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    During re-entry, spacecrafts are subjected to extreme thermal loads. On mars, they may go through dust storms. These external heat loads are leading the design of re-entry vehicles or are affecting it for spacecraft facing solid propellant jet stream. Sizing the Thermal Protection System require a good knowledge of such solicitations and means to model and reproduce them on earth. Through its work on European projects, ASTRIUM has developed the full range of competences to deal with such issues. For instance, we have designed and tested the heat-shield of the Huygens probe which landed on Titan. In particular, our plasma generators aim to reproduce a wide variety of re-entry conditions. Heat loads are generated by the huge speed of the probes. Such conditions cannot be fully reproduced. Ground tests focus on reproducing local aerothermal loads by using slower but hotter flows. Our inductive plasma torch enables to test little samples at low TRL. Amongst the arc-jets, one was design to test architecture design of ISS crew return system and others fit more severe re-entry such as sample returns or Venus re-entry. The last developments aimed in testing samples in seeded flows. First step was to design and test the seeding device. Special diagnostics characterizing the resulting flow enabled us to fit it to the requirements.

  7. A Spatial Analysis of Risks and Resources for Reentry Youth in Los Angeles County

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Laura S.; Freisthler, Bridget

    2012-01-01

    Research on youth reentering the community following incarceration has largely focused on individual risks for negative outcomes and in doing so, has overlooked the potential importance of the neighborhood context(s) where youth return. Addressing this research gap, this study explores associations between neighborhood risks and resources and rates of youth reentering the community following incarceration. Examining archival data from 272 zip codes in Los Angeles County, spatial analysis detected positive associations between rates of youth reentry and unemployment, poverty, and ethnic minority concentration. Reentry rates were also positively associated with neighborhood risks including density of off-premise alcohol outlets and level of community violence. Examining resources on their own, specifically designated youth services were positively associated with reentry rates, whereas education and mental health/substance abuse services were negatively associated. However, none of these resources were significantly associated with reentry rates when neighborhood risks were simultaneously considered. The results of this study highlight the relevance of neighborhood context in youth reentry research and lead to several directions for future study. PMID:23304429

  8. Trajectory Design and Control for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Re-Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, Susan; Vaughn, Frank; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) controlled re-entry operation was successfully conducted in June of 2000. The surviving parts of the spacecraft landed in the Pacific Ocean within the predicted footprint. The design of the maneuvers to control the trajectory to accomplish this re-entry presented several challenges. These challenges included timing and duration of the maneuvers, fuel management, post maneuver position knowledge, collision avoidance with other spacecraft, accounting for the break-up of the spacecraft into several pieces with a wide range of ballistic coefficients, and ensuring that the impact footprint would remain within the desired landing area in the event of contingencies. This paper presents the initial re-entry trajectory design and the evolution of the design into the maneuver sequence used for the re-entry. The paper discusses the constraints on the trajectory design, the modifications made to the initial design and the reasons behind these modifications. Data from the re-entry operation are presented.

  9. Atmospheric reentry of the in-core thermionic SP-100 reactor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatelatos, M. G.; Barsell, A. W.; Harris, P. A.; Francisco, J.

    1987-01-01

    Presumed end-of-life atmospheric reentry of the GA SP-100 system was studied to assess dispersal feasibility and associated hazards. Reentry was studied by sequential use of an orbital trajectory and a heat analysis computer program. Two heating models were used. The first model assumed a thermal equilibrium condition between the stagnation point aerodynamic heating and the radiative cooling of the skin material surface. The second model allowed for infinite conductivity of the skin material. Four reentering configurations were studied representing stages of increased SP-100 breakup: (1) radiator, shield and reactor, (2) shield and reactor, (3) reactor with control drums, and (4) reactor without control drums. Each reentering configuration was started from a circular orbit at 116 km having an inertial velocity near Mach 25. The assumed failing criterion was the attainment of melting temperature of a critical system component. The reentry analysis revealed breakup of the vessel in the neighborhood of 61 km altitude and scattering of the fuel elements. Subsequent breakup of the fuel elements was not predicted. Oxidation of the niobium skin material was calculated to cause an increase in surface temperature of less than ten percent. The concept of thermite analogs for enhancing reactor reentry dispersal was assessed and found to be feasible in principle. A conservative worst-case hazards analysis was performed for radioactive and nonradioactive toxic SP-100 materials assumed to be dispersed during end-of-life reentry. The hazards associated with this phase of the SP-100 mission were calculated to be insignificant.

  10. Behavioral health problems, ex-offender reentry policies, and the "Second Chance Act".

    PubMed

    Pogorzelski, Wendy; Wolff, Nancy; Pan, Ko-Yu; Blitz, Cynthia L

    2005-10-01

    The federal "Second Chance Act of 2005" calls for expanding reentry services for people leaving prison, yet existing policies restrict access to needed services for those with criminal records. We examined the interaction between individual-level characteristics and policy-level restrictions related to criminal conviction, and the likely effects on access to resources upon reentry, using a sample of prisoners with Axis I mental disorders (n=3073). We identified multiple challenges related to convictions, including restricted access to housing, public assistance, and other resources. Invisible punishments embedded within existing policies were inconsistent with the call for second chances. Without modification of federal and state policies, the ability of reentry services to foster behavioral health and community reintegration is limited. PMID:16131635

  11. Grading More Accurately

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rom, Mark Carl

    2011-01-01

    Grades matter. College grading systems, however, are often ad hoc and prone to mistakes. This essay focuses on one factor that contributes to high-quality grading systems: grading accuracy (or "efficiency"). I proceed in several steps. First, I discuss the elements of "efficient" (i.e., accurate) grading. Next, I present analytical results…

  12. Application of the FADS system on the Re-entry Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Huang

    2016-07-01

    The aerodynamic model for Flush Air Data Sensing System (FADS) is built based on the surface pressure distribution obtained through the pressure orifices laid on specific positions of the surface,and the flight parameters,such as angle of attack,angle of side-slip,Mach number,free-stream static pressure and dynamic pressure are inferred from the aerodynamic model.The flush air data sensing system (FADS) has been used on several flight tests of aircraft and re-entry vehicle,such as,X-15,space shuttle,F-14,X-33,X-43A and so on. This paper discusses the application of the FADS on the re-entry module with blunt body to obtain high-precision aerodynamic parameters.First of all,a basic theory and operating principle of the FADS is shown.Then,the applications of the FADS on typical aircrafts and re-entry vehicles are described.Thirdly,the application mode on the re-entry module with blunt body is discussed in detail,including aerodynamic simulation,pressure distribution,trajectory reconstruction and the hardware shoule be used,such as flush air data sensing system(FADS),inertial navigation system (INS),data acquisition system,data storage system.Finally,ablunt module re-entry flight test from low earth orbit (LEO) is planned to obtain aerodynamic parameters and amend the aerodynamic model with this FADS system data.The results show that FADS system can be applied widely in re-entry module with blunt bodies.

  13. IXV re-entry demonstrator: Mission overview, system challenges and flight reward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelini, Roberto; Denaro, Angelo

    2016-07-01

    The Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV) is an advanced re-entry demonstrator vehicle aimed to perform in-flight experimentation of atmospheric re-entry enabling systems and technologies. The IXV integrates key technologies at the system level, with significant advancements on Europe's previous flying test-beds. The project builds on previous achievements at system and technology levels, and provides a unique and concrete way of establishing and consolidating Europe's autonomous position in the strategic field of atmospheric re-entry. The IXV mission and system objectives are the design, development, manufacturing, assembling and on-ground to in-flight verification of an autonomous European lifting and aerodynamically controlled reentry system, integrating critical re-entry technologies at system level. Among such critical technologies of interest, special attention is paid to aerodynamic and aerothermodynamics experimentation, including advanced instrumentation for aerothermodynamics phenomena investigations, thermal protections and hot-structures, guidance, navigation and flight control through combined jets and aerodynamic surfaces (i.e. flaps), in particular focusing on the technologies integration at system level for flight. Following the extensive detailed design, manufacturing, qualification, integration and testing of the flight segment and ground segment elements, IXV has performed a full successful flight on February 11th 2015. After the launch with the VEGA launcher form the CSG spaceport in French Guyana, IXV has performed a full nominal mission ending with a successful splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. During Flight Phase, the IXV space and ground segments worked perfectly, implementing the whole flight program in line with the commanded maneuvers and trajectory prediction, performing an overall flight of 34.400 km including 7.600 km with hot atmospheric re-entry in automatic guidance, concluding with successful precision landing at a distance of ~1

  14. State Policies Affecting the "Adult Re-Entry Pipeline" in Postsecondary Education: Results of a Fifty-State Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeke, Marianne; Zis, Stacey; Ewell, Peter

    2011-01-01

    With support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS) is engaged in a two year project centered on state policies that foster student progression and success in the "adult re-entry pipeline." The adult re-entry pipeline consists of the many alternative pathways to obtain a…

  15. Reentry Programs for Students with Disabilities in the Juvenile Justice System: Four State Approaches. inForum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Eve

    2011-01-01

    Evidence strongly supports the notion that juvenile offenders, both with and without disabilities, are significantly more likely to experience successful reentry into their home schools and communities if appropriate programs and supports are in place. In spite of this, comprehensive state-level reentry programs for youth are few and far between.…

  16. Reentry Orientation and Alumni Networking in U.S. Colleges and Universities with Agriculture and Natural Resources Programs. Survey Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntsberger, Paul E.

    This report presents results of a survey of U.S. postsecondary institutions with agriculture and natural resources programs, concerning institutional support for reentry orientation and alumni networking programs. Reentry orientation" involves programs that help international students become aware of the adjustment aspects of returning home, and…

  17. A Novel 'Cheese Wire' Technique for Stent Positioning Following Difficult Iliac Artery Subintimal Dissection and Aortic Re-Entry

    SciTech Connect

    Watkinson, A. F.

    2009-07-15

    Subintimal wire dissection is a well-established method for traversing difficult vascular occlusions. This technique relies on re-entry of the true lumen distal to the occlusion, which may be difficult in diseased vessels with significant calcification. This case report describes a novel 'cheese wire' technique to allow stent positioning without the use of proprietary re-entry devices.

  18. Reentry Difficulty, Life Satisfaction and Psychological Well-Being of Taiwanese Students Who Have Returned from the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pai, Hui-Chuan

    This article examines the relationship among 11 selected factors and reentry difficulty, life satisfaction, and psychological well-being of Taiwanese students returning home from the United States. The results of the questionnaire showed that returnees' reentry adjustment was affected by gender, willingness to return home, overall satisfaction…

  19. Minimum Heating Re-Entry Trajectories for Advanced Hypersonic Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windhorst, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Optimal re-entry trajectories are generated for reusable launch vehicles which minimize: (1) the heat absorbed at the vehicle surface, (2) the lower surface temperature, and (3) the heat absorbed by the internal structure. The approach uses the energy state approximation technique and a finite control volume heat transfer code coupled to a flight path integration code. These trajectories are compared to the optimal re-entry trajectory minimizing the integrated convective heat rate to determine which trajectory produces the minimum internal structural temperatures for a given thermal protection system. Three different thermal protection systems are considered: tile, blanket, and metallic.

  20. Finite-element reentry heat-transfer analysis of space shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Quinn, Robert D.; Gong, Leslie

    1986-01-01

    A structural performance and resizing (SPAR) finite-element thermal analysis computer program was used in the heat-transfer analysis of the space shuttle orbiter subjected to reentry aerodynamic heating. Three wing cross sections and one midfuselage cross section were selected for the thermal analysis. The predicted thermal protection system temperatures were found to agree well with flight-measured temperatures. The calculated aluminum structural temperatures also agreed reasonably well with the flight data from reentry to touchdown. The effects of internal radiation and of internal convection were found to be significant. The SPAR finite-element solutions agreed reasonably well with those obtained from the conventional finite-difference method.

  1. Inflatable Re-Entry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE) Design Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Stephen J.; Dillman, Robert A.; Starr, Brett R.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Lindell, Michael C.; Player, Charles J.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil

    2005-01-01

    Inflatable aeroshells offer several advantages over traditional rigid aeroshells for atmospheric entry. Inflatables offer increased payload volume fraction of the launch vehicle shroud and the possibility to deliver more payload mass to the surface for equivalent trajectory constraints. An inflatable s diameter is not constrained by the launch vehicle shroud. The resultant larger drag area can provide deceleration equivalent to a rigid system at higher atmospheric altitudes, thus offering access to higher landing sites. When stowed for launch and cruise, inflatable aeroshells allow access to the payload after the vehicle is integrated for launch and offer direct access to vehicle structure for structural attachment with the launch vehicle. They also offer an opportunity to eliminate system duplication between the cruise stage and entry vehicle. There are however several potential technical challenges for inflatable aeroshells. First and foremost is the fact that they are flexible structures. That flexibility could lead to unpredictable drag performance or an aerostructural dynamic instability. In addition, durability of large inflatable structures may limit their application. They are susceptible to puncture, a potentially catastrophic insult, from many possible sources. Finally, aerothermal heating during planetary entry poses a significant challenge to a thin membrane. NASA Langley Research Center and NASA's Wallops Flight Facility are jointly developing inflatable aeroshell technology for use on future NASA missions. The technology will be demonstrated in the Inflatable Re-entry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE). This paper will detail the development of the initial IRVE inflatable system to be launched on a Terrier/Orion sounding rocket in the fourth quarter of CY2005. The experiment will demonstrate achievable packaging efficiency of the inflatable aeroshell for launch, inflation, leak performance of the inflatable system throughout the flight regime, structural

  2. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  3. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  4. Northern Kentucky University ReEntry Center, 1980-1990. 10 Year Anniversary Celebration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Kentucky Univ., Highland Heights.

    The original poems and articles contained in this publication were submitted by individuals who have either been through the programs offered by the ReEntry Center at Northern Kentucky University or have otherwise had their lives touched and changed by the center's existence. They are intended to illustrate the growth and achievement that these…

  5. Reentry Breakup Recorder: An Innovative Device for Collecting Data during Breakup of Reentering Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ailor, W. H.; Weaver, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    More than 40 large, human-made, uncontrolled objects reenter the earth's atmosphere every year, and some fraction of the mass of each object survives to impact the ground or water. Some of these surviving objects are sizable and potentially hazardous. Recognizing this fact, space agencies are developing regulations and standards to limit ground hazards. Unfortunately, detailed information on how objects respond to the severe heating and loads environment is not available due to the difficulty in recording and broadcasting data during reentry and breakup. The Reentry Breakup Recorder (REBR) was developed using a different paradigm - rather than broadcasting data during the breakup event, record the data and broadcast it after the reentry has effectively ended, but before the data recorder actually impacts the Earth's surface. The paper describes how this approach minimizes the weight of the recording device and the overall cost of data recovery. The first flight tests of the REBR device were conducted in 2011; a REBR was inside the Japanese HTV2 and the European ATV-2 vehicles when they were deorbited into the Pacific Ocean. The paper presents a summary of the results of those tests and gives an overview of how future versions of REBR will revolutionize our understanding of reentry breakup and might be used to prototype "black box" systems for space transportation vehicles.

  6. Improving Career Re-entry Outcomes for People with Multiple Sclerosis: A Comparison of Two Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumrill, Phillip D.; Roessler, Richard T.; Cook, Bryan G.

    1998-01-01

    Reentry workers with multiple sclerosis (n=23) participated with employers and rehabilitation counselors in training seminars; 14 received traditional job search intervention. After 16 weeks, 11 of the 37 had reentered the labor force. Most already had high self-efficacy and career maturity. (SK)

  7. 14 CFR 440.12 - Duration of coverage for licensed reentry; modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... determination that risk to third parties and Government property as a result of licensed reentry is sufficiently small that financial responsibility is no longer necessary, as determined by the FAA through the risk analysis conducted to determine MPL and specified in a license order. (b) Financial responsibility...

  8. 14 CFR 440.12 - Duration of coverage for licensed reentry; modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... determination that risk to third parties and Government property as a result of licensed reentry is sufficiently small that financial responsibility is no longer necessary, as determined by the FAA through the risk analysis conducted to determine MPL and specified in a license order. (b) Financial responsibility...

  9. Development of the re-entry spectrometer RESPECT for the ESA capsule EXPERT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lein, Sebastian; Reimer, Thomas; Stubicar, Kornelia; Deuble, Frank; Auweter-Kurtz, Monika; Herdrich, Georg; Winter, Michael

    2009-02-01

    At IRS the RESPECT sensor system for in-flight emission spectroscopic measurements of re-entry body post-shock regimes is currently under development. Design solutions for this sensor system based on the basic conditions of ESA's EXPERT program are presented. The sensor head design is described with emphasis on the optical access to the plasma in the stagnation area. To justify the presented design the thermal and mechanical tests already performed are described. The present tests include thermal tests of the TPS window assembly and transmittance investigations of the sapphire window at high temperatures using plasma wind tunnel facilities at DLR and IRS. Both test campaigns have been concluded successfully, showing that the window assembly is withstanding the thermal loads of the EXPERT re-entry and that no substantial changes in the sapphire transmittance properties could be detected up to temperatures of 700C. Mechanical testing has been limited so far to the spectrometer unit and has been performed using shaker facilities. The tests demonstrate that the chosen OceanOptics S2000 spectrometer can withstand the EXPERT-Volna vibrational launch environment and the EXPERT ballistic re-entry. In addition, the functionality of the sensor system in the harsh environment imposed by plasma wind tunnel tests has been approved. Summarizing all the tests performed to support the development of the sensor system it can be concluded that the presented sensor design can be fully applied for atmospheric (re-)entry mission such as EXPERT.

  10. Current Status on Radiation Modeling for the Hayabusa Re-entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Michael W.; McDaniel, Ryan D.; Chen, Yih-Kang; Liu, Yen; Saunders, David

    2011-01-01

    On June 13, 2010 the Japanese Hayabusa capsule performed its reentry into the Earths atmosphere over Australia after a seven year journey to the asteroid Itokawa. The reentry was studied by numerous imaging and spectroscopic instruments onboard NASA's DC-8 Airborne Laboratory and from three sites on the ground, in order to measure surface and plasma radiation generated by the Hayabusa Sample Return Capsule (SRC). Post flight, the flow solutions were recomputed to include the whole flow field around the capsule at 11 points along the reentry trajectory using updated trajectory information. Again, material response was taken into account to obtain most reliable surface temperature information. These data will be used to compute thermal radiation of the glowing heat shield and plasma radiation by the shock/post-shock layer system to support analysis of the experimental observation data. For this purpose, lines of sight data are being extracted from the flow field volume grids and plasma radiation will be computed using NEQAIR [4] which is a line-by-line spectroscopic code with one-dimensional transport of radiation intensity. The procedures being used were already successfully applied to the analysis of the observation of the Stardust reentry [5].

  11. Academic Potential among African American Adolescents in Juvenile Detention Centers: Implications for Reentry to School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toldson, Ivory A.; Woodson, Kamilah M.; Braithwaite, Ronald; Holliday, Rhonda C.; De La Rosa, Mario

    2010-01-01

    The study explores Black adolescent detainees' academic potential and motivation to return to school, to inform best practices and policies for juvenile reentry to educational settings. Adolescent detainees (N = 1,576) who were recruited from 1 male and 1 female youth detention facility, responded to surveys that assessed postdetention educational…

  12. Single Parent/Adult Homemaker Re-Entry Program. Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashland Community Coll., KY.

    The Single Parent/Adult Homemaker Reentry Program at Ashland Community College (Kentucky) was developed to meet the training needs of 40 eligible persons by enrolling them in vocational-technical programs at the college. Students received financial support for tuition, books, child care, and transportation; academic and personal counseling;…

  13. Continuing Education: Reentry and the Mature Woman--Annotated Selected References and Resources. Bibliography Series: 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirksena, Kathy, Comp.; And Others

    This bibliography, second in a series of three to be issued by the Women's Educational Equity Communications Network (WEECN), contains ninety-three selected information resources (articles, papers, separately published bibliographies, and monographs) in the area of continuing education and the reentry woman. These materials, alphabetized according…

  14. 14 CFR 440.12 - Duration of coverage for licensed reentry; modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... determination that risk to third parties and Government property as a result of licensed reentry is sufficiently small that financial responsibility is no longer necessary, as determined by the FAA through the risk analysis conducted to determine MPL and specified in a license order. (b) Financial responsibility...

  15. 14 CFR 440.12 - Duration of coverage for licensed reentry; modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... determination that risk to third parties and Government property as a result of licensed reentry is sufficiently small that financial responsibility is no longer necessary, as determined by the FAA through the risk analysis conducted to determine MPL and specified in a license order. (b) Financial responsibility...

  16. 14 CFR 440.12 - Duration of coverage for licensed reentry; modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... determination that risk to third parties and Government property as a result of licensed reentry is sufficiently small that financial responsibility is no longer necessary, as determined by the FAA through the risk analysis conducted to determine MPL and specified in a license order. (b) Financial responsibility...

  17. Learning to Resist: Educational Counter-Narratives of Black College Reentry Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sealey-Ruiz, Yolanda

    2013-01-01

    Background: College reentry women are often older than the traditional college student, and in this study are distinguished from other students because of their parental status as mothers (Johnson-Bailey, 2000; Sealey-Ruiz, 2007). As one of the the fastest growing populations in colleges and universities across the nation, it is alarming that many…

  18. Side Jet/Cross Flow Interaction at Hypersonic Re-entry Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeli, R.; Seiler, F.

    Since decades control jets are commonly used for steering re-entry vehicles, e.g. the Apollo capsules, the Space Shuttles and were also used for the "SpaceShipOne" mission and recently direct to the flight path of missiles.

  19. 77 FR 40068 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Recommendations for Donor Questioning, Deferral, Reentry, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... Questioning, Deferral, Reentry, and Product Management To Reduce the Risk of Transfusion-Transmitted Malaria...-Transmitted Malaria'' dated June 2012. The draft guidance document provides blood establishments that collect... malaria. This guidance replaces the draft guidance entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Recommendations...

  20. 78 FR 50421 - Guidance for Industry: Recommendations for Donor Questioning, Deferral, Reentry, and Product...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... deferral recommendations. In the Federal Register of July 6, 2012 (77 FR 40068), FDA announced the..., Deferral, Reentry, and Product Management To Reduce the Risk of Transfusion-Transmitted Malaria...-Transmitted Malaria'' dated August 2013. The guidance document provides blood establishments that...

  1. Anticipating Father Reentry: A Qualitative Study of Children's and Mothers' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yocum, Annie; Nath, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing a grounded theory analysis of interviews with 17 children and their 8 mothers anticipating a father's prison release within 12 months, the authors propose a theory of participants' experiences, focused on the child-father aspects of reentry. Among other expectations, all participants wanted fathers to be involved with the children after…

  2. Re-entry Women: Part-Time Enrollment, Full-Time Commitment. Field Evaluation Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Roberta M.

    Barriers re-entry women often face as they enroll, or attempt to enroll, in undergraduate and graduate degree programs on a part-time basis are discussed, and recommendations for change are offered. A wide range of possible actions is outlined so that institutions can pursue those most appropriate to their individual circumstances. Suggestions on…

  3. Effects of Personality Correlates on Achievement Motivation in Traditional and Reentry College Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Carolyn H.

    There is little literature comparing personality differences between traditional (under age 25) and reentry women students (aged 25 and older). The purpose of the present study is to examine these differences. A background questionnaire and five additional scales: (1) the Work and Family Orientation Questionnaire (WOFO-3); (2) the…

  4. Development of a Sheathed Miniature Aerothermal Reentry Thermocouple for Thermal Protection System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Edward R.; Weber, Carissa Tudryn; Oishi, Tomo; Santos, Jose; Mach, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The Sheathed Miniature Aerothermal Reentry Thermocouple is a micro-miniature thermocouple for high temperature measurement in extreme environments. It is available for use in Thermal Protection System materials for ground testing and flight. This paper discusses the heritage, and design of the instrument. Experimental and analytical methods used to verify its performance and limitations are described.

  5. Control of a high beta maneuvering reentry vehicle using dynamic inversion.

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, Alfred Chapman

    2005-05-01

    The design of flight control systems for high performance maneuvering reentry vehicles presents a significant challenge to the control systems designer. These vehicles typically have a much higher ballistic coefficient than crewed vehicles like as the Space Shuttle or proposed crew return vehicles such as the X-38. Moreover, the missions of high performance vehicles usually require a steeper reentry flight path angle, followed by a pull-out into level flight. These vehicles then must transit the entire atmosphere and robustly perform the maneuvers required for the mission. The vehicles must also be flown with small static margins in order to perform the required maneuvers, which can result in highly nonlinear aerodynamic characteristics that frequently transition from being aerodynamically stable to unstable as angle of attack increases. The control system design technique of dynamic inversion has been applied successfully to both high performance aircraft and low beta reentry vehicles. The objective of this study was to explore the application of this technique to high performance maneuvering reentry vehicles, including the basic derivation of the dynamic inversion technique, followed by the extension of that technique to the use of tabular trim aerodynamic models in the controller. The dynamic inversion equations are developed for high performance vehicles and augmented to allow the selection of a desired response for the control system. A six degree of freedom simulation is used to evaluate the performance of the dynamic inversion approach, and results for both nominal and off nominal aerodynamic characteristics are presented.

  6. Mentoring Formerly Incarcerated Adults: Insights from the Ready4Work Reentry Initiative. Field Report Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauldry, Shawn; Korom-Djakovic, Danijela; McClanahan, Wendy S.; McMaken, Jennifer; Kotloff, Lauren J.

    2009-01-01

    This report explores mentoring as a tool for supporting the successful reintegration of formerly incarcerated individuals within the context of a larger reentry strategy--in this case, the "Ready4Work" model. "Ready4Work" was a three-year national demonstration designed to address the needs of the growing ex-prisoner population and to test the…

  7. International Space Station as an Observation Platform for Hypersonic Re-Entry of its Visiting Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, John B.

    2001-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will receive an armada of visiting supply vehicles during its life in orbit. Over 500 tons of material will be destroyed in targeted re-entries of these vehicles. Because all such re-entries lie in the same orbital plane of the station, and because the visiting vehicles typically deorbit within a few hours of departure, the ISS will usually be within sight of the re-entry process, at a range of only 300-600 kilometers. This vantage point offers an unprecedented opportunity for systematically measuring hypersonic destructive processes. This paper examines the integrated operational constraints of the ISS, its supply vehicles, and candidate sensors which can be employed in the scientific observation of the re-entry process. It is asserted the ISS program has the potential to reduce the worldwide risks from future deorbiting spacecraft, through systematic experimental characterization of the factors which affect the rupture, debris survival, and footprint size of its visiting vehicle fleet.

  8. Empirical Accuracies of U.S. Space Surveillance Network Reentry Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Space Surveillance Network (SSN) issues formal satellite reentry predictions for objects which have the potential for generating debris which could pose a hazard to people or property on Earth. These prognostications, known as Tracking and Impact Prediction (TIP) messages, are nominally distributed at daily intervals beginning four days prior to the anticipated reentry and several times during the final 24 hours in orbit. The accuracy of these messages depends on the nature of the satellite s orbit, the characteristics of the space vehicle, solar activity, and many other factors. Despite the many influences on the time and the location of reentry, a useful assessment of the accuracies of TIP messages can be derived and compared with the official accuracies included with each TIP message. This paper summarizes the results of a study of numerous uncontrolled reentries of spacecraft and rocket bodies from nearly circular orbits over a span of several years. Insights are provided into the empirical accuracies and utility of SSN TIP messages.

  9. Re-Entry Survivability Risk Assessment of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Hara, Robin E.; Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2001-01-01

    A reentry analysis of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) spacecraft was performed using the Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool (ORSAT) - Version 5.0. The analysis was done in response to a request by NASA Headquarters and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) after a preliminary assessment using the NASA Johnson Space Center Debris Assessment Software (DAS) - Version 1.0 had shown that the EUVE reentry may produce a debris area greater than the limit set within the NASA Safety Standard 1740.14 guidelines. DAS predicted that an uncontrolled reentry of the EUVE spacecraft would result in a total casualty area of 12.41 sq m, which exceeds the 8 sq m limit set in the NASA standards and implies a potential human casualty risk of approximately 1 in 5300. The ORSAT model enabled a higher fidelity thermal analysis of the EUVE spacecraft, utilizing sophisticated material and thermal properties such as emissivity, heat of oxidation, thermal conductivity, and material thickness inputs, which provided a foundation for a more in depth analysis of the reentering objects. Due to the conservative nature of the DAS study, it was reasonable to run ORSAT for only the ten objects shown to survive in the original DAS analysis. The result of the ORSAT study was a reduced casualty area of only 5.95 sq m, well within NASA safety limits. With the risk to human life now acceptably low, NASA can avoid having to take mitigation measures and allow EUVE to reenter the Earth's atmosphere uncontrolled.

  10. Assessing Intermediate Outcomes of a Faith-Based Residential Prisoner Reentry Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Caterina G.; Wolff, Ashley; Correa, Vanessa; Buck, Janeen

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study examined intermediate outcomes of a faith-based prisoner reentry program by assessing how client spirituality related to client- and program-level characteristics, investigating differences between completers and terminators, and examining how religious preference, religiosity/spirituality, religious salience, and…

  11. Exploring Efficacy in Negotiating Support: Women Re-Entry Students in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filipponi-Berardinelli, Josephine Oriana

    2013-01-01

    The existing literature on women re-entry students reveals that women students concurrently struggle with family, work, and sometimes health issues. Women students often do not receive adequate support from their partners or from other sources in helping manage the multiple roles that compete for their time, and often face constraints that affect…

  12. 14 CFR 437.63 - Agreements with other entities involved in a launch or reentry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Agreements with other entities involved in a launch or reentry. 437.63 Section 437.63 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS Safety Requirements § 437.63 Agreements with other...

  13. Adult Learners in Cyberspace: A Collective Case Study of Reentry Women in a Virtual Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this collective case study is to describe and explore a virtual learning community as experienced by women reentering higher education in an online graduate degree program. The grand tour question for this study was: How do reentry women in an online graduate program describe their experience in a virtual learning community? …

  14. From Corrections to Community: The Juvenile Reentry Experience as Characterized by Multiple Systems Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cusick, Gretchen Ruth; Goerge, Robert M.; Bell, Katie Claussen

    2009-01-01

    This Chapin Hall report describes findings on the extent of system involvement among Illinois youth released from correctional facilities, tracking a population of youth under age 18 in Illinois following their release. Using administrative records, researchers develop profiles of reentry experiences across the many systems that serve youth and…

  15. Development of the parachute recovery system for the LBRV-2 reentry vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, W.B.

    1983-11-01

    A single-stage 6.44-ft-dia ribbon parachute has been developed for deceleration and recovery of a 130-lb nose cone. Recovery procedures begin with jettisoning a part of the initial reentry mass before the parachute is deployed. An operational RV flight resulted in recovery of the payload (in two pieces) and the undamaged parachute.

  16. ENTRYSAT: A 3U Cubesat to Study the Re-Entry Atmospheric Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, R. F.; Chaix, J.; Mimoun, D.; EntrySat student Team

    2014-04-01

    The EntrySat is a 3U CubeSat designed to study the uncontrolled atmospheric re-entry. The project, developed by ISAE in collaboration with ONERA, is funded by CNES and is intended to be launched in January 2016, in the context of the QB50 network. The scientific goal is to relate the kinematics of the satellite with the aerothermodynamic environment during re-entry. In particular, data will be compared with the computations of MUSIC/FAST, a new 6-degree of freedom code developed by ONERA to predict the trajectory of space debris. According to these requirements, the satellite will measure the temperature, pressure, heat flux, and drag force during re-entry, as well as the trajectory and attitude of the satellite. One of the major technological challenges is the retrieval of data during the re-entry phase, which will be based on the Iridium satellite network. The system design is based on the use of commercial COTS components, and is mostly developed by students from ISAE. As such, the EntrySat has an important educational value in the formation of young engineers.

  17. 19 CFR 123.29 - Procedure on arrival at port of reentry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS RELATIONS WITH CANADA AND MEXICO Shipments in Transit Through Canada or Mexico § 123.29 Procedure on arrival at port of reentry. (a) Presentation of documents. At the first port in the United States after transportation through Canada or Mexico under the provisions of...

  18. Virtual Reality Modelling Simulation of the Re-entry Motion of an Axialsymmetric Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidi, A.; Chu, Q.. P.; Mulder, J. A.

    This work started during the stability analysis of the Delft Aerospace Re-entry Test demonstrator (DART) which is a small axisymmetric ballistic re-entry vehicle. The dynamic stability evaluation of an axisymmetric re-entry vehicle is especially concerned on the behaviour of its angle of attack during the flight through the atmosphere. The variation in the angle of attack is essential for prediction of the trajectory of the vehicle and for heating requirement of the structure of the vehicle. The concept of the total angle of attack and the windward meridian plane are introduced. The position of the centre of pressure can be a crucial point in the stability of the vehicle. Although the simpleness of an axisymmetric shape, the re-entry of such a vehicle is characterised by several complex phenomenologies that were analysed with the aid of the flight simulator and of a 3D virtual reality modeling simulator. Simulations were performed with a 25° AOA initial condition in order to simulate the response of the vehicle to a disturbance that may occur during the flight causing a variation in attitude from its Trim . Certain aspects of re-entry vehicle motion are conveniently described in the terms of Euler angles. Using the Eulerian angle it is possible to generate a tridimensional animation of the output of the Flight Simulator. This tridimensional analysis is of great importance in order to understand the mentioned complex motions. Furthermore with growing in computer power it is possible to generate online visualisation of the simulations. The output of the flight simulator was used in a software written in Virtual Reality Modelling Language (VRML). With VRML this software was possible the visualisation of the re-entry motion of the vehicle. With this option the animation can run on-line during the with the flight simulator and can be also easily published on the internet or send to other users in very small file size. (the VRLM simulation of the re-entry, can be seen

  19. Airborne Observation of the Hayabusa Sample Return Capsule Re-Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Jenniskens, Peter M.; Cassell, Alan M.; Albers, Jim; Winterm Michael

    2011-01-01

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) recently completed their Hayabusa asteroid exploration mission. Launched in 2003, Hayabusa made contact with, and retrieved a sample from, the near-Earth asteroid Itokawa in 2005. The sample return capsule (SRC) re-entered over the Woomera Test Range (WTR) in southern Australia on June 13, 2010, at approximately 11:21 pm local time (09:51 UTC). The SRC re-entry velocity was 12.2 km/s, making it the second-fastest Earth return velocity behind NASA s Stardust sample return capsule re-entry in 2006. From a space technology development perspective, Hayabusa s re-entry functioned as a rare flight experiment of an entry vehicle and its thermal protection system. In collaboration with the SETI Institute, NASA deployed its DC-8 airborne laboratory and a team of international researchers to Australia to observe the re-entry of the SRC. The use of an airborne platform enables observation above most clouds and weather and greatly diminishes atmospheric absorption of the optical signals. The DC-8 s flight path was engineered and flown to provide a view of the spacecraft that bracketed the heat pulse to the capsule. A suite of imaging instruments on board the DC-8 successfully recorded the luminous portion of the re-entry event. For approximately 70 seconds, the spectroscopic and radiometric instruments acquired images and spectra of the capsule, its wake, and destructive re-entry of the spacecraft bus. Figure 1 shows a perspective view of the WTR, the SRC re-entry trajectory, and the flight path of the DC-8. The SRC was jettisoned from the spacecraft bus approximately 3 hours prior to entry interface. Due to thruster failures on the spacecraft, it could not be diverted from the entry path and followed the trajectory of the SRC, where it burned up in the atmosphere between approximately 100 and 50 km altitude. Fortuitously, the separation distance between the spacecraft and SRC was sufficient to clearly resolve the SRC from the

  20. Cell cycle re-entry sensitizes podocytes to injury induced death.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Manuel; Pfister, Eva; Kosel, Andrea; Shankland, Stuart; Pippin, Jeffrey; Amann, Kerstin; Daniel, Christoph

    2016-07-17

    Podocytes are terminally differentiated renal cells, lacking the ability to regenerate by proliferation. However, during renal injury, podocytes re-enter into the cell cycle but fail to divide. Earlier studies suggested that re-entry into cell cycle results in loss of podocytes, but a direct evidence for this is lacking. Therefore, we established an in vitro model to test the consequences of re-entry into the cell cycle on podocyte survival. A mouse immortalized podocyte cell line was differentiated to non-permissive podocytes and stimulated with e.g. growth factors. Stimulated cells were analyzed for mRNA-expression or stained for cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry and immunocytofluorescence microscopy. After stimulation to re-entry into cell cycle, podocytes were stressed with puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN) and analyzed for survival. During permissive stage more than 40% of immortalized podocytes were in the S-phase. In contrast, S-phase in non-permissive differentiated podocytes was reduced to 5%. Treatment with b-FGF dose dependently induced re-entry into cell cycle increasing the number of podocytes in the S-phase to 10.7% at an optimal bFGF dosage of 10 ng/ml. Forty eight hours after stimulation with bFGF the number of bi-nucleated podocytes significantly increased. A secondary injury stimulus significantly reduced podocyte survival preferentially in bi-nucleated podocytes In conclusion, stimulation of podocytes using bFGF was able to induce re-entry of podocytes into the cell cycle and to sensitize the cells for cell death by secondary injuries. Therefore, this model is appropriate for testing new podocyte protective substances that can be used for therapy. PMID:27232327

  1. Connection to mental health care upon community reentry for detained youth: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although detained youth evidence increased rates of mental illness, relatively few adolescents utilize mental health care upon release from detention. Thus, the goal of this study is to understand the process of mental health care engagement upon community reentry for mentally-ill detained youth. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted with 19 youth and caregiver dyads (39 participants) recruited from four Midwest counties affiliated with a state-wide mental health screening project. Previously detained youth (ages 11–17), who had elevated scores on a validated mental health screening measure, and a caregiver were interviewed 30 days post release. A critical realist perspective was used to identify themes on the detention and reentry experiences that impacted youth mental health care acquisition. Results Youth perceived detention as a crisis event and having detention-based mental health care increased their motivation to seek mental health care at reentry. Caregivers described receiving very little information regarding their child during detention and felt “out of the loop,” which resulted in mental health care utilization difficulty. Upon community reentry, long wait periods between detention release and initial contact with court or probation officers were associated with decreased motivation for youth to seek care. However, systemic coordination between the family, court and mental health system facilitated mental health care connection. Conclusions Utilizing mental health care services can be a daunting process, particularly for youth upon community reentry from detention. The current study illustrates that individual, family-specific and systemic issues interact to facilitate or impair mental health care utilization. As such, in order to aid youth in accessing mental health care at detention release, systemic coordination efforts are necessary. The systematic coordination among caregivers, youth, and individuals within the justice

  2. Targeting of cytosolic phospholipase A2α impedes cell cycle re-entry of quiescent prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Mu; Xie, Chanlu; Kiang, Mei-Yee; Teng, Ying; Harman, David; Tiffen, Jessamy; Wang, Qian; Sved, Paul; Bao, Shisan; Witting, Paul; Holst, Jeff; Dong, Qihan

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle re-entry of quiescent cancer cells has been proposed to be involved in cancer progression and recurrence. Cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α) is an enzyme that hydrolyzes membrane glycerophospholipids to release arachidonic acid and lysophospholipids that are implicated in cancer cell proliferation. The aim of this study was to determine the role of cPLA2α in cell cycle re-entry of quiescent prostate cancer cells. When PC-3 and LNCaP cells were rendered to a quiescent state, the active form of cPLA2α with a phosphorylation at Ser505 was lower compared to their proliferating state. Conversely, the phospho-cPLA2α levels were resurgent during the induction of cell cycle re-entry. Pharmacological inhibition of cPLA2α with Efipladib upon induction of cell cycle re-entry inhibited the re-entry process, as manifested by refrained DNA synthesis, persistent high proportion of cells in G0/G1 and low percentage of cells in S and G2/M phases, together with a stagnant recovery of Ki-67 expression. Simultaneously, Efipladib prohibited the emergence of Skp2 while maintained p27 at a high level in the nuclear compartment during cell cycle re-entry. Inhibition of cPLA2α also prevented an accumulation of cyclin D1/CDK4, cyclin E/CDK2, phospho-pRb, pre-replicative complex proteins CDC6, MCM7, ORC6 and DNA synthesis-related protein PCNA during induction of cell cycle re-entry. Moreover, a pre-treatment of the prostate cancer cells with Efipladib during induction of cell cycle re-entry subsequently compromised their tumorigenic capacity in vivo. Hence, cPLA2α plays an important role in cell cycle re-entry by quiescent prostate cancer cells. PMID:26416244

  3. Accurate measurement of time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itano, Wayne M.; Ramsey, Norman F.

    1993-07-01

    The paper discusses current methods for accurate measurements of time by conventional atomic clocks, with particular attention given to the principles of operation of atomic-beam frequency standards, atomic hydrogen masers, and atomic fountain and to the potential use of strings of trapped mercury ions as a time device more stable than conventional atomic clocks. The areas of application of the ultraprecise and ultrastable time-measuring devices that tax the capacity of modern atomic clocks include radio astronomy and tests of relativity. The paper also discusses practical applications of ultraprecise clocks, such as navigation of space vehicles and pinpointing the exact position of ships and other objects on earth using the GPS.

  4. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  5. Development and application of an empirical probability distribution for the prediction error of re-entry body maximum dynamic pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzi, R. James; Vincent, Brett T.

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between actual and predicted re-entry maximum dynamic pressure is characterized using a probability density function and a cumulative distribution function derived from sounding rocket flight data. This paper explores the properties of this distribution and demonstrates applications of this data with observed sounding rocket re-entry body damage characteristics to assess probabilities of sustaining various levels of heating damage. The results from this paper effectively bridge the gap existing in sounding rocket reentry analysis between the known damage level/flight environment relationships and the predicted flight environment.

  6. A vehicle health monitoring system for the Space Shuttle Reaction Control System during reentry. M.S. Thesis - Massachusetts Inst. of Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosello, Anthony David

    1995-01-01

    A general two tier framework for vehicle health monitoring of Guidance Navigation and Control (GN&C) system actuators, effectors, and propulsion devices is presented. In this context, a top level monitor that estimates jet thrust is designed for the Space Shuttle Reaction Control System (RCS) during the reentry phase of flight. Issues of importance for the use of estimation technologies in vehicle health monitoring are investigated and quantified for the Shuttle RCS demonstration application. These issues include rate of convergence, robustness to unmodeled dynamics, sensor quality, sensor data rates, and information recording objectives. Closed loop simulations indicate that a Kalman filter design is sensitive to modeling error and robust estimators may reduce this sensitivity. Jet plume interaction with the aerodynamic flowfield is shown to be a significant effect adversely impacting the ability to accurately estimate thrust.

  7. Dispersion of refractoriness and induction of reentry due to chaos synchronization in a model of cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuanfang; Hu, Gang; Sato, Daisuke; Weiss, James N; Garfinkel, Alan; Qu, Zhilin

    2007-09-14

    Ventricular fibrillation is a lethal condition caused by multiple chaotically wandering electrical wavelets in the heart, reentering their own and each other's territories. The development of effective therapies requires a detailed understanding of how these reentrant waves are initiated. In this Letter, we demonstrate a novel mechanism for inducing reentry, in which chaos synchronization causes large-scale heterogeneities of refractoriness transverse to the direction of propagation. These regions of increased refractoriness create localized conduction block, which induces spiral wave reentry. PMID:17930473

  8. Trajectory optimization study of a lifting body re-entry vehicle for medium to intermediate range applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizvi, S. Tauqeer ul Islam; Linshu, He; ur Rehman, Tawfiq; Rafique, Amer Farhan

    2012-11-01

    A numerical optimization study of lifting body re-entry vehicles is presented for nominal as well as shallow entry conditions for Medium and Intermediate Range applications. Due to the stringent requirement of a high degree of accuracy for conventional vehicles, lifting re-entry can be used to attain the impact at the desired terminal flight path angle and speed and thus can potentially improve accuracy of the re-entry vehicle. The re-entry of a medium range and intermediate range vehicles is characterized by very high negative flight path angle and low re-entry speed as compared to a maneuverable re-entry vehicle or a common aero vehicle intended for an intercontinental range. Highly negative flight path angles at the re-entry impose high dynamic pressure as well as heat loads on the vehicle. The trajectory studies are carried out to maximize the cross range of the re-entry vehicle while imposing a maximum dynamic pressure constraint of 350 KPa with a 3 MW/m2 heat rate limit. The maximum normal acceleration and the total heat load experienced by the vehicle at the stagnation point during the maneuver have been computed for the vehicle for possible future conceptual design studies. It has been found that cross range capability of up to 35 km can be achieved with a lifting-body design within the heat rate and the dynamic pressure boundary at normal entry conditions. For shallow entry angle of -20 degree and intermediate ranges a cross range capability of up to 250 km can be attained for a lifting body design with less than 10 percent loss in overall range. The normal acceleration also remains within limits. The lifting-body results have also been compared with wing-body results at shallow entry condition. An hp-adaptive pseudo-spectral method has been used for constrained trajectory optimization.

  9. Effect of shock interactions on the attitude stability of a toroidal ballute for reentry vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsu, Hirotaka; Abe, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    The effect of shock interactions on the attitude stability of a reentry vehicle system with a toroidal ballute was investigated. The hypersonic wind tunnel experimental results showed that when the shock interaction occurred near or outside the ballute, an unstable oscillation of the ballute was observed. This was caused by the local high-pressure region on the ballute surface created by the shock interaction between the shock from the reentry capsule and the shock from the ballute. To avoid this unstable oscillation, the radius of the ballute should be designed to be large enough so that the shock from the capsule will be located inside the ballute, which can avoid the local high-pressure region on the ballute surface.

  10. Measuring the spectral emissivity of thermal protection materials during atmospheric reentry simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marble, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    Hypersonic spacecraft reentering the earth's atmosphere encounter extreme heat due to atmospheric friction. Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials shield the craft from this searing heat, which can reach temperatures of 2900 F. Various thermophysical and optical properties of TPS materials are tested at the Johnson Space Center Atmospheric Reentry Materials and Structures Evaluation Facility, which has the capability to simulate critical environmental conditions associated with entry into the earth's atmosphere. Emissivity is an optical property that determines how well a material will reradiate incident heat back into the atmosphere upon reentry, thus protecting the spacecraft from the intense frictional heat. This report describes a method of measuring TPS emissivities using the SR5000 Scanning Spectroradiometer, and includes system characteristics, sample data, and operational procedures developed for arc-jet applications.

  11. REENTRY OF YOUNG OFFENDERS FROM THE JUSTICE SYSTEM: A Developmental Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Laurence; Chung, He Len; Little, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a developmental perspective on the reentry of young offenders into the community. We begin with a discussion of the psychosocial tasks of late adolescence. Next, we discuss contextual influences on the successful negotiation of these psychosocial tasks. Third, we examine whether and to what extent the contexts to which young offenders are exposed in the justice system are likely to facilitate normative psychosocial development. Finally, we argue that the psychosocial development of youthful offenders is disrupted, or “arrested,” by their experiences within the justice system. Interventions designed to facilitate the successful reentry of young offenders into the community must be informed by what we know about healthy psychosocial development in late adolescence. PMID:20119512

  12. Modelling the Thermal Decomposition of Carbon Fibre Materials During Re-Entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsche, B.

    2013-08-01

    The SCARAB software is a tool for calculating the motion and aerothermal destruction of spacecraft entering the Earth's atmosphere. To increase the accuracy of the re-entry simulation for spacecraft containing CFRP as wall material, the modelling of the properties of CFRP was improved. Different to the simple conventional "metallic" model with monolithic properties a sophisticated model with different zones with different properties and taking into account additional effects was developed. First a mathematical model was formulated, which was then converted to a numerical model. The numerical 1D model was tested in a testbed software, then implemented into the SCARAB software and applied to wind tunnel conditions and the re-entry of the ROSAT satellite.

  13. Modified fused silicide coatings for tantalum (Ta-10W) reentry heat shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packer, C. M.; Perkins, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Results are presented of a program of research to develop a reliable, high performance, fused slurry silicide coating for the Ta-10W alloy. The effort was directed toward developing new and improved formulations for use at 2600 to 2800 F (1700 to 1811 K) in an atmospheric reentry thermal protection system with a 100-mission capability. Based on a thorough characterization of isothermal and cyclic oxidation behavior, bend transition temperatures, room- and elevated-temperature tensile properties, and creep behavior, a 2.5 Mn-33Ti-64.5Si coating (designated MTS) provides excellent protection for the Ta-10W alloy in simulated reentry environments. An extensive analysis of the oxidation behavior and characteristics of the MTS coating in terms of fundamental mechanisms also is presented.

  14. Reentry Near the Percolation Threshold in a Heterogeneous Discrete Model for Cardiac Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Sergio; Bär, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Arrhythmias in cardiac tissue are related to irregular electrical wave propagation in the heart. Cardiac tissue is formed by a discrete cell network, which is often heterogeneous. A localized region with a fraction of nonconducting links surrounded by homogeneous conducting tissue can become a source of reentry and ectopic beats. Extensive simulations in a discrete model of cardiac tissue show that a wave crossing a heterogeneous region of cardiac tissue can disintegrate into irregular patterns, provided the fraction of nonconducting links is close to the percolation threshold of the cell network. The dependence of the reentry probability on this fraction, the system size, and the degree of excitability can be inferred from the size distribution of nonconducting clusters near the percolation threshold.

  15. Thermal Analysis and Design of Multi-layer Insulation for Re-entry Aerodynamic Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran

    2001-01-01

    The combined radiation/conduction heat transfer in high-temperature multi-layer insulations was modeled using a finite volume numerical model. The numerical model was validated by comparison with steady-state effective thermal conductivity measurements, and by transient thermal tests simulating re-entry aerodynamic heating conditions. A design of experiments technique was used to investigate optimum design of multi-layer insulations for re-entry aerodynamic heating. It was found that use of 2 mm foil spacing and locating the foils near the hot boundary with the top foil 2 mm away from the hot boundary resulted in the most effective insulation design. A 76.2 mm thick multi-layer insulation using 1, 4, or 16 foils resulted in 2.9, 7.2, or 22.2 percent mass per unit area savings compared to a fibrous insulation sample at the same thickness, respectively.

  16. A peer-driven mentoring case management community reentry model: an application for jails and prisons.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Earl H; Warner-Robbins, Carmen; McClean, Christopher; Macatula, Liza; Conklin, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Welcome Home Ministries (WHM) is a peer-driven reentry program for women reentering the community from jail and prison. One of the major contributing factors to a high recidivism rate is the presenting issue of co-occurring disorders stemming from early childhood abuse and trauma found in 85% of the women seeking the assistance of WHM. The peers within WHM, having experienced mental health issues, substance abuse, and incarceration themselves, identified and developed a specific reentry program for this population. This article presents the results of a yearlong study that addresses the following: (1) the issue of co-occurring disorders; (2) the impact of early childhood trauma and abuse on the rate of incarceration; (3) the outcomes for restoration and recovery; and (4) the desire of the women to give back to the community. PMID:19752632

  17. Integrated trauma treatment in correctional health care and community-based treatment upon reentry.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Barbara C; Conner, Latoya C; Dass-Brailsford, Priscilla

    2011-10-01

    Given the crisis of mass incarceration in the United States and the high prevalence of trauma histories among those incarcerated, it is imperative to improve service delivery to inmates in correctional facilities and to those undergoing reentry in community-based treatment settings. This article provides trauma definitions and categories, describes the sequelae of trauma, reviews research on the high prevalence of incarceration in this nation, and reviews research on the high prevalence of trauma among the incarcerated. This article also provides a menu of evidence-based and promising treatment approaches to address the overlap among trauma, mental illness, substance abuse, and behavioral problems. A synthesis of research via seven points is meant to guide practitioner and policy responses to the national challenge of meeting the needs of those undergoing reentry. PMID:21948808

  18. Development of fused slurry silicide coatings for tantalum reentry heat shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warnock, R. V.; Stetson, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    A fused slurry silicide coating was developed to provide atmospheric reentry protection for the 90Ta-lOW alloy. Overlaying the silicide with a highly refractory glass greatly improved total lifetime and reliability of the coating system. Low pressure, slow cycle lifetimes in excess of 100 cycles were consistently recorded for 1700 K - 13 and 1300 N/sq m test conditions. A minimum of 25 cycles was obtained for 1810 K - 1300 N/sq m conditions. About 50 simulated reentry cycles (variable temperature, pressure, and stress) were endured by coated 1-inch miniature heat shield panels when exposed to a maximum of 1700 K and either internal or external pressure conditions.

  19. Computer systems analysis of the cardiovascular mechanisms of reentry orthostasis in astronauts.

    PubMed

    Summers, R L; Coleman, T G

    2002-01-01

    Reentry orthostasis secondary to a prolonged exposure to microgravity is a common problem among astronauts. However, the physiologic mechanisms are poorly understood due to the many control systems involved. In this study an advanced computer model of cardiovascular functioning was employed in a systems analysis approach to clarify the relative importance of some of the adaptive physiologic processes engaged when humans return from space. After simulation of the conditions of zero gravity for one month, the model predicted that the change in capacitance of the lower extremity veins resulting from a loss of external fluid forces in the dehydrated extracellular compartment was the dominant mechanism associated with reentry orthostasis. This condition appears accentuated in women due to their inherent lower center of gravity and proportionately larger mass in the lower extremities. PMID:14686452

  20. From the inside/out: Greene County jail inmates on restorative reentry.

    PubMed

    Hass, Aida Y; Saxon, Caryn E

    2012-10-01

    The application of criminal justice sanctions is often misguided by a failure to recognize the need for a comprehensive approach in the transformation of offenders into law-abiding citizens. Restorative justice is a growing movement within criminal justice that recognizes the disconnect between offender rehabilitative measures and the social dynamics within which offender reentry takes place. By using restorative approaches to justice, what one hopes of these alternative processes is that the offenders become reconnected to the community and its values, something rarely seen in retributive models in which punishment is imposed and offenders can often experience further alienation from society. In this study, the authors wish to examine factors that contribute to failed prisoner reentry and reintegration and explore how restorative reintegration processes can address these factors as well as the needs, attitudes, and perceptions that help construct and maintain many of the obstacles and barriers returning inmates face when attempting to reintegrate into society. PMID:21824892

  1. Wind Tunnel Aero-Heating and Material Destruction Tests for Improved Debris Re-Entry Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppenwallner, G.; Lips, T.; Alwes, D.

    2009-03-01

    During the S/C re-entry destruction fragments of irregular geometry are released. One finds spheres, boxes and cylinders, which may be hollow and which are flying in tumbling motion. The experimental database on such bodies is limited. Therefore heat transfer test have been conducted in the hypersonic vacuum wind tunnel V2G of DLR Göttingen. With a special model support also rotating models could be tested.Another study objective was the thermal destruction of selected materials and CFRP components under simulated re-entry heat loads. In use are solid CFRP structures, honeycombs with CFRP facesheets, or thin walled titanium tanks with external CFRP reinforcements. The destruction of multilayer structures may be completely different to solid thick CFRP. Therefore samples of 12 CFRP and CFRP honeycombs have been tested in the LBK 2 arc jet facility of DLR.

  2. Recovery, Transportation and Acceptance to the Curation Facility of the Hayabusa Re-Entry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abe, M.; Fujimura, A.; Yano, H.; Okamoto, C.; Okada, T.; Yada, T.; Ishibashi, Y.; Shirai, K.; Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; Okazaki, R.; Zolensky, M.; Sandford, S.; Ireland, T.; Ueno, M.; Mukai, T.; Yoshikawa, M.; Yamada, T.; Kuninaka, H.; Kawaguchi, J.

    2011-01-01

    The "Hayabusa" re-entry capsule was safely carried into the clean room of Sagamihara Planetary Sample Curation Facility in JAXA on June 18, 2010. After executing computed tomographic (CT) scanning, removal of heat shield, and surface cleaning of sample container, the sample container was enclosed into the clean chamber. After opening the sample container and residual gas sampling in the clean chamber, optical observation, sample recovery, sample separation for initial analysis will be performed. This curation work is continuing for several manths with some selected member of Hayabusa Asteroidal Sample Preliminary Examination Team (HASPET). We report here on the 'Hayabusa' capsule recovery operation, and transportation and acceptance at the curation facility of the Hayabusa re-entry capsule.

  3. AN EMPIRICAL PORTRAIT OF COMMUNITY REENTRY AMONG SERIOUS JUVENILE OFFENDERS IN TWO METROPOLITAN CITIES

    PubMed Central

    CHUNG, HE LEN; SCHUBERT, CAROL A.; MULVEY, EDWARD P.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the community reentry process among 413 serious adolescent offenders released from juvenile court commitments in two metropolitan areas. Data are provided about postrelease court supervision and community-based services (CBSs) during the first 6 months in the community as well as indicators of antisocial activity, formal system involvement, school attendance, and employment. Findings indicate that a far greater proportion of offenders reported receiving supervision than CBSs, but when utilized, the frequency of CBS use was high, and intensive services reduced the odds of formal system involvement. In addition, court supervision increased the likelihood of positive adjustment during community reentry. These results held after controlling for social context variables, including peer deviance, parental monitoring, and contact with caring adults. PMID:19997526

  4. Stimulus-induced critical point. Mechanism for electrical initiation of reentry in normal canine myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, D W; Wolf, P D; Wharton, J M; Tang, A S; Smith, W M; Ideker, R E

    1989-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that the field of a premature (S2) stimulus, interacting with relatively refractory tissue, can create unidirectional block and reentry in the absence of nonuniform dispersion of recovery. Simultaneous recordings from a small region of normal right ventricular (RV) myocardium were made from 117 to 120 transmural or epicardial electrodes in 14 dogs. S1 pacing from a row of electrodes on one side of the mapped area generated parallel activation isochrones followed by uniform parallel isorecovery lines. Cathodal S2 shocks of 25 to 250 V lasting 3 ms were delivered from a mesh electrode along one side of the mapped area to scan the recovery period, creating isogradient electric field lines perpendicular to the isorecovery lines. Circus reentry was created following S2 stimulation; initial conduction was distant from the S2 site and spread towards more refractory tissue. Reentry was clockwise for right S1 (near the septum) with top S2 (near the pulmonary valve) and for left S1 with bottom S2; and counterclockwise for right S1 with bottom S2 and left S1 with top S2. The center of the reentrant circuit for all S2 voltages and coupling intervals occurred at potential gradients of 5.1 +/- 0.6 V/cm (mean +/- standard deviation) and at preshock intervals 1 +/- 3 ms longer than refractory periods determined locally for a 2 mA stimulus. Thus, when S2 field strengths and tissue refractoriness are uniformally dispersed at an angle to each other, circus reentry occurs around a "critical point" where an S2 field of approximately 5 V/cm intersects tissue approximately at the end of its refractory period. Images PMID:2921316

  5. Atrioventricular Nodal Re-entry Tachycardia in Identical Twins: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Barake, Walid; Caldwell, Jane; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    This report details the case of 17 year old identical twins who both presented with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT). Electrophysiological studies revealed atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia (AVNRT) in both twins. Successful but technically challenging slow pathway ablation was performed in both twins. This is the first reported case of confirmed AVNRT in identical twins which adds strong evidence to heritability of the dual AV node physiology and AVNRT. A review of the current literature regarding PSVT in monozygotic twins is provided. PMID:23329875

  6. Regional cooling facilitates termination of spiral-wave reentry through unpinning of rotors in rabbit hearts

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Masatoshi; Honjo, Haruo; Ashihara, Takashi; Harada, Masahide; Sakuma, Ichiro; Nakazawa, Kazuo; Trayanova, Natalia; Horie, Minoru; Kalifa, Jérôme; Jalife, José; Kamiya, Kaichiro; Kodama, Itsuo

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Moderate global cooling of myocardial tissue was shown to destabilize 2-dimensional (2-D) reentry and facilitate its termination. OBJECTIVE This study sought to test the hypothesis that regional cooling destabilizes rotors and facilitates termination of spontaneous and DC shock-induced subepicardial reentry in isolated, endocardially ablated rabbit hearts. METHODS Fluorescent action potential signals were recorded from 2-D subepicardial ventricular myocardium of Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts. Regional cooling (by 5.9°C ± 1.3°C) was applied to the left ventricular anterior wall using a transparent cooling device (10 mm in diameter). RESULTS Regional cooling during constant stimulation (2.5 Hz) prolonged the action potential duration (by 36% ± 9%) and slightly reduced conduction velocity (by 4% ± 4%) in the cooled region. Ventricular tachycardias (VTs) induced during regional cooling terminated earlier than those without cooling (control): VTs lasting >30 seconds were reduced from 17 of 39 to 1 of 61. When regional cooling was applied during sustained VTs (>120 seconds), 16 of 33 (48%) sustained VTs self-terminated in 12.5 ± 5.1 seconds. VT termination was the result of rotor destabilization, which was characterized by unpinning, drift toward the periphery of the cooled region, and subsequent collision with boundaries. The DC shock intensity required for cardioversion of the sustained VTs decreased significantly by regional cooling (22.8 ± 4.1 V, n = 16, vs 40.5 ± 17.6 V, n = 21). The major mode of reentry termination by DC shocks was phase resetting in the absence of cooling, whereas it was unpinning in the presence of cooling. CONCLUSION Regional cooling facilitates termination of 2-D reentry through unpinning of rotors. PMID:21839044

  7. Evaluating and Addressing Potential Hazards of Fuel Tanks Surviving Atmospheric Reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Robert L.; Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    In order to ensure reentering spacecraft do not pose an undue risk to the Earth's population it is important to design satellites and rocket bodies with end of life considerations in mind. In addition to considering the possible consequences of deorbiting a vehicle, consideration must also be given to the possible risks associated with a vehicle failing to become operational or reach its intended orbit. Based on recovered space debris and numerous reentry survivability analyses, fuel tanks are of particular concern in both of these considerations. Most spacecraft utilize some type of fuel tank as part of their propulsion system. These fuel tanks are most often constructed using stainless steel or titanium and are filled with potentially hazardous substances such as hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide. For a vehicle which has reached its scheduled end of mission the contents of the tanks are typically depleted. In this scenario the use of stainless steel and titanium results in the tanks posing a risk to people and property do to the high melting point and large heat of ablation of these materials leading to likely survival of the tank during reentry. If a large portion of the fuel is not depleted prior to reentry, there is the added risk of hazardous substance being released when the tank impact the ground. This paper presents a discussion of proactive methods which have been utilized by NASA satellite projects to address the risks associated with fuel tanks reentering the atmosphere. In particular it will address the design of a demiseable fuel tank as well as the evaluation of off the shelf designs which are selected to burst during reentry.

  8. Evaluating and Addressing Potential Hazards of Fuel Tanks Surviving Atmospheric Reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, R. L.; Johnson, N. L.

    2012-01-01

    In order to ensure reentering spacecraft do not pose an undue risk to the Earth's population, it is important to design satellites and rocket bodies with end-of-life considerations in mind. In addition to the possible consequences of deorbiting a vehicle, consideration must be given to the possible risks associated with a vehicle failing to become operational or to reach its intended orbit. Based on recovered space debris and numerous reentry survivability analyses, fuel tanks are of particular concern in both of these considerations. Most spacecraft utilize some type of fuel tank as part of their propulsion systems. These fuel tanks are most often constructed using stainless steel or titanium and are filled with potentially hazardous substances such as hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide. For a vehicle that has reached its scheduled end-of mission, the contents of the tanks are typically depleted. In this scenario, the likely survival of a stainless steel or titanium tank during reentry poses a risk to people and property due to the high melting point and large heat-of-ablation of these materials. If a large portion of the fuel is not depleted prior to reentry, there is the added risk of a hazardous substance being released when the tank impacts the ground. This paper presents a discussion of proactive methods that have been utilized by NASA satellite projects to address the risks associated with fuel tanks reentering the atmosphere. In particular, it will address the design of a demiseable fuel tank, as well as the evaluation of fuel tank designs, which are selected based on whether they burst during reentry.

  9. Plume-Free Stream Interaction Heating Effects During Orion Crew Module Reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marichalar, J.; Lumpkin, F.; Boyles, K.

    2012-01-01

    During reentry of the Orion Crew Module (CM), vehicle attitude control will be performed by firing reaction control system (RCS) thrusters. Simulation of RCS plumes and their interaction with the oncoming flow has been difficult for the analysis community due to the large scarf angles of the RCS thrusters and the unsteady nature of the Orion capsule backshell environments. The model for the aerothermal database has thus relied on wind tunnel test data to capture the heating effects of thruster plume interactions with the freestream. These data are only valid for the continuum flow regime of the reentry trajectory. A Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) analysis was performed to study the vehicle heating effects that result from the RCS thruster plume interaction with the oncoming freestream flow at high altitudes during Orion CM reentry. The study was performed with the DSMC Analysis Code (DAC). The inflow boundary conditions for the jets were obtained from Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solutions. Simulations were performed for the roll, yaw, pitch-up and pitch-down jets at altitudes of 105 km, 125 km and 160 km as well as vacuum conditions. For comparison purposes (see Figure 1), the freestream conditions were based on previous DAC simulations performed without active RCS to populate the aerodynamic database for the Orion CM. Other inputs to the analysis included a constant Orbital reentry velocity of 7.5 km/s and angle of attack of 160 degrees. The results of the study showed that the interaction effects decrease quickly with increasing altitude. Also, jets with highly scarfed nozzles cause more severe heating compared to the nozzles with lower scarf angles. The difficulty of performing these simulations was based on the maximum number density and the ratio of number densities between the freestream and the plume for each simulation. The lowest altitude solutions required a substantial amount of computational resources

  10. Development of the parachute recovery system for the LBRV-2 reentry vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, W.B.

    1983-10-01

    A 6.44-ft-dia ribbon parachute with no reefing has been developed for recovery for the 130-lb LBRV-2 reentry nose cone. This report presents the results of five sled-launched, free-flight tests and of an operational recovery at velocities of 600 to 875 ft/s with corresponding dynamic pressures of 340 to 766 lb/ft/sup 2/.

  11. Test of Re-Entry Systems at Estrange Using Sounding Rockets and Stratospheric Balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockowandt, C.; Abrahamsson, M.; Florin, G.

    2015-09-01

    Stratospheric balloons and sounding rockets can provide an ideal in-flight platform for performing re-entry and other high speed tests off different types of vehicles and techniques. They are also ideal platforms for testing different types of recovery systems such as airbrakes and parachutes. This paper expands on some examples of platforms and missions for drop tests from balloons as well as sounding rockets launched from Esrange Space Center, a facility run by Swedish Space Corporation SSC in northern Sweden.

  12. Experiment module/support module interface specification for the reusable reentry satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This Interface Specification (IFS) identifies, defines, and controls the interface between the Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) Vehicle (RRV) Experiment Module (EM) and the Support Module (SM) equipment. Contained in this specification are the physical, functional, and environmental interface requirements for the SM and EM. This specification is tailored to the unique requirements of the EM associated with the Rodent Module. The addenda to this specification contain the requirements for alternate EM's.

  13. Experiment module/support module interface specification for the reusable reentry satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-02-01

    This Interface Specification (IFS) identifies, defines, and controls the interface between the Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) Vehicle (RRV) Experiment Module (EM) and the Support Module (SM) equipment. Contained in this specification are the physical, functional, and environmental interface requirements for the SM and EM. This specification is tailored to the unique requirements of the EM associated with the Rodent Module. The addenda to this specification contain the requirements for alternate EM's.

  14. Lifetime and reentry prediction for the Petite Amateur Navy Satellite (PANSAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuff, Daniel J.

    1994-06-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) is developing a small satellite for digital communications in the amateur frequency band. The Petite Amateur Navy Satellite (PANSAT) will primarily act as an orbiting spread-spectrum communications laboratory, possesses neither an attitude control nor a propulsion system, and is designed to 'tumble' along its orbital path once it is released from the launch vehicle which is scheduled to be the space shuttle. An explanation of the many variables and assumptions affecting PANSAT is provided as insight for the lifetime and reentry predictions. Using a conservative approach, results from combining altitudes and inclinations from expected space shuttle missions, solar flux and magnetic indices from three different sources, and the use of an orbital propagator program, LIFETIME 4.1, which was developed by Aerospace Corporation, attest that the minimum 2 year lifetime requirement for PANSAT will be met by nine shuttle missions between July 1996 and December 1997. A reentry analysis concluded that PANSAT will experience sufficient aerodynamic forces to cause structural failure and breakup during atmospheric reentry.

  15. Relative potency estimates of acceptable residues and reentry intervals after nerve agent release.

    PubMed

    Watson, A P; Jones, T D; Adams, J D

    1992-06-01

    In the event of an unplanned release of a chemical warfare agent during any stage of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program, the potential exists for off-post contamination of drinking water, forage crops, grains, garden produce, and livestock. The more persistent agents, such as the organophosphate nerve agent VX, pose the greatest human health concern for reentry. A relative potency approach comparing the toxicity of VX to organophosphate insecticide analogues is developed and used to estimate allowable residues for VX in agricultural products and reentry intervals for public access to contaminated areas. Analysis of mammalian LD50 data by all exposure routes indicates that VX is 10(3) to 10(4) times more toxic than most commercially available organophosphate insecticides. Thus, allowable residues of VX could be considered at concentration levels 10(3) to 10(4) lower than those established for certain insecticides by the U.S. EPA. Evaluation of reentry intervals developed for these organophosphate analogues indicate that, if environmental monitoring cannot reliably demonstrate acceptable levels of VX, restricted access to suspect or contaminated areas may be on the order of weeks to months following agent release. Planning for relocation, mass care centers, and quarantine should take this time period into account. PMID:1376237

  16. Reentry produced by small-scale heterogeneities in a discrete model of cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Sergio; Bär, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Reentries are reexcitations of cardiac tissue after the passing of an excitation wave which can cause dangerous arrhythmias like tachycardia or life-threatening heart failures like fibrillation. The heart is formed by a network of cells connected by gap junctions. Under ischemic conditions some of the cells lose their connections, because gap junctions are blocked and the excitability is decreased. We model a circular region of the tissue where a fraction of connections among individual cells are removed and substituted by non-conducting material in a two-dimensional (2D) discrete model of a heterogeneous excitable medium with local kinetics based on electrophysiology. Thus, two neighbouring cells are connected (disconnected) with a probability ϕ (1 – ϕ). Such a region is assumed to be surrounded by homogeneous tissue. The circular heterogeneous area is shown to act as a source of new waves which reenter into the tissue and reexcitate the whole domain. We employ the Fenton-Karma equations to model the action potential for the local kinetics of the discrete nodes to study the statistics of the reentries in two dimensional networks with different topologies. We conclude that the probability of reentry is determined by the proximity of the fraction of disrupted connections between neighboring nodes (“cells”) in the heterogeneous region to the percolation threshold.

  17. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) system design study: System cost estimates document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) program was initiated to provide life science investigators relatively inexpensive, frequent access to space for extended periods of time with eventual satellite recovery on earth. The RRS will provide an on-orbit laboratory for research on biological and material processes, be launched from a number of expendable launch vehicles, and operate in Low-Altitude Earth Orbit (LEO) as a free-flying unmanned laboratory. SAIC's design will provide independent atmospheric reentry and soft landing in the continental U.S., orbit for a maximum of 60 days, and will sustain three flights per year for 10 years. The Reusable Reentry Vehicle (RRV) will be 3-axis stabilized with artificial gravity up to 1.5g's, be rugged and easily maintainable, and have a modular design to accommodate a satellite bus and separate modular payloads (e.g., rodent module, general biological module, ESA microgravity botany facility, general botany module). The purpose of this System Cost Estimate Document is to provide a Life Cycle Cost Estimate (LCCE) for a NASA RRS Program using SAIC's RRS design. The estimate includes development, procurement, and 10 years of operations and support (O&S) costs for NASA's RRS program. The estimate does not include costs for other agencies which may track or interface with the RRS program (e.g., Air Force tracking agencies or individual RRS experimenters involved with special payload modules (PM's)). The life cycle cost estimate extends over the 10 year operation and support period FY99-2008.

  18. The effects of bedrest on crew performance during simulated shuttle reentry. Volume 2: Control task performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jex, H. R.; Peters, R. A.; Dimarco, R. J.; Allen, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    A simplified space shuttle reentry simulation performed on the NASA Ames Research Center Centrifuge is described. Anticipating potentially deleterious effects of physiological deconditioning from orbital living (simulated here by 10 days of enforced bedrest) upon a shuttle pilot's ability to manually control his aircraft (should that be necessary in an emergency) a comprehensive battery of measurements was made roughly every 1/2 minute on eight military pilot subjects, over two 20-minute reentry Gz vs. time profiles, one peaking at 2 Gz and the other at 3 Gz. Alternate runs were made without and with g-suits to test the help or interference offered by such protective devices to manual control performance. A very demanding two-axis control task was employed, with a subcritical instability in the pitch axis to force a high attentional demand and a severe loss-of-control penalty. The results show that pilots experienced in high Gz flying can easily handle the shuttle manual control task during 2 Gz or 3 Gz reentry profiles, provided the degree of physiological deconditioning is no more than induced by these 10 days of enforced bedrest.

  19. Engagement Processes in Model Programs for Community Reentry from Prison for People with Serious Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Angell, Beth; Matthews, Elizbeth; Barrenger, Stacey; Watson, Amy C.; Draine, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Linking prisoners with mental illness with treatment following release is critical to preventing recidivism, but little research exists to inform efforts to engage them effectively. This presentation compares the engagement process in two model programs, each representing an evidence-based practice for mental health which has been adapted to the context of prison reentry. One model, Forensic Assertive Community Treatment (FACT), emphasizes a long-term wrap-around approach that seeks to maximize continuity of care by concentrating all services within one interdisciplinary team; the other, Critical Time Intervention (CTI), is a time-limited intervention that promotes linkages to outside services and bolsters natural support systems. To compare engagement practices, we analyze data from two qualitative studies, each conducted in a newly developed treatment program serving prisoners with mental illness being discharged from prisons to urban communities. Findings show that the working relationship in reentry services exhibits unique features and is furthered in both programs by the use of practitioner strategies of engagement, including tangible assistance, methods of interacting with consumers, and encouragement of service use via third parties such as families and parole officers. Nevertheless, each program exhibited distinct cultures and rituals of reentry that were associated with fundamental differences in philosophy and differences in resources available to each program. PMID:24650496

  20. AFDC/TANF Exits and Re-entries for Families Raising Children with Educational Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Porterfield, Shirley; Jonson-Reid, Melissa; Drake, Brett

    2012-01-01

    Having a child with a disability is considered a barrier to self-sufficiency among welfare recipients. This study examines the impact of children’s educational disability on single-mother families’ welfare exits and re-entries for a cohort of children in a metropolitan region in Missouri, who were born between 1982 and 1994, and received AFDC/TANF at least once from 1990 through 2008 (N=4,928). A semiparametric proportional hazards model for recurrent events is used to analyze the relationship between a child’s educational disability and family welfare exit and re-entry. Results show that families with children with disabilities (the disability group) are less likely to exit and more likely to re-enter the welfare system than families with children without disabilities (the nondisability group). After the 1996 welfare reform, the welfare exit rate increases more for the disability group than for the nondisability group, while the welfare re-entry rate decreases less for the disability group than for the nondisability group. PMID:22822283

  1. AFDC/TANF Exits and Re-entries for Families Raising Children with Educational Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Porterfield, Shirley; Jonson-Reid, Melissa; Drake, Brett

    2012-09-01

    Having a child with a disability is considered a barrier to self-sufficiency among welfare recipients. This study examines the impact of children's educational disability on single-mother families' welfare exits and re-entries for a cohort of children in a metropolitan region in Missouri, who were born between 1982 and 1994, and received AFDC/TANF at least once from 1990 through 2008 (N=4,928). A semiparametric proportional hazards model for recurrent events is used to analyze the relationship between a child's educational disability and family welfare exit and re-entry. Results show that families with children with disabilities (the disability group) are less likely to exit and more likely to re-enter the welfare system than families with children without disabilities (the nondisability group). After the 1996 welfare reform, the welfare exit rate increases more for the disability group than for the nondisability group, while the welfare re-entry rate decreases less for the disability group than for the nondisability group. PMID:22822283

  2. Study and Development of a Sub-Orbital Re-Entry Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savino, R.

    The Italian and European Space Agencies are supporting a research programme, developed in Campania region by a cluster of industries, research institutes and universities, on a low-cost re-entry capsule, able to return payloads from the ISS to Earth and/or to perform short-duration scientific missions in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The ballistic capsule is characterized by a deployable, disposable "umbrella-like" heat shield that allows relatively small dimensions at launch and a sufficient exposed surface area in re-entry conditions, reducing the ballistic coefficient and leading to acceptable heat fluxes, mechanical loads and final descent velocity. ESA is supporting a preliminary study to develop a flight demonstrator of the capsule to be embarked as a secondary payload onboard a sub-orbital sounding rocket. The deployable thermal protection system concept may be applied to future science and robotic exploration mission requiring planetary entry and, possibly also to missions in the framework of Human Space flight, requiring planetary entry or re-entry. The technology offers also an interesting potential for aerobraking, aerocapture and for de-orbiting. This paper summarizes the results of these activities, which are being more and more refined as the work proceeds, including the definition and analysis of the mission scenario, the aerodynamic, aerothermodynamic, mechanical and structural analyses and the technical definition of avionics, instrumentation and main subsystems.

  3. Relative potency estimates of acceptable residues and reentry intervals after nerve agent release

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.P.; Jones, T.D.; Adams, J.D. )

    1992-06-01

    In the event of an unplanned release of a chemical warfare agent during any stage of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program, the potential exists for off-post contamination of drinking water, forage crops, grains, garden produce, and livestock. The more persistent agents, such as the organophosphate nerve agent VX, pose the greatest human health concern for reentry. A relative potency approach comparing the toxicity of VX to organophosphate insecticide analogues is developed and used to estimate allowable residues for VX in agricultural products and reentry intervals for public access to contaminated areas. Analysis of mammalian LD50 data by all exposure routes indicates that VX is 10(3) to 10(4) times more toxic than most commercially available organophosphate insecticides. Thus, allowable residues of VX could be considered at concentration levels 10(3) to 10(4) lower than those established for certain insecticides by the U.S. EPA. Evaluation of reentry intervals developed for these organophosphate analogues indicate that, if environmental monitoring cannot reliably demonstrate acceptable levels of VX, restricted access to suspect or contaminated areas may be on the order of weeks to months following agent release. Planning for relocation, mass care centers, and quarantine should take this time period into account.

  4. Analytical Predictions of Thermal Stress in the Stardust PICA Heatshield Under Reentry Flight Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, Thomas; Milos, Frank; Agrawal, Parul

    2009-01-01

    We performed finite element analyses on a model of the Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) heatshield from the Stardust sample return capsule (SRC) to predict the thermal stresses in the PICA material during reentry. The heatshield on the Stardust SRC was a 0.83 m sphere cone, fabricated from a single piece of 5.82 cm-thick PICA. The heatshield performed successfully during Earth reentry of the SRC in January 2006. Material response analyses of the full, axisymmetric PICA heatshield were run using the Two-Dimensional Implicit Ablation, Pyrolysis, and Thermal Response Program (TITAN). Peak surface temperatures were predicted to be 3385K, while the temperature at the PICA backface remained at the estimated initial cold-soak temperature of 278K. Surface recession and temperature distribution results from TITAN, at several points in the reentry trajectory, were mapped onto an axisymmetric finite element model of the heatshield. We used the finite element model to predict the thermal stresses in the PICA from differential thermal expansion. The predicted peak compressive stress in the PICA heatshield was 1.38 MPa. Although this level of stress exceeded the chosen design limit for compressive stresses in PICA tiles for the design of the Orion crew exploration vehicle heatshield, the Stardust heatshield exhibited no obvious mechanical failures from thermal stress. The analyses of the Stardust heatshield were used to assess and adjust the level of conservatism in the finite element analyses in support of the Orion heatshield design.

  5. Study on Mini Re-Entry System Using Deployable Membrane Aeroshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Masashi; Suzuki, Kojiro; Imamura, Osamu; Yamada, Kazuhiko

    An aeroshell made from membrane material have an advantage of reduction in the aerodynamic heating, because its small mass and large area enable us to make the low-ballistic-coefficient flight, in which the vehicle decelerates at very high altitude with low atmospheric density. In this paper, we propose a new concept of mini re-entry system for small satellites. This vehicle is called "FEATHER" (Flexible Expanded Aeroshell with Tiny payload Harness for Entry and Recovery). "FEATHER" is a novel re-entry and recovery system, featuring the autonomous aeroshell deployment, the low-ballistic-coefficient re-entry with less severe aerodynamicc heating and so on. FEATHER is composed of the membrane aeroshell made from the high-temperature cloth called ZYLON®, an outer frame made of Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) and a payload. When the aeroshell receives the aerodynamic heating, the temperature of SMA frame rises and restores the circular shape as memorized beforehand. Then the membrane aeroshell is automatically deployed. Therefore the vehicle can achieve the low-ballistic-coefficient flight with a drastic reduction in the aerodynamic heating without any additional sensors, controllers and actuators. The preliminary studies made on FEATHER system so far including the hypersonic wind tunnel experiments are presented in this paper.

  6. Airborne Observation of the Hayabusa Sample Return Capsule Re-Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Jenniskens, Peter; Cassell, Alan M.; Albers, James; Winter, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center and the SETI Institute collaborated on an effort to observe the Earth re-entry of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Hayabusa sample return capsule. Hayabusa was an asteroid exploration mission that retrieved a sample from the near-Earth asteroid Itokawa. Its sample return capsule re-entered over the Woomera Prohibited Area in southern Australia on June 13, 2010. Being only the third sample return mission following NASA's Genesis and Stardust missions, Hayabusa's return was a rare opportunity to collect aerothermal data from an atmospheric entry capsule returning at superorbital speeds. NASA deployed its DC-8 airborne laboratory and a team of international researchers to Australia for the re-entry. For approximately 70 seconds, spectroscopic and radiometric imaging instruments acquired images and spectra of the capsule, its wake, and destructive re-entry of the spacecraft bus. Once calibrated, spectra of the capsule will be interpreted to yield data for comparison with and validation of high fidelity and engineering simulation tools used for design and development of future atmospheric entry system technologies. A brief summary of the Hayabusa mission, the preflight preparations and observation mission planning, mission execution, and preliminary spectral data are documented.

  7. TRMM Re-Entry Planning: Attitude Determination and Control During Thruster Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWeese, Keith

    2005-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft has been undergoing design for a controlled re-entry to Earth. During simulation of the re-entry plan, there was evidence of errors in the attitude determination algorithms during thruster modes. These errors affected the bum efficiency, and thus planning, during re-entry. During thruster modes, the spacecraft attitude is controlled off of integrated Gyro Error Angles that were designed to closely follow the nominal spacecraft pointing frame (Tip Frame). These angles, however, were not exactly mapped to the Tip Frame from the Body Frame. Additionally, in the initial formulation of the thruster mode attitude determination algorithms, several assumptions and approximations were made to conserve processor speed. These errors became noticeable and significant when simulating bums of much longer duration (-10 times) than had been produced in flight. A solution is proposed that uses attitude determination information from a propagated extended Kalman filter that already exists in the TRMM thruster modes. This attitude information is then used to rotate the Gyro Error Angles into the Tip Frame. An error analysis is presented that compares the two formulations. The new algorithm is tested using the TRMM High-Fidelity Simulator and verified with the TRMM Software Testing and Training Facility. Simulation results for both configurations are also presented.

  8. EntrySat: A 3U CubeStat to study the reentry atmospheric environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Sournac; Raphael, Garcia; David, Mimoun; Jeremie, Chaix

    2016-04-01

    ISAE France Entrysat has for main scientific objective the study of uncontrolled atmospheric re-entry. This project, is developed by ISAE in collaboration with ONERA and University of Toulouse, is funded by CNES, in the overall frame of the QB50 project. This nano-satellite is a 3U Cubesat measuring 34*10*10 cm3, similar to secondary debris produced during the break up of a spacecraft. EntrySat will collect the external and internal temperatures, pressure, heat flux, attitude variations and drag force of the satellite between ≈150 and 90 km before its destruction in the atmosphere, and transmit them during the re-entry using the IRIDIUM satellite network. The result will be compared with the computations of MUSIC/FAST, a new 6-degree of freedom code developed by ONERA to predict the trajectory of space debris. In order to fulfil the scientific objectives, the satellite will acquire 18 re-entry sensors signals, convert them and compress them, thanks to an electronic board developed by ISAE students in cooperation with EREMS. In order to transmit these data every second during the re-entry phase, the satellite will use an IRIDIUM connection. In order to keep a stable enough attitudes during this phase, a simple attitude orbit and control system using magnetotorquers and an inertial measurement unit (IMU) is developed at ISAE by students. A commercial GPS board is also integrated in the satellite into Entry Sat to determine its position and velocity which are necessary during the re-entry phase. This GPS will also be used to synchronize the on-board clock with the real-time UTC data. During the orbital phase (≈2 year) EntrySat measurements will be recorded transmitted through a more classical "UHF/VHF" connection. Preference for presentation: Poster Most suitable session: Author for correspondence: Dr Raphael F. Garcia ISAE 10, ave E. Belin, 31400 Toulouse, France Raphael.GARCIA@isae.fr +33 5 61 33 81 14

  9. Reentry response of the lightweight radioisotope heater unit resulting from a Cassini Venus-Venus-Earth-Jupiter gravity assist maneuver accident

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    Reentry analyses consisting of ablation response, thermal response and thermal stress response have been conducted on the Lightweight Radioisotope Heater Unit (LWRHU) for Cassini/Venus-Venus-Earth-Jupiter-Gravity-Assist (VVEJGA) reentry conditions. Sequential ablation analyses of the LWRHU aeroshell, and the fuel pellet have been conducted in reentry regimes where the aeroshell has been deemed to fail. The failure criterion for ablation is generally assumed to be recession corresponding to 75% and 100% of the wall thickness. The 75% recession failure criteria allows for uncertainties that result mainly because of the high energies involved in the VVEJGA reentries compared to orbital decay reentries. Risk evaluations should consider the fact that for shallow flight paths the unit may disassemble at high-altitude as a result of ablation or may remain intact with a clad that had been molten. Within the limitations of the methodologies and assumptions of the analyses, the results indicate that: (1) For a side-on stable LWRHU reentry, aeroshell ablation failures occur for all reentry angles. (2)For a side-on spinning LWRHU reentry, aeroshell ablation failures are minimal. (3) For the tumbling LWRHU reentry, the aeroshell survives for most angles. (4) For the thermostructural analyses, using both a 1% and 5% allowable strain, all reentry angles and orientations examined resulted in small localized failures, but aeroshell breach is not predicted for any case. The analyses included in this report concentrate on VVEJGA reentry scenarios. Analyses reported previously have demonstrated that the LWRHU has adequate design margin to survive reentry from orbital decay scenarios and most injection scenarios at speeds up to escape speeds. The exception is a narrow range of flight path angles that produce multiple skip trajectories which may have excessive ablation.

  10. GPHS motion studies for heat pulse intervals of reentries from gravity-assist trajectories. [General Purpose Heat Source Module (GPHS)

    SciTech Connect

    Lucero, E.F.; Sharbaugh, R.C.

    1990-03-01

    Motion studies of the General Purpose Heat Source Module, GPHS, were conducted in the heat pulse interval associated with entries from earth gravity assist trajectories. The APL six-degree-of-freedom reentry program designated TMAGRA6C was used. The objectives of the studies were to (1) determine the effect of ablation on GPHS motion, and (2) determine whether the GPHS module entering the earth's atmosphere from an earth-gravity-assist trajectory has a preferred orientation during the heat pulse phase of reentry. The results are given in summary form for easy visualization of the initial conditions investigated and to provide a quick-look of the resulting motion. Detail of the motion is also given for the parameters of interest for each case studied. Selected values of initial pitch rate, roll rate, and combinations of these within the range 0[degree] to 1000[degrees]/sec were investigated for initial reentry angles of -7[degrees] (shallow) and -90[degrees] (steep) and initial angles of attack of 0[degree] (broadface to the wind) and 90[degrees]. Although the studies are not exhaustive, a sufficient number of reentry conditions (initial altitude, reentry angle, angle of attack, rotational motion) have been investigated to deduce certain trends. The results also provide information on additional reentry conditions that need to be investigated. The present results show four GPHS orientations that predominate - all with some pitch oscillations and rolling motion. These are: angles of attack, [alpha][sub R] of 0[degree], 30[degrees], 90[degrees] and tumbling. It should be assumed that all these orientations are equally probable because only combinations of two initial reentry angles, [gamma][sub 0], and two values of [alpha][sub R]. have been investigated. Further the probability for any given initial rate on orientation is not known.

  11. GPHS motion studies for heat pulse intervals of reentries from gravity-assist trajectories. Aerospace Nuclear Safety Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lucero, E.F.; Sharbaugh, R.C.

    1990-03-01

    Motion studies of the General Purpose Heat Source Module, GPHS, were conducted in the heat pulse interval associated with entries from earth gravity assist trajectories. The APL six-degree-of-freedom reentry program designated TMAGRA6C was used. The objectives of the studies were to (1) determine the effect of ablation on GPHS motion, and (2) determine whether the GPHS module entering the earth`s atmosphere from an earth-gravity-assist trajectory has a preferred orientation during the heat pulse phase of reentry. The results are given in summary form for easy visualization of the initial conditions investigated and to provide a quick-look of the resulting motion. Detail of the motion is also given for the parameters of interest for each case studied. Selected values of initial pitch rate, roll rate, and combinations of these within the range 0{degree} to 1000{degrees}/sec were investigated for initial reentry angles of -7{degrees} (shallow) and -90{degrees} (steep) and initial angles of attack of 0{degree} (broadface to the wind) and 90{degrees}. Although the studies are not exhaustive, a sufficient number of reentry conditions (initial altitude, reentry angle, angle of attack, rotational motion) have been investigated to deduce certain trends. The results also provide information on additional reentry conditions that need to be investigated. The present results show four GPHS orientations that predominate - all with some pitch oscillations and rolling motion. These are: angles of attack, {alpha}{sub R} of 0{degree}, 30{degrees}, 90{degrees} and tumbling. It should be assumed that all these orientations are equally probable because only combinations of two initial reentry angles, {gamma}{sub 0}, and two values of {alpha}{sub R}. have been investigated. Further the probability for any given initial rate on orientation is not known.

  12. Vulnerability to re-entry in simulated two-dimensional cardiac tissue: Effects of electrical restitution and stimulation sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Diana X.; Yang, Ming-Jim; Weiss, James N.; Garfinkel, Alan; Qu, Zhilin

    2007-12-01

    Ventricular fibrillation is a lethal arrhythmia characterized by multiple wavelets usually starting from a single or figure-of-eight re-entrant circuit. Understanding the factors regulating vulnerability to the re-entry is essential for developing effective therapeutic strategies to prevent ventricular fibrillation. In this study, we investigated how pre-existing tissue heterogeneities and electrical restitution properties affect the initiation of re-entry by premature extrastimuli in two-dimensional cardiac tissue models. We studied two pacing protocols for inducing re-entry following the "sinus" rhythm (S1) beat: (1) a single premature (S2) extrastimulus in heterogeneous tissue; (2) two premature extrastimuli (S2 and S3) in homogeneous tissue. In the first case, the vulnerable window of re-entry is determined by the spatial dimension and extent of the heterogeneity, and is also affected by electrical restitution properties and the location of the premature stimulus. The vulnerable window first increases as the action potential duration (APD) difference between the inside and outside of the heterogeneous region increases, but then decreases as this difference increases further. Steeper APD restitution reduces the vulnerable window of re-entry. In the second case, electrical restitution plays an essential role. When APD restitution is flat, no re-entry can be induced. When APD restitution is steep, re-entry can be induced by an S3 over a range of S1S2 intervals, which is also affected by conduction velocity restitution. When APD restitution is even steeper, the vulnerable window is reduced due to collision of the spiral tips.

  13. Simulation of launch and re-entry acceleration profiles for testing of shuttle and unmanned microgravity research payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassanto, J. M.; Ziserman, H. I.; Chapman, D. K.; Korszun, Z. R.; Todd, P.

    Microgravity experiments designed for execution in Get-Away Special canisters, Hitchhiker modules, and Reusable Re-entry Satellites will be subjected to launch and re-entry accelerations. Crew-dependent provisions for preventing acceleration damage to equipment or products will not be available for these payloads during flight; therefore, the effects of launch and re-entry accelerations on all aspects of such payloads must be evaluated prior to flight. A procedure was developed for conveniently simulating the launch and re-entry acceleration profiles of the Space Shuttle (3.3 and 1.7 × g maximum, respectively) and of two versions of NASA's proposed materials research Re-usable Re-entry Satellite (8 × g maximum in one case and 4 × g in the other). By using the 7 m centrifuge of the Gravitational Plant Physiology Laboratory in Philadelphia it was found possible to simulate the time dependence of these 5 different acceleration episodes for payload masses up to 59 kg. A commercial low-cost payload device, the “Materials Dispersion Apparatus” of Instrumentation Technology Associates was tested for (1) integrity of mechanical function, (2) retention of fluid in its compartments, and (3) integrity of products under simulated re-entry g-loads. In particular, the sharp rise from 1 g to maximum g-loading that occurs during re-entry in various unmanned vehicles was successfully simulated, conditions were established for reliable functioning of the MDA, and crystals of 5 proteins suspended in compartments filled with mother liquor were subjected to this acceleration load.

  14. Reentry-Vehicle Shape Optimization Using a Cartesian Adjoint Method and CAD Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    A DJOINT solutions of the governing flow equations are becoming increasingly important for the development of efficient analysis and optimization algorithms. A well-known use of the adjoint method is gradient-based shape. Given an objective function that defines some measure of performance, such as the lift and drag functionals, its gradient is computed at a cost that is essentially independent of the number of design variables (e.g., geometric parameters that control the shape). Classic aerodynamic applications of gradient-based optimization include the design of cruise configurations for transonic and supersonic flow, as well as the design of high-lift systems. are perhaps the most promising approach for addressing the issues of flow solution automation for aerodynamic design problems. In these methods, the discretization of the wetted surface is decoupled from that of the volume mesh. This not only enables fast and robust mesh generation for geometry of arbitrary complexity, but also facilitates access to geometry modeling and manipulation using parametric computer-aided design (CAD). In previous work on Cartesian adjoint solvers, Melvin et al. developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code, which is based on the full-potential equation with viscous corrections. More recently, Dadone and Grossman presented an adjoint formulation for the two-dimensional Euler equations using a ghost-cell method to enforce the wall boundary conditions. In Refs. 18 and 19, we presented an accurate and efficient algorithm for the solution of the adjoint Euler equations discretized on Cartesian meshes with embedded, cut-cell boundaries. Novel aspects of the algorithm were the computation of surface shape sensitivities for triangulations based on parametric-CAD models and the linearization of the coupling between the surface triangulation and the cut-cells. The accuracy of the gradient computation was verified using several three-dimensional test cases, which included design

  15. Reentry response of the light weight radioisotope heater unit resulting from a Venus-Earth-Earth Gravity Assist maneuver accident

    SciTech Connect

    Hagan, J.C.

    1988-10-01

    Reentry analyses consisting of ablation response, thermal response and thermal stress response have been conducted on the Light Weight Radioisotope Heater Unit for Galileo/VEEGA reentry conditions. Sequential ablation analyses of the LWRHU aeroshell, the fuel clad, and the fuel pellet have been conducted in reentry regimes where the aeroshell has been deemed to fail. The failure criterion for ablation is assumed to be recession corresponding to 50% of the wall thickness (the design criterion recommended in the DOE Overall Safety Manual). Although the analyses have been carried far beyond this limit (as presented and discussed herein), JHU/APL endorses the position that failure may occur at the time that this recession is achieved or at lower altitudes within the heat pulse considering the uncertainties in the aerodynamic, thermodynamic, and thermo-structural analyses and modeling. These uncertainties result mainly because of the high energies involved in the VEEGA reentries compared to orbital decay reentries. Risk evaluations should consider the fact that for shallow flight paths the unit may disassemble at high-altitude as a result of ablation or may remain intact until it impacts with a clad that had been molten. 80 refs., 46 figs., 16 tabs.

  16. Modulation of conduction and refractoriness in atrioventricular junctional reentrant circuit. Effect on reentry initiated by atrial extrastimulus.

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, R; Denker, S T; Tchou, P J; Jazayeri, M; Akhtar, M

    1988-01-01

    The importance of activation sequence of an atrioventricular junctional reentrant (AVJRe) circuit, before delivery of an extrastimulus, has received little attention in studies concerned with clinical tachycardias. In this study a change in activation sequence was accomplished using bidirectional activation (V-A sequential pacing) during the basic drive (V1A1-V1A1). It was noted that, compared with an atrial extrastimulus (A2) after an atrial drive (A1-A1), earlier activation (by V1 impulse of the V1A1-V1A1 drive) consistently improved conduction, or decreased refractoriness, or both, in the anterograde as well as the retrograde pathway of the AVJRe circuit. In all patients, five with AV nodal reentry and six with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, reentrant tachycardia could be prevented during V-A sequential pacing. In four of eleven patients, reentry was prevented despite achieving the so-called critical atrioventricular nodal delays that had previously caused reentry during control study. This finding suggested that conduction delay necessary for reentry was related to the site of block, which in turn was affected by V-A sequential pacing. We concluded that changing the activation sequence during basic drive modulates conduction and refractoriness in AVJRe circuits, and allows the study of a wide range of electrophysical factors that prevent or permit reentry. Images PMID:3335641

  17. Flow Redistribution Between Legs and Brain During STS 93 Re-Entry and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbeille, P.; Meck, J.; Porcher, M.; Benavides, E.; Martin, D. S.; South, D. A.; Ribeiro, C.; Westover, A.

    2003-01-01

    The objective was to quantify bit by bit the arterial hemodynamic response to the successive acceleration induced fluid shifts during re-entry and landing. Method: The astronaut instrumented himself with a flat Doppler probe fixed on the skin, a blood pressure arm cuff, and 3 ECG electrodes. The ICMS (integrated cardiovascular monitoring system, 15x15x25 cu cm, battery powered) designed to monitor Blood pressure, ECG, cerebral and femoral flows was fixed below the astronaut sit in the middeck. Recordings started 5 minutes before de-orbiting (TIG) and stopped 5 min after wheels stop. Results. During re-entry blood pressure increased by 20% at TIG, and then by 25 to 30% during the highest Gz accelerations (approx 1 S g ) . The cerebral flow remained decreased by 10 to 15% below inflight value all during the Entry and landing phases. Conversely the femoral flow increased at TIG and entry ( + l0 to 20%), recovered at 0.lg, and then decreased in proportion with the Gz acceleration (-10% to -40% from 0.5g to 1.5g). The reduction in Femoral flow was associated with an opposite variation in lower limb vascular resistance. Consequently the cerebral flow/femoral flow ratio decreased at TIG and entry (-20%), and then increased according to the Gz acceleration level ( + l0 to +40% from 0.5 to 1.5g). Conclusion: During orthostatic tests (Stand LBNP tests) the cerebral to femoral flow ratio allowed to quantify the efficiency of the flow redistribution between these 2 areas and predicted orthostatic intolerance. In the present case the astronaut was found orthostatically tolerant at postflight tilt tests, but we suggest that during re-entry this parameter could predict the occurrence of syncope in severely disadapted astronauts.

  18. Empirical Tests of the Predicted Footprint for Uncontrolled Satellite Reentry Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A number of statistical tools have been developed over the years for assessing the risk of reentering object to human populations. These tools make use of the characteristics (e.g., mass, material, shape, size) of debris that are predicted by aerothermal models to survive reentry. The statistical tools use this information to compute the probability that one or more of the surviving debris might hit a person on the ground and cause one or more casualties. The statistical portion of the analysis relies on a number of assumptions about how the debris footprint and the human population are distributed in latitude and longitude, and how to use that information to arrive at realistic risk numbers. Because this information is used in making policy and engineering decisions, it is important that these assumptions be tested using empirical data. This study uses the latest database of known uncontrolled reentry locations measured by the United States Department of Defense. The predicted ground footprint distributions of these objects are based on the theory that their orbits behave basically like simple Kepler orbits. However, there are a number of factors in the final stages of reentry - including the effects of gravitational harmonics, the effects of the Earth s equatorial bulge on the atmosphere, and the rotation of the Earth and atmosphere - that could cause them to diverge from simple Kepler orbit behavior and possibly change the probability of reentering over a given location. In this paper, the measured latitude and longitude distributions of these objects are directly compared with the predicted distributions, providing a fundamental empirical test of the model assumptions.

  19. Electrophysiological actions of somatostatin on the atrioventricular junction in sinus rhythm and reentry tachycardia.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, S C; Krikler, D M; Hendry, W G; Adrian, T E; Bloom, S R

    1986-01-01

    Because somatostatin, a neuroregulatory peptide, is found in abundance in the atria and atrioventricular node, its electrophysiological and antiarrhythmic properties were compared with those of verapamil in ten patients with paroxysmal atrioventricular tachycardia. During sinus rhythm, intravenous somatostatin slowed the heart rate whereas verapamil increased it. Though both agents prolonged atrioventricular conduction time and refractoriness, verapamil was more potent. They were equally effective at terminating reentry atrioventricular tachycardia, restoring sinus rhythm in six of seven patients. Whereas verapamil consistently blocked conduction in the atrioventricular node, somatostatin usually induced ventricular extrasystoles at the time of conversion. Somatostatin may have physiological importance in the neurohumoral control of cardiac impulse formation and conduction. PMID:2875723

  20. Sensor Fusion of Gaussian Mixtures for Ballistic Target Tracking in the Re-Entry Phase.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kelin; Zhou, Rui

    2016-01-01

    A sensor fusion methodology for the Gaussian mixtures model is proposed for ballistic target tracking with unknown ballistic coefficients. To improve the estimation accuracy, a track-to-track fusion architecture is proposed to fuse tracks provided by the local interacting multiple model filters. During the fusion process, the duplicate information is removed by considering the first order redundant information between the local tracks. With extensive simulations, we show that the proposed algorithm improves the tracking accuracy in ballistic target tracking in the re-entry phase applications. PMID:27537883

  1. Re-entry simulation chamber for thermo-mechanical characterisation of space materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liedtke, Volker

    2003-09-01

    During re-entry, materials and components are subject to very high thermal and mechanical loads. Any failure may cause loss of mission. Therefore, materials and components have to be tested under most rigid conditions to verify the suitability of the material and to verify the design of the components. The Re-Entry Simulation Chamber (RESiC) at ARC Seibersdorf research (ARCS) allows simulating the high thermal loads as well as complex mechanical load profiles that may occur during a re-entry; additionally, the influence of chemical reactions of materials with gaseous components of the atmosphere can be studied. The high vacuum chamber (better than 1×10-6 mbar) has a diameter of 650 mm and allows a sample height of 500 mm, or 1000 mm with extension flange. The gas dosing system is designed to emulate the increasing atmospheric pressure during the re-entry trajectory of a vehicle. Heating is performed by a 30 kW induction generator that allows a sufficiently rapid heating of larger components; electrically conductive materials such as metals or carbon fibre reinforced ceramics are directly heated, while for electrical insulators, susceptor plates or tubes will be employed. The uniaxial servo-hydraulic testing machine has a maximum load of 70 kN, either static or with a frequency of up to 70 Hz, with any given load profile (sinus, rectangular, triangular, ...). Strain measurements will be done by non-contacting laser speckle system for maximum flexibility and minimum instrumentation time effort (currently under application testing), or by strain gauges. All relevant process parameters are controlled and recorded by microcomputer. The highly sophisticated control software allows a convenient and reliable multi-channel data acquisition, e.g. temperatures at various positions of the test piece, pressure, loads, strains, and any other test data according to customer specifications; the data format is suitable for any further data processing. During the set-up and

  2. Review of ESOC re-entry prediction results of Salyut-7/Kosmos-1686

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinkrad, H.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of activities at ESA/ESOC during the followup of the Salyut-7/Kosmos-1686 decay, and of related cooperations with space agencies, research institutes, and national bodies within the ESA Member States, within the U.S. and within the USSR, is presented. A postflight analysis indicated areas for improvement in the forecast procedures, especially during the last day of the orbital lifetime. Corresponding revised decay predictions are presented for Salyut-7/Kosmos-1686, and the improved procedures are verified by an analysis of the reentries of Kosmos-1402A and Kosmos-1402C.

  3. OVERFLOW Simulations of Space Shuttle Orbiter Reentry Based on As-Built Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Edward C.; Vicker, Darby J.; Campbell, Charles H.; Wilson, Brad; Pavek, Mike; Berger, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiters Discovery and Endeavor have been digitally scanned to obtain outer mold line surfaces. Using these scans, the existing overset computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grid system will be modified by projecting the grid points to the scanned geometry. Simulations will be performed using the OVERFLOW solver and the results compared to previous OVERFLOW results on the theoretical geometry and the aerodynamic databook. The "bent airframe" term will be compared between the aerodynamic databook and the computations over a range of reentry conditions.

  4. An Overview of JAXA's Ground-Observation Activities for HAYABUSA Reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Kazuhisa; Yamamoto, Masa-Yuki; Abe, Shinsuke; Ishihara, Yoshiaki; Iiyama, Ohmi; Kakinami, Yoshihiro; Hiramatsu, Yoshihiro; Furumoto, Muneyoshi; Takayanagi, Hiroki; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Yanagisawa, Toshifumi; Kurosaki, Hirohisa; Shoemaker, Michael; Ueda, Masayoshi; Shiba, Yasuo; Suzuki, Masaharu

    2011-10-01

    On 2010 June 13, the HAYABUSA asteroid explorer returned to Earth and underwent a super-orbital atmospheric reentry. In order to recover the sample return capsule and to take ground-based measurements, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency organized a ground-observation team and performed optical tracking of the capsule, spectroscopy of the fireball, and measurements of infrasounds and shock waves generated by the fireball. In this article, an overview of the ground-based observation is presented, and an outline of the preliminary results derived from observations is reported.

  5. Electromagnetic manipulation of plasma layer for re-entry blackout mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min Kwan

    This thesis uses numerical simulation to study a new communication method for addressing radio blackout during hypersonic flight. The radio blackout problem is an important issue for hypersonic vehicles because of flight safety, catastrophe analysis, and mission success. During the last 50 years, several approaches have been proposed to solve radio blackout. However, from the Apollo reentry capsule to the Space shuttle, vehicles have experienced difficulties in communication and vehicle tracking due to this phenomenon. As a reentry mitigation scheme, this study suggests plasma manipulation methods using an electrostatic sheath and an electromagnetic (ExB) layer. The electrostatic sheath scheme is based on the formation of an electron-depleted sheath with a scale length comparable to the plasma layer. This study suggests two-dimensional shaped electrodes, one U-shaped and the other cylindrical. An electromagnetic, ExB layer mitigation scheme is also studied. The possibility of the scheme is analyzed using two suggested ExB layer models, a one-dimensional and a two-dimensional model. The results of the suggested models are assessed using an analytical solution and experimental results that were obtained at the University of Michigan. The possibility of the ExB layer mitigation scheme is evaluated in a realistic operating condition for a hypersonic flow. The major contributions of this work to the field include: the analysis of two possible blackout mitigation approaches, the electrostatic sheath and the electromagnetic layer mitigation schemes; the development of the one-dimensional and two-dimensional ExB layer models for optimizing the ExB layer configuration; simulations illustrating the effectiveness of the suggested mitigation schemes; the assessment of the suggested ExB layer model using an analytical solution and experimental measurement; and the illustration of the possibility of the ExB layer as a blackout mitigation scheme with the OREX reentry vehicle and

  6. Thermodynamic energy balance equations for Space Shuttle Orbiter gas compartment during ascent and re-entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, P. C.

    1982-01-01

    Thermodynamic energy balance equations are derived and applied to midsection Orbiter-payload atmospheric thermal math models (TMMs) to predict Orbiter component, element, compartment, internal insolation and structure temperatures in support of NASA/JSC mission planning, postflight thermal analysis and payload thermal integration planning. The equations are extended and applied to the forward section, midsection, and aft section of the TMMs for five Orbiter mission phases: prelaunch on pad with purge, lift-off to ascent, re-entry to touchdown, post landing without purge, and post-landing with purge. Predicted results from the 390 node/DFI atmospheric TMM are in good agreement with STS-1 flight measurement data.

  7. Analysis of SRB reentry acoustic environments. [aeroacoustic spectra determined from wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffin, T.; Dandridge, R. E.; Haddock, U. W.

    1979-01-01

    Space shuttle solid rocket booster reentry aeroacoustic environments were estimated. Particular emphasis was given to the aft skirt/exit plane region for the Mach number regime 0.6 = or greater than M infinity = or less than 3.5. The analysis is based on the evaluation of wind tunnel model results in conjunction with Monte Carlo simulation of trajectory parameters. The experimental approach is described as well as the evaluation process utilized. Predicted environments are presented in terms of one-third octave band spectra representing space averaged values for critical regions on the solid rocket booster.

  8. Mental Health and Substance Abuse Service Engagement by Men and Women During Community Reentry Following Incarceration.

    PubMed

    Begun, Audrey L; Early, Theresa J; Hodge, Ashleigh

    2016-03-01

    Individuals reentering the community following incarceration are at high risk for experiencing mental health and substance use problems. This longitudinal study explores patterns and barriers for engaging treatment services during early reentry. Seventy-five men and 62 women in jail, prison, or community based correctional facilities (CBCFs) participated in pre- and post-release interviews. Findings indicate that services were engaged at a lower-than-needed rate and barriers were greater for individuals leaving jails compared to prison or CBCF. Exploratory factor analysis of the barriers instrument is presented. Implications for extending service access to this population are discussed, as are future directions for research. PMID:25663094

  9. Stability analysis of the motion along re-entry optimal trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, M.

    1983-10-01

    A stability analysis of the equations of motion governing the ricochet re-entry trajectory of a rocket-powered vehicle is presented. The plane case of a vehicle propelled by the time-dependent expulsion of gases is considered, taking the change in mass into account. The zone of stability is defined using a frequency criterion, while the stability domains of the parameters of motion are derived by constructing a Liapunov function. The perturbations of the state variables and their damping-out velocities are estimated.

  10. Bundle-branch reentry ventricular tachycardia after transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    de la Rosa Riestra, Adriana; Rubio Caballero, José Amador; Freites Estévez, Alfonso; Alonso Belló, Javier; Botas Rodríguez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    An 83-year-old male suffering from severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis received an implant of a biological aortic prosthesis through the femoral artery without complications. Seven days after dischargement he experienced a syncope. The patient was wearing an ECG holter monitor that day, which showed a wide QRS complex tachycardia of 300 beats per minute. The electrophysiological study revealed a bundle-branch reentry ventricular tachycardia as the cause of the syncope. Radio-frequency was applied on the right-bundle branch. Twelve months later, the patient has remained asymptomatic. PMID:27134443

  11. Analysis of ECLSS performance during reentry after loss of one ammonia tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steines, G. J.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis was performed to determine whether, in case of a loss of one of the ammonia tanks, the Ammonia Boiler System can provide adequate heat rejection for the orbiter ECLSS during reentry. Results indicate that temperatures can be maintained as long as NH3 is available, but that one tank does not contain sufficient NH3 to complete all missions. A recommendation is made to investigate incorporation of onboard NH3 quantity calculations, and/or addition of a third NH3 tank.

  12. A mathematical model of the unidirectional block caused by the pulmonary veins for anatomically induced atrial reentry.

    PubMed

    Chun, Sehun

    2014-06-01

    It is widely believed that the pulmonary veins (PVs) of the left atrium play the central role in the generation of anatomically induced atrial reentry but its mechanism has not been analytically explained. To understand this mechanism, a new analytic approach is proposed by adapting the geometric relative acceleration analysis from spacetime physics based on the hypothesis that a large relative acceleration can translate to a dramatic increase in the curvature of a wavefront and subsequently to conduction failure. By verifying the strong dependency of the propagational direction and the magnitude of anisotropy for conduction failure, this analytic method reveals that a unidirectional block can be generated by asymmetric propagation toward the PVs. This model is validated by computational tests in a T-shaped domain, computational simulations for three-dimensional atrial reentry and previous in-silico reports for anatomically induced atrial reentry. PMID:24789612

  13. Analysis of Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in a Magnetized Re-Entry Plasma Sheath Via the Kinetic Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Based on a theoretical model of the propagation of electromagnetic waves through a hypersonically induced plasma, it has been demonstrated that the classical radiofrequency communications blackout that is experienced during atmospheric reentry can be mitigated through the appropriate control of an external magnetic field of nominal magnitude. The model is based on the kinetic equation treatment of Vlasov and involves an analytical solution for the electric and magnetic fields within the plasma allowing for a description of the attendant transmission, reflection and absorption coefficients. The ability to transmit through the magnetized plasma is due to the magnetic windows that are created within the plasma via the well-known whistler modes of propagation. The case of 2 GHz transmission through a re-entry plasma is considered. The coefficients are found to be highly sensitive to the prevailing electron density and will thus require a dynamic control mechanism to vary the magnetic field as the plasma evolves through the re-entry phase.

  14. The reentry to Earth as a valuable option at the end-of-life of Libration Point Orbit missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessi, Elisa Maria

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays the mission design must comprise the implementation of end-of-life disposal solutions to preserve the space environment and for the sustainability of the project as a whole. In this work, the Earth's reentry is presented as a disposal strategy that it is worth investigating also for Libration Point Orbit missions. Following a recent ESA study, the analysis is performed first in the Circular Restricted Three-Body Problem, and then considering a high-fidelity model. The test cases selected are Herschel, SOHO and Gaia. Attention is paid not only to the Δv -budget, but also to the reentry angle, the time of flight and the regions on the surface of the Earth involved. A review on the known cases of hypervelocity reentries and the corresponding physics is given in order to find a reasonable approach to avoid dangerous fragmentations at low altitudes.

  15. NNLOPS accurate associated HW production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astill, William; Bizon, Wojciech; Re, Emanuele; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2016-06-01

    We present a next-to-next-to-leading order accurate description of associated HW production consistently matched to a parton shower. The method is based on reweighting events obtained with the HW plus one jet NLO accurate calculation implemented in POWHEG, extended with the MiNLO procedure, to reproduce NNLO accurate Born distributions. Since the Born kinematics is more complex than the cases treated before, we use a parametrization of the Collins-Soper angles to reduce the number of variables required for the reweighting. We present phenomenological results at 13 TeV, with cuts suggested by the Higgs Cross section Working Group.

  16. Ready4Work "In Brief": Update on Outcomes; Reentry May Be Critical for States, Cities. P/PV In Brief. Issue 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Chelsea; McClanahan, Wendy S.

    2007-01-01

    This issue of "P/PV In Brief" provides updated data from the Ready4Work prisoner reentry initiative, with a focus on the prison crisis occurring in many cities and states. While much more research is needed to understand the true, long-term impact of prisoner reentry initiatives, outcomes from Ready4Work were extremely promising in terms of…

  17. Follow-up investigations of GPHS motion during heat pulse intervals of reentries from gravity-assist trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Sharbaugh, R.C.

    1992-03-23

    Motion studies of the General Purpose Heat Source Module, GPHS, which were conducted in the heat pulse intervals associated with entries from earth gravity assist trajectories. The APL six-degree-of-freedom reentry program designated TMAGRA6C was used. The objectives of the studies were to (1) determine whether the GPHS module entering the earth's atmosphere from an earth-gravity-assist trajectory has a preferred orientation during the heat pulse of reentry, (2) determine the effect of magnus force on the roll rate and angle of attack of the GPHS during an EGA entry, (3) determine the effect of the magnitude of pitch and roll damping on the GPHS motion.

  18. Simulation of launch and re-entry acceleration profiles for testing of Shuttle and unmanned microgravity research payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassanto, J. M.; Ziserman, H. I.; Chapman, D. K.; Korszun, Z. R.; Todd, D. K.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure was developed for the simulation of the launch and reentry acceleration profiles of the Space Shuttle (3.3 and 1.7 g maximum, respectively) and of two versions of NASA's proposed materials research Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) (8 and 4 g maximum, respectively). With a 7-m centrifuge, the time dependence of five different acceleration episodes was simulated for payload masses up to 59 kg. Test results obtained for the Materials Dispersion Apparatus, a commercial low-cost payload device, are presented.

  19. How to accurately bypass damage

    PubMed Central

    Broyde, Suse; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation can cause cancer through DNA damage — specifically, by linking adjacent thymine bases. Crystal structures show how the enzyme DNA polymerase η accurately bypasses such lesions, offering protection. PMID:20577203

  20. Accurate Evaluation of Quantum Integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, David C.; Goorvitch, D.

    1994-01-01

    Combining an appropriate finite difference method with Richardson's extrapolation results in a simple, highly accurate numerical method for solving a Schr\\"{o}dinger's equation. Important results are that error estimates are provided, and that one can extrapolate expectation values rather than the wavefunctions to obtain highly accurate expectation values. We discuss the eigenvalues, the error growth in repeated Richardson's extrapolation, and show that the expectation values calculated on a crude mesh can be extrapolated to obtain expectation values of high accuracy.

  1. Simulation of Ectopic Pacemakers in the Heart: Multiple Ectopic Beats Generated by Reentry inside Fibrotic Regions

    PubMed Central

    Gouvêa de Barros, Bruno; Weber dos Santos, Rodrigo; Lobosco, Marcelo; Alonso, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of nonconducting media, mimicking cardiac fibrosis, in two models of cardiac tissue produces the formation of ectopic beats. The fraction of nonconducting media in comparison with the fraction of healthy myocytes and the topological distribution of cells determines the probability of ectopic beat generation. First, a detailed subcellular microscopic model that accounts for the microstructure of the cardiac tissue is constructed and employed for the numerical simulation of action potential propagation. Next, an equivalent discrete model is implemented, which permits a faster integration of the equations. This discrete model is a simplified version of the microscopic model that maintains the distribution of connections between cells. Both models produce similar results when describing action potential propagation in homogeneous tissue; however, they slightly differ in the generation of ectopic beats in heterogeneous tissue. Nevertheless, both models present the generation of reentry inside fibrotic tissues. This kind of reentry restricted to microfibrosis regions can result in the formation of ectopic pacemakers, that is, regions that will generate a series of ectopic stimulus at a fast pacing rate. In turn, such activity has been related to trigger fibrillation in the atria and in the ventricles in clinical and animal studies. PMID:26583127

  2. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS): Telemetry, Tracking, and Command (TT/C) Coverage Tradeoff Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) Telemetry, Tracking & Command (TT&C) Coverage Tradeoff Study described herein was performed during Part 1 of the RRS Phase B contract. This report is one of several that describes the results of various trade studies performed to arrive at a recommended design for the RRS satellite system. The overall RRS Phase B Study objective is to design a relatively inexpensive satellite to access space for extended periods of time, with eventual recovery of experiments on Earth. The RRS will be capable of: (1) being launched by a variety of expendable launch vehicles; (2) operating in low earth orbit as a free flying unmanned laboratory; and (3) executing an independent atmospheric reentry and soft landing. The RRS will be designed to be refurbished and reused up to three times a year for a period of 10 years. The expected principal use for such a system is research on the effects of variable gravity (0 to 1.5 g) and radiation on small animals, plants, lower life forms, tissue samples, and materials processes. This Summary Report provides a description of the RRS Telemetry, Tracking & Command Analysis performed to study the ground station coverage available to meet RRS requirements. Concepts were considered that used off-the-shelf technology, had generous margins of capability, and high reliability, were easily maintained, cost effective, and were compatible with existing support networks. From this study, a recommended RRS TT&C configuration will be developed.

  3. Assessment of thermochemical nonequilibrium and slip effects for Orbital Reentry Experiment (OREX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Roop N.; Moss, James N.; Price, Joseph M.

    1996-01-01

    Results are provided from a viscous shock layer (VSL) analysis of the reentry flowfield around the forebody of the Japanese Orbital Reentry Experiment (OREX) vehicle. This vehicle is a 50 deg. spherically blunted cone with a nose radius of 1.35 m and a base diameter of 3.4 m. Calculations are done for the OREX trajectory from 105 to 48.4 km altitude range. A 7-species chemical model is found adequate for the flowfield analysis. However, for altitudes greater than 84 km, the low density effects (such as thermal nonequilibrium and slip) are to be implemented for good agreement between the predictions and flight inferred heat-transfer rate data. Further, at altitudes lower than 84 km, a finite surface recombination probability is to be employed in place of a non-catalytic surface for better comparison between the calculations and data. VSL results are also compared with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) predictions at high altitudes (greater than 80 km) and the electron number density data for three altitudes in the OREX trajectory. Overall, there is a good comparison between the flight data and calculated results. With the ongoing refinements in data extraction procedures, the OREX data should prove valuable for validating theoretical models employed in flowfield codes for calculation of reacting-gas flowfields.

  4. Joint computational/experimental aerodynamics research on a reentry vehicle: Part 2, Computational results

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, M.M.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    Computational aerodynamics simulation applied to supersonic and hypersonic flight vehicles has significantly increased during the last several years. Flow field simulations have been computed for a wide variety of vehicles from ballistic reentry vehicles to the Space Shuttle. Although computational aerodynamics simulation has been taking more responsibility during this time, wind tunnel experimentation has continued to play the major role in flight vehicle analysis and design. This role, however, is changing because of the great strides in the capability and confidence in numerical simulations. In this paper computational results are obtained for a spherically blunted cone with a slice parallel to the cone axis. Aerodynamic force and moment predictions from Sandia's CFD codes are compared with wind tunnel data from the Sandia Mach 8 hypersonic wind tunnel. These comparisons are made on a sliced reentry vehicle both with and without a windward flap. The windward flap will be deflected 10{degree}, 20{degree}, and 30{degree}. Inviscid/boundary layer codes and the Parabolized Navier-Stokes code are used to generate solutions for the sliced vehicle. In the region of the flap, some reversed flow is apparent and a full Navier-Stokes code will be used to provide comparisons with the data. Force and moment and surface flow visualization comparisons are made for laminar, ideal gas flow. This will be the first of a series of papers providing comparisons with the Sandia wind tunnel data. Additional papers will report comparisons with surface pressure measurements. 21 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Casualty Risk Assessment Controlled Re-Entry of EPS - Ariane 5ES - ATV Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, M.-H.; Laine, N.; Aussilhou, C.

    2012-01-01

    To fulfil its mission of compliance check to the French Space Operations Act, CNES has developed ELECTRA© tool in order to estimate casualty risk induced by a space activity (like rocket launch, controlled or un-controlled re-entry on Earth of a space object). This article describes the application of such a tool for the EPS controlled re-entry during the second Ariane 5E/S flight (Johannes Kepler mission has been launched in February 2011). EPS is the Ariane 5E/S upper composite which is de-orbited from a 260 km circular orbit after its main mission (release of the Automated Transfer Vehicle - ATV). After a brief description of the launcher, the ATV-mission and a description of all the failure cases taken into account in the mission design (which leads to "back-up scenarios" into the flight software program), the article will describe the steps which lead to the casualty risk assessment (in case of failure) with ELECTRA©. In particular, the presence on board of two propulsive means of de-orbiting (main engine of EPS, and 4 ACS longitudinal nozzles in case of main engine failure or exhaustion) leads to a low remaining casualty risk.

  6. Structural Analysis and Testing of the Inflatable Re-entry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindell, Michael C.; Hughes, Stephen J.; Dixon, Megan; Wiley, Cliff E.

    2006-01-01

    The Inflatable Re-entry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE) is a 3.0 meter, 60 degree half-angle sphere cone, inflatable aeroshell experiment designed to demonstrate various aspects of inflatable technology during Earth re-entry. IRVE will be launched on a Terrier-Improved Orion sounding rocket from NASA s Wallops Flight Facility in the fall of 2006 to an altitude of approximately 164 kilometers and re-enter the Earth s atmosphere. The experiment will demonstrate exo-atmospheric inflation, inflatable structure leak performance throughout the flight regime, structural integrity under aerodynamic pressure and associated deceleration loads, thermal protection system performance, and aerodynamic stability. Structural integrity and dynamic response of the inflatable will be monitored with photogrammetric measurements of the leeward side of the aeroshell during flight. Aerodynamic stability and drag performance will be verified with on-board inertial measurements and radar tracking from multiple ground radar stations. In addition to demonstrating inflatable technology, IRVE will help validate structural, aerothermal, and trajectory modeling and analysis techniques for the inflatable aeroshell system. This paper discusses the structural analysis and testing of the IRVE inflatable structure. Equations are presented for calculating fabric loads in sphere cone aeroshells, and finite element results are presented which validate the equations. Fabric material properties and testing are discussed along with aeroshell fabrication techniques. Stiffness and dynamics tests conducted on a small-scale development unit and a full-scale prototype unit are presented along with correlated finite element models to predict the in-flight fundamental mod

  7. Contribution of Vacuum-Ultraviolet Transitions of Molecular Nitrogen to Radiative Heat Flux During Atmospheric Reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebhart, Heiko; Fertig, Markus; Herdrich, Georg; Fasoulas, Stefanos; Roser, Hans-Peter

    2011-02-01

    Within this work we investigate the radiative properties of molecular nitrogen with respect to the highly excited electronic states giving rise to radiative transitions occurring in the spectral range of Vacuum-Ultraviolet (VUV) radiation. This is done in order to shed light on the role of VUV radiation of molecular nitrogen in the radiative heat load encountered by a vessel during highspeed atmospheric reentry. The considered transitions bands are the Lyman - Birge - Hopfield (a1IIg - X1Σ+g ), Birge - Hopfield I (b1Πu - X1Σ+g ), Birge-Hopfield II(b Σu -X Σg ), Caroll - Yoshino (c'41Σ+u - X1Σ+g ), Worley - Jenkins (c31IIu - X1Σ+g ), Worley (o31IIu - X1Σ+g ), and e Σu - X Σg band. The approach to retrieve the relevant parameters for the line by line radiation simulation follows common methods of calculation, which are the re- construction of the potential energy function via the Rydberg-Klein-Rees (RKR) method and subsequently solving the correspond- ing radial Schrodinger equation. Absorption and emission spectra are then calculated for a known equilibrium test condition of air plasma to illustrate the contribution of the VUV transitions to the radiation. The influence of the VUV radiation on the heat load experienced by a reentry vehicle is illustrated with an exemplary CFD calculation.

  8. Telemetry Channel Capacity Assessment for Reentry Vehicles in Plasma Sheath Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Zhao, Lei; Yao, Bo; Li, Xiaoping

    2015-12-01

    Channel capacity is the prerequisite and basis for the design of a communication system. To assess the impact of a harsh plasma environment on the communication system of reentry vehicles, Shannon's information theory is used to evaluate the channel capacity through the estimation results of the signal-to-noise ratio obtained by the communication link budget method. First, the attenuation caused by the plasma sheath is calculated with a stratified medium finite-difference time-domain method for typical S, C and Ka telemetry frequencies in a typical reentry plasma environment. Thereafter, typical telemetry transceiver parameters are considered to estimate the channel capacity. Results show that the S-band channel capacity is almost zero at the altitude of 30-40 km and the plasma attenuation at the C-band is slightly better. However, the blackout phenomenon remains obvious. The Ka-band signal can penetrate the plasma sheath layer with the smallest attenuation, thus significantly increasing the capacity of the channel and it may thus adequately meet telemetry needs. supported by the National Program on Key Basic Research Project of China (No. 2014CB340205) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61301173 and 61473228)

  9. VEGA 4th Stage Direct Re-Entry Survivability Analysis and Casualty Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battie, F.; Fossati, T.; Gallucci, S.

    2013-08-01

    A key task in launch vehicle (LV) system design process consists in the estimation of upper stage fragmentation during atmospheric re-entry once accomplished the launcher mission, and the related probability of making on-ground casualties. As a European launcher operating from French Guyana, VEGA has to abide by ESA debris mitigation rules, and by the French Law on Space Operations (LOS). The second flight of VEGA aims at demonstrating the versatility of the launcher by performing a multi-payload launch with different target orbits. From a safety point of view, the compliance of VEGA to the LOS will also be extended through the performance of the direct deorbiting of its upper stage, the AVUM, at the end of its mission. Indeed, during the qualification flight, VEGA had submitted to the safety authorities the derogation envisaged by the LOS: under certain conditions, it allows the indirect re-entry of the launcher's upper stage, provided it shall do so in less than 25 years.

  10. Landing Characteristics of a Re-entry Vehicle with a Passive Landing System for Impact Alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Landing Characteristics of a Re-entry Vehicle with a Passive Landing System for Impact Alleviation. An experimental investigation was made to determine the landing characteristics of a 1/8-scale dynamic model of a reentry vehicle using a passive landing system to alleviate the landing-impact loads. The passive landing system consisted of a flexible heat shield with a small section of aluminum honeycomb placed between the heat shield and the crew compartment at the point that would be the first to contact the landing surface. The model was landed on concrete and sand landing surfaces at parachute letdown velocities. The investigations simulated a vertical velocity of 30 ft/sec (full scale), horizontal velocities of 0, 15, 30, 40, and 50 ft/sec (full scale), and landing attitudes ranging from -30 degrees to 20 degrees. The model investigation indicated that stable landings could be made on a concrete surface at horizontal velocities up to about 30 ft/sec, but the stable landing-attitude range at these speeds was small. The aluminum honeycomb bottomed occasionally during landings on concrete. When bottoming did not occur, maximum normal and longitudinal accelerations at the center of gravity of the vehicle were approximately 50g and 30g, respectively. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030981. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  11. Sonic-boom ground pressure measurements from the launch and reentry of Apollo 16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, H. R.; Hilton, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Sonic-boom pressure signatures recorded during the launch and reentry phases of the Apollo 16 mission are presented. Five measurements were obtained along the vehicle ground track: 69 km (37.3 n. mi.) 92 km (49.8 n. mi.), and 130 km (70.3 n. mi.) down range from the launch site during ascent, and at 185 km (100 n. mi.) and approximately 5.5 km (3 n. mi.) from the splash-down point during reentry. Tracings of the measured signatures are included along with values of the overpressure, impulse, time duration, and rise times. Also included are brief descriptions of the launch and recovery test areas in which the measurements were obtained, the sonic-boom instrumentation deployment, flight profiles, and operating conditions for the launch vehicle and spacecraft, surface weather information at the measuring sites, and high-altitude weather information for the general measurement areas. Comparisons of the sonic-boom overpressures from Apollo 15 and 16 along with those from current aircraft are also presented.

  12. Influences of Turbulent Reentry Plasma Sheath on Wave Scattering and Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiwei; Bao, Weimin; Li, Xiaoping; Shi, Lei; Liu, Donglin

    2016-06-01

    The randomness of turbulent reentry plasma sheaths can affect the propagation and scattering properties of electromagnetic waves. This paper developed algorithms to estimate the influences. With the algorithms and typical reentry data, influences of GPS frequency and Ka frequency are studied respectively. Results show that, in terms of wave scattering, the scattering loss caused by the randomness of the turbulent plasma sheath increases with the increase of the ensemble average electron density, ensemble average collision frequency, electron density fluctuation and turbulence integral scale respectively. Also the scattering loss is much smaller than the dielectric loss. The scattering loss of Ka frequency is much less than that of the GPS frequency. In terms of wave propagation, the randomness arouses the fluctuations of amplitude and phase of waves. The fluctuations change with altitudes that when the altitude is below 30 km, fluctuations increase with altitude increasing, and when the altitude is above 30 km, fluctuations decrease with altitude increasing. The fluctuations of GPS frequency are strong enough to affect the tracking, telemetry, and command at appropriate conditions, while the fluctuations of Ka frequency are much more feeble. This suggests that the Ka frequency suffers less influences of the randomness of a turbulent plasma sheath. supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2014CB340205) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61301173 and 61473228)

  13. Hypothetical Reentry Thermostructural Performance of Space Shuttle Orbiter With Missing or Eroded Thermal Protection Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Gong, Leslie; Quinn, Robert D.

    2004-01-01

    This report deals with hypothetical reentry thermostructural performance of the Space Shuttle orbiter with missing or eroded thermal protection system (TPS) tiles. The original STS-5 heating (normal transition at 1100 sec) and the modified STS-5 heating (premature transition at 800 sec) were used as reentry heat inputs. The TPS missing or eroded site is assumed to be located at the center or corner (spar-rib juncture) of the lower surface of wing midspan bay 3. For cases of missing TPS tiles, under the original STS-5 heating, the orbiter can afford to lose only one TPS tile at the center or two TPS tiles at the corner (spar-rib juncture) of the lower surface of wing midspan bay 3. Under modified STS-5 heating, the orbiter cannot afford to lose even one TPS tile at the center or at the corner of the lower surface of wing midspan bay 3. For cases of eroded TPS tiles, the aluminum skin temperature rises relatively slowly with the decreasing thickness of the eroded central or corner TPS tile until most of the TPS tile is eroded away, and then increases exponentially toward the missing tile case.

  14. Thermographic imaging of the space shuttle during re-entry using a near-infrared sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Kerns, Robbie V.; Burke, Eric R.; Taylor, Jeff C.; Spisz, Tom; Gibson, David M.; Shea, Edward J.; Mercer, C. David; Schwartz, Richard J.; Tack, Steve; Bush, Brett C.; Dantowitz, Ronald F.; Kozubal, Marek J.

    2012-06-01

    High resolution calibrated near infrared (NIR) imagery of the Space Shuttle Orbiter was obtained during hypervelocity atmospheric re-entry of the STS-119, STS-125, STS-128, STS-131, STS-132, STS-133, and STS-134 missions. This data has provided information on the distribution of surface temperature and the state of the airflow over the windward surface of the Orbiter during descent. The thermal imagery complemented data collected with onboard surface thermocouple instrumentation. The spatially resolved global thermal measurements made during the Orbiter's hypersonic re-entry will provide critical flight data for reducing the uncertainty associated with present day ground-to-flight extrapolation techniques and current state-of-the-art empirical boundary-layer transition or turbulent heating prediction methods. Laminar and turbulent flight data is critical for the validation of physics-based, semi-empirical boundary-layer transition prediction methods as well as stimulating the validation of laminar numerical chemistry models and the development of turbulence models supporting NASA's next-generation spacecraft. In this paper we provide details of the NIR imaging system used on both air and land-based imaging assets. The paper will discuss calibrations performed on the NIR imaging systems that permitted conversion of captured radiant intensity (counts) to temperature values. Image processing techniques are presented to analyze the NIR data for vignetting distortion, best resolution, and image sharpness.

  15. Thermographic Imaging of the Space Shuttle During Re-Entry Using a Near Infrared Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Kerns, Robbie V.; Burke, Eric R.; Taylor, Jeff C.; Spisz, Tom; Gibson, David M.; Shea, Edward J.; Mercer, C. David; Schwartz, Richard J.; Tack, Steve; Bush, Brett C.; Dantowitz, Ronald F.; Kozubal, Marek J.

    2012-01-01

    High resolution calibrated near infrared (NIR) imagery of the Space Shuttle Orbiter was obtained during hypervelocity atmospheric re-entry of the STS-119, STS-125, STS-128, STS-131, STS-132, STS-133, and STS-134 missions. This data has provided information on the distribution of surface temperature and the state of the airflow over the windward surface of the Orbiter during descent. The thermal imagery complemented data collected with onboard surface thermocouple instrumentation. The spatially resolved global thermal measurements made during the Orbiter s hypersonic re-entry will provide critical flight data for reducing the uncertainty associated with present day ground-to-flight extrapolation techniques and current state-of-the-art empirical boundary-layer transition or turbulent heating prediction methods. Laminar and turbulent flight data is critical for the validation of physics-based, semi-empirical boundary-layer transition prediction methods as well as stimulating the validation of laminar numerical chemistry models and the development of turbulence models supporting NASA s next-generation spacecraft. In this paper we provide details of the NIR imaging system used on both air and land-based imaging assets. The paper will discuss calibrations performed on the NIR imaging systems that permitted conversion of captured radiant intensity (counts) to temperature values. Image processing techniques are presented to analyze the NIR data for vignetting distortion, best resolution, and image sharpness. Keywords: HYTHIRM, Space Shuttle thermography, hypersonic imaging, near infrared imaging, histogram analysis, singular value decomposition, eigenvalue image sharpness

  16. Near-Optimal Re-Entry Trajectories for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, H.-C.; Ardema, M. D.; Bowles, J. V.

    1997-01-01

    A near-optimal guidance law for the descent trajectory for earth orbit re-entry of a fully reusable single-stage-to-orbit pure rocket launch vehicle is derived. A methodology is developed to investigate using both bank angle and altitude as control variables and selecting parameters that maximize various performance functions. The method is based on the energy-state model of the aircraft equations of motion. The major task of this paper is to obtain optimal re-entry trajectories under a variety of performance goals: minimum time, minimum surface temperature, minimum heating, and maximum heading change; four classes of trajectories were investigated: no banking, optimal left turn banking, optimal right turn banking, and optimal bank chattering. The cost function is in general a weighted sum of all performance goals. In particular, the trade-off between minimizing heat load into the vehicle and maximizing cross range distance is investigated. The results show that the optimization methodology can be used to derive a wide variety of near-optimal trajectories.

  17. The FAA's Approach to Quality Assurance in the Flight Safety Analysis of Launch and Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Daniel P.; Weil, Andre

    2010-09-01

    The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration(FAA) Office of Commercial Space Transportation’s safety mission is to ensure protection of the public, property, and the national security and foreign policy interests of the United States during commercial launch and reentry activities. As part of this mission, the FAA issues licenses to the operators of launch and reentry vehicles who successfully demonstrate compliance with FAA regulations. To meet these regulations, vehicle operators submit an application that contains, among other things, flight safety analyses of their proposed missions. In the process of evaluating these submitted analyses, the FAA often conducts its own independent analyses, using input data from the submitted license application. These analyses are conducted according to approved procedures using industry developed tools. To assist in achieving the highest levels of quality in these independent analyses, the FAA has developed a quality assurance program that consists of multiple levels of review. These reviews rely on the work of multiple teams, as well as additional, independently performed work of support contractors. This paper describes the FAA’s quality assurance process for flight safety analyses. Members of the commercial space industry may find that elements of this process can be easily applied to their own analyses, improving the quality of the material they submit to the FAA in their license applications.

  18. The induction of reentry in cardiac tissue. The missing link: How electric fields alter transmembrane potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Bradley J.; Krassowska, Wanda

    1998-03-01

    This review examines the initiation of reentry in cardiac muscle by strong electric shocks. Specifically, it concentrates on the mechanisms by which electric shocks change the transmembrane potential of the cardiac membrane and create the physiological substrate required by the critical point theory for the initiation of rotors. The mechanisms examined include (1) direct polarization of the tissue by the stimulating current, as described by the one-dimensional cable model and its two- and three-dimensional extensions, (2) the presence of virtual anodes and cathodes, as described by the bidomain model with unequal anisotropy ratios of the intra- and extracellular spaces, (3) polarization of the tissue due to changing orientation of cardiac fibers, and (4) polarization of individual cells or groups of cells by the electric field ("sawtooth potential"). The importance of these mechanisms in the initiation of reentry is examined in two case studies: the induction of rotors using successive stimulation with a unipolar electrode, and the induction of rotors using cross-field stimulation. These cases reveal that the mechanism by which a unipolar stimulation induces arrhythmias can be explained in the framework of the bidomain model with unequal anisotropy ratios. In contrast, none of the examined mechanisms provide an adequate explanation for the induction of rotors by cross-field stimulation. Hence, this study emphasizes the need for further experimental and theoretical work directed toward explaining the mechanism of field stimulation.

  19. Cellular mechanism of reentry induced by a strong electrical stimulus: implications for fibrillation and defibrillation.

    PubMed

    Karagueuzian, H S; Chen, P S

    2001-05-01

    The objective of this review article is to describe the graded response hypothesis of reentry induced by a strong single electrical stimulus in the normal canine ventricular myocardium. It is shown that the graded responses (subthreshold depolarization during phase 3 of the action potential) induced at a site distant (S2) from the regular S1--S1 pacing site, propagate slowly over short distances (approximately 5 mm) and initiate a regenerative action potentials in recovered cells near the S1 site. Activation wave then blocks near the S2 site (unidirectional block) but reenters when the S2 site recovers it excitability. Super strong S2 currents do not induce reentry (upper limit of vulnerability). Since similar activation sequence and properties are shown to exist in intact canine hearts during induction of ventricular fibrillation with a similar S2 stimulus, the graded response hypothesis may have relevance to vulnerability to fibrillation. Furthermore, since the upper limit of vulnerability is closely related to defibrillation threshold, the graded response hypothesis might also be relevant to defibrillation mechanism. Other proposed mechanisms of fibrillation and defibrillation (critical point hypothesis, the progressive depolarization hypothesis and the hypothesis of phase singularity of defibrillation failure) are also discussed in this review paper and compared to the graded response hypothesis. PMID:11334829

  20. Dynamic and Static High Temperature Resistant Ceramic Seals for X- 38 re-Entry Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handrick, Karin E.; Curry, Donald M.

    2002-01-01

    In a highly successful partnership, NAS A, ESA, DLR (German Space Agency) and European industry are building the X-38, V201 re-entry spacecraft, the prototype of the International Space Station's Crew Return Vehicle (CRV). This vehicle would serve both as an ambulance for medical emergencies and as an evacuation vehicle for the Space Station. The development of essential systems and technologies for a reusable re-entry vehicle is a first for Europe, and sharing the development of an advanced re-entry spacecraft with foreign partners is a first for NASA. NASA, in addition to its subsystem responsibilities, is performing overall X-38 vehicle system engineering and integration, will launch V201 on the Space Shuttle, deliver flight data for post-flight analysis and assessment and is responsible for development and manufacture of structural vehicle components and thermal protection (TPS) tiles. The major European objective for cooperation with NASA on X-38 was to establish a clear path through which key technologies needed for future space transportation systems could be developed and validated at affordable cost and with controlled risk. Europe has taken the responsibility to design and manufacture hot control surfaces like metallic rudders and ceramic matrix composites (CMC) body flaps, thermal protection systems such as CMC leading edges, the CMC nose cap and -skirt, insulation, landing gears and elements of the V201 primary structure. Especially hot control surfaces require extremely high temperature resistant seals to limit hot gas ingestion and transfer of heat to underlying low-temperature structures to prevent overheating of these structures and possible loss of the vehicle. Complex seal interfaces, which have to fulfill various, tight mission- and vehicle-related requirements exist between the moveable ceramic body flaps and the bottom surface of the vehicle, between the rudder and fin structure and the ceramic leading edge panel and TPS tiles. While NASA

  1. Infrasound and Seismic Observation of Hayabusa Reentry as An Artificial Meteorite Fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Y.; Hiramatsu, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Furumoto, M.; Fujita, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Hayabusa, the world first sample-return minor body explorer, came back to the Earth, and reentered into the Earth's atmosphere on June 13, 2010. Following the reentries of the Genesis in 2004 and the Stardust in 2006, the return of the Hayabusa Sample Return Capsule (H-SRC) was the third direct reentry event from the interplanetary transfer orbit to the Earth at a velocity of over 11.2 km/s. In addition, it was the world first case of the direct reentry of the spacecraft (H-S/C) itself from the interplanetary transfer orbit. The H-SRC and the H-S/C reentries are very good analogue for studying bolide size meteors and meteorite falls. We, therefore, conducted a ground observation campaign for aspects of meteor sciences. We carried out multi-site ground observations of the Hayabusa reentry in the Woomera Prohibited Area (WPA), Australia. The observations were configured with optical imaging with still and video recordings, spectroscopies, and shockwave detection with infrasound and seismic sensors. In this study, we report details of the infrasound/seismic observations and those results. To detect shockwaves from the H-SRC and the H-S/C, we installed three small aperture infrasound/seismic arrays as the main stations. In addition, we also installed three single component seismic sub stations and an audible sound recorder. The infrasound and seismic sensors clearly recorded sonic boom type shockwaves from the H-SRC and disrupted fragments of the H-S/C itself. The audible recording also detected those shockwave sounds in the human audible band. Positive overpressure values of shockwaves (corresponding to the H-SRC) recorded at three main stations are 1.3 Pa, 1.0 Pa, and 0.7 Pa with the slant distance of 36.9 km, 54.9 km, and 67.8 km (i.e., the source altitude of 36.5 km, 38.9km, and 40.6 km), respectively. These amplitudes of shockwave overpressures are systematically smaller than those of theoretical predictions. We tried to identify the sources of shockwaves

  2. Reentry into Out-of-Home Care: Implications of Child Welfare Workers' Assessments of Risk and Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Melissa; Correia, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal analysis examined predictors of reentry to foster care among children and youths who entered foster care between 2001 and 2007. Three sources of administrative data (Chapin Hall Center for Children longitudinal files, National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System, and structured decision making) from one state were used to assess…

  3. Career Assessment, Remediation, Education, Employment, and Re-entry Program (CAREER). El Paso Community College Career Grant. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFleur, Carol A.

    Objectives of the Career Assessment, Remediation, Education, Employment, and Re-entry (CAREER) project were to establish a series of intensive, short-term job training programs using competency-based instruction to serve Hispanic persons who were economically disadvantaged, displaced, unemployed, or underemployed, as well as Hispanic females who…

  4. Vocational Interest as a Correlate of Re-Entry of Girls into School in Edo State, Nigeria: Implications for Counselling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alika, Ijeoma Henrietta; Egbochuku, Elizabeth Omotunde

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the relationship between vocational interest socio-economic status and re-entry of girls into school in Edo State. The research design adopted was correlational because it sought to establish the relationship between the independent variable and the dependent variable. A sample size of 306 girls who re-enrolled in institutes…

  5. A Qualitative Investigation of the College Choice Experiences and Reentry Expectations of U.S. American Third Culture Kids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurston-Gonzalez, Sara J.

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this qualitative study is on U.S. third culture kids (TCKs), youth who have grown up abroad because of their parent's work, and their college choice experiences and reentry expectations. Through a background questionnaire and personal interviews with eleven students transitioning from two international secondary schools in a…

  6. The Federal Workforce Development Program: An Analysis of Probationers and Characteristics Associated with and Predictive of Successful Reentry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNichols, Kelley B.

    2012-01-01

    With years of research focusing on soaring incarceration rates, the phenomena of prisoner reentry has been largely overlooked. The majority of incarcerated people will return to the community setting. In fact, millions of recently released offenders are on some form of community based supervision. Today, recidivism is a problem that plagues…

  7. An Exploration of Factors Reducing Recidivism Rates of Formerly Incarcerated Youth with Disabilities Participating in a Re-Entry Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unruh, Deanne K.; Gau, Jeff M.; Waintrup, Miriam G.

    2009-01-01

    Juvenile offenders are costly to our society in terms of the monetary and social expenditures from the legal system, victims' person costs, and incarceration. The re-entry and community reintegration outcomes for formerly incarcerated youth with a disabling condition are bleak compared to peers without disabilities. In this study, we examined the…

  8. The Role of the Center for Innovation in Teaching the Handicapped in Project PRIME. (Programmed Reentry into Mainstream Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semmel, Melvyn I.; Adler, Meredith

    Described is the role of the Center for Innovation in Teaching the Handicapped (CITH) in Project PRIME (Programmed Reentry into Mainstream Education), which attempted to assess the efficacy of mainstreaming for 1,035 emotionally disturbed, educable mentally retarded, and language/learning disabled Texas pupils in grades 3-5. The behavior…

  9. Toward cardiac electrophysiological mapping based on micro-Tesla NMR: a novel modality for localizing the cardiac reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kiwoong

    2012-06-01

    Matching the proton magnetic resonance frequency to the frequency of a periodic electrophysiological excitation of myocardium enables direct localization of the cardiac reentry by magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The feasibility of this new idea has been demonstrated by conducting a numerical simulation based on a realistic heart model and experimental parameters in SQUID-based micro-Tesla NMR.

  10. The Role of Counselling and Parental Encouragement on Re-Entry of Adolescents into Secondary Schools in Abia State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alika, Henrietta Ijeoma; Ohanaka, Blessing Ijeoma

    2013-01-01

    This paper examined the role of counselling, and parental encouragement on re-entry of adolescents into secondary school in Abia State, Nigeria. A total of 353 adolescents who re-entered school were selected from six secondary schools in the State through a simple random sampling technique. A validated questionnaire was used for data analysis.…

  11. Does Offender Gambling on the inside Continue on the outside? Insights from Correctional Professionals on Gambling and Re-Entry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, D. J.; Walker, Gordon J.

    2009-01-01

    This study brings to light a neglected topic of particular importance--offender gambling issues within the context of re-entry into the community. Fifteen correctional professionals from Nevada (high gambling availability) and Utah (no legalized gambling) participated in semi-structured interviews to provide insights into how gambling may impact…

  12. Foster care re-entry: Exploring the role of foster care characteristics, in-home child welfare services and cross-sector services.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangmoo; Jonson-Reid, Melissa; Drake, Brett

    2012-09-01

    This study seeks to advance our understanding of how modifiable and non-modifiable factors may impact the likelihood of re-entry into foster care. Children who entered foster care for the first time following at least one report of maltreatment and were then reunified were followed from exit to re-entry, age 18 or the end of the study period using longitudinal administrative data. Risk of re-entry was explored according to a range of modifiable and non-modifiable case and service characteristics. Children removed from homes with parents who had multiple risk factors (e.g., no high school diploma, mental health diagnosis, criminal record, or teen parents) or were receiving AFDC prior to entry were more likely to re-enter. The receipt of in-home child welfare services during or after foster care was associated with reduced risk of re-entry. Having the longest placement with a relative was associated with decreased risk of re-entry. In conclusion, both modifiable and non-modifiable factors are associated with re-entry into foster care. Among modifiable factors, services appear to have a particularly strong relationship to re-entry. Our data also suggest that in-home child welfare services provided during and after foster care may be associated with improved long-term permanency after return home. Given the continued import of caregiver risk factors even among reunified families, services provided to support reunification should include attention to caregiver needs outside parenting. PMID:23729947

  13. Foster care re-entry: Exploring the role of foster care characteristics, in-home child welfare services and cross-sector services☆

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangmoo; Jonson-Reid, Melissa; Drake, Brett

    2013-01-01

    This study seeks to advance our understanding of how modifiable and non-modifiable factors may impact the likelihood of re-entry into foster care. Children who entered foster care for the first time following at least one report of maltreatment and were then reunified were followed from exit to re-entry, age 18 or the end of the study period using longitudinal administrative data. Risk of re-entry was explored according to a range of modifiable and non-modifiable case and service characteristics. Children removed from homes with parents who had multiple risk factors (e.g., no high school diploma, mental health diagnosis, criminal record, or teen parents) or were receiving AFDC prior to entry were more likely to re-enter. The receipt of in-home child welfare services during or after foster care was associated with reduced risk of re-entry. Having the longest placement with a relative was associated with decreased risk of re-entry. In conclusion, both modifiable and non-modifiable factors are associated with re-entry into foster care. Among modifiable factors, services appear to have a particularly strong relationship to re-entry. Our data also suggest that in-home child welfare services provided during and after foster care may be associated with improved long-term permanency after return home. Given the continued import of caregiver risk factors even among reunified families, services provided to support reunification should include attention to caregiver needs outside parenting. PMID:23729947

  14. European Experimental Re-Entry Testbed EXPERT: Qualification of Payloads for Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratti, F.; Gavira, J.; Thirkettle, A. C.; Erba, F.; Muylaert, J.-M.; Walpot, L.; Rembiasz, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    The European Experimental Re-entry Test-bed EXPERT is developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) as part of its General Technological Research Program (GSTP). The aim of EXPERT is to improve the understanding of critical aero-thermodynamic phenomena associated with hypersonic re-entry flights. The EXPERT project provides an opportunity to the scientific community and industries throughout Europe to propose and perform experiments in order to obtain aero-thermodynamic data for the validation of numerical models and of ground to flight extrapolation methodologies. During the last years an intense activity has been performed at ESA in order to select the most suitable experiments, bring them to a mature design, manufacture the qualification model and qualify the experiments for flight. ESA staffs coordinated and supported the work of the principal investigators of the experiments from European institutions and industrial organizations in order to maximize the scientific output in compliance with the budget resources made available to the EXPERT project and the programmatic constraints. EXPERT is a re-entry capsule having the shape of a blunted cone. The front part consists of a nose made of ceramic material developed at DLR Stuttgart. No ablative material is implemented so as not to contaminate the specific measurements of Payloads on board. The ceramic nose hosts a set of experiments: the Flush Air Data System (FADS) developed by HTG aiming at collecting free flow data required for post flight analysis, the pyrometer PYREX developed at IRS in Stuttgart collecting data on the temperature and heat flux of the ceramic nose, and the IRS spectrometer RESPECT aiming at resolving the different species generated in the plasma region during re-entry. The sides of the blunted cone are protected by a metallic thermal protection system in which several experiments are located. Two Payloads developed by IRS and VKI are dedicated to the measurement of catalytic effects. One aims

  15. Violence and Victimization During Incarceration: Relations to Psychosocial Adjustment During Reentry to the Community.

    PubMed

    Schappell, Ashley; Docherty, Meagan; Boxer, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We surveyed male ex-offenders (N = 100) about their experiences during and prior to incarceration to assess the role of these factors in psychosocial adjustment postrelease. Participants completed measures of preincarceration mental health problems and severe victimization and feelings of safety during incarceration; they also self-reported emotional distress, antisocial behavior, and posttraumatic stress (PTS). Moderator analyses of PTS outcomes revealed two key interactions between preincarceration mental health problems and severe victimization during incarceration as well as preincarceration mental health problems by feelings of safety during incarceration. In those without preincarceration mental health problems, victimization and PTS were significantly positively related; this was not the case for those with preexisting mental problems. Furthermore, the positive relation between feeling unsafe and PTS was stronger among those with preexisting mental problems. Findings are discussed with respect to implications for reentry services. PMID:26830297

  16. From the ideal to the real world: a phenomenological inquiry into student sojourners' reentry adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Feilin

    2011-01-01

    This phenomenological study examines the thematic structure of reentry transition for international music therapy graduates who have returned home after studying in the United States. Emphasis is placed upon career development. Standardized open-ended interviews were used to obtain rich and in-depth descriptions of the participants' experiences. Ten music therapists from six countries participated in the study. The themes that emerged from the data include moving from the ideal to the real world, shifting from the role of student to professional, confronting reality and working through challenges, and achieving personal growth and self-transformation. The dynamics of cross-cultural comparison, confronting the home culture, and redefining music therapy and professional identities within the local cultural context are illustrated via quotations from the participants. Implications and recommendations for music therapy education and career preparation for international graduates are discussed. PMID:22506298

  17. Aerodynamic characteristics of some lifting reentry concepts applicable to transatmospheric vehicle design studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of some lifting reentry concepts are examined with a view to the applicability of such concepts to the design of possible transatmospheric vehicles (TAV). A considerable amount of research has been done in past years with vehicle concepts suitable for manned atmospheric-entry, atmospheric flight, and landing. Some of the features of these concepts that permit flight in or out of the atmosphere with maneuver capability should be useful in the mission requirements of TAV's. The concepts illustrated include some hypersonic-body shapes with and without variable geometry surfaces, and a blunt lifting-body configuration. The merits of these concepts relative to the aerodynamic behavior of a TAV are discussed.

  18. Characteristics of the GOCE Orbit in the Re-Entry Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, Johann; Lengsfeld, Alexander; Kekce, Ugur; Pape, Werner; Shabanloui, Akbar; Naeimi, Majid; Flury, Jakob

    2015-03-01

    The GOCE de-orbiting phase was started as the Ion thruster was switched off on 21st October 2013. Beginning with this, the transition from the Drag-Free and Attitude Control System (DFACS) to Fine Pointing Mode (FPM) started, so the Gradiometer was no longer in the attitude control loop. On 11th of November 2013, the de-orbiting phase ended with the re-entry of GOCE in the Earth’s atmosphere, near to the Falkland Islands. As a part of a research project, we analyzed the 20 days of the GOCE data during de-orbiting phase. We investigate: Electrostatic Gravity Gradiometer (EGG), DFACS Accelerometer data, Magneto-Torques Currents (MTR) data, Precise Science Orbits (PSO) data, Satellite to Satellite Tracking (SST) data and Atmospheric Models (MSISE-90, NRMSISE-00).

  19. The application of some lifting-body reentry concepts to missile design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of some lifting-body concepts are examined with a view to the applicability of such concepts to the design of missiles. A considerable amount of research has been done in past years with vehicle concepts suitable for manned atmospheric-entry and atmospheric flight. Some of the concepts appear to offer some novel design approaches for missiles for a variety of missions and flight profiles, including long-range orbital/reentry with transatmospheric operation for strategic penetration, low altitude penetration, and battlefield tactical. The concepts considered include right triangular pyramidal configurations, a lenticular configuration, and various 75-degree triangular planform configurations with variations in body camber and control systems. The aerodynamic features are emphasized but some observations are also made relative to other factors such as heat transfer, structures, carriage, observability, propulsion, and volumetric efficiency.

  20. Measurement of lateral launch loads on re-entry vehicles using SWAT

    SciTech Connect

    Mayes, R.L.

    1993-11-01

    The Sum of Weighted Accelerations Technique (SWAT) has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to infer dynamic forces acting on free elastic structures from acceleration measurements. A derivative of SWAT known as SWAT TEEM (Sum of Weighted Accelerations using Tome Eliminated Elastic Modes) is utilized. This paper describes experiments demonstrating how this technology can be applied to measure lateral launch loads on Re-entry Vehicle (RV) payloads. A technique to determine the number of sensors and best locations is described. Experiments are performed to excite a structure to which a mockup RV is mounted. Acceleration measurements on the RV are used to reconstruct the lateral force acting at the RV base, and these results are compared to measured results.

  1. Numerical Flight Mechanics Analysis Of The SHEFEX I Ascent And Re-Entry Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolome Calvo, Javier; Eggers, Thino

    2011-08-01

    The SHarp Edge Flight EXperiment (SHEFEX) I provides a huge amount of scientific data to validate numerical tools in hypersonic flows. These data allow the direct comparison of flight measurements with the current numerical tools available at DLR. Therefore, this paper is devoted to apply a recently developed direct coupling between aerodynamics and flight dynamics to the SHEFEX I flight. In a first step, mission analyses are carried out using the trajectory optimization program REENT 6D coupled to missile DATCOM. In a second step, the direct coupling between the trajectory program and the DLR TAU code, in which the unsteady Euler equations including rigid body motion are solved, is applied to analyze some interesting parts of ascent and re-entry phases of the flight experiment. The agreement of the numerical predictions with the obtained flight data is satisfactory assuming a variable fin deflection angle.

  2. Static mechanical strain induces capillary endothelial cell cycle re-entry and sprouting.

    PubMed

    Zeiger, A S; Liu, F D; Durham, J T; Jagielska, A; Mahmoodian, R; Van Vliet, K J; Herman, I M

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are known to respond to a range of biochemical and time-varying mechanical cues that can promote blood vessel sprouting termed angiogenesis. It is less understood how these cells respond to sustained (i.e., static) mechanical cues such as the deformation generated by other contractile vascular cells, cues which can change with age and disease state. Here we demonstrate that static tensile strain of 10%, consistent with that exerted by contractile microvascular pericytes, can directly and rapidly induce cell cycle re-entry in growth-arrested microvascular endothelial cell monolayers. S-phase entry in response to this strain correlates with absence of nuclear p27, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. Furthermore, this modest strain promotes sprouting of endothelial cells, suggesting a novel mechanical 'angiogenic switch'. These findings suggest that static tensile strain can directly stimulate pathological angiogenesis, implying that pericyte absence or death is not necessarily required of endothelial cell re-activation. PMID:27526677

  3. Adjustable high emittance gap filler. [reentry shielding for space shuttle vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, D. B.; Stewart, D. A.; Smith, M.; Estrella, C. A.; Goldstein, H. E. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A flexible, adjustable refractory filler is disclosed for filling gaps between ceramic tiles forming the heat shield of a space shuttle vehicle, to protect its aluminum skin during atmospheric reentry. The easily installed and replaced filler consists essentially of a strip of ceramic cloth coated, at least along both its longitudinal edges with a room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber compound with a high emittance colored pigment. The filler may have one or more layers as the gap width requires. Preferred materials are basket weave aluminoborosilicate cloth, and a rubber compounded with silicon tetraboride as the emittance agent and finely divided borosilicate glass containing about 7.5% B2O3 as high temperature binder. The filler cloth strip or tape is cut to proper width and length, inserted into the gap, and fastened with previously applied drops of silicone rubber adhesive.

  4. Rudder/Fin Seals Investigated for the X-38 Re-Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2002-01-01

    NASA is developing the X-38 vehicle that will demonstrate the technologies required for a potential crew return vehicle for the International Space Station. This vehicle would serve both as an ambulance for medical emergencies and as an evacuation vehicle for the space station. Control surfaces on the X-38 (body flaps and rudder/fin assemblies) require high temperature seals to limit hot gas ingestion and the transfer of heat to underlying low temperature structures. Working with the NASA Johnson Space Center, the Seals Team at the NASA Glenn Research Center completed a series of tests to further characterize baseline seal designs for the rudder/fin interfaces of the X-38. The structures of the rudder/fin assembly and its associated seals are shown in the the preceding illustration. Tests performed at Glenn indicated that exposure of the seals in a compressed state at simulated seal re-entry temperatures resulted in a large permanent set and loss of seal resiliency. This could be of concern because the seals are required to maintain contact with the sealing surfaces while the vehicle goes through the maximum re-entry heating cycle to prevent hot gases from leaking past the seals and damaging interior low-temperature structures. To simulate conditions in which the seals may become unloaded during use, such as when they take on a large permanent set, Glenn researchers performed room temperature flow and compression tests to determine seal flow rates, resiliency, and unit loads under minimal loads. Flow rates through an unloaded (i.e., 0-percent compression) double seal arrangement were twice those of a double seal compressed to the 20-percent design compression level. These flow rates are being used in thermal analyses to predict the effect of flow through the seals on over-all seal temperatures. Compression test results showed that seal unit loads and contact pressures were below the limits that Johnson had set as goals for the seals. In the rudder/fin seal location

  5. Application of DSMC Electronic Excitation Modeling to Radiation Calculation of Hypersonic Reentry Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Sohn, Ilyoup; Levin, Deborah A.; Modest, Michael F.

    2011-05-01

    The current work implemented excited levels of atomic N and corresponding electron impact excitation/de-excitation and ionization processes in DSMC. Results show that when excitation models are included, the Stardust 68.9 km re-entry flow has an observable change in the ion number densities and electron temperature. Adding in the excited levels of atoms improves the degree of ionization by providing additional intermediate steps to ionization. The extra ionization reactions consume the electron energy and reduce the electron temperature. The DSMC results of number densities of excited levels are lower than the prediction of quasi steady state calculation. Comparison of radiation calculations using electronic excited populations from DSMC and QSS indicates that, at the stagnation point, there is about 20% difference of the radiative heat flux between DSMC and QSS.

  6. Gravity wave and tidal structures between 60 and 140 km inferred from space shuttle reentry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, David C.; Wang, Ding-Yi; Blanchard, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    This study presents an analysis of density measurements made using high-resolution accelerometers aboard several space shuttles at altitudes from 60 to 140 km during reentry into the earth's atmosphere. The observed density fluctuations are interpreted in terms of gravity waves and tides and provide evidence of the importance of such motions well into the thermosphere. Height profiles of fractional density variance reveal that wave amplitudes increase at a rate consistent with observations at lower levels up to about 90 km. The rate of amplitude growth decreases at greater heights, however, and appears to cease above about 110 km. Wave amplitudes are nevertheless large at these heights and suggest that gravity waves may play an important role in forcing of the lower thermosphere.

  7. Ceramic Adhesive and Methods for On-Orbit Repair of Re-Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedell, James A.; Easler, Timothy E.

    2013-01-01

    This adhesive is capable of repairing damaged leading edge components of reentry vehicles while in space, and is novel with regard to its ability to be applied in the vacuum of space, and in a microgravity environment. Once applied, the adhesive provides thermal and oxidation protection to the substrate (in this case, reinforced carbon/carbon composites, RCCs) during re-entry of a space vehicle. Although there may be many formulations for repair adhesives, at the time of this reporting, this is the first known adhesive capable of an on-orbit repair. The adhesive is an engineered ceramic material composed of a pre-ceramic polymer and refractory powders in the form of a paste or putty that can be applied to a scratched, cracked, or fractured composite surface, covering and protecting the damaged area. The adhesive is then "cured" with a heat cycle, thereby cross-linking the polymer into a hardened material and bonding it to the substrate. During the heat of reentry, the material is converted to a ceramic coating that provides thermal and oxidative stability to the repaired area, thus allowing the vehicle to pass safely from space into the upper atmosphere. Ceramic powders such as SiC, ZrB2 and Y2O3 are combined with allylhydridopolycarbosilane (AHPCS) resin, and are mixed to form a paste adhesive. The material is then applied to the damaged area by brush, spatula, trowel, or other means to fill cracks, gaps, and holes, or used to bond patches onto the damaged area. The material is then cured, in a vacuum, preferably at 250F (approximately equal to 121C) for two hours. The re-entry heating of the vehicle at temperatures in excess of 3,000F (approximately equal to 1,650C) then converts this material into a ceramic coating. This invention has demonstrated advantages in resistance to high temperatures, as was demonstrated in more than 100 arc-jet tests in representative environments at NASA. Extensive testing verified oxidation protection for the repaired substrate (RCC

  8. [Lodged bullet or bullet penetration? Re-entry of a projectile and pseudo-shot].

    PubMed

    Grimm, U; Zollinger, U

    1996-01-01

    In an extended suicide an 11-year-old boy was killed by two shots into the back. In spite of corresponding entry and exit points one of the projectiles was found inside the body. By laying open the respective bullet track, examination of the deformations of the bullet, on which a total of three ricochet points were identified, and a second visit to the scene both the order in which the shots were fired and the reason why one of the projectiles was lodged inside the body, although there was an exit point, could be clarified: On firing the second shot the victim had been lying on the wooden threshold of a door, from which the projectile ricochetted. The terms "reentry" and "pseudo exit point" are discussed. The retention of the bullet in the depth of an alleged exit wound emphasizes the importance of post-mortal X-ray examinations. PMID:8687277

  9. Heatshield material selection for advanced ballistic reentry vehicles. [rayon fiber cloth impregnated with phenolic resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legendre, P. J.; Holtz, T.; Sikra, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The Performance of staple rayon fiber and AVTEX continuous rayon fiber was evaluated as precursor materials for heatshields. The materials studied were referenced to the IRC FM5055A heatshield materials flown during the past decade. Three different arc jet facilities were used to simulate portions of the reentry environment. The IRC FM5055A and the AVTEX FM5055G, both continuous rayon fiber woven materials having the phenolic impregnant filled with carbon particles were compared. The AVTEX continuous fiber, unfilled material FM5822A was also examined to a limited extent. Test results show that the AVTEX FM5055G material provided a close substitute for the IRC FM5055A material both in terms of thermal protection and roll torque performance.

  10. The Advanced Re-Entry Vehicle (ARV) A Development Step From ATV Toward Manned Transportation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottacini, Massimiliano; Berthe, Philippe; Vo, Xavier; Pietsch, Klaus

    2011-05-01

    The Advanced Re-entry Vehicle (ARV) programme has been undertaken by Europe with the objective to contribute to the preparation of a future European crew transportation system, while providing a valuable logistic support to the ISS through an operational cargo return system. This development would allow: - the early acquisition of critical technologies; - the design, development and testing of elements suitable for the follow up human rated transportation system. These vehicles should also serve future LEO infrastructures and exploration missions. With the aim to satisfy the above objectives a team composed by major European industries and led by EADS Astrium Space Transportation is currently conducting the phase A of the programme under contract with the European Space Agency (ESA). Two vehicle versions are being investigated: a Cargo version, transporting cargo only to/from the ISS, and a Crew version, which will allow the transfer of both crew and cargo to/from the ISS. The ARV Cargo version, in its present configuration, is composed of three modules. The Versatile Service Module (VSM) provides to the system the propulsion/GNC for orbital manoeuvres and attitude control and the orbital power generation. Its propulsion system and GNC shall be robust enough to allow its use for different launch stacks and different LEO missions in the future. The Un-pressurised Cargo Module (UCM) provides the accommodation for about 3000 kg of unpressurised cargo and is to be sufficiently flexible to ensure the transportation of: - orbital infrastructure components (ORU’s); - scientific / technological experiments; - propellant for re-fuelling, re-boost (and de-orbiting) of the ISS. The Re-entry Module (RM) provides a pressurized volume to accommodate active/passive cargo (2000 kg upload/1500 kg download). It is conceived as an expendable conical capsule with spherical heat-shield, interfacing with the new docking standard of the ISS, i.e. it carries the IBDM docking system, on

  11. The Advanced Re-Entry Vehicle (ARV) a Development Step from ATV Toward Manned Transportation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottacini, M.; Berthe, P.; Vo, X.; Pietsch, K.

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced Re-entry Vehicle (ARV) programme has been undertaken by Europe with the objective to contribute to the preparation of a future European crew transportation system, while providing a valuable logistic support to the ISS through an operational cargo return system. This development would allow: - the early acquisition of critical technologies; - the design, development and testing of elements suitable for the follow up human rated transportation system. These vehicles should also serve future LEO infrastructures and exploration missions. With the aim to satisfy the above objectives a team composed by major European industries and led by EADS Astrium Space Transportation is currently conducting the phase A of the programme under contract with the European Space Agency (ESA). Two vehicle versions are being investigated: a Cargo version, transporting cargo only to/from the ISS, and a Crew version, which will allow the transfer of both crew and cargo to/from the ISS. The ARV Cargo version, in its present configuration, is composed of three modules. The Versatile Service Module (VSM) provides to the system the propulsion/GNC for orbital manoeuvres and attitude control and the orbital power generation. Its propulsion system and GNC shall be robust enough to allow its use for different launch stacks and different LEO missions in the future. The Un-pressurised Cargo Module (UCM) provides the accommodation for about 3000 kg of un-pressurised cargo and is to be sufficiently flexible to ensure the transportation of: - orbital infrastructure components (ORU's); - scientific / technological experiments; - propellant for re-fuelling, re-boost (and deorbiting) of the ISS. The Re-entry Module (RM) provides a pressurized volume to accommodate active/passive cargo (2000 kg upload/1500 kg download). It is conceived as an expendable conical capsule with spherical heat- hield, interfacing with the new docking standard of the ISS, i.e. it carries the IBDM docking system, on a

  12. SHARK-MAXUS 8 Experiment: A Technology Demonstrator for Re-Entry Drop Capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardi, R.; del Vecchio, A.; Russo, G.; Weikert, S.; Cremaschi, F.; Ortega, G.; Rinalducci, A.; Martinez Barrio, A.

    2012-01-01

    SHARK (Sounding Hypersonic Atmospheric Re- entering 'Kapsule') is a small capsule designed and realized at CIRA under ESA contract. The aim of the project is to prove the feasibility to set up a low cost experimental space platform and execute a reentry test flight by dropping a capsule from a sounding rocket. The main payload of SHARK is a UHTC (Ultra High Temperature Ceramic) component, machined from scraps of previous ground tests executed in the CIRA Plasma Wind Tunnel SCIROCCO. SHARK was successfully launched on March the 26th 2010, by the European sounding rocket MAXUS 8. The separation occurred nominally during the ascent parabola and successfully executed its 15 minutes ballistic flight (achieving more than 700 km altitude) and then re-entered the atmosphere and landed. The capsule was recovered on the 1st of July 2010 and the data retrieved from the memory unit. This paper will present a mission overview, with particular details on the safety and operational aspects.

  13. Academic potential among African American adolescents in juvenile detention centers: Implications for reentry to school

    PubMed Central

    Toldson, Ivory A.; Woodson, Kamilah M.; Braithwaite, Ronald; Holliday, Rhonda C.

    2010-01-01

    The study explores Black adolescent detainees academic potential and motivation to return to school to inform best practices and policies for juvenile reentry to educational settings. Adolescent detainees (N = 1,576) who were recruited from one male and one female youth detention facility, responded to surveys that assessed post-detention educational plans, as well as social and emotional characteristics, and criminal history. Multivariate analysis techniques were used to compare factors across race and gender, and plot linear relationships between key indicators of academic potential with associate factors. Findings revealed that youth were more likely to evince academic potential when they had a healthy level of self-esteem, adequate future goal orientation, positive mood, family and community involvement, fewer traumatic events, and less delinquent activity. PMID:21654936

  14. Flutter of Winged Reentry Space Vehicles Affected by an Elastic Attachment in Launching Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Atsushi; Ueda, Tetsuhiko

    This paper reports the flutter investigation of a winged reentry space vehicle having rotational modes in dynamic deflection due to an elastic attachment between a vehicle and a booster rocket. The elastic rotational mode is taken into consideration as an elastic rolling mode or an elastic yawing mode. Flutter experiments have been conducted in a transonic wind tunnel. The doublet-point method (DPM) is used to calculate flutter boundaries for this model. It is shown that an elastic rolling mode may lower the critical speed of anti-symmetric mode flutter because its existence alters the natural vibration mode of anti-symmetric bending which causes flutter. On the other hand, a coupling between an elastic yawing mode and an anti-symmetric bending one becomes critical in the different model.

  15. Evaluation of non-intrusive flow measurement techniques for a re-entry flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, R. B.; Santavicca, D. A.; Zimmermann, M.

    1983-01-01

    This study evaluates various non-intrusive techniques for the measurement of the flow field on the windward side of the Space Shuttle orbiter or a similar reentry vehicle. Included are linear (Rayleigh, Raman, Mie, Laser Doppler Velocimetry, Resonant Doppler Velocimetry) and nonlinear (Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman, Laser-Induced Fluorescence) light scattering, electron-beam fluorescence, thermal emission, and mass spectroscopy. Flow-field properties were taken from a nonequilibrium flow model by Shinn, Moss, and Simmonds at the NASA Langley Research Center. Conclusions are, when possible, based on quantitative scaling of known laboratory results to the conditions projected. Detailed discussion with researchers in the field contributed further to these conclusions and provided valuable insights regarding the experimental feasibility of each of the techniques.

  16. Emergency Scenarios of a Re-Entry Vehicle due to Control Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, O.; Sachs, G.

    A controls degradation scenario is investigated for a reentry vehicle. It is assumed that one of two body flaps is blocked. The reaction control system is used to generate control moments in combination with the aerodynamic surfaces still operative. Particular emphasis is placed on implementing a control allocation method which yields an optimum utilization of the aerodynamic control surfaces in terms of minimizing the propellant mass required for the reaction control system. Minimum-propellant trajectories for the blocked body flap scenarios are determined using an efficient optimization technique. Results are presented which address blocked body flap scenarios caused by off-normal situations already in the orbital phase. The results show that no additional landing sites are required if an adequate amount of propellant mass is available.

  17. Fused slurry silicide coatings for columbium alloys reentry heat shields. Volume 1: Evaluation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, B.

    1973-01-01

    The R-512E (Si-20Cr-20Fe) fused slurry silicide coating process was optimized to coat full size (20in x 20in) single face rib and corrugation stiffened panels fabricated from FS-85 columbium alloy for 100 mission space shuttle heat shield applications. Structural life under simulated space shuttle lift-off stresses and reentry conditions demonstrated reuse capability well beyond 100 flights for R-512E coated FS-85 columbium heat shield panels. Demonstrated coating damage tolerance showed no immediate structural failure on exposure. The FS-85 columbium alloy was selected from five candidate alloys (Cb-752, C-129Y, WC-3015, B-66 and FS-85) based on the evaluation tests which have designed to determine: (1) change in material properties due to coating and reuse; (2) alloy tolerance to coating damage; (3) coating emittance characteristics under reuse conditions; and (4) new coating chemistries for improved coating life.

  18. Ares I-X First Stage Internal Aft Skirt Re-Entry Heating Data and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Craig P.; Tashakkor, Scott B.

    2011-01-01

    The CLVSTATE engineering code is being used to predict Ares-I launch vehicle first stage reentry aerodynamic heating. An engineering analysis is developed which yields reasonable predictions for the timing of the first stage aft skirt thermal curtain failure and the resulting internal gas temperatures. The analysis is based on correlations of the Ares I-X internal aft skirt gas temperatures and has been implemented into CLVSTATE. Validation of the thermal curtain opening models has been accomplished using additional Ares I-X thermocouple, calorimeter and pressure flight data. In addition, a technique which accounts for radiation losses at high altitudes has been developed which improves the gas temperature measurements obtained by the gas temperature probes (GTP). Updates to the CLVSTATE models are shown to improve the accuracy of the internal aft skirt heating predictions which will result in increased confidence in future vehicle designs

  19. Effects of verapamil on ventricular tachycardias possibly caused by reentry, automaticity, and triggered activity.

    PubMed Central

    Sung, R J; Shapiro, W A; Shen, E N; Morady, F; Davis, J

    1983-01-01

    To define the role of verapamil in the treatment of ventricular tachycardia (VT), we studied 21 patients with chronic recurrent VT. Electrophysiologic studies were performed before and during intravenous infusion of verapamil (0.15 mg/kg followed by 0.005 mg/kg per min). On the basis of the mode of VT initiation and termination, we identified three groups of patients: (a) 11 patients had VT suggestive of reentry, as VT could be initiated with ventricular extrastimulation and terminated with overdrive ventricular pacing. Verapamil did not affect the inducibility and cycle length of VT. (b) 7 patients had VT suggestive of catecholamine-sensitive automaticity as VT could not be initiated with programmed electrical stimulation but could be provoked by isoproterenol infusion. Moreover, the VT could not be converted to a sustained sinus rhythm with overdrive ventricular pacing and it resolved only with discontinuing isoproterenol infusion. Verapamil exerted no effects on VT. (c) 3 patients had VT with electrophysiologic characteristics suggestive of triggered activity related to delayed afterdepolarizations. Characteristically, after attaining a range of cycle lengths, the sinus, atrial or ventricular paced rhythm could initiate VT without ventricular extrastimulation. The first beat of VT invariably occurred late in the cardiac cycle with a premature coupling interval 0-80 ms shorter than the preceding QRS cycle length; the premature coupling interval gradually decreased as the sinus, atrial or ventricular paced cycle length progressively shortened. Of note, verapamil completely suppressed VT inducibility in these three patients. These observations lead us to suggest that verapamil does not affect VT caused by reentry and catecholamine-sensitive automaticity but is effective in suppressing VT caused by triggered activity related to delayed afterdepolarizations in humans. PMID:6874951

  20. Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust Particles: Reentry Heating and Capture in Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szydlik, Paul P.

    1996-01-01

    Studies of interplanetary and interstellar dust can provide significant information on the evolution of the solar system or stars, respectively. However, for reliable analysis it is crucial to know how the particles have been modified during reentry (in the case of interplanetary dust particles, or [DP's) and impact into the capture medium. In the case of stratospheric capture, particles will be heated by atmospheric drag. Subsequent capture of the particles will result in heating, ablation, accretion of the capture medium and possible fragmentation. Modeling of these processes is a useful way of assessing their effects on the interpretation of the compositional data for these particles. Previous work on reentry heating has shown that heat diffusion alone cannot adequately account for temperature gradients observed in IDP's. In fact, for any reasonable thermal parameters, calculations show the particles to be nearly isothermal. Here we extend those studies to include phase transitions. These preliminary results are promising and show a significant temperature gradient for a 100 micron (diameter) particle. The actual capture of the particles in silica aerogel is being modeled using a comprehensive shock hydrodynamic code (called CTH). Various options of this code were investigated to attempt to make the most appropriate choice of methods of impact, equations of state, and processes of energy transfer from capture material to particle. The initial calculations with the code used only 'reasonable' estimates for the physical parameters of silica aerogel. Through the literature searches and personal contacts with the knowledgeable scientists, the best possible mechanical and thermal data have been made available for these computations.