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Sample records for accurate variational wave

  1. Water wave model with accurate dispersion and vertical vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhove, Onno

    2010-05-01

    Cotter and Bokhove (Journal of Engineering Mathematics 2010) derived a variational water wave model with accurate dispersion and vertical vorticity. In one limit, it leads to Luke's variational principle for potential flow water waves. In the another limit it leads to the depth-averaged shallow water equations including vertical vorticity. Presently, focus will be put on the Hamiltonian formulation of the variational model and its boundary conditions.

  2. Seismic Waves, 4th order accurate

    2013-08-16

    SW4 is a program for simulating seismic wave propagation on parallel computers. SW4 colves the seismic wave equations in Cartesian corrdinates. It is therefore appropriate for regional simulations, where the curvature of the earth can be neglected. SW4 implements a free surface boundary condition on a realistic topography, absorbing super-grid conditions on the far-field boundaries, and a kinematic source model consisting of point force and/or point moment tensor source terms. SW4 supports a fully 3-Dmore » heterogeneous material model that can be specified in several formats. SW4 can output synthetic seismograms in an ASCII test format, or in the SAC finary format. It can also present simulation information as GMT scripts, whixh can be used to create annotated maps. Furthermore, SW4 can output the solution as well as the material model along 2-D grid planes.« less

  3. Seismic Waves, 4th order accurate

    SciTech Connect

    2013-08-16

    SW4 is a program for simulating seismic wave propagation on parallel computers. SW4 colves the seismic wave equations in Cartesian corrdinates. It is therefore appropriate for regional simulations, where the curvature of the earth can be neglected. SW4 implements a free surface boundary condition on a realistic topography, absorbing super-grid conditions on the far-field boundaries, and a kinematic source model consisting of point force and/or point moment tensor source terms. SW4 supports a fully 3-D heterogeneous material model that can be specified in several formats. SW4 can output synthetic seismograms in an ASCII test format, or in the SAC finary format. It can also present simulation information as GMT scripts, whixh can be used to create annotated maps. Furthermore, SW4 can output the solution as well as the material model along 2-D grid planes.

  4. Lanczos steps to improve variational wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becca, Federico; Hu, Wen-Jun; Iqbal, Yasir; Parola, Alberto; Poilblanc, Didier; Sorella, Sandro

    2015-09-01

    Gutzwiller-projected fermionic states can be efficiently implemented within quantum Monte Carlo calculations to define extremely accurate variational wave functions for Heisenberg models on frustrated two-dimensional lattices, not only for the ground state but also for low-energy excitations. The application of few Lanczos steps on top of these states further improves their accuracy, allowing calculations on large clusters. In addition, by computing both the energy and its variance, it is possible to obtain reliable estimations of exact results. Here, we report the cases of the frustrated Heisenberg models on square and Kagome lattices.

  5. How Accurate Is Pierce's Theory of Traveling Wave Tube?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, D. H.; Chernin, D.; Wong, P.; Zhang, P.; Lau, Y. Y.; Dong, C. F.; Hoff, B.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2015-11-01

    This paper provides a rigorous test of the accuracy of Pierce's classical theory of traveling wave tubes (TWTs). The EXACT dispersion relation for a dielectric TWT is derived, from which the spatial amplification rate, ki, is calculated. This ki is compared with that obtained from Pierce's widely used 3-wave theory and his more general 4-wave theory (which includes the reverse propagating circuit mode). We have used various procedures to extract Pierce's gain parameter C and space charge parameter Q from the exact dispersion relation. We find that, in general, the 3-wave theory is a poor representation to the exact dispersion relation if C >0.05. However, the 4-wave theory gives excellent agreement even for C as high as 0.12 and over more than 20 percent bandwidth, if the quantity (k2 × C3) is evaluated accurately as a function of frequency, and if Q is expanded to first order in the wavenumber k, where Q is the difference between the exact dispersion relation and its 4-wave representation in which Q is set to zero. Similar tests will be performed on the disk-on-rod slow wave TWT, for which the hot tube dispersion relation including all space harmonics has been obtained. Supported by AFOSR FA9550-14-1-0309, FA9550-15-1-0097, AFRL FA9451-14-1-0374, and L-3 Communications.

  6. Accurate tremor locations from coherent S and P waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, John G.; Kim, Won-Young; Rubin, Allan M.

    2014-06-01

    Nonvolcanic tremor is an important component of the slow slip processes which load faults from below, but accurately locating tremor has proven difficult because tremor rarely contains clear P or S wave arrivals. Here we report the observation of coherence in the shear and compressional waves of tremor at widely separated stations which allows us to detect and accurately locate tremor events. An event detector using data from two stations sees the onset of tremor activity in the Cascadia tremor episodes of February 2003, July 2004, and September 2005 and confirms the previously reported south to north migration of the tremor. Event detectors using data from three and four stations give Sand P arrival times of high accuracy. The hypocenters of the tremor events fall at depths of ˜30 to ˜40 km and define a narrow plane dipping at a shallow angle to the northeast, consistent with the subducting plate interface. The S wave polarizations and P wave first motions define a source mechanism in agreement with the northeast convergence seen in geodetic observations of slow slip. Tens of thousands of locations determined by constraining the events to the plate interface show tremor sources highly clustered in space with a strongly similar pattern of sources in the three episodes examined. The deeper sources generate tremor in minor episodes as well. The extent to which the narrow bands of tremor sources overlap between the three major episodes suggests relative epicentral location errors as small as 1-2 km.

  7. Accurate finite difference methods for time-harmonic wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harari, Isaac; Turkel, Eli

    1994-01-01

    Finite difference methods for solving problems of time-harmonic acoustics are developed and analyzed. Multidimensional inhomogeneous problems with variable, possibly discontinuous, coefficients are considered, accounting for the effects of employing nonuniform grids. A weighted-average representation is less sensitive to transition in wave resolution (due to variable wave numbers or nonuniform grids) than the standard pointwise representation. Further enhancement in method performance is obtained by basing the stencils on generalizations of Pade approximation, or generalized definitions of the derivative, reducing spurious dispersion, anisotropy and reflection, and by improving the representation of source terms. The resulting schemes have fourth-order accurate local truncation error on uniform grids and third order in the nonuniform case. Guidelines for discretization pertaining to grid orientation and resolution are presented.

  8. Accurate source location from P waves scattered by surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, N.; Shen, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate source locations of earthquakes and other seismic events are fundamental in seismology. The location accuracy is limited by several factors, including velocity models, which are often poorly known. In contrast, surface topography, the largest velocity contrast in the Earth, is often precisely mapped at the seismic wavelength (> 100 m). In this study, we explore the use of P-coda waves generated by scattering at surface topography to obtain high-resolution locations of near-surface seismic events. The Pacific Northwest region is chosen as an example. The grid search method is combined with the 3D strain Green's tensor database type method to improve the search efficiency as well as the quality of hypocenter solution. The strain Green's tensor is calculated by the 3D collocated-grid finite difference method on curvilinear grids. Solutions in the search volume are then obtained based on the least-square misfit between the 'observed' and predicted P and P-coda waves. A 95% confidence interval of the solution is also provided as a posterior error estimation. We find that the scattered waves are mainly due to topography in comparison with random velocity heterogeneity characterized by the von Kάrmάn-type power spectral density function. When only P wave data is used, the 'best' solution is offset from the real source location mostly in the vertical direction. The incorporation of P coda significantly improves solution accuracy and reduces its uncertainty. The solution remains robust with a range of random noises in data, un-modeled random velocity heterogeneities, and uncertainties in moment tensors that we tested.

  9. Fast and accurate analytical model to solve inverse problem in SHM using Lamb wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddar, Banibrata; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Lamb wave propagation is at the center of attention of researchers for structural health monitoring of thin walled structures. This is due to the fact that Lamb wave modes are natural modes of wave propagation in these structures with long travel distances and without much attenuation. This brings the prospect of monitoring large structure with few sensors/actuators. However the problem of damage detection and identification is an "inverse problem" where we do not have the luxury to know the exact mathematical model of the system. On top of that the problem is more challenging due to the confounding factors of statistical variation of the material and geometric properties. Typically this problem may also be ill posed. Due to all these complexities the direct solution of the problem of damage detection and identification in SHM is impossible. Therefore an indirect method using the solution of the "forward problem" is popular for solving the "inverse problem". This requires a fast forward problem solver. Due to the complexities involved with the forward problem of scattering of Lamb waves from damages researchers rely primarily on numerical techniques such as FEM, BEM, etc. But these methods are slow and practically impossible to be used in structural health monitoring. We have developed a fast and accurate analytical forward problem solver for this purpose. This solver, CMEP (complex modes expansion and vector projection), can simulate scattering of Lamb waves from all types of damages in thin walled structures fast and accurately to assist the inverse problem solver.

  10. Variational modelling of nonlinear water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogirou, Anna; Bokhove, Onno

    2015-11-01

    Mathematical modelling of water waves is demonstrated by investigating variational methods. A potential flow water wave model is derived using variational techniques and extented to include explicit time-dependence, leading to non-autonomous dynamics. As a first example, we consider the problem of a soliton splash in a long wave channel with a contraction at its end, resulting after a sluice gate is removed at a finite time. The removal of the sluice gate is included in the variational principle through a time-dependent gravitational potential. A second example involving non-autonomous dynamics concerns the motion of a free surface in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell. Explicit time-dependence now enters the model through a linear damping term due to the effect of wall friction and a term representing the motion of an artificially driven wave pump. In both cases, the model is solved numerically using a Galerkin FEM and the numerical results are compared to wave structures observed in experiments. The water wave model is also adapted to accommodate nonlinear ship dynamics. The novelty is this case is the coupling between the water wave dynamics, the ship dynamics and water line dynamics on the ship. For simplicity, we consider a simple ship structure consisting of V-shaped cross-sections.

  11. Accurate source location from waves scattered by surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nian; Shen, Yang; Flinders, Ashton; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Accurate source locations of earthquakes and other seismic events are fundamental in seismology. The location accuracy is limited by several factors, including velocity models, which are often poorly known. In contrast, surface topography, the largest velocity contrast in the Earth, is often precisely mapped at the seismic wavelength (>100 m). In this study, we explore the use of P coda waves generated by scattering at surface topography to obtain high-resolution locations of near-surface seismic events. The Pacific Northwest region is chosen as an example to provide realistic topography. A grid search algorithm is combined with the 3-D strain Green's tensor database to improve search efficiency as well as the quality of hypocenter solutions. The strain Green's tensor is calculated using a 3-D collocated-grid finite difference method on curvilinear grids. Solutions in the search volume are obtained based on the least squares misfit between the "observed" and predicted P and P coda waves. The 95% confidence interval of the solution is provided as an a posteriori error estimation. For shallow events tested in the study, scattering is mainly due to topography in comparison with stochastic lateral velocity heterogeneity. The incorporation of P coda significantly improves solution accuracy and reduces solution uncertainty. The solution remains robust with wide ranges of random noises in data, unmodeled random velocity heterogeneities, and uncertainties in moment tensors. The method can be extended to locate pairs of sources in close proximity by differential waveforms using source-receiver reciprocity, further reducing errors caused by unmodeled velocity structures.

  12. Lamb mode selection for accurate wall loss estimation via guided wave tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Huthwaite, P.; Ribichini, R.; Lowe, M. J. S.; Cawley, P.

    2014-02-18

    Guided wave tomography offers a method to accurately quantify wall thickness losses in pipes and vessels caused by corrosion. This is achieved using ultrasonic waves transmitted over distances of approximately 1–2m, which are measured by an array of transducers and then used to reconstruct a map of wall thickness throughout the inspected region. To achieve accurate estimations of remnant wall thickness, it is vital that a suitable Lamb mode is chosen. This paper presents a detailed evaluation of the fundamental modes, S{sub 0} and A{sub 0}, which are of primary interest in guided wave tomography thickness estimates since the higher order modes do not exist at all thicknesses, to compare their performance using both numerical and experimental data while considering a range of challenging phenomena. The sensitivity of A{sub 0} to thickness variations was shown to be superior to S{sub 0}, however, the attenuation from A{sub 0} when a liquid loading was present was much higher than S{sub 0}. A{sub 0} was less sensitive to the presence of coatings on the surface of than S{sub 0}.

  13. Lamb mode selection for accurate wall loss estimation via guided wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huthwaite, P.; Ribichini, R.; Lowe, M. J. S.; Cawley, P.

    2014-02-01

    Guided wave tomography offers a method to accurately quantify wall thickness losses in pipes and vessels caused by corrosion. This is achieved using ultrasonic waves transmitted over distances of approximately 1-2m, which are measured by an array of transducers and then used to reconstruct a map of wall thickness throughout the inspected region. To achieve accurate estimations of remnant wall thickness, it is vital that a suitable Lamb mode is chosen. This paper presents a detailed evaluation of the fundamental modes, S0 and A0, which are of primary interest in guided wave tomography thickness estimates since the higher order modes do not exist at all thicknesses, to compare their performance using both numerical and experimental data while considering a range of challenging phenomena. The sensitivity of A0 to thickness variations was shown to be superior to S0, however, the attenuation from A0 when a liquid loading was present was much higher than S0. A0 was less sensitive to the presence of coatings on the surface of than S0.

  14. Rogue wave variational modelling through the interaction of two solitary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidel, Floriane; Bokhove, Onno

    2016-04-01

    The extreme and unexpected characteristics of Rogue waves have made them legendary for centuries. It is only on the 1st of January 1995 that these mariners' tales started to raise scientist's curiosity, when such a wave was recorded in the North Sea; a sudden wall of water hit the Draupner offshore platform, more than twice higher than the other waves, providing evidence of the existence of rogue or freak waves. Since then, studies have shown that these surface gravity waves of high amplitude (at least twice the height of the other sea waves [Dyste et al., 2008]) appear in non-linear dispersive water motion [Drazin and Johnson, 1989], at any depth, and have caused a lot of damage in recent years [Nikolkina and Didenkulova, 2011 ]. So far, most of the studies have tried to determine their probability of occurrence, but no conclusion has been achieved yet, which means that we are currently unenable to predict or avoid these monster waves. An accurate mathematical and numerical water-wave model would enable simulation and observation of this external forcing on boats and offshore structures and hence reduce their threat. In this work, we aim to model rogue waves through a soliton splash generated by the interaction of two solitons coming from different channels at a specific angle. Kodama indeed showed that one way to produce extreme waves is through the intersection of two solitary waves, or one solitary wave and its oblique reflection on a vertical wall [Yeh, Li and Kodama, 2010 ]. While he modelled Mach reflection from Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) theory, we aim to model rogue waves from the three-dimensional potential flow equations and/or their asymptotic equivalent described by Benney and Luke [Benney and Luke, 1964]. These theories have the advantage to allow wave propagation in several directions, which is not the case with KP equations. The initial solitary waves are generated by removing a sluice gate in each channel. The equations are derived through a

  15. Validation of an Accurate Three-Dimensional Helical Slow-Wave Circuit Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    1997-01-01

    The helical slow-wave circuit embodies a helical coil of rectangular tape supported in a metal barrel by dielectric support rods. Although the helix slow-wave circuit remains the mainstay of the traveling-wave tube (TWT) industry because of its exceptionally wide bandwidth, a full helical circuit, without significant dimensional approximations, has not been successfully modeled until now. Numerous attempts have been made to analyze the helical slow-wave circuit so that the performance could be accurately predicted without actually building it, but because of its complex geometry, many geometrical approximations became necessary rendering the previous models inaccurate. In the course of this research it has been demonstrated that using the simulation code, MAFIA, the helical structure can be modeled with actual tape width and thickness, dielectric support rod geometry and materials. To demonstrate the accuracy of the MAFIA model, the cold-test parameters including dispersion, on-axis interaction impedance and attenuation have been calculated for several helical TWT slow-wave circuits with a variety of support rod geometries including rectangular and T-shaped rods, as well as various support rod materials including isotropic, anisotropic and partially metal coated dielectrics. Compared with experimentally measured results, the agreement is excellent. With the accuracy of the MAFIA helical model validated, the code was used to investigate several conventional geometric approximations in an attempt to obtain the most computationally efficient model. Several simplifications were made to a standard model including replacing the helical tape with filaments, and replacing rectangular support rods with shapes conforming to the cylindrical coordinate system with effective permittivity. The approximate models are compared with the standard model in terms of cold-test characteristics and computational time. The model was also used to determine the sensitivity of various

  16. Accurate Tremor Locations in Japan from Coherent S-Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    The tremor detectors developed for accurately locating tectonic tremor in Cascadia [Armbruster et al., JGR 2014] have been applied to data from the HINET seismic network in Japan. The best results were obtained in the Tokai region with stations ASU, ASH and TYE having relatively close spacing (11-18 km). 330 days with active tremor, 2004-2014, near these stations were found on the daily epicentral distributions of tremor on the HINET web site. The detector sees numbers of detections per day comparable to minor tremor episodes in Cascadia. Major tremor episodes in Cascadia are associated with geodetic signals stronger than those seen in Japan. If the tremor is located by constraining it to the plate interface, a pattern of persistent sources is seen, with some intense sources. This is similar to what was seen in Cascadia. In southwest Shikoku 139 days with tremor were identified. Stations UWA, OOZ and IKT see tremor with persistent patterns and strong sources but with approximately one fifth as many detections per day on active days, compared to ASU-ASH-TYE. The web site tremor distributions show activity here as strong as in Tokai. We believe the lesser number of detections in Shikoku is primarily the result of wider station spacing, 19-30 km, than in Tokai, although there may be other factors. Yabe and Ide [EPS 2013] detect and locate tremor in Kyushu on July 17-18 2005 and December 4-6 2008. A detector with stations NRA, SUK and KTM, station spacing 21-22 km, sees tremor which resembles minor episodes in Cascadia. The relative arrival times are consistent with their locations. We conclude that the methods developed in Cascadia will work in Japan but the typical spacing of HINET stations, ~20 km, is greater than the optimum distance found in analysis of data from Cascadia, 8 to 15 km.

  17. Variational wave functions for homogenous Bose systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sueto, Andras; Szepfalusy, Peter

    2008-02-15

    We study variational wave functions of the product form, factorizing according to the wave vectors k, for the ground state of a system of bosons interacting via positive pair interactions with a positive Fourier transform. Our trial functions are members of different orthonormal bases in Fock space. Each basis contains a quasiparticle vacuum state and states with an arbitrary finite number of quasiparticles. One of the bases is that of Valatin and Butler (VB), introduced fifty years ago and parametrized by an infinite set of variables determining Bogoliubov's canonical transformation for each k. In another case, inspired by Nozieres and Saint James the canonical transformation for k=0 is replaced by a shift in the creation/annihilation operators. For the VB basis we prove that the lowest energy is obtained in a state with {approx}{radical}(volume) quasiparticles in the zero mode. The number of k=0 physical particles is of the order of the volume and its fluctuation is anomalously large, resulting in an excess energy. The same fluctuation is normal in the second type of optimized bases, the minimum energy is smaller and is attained in a vacuum state. Associated quasiparticle theories and questions about the gap in their spectrum are also discussed.

  18. Special purpose hybrid transfinite elements and unified computational methodology for accurately predicting thermoelastic stress waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper represents an attempt to apply extensions of a hybrid transfinite element computational approach for accurately predicting thermoelastic stress waves. The applicability of the present formulations for capturing the thermal stress waves induced by boundary heating for the well known Danilovskaya problems is demonstrated. A unique feature of the proposed formulations for applicability to the Danilovskaya problem of thermal stress waves in elastic solids lies in the hybrid nature of the unified formulations and the development of special purpose transfinite elements in conjunction with the classical Galerkin techniques and transformation concepts. Numerical test cases validate the applicability and superior capability to capture the thermal stress waves induced due to boundary heating.

  19. A Novel Multimode Waveguide Coupler for Accurate Power Measurement of Traveling Wave Tube Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler fabricated from two dissimilar waveguides is capable of isolating the power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT). In addition to accurate power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave frequencies.

  20. An evaluation of effective radiuses of bulk-wave ultrasonic transducers as circular piston sources for accurate velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Mototaka; Kushibiki, Jun-ichi; Aoki, Naoya

    2004-05-01

    The effective radius of a bulk-wave ultrasonic transducer as a circular piston source, fabricated on one end of a synthetic silica (SiO2) glass buffer rod, was evaluated for accurate velocity measurements of dispersive specimens over a wide frequency range. The effective radius was determined by comparing measured and calculated phase variations due to diffraction in an ultrasonic transmission line of the SiO2 buffer rod/water-couplant/SiO2 standard specimen, using radio-frequency (RF) tone burst ultrasonic waves. Fourteen devices with different device parameters were evaluated. The velocities of the nondispersive standard specimen (C-7940) were found to be 5934.10 +/- 0.35 m/s at 70 to 290 MHz, after diffraction correction using the nominal radius (0.75 mm) for an ultrasonic device with an operating center frequency of about 400 MHz. Corrected velocities were more accurately found to be 5934.15 +/- 0.03 m/s by using the effective radius (0.780 mm) for the diffraction correction. Bulk-wave ultrasonic devices calibrated by this experimental procedure enable conducting extremely accurate velocity dispersion measurements. PMID:15217227

  1. Accurate Young's modulus measurement based on Rayleigh wave velocity and empirical Poisson's ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingxia; Feng, Zhihua

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a method for Young's modulus measurement based on Rayleigh wave speed. The error in Poisson's ratio has weak influence on the measurement of Young's modulus based on Rayleigh wave speed, and Poisson's ratio minimally varies in a certain material; thus, we can accurately estimate Young's modulus with surface wave speed and a rough Poisson's ratio. We numerically analysed three methods using Rayleigh, longitudinal, and transversal wave speed, respectively, and the error in Poisson's ratio shows the least influence on the result in the method involving Rayleigh wave speed. An experiment was performed and has proved the feasibility of this method. Device for speed measuring could be small, and no sample pretreatment is needed. Hence, developing a portable instrument based on this method is possible. This method makes a good compromise between usability and precision.

  2. Defining allowable physical property variations for high accurate measurements on polymer parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, A.; Sonne, M. R.; Madruga, D. G.; De Chiffre, L.; Hattel, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Measurement conditions and material properties have a significant impact on the dimensions of a part, especially for polymers parts. Temperature variation causes part deformations that increase the uncertainty of the measurement process. Current industrial tolerances of a few micrometres demand high accurate measurements in non-controlled ambient. Most of polymer parts are manufactured by injection moulding and their inspection is carried out after stabilization, around 200 hours. The overall goal of this work is to reach ±5μm in uncertainty measurements a polymer products which is a challenge in today`s production and metrology environments. The residual deformations in polymer products at room temperature after injection molding are important when micrometer accuracy needs to be achieved. Numerical modelling can give a valuable insight to what is happening in the polymer during cooling down after injection molding. In order to obtain accurate simulations, accurate inputs to the model are crucial. In reality however, the material and physical properties will have some variations. Although these variations may be small, they can act as a source of uncertainty for the measurement. In this paper, we investigated how big the variation in material and physical properties are allowed in order to reach the 5 μm target on the uncertainty.

  3. Accurate projected augmented wave (PAW) datasets for rare-earth elements (RE=La-Lu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topsakal, Mehmet; Wentzcovitch, Renata

    2015-03-01

    We provide accurate projected augmented wave (PAW) datasets for rare-earth (RE) elements with some suggested Hubbard U values allowing efficient plane-wave calculations. Solid state tests of generated datasets were performed on rare-earth nitrides. Through density of state (DOS) and equation of state (EoS) comparisons, generated datasets were shown to yield excellent results comparable to highly accurate all-electron full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave plus local orbital (FLAPW+LO) calculations. Hubbard U values for trivalent RE ions are determined according to hybrid functional calculations. We believe that these new and open-source PAW datasets will allow further studies on rare-earth materials. NSF/EAR 1319361

  4. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION Accurate estimate of α variation and isotope shift parameters in Na and Mg+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, B. K.

    2010-12-01

    We present accurate calculations of fine-structure constant variation coefficients and isotope shifts in Na and Mg+ using the relativistic coupled-cluster method. In our approach, we are able to discover the roles of various correlation effects explicitly to all orders in these calculations. Most of the results, especially for the excited states, are reported for the first time. It is possible to ascertain suitable anchor and probe lines for the studies of possible variation in the fine-structure constant by using the above results in the considered systems.

  5. Variational Water Wave Modelling: from Continuum to Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhove, Onno; Kalogirou, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Variational methods are investigated asymptotically and numerically to model water waves in tanks with wave generators. A modified Benney-Luke model is derived using variational techniques including a time-dependent gravitional potential mimicking a removable "sluice gate". As a validation, our modelling results using (dis)continuous Galerkin finite elements will be compared to a soliton splash event resulting after a sluice gate is removed during a finite time in a long water channel with a contraction at its end. Future work will explore these methods for wave-energy devices and ships in modest to heavy seas.

  6. Accurate near-field calculation in the rigorous coupled-wave analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weismann, Martin; Gallagher, Dominic F. G.; Panoiu, Nicolae C.

    2015-12-01

    The rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) is one of the most successful and widely used methods for modeling periodic optical structures. It yields fast convergence of the electromagnetic far-field and has been adapted to model various optical devices and wave configurations. In this article, we investigate the accuracy with which the electromagnetic near-field can be calculated by using RCWA and explain the observed slow convergence and numerical artifacts from which it suffers, namely unphysical oscillations at material boundaries due to the Gibbs phenomenon. In order to alleviate these shortcomings, we also introduce a mathematical formulation for accurate near-field calculation in RCWA, for one- and two-dimensional straight and slanted diffraction gratings. This accurate near-field computational approach is tested and evaluated for several representative test-structures and configurations in order to illustrate the advantages provided by the proposed modified formulation of the RCWA.

  7. An accurate Fortran code for computing hydrogenic continuum wave functions at a wide range of parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Liang-You; Gong, Qihuang

    2010-12-01

    The accurate computations of hydrogenic continuum wave functions are very important in many branches of physics such as electron-atom collisions, cold atom physics, and atomic ionization in strong laser fields, etc. Although there already exist various algorithms and codes, most of them are only reliable in a certain ranges of parameters. In some practical applications, accurate continuum wave functions need to be calculated at extremely low energies, large radial distances and/or large angular momentum number. Here we provide such a code, which can generate accurate hydrogenic continuum wave functions and corresponding Coulomb phase shifts at a wide range of parameters. Without any essential restrict to angular momentum number, the present code is able to give reliable results at the electron energy range [10,10] eV for radial distances of [10,10] a.u. We also find the present code is very efficient, which should find numerous applications in many fields such as strong field physics. Program summaryProgram title: HContinuumGautchi Catalogue identifier: AEHD_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHD_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1233 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7405 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran90 in fixed format Computer: AMD Processors Operating system: Linux RAM: 20 MBytes Classification: 2.7, 4.5 Nature of problem: The accurate computation of atomic continuum wave functions is very important in many research fields such as strong field physics and cold atom physics. Although there have already existed various algorithms and codes, most of them can only be applicable and reliable in a certain range of parameters. We present here an accurate FORTRAN program for

  8. Geomagnetic field variations in seismic waves traveling across a fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukishov, B. G.; Spivak, A. A.; Ter-Semenov, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    The results of regular instrumental observations over geomagnetic field variations in the zones of influence of tectonic faults during movement of seismic waves of varied intensity are presented. It has been shown that seismic waves with an amplitude more than 5-10 μm/s, traveling across the fault zone, always produced geomagnetic field variations. At weaker seismic disturbances, geomagnetic field variations are of the "glimmer" character, and the relative frequency of appearance of the effect drops as the seismic wave amplitude decreases. The quantitative dependence between the maximal value of the full vector of variations in geomagnetic field induction in a fault zone and the amplitude of the seismic disturbance has been found for the first time.

  9. Variational principle for nonlinear wave propagation in dissipative systems.

    PubMed

    Dierckx, Hans; Verschelde, Henri

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of many natural systems is dominated by nonlinear waves propagating through the medium. We show that in any extended system that supports nonlinear wave fronts with positive surface tension, the asymptotic wave-front dynamics can be formulated as a gradient system, even when the underlying evolution equations for the field variables cannot be written as a gradient system. The variational potential is simply given by a linear combination of the occupied volume and surface area of the wave front and changes monotonically over time. PMID:26986334

  10. Solitary Waves of the MRLW Equation by Variational Iteration Method

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Saleh M.; Alamery, D. G.

    2009-09-09

    In a recent publication, Soliman solved numerically the modified regularized long wave (MRLW) equation by using the variational iteration method (VIM). In this paper, corrected numerical results have been computed, plotted, tabulated, and compared with not only the exact analytical solutions but also the Adomian decomposition method results. Solitary wave solutions of the MRLW equation are exactly obtained as a convergent series with easily computable components. Propagation of single solitary wave, interaction of two and three waves, and also birth of solitons have been discussed. Three invariants of motion have been evaluated to determine the conservation properties of the problem.

  11. Accurate Cold-Test Model of Helical TWT Slow-Wave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Dayton, J. A., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Recently, a method has been established to accurately calculate cold-test data for helical slow-wave structures using the three-dimensional (3-D) electromagnetic computer code, MAFIA. Cold-test parameters have been calculated for several helical traveling-wave tube (TWT) slow-wave circuits possessing various support rod configurations, and results are presented here showing excellent agreement with experiment. The helical models include tape thickness, dielectric support shapes and material properties consistent with the actual circuits. The cold-test data from this helical model can be used as input into large-signal helical TWT interaction codes making it possible, for the first time, to design a complete TWT via computer simulation.

  12. Accurate Cold-Test Model of Helical TWT Slow-Wave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Dayton, James A., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Recently, a method has been established to accurately calculate cold-test data for helical slow-wave structures using the three-dimensional (3-D) electromagnetic computer code, MAxwell's equations by the Finite Integration Algorithm (MAFIA). Cold-test parameters have been calculated for several helical traveLing-wave tube (TWT) slow-wave circuits possessing various support rod configurations, and results are presented here showing excellent agreement with experiment. The helical models include tape thickness, dielectric support shapes and material properties consistent with the actual circuits. The cold-test data from this helical model can be used as input into large-signal helical TWT interaction codes making It possible, for the first time, to design complete TWT via computer simulation.

  13. Accurate Cold-Test Model of Helical TWT Slow-Wave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Dayton, James A., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Recently, a method has been established to accurately calculate cold-test data for helical slow-wave structures using the three-dimensional electromagnetic computer code, MAFIA. Cold-test parameters have been calculated for several helical traveling-wave tube (TWT) slow-wave circuits possessing various support rod configurations, and results are presented here showing excellent agreement with experiment. The helical models include tape thickness, dielectric support shapes and material properties consistent with the actual circuits. The cold-test data from this helical model can be used as input into large-signal helical TWT interaction codes making it possible, for the first time, to design a complete TWT via computer simulation.

  14. Spatial variations in Achilles tendon shear wave speed

    PubMed Central

    DeWall, Ryan J.; Slane, Laura C.; Lee, Kenneth S.; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2014-01-01

    Supersonic shear imaging (SSI) is an ultrasound imaging modality that can provide insight into tissue mechanics by measuring shear wave propagation speed, a property that depends on tissue elasticity. SSI has previously been used to characterize the increase in Achilles tendon shear wave speed that occurs with loading, an effect attributable to the strain-stiffening behavior of the tissue. However, little is known about how shear wave speed varies spatially, which is important, given the anatomical variation that occurs between the calcaneus insertion and the gastrocnemius musculotendon junction. The purpose of this study was to investigate spatial variations in shear wave speed along medial and lateral paths of the Achilles tendon for three different ankle postures: resting ankle angle (R, i.e. neutral), plantarflexed (P; R − 15 deg), and dorsiflexed (D; R + 15 deg). We observed significant spatial and posture variations in tendon shear wave speed in ten healthy young adults. Shear wave speeds in the Achilles free tendon averaged 12 ± 1.2 m/s in a resting position, but decreased to 7.2 ± 1.8 m/s with passive plantarflexion. Distal tendon shear wave speeds often reached the maximum tracking limit (16.3 m/s) of the system when the ankle was in the passively dorsiflexed posture (+15 deg from R). At a fixed posture, shear wave speeds decreased significantly from the free tendon to the gastrocnemius musculotendon junction, with slightly higher speeds measured on the medial side than on the lateral side. Shear wave speeds were only weakly correlated with the thickness and depth of the tendon, suggesting that the distal-to-proximal variations may reflect greater compliance in the aponeurosis relative to the free tendon. The results highlight the importance of considering both limb posture and transducer positioning when using SSI for biomechanical and clinical assessments of the Achilles tendon. PMID:24933528

  15. Variational formulation of covariant eikonal theory for vector waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, A.N.; Ye, H.; Hui, Y.

    1986-10-01

    The eikonal theory of wave propagation is developed by means of a Lorentz-covariant variational principle, involving functions defined on the natural eight-dimensional phase space of rays. The wave field is a four-vector representing the electromagnetic potential, while the medium is represented by an anisotropic, dispersive nonuniform dielectric tensor D/sup ..mu nu../(k,x). The eikonal expansion yields, to lowest order, the Hamiltonian ray equations, which define the Lagrangian manifold k(x), and the wave-action conservation law, which determines the wave-amplitude transport along the rays. The first-order contribution to the variational principle yields a concise expression for the transport of the polarization phase. The symmetry between k-space and x-space allows for a simple implementation of the Maslov transform, which avoids the difficulties of caustic singularities.

  16. Effect of Helical Slow-Wave Circuit Variations on TWT Cold-Test Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Dayton, James A., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Recent advances in the state of the art of computer modeling offer the possibility for the first time to evaluate the effect that slow-wave structure parameter variations, such as manufacturing tolerances, have on the cold-test characteristics of helical traveling-wave tubes (TWT's). This will enable manufacturers to determine the cost effectiveness of controlling the dimensions of the component parts of the TWT, which is almost impossible to do experimentally without building a large number of tubes and controlling several parameters simultaneously. The computer code MAFIA is used in this analysis to determine the effect on dispersion and on-axis interaction impedance of several helical slow-wave circuit parameter variations, including thickness and relative dielectric constant of the support rods, tape width, and height of the metallized films deposited on the dielectric rods. Previous computer analyses required so many approximations that accurate determinations of the effect of many relevant dimensions on tube performance were practically impossible.

  17. Effect of Helical Slow-Wave Circuit Variations on TWT Cold-Test Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Dayton, J. A., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in the state of the art of computer modeling offer the possibility for the first time to evaluate the effect that slow-wave structure parameter variations, such as manufacturing tolerances, have on the cold-test characteristics of helical traveling-wave tubes (TWT's). This will enable manufacturers to determine the cost effectiveness of controlling the dimensions of the component parts of the TWT, which is almost impossible to do experimentally without building a large number of tubes and controlling several parameters simultaneously. The computer code MAFIA is used in this analysis to determine the effect on dispersion and on-axis interaction impedance of several helical slow-wave circuit parameter variations, including thickness and relative dielectric constant of the support rods, tape width, and height of the metallized films deposited on the dielectric rods. Previous computer analyzes required so many approximations that accurate determinations of the effect of many relevant dimensions on tube performance were practically impossible.

  18. Hurricane Directional Wave Spectrum Spatial Variation at Landfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, E. J.; Wright, C. W.; Vandemark, D.; Krabill, W. B.; Garcia, A. W.

    1999-01-01

    On 26 August 1998, hurricane Bonnie was making landfall near Wilmington, NC. The NASA airborne scanning radar altimeter (SRA) carried aboard one of the NOAA WP-3D hurricane hunter aircraft at 2.2 km height documented the sea surface directional wave spectrum in the region between Charleston, SC and Cape Hatteras, NC. The aircraft ground track included both segments along the shoreline and Pamlico Sound as well as far offshore. An animation of the directional wave spectrum spatial variation at landfall will be presented and contrasted with the spatial variation when Bonnie was in the open ocean on 24 August 1998.

  19. Hurricane Directional Wave Spectrum Spatial Variation at Landfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Edward J.; Wright, C. Wayne; Vandemark, Douglas C.; Krabill, William B.; Garcia, Andrew W.; Houston, Samuel H.; Powell, Mark D.; Black, Peter G.; Marke, Frank D.; Busalacchi, Antonio J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    On 26 August 1998, hurricane Bonnie was making landfall near Wilmington, NC. The NASA airborne scanning radar altimeter (SRA) carried aboard one of the NOAA WP-3D hurricane hunter aircraft at 2.2 km height documented the sea surface directional wave spectrum in the region between Charleston, SC and Cape Hatteras, NC. The aircraft ground track included both segments along the shoreline and Pamlico Sound as well as far offshore. An animation of the directional wave spectrum spatial variation at landfall will be presented and contrasted with the spatial variation when Bonnie was in the open ocean on 24 August 1998.

  20. A second order accurate embedded boundary method for the wave equation with Dirichlet data

    SciTech Connect

    Kreiss, H O; Petersson, N A

    2004-03-02

    The accuracy of Cartesian embedded boundary methods for the second order wave equation in general two-dimensional domains subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions is analyzed. Based on the analysis, we develop a numerical method where both the solution and its gradient are second order accurate. We avoid the small-cell stiffness problem without sacrificing the second order accuracy by adding a small artificial term to the Dirichlet boundary condition. Long-time stability of the method is obtained by adding a small fourth order dissipative term. Several numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the accuracy and stability of the method. The method is also used to solve the two-dimensional TM{sub z} problem for Maxwell's equations posed as a second order wave equation for the electric field coupled to ordinary differential equations for the magnetic field.

  1. A fourth order accurate finite difference scheme for the computation of elastic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Jordan, K. E.; Lemesurier, B. J.; Turkel, E.

    1986-01-01

    A finite difference for elastic waves is introduced. The model is based on the first order system of equations for the velocities and stresses. The differencing is fourth order accurate on the spatial derivatives and second order accurate in time. The model is tested on a series of examples including the Lamb problem, scattering from plane interf aces and scattering from a fluid-elastic interface. The scheme is shown to be effective for these problems. The accuracy and stability is insensitive to the Poisson ratio. For the class of problems considered here it is found that the fourth order scheme requires for two-thirds to one-half the resolution of a typical second order scheme to give comparable accuracy.

  2. Improved variational wave functions for few-body nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wiringa, R.B.; Arriaga, A.; Pandharipande, V.R.

    1995-08-01

    We continued to work on improvements to our variational wave functions for use in Monte Carlo calculations of few-body nuclei. These trial functions include central, spin, isospin, tensor, and spin-orbit two-body correlations and three-body correlations for the three-nucleon potential. In the last two years we studied a variety of extra three-body correlations. Our search for possible forms was guided by comparisons made with 34-channel Faddeev wave functions provided by the Los Alamos-Iowa group. The new trial functions reduce the discrepancy with exact Faddeev calculations in {sup 3}H and Green`s Function Monte Carlo (GFMC) calculations in {sup 4}He by about 40%. This work is now being written up for publication. We hope to use similar comparisons with GFMC calculations in the six-body nuclei to find further improvements for the light p-shell nuclei, where the variational wave functions are not as good.

  3. Accurate and efficient modeling of global seismic wave propagation for an attenuative Earth model including the center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokuni, Genti; Takenaka, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    We propose a method for modeling global seismic wave propagation through an attenuative Earth model including the center. This method enables accurate and efficient computations since it is based on the 2.5-D approach, which solves wave equations only on a 2-D cross section of the whole Earth and can correctly model 3-D geometrical spreading. We extend a numerical scheme for the elastic waves in spherical coordinates using the finite-difference method (FDM), to solve the viscoelastodynamic equation. For computation of realistic seismic wave propagation, incorporation of anelastic attenuation is crucial. Since the nature of Earth material is both elastic solid and viscous fluid, we should solve stress-strain relations of viscoelastic material, including attenuative structures. These relations represent the stress as a convolution integral in time, which has had difficulty treating viscoelasticity in time-domain computation such as the FDM. However, we now have a method using so-called memory variables, invented in the 1980s, followed by improvements in Cartesian coordinates. Arbitrary values of the quality factor (Q) can be incorporated into the wave equation via an array of Zener bodies. We also introduce the multi-domain, an FD grid of several layers with different grid spacings, into our FDM scheme. This allows wider lateral grid spacings with depth, so as not to perturb the FD stability criterion around the Earth center. In addition, we propose a technique to avoid the singularity problem of the wave equation in spherical coordinates at the Earth center. We develop a scheme to calculate wavefield variables on this point, based on linear interpolation for the velocity-stress, staggered-grid FDM. This scheme is validated through a comparison of synthetic seismograms with those obtained by the Direct Solution Method for a spherically symmetric Earth model, showing excellent accuracy for our FDM scheme. As a numerical example, we apply the method to simulate seismic

  4. Structure of Ground state Wave Functions for the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect: A Variational Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sutirtha; Mandal, Sudhansu

    The internal structure and topology of the ground states for fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) are determined by the relative angular momenta between all the possible pairs of electrons. Laughlin wave function is the only known microscopic wave function for which these relative angular momenta are homogeneous (same) for any pair of electrons and depend solely on the filling factor. Without invoking any microscopic theory, considering only the relationship between number of flux quanta and particles in spherical geometry, and allowing the possibility of inhomogeneous (different) relative angular momenta between any two electrons, we develop a general method for determining a closed-form ground state wave function for any incompressible FQHE state. Our procedure provides variationally obtained very accurate wave functions, yet having simpler structure compared to any other known complex microscopic wave functions for the FQHE states. This method, thus, has potential in predicting a very accurate ground state wave function for the puzzling states such as the state at filling fraction 5/2. We acknowledge support from Department of Science and Technology, India.

  5. Accurate variational calculations and analysis of the HOCl vibrational energy spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Skokov, S.; Qi, J.; Bowman, J.M.; Yang, C.; Gray, S.K.; Peterson, K.A. |; Mandelshtam, V.A.

    1998-12-01

    Large scale variational calculations for the vibrational states of HOCl are performed using a recently developed, accurate {ital ab initio} potential energy surface. Three different approaches for obtaining vibrational states are employed and contrasted; a truncation/recoupling scheme with direct diagonalization, the Lanczos method, and Chebyshev iteration with filter diagonalization. The complete spectrum of bound states for nonrotating HOCl is computed and analyzed within a random matrix theory framework. This analysis indicates almost entirely regular dynamics with only a small degree of chaos. The nearly regular spectral structure allows us to make assignments for the most significant part of the spectrum, based on analysis of coordinate expectation values and eigenfunctions. Ground state dipole moments and dipole transition probabilities are also calculated using accurate {ital ab initio} data. Computed values are in good agreement with available experimental data. Some exact rovibrational calculations for J=1, including Coriolis coupling, are performed. The exact results are nearly identical with those obtained from the adiabatic rotation approximation and very close to those from the centrifugal sudden approximation, thus indicating a very small degree of asymmetry and Coriolis coupling for the HOCl molecule. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Simulating and understanding sand wave variation: A case study of the Golden Gate sand waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sterlini, F.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Hanes, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a detailed comparison between measured features of the Golden Gate sand wave field and the results of a nonlinear sand wave model. Because the Golden Gate sand waves exhibit large variation in their characteristics and in their environmental physics, this area gives us the opportunity to study sand wave variation between locations, within one well-measured, large area. The nonlinear model used in this paper is presently the only tool that provides information on the nonlinear evolution of large-amplitude sand waves. The model is used to increase our understanding of the coupling between the variability in environmental conditions and the sand wave characteristics. Results show that the model is able to describe the variation in the Golden Gate sand waves well when both the local oscillating tidal current and the residual current are taken into account. Current and water depth seem to be the most important factors influencing sand wave characteristics. The simulation results give further confidence in the underlying model hypothesis and assumptions. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Hybrid algorithm for extracting accurate tracer position distribution in evanescent wave nano-velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Huang, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Evanescent wave nano-velocimetry offers a unique three-dimensional measurement capability that allows for inferring tracer position distribution through the imaged particle intensities. Our previous study suggested that tracer polydispersity and failure to account for a near-wall tracer depletion layer would lead to compromised measurement accuracy. In this work, we report on a hybrid algorithm that converts the measured tracer intensities as a whole into their overall position distribution. The algorithm achieves a superior accuracy by using tracer size variation as a statistical analysis parameter.

  8. Accurate and reliable high-throughput detection of copy number variation in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Fiegler, Heike; Redon, Richard; Andrews, Dan; Scott, Carol; Andrews, Robert; Carder, Carol; Clark, Richard; Dovey, Oliver; Ellis, Peter; Feuk, Lars; French, Lisa; Hunt, Paul; Kalaitzopoulos, Dimitrios; Larkin, James; Montgomery, Lyndal; Perry, George H.; Plumb, Bob W.; Porter, Keith; Rigby, Rachel E.; Rigler, Diane; Valsesia, Armand; Langford, Cordelia; Humphray, Sean J.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Lee, Charles; Hurles, Matthew E.; Carter, Nigel P.

    2006-01-01

    This study describes a new tool for accurate and reliable high-throughput detection of copy number variation in the human genome. We have constructed a large-insert clone DNA microarray covering the entire human genome in tiling path resolution that we have used to identify copy number variation in human populations. Crucial to this study has been the development of a robust array platform and analytic process for the automated identification of copy number variants (CNVs). The array consists of 26,574 clones covering 93.7% of euchromatic regions. Clones were selected primarily from the published “Golden Path,” and mapping was confirmed by fingerprinting and BAC-end sequencing. Array performance was extensively tested by a series of validation assays. These included determining the hybridization characteristics of each individual clone on the array by chromosome-specific add-in experiments. Estimation of data reproducibility and false-positive/negative rates was carried out using self–self hybridizations, replicate experiments, and independent validations of CNVs. Based on these studies, we developed a variance-based automatic copy number detection analysis process (CNVfinder) and have demonstrated its robustness by comparison with the SW-ARRAY method. PMID:17122085

  9. Dual-beam interferometer for the accurate determination of surface-wave velocity.

    PubMed

    McKie, A D; Wagner, J W; Spicer, J B; Deaton, J B

    1991-10-01

    A novel dual-beam interferometer has been designed and constructed that enables two beams from a He-Ne laser to probe remotely the surface of a material. The separation of the two He-Ne beams is adjustable in the 15-to- 40-mm range with a spatial resolution of 2 microm. Surface-acoustic-wave measurements have been performed with two different probe separations so that the travel time for the surface waves over a known distance can be determined accurately. With the aid of autocorrelation algorithms, the Rayleigh pulse velocity on 7075-T651 aluminum has been measured to be 2888 +/- 4 m/s. The current precision of the system is limited mainly by the 10-ns sampling rate of the digital oscilloscope used. Rayleigh pulse interactions with a surface-breaking slot, machined to a nominal depth of 0.5 mm, have also been examined and the depth estimated ultrasonically to be 0.49 +/- 0.02 mm. The system may also provide a technique for direct quantitative studies of surface-wave attenuation. PMID:20706500

  10. Explicitly correlated wave functions for atoms and singly charged ions from Li through Sr: Variational and Diffusion Monte Carlo results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buendía, E.; Gálvez, F. J.; Maldonado, P.; Sarsa, A.

    2014-11-01

    Total energies calculated from explicitly correlated wave functions for the ground state of the atoms Li to Sr and their singly charged anions and cations are obtained. Accurate all electron, non-relativistic Variational and Diffusion Monte Carlo energies are reported. The quality of the results, when comparing with exact estimations and experimental electron affinities and ionization potential is similar for all of the atoms studied. The parameterization of the explicitly correlated wave functions for all of the atomic systems studied is provided.

  11. On Variational Methods in the Physics of Plasma Waves

    SciTech Connect

    I.Y. Dodin

    2013-03-08

    A fi rst-principle variational approach to adiabatic collisionless plasma waves is described. The focus is made on one-dimensional electrostatic oscillations, including phase-mixed electron plasma waves (EPW) with trapped particles, such as Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal modes. The well known Whitham's theory is extended by an explicit calculation of the EPW Lagrangian, which is related to the oscillation-center energies of individual particles in a periodic fi eld, and those are found by a quadrature. Some paradigmatic physics of EPW is discussed for illustration purposes. __________________________________________________

  12. COSMOS: accurate detection of somatic structural variations through asymmetric comparison between tumor and normal samples

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, Koichi; Yamanishi, Ayako; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji; Sese, Jun

    2016-01-01

    An important challenge in cancer genomics is precise detection of structural variations (SVs) by high-throughput short-read sequencing, which is hampered by the high false discovery rates of existing analysis tools. Here, we propose an accurate SV detection method named COSMOS, which compares the statistics of the mapped read pairs in tumor samples with isogenic normal control samples in a distinct asymmetric manner. COSMOS also prioritizes the candidate SVs using strand-specific read-depth information. Performance tests on modeled tumor genomes revealed that COSMOS outperformed existing methods in terms of F-measure. We also applied COSMOS to an experimental mouse cell-based model, in which SVs were induced by genome engineering and gamma-ray irradiation, followed by polymerase chain reaction-based confirmation. The precision of COSMOS was 84.5%, while the next best existing method was 70.4%. Moreover, the sensitivity of COSMOS was the highest, indicating that COSMOS has great potential for cancer genome analysis. PMID:26833260

  13. COSMOS: accurate detection of somatic structural variations through asymmetric comparison between tumor and normal samples.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Koichi; Yamanishi, Ayako; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji; Sese, Jun

    2016-05-01

    An important challenge in cancer genomics is precise detection of structural variations (SVs) by high-throughput short-read sequencing, which is hampered by the high false discovery rates of existing analysis tools. Here, we propose an accurate SV detection method named COSMOS, which compares the statistics of the mapped read pairs in tumor samples with isogenic normal control samples in a distinct asymmetric manner. COSMOS also prioritizes the candidate SVs using strand-specific read-depth information. Performance tests on modeled tumor genomes revealed that COSMOS outperformed existing methods in terms of F-measure. We also applied COSMOS to an experimental mouse cell-based model, in which SVs were induced by genome engineering and gamma-ray irradiation, followed by polymerase chain reaction-based confirmation. The precision of COSMOS was 84.5%, while the next best existing method was 70.4%. Moreover, the sensitivity of COSMOS was the highest, indicating that COSMOS has great potential for cancer genome analysis. PMID:26833260

  14. A review of the kinetic detail required for accurate predictions of normal shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muntz, E. P.; Erwin, Daniel A.; Pham-Van-diep, Gerald C.

    1991-01-01

    Several aspects of the kinetic models used in the collision phase of Monte Carlo direct simulations have been studied. Accurate molecular velocity distribution function predictions require a significantly increased number of computational cells in one maximum slope shock thickness, compared to predictions of macroscopic properties. The shape of the highly repulsive portion of the interatomic potential for argon is not well modeled by conventional interatomic potentials; this portion of the potential controls high Mach number shock thickness predictions, indicating that the specification of the energetic repulsive portion of interatomic or intermolecular potentials must be chosen with care for correct modeling of nonequilibrium flows at high temperatures. It has been shown for inverse power potentials that the assumption of variable hard sphere scattering provides accurate predictions of the macroscopic properties in shock waves, by comparison with simulations in which differential scattering is employed in the collision phase. On the other hand, velocity distribution functions are not well predicted by the variable hard sphere scattering model for softer potentials at higher Mach numbers.

  15. Accurate Estimation of the Fine Layering Effect on the Wave Propagation in the Carbonate Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchaala, F.; Ali, M. Y.

    2014-12-01

    The attenuation caused to the seismic wave during its propagation can be mainly divided into two parts, the scattering and the intrinsic attenuation. The scattering is an elastic redistribution of the energy due to the medium heterogeneities. However the intrinsic attenuation is an inelastic phenomenon, mainly due to the fluid-grain friction during the wave passage. The intrinsic attenuation is directly related to the physical characteristics of the medium, so this parameter is very can be used for media characterization and fluid detection, which is beneficial for the oil and gas industry. The intrinsic attenuation is estimated by subtracting the scattering from the total attenuation, therefore the accuracy of the intrinsic attenuation is directly dependent on the accuracy of the total attenuation and the scattering. The total attenuation can be estimated from the recorded waves, by using in-situ methods as the spectral ratio and frequency shift methods. The scattering is estimated by assuming the heterogeneities as a succession of stacked layers, each layer is characterized by a single density and velocity. The accuracy of the scattering is strongly dependent on the layer thicknesses, especially in the case of the media composed of carbonate rocks, such media are known for their strong heterogeneity. Previous studies gave some assumptions for the choice of the layer thickness, but they showed some limitations especially in the case of carbonate rocks. In this study we established a relationship between the layer thicknesses and the frequency of the propagation, after certain mathematical development of the Generalized O'Doherty-Anstey formula. We validated this relationship through some synthetic tests and real data provided from a VSP carried out over an onshore oilfield in the emirate of Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates, primarily composed of carbonate rocks. The results showed the utility of our relationship for an accurate estimation of the scattering

  16. Spatial variations of ocean wave directional spectra from the Seasat synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, R. C.; Gerling, T. W.; Irvine, D. E.; Monaldo, F. M.; Tilley, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    Seasat synthetic aperture radar ocean wave spectra for a 900-km pass are analyzed and interpreted in the context of both their probable generation sources and their surface current and bathymetric modifiers. Systematic vector wavenumber variations of several times the standard error of determination (about 1.5 percent in magnitude and 0.9 deg in direction) occur along the entire 900-km pass. The large-scale spatial variation of a 200-m swell system can be accurately accounted for as a result of dispersion from a distant storm. The more local variations are qualitatively well correlated in position with known currents and bathymetry but show systematic biases that appear partly due to an environmentally dependent instrument transfer function in the regions of high current and highest sea state. There is also substantial evidence that a large angular deviation in the center of the pass is the result of a mesoscale eddy just to the east.

  17. Shear-wave velocity variation in jointed rock: an attempt to measure tide-induced variations

    SciTech Connect

    Beem, L.I.

    1987-08-01

    The use of the perturbation of seismic wave velocities by solid earth tides as a possible method of exploration for fractured media is discussed. Velocity of compressional seismic waves in fractured homogeneous rock has been observed to vary through solid earth tide cycles by a significant 0.5-0.9%. This variation of seismic velocities may be attributed to the opening and closing of joints by tidal stresses. In an attempt to see if shear-wave velocities show a similar velocity variation, a pneumatic shear-wave generator was used for the source. The 5 receivers, 3-component, 2.0 Hz, moving-coil geophones, were connected to a GEOS digital recorder. The two receivers located 120 m and 110 m from the source showed large shear-to-compression amplitude ratio and a high signal-to-noise ratio. A glaciated valley was chosen for the experiment site, since topography is flat and the granodiorite is jointed by a set of nearly orthogonal vertical joints, with superimposed horizontal sheeting joints. A slight velocity variation was noted in the first 200 consecutive firings; after which, the amplitude of the shear-wave begun to increase. This increase has been attributed to the compacting of the soil beneath the shear-wave generator (SWG). In the future, the soil will be compacted prior to placing the SWG or the SWG will be coupled directly to the rock to alleviate the amplitude fluctuation problem. This research may have application in exploration for fracture permeability in the rock mass between existing wells, by measuring seismic velocities from well to well through the tidal cycle.

  18. Solar cycle variation of gravity waves observed in OH airglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelinas, L. J.; Hecht, J. H.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Reid, I. M.; Woithe, J.; Vincent, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Airglow imaging provides a unique means by which to study many wave-related phenomena in the 80 to 100 km altitude regime. Two-dimensional image observations reveal quasi-monochromatic disturbances associated with atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) as well as small-scale instabilities, often called ripples. Image-averaged temperature and intensity measurements can be used to study the response of the airglow layer to tides and planetary waves, as well as monitor longer-term climatological variations. Here we present results of low and mid-latitude OH airglow observations beginning near solar max of solar cycle 23 and continuing through solar max of cycle 24. Aerospace imagers deployed at Alice Springs (23o42'S, 133o53'E) and Adelaide (34o55'S, 138o36'E) have been operating nearly continuously since ~2001. The imagers employ filters measuring OH Meinel (6, 2) and O2 Atmospheric (0, 1) band emission intensities and temperatures, as well as atmospheric gravity wave parameters. The Aerospace Corporation's Infrared Camera deployed at Maui, HI (20.7N,156.3W), collected more than 700 nights of airglow images from 2002-2005. The camera measures the OH Meinel (4,2) emission at 1.6 um using a 1 second exposure at a 3 second cadence, which allows the study of AGW and ripple features over very short temporal and spatial scales. The camera was relocated to Cerro Pachon, Chile (30.1 S, 70.8 W) and has been operating continuously since 2010. Temperature, intensity and gravity wave climatologies derived from the two Australian airglow imagers span a full solar cycle (solar max to solar max). Emission intensities have been calibrated using background stars, and temperatures have been calibrated with respect to TIMED/SABER temperatures, reducing the influence of instrument degradation on the solar cycle climatology. An automated wave detection algorithm is used to identify quasi monochromatic wave features in the airglow data, including wavelength, wave period and propagation

  19. Longitudinal variation and waves in Jupiter's south equatorial wind jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Rogers, John H.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Choi, David; Allison, Michael D.; Adamoli, Gianluigi; Mettig, Hans-Joerg

    2012-04-01

    A detailed study of the chevron-shaped dark spots on the strong southern equatorial wind jet near 7.5°S planetographic latitude shows variations in velocity with longitude and time. The presence of the large anticyclonic South Equatorial Disturbance (SED) has a profound effect on the chevron velocity, causing slower velocities to its east and increasing with distance from the disturbance. The chevrons move with velocities near the maximum wind jet velocity of ˜140 m/s, as deduced by the history of velocities at this latitude and the magnitude of the symmetric wind jet near 7°N latitude. Their repetitive nature is consistent with a gravity-inertia wave (n = 75-100) with phase speed up to 25 m/s, relative to the local flow, but the identity of this wave mode is not well constrained. However, for the first time, high spatial resolution movies from Cassini images show that the chevrons oscillate in latitude with a 6.7 ± 0.7-day period. This oscillating motion has a wavelength of ˜20° and a speed of 101 ± 3 m/s, following a pattern similar to that seen in the Rossby wave plumes of the North Equatorial Zone, and possibly reinforced by it. All dates show chevron latitude variability, but it is unclear if this larger wave is present during other epochs, as there are no other suitable time series movies that fully delineate it. In the presence of multiple wave modes, the difference in dominant cloud appearance between 7°N and 7.5°S is likely due to the presence of the Great Red Spot, either through changes in stratification and stability or by acting as a wave boundary.

  20. Longitudinal Variation and Waves in Jupiter's South Equatorial Wind Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Choi, David; Rogers, John H.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Allison, Michael D.; Adamoli, Gianluigi; Mettig, Hans-Joerg

    2012-01-01

    A detailed study of the chevron-shaped dark spots on the strong southern equatorial wind jet near 7.5 S planetographic latitude shows variations in velocity with longitude and time. The presence of the large anticyclonic South Equatorial Disturbance (SED) has a profound effect on the chevron velocity, causing slower velocities to its east and accelerations over distance from the disturbance. The chevrons move with velocities near the maximum wind jet velocity of approx 140 m/s, as deduced by the history of velocities at this latitude and the magnitude of the symmetric wind jet near 7 N latitude. Their repetitive nature is consistent with a gravity-inertia wave (n = 75 to 100) with phase speed up to 25 m/s, relative to the local flow, but the identity of this wave mode is not well constrained. However, for the first time, high spatial resolution movies from Cassini images show that the chevrons oscillate in latitude with a 6.7 +/- 0.7-day period. This oscillating motion has a wavelength of approx 20 and a speed of 101 +/- 3 m/s, following a pattern similar to that seen in the Rossby wave plumes of the North Equatorial Zone, and possibly reinforced by it. All dates show chevron latitude variability, but it is unclear if this larger wave is present during other epochs, as there are no other suitable time series movies that fully delineate it. In the presence of mUltiple wave modes, the difference in dominant cloud appearance between 7 deg N and 7.5 deg S is likely due to the presence of the Great Red Spot, either through changes in stratification and stability or by acting as a wave boundary.

  1. Seasonal variation of solitary wave properties in Lake Constance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preusse, M.; Freistühler, H.; Peeters, F.

    2012-04-01

    The properties of internal solitary waves (ISWs) depend on the stratification of the water body. In most climatic regions the stratification in lakes and oceans varies during the year, and hence the properties of the ISWs can also be expected to change over the seasons. On the basis of a long-term temperature time series recorded over 6 years, this paper investigates seasonal changes in the characteristic properties of ISWs in Lake Überlingen, a subbasin of Lake Constance. A large number of ISWs with amplitudes ranging from 3 m to 30 m were identified. More than 15% of the leading ISWs of a wave train were associated with density inversions, often indicating shear instabilities or trapped cores. For all waves the propagation depth and the value of a nonlinearity index nlp providing the degree of nonlinearity were determined, propagation depth being the rest height of the isotherm undergoing maximum displacement and nlp the ratio between wave amplitude and propagation depth. The index nlp was found to be a good parameter for predicting the occurrence of inversions. The statistical analysis of the wave properties derived from the observations revealed that the degree of nonlinearity of the ISWs changes with season. Complementary to the statistical analysis, the seasonally averaged ISW properties were compared with wave prototypes obtained numerically from the Dubreil-Jacotin-Long (DJL) and the stratified Korteweg-deVries (KdV) models. The simulations indicate that the typical stratification and its seasonal variation are responsible for the degree and the seasonality of nonlinearity of the ISWs.

  2. Coda wave interferometry for the measurement of thermally induced ultrasonic velocity variations in CFRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livings, Richard; Dayal, Vinay; Barnard, Dan

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasonic velocity measurement is a well-established method to measure properties and estimate strength as well as detect and locate damage. Determination of accurate and repeatable ultrasonic wave velocities can be difficult due to the influence of environmental and experimental factors. Diffuse fields created by a multiple scattering environment have been shown to be sensitive to homogeneous strain fields such as those caused by temperature variations, and Coda Wave Interferometry has been used to measure the thermally induced ultrasonic velocity variation in concrete, aluminum, and the Earth's crust. In this work, we analyzed the influence of several parameters of the experimental configuration on the measurement of thermally induced ultrasonic velocity variations in a carbon-fiber reinforced polymer plate. Coda Wave Interferometry was used to determine the relative velocity change between a baseline signal taken at room temperature and the signal taken at various temperatures. The influence of several parameters of the experimental configuration, such as the material type, the receiver aperture size, and fiber orientation on the results of the processing algorithm was evaluated in order to determine the optimal experimental configuration.---This work is supported by the NSF Industry/University Cooperative Research Program of the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation at Iowa State University.

  3. Variational stereo imaging of oceanic waves with statistical constraints.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Guillermo; Yezzi, Anthony; Fedele, Francesco; Benetazzo, Alvise

    2013-11-01

    An image processing observational technique for the stereoscopic reconstruction of the waveform of oceanic sea states is developed. The technique incorporates the enforcement of any given statistical wave law modeling the quasi-Gaussianity of oceanic waves observed in nature. The problem is posed in a variational optimization framework, where the desired waveform is obtained as the minimizer of a cost functional that combines image observations, smoothness priors and a weak statistical constraint. The minimizer is obtained by combining gradient descent and multigrid methods on the necessary optimality equations of the cost functional. Robust photometric error criteria and a spatial intensity compensation model are also developed to improve the performance of the presented image matching strategy. The weak statistical constraint is thoroughly evaluated in combination with other elements presented to reconstruct and enforce constraints on experimental stereo data, demonstrating the improvement in the estimation of the observed ocean surface. PMID:23807444

  4. Significance of accurate diffraction corrections for the second harmonic wave in determining the acoustic nonlinearity parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing; Barnard, Dan

    2015-09-15

    The accurate measurement of acoustic nonlinearity parameter β for fluids or solids generally requires making corrections for diffraction effects due to finite size geometry of transmitter and receiver. These effects are well known in linear acoustics, while those for second harmonic waves have not been well addressed and therefore not properly considered in previous studies. In this work, we explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction corrections using the multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) equations which were developed from the quasilinear solutions of the KZK equation. The effects of making these corrections are examined through the simulation of β determination in water. Diffraction corrections are found to have more significant effects than attenuation corrections, and the β values of water can be estimated experimentally with less than 5% errors when the exact second harmonic diffraction corrections are used together with the negligible attenuation correction effects on the basis of linear frequency dependence between attenuation coefficients, α{sub 2} ≃ 2α{sub 1}.

  5. Variational structure of inverse problems in wave propagation and vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J.G.

    1995-03-01

    Practical algorithms for solving realistic inverse problems may often be viewed as problems in nonlinear programming with the data serving as constraints. Such problems are most easily analyzed when it is possible to segment the solution space into regions that are feasible (satisfying all the known constraints) and infeasible (violating some of the constraints). Then, if the feasible set is convex or at least compact, the solution to the problem will normally lie on the boundary of the feasible set. A nonlinear program may seek the solution by systematically exploring the boundary while satisfying progressively more constraints. Examples of inverse problems in wave propagation (traveltime tomography) and vibration (modal analysis) will be presented to illustrate how the variational structure of these problems may be used to create nonlinear programs using implicit variational constraints.

  6. A coupled phase-field and volume-of-fluid method for accurate representation of limiting water wave deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Yu, Xiping

    2016-09-01

    A coupled phase-field and volume-of-fluid method is developed to study the sensitive behavior of water waves during breaking. The THINC model is employed to solve the volume-of-fluid function over the entire domain covered by a relatively coarse grid while the phase-field model based on Allen-Cahn equation is applied over the fine grid. A special algorithm that takes into account the sharpness of the diffuse-interface is introduced to correlate the order parameter obtained on the fine grid and the volume-of-fluid function obtained on the coarse grid. The coupled model is then applied to the study of water waves generated by moving pressures on the free surface. The deformation process of the wave crest during the initial stage of breaking is discussed in details. It is shown that there is a significant variation of the free nappe developed at the front side of the wave crest as the wave steepness differs. It is of a plunging type at large wave steepness while of a spilling type at small wave steepness. The numerical results also indicate that breaking occurs later and the duration of breaking is shorter for waves of smaller steepness and vice versa. Neglecting the capillary effect leads to wave breaking with a sharper nappe and a more dynamic plunging process. The surface tension also has an effect to prevent the formation of a free nappe at the front side of the wave crest in some cases.

  7. Planetary Wave Influence on Wintertime OH Meinel Longitudinal Variation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, J. R.; Picard, R. H.; Wintersteiner, P. P.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Russell, J. M.; Gordley, L.

    2009-05-01

    We report on very unusual conditions in the upper mesosphere during the boreal winters of 2004 and 2006. Unusually bright OH volume emissions, as measured by TIMED/SABER, occurred in the region north of 60N. These emissions also occurred at unusually low altitudes, while at the same time very high temperatures characterized the upper mesosphere. These large perturbations allowed us to see more clearly longitudinal spatial and temporal variations that were present in the emissions. The affected areas varied in size and location on time scales of a few days and had a distinct planetary-wave wave-1 structure. We present data demonstrating the variability in the emissions and temperatures throughout the polar region and the correlations among them, and we contrast their behavior with that in normal years. The underlying cause of the correlations and longitudinal structure appears to be greatly enhanced downwelling in the upper mesosphere, which in turn was produced by unusual dynamical conditions in the lower atmosphere, consisting of stratospheric warmings and perturbations of wave structures within the polar vortex.

  8. The impact of crustal density variations on seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plonka, A.; Fichtner, A.

    2014-12-01

    Lateral density variations are the source of mass transport in the Earth at all scales, acting as drivers of convective motion. However, the density structure of the Earth remains largely unknown since classic seismic observables and gravity provide only weak constraints with strong trade-offs. Current density models are therefore often based on velocity scaling, making strong assumptions on the origin of structural heterogeneities, which may not necessarily be correct.We propose to develop a seismic tomography technique that directly inverts for density, using complete seismograms rather than arrival times of certain waves only. The first task in this challenge is to systematically study the imprints of density on synthetic seismograms.To compute the full seismic wavefield in a 3D heterogeneous medium without making significant approximations, we usenumerical wave propagation based on a spectral-element discretization of the seismic wave equation. We consider a 2000 by 1000 km wide and 500 km deep spherical section, with the 1D Earth model PREM (with 40 km crust thickness) as a background. Onto this (in the uppermost 40 km) we superimpose 3D randomly generated velocity and density heterogeneities of various magnitudes and correlation lenghts. We use different random realizations of heterogeneity distribution.We compare the synthetic seismograms for 3D velocity and density structure with 3D velocity structure and with the 1D background, calculating relative amplitude differences and timeshifts as functions of time and frequency.Our analyses indicate that reasonably sized density variations within the crust can leave a strong imprint on both traveltimes and amplitudes. This suggests (1) that crustal tomography can be significantly biased when density heterogeneities are not properly accounted for, and (2) that the solution of the seismic inverse problem for density may become feasible.

  9. Variational integrators for the dynamics of thermo-elastic solids with finite speed thermal waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mata, Pablo

    2014-01-15

    This paper formulates variational integrators for finite element discretizations of deformable bodies with heat conduction in the form of finite speed thermal waves. The cornerstone of the construction consists in taking advantage of the fact that the Green–Naghdi theory of type II for thermo-elastic solids has a Hamiltonian structure. Thus, standard techniques to construct variational integrators can be applied to finite element discretizations of the problem. The resulting discrete-in-time trajectories are then consistent with the laws of thermodynamics for these systems: for an isolated system, they exactly conserve the total entropy, and nearly exactly conserve the total energy over exponentially long periods of time. Moreover, linear and angular momenta are also exactly conserved whenever the exact system does. For definiteness, we construct an explicit second-order accurate algorithm for affine tetrahedral elements in two and three dimensions, and demonstrate its performance with numerical examples.

  10. Longitudinal Variations of Low-Latitude Gravity Waves and Their Impacts on the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullens, C. Y.; England, S.; Immel, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    The lower atmospheric forcing has important roles in the ionospheric variability. However, influences of lower atmospheric gravity waves on the ionospheric variability are still not clear due to the simplified gravity wave parameterizations and the limited knowledge of gravity wave distributions. In this study, we aim to study the longitudinal variations of gravity waves and their impacts of longitudinal variations of low-latitude gravity waves on the ionospheric variability. Our SABER results show that longitudinal variations of gravity waves at the lower boundary of TIME-GCM are the largest in June-August and January-February. We have implemented these low-latitude gravity wave variations from SABER instrument into TIME-GCM model. TIME-GCM simulation results of ionospheric responses to longitudinal variations of gravity waves and physical mechanisms will be discussed.

  11. Effect of Helical Slow-Wave Circuit Variations on TWT Cold-Test Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Dayton, James A., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in the state of the art of computer modeling offer the possibility for the first time to evaluate the effect that slow-wave structure parameter variations, such'as manufacturing tolerances, have on the cold-test characteristics of helical traveling-wave tubes (TWT's). This will enable manufacturers to determine the cost effectiveness of controlling the dimensions of the component parts of the TWT, which is almost impossible to do experimentally without building a large number of tubes and controlling several parameters simultaneously. The computer code MAxwell's equations by the Finite Integration Algorithm (MAFIA) is used in this analysis to determine the effect on dispersion and on-axis interaction impedance of several helical slow-wave circuit parameter variations, including thickness and relative dielectric constant of the support rods, tape width, and height of the metallized films deposited on the dielectric rods. Previous computer analyzes required so many approximations that accurate determinations of the effect of many relevant dimensions on tube performance were practically impossible.

  12. Control of Periodic Variations in Saturn's Magnetosphere By Compressional Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, X.; Kivelson, M.

    2014-12-01

    Many of the periodic variations observed in Saturn's magnetosphere can be linked directly to the presence of a rotating pattern of field-aligned currents that link the northern and southern ionospheres with each other and with the magnetosphere. Such a current system is incorporated in a magnetohydrodynamic simulation that has previously been shown to reproduce many of the observed periodic properties of the system (Jia et al., 2012; Jia and Kivelson, 2012). Here the simulation is used to investigate a range of phenomena that can be attributed to the effects of compressional waves launched from the rotating current sources. The compressional waves are found to drive the flapping of the plasma sheet and the expansion and contraction of the magnetopause in each rotation period. Because the compressional perturbations weaken as they rotate from morning to evening around the day side of the magnetosphere, the boundary develops a strong morning-evening asymmetry. A fit to the shape is provided that may be useful in further investigation of magnetopause properties, but there is already evidence of the proposed asymmetry in the Cassini observations of Clarke et al. [2010].

  13. Control of periodic variations in Saturn's magnetosphere by compressional waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelson, Margaret Galland; Jia, Xianzhe

    2014-10-01

    Many of the periodic variations observed in Saturn's magnetosphere can be linked directly to the presence of a rotating pattern of field-aligned currents that link the northern and southern ionospheres with each other and with the magnetosphere. Such a current system is incorporated in a magnetohydrodynamic simulation that has previously been shown to reproduce many of the observed periodic properties of the system. Here the simulation is used to investigate a range of phenomena that can be attributed to the effects of compressional waves launched from the rotating current sources. The compressional waves are found to drive the flapping of the plasma sheet and the expansion and contraction of the magnetopause in each rotation period. Because the compressional perturbations weaken as they rotate from morning to evening around the dayside of the magnetosphere, the boundary develops a strong morning-evening asymmetry. A fit to the shape is provided that may be useful in further investigation of magnetopause properties, but there is already evidence of the proposed asymmetry in the observations of Clarke et al. (2010a).

  14. Effect of gravity wave temperature variations on homogeneous ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Tra; Podglajen, Aurélien; Hertzog, Albert; Legras, Bernard; Plougonven, Riwal

    2015-04-01

    Observations of cirrus clouds in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) have shown various ice number concentrations (INC) (e.g., Jensen et al. 2013), which has lead to a puzzle regarding their formation. In particular, the frequently observed low numbers of ice crystals seemed hard to reconcile with homogeneous nucleation knowing the ubuquity of gravity waves with vertical velocity of the order of 0.1 m/s. Using artificial time series, Spichtinger and Krämer (2013) have illustrated that the variation of vertical velocity during a nucleation event could terminate it and limit the INC. However, their study was limited to constructed temperature time series. Here, we carry out numerical simulations of homogeneous ice nucleation forced by temperature time series data collected by isopycnic balloon flights near the tropical tropopause. The balloons collected data at high frequency (30 s), so gravity wave signals are well resolved in the temperature time series. With the observed temperature time series, the numerical simulations with homogeneous freezing show a full range of ice number concentrations (INC) as previously observed in the tropical upper troposphere. The simulations confirm that the dynamical time scale of temperature variations (as seen from observations) can be shorter than the nucleation time scale. They show the existence of two regimes for homogeneous ice nucleation : one limited by the depletion of water vapor by the nucleated ice crystals (those we name vapor events) and one limited by the reincrease of temperature after its initial decrease (temperature events). Low INC may thus be obtained for temperature events when the gravity wave perturbations produce a non-persistent cooling rate (even with large magnitude) such that the absolute change in temperature remains small during nucleation. This result for temperature events is explained analytically by a dependence of the INC on the absolute drop in temperature (and not on the cooling rate). This

  15. Temporal variation of traffic on highways and the development of accurate temporal allocation factors for air pollution analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batterman, Stuart; Cook, Richard; Justin, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Traffic activity encompasses the number, mix, speed and acceleration of vehicles on roadways. The temporal pattern and variation of traffic activity reflects vehicle use, congestion and safety issues, and it represents a major influence on emissions and concentrations of traffic-related air pollutants. Accurate characterization of vehicle flows is critical in analyzing and modeling urban and local-scale pollutants, especially in near-road environments and traffic corridors. This study describes methods to improve the characterization of temporal variation of traffic activity. Annual, monthly, daily and hourly temporal allocation factors (TAFs), which describe the expected temporal variation in traffic activity, were developed using four years of hourly traffic activity data recorded at 14 continuous counting stations across the Detroit, Michigan, U.S. region. Five sites also provided vehicle classification. TAF-based models provide a simple means to apportion annual average estimates of traffic volume to hourly estimates. The analysis shows the need to separate TAFs for total and commercial vehicles, and weekdays, Saturdays, Sundays and observed holidays. Using either site-specific or urban-wide TAFs, nearly all of the variation in historical traffic activity at the street scale could be explained; unexplained variation was attributed to adverse weather, traffic accidents and construction. The methods and results presented in this paper can improve air quality dispersion modeling of mobile sources, and can be used to evaluate and model temporal variation in ambient air quality monitoring data and exposure estimates.

  16. Temporal variation of traffic on highways and the development of accurate temporal allocation factors for air pollution analyses

    PubMed Central

    Batterman, Stuart; Cook, Richard; Justin, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Traffic activity encompasses the number, mix, speed and acceleration of vehicles on roadways. The temporal pattern and variation of traffic activity reflects vehicle use, congestion and safety issues, and it represents a major influence on emissions and concentrations of traffic-related air pollutants. Accurate characterization of vehicle flows is critical in analyzing and modeling urban and local-scale pollutants, especially in near-road environments and traffic corridors. This study describes methods to improve the characterization of temporal variation of traffic activity. Annual, monthly, daily and hourly temporal allocation factors (TAFs), which describe the expected temporal variation in traffic activity, were developed using four years of hourly traffic activity data recorded at 14 continuous counting stations across the Detroit, Michigan, U.S. region. Five sites also provided vehicle classification. TAF-based models provide a simple means to apportion annual average estimates of traffic volume to hourly estimates. The analysis shows the need to separate TAFs for total and commercial vehicles, and weekdays, Saturdays, Sundays and observed holidays. Using either site-specific or urban-wide TAFs, nearly all of the variation in historical traffic activity at the street scale could be explained; unexplained variation was attributed to adverse weather, traffic accidents and construction. The methods and results presented in this paper can improve air quality dispersion modeling of mobile sources, and can be used to evaluate and model temporal variation in ambient air quality monitoring data and exposure estimates. PMID:25844042

  17. Variational symplectic particle-in-cell simulation of nonlinear mode conversion from extraordinary waves to Bernstein waves

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jianyuan; Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong; Yu, Zhi; Xiang, Nong

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, the nonlinear mode conversion of extraordinary waves in nonuniform magnetized plasmas is studied using the variational symplectic particle-in-cell simulation. The accuracy of the nonlinear simulation is guaranteed by the long-term accuracy and conservativeness of the symplectic algorithm. The spectra of the electromagnetic wave, the evolution of the wave reflectivity, the energy deposition profile, and the parameter-dependent properties of radio-frequency waves during the nonlinear mode conversion are investigated. It is illustrated that nonlinear effects significantly modify the physics of the radio-frequency injection in magnetized plasmas. The evolutions of the radio-frequency wave reflectivity and the energy deposition are observed, as well as the self-interaction of the Bernstein waves and mode excitations. Even for waves with small magnitude, nonlinear effects can also become important after continuous wave injections, which are common in the realistic radio-frequency wave heating and current drive experiments.

  18. A hybrid genetic algorithm-extreme learning machine approach for accurate significant wave height reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, E.; Cuadra, L.; Nieto-Borge, J. C.; Candil-García, G.; del Pino, M.; Salcedo-Sanz, S.

    2015-08-01

    Wave parameters computed from time series measured by buoys (significant wave height Hs, mean wave period, etc.) play a key role in coastal engineering and in the design and operation of wave energy converters. Storms or navigation accidents can make measuring buoys break down, leading to missing data gaps. In this paper we tackle the problem of locally reconstructing Hs at out-of-operation buoys by using wave parameters from nearby buoys, based on the spatial correlation among values at neighboring buoy locations. The novelty of our approach for its potential application to problems in coastal engineering is twofold. On one hand, we propose a genetic algorithm hybridized with an extreme learning machine that selects, among the available wave parameters from the nearby buoys, a subset FnSP with nSP parameters that minimizes the Hs reconstruction error. On the other hand, we evaluate to what extent the selected parameters in subset FnSP are good enough in assisting other machine learning (ML) regressors (extreme learning machines, support vector machines and gaussian process regression) to reconstruct Hs. The results show that all the ML method explored achieve a good Hs reconstruction in the two different locations studied (Caribbean Sea and West Atlantic).

  19. Fast and accurate inference on gravitational waves from precessing compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Rory; Field, Scott E.; Blackburn, Kent; Haster, Carl-Johan; Pürrer, Michael; Raymond, Vivien; Schmidt, Patricia

    2016-08-01

    Inferring astrophysical information from gravitational waves emitted by compact binaries is one of the key science goals of gravitational-wave astronomy. In order to reach the full scientific potential of gravitational-wave experiments, we require techniques to mitigate the cost of Bayesian inference, especially as gravitational-wave signal models and analyses become increasingly sophisticated and detailed. Reduced-order models (ROMs) of gravitational waveforms can significantly reduce the computational cost of inference by removing redundant computations. In this paper, we construct the first reduced-order models of gravitational-wave signals that include the effects of spin precession, inspiral, merger, and ringdown in compact object binaries and that are valid for component masses describing binary neutron star, binary black hole, and mixed binary systems. This work utilizes the waveform model known as "IMRPhenomPv2." Our ROM enables the use of a fast reduced-order quadrature (ROQ) integration rule which allows us to approximate Bayesian probability density functions at a greatly reduced computational cost. We find that the ROQ rule can be used to speed-up inference by factors as high as 300 without introducing systematic bias. This corresponds to a reduction in computational time from around half a year to half a day for the longest duration and lowest mass signals. The ROM and ROQ rules are available with the main inference library of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, LALInference.

  20. Material response mechanisms are needed to obtain highly accurate experimental shock wave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Jerry

    2015-06-01

    The field of shock wave compression of matter has provided a simple set of equations relating thermodynamic and kinematic parameters that describe the conservation of mass, momentum and energy across a steady shock wave with one-dimensional flow. Well-known condensed matter shock wave experimental results will be reviewed to see whether the assumptions required for deriving these simple R-H equations are met. Note that the material compression model is not required for deriving the 1-D conservation flow equations across a steady shock front. However, this statement is misleading from a practical experimental viewpoint since obtaining small systematic errors in shock wave measured parameters requires the material compression and release mechanisms to be known. A brief review will be presented on systematic errors in shock wave data from common experimental techniques for fluids, elastic-plastic solids, materials with negative volume phase transitions, glass and ceramic materials, and high explosives. Issues related to time scales of experiments and quasi-steady flow will also be presented.

  1. New density functional parameterizations to accurate calculations of electric field gradient variations among compounds.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Régis Tadeu; Haiduke, Roberto Luiz Andrade

    2015-10-30

    This research provides a performance investigation of density functional theory and also proposes new functional parameterizations to deal with electric field gradient (EFG) calculations at nuclear positions. The entire procedure is conducted within the four-component formalism. First, we noticed that traditional hybrid and long-range corrected functionals are more efficient in the description of EFG variations for a set of elements (indium, antimony, iodine, lutetium, and hafnium) among linear molecules. Thus, we selected the PBE0, B3LYP, and CAM-B3LYP functionals and promoted a reoptimization of their parameters for a better description of these EFG changes. The PBE0q variant developed here showed an overall promising performance in a validation test conducted with potassium, iodine, copper, and gold. In general, the correlation coefficients found in linear regressions between experimental nuclear quadrupole coupling constants and calculated EFGs are improved while the systematic EFG errors also decrease as a result of this reparameterization. PMID:26284820

  2. Simple, accurate, and precise measurements of thermal diffusivity in liquids using a thermal-wave cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderas-López, J. A.; Mandelis, A.

    2001-06-01

    A simple methodology for the direct measurement of the thermal wavelength using a thermal-wave cavity, and its application to the evaluation of the thermal diffusivity of liquids is described. The simplicity and robustness of this technique lie in its relative measurement features for both the thermal-wave phase and cavity length, thus eliminating the need for taking into account difficult-to-quantify and time-consuming instrumental phase shifts. Two liquid samples were used: distilled water and ethylene glycol. Excellent agreement was found with reported results in the literature. The accuracy of the thermal diffusivity measurements using the new methodology originates in the use of only difference measurements in the thermal-wave phase and cavity length. Measurement precision is directly related to the corresponding precision on the measurement of the thermal wavelength.

  3. Assessing the orbital selective Mott transition with variational wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tocchio, Luca F.; Arrigoni, Federico; Sorella, Sandro; Becca, Federico

    2016-03-01

    We study the Mott metal-insulator transition in the two-band Hubbard model with different hopping amplitudes t 1 and t 2 for the two orbitals on the two-dimensional square lattice by using non-magnetic variational wave functions, similarly to what has been considered in the limit of infinite dimensions by dynamical mean-field theory. We work out the phase diagram at half filling (i.e. two electrons per site) as a function of R={{t}2}/{{t}1} and the on-site Coulomb repulsion U, for two values of the Hund’s coupling J  =  0 and J/U  =  0.1. Our results are in good agreement with previous dynamical mean-field theory calculations, demonstrating that the non-magnetic phase diagram is only slightly modified from infinite to two spatial dimensions. Three phases are present: a metallic one, for small values of U, where both orbitals are itinerant; a Mott insulator, for large values of U, where both orbitals are localized because of the Coulomb repulsion; and the so-called orbital-selective Mott insulator (OSMI), for small values of R and intermediate Us, where one orbital is localized while the other one is still itinerant. The effect of the Hund’s coupling is two-fold: on one side, it favors the full Mott phase over the OSMI; on the other side, it stabilizes the OSMI at larger values of R.

  4. Longitudinal Variation and Waves in Jupiter's South Equatorial Wind Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon-Miller, A. A.; Rogers, J. H.; Gierasch, P. J.; Choi, D.; Allison, M. D.; Adamoli, G.; Mettig, H.-J.

    2012-03-01

    Jupiter's south equatorial winds and clouds are consistent with a high frequency, gravity-inertia, wave. A second, westward-moving, Rossby wave was also identified. Asymmetry with the north equatorial clouds are likely due to the Great Red Spot.

  5. A More Accurate and Efficient Technique Developed for Using Computational Methods to Obtain Helical Traveling-Wave Tube Interaction Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    1999-01-01

    The phenomenal growth of commercial communications has created a great demand for traveling-wave tube (TWT) amplifiers. Although the helix slow-wave circuit remains the mainstay of the TWT industry because of its exceptionally wide bandwidth, until recently it has been impossible to accurately analyze a helical TWT using its exact dimensions because of the complexity of its geometrical structure. For the first time, an accurate three-dimensional helical model was developed that allows accurate prediction of TWT cold-test characteristics including operating frequency, interaction impedance, and attenuation. This computational model, which was developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center, allows TWT designers to obtain a more accurate value of interaction impedance than is possible using experimental methods. Obtaining helical slow-wave circuit interaction impedance is an important part of the design process for a TWT because it is related to the gain and efficiency of the tube. This impedance cannot be measured directly; thus, conventional methods involve perturbing a helical circuit with a cylindrical dielectric rod placed on the central axis of the circuit and obtaining the difference in resonant frequency between the perturbed and unperturbed circuits. A mathematical relationship has been derived between this frequency difference and the interaction impedance (ref. 1). However, because of the complex configuration of the helical circuit, deriving this relationship involves several approximations. In addition, this experimental procedure is time-consuming and expensive, but until recently it was widely accepted as the most accurate means of determining interaction impedance. The advent of an accurate three-dimensional helical circuit model (ref. 2) made it possible for Lewis researchers to fully investigate standard approximations made in deriving the relationship between measured perturbation data and interaction impedance. The most prominent approximations made

  6. Interseasonal Variations in the Middle Atmosphere Forced by Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Drob, D. P.; Porter, H. S.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In our Numerical Spectral Model (NSM), which incorporates Hines' Doppler Spread Parameterization, gravity waves (GW) propagating in the east/west direction can generate the essential features of the observed equatorial oscillations of the zonal circulation and in particular the QBO (quasi-biennial oscillation) extending from the stratosphere into the upper mesosphere. We report here that the NSM also produces inter-seasonal variations in the zonally symmetric meridional circulation. A distinct meridional oscillation (MO) is generated, which appears to be the counterpart to the QBO. With a vertical grid-point resolution of about 0.5 km, the NSM produces the MO through momentum deposition of GW's propagating in the north/south direction. This process is inherently non-linear, of third (odd) order, which enables the oscillation. Since the meridional winds are relatively small compared to the zonal winds, the vertical wavelength required to maintain the MO is also smaller, i.e., only about 10 km instead of the 30 km for the QBO. The corresponding viscous stress is then larger, and the period of the MO is thus short compared with that of the QBO, i.e., only about 3 to 4 months. Depending on the strength of the GW forcing, the computed amplitudes of the meridional wind oscillation are typically 5 m/s in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere, and the associated temperature amplitudes are between about 2 and 3 K. These amplitudes may be observable with the instruments on the TIMED spacecraft. Extended computer simulations with the NSM in 2D and 3D reveal that the MO at low latitudes is modulated by the QBO and in turn can influence it to produce a hemispherically asymmetric component. The annual circulation from the summer to the winter hemisphere is likely to play an important role.

  7. Interseasonal Variations in the Middle Atmosphere Forced by Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Drob, D. P.; Porter, H. S.; Chan, K. L.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In our Numerical Spectral Model (NSM), which incorporates Hines' Doppler Spread Parameterization, gravity waves (GW) propagating in the east/west direction can generate the essential features of the observed equatorial oscillations in the zonal circulation and in particular the QBO (quasi-biennial oscillation) extending from the stratosphere into the upper mesosphere. We report here that the NSM also produces inter-seasonal variations in the zonally symmetric (m = 0) meridional circulation. A distinct but variable meridional wind oscillation (MWO) is generated, which appears to be the counterpart to the QBO. With a vertical grid-point resolution of about 0.5 km, the NSM produces the MWO through momentum deposition of GWs propagating in the north/south direction. The resulting momentum source represents a third (generally odd) order non-linear function of the meridional winds, and this enables the oscillation, as in the case of the QBO for the zonal winds. Since the meridional winds are relatively small compared to the zonal winds, however, the vertical wavelength that maintains the MWO is much smaller, i.e., only about 10 km instead of 40 km for the QBO. Consistent with the associated increase of the viscous stress, the period of the MWO is then short compared with that of the QBO, i.e., only about two to four months. Depending on the strength of the GW forcing, the computed amplitudes of the MWO are typically 4 m/s in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere, and the associated temperature amplitudes are between about 2 and 3 K. These amplitudes may be observable with the instruments on the TIMED spacecraft. Extended computer simulations with the NSM in 2D (two-dimensional) and 3D (three-dimensional) reveal that the MWO is modulated by and in turn influences the QBO.

  8. Simple and accurate theory for strong shock waves in a dense hard-sphere fluid.

    PubMed

    Montanero, J M; López de Haro, M; Santos, A; Garzó, V

    1999-12-01

    Following an earlier work by Holian et al. [Phys. Rev. E 47, R24 (1993)] for a dilute gas, we present a theory for strong shock waves in a hard-sphere fluid described by the Enskog equation. The idea is to use the Navier-Stokes hydrodynamic equations but taking the temperature in the direction of shock propagation rather than the actual temperature in the computation of the transport coefficients. In general, for finite densities, this theory agrees much better with Monte Carlo simulations than the Navier-Stokes and (linear) Burnett theories, in contrast to the well-known superiority of the Burnett theory for dilute gases. PMID:11970718

  9. Theory of spin wave modes in tangentially magnetized thin cylindrical dots: A variational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zivieri, R.; Stamps, R. L.

    2006-04-01

    We present a theoretical study of the quantized spin wave spectrum in tangentially magnetized cylindrical thin magnetic dots. Low-energy spin waves in magnetic dots may be subdivided into four families: Damon-Eshbach like, backward like, mixed, and end modes. Frequencies and mode profiles are found using a variational approach based on carefully chosen trial functions. The variational method has the advantage that it can be used for large dots that are not practical to treat using numerical finite-element methods. Results for small dots generated using the variational method compare well with micromagnetic results. The variational method is demonstrated with an analysis of data obtained from experimental Brillouin light scattering data from saturated thin cylindrical Permalloy dots. Our approach allows for the definition of parameters describing important contributions to the spin wave energies. As an example, we show that a variational parameter γ provides a measure of spin wave localization near the dot border for one class of modes.

  10. Stationary Planetary Wave and Nonmigrating Tidal Composition of Ionospheric Wave-3 & Wave-4 variations in 2007-2011 FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, L. C.; Lin, C.; Yue, J.; Liu, J. G.; Lin, J.

    2013-12-01

    The wave-3 and wave-4 modulations of the Equatorial Ionization Anomalies (EIAs) are a robust feature of the low latitude ionosphere, when viewed in a constant local time reference frame. Although initially associated respectively with the DE2 and DE3 nonmigrating diurnal tides coupling upwards from the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region alone, recent results have suggested that the wave-3 and wave-4 components may also have significant contributions from other nonmigrating tidal and stationary planetary wave (SPW) components. In this study, we present observations of tidal and SPW components comprising the ionospheric wave-3 and wave-4 structures from FORMOSAT-3 / COSMIC Total Electron Content (TEC) from 2007-2011. We find that the wave-3 (wave-4) feature is comprised predominately by DE2 (DE3) and SPW3 (SPW4) throughout the entire five year period, with contributions from SE1 (SE2) being less significant. Additionally, the wave-3 component also has recurring contributions from a DW4 component during December/January. The absolute amplitudes of all the aforementioned components are positively correlated to the level of solar activity, as well as the semiannual variation in zonal mean TEC. After normalizing by the zonal mean TEC, the relative amplitudes of the wave-4 related components show an anti-correlation to solar activity through 2010, which is not seen with the wave-3 related components. The seasonal variation and phase relations of the main constituents of wave-3 and wave-4 are consistent from year to year, as evidenced by the inter-annual recurrence in the peak and trough locations of the ionospheric wave-3 and wave-4. Relative amplitudes of DE3 (black) and SPW4 (blue) in COSMIC TECs as a function of time at 15°N (a) and 15°S (b). Units % of maximum daily zonal mean TEC. Range of uncertainties denoted by dotted lines.

  11. WaveQ3D: Fast and accurate acoustic transmission loss (TL) eigenrays, in littoral environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Sean M.

    This study defines a new 3D Gaussian ray bundling acoustic transmission loss model in geodetic coordinates: latitude, longitude, and altitude. This approach is designed to lower the computation burden of computing accurate environmental effects in sonar training application by eliminating the need to transform the ocean environment into a collection of Nx2D Cartesian radials. This approach also improves model accuracy by incorporating real world 3D effects, like horizontal refraction, into the model. This study starts with derivations for a 3D variant of Gaussian ray bundles in this coordinate system. To verify the accuracy of this approach, acoustic propagation predictions of transmission loss, time of arrival, and propagation direction are compared to analytic solutions and other models. To validate the model's ability to predict real world phenomena, predictions of transmission loss and propagation direction are compared to at-sea measurements, in an environment where strong horizontal refraction effect have been observed. This model has been integrated into U.S. Navy active sonar training system applications, where testing has demonstrated its ability to improve transmission loss calculation speed without sacrificing accuracy.

  12. Occurring Conditions of Atmospheric Electricity Variation during Seismic Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Kan; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Takayama, Masakazu; Takeuchi, Nobunao

    We have observed the co-seismic electromagnetic phenomena such as earth potential difference (EPD) variation and atmospheric electricity (AE) variation at three observation sites in Akita Prefecture. In the strong earthquake of December 2nd, 2001, we observed clear signals of the EPD and the AE variation at all three sites. However, the amplitude of both observed signals at three sites are very different though with almost equal quake intensity at each site. The AE signal amplitude is increasing with the EPD signal one at each site. The model how both variation signals appear is proposed to explain the observed data.

  13. Accurate Time-Dependent Traveling-Wave Tube Model Developed for Computational Bit-Error-Rate Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    2001-01-01

    The phenomenal growth of the satellite communications industry has created a large demand for traveling-wave tubes (TWT's) operating with unprecedented specifications requiring the design and production of many novel devices in record time. To achieve this, the TWT industry heavily relies on computational modeling. However, the TWT industry's computational modeling capabilities need to be improved because there are often discrepancies between measured TWT data and that predicted by conventional two-dimensional helical TWT interaction codes. This limits the analysis and design of novel devices or TWT's with parameters differing from what is conventionally manufactured. In addition, the inaccuracy of current computational tools limits achievable TWT performance because optimized designs require highly accurate models. To address these concerns, a fully three-dimensional, time-dependent, helical TWT interaction model was developed using the electromagnetic particle-in-cell code MAFIA (Solution of MAxwell's equations by the Finite-Integration-Algorithm). The model includes a short section of helical slow-wave circuit with excitation fed by radiofrequency input/output couplers, and an electron beam contained by periodic permanent magnet focusing. A cutaway view of several turns of the three-dimensional helical slow-wave circuit with input/output couplers is shown. This has been shown to be more accurate than conventionally used two-dimensional models. The growth of the communications industry has also imposed a demand for increased data rates for the transmission of large volumes of data. To achieve increased data rates, complex modulation and multiple access techniques are employed requiring minimum distortion of the signal as it is passed through the TWT. Thus, intersymbol interference (ISI) becomes a major consideration, as well as suspected causes such as reflections within the TWT. To experimentally investigate effects of the physical TWT on ISI would be

  14. Variational space-time (dis)continuous Galerkin method for nonlinear free surface water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagarina, E.; Ambati, V. R.; van der Vegt, J. J. W.; Bokhove, O.

    2014-10-01

    A new variational finite element method is developed for nonlinear free surface gravity water waves using the potential flow approximation. This method also handles waves generated by a wave maker. Its formulation stems from Miles' variational principle for water waves together with a finite element discretization that is continuous in space and discontinuous in time. One novel feature of this variational finite element approach is that the free surface evolution is variationally dependent on the mesh deformation vis-à-vis the mesh deformation being geometrically dependent on free surface evolution. Another key feature is the use of a variational (dis)continuous Galerkin finite element discretization in time. Moreover, in the absence of a wave maker, it is shown to be equivalent to the second order symplectic Störmer-Verlet time stepping scheme for the free-surface degrees of freedom. These key features add to the stability of the numerical method. Finally, the resulting numerical scheme is verified against nonlinear analytical solutions with long time simulations and validated against experimental measurements of driven wave solutions in a wave basin of the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands.

  15. Variational Approach to Yang-Mills Theory with non-Gaussian Wave Functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagnari, Davide R.; Reinhardt, Hugo

    2011-05-01

    A general method for treating non-Gaussian wave functionals in quantum field theory is presented and applied to the Hamiltonian approach to Yang-Mills theory in Coulomb gauge in order to include a three-gluon kernel in the exponential of the vacuum wave functional. The three-gluon vertex is calculated using the propagators found in the variational approach with a Gaussian trial wave functional as input.

  16. On the accurate long-time solution of the wave equation in exterior domains: Asymptotic expansions and corrected boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagstrom, Thomas; Hariharan, S. I.; Maccamy, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    We consider the solution of scattering problems for the wave equation using approximate boundary conditions at artificial boundaries. These conditions are explicitly viewed as approximations to an exact boundary condition satisfied by the solution on the unbounded domain. We study the short and long term behavior of the error. It is provided that, in two space dimensions, no local in time, constant coefficient boundary operator can lead to accurate results uniformly in time for the class of problems we consider. A variable coefficient operator is developed which attains better accuracy (uniformly in time) than is possible with constant coefficient approximations. The theory is illustrated by numerical examples. We also analyze the proposed boundary conditions using energy methods, leading to asymptotically correct error bounds.

  17. Low-frequency wave modulations in an electronegative dusty plasma in the presence of charge variations.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Samiran; Sarkar, Subrata; Khan, Manoranjan; Gupta, M R

    2011-12-01

    The effects of dust charge variations on low-frequency wave modulations in an electronegative dusty plasma are investigated. The dynamics of the modulated wave is governed by a nonlinear Schrödinger equation with a dissipative term. The dissipation arises due to the nonsteady (nonadiabatic) dust charge variations. Theoretical and numerical investigations predict the formation of dissipative bright (envelope) and dark solitons. The nonsteady charge-variation-induced dissipation reduces the modulational instability growth rate and introduces a characteristic time scale to observe bright solitons. Results are discussed in the context of electronegative dusty plasma experiments. PMID:22304202

  18. The correlation of VLF propagation variations with atmospheric planetary-scale waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, D. J.; Deland, R. J.; Potemra, T. A.; Gavin, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    Variations in the received daytime phase of long distance, cesium-controlled, VLF transmission were compared to the height variations of the 10-mb isobaric surface during the first three months of 1965 and 1969. The VLF phase values are also compared to height variations of constant electron densities in the E-region and to variations of f-min which have been shown to be well correlated with planetary-scale variations in the stratosphere by Deland and Cavalieri (1973). The VLF phase variations show good correlation with these previous ionospheric measurements and with the 10-mb surfaces. The planetary scale waves in the stratosphere are shown to be travelling on the average eastward in 1965 and westward in 1969. These correlations are interpreted as due to the propagation of travelling planetary scale waves with westward tilted wave fronts. Upward energy transport due to the vertical structure of those waves is also discussed. These correlations provide further evidence for the coupling between the lower ionosphere at about 70 km altitude (the daytime VLF reflection height and the stratosphere, and they demonstrate the importance of planetary wave phenomena to VLF propagation.

  19. Longitudinal Variation and Waves in Jupiter's South Equatorial Wind Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon-Miller, A. A.; Rogers, John H.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Choi, David; Allison, Michael; Adamoli, Gianluigi; Mettig, Hans-Joerg

    2012-01-01

    We have conducted a detailed study of the cloud features in the strong southern equatorial wind jet near 7.5 S planetographic latitude. To understand the apparent variations in average zonal wind jet velocity at this latitude [e.g.. 1,2,3], we have searched for variations iIi both feature latitude and velocity with longitude and time. In particular, we focused on the repetitive chevron-shaped dark spots visible on most dates and the more transient large anticyclonic system known as the South Equatorial Disturbance (SED). These small dark spots are interpreted as cloud holes, and are often used as material tracers of the wind field.

  20. How accurately does the free complement wave function of a helium atom satisfy the Schrödinger equation?

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroyuki; Nakatsuji, Hiroshi

    2008-12-12

    The local energy defined by Hpsi/psi must be equal to the exact energy E at any coordinate of an atom or molecule, as long as the psi under consideration is exact. The discrepancy from E of this quantity is a stringent test of the accuracy of the calculated wave function. The H-square error for a normalized psi, defined by sigma2 identical with psi|(H-E)2|psi, is also a severe test of the accuracy. Using these quantities, we have examined the accuracy of our wave function of a helium atom calculated using the free complement method that was developed to solve the Schrödinger equation. Together with the variational upper bound, the lower bound of the exact energy calculated using a modified Temple's formula ensured the definitely correct value of the helium fixed-nucleus ground state energy to be -2.903,724,377,034,119,598,311,159,245, 194,4 a.u., which is correct to 32 digits. PMID:19113607

  1. Effect of nonadiabaticity of dust charge variation on dust acoustic waves: generation of dust acoustic shock waves.

    PubMed

    Gupta, M R; Sarkar, S; Ghosh, S; Debnath, M; Khan, M

    2001-04-01

    The effect of nonadiabaticity of dust charge variation arising due to small nonzero values of tau(ch)/tau(d) has been studied where tau(ch) and tau(d) are the dust charging and dust hydrodynamical time scales on the nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic waves. Analytical investigation shows that the propagation of a small amplitude wave is governed by a Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) Burger equation. Notwithstanding the soliton decay, the "soliton mass" is conserved, but the dissipative term leads to the development of a noise tail. Nonadiabaticity generated dissipative effect causes the generation of a dust acoustic shock wave having oscillatory behavior on the downstream side. Numerical investigations reveal that the propagation of a large amplitude dust acoustic shock wave with dust density enhancement may occur only for Mach numbers lying between a minimum and a maximum value whose dependence on the dusty plasma parameters is presented. PMID:11308955

  2. Seasonal variations in lower stratospheric gravity wave energy above the Falkland Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat-Griffin, T.; Jarvis, M. J.; Colwell, S. R.; Kavanagh, A. J.; Manney, G. L.; Daffer, W. H.

    2013-10-01

    gravity wavefield in the lower stratosphere (between 15 km and 22 km altitude) above Mount Pleasant Airport (51°49'S, 58°26'W) on the Falkland Islands is studied using over 2100 high-resolution radiosonde soundings from 2002 to 2010. The seasonal variation in vertical direction of propagation shows a small decrease in numbers of upward propagating waves that is related to critical level filtering; however, there is a very large increase in numbers of downward propagating waves between July and September; this is attributed to the proximity of the edge of the polar vortex. There is a seasonal variation in gravity wave energy density, with a large peak during the austral autumn equinox; this is markedly different to results in the literature both from Rothera, on the Antarctic Peninsula, and stations on the main Antarctic continent. This seasonal pattern has been shown to be linked to variations in the sources of upward propagating gravity waves. The seasonal variation in gravity wave characteristics above Mount Pleasant Airport seen in our results suggests that the gravity wavefield in this region is determined by a combination of different gravity wave sources located above and below the lower stratosphere.

  3. Middle-aged adults exhibit altered spatial variations in Achilles tendon wave speed

    PubMed Central

    Slane, Laura Chernak; DeWall, Ryan; Martin, Jack; Lee, Kenneth; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate spatial variations in measured wave speed in the relaxed and stretched Achilles tendons of young and middle-aged adults. Wave speed was measured from the distal Achilles tendon, soleus aponeurosis, medial gastrocnemius aponeurosis and medial gastrocnemius muscle in healthy young (n = 15, aged 25 ± 4 years) and middle-aged (n = 10, aged 49 ± 4 years) adults in resting, dorsiflexed and plantarflexed postures. In both age groups, Achilles tendon wave speed decreased proximally, with the lowest wave speed measured in the gastrocnemius aponeurosis. Measured wave speed increased with passive dorsiflexion, reflecting the strain-stiffening behavior of tendons. There were no significant aging effects on wave speed in the free tendon or soleus aponeurosis. However, a significant, inverse relationship between gastrocnemius aponeurosis wave speed and age was observed in the dorsiflexed posture. We also observed significantly lower wave speeds in the gastrocnemius muscles of middle-aged adults when compared with young adults. These results suggest that Achilles tendon compliance increases in a distal-to-proximal pattern, with middle-aged adults exhibiting greater compliance in the distal gastrocnemius muscle and tendinous structures. An age-related change in the spatial variation in Achilles tendon compliance could affect localised tissue deformation patterns and injury potential within the triceps surae muscle-tendon units. PMID:26020294

  4. Variational principle in optics II: Dissipative wave equations.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Jacob; Wolansky, Gershon

    2016-08-01

    The problem of phase retrieval from intensity measurements is examined for the case of dissipative wave equations. Unlike the conservative case, it is not clear if and when the problem is solvable at all. We provide two solutions. First, it is shown that, for a certain class of dissipating potentials, the problem can be fully solved by converting it through a simple transformation to the framework of the weighted least action principle. Second, for all other dissipating potentials, a deep result from the theory of elliptic partial differential equations is used to show that the problem is always solvable up to a scaling of one of the measured intensities. Moreover, the solution in this general case can be obtained by solving a Monge-Ampere type differential equation. Two numerical examples are given to illustrate some of the theoretical considerations. PMID:27505643

  5. Variation of wave velocity and porosity of sandstone after high temperature heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiang; Zhang, ·Weiqiang; Su, Tianming; Zhu, Shuyun

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the variations of mass, porosity, and wave velocity of sandstone after high temperature heating. The range of temperature to which the sandstone specimens have been exposed is 25-850°C, in a heating furnace. It has been shown that below 300°C, porosity and wave velocity change very little. Above 300°C, there is a rapid increase in porosity, but the wave velocity decreases significantly. The results of thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) suggest that a series of changes occurred between 400 and 600°C in sandstone could be responsible for the different patterns of variation in porosity and wave velocity.

  6. Development and experimental verification of a finite element method for accurate analysis of a surface acoustic wave device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohibul Kabir, K. M.; Matthews, Glenn I.; Sabri, Ylias M.; Russo, Salvy P.; Ippolito, Samuel J.; Bhargava, Suresh K.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate analysis of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices is highly important due to their use in ever-growing applications in electronics, telecommunication and chemical sensing. In this study, a novel approach for analyzing the SAW devices was developed based on a series of two-dimensional finite element method (FEM) simulations, which has been experimentally verified. It was found that the frequency response of the two SAW device structures, each having slightly different bandwidth and center lobe characteristics, can be successfully obtained utilizing the current density of the electrodes via FEM simulations. The two SAW structures were based on XY Lithium Niobate (LiNbO3) substrates and had two and four electrode finger pairs in both of their interdigital transducers, respectively. Later, SAW devices were fabricated in accordance with the simulated models and their measured frequency responses were found to correlate well with the obtained simulations results. The results indicated that better match between calculated and measured frequency response can be obtained when one of the input electrode finger pairs was set at zero volts and all the current density components were taken into account when calculating the frequency response of the simulated SAW device structures.

  7. Accurate method for measurement of pipe wall thickness using a circumferential guided wave generated and detected by a pair of noncontact transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, H.; Taniguchi, Y.; Yoshida, K.

    2012-05-01

    A noncontact method of an accurate estimation of a pipe wall thickness using a circumferential (C-) Lamb wave is presented. The C-Lamb waves circling along the circumference of pipes are transmitted and received by the critical angle method using a pair of noncontact air-coupled ultrasonic transducers. For the accurate estimation of a pipe wall thickness, the accurate measurement of the angular wave number that changes minutely owing to the thickness must be achieved. To achieve the accurate measurement, a large number of tone-burst cycles are used so as to superpose the C-Lamb wave on itself along its circumferential orbit. In this setting, the amplitude of the superposed region changes considerably with the angular wave number, from which the wall thickness can be estimated. This paper presents the principle of the method and experimental verifications. As results of the experimental verifications, it was confirmed that the maximum error between the estimates and the theoretical model was less than 10 micrometers.

  8. sup 4 He- sup 4 He elastic scattering and variational wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Usmani, A.A.; Ahmad, I. ); Usmani, Q.N. )

    1992-01-01

    We calculate differential cross sections for {sup 4}He-{sup 4}He elastic scattering at 4.32 GeV/{ital c} in the framework of Glauber multiple scattering theory using correlated variational wave functions as given by the two-nucleon Urbana {ital v}{sub 14} potential and the spin-isospin averaged Melfleit-Tjon force {ital V}. These wave functions are found to give fairly satisfactory results.

  9. Optical beam shaping and diffraction free waves: A variational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmer, John A.; Venkataramani, Shankar C.; Durfee, Charles G.; Moloney, Jerome V.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the problem of shaping radially symmetric annular beams into desired intensity patterns along the optical axis. Within the Fresnel approximation, we show that this problem can be expressed in a variational form equivalent to the one arising in phase retrieval. Using the uncertainty principle we prove various rigorous lower bounds on the functional; these lower bounds estimate the L2 error for the beam shaping problem in terms of the design parameters. We also use the method of stationary phase to construct a natural ansatz for a minimizer in the short wavelength limit. We illustrate the implications of our results by applying the method of stationary phase coupled with the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm to beam shaping problems arising in the remote delivery of beams and pulses.

  10. A normalized wave number variation parameter for acoustic black hole design.

    PubMed

    Feurtado, Philip A; Conlon, Stephen C; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, the concept of the Acoustic Black Hole has been developed as an efficient passive, lightweight absorber of bending waves in plates and beams. Theory predicts greater absorption for a higher thickness taper power. However, a higher taper power also increases the violation of an underlying theory smoothness assumption. This paper explores the effects of high taper power on the reflection coefficient and spatial change in wave number and discusses the normalized wave number variation as a spatial design parameter for performance, assessment, and optimization. PMID:25096139

  11. Analysis of Wave Propagation in Mechanical Continua Using a New Variational Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Goutam

    2016-06-01

    In this paper a new variational principle is presented for studying various wave propagation phenomena without explicitly deriving the equations of motion. The method looks for steady state solutions of linear or non-linear partial differential equations that admit wave-like solutions. Dispersion relations of plane waves propagating in unbounded continuous media, transmission and reflection coefficients of wave incident on the boundary of two semi-infinite media and wave impedance and mobility in an excited medium are studied with the help of the same principle. Numerous examples are given to clarify the method adopted showing distinct advantages over the traditional methods. The scientific insights that this principle provides are also highlighted.

  12. Hurricane Directional Wave Spectrum Spatial Variation in the Open Ocean and at Landfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, E. J.; Wright, C. W.; Vandemark, D.; Krabill, W. B.; Garcia, A. W.; Houston, S. H.; Powell, M. D.; Black, P. G.; Marks, F. D.; Busalacchi, Antonio J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The sea surface directional wave spectrum was measured for the first time in all quadrants of a hurricane in open water using the NASA airborne scanning radar altimeter (SRA) carried aboard one of the NOAA WP-3D hurricane hunter aircraft at 1.5 km height. The SRA measures the energetic portion of the directional wave spectrum by generating a topographic map of the sea surface. At 8 Hz, the SRA sweeps a radar beam of 1 E half-power width (two-way) across the aircraft ground track over a swath equal to 0.8 of the aircraft height, simultaneously measuring the backscattered power at its 36 GHz (8.3 mm) operating frequency and the range to the sea surface at 64 positions. These slant ranges are multiplied by the cosine of the incidence angles to determine the vertical distances from the aircraft to the sea surface. Subtracting these distances from the aircraft height produces the sea surface elevation map. The sea surface topography is interpolated to a uniform grid, transformed by a two-dimensional FFT, and Doppler corrected. The open-ocean data were acquired on 24 August 1998 when hurricane Bonnie was east of the Bahamas and moving slowly to the north. Individual waves with heights up to 18 m were observed and the spatial variation of the wave field was dramatic. The dominant waves generally propagated at significant angles to the downwind direction. At some positions there were three different wave fields of comparable energy crossing each other. The NOAA aircraft spent over five hours within 180 km of the hurricane Bonnie eye, and made five eye penetrations. A 3-minute animation of the directional wave spectrum spatial variation over this period will be shown as well as summary plots of the wave field spatial variation. On 26 August 1998, the NOAA aircraft flew at 2.2 km height when hurricane Bonnie was making landfall near Wilmington, NC, documenting the directional wave spectrum in the region between Charleston, SC and Cape Hatteras, NC. The aircraft ground track

  13. Full-wave calculation of fast-wave current drive in tokamaks including k sub parallel variations

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, E.F; Batchelor, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    When fast waves propagate inward from the edge of a tokamak toward the plasma center, the k{perpendicular} spectrum produced by the antenna is not maintained but is shifted and deformed due to the presence of the finite poloidal magnetic field. This k{perpendicular} shift causes a variation in the parallel phase speed of the wave and can therefore have a strong effect on electron damping and current drive efficiency. In this paper, we include this effect in a new full-wave calculation (PICES) which represents the wave fields as a superposition of poloidal modes, thereby reducing k{perpendicular} to an algebraic operator. The wave equation is solved in general flux coordinates, including a full (non-perturbative) solution for E{perpendicular} and a reduced-order dielectric formulation to eliminate short-wavelength ion Bernstein modes. A simplified current drive model which includes particle trapping is used to estimate the effect of the k{perpendicular} shift on current drive efficiency in ITER and D3-D. Results suggest that when single-pass absorption is weak, reflected power may drive current nearly as efficiently as that absorbed on the first pass. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Accurate Time-Dependent Wave Packet Calculations for the O(+) + H2 → OH(+) + H Ion-Molecule Reaction.

    PubMed

    Bulut, N; Castillo, J F; Jambrina, P G; Kłos, J; Roncero, O; Aoiz, F J; Bañares, L

    2015-12-17

    Accurate quantum reactive scattering time-dependent wave packet close-coupling calculations have been carried out to determine total reaction probabilities and integral cross sections for the O(+) + H2 → OH(+) + H reaction in a range of collision energies from 10(-3) eV up to 1.0 eV for the H2 rovibrational states (v = 0; j = 0, 1, 2) and (v = 1; j = 0) using the potential energy surface (PES) by Martı́nez et al. As expected for a barrierless reaction, the reaction cross section decays rapidly with collision energy, Ec, following a behavior that nearly corresponds to that predicted by the Langevin model. Rotational excitation of H2 into j = 1, 2 has a very moderate effect on reactivity, similarly to what happens with vibrational excitation below Ec ≈ 0.3 eV. However, at higher collision energies the cross section increases notably when H2 is promoted to v = 1. This effect is explained by resorting to the effective potentials in the entrance channel. The integral cross sections have been used to calculate rate constants in the temperature range 200-1000 K. A good overall agreement has been found with the available experimental data on integral cross sections and rate constants. In addition, time-independent quantum mechanical and quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations have been performed on the same PES aimed to compare the various methodologies and to discern the detailed mechanism of the title reaction. In particular, the analysis of individual trajectories has made it possible to explain, in terms of the coupling between reagent relative velocity and the topography of the PES, the presence of a series of alternating maxima and minima in the collision energy dependence of the QCT reaction probabilities for the reactions with H2(v=0,1,j=0), which are absent in the quantum mechanical calculations. PMID:25822338

  15. Regional variations of the shear-wave polarization anisotropy in the crust and mantle wedge beneath the Tohoku district

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Mitsumi; Oda, Hitoshi

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the regional variations of the shear-wave polarization anisotropy in the upper crust, lower crust, and mantle wedge beneath the Tohoku district in the northeast Japan arc. The shear-wave splitting parameters (fast polarization direction (FPD) and split time) for the upper and lower crusts are estimated by shear-wave splitting analysis of the Ps phases, which are generated by the conversion of a P wave into an S wave at the Conrad and Moho discontinuity interfaces. The splitting parameters for the mantle wedge are determined by splitting analysis of the slab Ps phase converted at the oceanic crust on the subducting Pacific slab and the direct S waves from deep focus earthquakes located just below seismic stations. The Ps phases are identified on the P-wave receiver functions constructed from the teleseismic records. To accurately determine the splitting parameters for the lower crust from the Moho Ps phase, the Ps phase should be corrected for the shear-wave splitting effect in the upper crust. Similarly, to estimate the mantle wedge anisotropy, the direct S wave and slab Ps phase must be corrected for the splitting effect in the crust. The anisotropies of the crust and mantle wedge are estimated from the corrected Ps phases and direct S waves. The anisotropy of the upper crust exhibits a regional variation where FPD of the split shear wave is predominant in the N-S direction in the Pacific coast area and in the E-W direction in the rest of the Tohoku district. The split time is less than 0.2 s. The upper crustal anisotropy is attributed to the alignment of vertical cracks induced in the upper crust by tectonic stress. In the lower crust, FPD is predominant in the E-W direction with a split time similar to that in the upper crust, and the anisotropy of the lower crust is due to the lattice preferred orientation of rock-forming minerals. In the mantle wedge, FPD is predominant in the N-S direction (trench-parallel) in the fore-arc side of the volcanic

  16. Lunar Brightness Variations with Phase at 4.3-MM Wave Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, Robert J.

    1961-01-01

    The lunar radio observations and interpretations of Piddington and Minnett (1949) and Gibson (1958) show that the lunar brightness variation with phase at millimeter wave lengths can be used to determine the physical properties of the lunar surface. They found that the millimeter-wave brightness lagged the optical phase, and their interpretation was that the millimeter radiation originates below a surface layer that is a very good thermal insulator. The thickness of this layer could not be determined from observations at one frequency. Observations at different frequencies give different results because of the wave-length dependence of the radio absorption by the surface material. The attenuation in the material increases with decreasing wave length, and therefore it is possible, in principle, to determine surface layer thickness from radio observations at several wave lengths. For this reason, observations of lunar radiation were started at the Naval Research Laboratory at a wave length of 4.3 mm. This is half the wave length used by Gibson (1958) in his earlier studies. The radio telescope used for these observations has been described in detail in a previous publication (Coates 1958). The antenna is a parabolic reflector 10 feet in diameter, and it has a beam width of 6.7 minutes of arc at the wave length of 4.3 mm. This is about one-fifth the diameter of the moon. The receiver was a Dicke-type radiometer.

  17. The influence of temperature variations on ultrasonic guided waves in anisotropic CFRP plates.

    PubMed

    Putkis, O; Dalton, R P; Croxford, A J

    2015-07-01

    Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) materials are lightweight and corrosion-resistant and therefore are increasingly used in aerospace, automotive and construction industries. In Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) applications of CFRP materials, ultrasonic guided waves potentially offer large area inspection or inspection from a remote location. This paper addresses the effect of temperature variation on guided wave propagation in highly anisotropic CFRP materials. Temperature variations cause changes in guided wave velocity that can in turn compromise the baseline subtraction procedures employed by many SHM systems for damage detection. A simple model that describes the dependence of elastic properties of the CFRP plates on temperature is presented in this paper. The model can be used to predict anisotropic velocity changes and baseline subtraction performance under varying thermal conditions. The results produced by the model for unidirectional and 0/90 CFRP plates are compared with experimental measurements. PMID:25812468

  18. Temperature variation effects on sparse representation of guided-waves for damage diagnosis in pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eybpoosh, Matineh; Berges, Mario; Noh, Hae Young

    2015-04-01

    Multiple ultrasonic guided-wave modes propagating along a pipe travel with different velocities which are themselves a function of frequency. Reflections from the features of the structure (e.g., boundaries, pipe welding, damage, etc.), and their complex superposition, adds to the complexity of guided-waves. Guided-wave based damage diagnosis of pipelines becomes even more challenging when environmental and operational conditions (EOCs) vary (e.g., temperature, flow rate, inner pressure, etc.). These complexities make guided-wave based damage diagnosis of operating pipelines a challenging task. This paper reviews the approaches to-date addressing these challenges, and highlights the preferred characteristics of a method that simplifies guided-wave signals for damage diagnosis purposes. A method is proposed to extract a sparse subset of guided-wave signals in time-domain, while retaining optimal damage information for detection purpose. In this paper, the general concept of this method is proved through an extensive set of experiments. Effects of temperature variation on detection performance of the proposed method, and on discriminatory power of the extracted damage-sensitive features are investigated. The potential of the proposed method for real-time damage detection is illustrated, for wide range of temperature variation scenarios (i.e., temperature difference between training and test data varying between -2°C and 13°C).

  19. Regional synchrony of temperature variation and internal wave forcing along the Florida Keys reef tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leichter, James J.; Stokes, M. Dale; Vilchis, L. Ignacio; Fiechter, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of 10 year temperature records collected along the Florida Keys reef tract (FLKRT) reveals strong, regional-scale synchrony in high-frequency temperature variation suggestive of internal wave forcing at predominately semidiurnal frequencies. In each year and at all sites, the amplitude of semidiurnal temperature variation was greatest from March to September, and markedly lower from October to February. Comparisons of the semidiurnal component of the temperature variation among sites suggest complex patterns in the arrival of internal waves, with highest cross correlation among closely spaced sites and synchrony in periods of enhanced internal wave activity across the length of the FLKRT, particularly in summer. The periods of enhanced semidiurnal temperature variation at the 20 and 30 m isobaths on the reef slopes appear to be associated with the dynamics of the Florida Current and the onshore movement of warm fronts preceding the passage of Florida Current frontal eddies. Regional-scale satellite altimetry observations suggest temporal linkages to sea surface height anomalies in the Loop Current (upstream of the Florida Current) and setup of the Tortugas Gyre. The synchronized forcing of cool water onto the reef slope sites across the FLKRT is likely to affect physiological responses to temperature variation in corals and other ectothermic organisms, as well as larval transport and nutrient dynamics with the potential for regionally coherent pulses of larvae and nutrients arriving on reef slopes across the FLKRT.

  20. Possible variations of E-layer electromagnetic fields by acoustic waves above earthquake preparation regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, C.-V.; Mayer, B.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.

    2012-04-01

    The many-fluid magnetohydrodynamic theory is applied to describe the modification of the electromagnetic field of the ionospheric E-layer by acoustic-type waves. These waves originate from lower altitudes and may be caused by earthquake preparation processes. In comparison to former works, the different stratification of the positively and negatively charged ionospheric particles and of the neutral constituents is taken into account. There also the influence of the mean electric field on the different hight scales of the plasma parameters is discussed. Besides, the hight scales of the electric and magnetic wave fields are modeled. It is shown that at E-layer altitudes the acoustic waves may be converted into Alfvén waves. The dependence of these waves on the height scales of the plasma parameters of the particles and on the momentum transport between the charged and neutral particles is analysed. First estimates of the temperature variations within the E-layer because of the assumed acoustic-type waves of seismic origin are made.

  1. Coherent molecular transistor: Control through variation of the gate wave function

    SciTech Connect

    Ernzerhof, Matthias

    2014-03-21

    In quantum interference transistors (QUITs), the current through the device is controlled by variation of the gate component of the wave function that interferes with the wave function component joining the source and the sink. Initially, mesoscopic QUITs have been studied and more recently, QUITs at the molecular scale have been proposed and implemented. Typically, in these devices the gate lead is subjected to externally adjustable physical parameters that permit interference control through modifications of the gate wave function. Here, we present an alternative model of a molecular QUIT in which the gate wave function is directly considered as a variable and the transistor operation is discussed in terms of this variable. This implies that we specify the gate current as well as the phase of the gate wave function component and calculate the resulting current through the source-sink channel. Thus, we extend on prior works that focus on the phase of the gate wave function component as a control parameter while having zero or certain discrete values of the current. We address a large class of systems, including finite graphene flakes, and obtain analytic solutions for how the gate wave function controls the transistor.

  2. Seasonal variation of gravity waves in the Equatorial Middle Atmosphere: results from ISRO's Middle Atmospheric Dynamics (MIDAS) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramkumar, G.; Antonita, T. M.; Bhavani Kumar, Y.; Venkata Kumar, H.; Narayana Rao, D.

    2006-10-01

    Altitude profiles of temperature in the stratospheric and mesopheric region from lidar observations at NARL, Gadanki, India, during December 2002-April 2005, as part of ISRO's Middle Atmospheric Dynamics - "MIDAS (2002-2005)" program are used to study the characteristics of gravity waves and their seasonal variation. Month-to-month variation of the gravity wave activity observed during the period of December 2002-April 2005 show maximum wave activity, with primary peaks in May 2003, August 2004 and March 2005 and secondary peaks in February 2003 and November 2004. This month-to-month variation in gravity wave activity is linked to the variation in the strength of the sources, viz. convection and wind shear, down below at the tropospheric region, estimated from MST radar measurements at the same location. Horizontal wind shear is found to be mostly correlated with wave activity than convection, and sometimes both sources are found to contribute towards the wave activity.

  3. Seasonal variation in accurate identification of Escherichia coli within a constructed wetland receiving tertiary-treated municipal effluent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reuse of municipal wastewater has been escalating worldwide as a means to extend increasingly limited water supplies. With the growth in use of recycled water, accurate monitoring of water quality parameters, including Escherichia coli (E. coli), increases in importance. Chromogenic media, becau...

  4. Schwinger variational principle calculations of wave scattering from conducting cylinders using physically motivated trial functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, B. J.; Farrell, R. A.

    1996-02-01

    The Schwinger variational principle for the scattering amplitude is applied to two related test problems: an infinitely long perfectly conducting circular cylinder and a hemicylindrically embossed plane illuminated by a normally incident plane wave whose magnetic field is perpendicular to the cylinder axis (TM polarization). It is demonstrated that the variational principle yields very good results with trial functions containing only a few variational parameters, provided the trial functions mimic not only the correct boundary conditions on the scatterer surface but also the expected shadowing effects of the obstacle. A variety of analytical variational limits for both low and high frequencies are derived, which, together with the numerical results for intermediate frequencies, compare very favorably with the available exact solutions.

  5. Seasonal variation in Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratio in the secondary microseism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, T.; Hadziioannou, C.; Igel, H.; Wassermann, J. M.; Schreiber, U.; Gebauer, A.; Chow, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Ring Laser (the G-ring) at Wettzell (WET), Germany, is a rotation-measurement instrument that can monitor tiny variations in seismic noise. It essentially records only SH-type signals. Combined with a co-located seismograph (three-component seismograph STS-2), we can monitor the amount of Love waves from this instrument and that of Rayleigh waves from the STS seismograph. We report on seasonal variation of Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratio in the secondary microseism. The first step in our analysis is to obtain stacked Fourier spectra that were least affected by earthquakes. We used two earthquake catalogues to do this; the GCMT (Global Centroid Moment Tensor, Earthquakes M > 5.5) catalogue and the EMSC (European-Mediterranean Seismic Centre) catalogue for regional earthquakes (distance < 1000 km) with M > 4.5. We then created monthly averages of noise Fourier spectra for the frequency range 0.13-0.30 Hz using both the G-ring and STS data from 2009 to 2015. Monthly spectra show clear seasonal variations for the secondary microseism. We obtained surface vertical acceleration from STS and surface transverse acceleration from G-ring from which we can directly measure the Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratio. The procedure is the same with an account in our recent GRL paper (Tanimoto et al., 2015). Comparison between vertical acceleration and transverse acceleration shows that Rayleigh-wave surface amplitudes are about 20 percent larger than Love waves but in terms of kinetic energy this ratio will be different. We converted these ratios of surface amplitude to those of kinetic energy using an available earth model (Fichtner et al., 2013). The averaged ratio over the frequency band 0.13-0.30 Hz shows is in the range 0.6-0.8 in spring, autumn and winter but it increases to about 1.2 in summer. Except for the summer, the amount of Love waves are higher but the amount of Rayleigh waves increases in summer and appears to exceed that of Love waves.

  6. Gaussian variational ansatz in the problem of anomalous sea waves: Comparison with direct numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruban, V. P.

    2015-05-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of an obliquely oriented wave packet on a sea surface is analyzed analytically and numerically for various initial parameters of the packet in relation to the problem of the so-called rogue waves. Within the Gaussian variational ansatz applied to the corresponding (1+2)-dimensional hyperbolic nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE), a simplified Lagrangian system of differential equations is derived that describes the evolution of the coefficients of the real and imaginary quadratic forms appearing in the Gaussian. This model provides a semi-quantitative description of the process of nonlinear spatiotemporal focusing, which is one of the most probable mechanisms of rogue wave formation in random wave fields. The system of equations is integrated in quadratures, which allows one to better understand the qualitative differences between linear and nonlinear focusing regimes of a wave packet. Predictions of the Gaussian model are compared with the results of direct numerical simulation of fully nonlinear long-crested waves.

  7. Variation of particle size distribution in Saturn's rings and search for density waves in Uranus rings

    SciTech Connect

    Yanamandra-Fisher, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    A bimodal size distribution for particles in Saturn's rings has been determined via an analysis of PPS, UVS and RSS occultation data. The variation of the size distribution in featureless regions indicates that the dust variation is nearly constant in the Saturn's rings and exhibits a slight anti-correlation with 1 cm sized particles. Sub-centimeter sized particles increase outward in the rings, with a maximum in the B ring, similar to the variation of 1 cm sized particles. However, the ratio of subcentimeter sized particles to 1 cm sized particles does not vary significantly in the rings. Janus 5:4 density wave differs significantly from the featureless regions. The amount of dust is greater by a factor of about 2. Both dust and sub-centimeter sized particles are strongly anti-correlated with 1 cm sized particles. Partial formation of gaps is evident for both sub- and supra-centimeter sized particles, consistent with the predictions of Goldreich and Tremaine (1978). Dust is insensitive to the gravitational torque associated with the resonance. The results are also consistent with Dones (1987). In wave regions, large particles collide and produce dust and do not break up into smaller particles. The author searched the Uranian rings, via time series analysis methods, to identify periodic phenomena in the rings. A possible wave-like feature has been identified in both the {epsilon} and the {delta} rings of Uranus. A density wave has been identified in the inner half of the {delta} ring. It implies the existence of a moonlet between the {gamma} and {delta} rings and a possible shepherd for the outer edge of the {gamma} ring and an inner shepherd for the {delta} ring. Comparison of density waves in the two ring systems are similar, indicating the similarity of the local ring environments.

  8. Data fusion for compensation of temperature variations in Lamb-wave based SHM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dworakowski, Ziemowit; Ambrozinski, Lukasz; Stepinski, Tadeusz

    2015-03-01

    Temperature variations affect Lamb wave propagation and therefore in this way they can severely limit application of baseline signals in SHM systems. Various techniques are proposed in the paper to solve this problem. New method based on an interpretation of multiple signals acquired in distinct points of the structure is introduced and compared with other widely used approaches. Data fusion is used to merge a number of methods into one with a substantially increased efficiency.

  9. Accurate variational calculations of the ground 2Po(1s22s22p) and excited 2S(1s22s2p2) and 2Po(1s22s23p) states of singly ionized carbon atom.

    PubMed

    Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2011-12-01

    In this article we report accurate nonrelativistic variational calculations of the ground and two excited states of C(+) ion. We employ extended and well optimized basis sets of all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussians to represent the wave functions of the states. The optimization of the basis functions is performed with a procedure employing the analytic gradient of the energy with respect to the nonlinear parameters of the Gaussians. The calculations explicitly include the effects due to the finite nuclear mass. The calculated transition energies between the three states are compared to the experimentally derived values. Finally, we present expectation values of some small positive and negative powers of the interparticle distances and contact densities. PMID:22149776

  10. Explanation of the Normal Winter Anomaly from the Seasonal Variation of Short Wave Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velinov, P. J.; Smirnova, N. V.; Vlaskov, V. A.

    1984-01-01

    The frequency dependence of the winter anomaly (WA) of radio wave absorption indicates the altitude range where the considered seasonal variation of absorption, L, takes place: 75-95 km. In this height region considerable seasonal variations of ionic composition and effective recombination coefficient, alpha sub e, exist, which can cause seasonal variations of electron concentration, N, and absorption, L. An attempt to render a qualitative estimation of the normal WA, i.e., the increased ratio of winter over summer absorption, L sub w/L sub s, at medium latitudes 40 deg and 50 deg, for solar zenith angles CHi = 60 deg and 75 deg is made. This is compared with existing experimental data.

  11. Laboratory coda wave interferometry for the monitoring of rock property variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittbuhl, Jean; Chaintreuil, Marie; Lengliné, Olivier; Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Mike; Baud, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    A significant effort is on-going in the community to continuously monitor deep geothermal reservoirs using ambient seismic noise tomography (e.g. Calo et al, 2013; Lehujeur et al, 2015). It is a method that determines the Green's function between a pair of receivers by correlating sufficiently long seismic noise records. Very small changes of the medium are accessible using this new monitoring technique (significantly smaller than those deduced from direct arrivals). In particular, very small variations of seismic velocities are shown to appear both in time and space during the stimulation of the reservoir. A central question is how to interpret these transient or lateral variations of the seismic velocities for a precise 4D tomography of the reservoir properties. In this study, we address the direct problem of monitoring small variations in seismic velocities when small variations in stress or temperature are slowly applied to the sample. We use a network of piezo-electric sensors on laboratory samples (sandstone and granite from Soultz-sous-Forêts core samples) to perform coda wave interferometry from the multiple scattering of well-controlled seismic pulses (Grêt et al, 2006). The data collected are estimates of the relative variation of travel time. We combine acoustic measurements and strain gauges to differentiate between travel time variations due to seismic velocity changes and those due to deformation effects. We expect this approach to provide useful information for large scale seismic tomography despite the significant difference of considered wavelengths.

  12. A new global model for P wave speed variations in Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chang; van der Hilst, Robert D.; Engdahl, E. Robert; Burdick, Scott

    2008-05-01

    We document our tomographic method and present a new global model of three-dimensional (3-D) variations in mantle P wave velocity. The model is parameterized by means of rectangular cells in latitude, longitude, and radius, the size of which adapts to sampling density by short-period (1 Hz) data. The largest single data source is ISC/NEIC data reprocessed by Engdahl and coworkers, from which we use routinely picked, short-period P, Pg, Pn, pP, and pwP data (for earthquakes during the period 1964˜2007). To improve the resolution in the lowermost and uppermost mantle, we use differential times of core phases (PKPAB - PKPDF, PKPAB - PKPBC, Pdiff - PKPDF) and surface-reflected waves (PP-P). The low-frequency differential times (Pdiff, PP) are measured by waveform cross correlation. Approximate 3-D finite frequency kernels are used to integrate the long-period data (Pdiff, PP) and short-period (P, pP, PKP) data. This global data set is augmented with data from regional catalogs and temporary seismic arrays. A crust correction is implemented to mitigate crustal smearing into the upper mantle. We invert the data for 3-D variations in P wave speed and effects of hypocenter mislocation subject to norm and gradient regularization. Spatial resolution is ˜100 km in the best sampled upper mantle regions. Our model, which is available online and which will be updated periodically, reveals in unprecedented detail the rich variation in style of subduction of lithospheric slabs into the mantle. The images confirm the structural complexity of downwellings in the transition zone discussed in previous papers and show with more clarity the structure of slab fragments stagnant in the transition zone beneath east Asia. They also reveal low wave speed beneath major hot spots, such as Iceland, Afar, and Hawaii, but details of these structures are not well resolved by the data used.

  13. Can the Tibetan Plateau snow cover influence the interannual variations of Eurasian heat wave frequency?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiwei; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Hua; Li, Yun

    2016-06-01

    The Eurasian continent has experienced significant year-to-year variations of summer heat waves during the past decades. Several possible factors, such as ocean temperature, soil moisture, and changes in land use and greenhouse gases, have been identified in previous studies, but the mechanisms are still unclear. In this study, it is found that the Tibetan Plateau snow cover (TPSC) is closely linked to the interannual variations of summer heat waves over Eurasia. The TPSC variability explains more than 30 % of the total variances of heat wave variability in the southern Europe and northeastern Asia (SENA) region. A set of numerical experiments reveal that the reduced TPSC may induce a distinct teleconnection pattern across the Eurasian continent, with two anomalous high pressure centers in the upper troposphere over the SENA region, which may lead to a reduction of the cloud formation near the surface. The less cloud cover tends to increase the net shortwave radiation and favor a stronger surface sensible heat flux in the dry surface condition over the SENA region, resulting in a deeper, warmer and drier atmospheric boundary layer that would further inhibit the local cloud formation. Such a positive land-atmosphere feedback may dry the surface even further, heat the near-surface atmosphere and thereby intensify the local heat waves. The above dynamical processes also operate on interdecadal time scales. Given the reduction of the TPSC could become more pronounced with increasing levels of greenhouse gases in a warming climate, we infer that the TPSC may play an increasingly important role in shaping the summer heat waves over the SENA region in next decades.

  14. Studies on gravity waves momentum flux variations in different seasons using MST radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    I, V.; Y-H, C.; v, S.; D, N.; S, V.

    2006-12-01

    MST radars are the best tools to study the high frequency gravity waves and its associated momentum fluxes because of excellent temporal and spatial resolutions. The upward propagating gravity waves transport energy and momentum in different regions of the atmosphere along with their propagation to produce effects at upper heights. The estimation of the vertical flux of horizontal momentum in the troposphere and lower stratosphere involves two methods, using three beams V one vertical and two oblique, and using four beams V two pairs of oblique beams systematically offset from the vertical. The rapid steerability of the Indian MST radar allows to make three and four beam measurements simultaneously. The objective of this study is to examine the variations of zonal and meridional momentum fluxes with height, variation of momentum fluxes with wave periods and body forces. We choose frequency bands corresponding to periods of 30 min-2h, 2-8 h, and 2-16h. Vertical profiles of the zonal and meridional flux in each frequency band were found to be consistent, in general, with the total flux. The study also compares momentum fluxes computed with three and four beam methods. Zonal fluxes were small at lower levels and increasingly negative (westward) at higher heights. The dominant contributions to the meridional flux occur in the lower-frequency band. The large vertical momentum flux values observed around the 16 km altitude on most of the observations are due to the presence of large zonal wind shears at that altitude. Due to their persistent southward direction of propagation the meridional momentum flux during winter and summer shows southward direction of propagation and long period waves make contributions to the momentum flux in the lower stratosphere which is comparable to that of short period waves. The detailed discussion will be presented in the meeting.

  15. Pulse Oximetry Wave Variation as a Noninvasive Tool to Assess Volume Status in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Glauco A; Silva, Eliezer; Gonçalves, Anderson Roman; Filho, Milton Caldeira; Poli-de-Figueiredo, Luíz F

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare variations of plethysmographic wave amplitude (ΔPpleth) and to determine the percent difference between inspiratory and expiratory pulse pressure (ΔPp) cutoff values for volume responsiveness in a homogenous population of postoperative cardiac surgery patients. INTRODUCTION: Intra-thoracic pressure variations interfere with stroke volume variation. Pulse pressure variations through arterial lines during mechanical ventilation have been recommended for the estimation of fluid responsiveness. Pulse oximetry may offer a non-invasive plethysmographic method to evaluate pulse pressure; this may be useful for guiding fluid replacement. METHODS: Controlled, prospective study in cardiac surgery patients under controlled ventilation. Simultaneous digital recordings of arterial pressure and plethysmographic waves were performed. ΔPp, systolic pressure (ΔPs), ΔPpleth, and systolic component (ΔSpleth) were calculated. A ΔPp ≥ 13% identified fluid-responsive patients. Volume expansion was performed in responsive subjects. Systolic and amplitude components of pressure and plethysmographic waves were compared. RESULTS: In 50 measurements from 43 patients, ΔPp was correlated with (Ppleth (r=0.90, p<0.001), (Ps (r=0.90, p<0.001), and (Spleth (r=0.73, p<0.001). An aArea under ROC curve (AUC) identified the fluid responsiveness thresholds: (Ppleth of 11% (AUC = 0.95±0.04), (Ps of 8% (AUC=0.93±0.05), and (Spleth of 32% (AUC=0.82±0.07). A (Ppleth value ≥ 11% predicted (Pp ≥ 13% with 100% specificity and 91% sensitivity. Volume expansion, performed in 20 patients, changed (Pp, (Ppleth, (Ps and (Spleth significantly (p<0.008). CONCLUSIONS: ΔPpleth is well correlated with ΔPp and constitutes a simple and non-invasive method for assessing fluid responsiveness in patients following cardiac surgery. PMID:19488592

  16. Accurate relativistic adapted Gaussian basis sets for francium through Ununoctium without variational prolapse and to be used with both uniform sphere and Gaussian nucleus models.

    PubMed

    Teodoro, Tiago Quevedo; Haiduke, Roberto Luiz Andrade

    2013-10-15

    Accurate relativistic adapted Gaussian basis sets (RAGBSs) for 87 Fr up to 118 Uuo atoms without variational prolapse were developed here with the use of a polynomial version of the Generator Coordinate Dirac-Fock method. Two finite nuclear models have been used, the Gaussian and uniform sphere models. The largest RAGBS error, with respect to numerical Dirac-Fock results, is 15.4 miliHartree for Ununoctium with a basis set size of 33s30p19d14f functions. PMID:23913741

  17. Differential shear wave attenuation and its lateral variation in the North Atlantic region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheehan, Anne F.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1992-01-01

    A digital data base of over 150 seismograms and a spectral radio technique are used to measure SS-S differential attenuation in the North Atlantic region. Differential attenuation is positively correlated with SS-S travel time residual, and both differential attentuation and travel time residual decrease with increasing seafloor age. Models are developed for seismic Q in which lateral variations include contributions from the asthenospheric low-Q zone as well as from lithospheric cooling. The Q models obtained under this assumption are in good agreement with those obtained from surface wave studies and are therefore preferred over those models with lateral variations confined to the upper 125 km. Systematic long-wavelength (1000-7000 km) variations in differential attenuation, corrected for seafloor age, are evident along the axis of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. These variations can be qualitatively correlated with long-wavelength variations in SS-S differential travel time residuals and are attributed to along-axis differences in upper mantle temperature.

  18. Effects of temperature variations on guided waves propagating in composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoja, Siavash; Berbyuk, Viktor; Boström, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Effects of temperature on guided waves propagating in composite materials is a well-known problem which has been investigated in many studies. The majority of the studies is focused on effects of high temperature. Understanding the effects of low temperature has major importance in composite structures and components which are operating in cold climate conditions such as e.g. wind turbines operating in cold climate regions. In this study first the effects of temperature variations on guided waves propagating in a composite plate is investigated experimentally in a cold climate chamber. The material is a common material used to manufacture rotor blades of wind turbines. The temperature range is 25°C to -25°C and effects of temperature variations on amplitude and phase shift of the received signal are investigated. In order to apply the effects of lowering the temperature on the received signal, the Baseline Signal Stretch (BSS) method is modified and used. The modification is based on decomposing the signal into symmetric and asymmetric modes and applying two different stretch factors on each of them. Finally the results obtained based on the new method is compared with the results of application of BSS with one stretch factor and experimental measurements. Comparisons show that an improvement is obtained using the BSS with the mode decomposition method at temperature variations of more than 25°C.

  19. Theory on excitations of drift Alfvén waves by energetic particles. I. Variational formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zonca, Fulvio; Chen, Liu

    2014-07-15

    A unified theoretical framework is presented for analyzing various branches of drift Alfvén waves and describing their linear and nonlinear behaviors, covering a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Nonlinear gyrokinetic quasineutrality condition and vorticity equation, derived for drift Alfvén waves excited by energetic particles in fusion plasmas, are cast in integral form, which is generally variational in the linear limit; and the corresponding gyrokinetic energy principle is obtained. Well known forms of the kinetic energy principle are readily recovered from this general formulation. Furthermore, it is possible to demonstrate that the general fishbone like dispersion relation, obtained within the present theoretical framework, provides a unified description of drift Alfvén waves excited by energetic particles as either Alfvén eigenmodes or energetic particle modes. The advantage of the present approach stands in its capability of extracting underlying linear and nonlinear physics as well as spatial and temporal scales of the considered fluctuation spectrum. For these reasons, this unified theoretical framework can help understanding experimental observations as well as numerical simulation and analytic results with different levels of approximation. Examples and applications are given in Paper II [F. Zonca and L. Chen, “Theory on excitations of drift Alfvén waves by energetic particles. II. The general fishbone-like dispersion relation,” Phys. Plasmas 21, 072121 (2014)].

  20. Spatiotemporal current variation of coastal-trapped waves west of the Noto Peninsula measured by using fishing boats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukudome, Ken-ichi; Igeta, Yosuke; Senjyu, Tomoharu; Okei, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Tatsuro

    2016-03-01

    Spatiotemporal current variations of coastal-trapped waves (CTWs) were investigated by using a current dataset obtained from daily fishing operations west of the Noto Peninsula (NTP), Japan. Cross-shore lines located in southern, middle, and northern parts of the west coast of the NTP were designed to detect characteristics of CTWs with a time interval of a few days and about 5-km resolution in the cross-shore direction. Accuracy validation by using moored current meter data and sea level data demonstrated that the established dataset expresses accurate variations with periods of several days. The generation and propagation of a CTW event associated with a low-pressure zone passing north of the study area in late May 2010 were analyzed. Along-shore currents with the coast on the right strengthened in every line simultaneously with the domination of the southerly wind, and then weakened in order from south to north simultaneously with weakening of the southerly wind. Although the along-shore currents of the CTWs linearly decreased heading offshore along the south and middle lines, these currents broadened within about 50 km from the coast along the north line, with small variations in the cross-shelf direction, with an increase in shelf width. These generation, propagation and current structure characteristics are clarified and interpreted by the characteristics of the estimated possible CTWs west of the NTP and numerical experiments, which reproduce wind-induced freely propagating CTWs. A change in the propagation characteristics and the structure of the CTWs associated with bottom topography indicates the possibility that adjustments can occur on the order of a few dozen kilometers.

  1. Overhauser Magnetometers Development and Some Magnetic Field Variation and Long-wave Seismic Synchronous Registration Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusonsky, O.; Sapunov, V.; Denisova, O.

    Creation experience and advantages of the cyclic Overhauser magnetometers with double polarization by magnetostatic and high-frequency magnetic fields (DC-HF OVH magnetometers) are discussed for some geophysical tasks. In particular, DC- HF OVH method provides: · The high sensitivity (0.01-0.05nT) is achievable even for the bottom geomagnetic field range (10000-40000nT), is due to the simple ESR-structure of the radical in bias DC field, and that is especially useful for applications in equatorial conditions an d space. · The record gradient tolerance (up to 40000 nT/m) useful for borehole applications is reached, that is caused by an opportunity of adaptive reduction of the proton precession signal time registration. · The high-sensitivity registration of magnetic field variations up to 0.001 nT at rate about 10 seconds and high stability (0.05 nT/year), and absolute (up to 0.1 nT) measurements are possible that is useful at ground seismic researches. Addressing this last advantage of DC-HF OVH magnetometer, the magnetic field variation and long-wave seismic synchronous investigations at the Ural magnetic observatory ARTY has been made. Magnetometer POS-1 and digital seismic station IRIS/IDA recording elastic fluctuation from 0,1 up to 1000 sec and more duration were used. The observable correlation of elastic waves and geomagnetic variations, and also superlong-wave emission can testify that the Earth crust has high strain -sensing characteristics where supervision was carried out. The latter is peculiar to lithospher ic areas at astable condition near to a destruction barrier.

  2. Accurate Analysis and Characterization of Silicon Field Effect Transistor-Based Terahertz Wave Detector with Quasi-Plasma Two-Dimensional Electron Gas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwan Sung; Ryu, Min Woo; Lee, Jeong Seop; Kim, Kyung Rok

    2016-05-01

    We report the nonresonant plasmonic terahertz (THz) wave detector based on the silicon (Si) field effect transistor (FET) with a technology computer-aided design (TCAD) platform. The plasma wave behavior has been modeled by a quasi-plasma electron box as a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the channel of the FET. The incoming alternating current (AC) signal as the THz wave radiation can induce the direct-current (DC) voltage difference between the source and drain, which is called the photoresponse. For accurate analysis of the modulation and propagation of the channel electron density as the plasma wave, we have characterized the quasi-plasma 2DEG model with two key parameters, such as quasi-plasma 2DEG length (I(QP)) and density (N(QP)). By using our normalization method, I(QP) and N(QP) is defined exactly as extracting the average point of the electron density. We also investigate the performance enhancement of the plasmonic terahertz wave detector based on Si FET by scaling down the gate oxide thickness (t(ox)), which is a significant parameter of FET-based plasmonic terahertz detector for the channel electron density modulation. According to scaling down t(ox), the responsivity (R(v)) and noise equivalent power (NEP), which are the important performance metrics of the THz wave detector, have been enhanced. The proposed methodologies will provide the advanced physical analysis and structural design platform for developing the plasmonic terahertz detectors operating in nonresonant regime. PMID:27483817

  3. A Variational Formulation for the Finite Element Analysis of Sound Wave Propagation in a Spherical Shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebiedzik, Catherine

    1995-01-01

    Development of design tools to furnish optimal acoustic environments for lightweight aircraft demands the ability to simulate the acoustic system on a workstation. In order to form an effective mathematical model of the phenomena at hand, we have begun by studying the propagation of acoustic waves inside closed spherical shells. Using a fully-coupled fluid-structure interaction model based upon variational principles, we have written a finite element analysis program and are in the process of examining several test cases. Future investigations are planned to increase model accuracy by incorporating non-linear and viscous effects.

  4. Variation of shear and compressional wave modulus upon saturation for pure pre-compacted sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuiyan, M. H.; Holt, R. M.

    2016-04-01

    Gassmann's fluid substitution theory is commonly used to predict seismic velocity change upon change in saturation, and is hence essential for 4D seismic and AVO studies. This paper addresses the basics assumptions of the Gassmann theory, in order to see how well they are fulfilled in controlled laboratory experiments. Our focus is to investigate the sensitivity of shear modulus to fluid saturation, and the predictability of Gassmann's fluid substitution theory for P-wave modulus. Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities in dry and saturated (3.5wt% NaCl) unconsolidated clean sands (Ottawa and Columbia) were measured in an oedometer test system (uniaxial strain conditions) over a range of 0.5 MPa to 10 MPa external vertical stress. This study shows shear modulus hardening upon brine saturation, which is consistent with previous data found in the literature. Analysis of the data shows that most of the hardening of the ultrasonic shear modulus may be explained by Biot dispersion. Isotropic Gassmann's fluid substitution is found to underestimate the P-wave modulus upon fluid saturation. However, adding the Biot dispersion effect improves the prediction. More work is required to obtain good measurements of parameters influencing dispersion, such as tortuosity, which is very ambiguous and challenging to measure accurately.

  5. Variation of shear and compressional wave modulus upon saturation for pure pre-compacted sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuiyan, M. H.; Holt, R. M.

    2016-07-01

    Gassmann's fluid substitution theory is commonly used to predict seismic velocity change upon change in saturation, and is hence essential for 4-D seismic and AVO studies. This paper addresses the basics assumptions of the Gassmann theory, in order to see how well they are fulfilled in controlled laboratory experiments. Our focus is to investigate the sensitivity of shear modulus to fluid saturation, and the predictability of Gassmann's fluid substitution theory for P-wave modulus. Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities in dry and saturated (3.5 wt per cent NaCl) unconsolidated clean sands (Ottawa and Columbia) were measured in an oedometer test system (uniaxial strain conditions) over a range of 0.5-10 MPa external vertical stress. This study shows shear modulus hardening upon brine saturation, which is consistent with previous data found in the literature. Analysis of the data shows that most of the hardening of the ultrasonic shear modulus may be explained by Biot dispersion. Isotropic Gassmann's fluid substitution is found to underestimate the P-wave modulus upon fluid saturation. However, adding the Biot dispersion effect improves the prediction. More work is required to obtain good measurements of parameters influencing dispersion, such as tortuosity, which is very ambiguous and challenging to measure accurately.

  6. Accurate all-electron G0W0 quasiparticle energies employing the full-potential augmented plane-wave method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabok, Dmitrii; Gulans, Andris; Draxl, Claudia

    2016-07-01

    The G W approach of many-body perturbation theory has become a common tool for calculating the electronic structure of materials. However, with increasing number of published results, discrepancies between the values obtained by different methods and codes become more and more apparent. For a test set of small- and wide-gap semiconductors, we demonstrate how to reach the numerically best electronic structure within the framework of the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FLAPW) method. We first evaluate the impact of local orbitals in the Kohn-Sham eigenvalue spectrum of the underlying starting point. The role of the basis-set quality is then further analyzed when calculating the G0W0 quasiparticle energies. Our results, computed with the exciting code, are compared to those obtained using the projector-augmented plane-wave formalism, finding overall good agreement between both methods. We also provide data produced with a typical FLAPW basis set as a benchmark for other G0W0 implementations.

  7. Diurnal Variation in Gravity Wave Activity at Low and Middle Latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrioli, V. F.; Fritts, D. C.; Batista, P. P.; Clemesha, B. R.; Janches, Diego

    2013-01-01

    We employ a modified composite day extension of the Hocking (2005) analysis method to study gravity wave (GW) activity in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere using 4 meteor radars spanning latitudes from 7deg S to 53.6deg S. Diurnal and semidiurnal modulations were observed in GW variances over all sites. Semidiurnal modulation with downward phase propagation was observed at lower latitudes mainly near the equinoxes. Diurnal modulations occur mainly near solstice and, except for the zonal component at Cariri (7deg S), do not exhibit downward phase propagation. At a higher latitude (SAAMER, 53.6deg S) these modulations are only observed in the meridional component where we can observe diurnal variation from March to May, and semidiurnal, during January, February, October (above 88 km) and November. Some of these modulations with downward phase progression correlate well with wind shear. When the wind shear is well correlated with the maximum of the variances the diurnal tide has its largest amplitudes, i.e., near equinox. Correlations exhibiting variations with tidal phases suggest significant GW-tidal interactions that have different characters depending on the tidal components and possible mean wind shears. Modulations that do not exhibit phase variations could be indicative of diurnal variations in GW sources.

  8. Relativistic blast-wave model for the rapid flux variations of AO 0235+164 and other compact radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.

    1978-01-01

    A relativistic blast-wave version of a signal-screen model is developed which can adequately explain the details of the flux-density and structural variations of compact extragalactic radio sources. The relativistic motion implied by flux variations is analyzed with respect to the synchrotron spectrum of the BL Lac object AO 0235+164 observed during outbursts, and a signal-screen model for rapidly expanding shells produced by ultrarelativistic blast waves is examined. The approximate observed structure of the blast wave at three stages in its evolution is illustrated, each stage is described, and the model is applied to the flux density outburst in AO 0235+164 observed in late 1975. The results show that a relativistic blast-wave model can in general reproduce the main features of the observed flux variations in compact sources. Some problems with the proposed model are briefly discussed.

  9. One dimensional P wave velocity structure of the crust beneath west Java and accurate hypocentre locations from local earthquake inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Supardiyono; Santosa, Bagus Jaya

    2012-06-20

    A one-dimensional (1-D) velocity model and station corrections for the West Java zone were computed by inverting P-wave arrival times recorded on a local seismic network of 14 stations. A total of 61 local events with a minimum of 6 P-phases, rms 0.56 s and a maximum gap of 299 Degree-Sign were selected. Comparison with previous earthquake locations shows an improvement for the relocated earthquakes. Tests were carried out to verify the robustness of inversion results in order to corroborate the conclusions drawn out from our reasearch. The obtained minimum 1-D velocity model can be used to improve routine earthquake locations and represents a further step toward more detailed seismotectonic studies in this area of West Java.

  10. The effects of nonadiabatic dust charge variation and ultraviolet irradiation on the modulational instability of dust ion acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yunliang; Guo Chunxia; Ni Xiaodong; Qian Ping; Shen Jiang; Jiang Xiangqian; Zhou Zhongxiang

    2010-11-15

    The effects of nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation on the nonlinear propagation of the dust ion acoustic (DIA) waves in the dusty plasma with positively charged dust grains have been investigated. By using the reductive perturbation technique, a three-dimensional modified nonlinear Schroedinger equation (mNLSE) governing the nonlinear envelope DIA waves was derived and the approximate solitary wave solution of the mNLSE was also obtained in the weak effect of nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation limit, which shows that the amplitude of the DIA solitary wave exponentially decreases with time due to the collisionless dissipation caused by the nonadiabatic dust charge variation. The frequency, instability growth rate, and the critical modulational wave number of the small amplitude modulation are all dependent on photoelectron generated by ultraviolet irradiation and time due to the presence of nonadiabatic dust charge variation. The transverse perturbation plays an important role in the modulational instability region.

  11. Global and seasonal variations in three-dimensional gravity wave momentum flux from satellite limb-sounding temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M. Joan

    2015-08-01

    Satellite limb-sounding methods provide the best global temperature data available for simultaneous measurement of gravity wave horizontal and vertical structures needed to estimate momentum flux and constrain wave effects on general circulation. Gravity waves vary in the three spatial dimensions and time, so the ideal measurement observes all three dimensions at high resolution nearly simultaneously. High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) measurements give near-simultaneous profiles in close proximity and at high vertical resolution, but these coincident profiles lie only along the plane of the measurement track. Here we combine HIRDLS and radio occultation data sets to obtain three-dimensional properties of gravity waves on a global scale as well as seasonal variations. The results show dramatic changes from previous estimates using either data set alone. Changes include much larger momentum fluxes and latitudinal variations in propagation direction that support an enhanced role for gravity wave forcing of middle atmosphere circulation.

  12. A physical model study of converted wave amplitude variation in a reservoir of systematically aligned vertical fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Sun, L.; Lin, C.; Chang, Y.; Tseng, P.

    2013-12-01

    The existence of fractures not only provides spaces for the residence of oils and gases reside, but it also creates pathways for migration. Characterizing a fractured reservoir thus becomes an important subject and has been widely studied by exploration geophysicists and drilling engineers. In seismic anisotropy, a reservoir of systematically aligned vertical fractures (SAVF) is often treated as a transversely isotropic medium (TIM) with a horizontal axis of symmetry (HTI). Subjecting to HTI, physical properties vary in azimuth. P-wave reflection amplitude, which is susceptible to vary in azimuth, is one of the most popular seismic attributes which is widely used to delineate the fracture strike of an SAVF reservoir. Instead of going further on analyzing P-wave signatures, in this study, we focused on evaluating the feasibility of orienting the fracture strike of an SAVF reservoir using converted (C-) wave amplitude. For a C-wave is initiated by a downward traveling P-wave that is converted on reflection to an upcoming S-wave; the behaviors of both P- and S-waves should be theoretically woven in a C-wave. In our laboratory work, finite offset reflection experiments were carried out on the azimuthal plane of a HTI model at two different offset intervals. To demonstrate the azimuthal variation of C-wave amplitude in a HTI model, reflections were acquired along the principal symmetry directions and the diagonal direction of the HTI model. Inheriting from phenomenon of S-wave splitting in a transversely isotropic medium (TIM), P-waves get converted into both the fast (S1) and slow (S2) shear modes at all azimuths outside the vertical symmetry planes, thus producing split PS-waves (PS1 and PS2). In our laboratory data, the converted PS1- (C1-) wave were observed and identified. As the azimuth varies from the strike direction to the strike normal, C1-wave amplitude exhibits itself in a way of weakening and can be view from the common-reflection-point (CRP) gathers

  13. Band-gap Variation of "Semi-metallic" Zig-Zag Carbon Nanotubes under Uniaxial Strain: Accurate Ab-initio Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Guang-Yu; Chu, K. C.; Liu, Lei; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, Shi-Yu

    2003-03-01

    We have calculated the electronic properties of "semi-metallic" zigzag carbon nanotubes as a function of uniaxial strain using highly accurate all-electron projector augmented-wave (PAW) method. The calculated band gaps for unstrained nanotubes are in good agreement with available STM experimental results [1]. It is found that with increasing elongation, the band gap of all the "semi-metallic" nanotubes initially decreases linearly, then vanishes at a small strain, and then increases linearly for relatively small strains. The strain characterizing the semiconductor to metal transition is found to be inversely proportional to the square of the diameter of the nanotube. The calculated transition strain values are all within 1 thus easily verifiable experimentally. Analytic relations among band gaps, diameters, and strains of zig-zag nanotubes extracted from our accurate calculations will be reported. Acknowledgements: The work is supported by National Science Council of Taiwan (NSC 91-2112-M-002-054) as well as NSF (DMR-0112824) and DOE (DEFG02-00ER45832). [1] M. Ouyang, J.-L. Huang, C.L. Cheung, and C.M. Lieber, Science 292, 702 (2001).

  14. Understanding the variation in the millimeter-wave emission of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahd, Antoine K.; Steffes, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    Recent observations of the millimeter-wave emission from Venus at 112 GHz (2.6 mm) have shown significant variations in the continuum flux emission that may be attributed to the variability in the abundances of absorbing constituents in the Venus atmosphere. Such constituents include gaseous H2SO4, SO2, and liquid sulfuric acid (cloud condensates). Recently, Fahd and Steffes have shown that the effects of liquid H, SO4, and gaseous SO2 cannot completely account for this measured variability in the millimeter-wave emission of Venus. Thus, it is necessary to study the effect of gaseous H2SO4 on the millimeter-wave emission of Venus. This requires knowledge of the millimeter-wavelength (MMW) opacity of gaseous H2SO4, which unfortunately has never been determined for Venus-like conditions. We have measured the opacity of gaseous H2SO4 in a CO2 atmosphere at 550, 570, and 590 K, at 1 and 2 atm total pressure, and at a frequency of 94.1 GHz. Our results, in addition to previous centimeter-wavelength results are used to verify a modeling formalism for calculating the expected opacity of this gaseous mixture at other frequencies. This formalism is incorporated into a radiative transfer model to study the effect of gaseous H2SO4 on the MMW emission of Venus.

  15. Two-component density functional theory within the projector augmented-wave approach: Accurate and self-consistent computations of positron lifetimes and momentum distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiktor, Julia; Jomard, Gérald; Torrent, Marc

    2015-09-01

    Many techniques have been developed in the past in order to compute positron lifetimes in materials from first principles. However, there is still a lack of a fast and accurate self-consistent scheme that could handle accurately the forces acting on the ions induced by the presence of the positron. We will show in this paper that we have reached this goal by developing the two-component density functional theory within the projector augmented-wave (PAW) method in the open-source code abinit. This tool offers the accuracy of the all-electron methods with the computational efficiency of the plane-wave ones. We can thus deal with supercells that contain few hundreds to thousands of atoms to study point defects as well as more extended defects clusters. Moreover, using the PAW basis set allows us to use techniques able to, for instance, treat strongly correlated systems or spin-orbit coupling, which are necessary to study heavy elements, such as the actinides or their compounds.

  16. Spatial variation of Lg-wave attenuation in the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega, Raquel; Ugalde, Arantza; Villaseñor, Antonio; José Jurado, María

    2014-05-01

    Within a global context, the Iberian Peninsula is a region where low to moderate (Mw < 5.5) earthquakes occur, most of them at shallow depths (h < 40 km). Seismicity concentrates mainly around the Pyrenean Range, the northwestern part of the peninsula, and the southern deformation zone that includes the Betics, the Alborán Sea and the Gulf of Cádiz. In recent years, considerable improvements in seismic data quality and geographic coverage have been made by the deployment of new permanent and portable broadband seismic stations in the Iberian Peninsula. The dense accumulation of seismic data has allowed us to investigate lateral variation of crustal seismic attenuation to develop the first regional 2D Lg-wave attenuation model for the entire Iberian Peninsula and its frequency dependence. Seismic data used consist of 71 events with magnitudes 3 ≤ mbLg ≤ 5.4 focal depths less than 30 km and epicentral distances from 100 to 1000 km which were recorded by 343 seismic stations between January 2008 and October 2013. To avoid confusion with fundamental-mode Love-wave energy on the transverse components, we only analyzed vertical component recordings. Among all the methods proposed to measure Lg attenuation, we considered the reliable Two-Station Method that allows removing the common source term by taking the ratio of Lg amplitudes recorded at two different stations along the same great-circle path from the same event. It requires, however, strict source-station configuration and dense event and station coverage. The spectral ratios collected over high-quality interstation paths were used to determine 1 Hz Lg Q (Q0) and its frequency dependence η. Then, the lateral variations of the attenuation parameters were mapped using inversion. Lg-wave propagation was found to be inefficient or blocked for most of the paths crossing the Mediterranean Sea, the western Alborán Sea and the Strait of Gibraltar. Our results reflect large variations in Q0 values across the Iberian

  17. Seismicity, Vp/Vs and shear wave anisotropy variations during the 2011 unrest at Santorini caldera, southern Aegean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinou, K. I.; Evangelidis, C. P.; Liang, W.-T.; Melis, N. S.; Kalogeras, I.

    2013-11-01

    The Santorini caldera has been the focus of several large explosive eruptions in the past, the last of which occurred in the early 1950s. The volcano was dormant until early 2011 when increasing number of earthquakes accompanied significant intra-caldera uplift. This seismic activity was recorded by 8 temporary as well as 19 permanent seismic stations that were installed on Santorini and nearby islands after the onset of the unrest. Using data from January 2011 until June 2012 we calculated accurate relative locations for 490 events utilizing both catalog and waveform cross-correlation differential travel times of P- and S-phases. The distribution of relocated events exhibits a large cluster between Thera and Nea Kameni islands along the caldera rim, suggesting the activation of a preexisting ring fault. All hypocenters are located between 5 and 11 km resulting in a sharp cutoff of seismicity above and below these depths. We also used P and S travel times in order to calculate average Vp/Vs ratios and estimated shear wave splitting parameters (fast direction φ, delay time δt) for events within the shear wave window. The Vp/Vs ratios at several stations exhibit a majority of values consistently below the regional one (~ 1.77). Their temporal variations can be explained as periods of gas influx and depletion in the upper crust beneath the caldera. A comparison of δt for a number of earthquake doublets shows a progressive decrease of delay times towards the end of the unrest probably as a result of cracks closing owing to stress relaxation. The seismological observations presented here are compatible with petrological models that suggest the existence of a deep (11-14 km) dacitic magma reservoir and a shallower (< 5 km) rhyolitic magma chamber.

  18. ACCURATE TIME-DEPENDENT WAVE PACKET STUDY OF THE H{sup +}+LiH REACTION AT EARLY UNIVERSE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Aslan, E.; Bulut, N.; Castillo, J. F.; Banares, L.; Aoiz, F. J.; Roncero, O.

    2012-11-01

    The dynamics and kinetics of the H{sup +} + LiH reaction have been studied using a quantum reactive time-dependent wave packet (TDWP) coupled-channel quantum mechanical method on an ab initio potential energy surface at conditions of the early universe. The total reaction probabilities for the H{sup +} + LiH(v = 0, j = 0) {yields} H{sup +} {sub 2} + Li process have been calculated from 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} eV up to 1 eV for total angular momenta J from 0 to 110. Using a Langevin model, integral cross sections have been calculated in that range of collision energies and extrapolated for energies below 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} eV. The calculated rate constants are found to be nearly independent of temperature in the 10-1000 K interval with a value of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -9} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}, which is in good agreement with estimates used in evolutionary models of the early universe lithium chemistry.

  19. Variation of Fundamental Mode Surface Wave Group Velocity Dispersion in Iran and the Surrounding Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rham, D. J.; Preistley, K.; Tatar, M.; Paul, A.

    2006-12-01

    We present group velocity dispersion results from a study of regional fundamental mode Rayleigh and Love waves propagating across Iran and the surrounding region. Data for these measurements comes from field deployments within Iran by the University of Cambridge (GBR) and the Universite Joseph-Fourier (FRA) in conjunction with International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (Iran), in addition to data from IRIS and Geofone. 1D path- averaged dispersion measurements have been made for ~5500 source-receiver paths using multiple filter analysis. We combine these observations in a tomographic inversion to produce group velocity images between 10 and 60 s period. Because of the dense path coverage, these images have substantially higher lateral resolution for this region than is currently available from global and regional group velocity studies. We observe variations in short-period wave group velocity which is consistent with the surface geology. Low group velocities (2.00-2.55 km/s) at short periods (10-20 s), for both Rayleigh and Love waves are observed beneath thick sedimentary deposits; The south Caspian Basin, Black Sea, the eastern Mediterranean, the Persian Gulf, the Makran, the southern Turan shield, and the Indus and Gangetic basins. Somewhat higher group velocity (2.80-3.15 km/s for Rayleigh, and 3.00-3.40 km/s for Love) at these periods occur in sediment poor regions, such as; the Turkish-Iranian plateau, the Arabian shield, and Kazakhstan. At intermediate periods (30-40 s) group velocities over most of the region are low (2.65-3.20 km/s for Rayleigh, and 2.80-3.45 km/s for love) compared to Arabia (3.40-3.70 km/s Rayleigh, 3.50-4.0 km/s Love). At longer periods (50-60 s) Love wave group velocities remain low (3.25-3.70 km/s) over most of Iran, but there are even lower velocities (2.80-3.00 km/s) still associated with the thick sediments of the south Caspian basin, the surrounding shield areas have much higher group velocities (3

  20. Depth variations of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy beneath Mainland China.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Zhao, Dapeng; Xu, Jiandong; Zhou, Bengang; Shi, Yaolin

    2016-01-01

    A high-resolution model of P-wave anisotropic tomography beneath Mainland China and surrounding regions is determined using a large number of arrival-time data recorded by the China seismic network, the International Seismological Centre (ISC) and temporary seismic arrays deployed on the Tibetan Plateau. Our results provide important new insights into the subducted Indian plate and mantle dynamics in East Asia. Our tomographic images show that the northern limit of the subducting Indian plate has reached the Jinsha River suture in eastern Tibet. A striking variation of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy is revealed in the Indian lithosphere: the fast velocity direction (FVD) is NE-SW beneath the Indian continent, whereas the FVD is arc parallel beneath the Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau, which may reflect re-orientation of minerals due to lithospheric extension, in response to the India-Eurasia collision. There are multiple anisotropic layers with variable FVDs in some parts of the Tibetan Plateau, which may be the cause of the dominant null splitting measurements in these regions. A circular pattern of FVDs is revealed around the Philippine Sea slab beneath SE China, which reflects asthenospheric strain caused by toroidal mantle flow around the edge of the subducting slab. PMID:27432744

  1. Depth variations of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy beneath Mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Zhao, Dapeng; Xu, Jiandong; Zhou, Bengang; Shi, Yaolin

    2016-01-01

    A high-resolution model of P-wave anisotropic tomography beneath Mainland China and surrounding regions is determined using a large number of arrival-time data recorded by the China seismic network, the International Seismological Centre (ISC) and temporary seismic arrays deployed on the Tibetan Plateau. Our results provide important new insights into the subducted Indian plate and mantle dynamics in East Asia. Our tomographic images show that the northern limit of the subducting Indian plate has reached the Jinsha River suture in eastern Tibet. A striking variation of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy is revealed in the Indian lithosphere: the fast velocity direction (FVD) is NE-SW beneath the Indian continent, whereas the FVD is arc parallel beneath the Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau, which may reflect re-orientation of minerals due to lithospheric extension, in response to the India-Eurasia collision. There are multiple anisotropic layers with variable FVDs in some parts of the Tibetan Plateau, which may be the cause of the dominant null splitting measurements in these regions. A circular pattern of FVDs is revealed around the Philippine Sea slab beneath SE China, which reflects asthenospheric strain caused by toroidal mantle flow around the edge of the subducting slab. PMID:27432744

  2. Numerical Assessment of Four-Port Through-Flow Wave Rotor Cycles with Passage Height Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, D. E.; Lindau, Jules W.

    1997-01-01

    The potential for improved performance of wave rotor cycles through the use of passage height variation is examined. A Quasi-one-dimensional CFD code with experimentally validated loss models is used to determine the flowfield in the wave rotor passages. Results indicate that a carefully chosen passage height profile can produce substantial performance gains. Numerical performance data are presented for a specific profile, in a four-port, through-flow cycle design which yielded a computed 4.6% increase in design point pressure ratio over a comparably sized rotor with constant passage height. In a small gas turbine topping cycle application, this increased pressure ratio would reduce specific fuel consumption to 22% below the un-topped engine; a significant improvement over the already impressive 18% reductions predicted for the constant passage height rotor. The simulation code is briefly described. The method used to obtain rotor passage height profiles with enhanced performance is presented. Design and off-design results are shown using two different computational techniques. The paper concludes with some recommendations for further work.

  3. Depth variations of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy beneath Mainland China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Zhao, Dapeng; Xu, Jiandong; Zhou, Bengang; Shi, Yaolin

    2016-07-01

    A high-resolution model of P-wave anisotropic tomography beneath Mainland China and surrounding regions is determined using a large number of arrival-time data recorded by the China seismic network, the International Seismological Centre (ISC) and temporary seismic arrays deployed on the Tibetan Plateau. Our results provide important new insights into the subducted Indian plate and mantle dynamics in East Asia. Our tomographic images show that the northern limit of the subducting Indian plate has reached the Jinsha River suture in eastern Tibet. A striking variation of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy is revealed in the Indian lithosphere: the fast velocity direction (FVD) is NE-SW beneath the Indian continent, whereas the FVD is arc parallel beneath the Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau, which may reflect re-orientation of minerals due to lithospheric extension, in response to the India-Eurasia collision. There are multiple anisotropic layers with variable FVDs in some parts of the Tibetan Plateau, which may be the cause of the dominant null splitting measurements in these regions. A circular pattern of FVDs is revealed around the Philippine Sea slab beneath SE China, which reflects asthenospheric strain caused by toroidal mantle flow around the edge of the subducting slab.

  4. Quantum variational measurement and the optical lever intracavity topology of gravitational-wave detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Khalili, F. Ya.

    2007-04-15

    The intracavity topologies of laser gravitational-wave detectors proposed several years ago are the promising way to obtain sensitivity of these devices significantly better than the Standard Quantum Limit (SQL). In essence, the intracavity detector is a two-stage device where the end mirrors displacement created by the gravitational wave is transferred to the displacement of an additional local mirror by means of the optical rigidity. The local mirror positions have to be monitored by an additional local meter. It is evident that the local meter precision defines the sensitivity of the detector. To overcome the SQL, the quantum variational measurement can be used in the local meter. In this method a frequency-dependent correlation between the meter backaction noise and measurement noise is introduced, which allows us to eliminate the backaction noise component from the meter output signal. This correlation is created by means of an additional filter cavity. In this article the sensitivity limitations of this scheme imposed by the optical losses both in the local meter itself and in the filter cavity are estimated. It is shown that the main sensitivity limitation stems from the filter cavity losses. In order to overcome it, it is necessary to increase the filter cavity length. In a preliminary prototype experiment, an approximate 10 m long filter cavity can be used to obtain sensitivity approximately 2-3 times better than the SQL. For future Quantum Non-Demolition (QND) gravitational-wave detectors with sensitivity about 10 times better than the SQL, the filter cavity length should be within kilometer range.

  5. Variations in Shear Wave Splitting Beneath Southern Arabia and the Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallacher, R. J.; Eakin, C. M.; Keir, D.; Leroy, S. D.; Stuart, G. W.; Harmon, N.; Ahmed, A.

    2015-12-01

    Mantle flow beneath Southern Arabia and the Gulf of Aden remains enigmatic due to a paucity of seismic measurements in the region. Potential processes contributing to mantle flow include northward progression of the African Superplume, radial flow from the Afar plume and vertical flow from small-scale convection along the margins of the Gulf of Aden. These would result in characteristic mantle flow directions, creating mantle anisotropy that can be detected by shear wave splitting. We analyse SKS, SKKS & PKS phases for shear wave splitting at 141 stations deployed throughout Yemen, Oman and Socotra along the margins of the Gulf of Aden. Large numbers of null measurements from a range of back azimuths are found beneath the entire region. These may indicate that vertical anisotropy is present in the upper mantle beneath the region, consistent with models of small-scale convection. The null measurements may also be due to complicated layering of crustal anisotropy interfering destructively and precluding measurement of shear wave splitting. Splitting measurements bordering the Red Sea show North-South orientations that may result from shallow aligned melt along the Red Sea or from variations in lower mantle flow. Fast polarization directions of splitting measurements along the Northern margin of the Gulf of Aden are rift parallel suggesting a shallow source such as rift related faulting might be responsible. These results show that anisotropy beneath the region is not controlled by the northward progression of the African Superplume or radial flow from the Afar plume. Upper mantle flow is likely vertical with splitting occurring either in the crust or the lower mantle.

  6. Accurate spectroscopy of polycyclic aromatic compounds: from the rotational spectrum of fluoren-9-one in the millimeter wave region to its infrared spectrum.

    PubMed

    Maris, Assimo; Calabrese, Camilla; Melandri, Sonia; Blanco, Susana

    2015-01-14

    The rotational spectrum of fluoren-9-one, a small oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, has been recorded and assigned in the 52-74.4 GHz region. The determined small negative value of the inertia defect (-0.3 u Å(2)) has been explained in terms of vibrational-rotational coupling constants calculated at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Vibrational anharmonic analysis together with second-order vibrational perturbation theory approximation was applied both to fluorenone and its reduced form, fluorene, to predict the mid- and near-infrared spectra. The data presented here give precise indication on the fluorenone ground state structure, allow for an accurate spectral characterization in the millimeter wave and infrared regions, and hopefully will facilitate extensive radio astronomical searches with large radio telescopes. PMID:25591363

  7. Spatial variations of shear wave anisotropy near the San Jacinto Fault Zone in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zefeng; Peng, Zhigang; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Vernon, Frank L.

    2015-12-01

    We examine crustal anisotropy at several scales along and across the San Jacinto Fault Zone (SJFZ) by systematically measuring shear wave splitting (SWS) parameters. The analyzed data are recorded by 86 stations during 2012-2014, including five linear dense arrays crossing the SJFZ at different locations and other autonomous stations within 15 km from the main fault trace. Shear phase arrivals and SWS parameters (fast directions and delay times) are obtained with automated methods. The measurement quality is then assessed using multiple criteria, resulting in 23,000 high-quality measurements. We find clear contrast of fast directions between the SW and NE sides of the SJFZ. Stations on the SW side have fast directions consistent overall with the maximum horizontal compression direction (SHmax), while stations on the NE side show mixed patterns likely reflecting lithological/topographic variations combined with fault zone damage. The fast directions in the Anza gap section with relatively simple fault geometry agree with the inferred SHmax, and the delay times at an array within that section are smaller than those observed at other across-fault arrays. These indications of less pronounced damage zone in the Anza section compared to other segments of the SJFZ are correlated generally with geometrical properties of the surface traces. Significant variations of fast directions on several across-fault arrays, with station spacing on the orders of a few tens of meters, suggest that shallow fault structures and near-surface layers play an important role in controlling the SWS parameters.

  8. Seasonal variations in the Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratio in the secondary microseism from colocated ring laser and seismograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro; Hadziioannou, Céline; Igel, Heiner; Wassermann, Joachim; Schreiber, Ulrich; Gebauer, André; Chow, Bryant

    2016-04-01

    Monthly variations in the ratio of Rayleigh-to-Love waves in the secondary microseism are obtained from a colocated ring laser and an STS-2 seismograph at Wettzell, Germany. Two main conclusions are derived for the Rayleigh-to-Love wave kinetic energy ratios in the secondary microseism; first, the energy ratio is in the range 0.8-0.9 (<1.0) throughout a year except for June and July. It means that Love wave energy is larger than Rayleigh wave energy most of the year by about 10-20%. Second, this ratio suddenly increases to 1.0-1.2 in June and July, indicating a larger fraction of Rayleigh wave energy. This change suggests that the locations and behaviors of excitation sources are different in these months.

  9. Highly accurate stability-preserving optimization of the Zener viscoelastic model, with application to wave propagation in the presence of strong attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Émilie; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Chaljub, Emmanuel; Lombard, Bruno; Xie, Zhinan

    2016-04-01

    This paper concerns the numerical modelling of time-domain mechanical waves in viscoelastic media based on a generalized Zener model. To do so, classically in the literature relaxation mechanisms are introduced, resulting in a set of the so-called memory variables and thus in large computational arrays that need to be stored. A challenge is thus to accurately mimic a given attenuation law using a minimal set of relaxation mechanisms. For this purpose, we replace the classical linear approach of Emmerich & Korn with a nonlinear optimization approach with constraints of positivity. We show that this technique is more accurate than the linear approach. Moreover, it ensures that physically meaningful relaxation times that always honour the constraint of decay of total energy with time are obtained. As a result, these relaxation times can always be used in a stable way in a modelling algorithm, even in the case of very strong attenuation for which the classical linear approach may provide some negative and thus unusable coefficients.

  10. Investigation of coastal wave field variations with TerraSAR-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Sven; Lehner, Susanne; Bruck, Miguel; Gies, Tobias; Pleskachevsky, Andrey; Rosenthal, Wolfgang; Bruns, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is a uniquely powerful sensor providing two-dimensional information of the ocean surface like a broad spectrum of meteo-marine parameters such as windfields, significant wave height, peak wavelength and other seastate characteristics. SAR is particularly suitable for many oceanographic observations due to its high resolution in combination with global coverage and the independence of daylight and cloud conditions. The data has been amongst others used to investigate geophysical processes and for numerical model validation. It has also so been found to be a valuable contribution regarding data assimilation into meteorological, marine and coupled models. The X-band radar of the TerraSAR-X (TS-X) satellite acquires images of the sea surface with a high resolution up to 1m. Due to a lower platform altitude and a higher signal frequency, nonlinear imaging effects of the moving ocean surface are reduced when compared to previous C-band sensors and thus individual ocean waves with wavelengths below 30m are detectable. Minor importance of nonlinear effects in the wave imaging process also gives rise to new empirical model functions to derive sea state parameters directly from the SAR image spectrum properties and thus minimizing data processing time. This is of special interest with regard to the development of near-real-time (NRT) data products often favorable for maritime safety and security applications particularly . The latest generation of the empirical algorithm for TS-X seastate analysis XWAVE has been tuned with hundreds of collocated buoy measurements over the open ocean and subsequent validation exhibits a very good agreement with in-situ data. However, in contrast to the open ocean where seastate parameters do not change significantly on the scale of kilometers, coastal waters exhibit a large spacial variablility owing to ,inter alia, subsurface topography influence. The lateral variation complicates the extraction of

  11. Oscillations in sympatho-vagal balance oppose variations in delta-wave activity and the associated renin release.

    PubMed

    Charloux, A; Otzenberger, H; Gronfier, C; Lonsdorfer-Wolf, E; Piquard, F; Brandenberger, G

    1998-05-01

    To determine the potential role of the sympathetic nervous system in the generation of the oscillations in PRA over the 24-h period, we used the autocorrelation coefficient of RR interval (rRR), a new tool to evaluate the sympatho-vagal balance continuously. We determined the influence of the sympathetic nervous system both on the nocturnal PRA oscillations associated to increases in delta-wave activity and on the daytime oscillations that occur randomly in awake subjects. PRA and rRR were determined every 10 min during 24 h in nine healthy subjects under continuous bed rest. Electroencephalographic spectral analysis was used to establish the variations in delta-wave activity during sleep, from 2300-0700 h. The overnight profiles in PRA, rRR and delta-wave activity were analyzed using a modified version of the pulse detection program ULTRA. The temporal link among the profiles of rRR, PRA, and delta-wave activity was quantified using cross-correlation analysis. During sleep, large oscillations in PRA were strongly linked to variations in delta-wave activity. They were preceded by opposite oscillations in rRR, decreases in rRR reflecting predominant vagal activity, and increases in rRR reflecting sympathetic dominance. During the waking periods, the levels of rRR were higher, with smaller variations. The daytime PRA oscillations were not associated with any significant changes in rRR, and conversely, significant oscillations in rRR were not followed by any significant changes in PRA. In conclusion, the sympathetic nervous system is not directly involved in the generation of renin oscillations observed under basal conditions. During sleep, the oscillations in sympatho-vagal balance are inversely related to the variations in delta-wave activity and the associated renin release. The processes that give the intermittent signal for concomitant increases in slow wave activity and renin release from the kidney remain to be identified. PMID:9589649

  12. A model for seasonal changes in GPS positions and seismic wave speeds due to thermoelastic and hydrologic variations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsai, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    It is known that GPS time series contain a seasonal variation that is not due to tectonic motions, and it has recently been shown that crustal seismic velocities may also vary seasonally. In order to explain these changes, a number of hypotheses have been given, among which thermoelastic and hydrology-induced stresses and strains are leading candidates. Unfortunately, though, since a general framework does not exist for understanding such seasonal variations, it is currently not possible to quickly evaluate the plausibility of these hypotheses. To fill this gap in the literature, I generalize a two-dimensional thermoelastic strain model to provide an analytic solution for the displacements and wave speed changes due to either thermoelastic stresses or hydrologic loading, which consists of poroelastic stresses and purely elastic stresses. The thermoelastic model assumes a periodic surface temperature, and the hydrologic models similarly assume a periodic near-surface water load. Since all three models are two-dimensional and periodic, they are expected to only approximate any realistic scenario; but the models nonetheless provide a quantitative framework for estimating the effects of thermoelastic and hydrologic variations. Quantitative comparison between the models and observations is further complicated by the large uncertainty in some of the relevant parameters. Despite this uncertainty, though, I find that maximum realistic thermoelastic effects are unlikely to explain a large fraction of the observed annual variation in a typical GPS displacement time series or of the observed annual variations in seismic wave speeds in southern California. Hydrologic loading, on the other hand, may be able to explain a larger fraction of both the annual variations in displacements and seismic wave speeds. Neither model is likely to explain all of the seismic wave speed variations inferred from observations. However, more definitive conclusions cannot be made until the model

  13. Generation of the cosmic rays flux variations due to surfatron acceleration of charges by electromagnetic waves in space plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erokhin, Nikolay; Loznikov, Vladimir; Shkevov, Rumen; Zolnikova, Nadezhda; Mikhailovskaya, Ludmila

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of experimental data on the spectra of cosmic rays (CR) has shown their variability on time scales of a few years, in particular, CR variations observed in E / Z range from TeV to 10000 TeV, where E is the energy of the particle, Z is its charge number. Consequently, the source of these variations must be located at a distance of no more than 1 parsec from the sun in the closest local interstellar clouds. As a mechanism of such variations appearance it is considered the surfatron acceleration of CR particles by electromagnetic wave in a relatively quiet space plasma. On the basis of developed model the numerical calculations were performed for particle capture dynamics (electrons, protons, helium and iron nuclei) in the wave effective potential well with a following growth their energy by 3-6 orders of magnitude. Optimal conditions for the implementation of charged particles surfatron acceleration in space plasma, the rate of trapped particles energy growth, the dynamics of wave phase on the captured particle trajectory, a temporal dynamics of components for charge impulse momentum and speed were studied. It is indicated that the capture of a small fraction of particles by wave for energies about TeV and less followed by their surfatron acceleration to an energy of about 10000 TeV will lead to a significant increase in the CR flux at such high energies. Thus CL flow variations are conditioned by changes in the space weather parameters

  14. Dust-acoustic solitary waves and double layers in a magnetized dusty plasma with nonthermal ions and dust charge variation

    SciTech Connect

    El-Taibany, W.F.; Sabry, R.

    2005-08-15

    The effect of nonthermal ions and variable dust charge on small-amplitude nonlinear dust-acoustic (DA) waves is investigated. It is found that both compressive and rarefactive solitons exist and depend on the nonthermal parameter a. Using a reductive perturbation theory, a Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation is derived. At critical value of a, a{sub c}, a modified ZK equation with third- and fourth-order nonlinearities, is obtained. Depending on a, the solution of the evolution equation reveals whether there is coexistence of both compressive and rarefactive solitary waves or double layers (DLs) with the possibility of their two kinds. In addition, for certain plasma parameters, the solitary wave disappears and a DL is expected. The variation of dust charge number, wave velocity, and soliton amplitude and its width against system parameters is investigated for the DA solitary waves. It is shown that the incorporation of both the adiabatic dust-charge variation and the nonthermal distributed ions modifies significantly the nature of DA solitary waves and DA DLs. The findings of this investigation may be useful in understanding the ion acceleration mechanisms close to the Moon and also enhances our knowledge on pickup ions around unmagnetized bodies, such as comets, Mars, and Venus.

  15. Application of the energy reassignment method to measure accurate Rayleigh and Love wave group velocities from ambient seismic noise cross-correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witek, M.; Kang, T. S.; van der Lee, S.

    2015-12-01

    We have collected three-component data from 122 Korean accelerometer stations for the month of December in 2014. We apply similar techniques described by Zha et al. (2013) to retrieve accurate station orientation angles, in order to rotate the horizontal component data into the radial and transverse frame of reference, and for subsequent measurement of Love wave group velocity dispersion. We simultaneously normalize all three components of a daily noise record via the frequency-time normalization (FTN) method. Each component is divided by the average signal envelope in an effort to retain relative amplitude information between all three components. Station orientations are found by a grid search for the orientation azimuth which maximizes the coherency between the radial-vertical cross-correlation and the Hilbert transformed vertical-vertical cross-correlation. After measuring orientation angles, we cross-correlate and rotate the data. Typically, the group velocity dispersion curves are measured using the frequency time analysis technique (FTAN), effectively producing spectrograms with significant uncertainty in the time-frequency plane. The spectrogram approach retains only the amplitude information of the short-time Fourier transform (STFT). However, Kodera et al (1976) show that by taking into account the phase information, the concepts of instantaneous frequency and group-time delay can be used to compute the first moment of the signal power in the frequency and time domains. During energy reassignment, the signal power calculated using the STFT at a point (t0,f0t_0, f_0) is reassigned to the location of the first moment (t^g,f^ihat{t}_g,hat{f}_i), where t^ghat{t}_g is the group-time delay and f^ihat{f}_i is the instantaneous frequency. We apply the method of energy reassignment to produce precise Rayleigh and Love wave group velocity measurements in the frequency range 0.1 - 1.0 Hz. Tests on synthetic data show more accurate retrieval of group velocities at

  16. The nonadiabatic dust charge variation on dust acoustic solitary and shock waves in strongly coupled dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunliang; Guo, Xiaoyan; Lu, Yanzhen; Wang, Xiaodan

    2016-01-01

    The combined effects of nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and strongly coupled dust particles on the nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic (DA) waves in dusty plasma consisting of nonthermal electrons and trapped ions with vortex-like distribution are presented here. We use generalized viscoelastic hydrodynamic model for dust particles. In the weak nonlinearity limit, a modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation with a damping term and a KdV-Burger equation have been derived in the kinetic regime and hydrodynamic regime, respectively. The approximate analytical solitary solution of modified KdV equation is derived in the weak nonadiabatic dust charge variation limit, which shows that the amplitude of DA solitary waves decreases with time. The presence of viscosity due to strong coupling stands for the formation of DA shock waves in the hydrodynamic regime. The results show that the DA shock waves will be oscillating one for weak viscosity and will become monotonic ones for large viscosity.

  17. Cosmogenic Beryllium Production from Ocean Sediment Sequences Help to Construct Accurate Records of the Geodynamo Variation at the Millennial to Million Year Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouveny, N.; Ménabréaz, L.; Bourles, D. L.; Demory, F.; Guillou, V.; Arnold, M.; Vidal, L.

    2013-12-01

    The possible contribution of the axial precession to the energy of the geodynamo was recently reintroduced by theoretical and experimental studies. It is supported by relative paleointensity stacks and deep sea floor magnetization records documenting series of geomagnetic dipole lows (GDL) with recurrence at periods ranging from 30 to 120 kyr, and intriguing phase relationships with obliquity variations and δ18O records (e.g. Fuller, 2006; Thouveny et al. 2008). Yet, these time-series are presently not precise and complete enough to validate this fundamental and debated relationship. The MAG-ORB project funded by the French "Agence nationale de la Recherche" aims at reconstructing the series of GDL over the last Ma, by coupling -on the very same sedimentary sequences- the reconstructions of paleomagnetic variations, cosmogenic10Be production variations and δ18O isotope variations. Recent results (e.g. Ménabréaz et al., 2012, 2013) demonstrate that 10Be overproduction events are systematically induced by the GDL linked with excursions and reversals -as awaited from the theoretical and empirical non linear inverse relationship established between the magnetic moment value and the penetration rate of cosmic rays and particles. The calibration of the authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio signals using absolute Virtual (axial) Dipole Moment values allowed us to construct 10Be-derived Geomagnetic Dipole Moment records over the last millennium, the last 60 ka and the last Ma, allowing to assess the robustness of the GDL series by a method completely independent from rock and paleo-magnetic methods. These records are comparable with individuals RPI records obtained from the same cores, and with global RPI stacks (e.g. GLOPIS, SINT 800 and PISO-1500). Since the Beryllium atoms are adsorbed on the settling silicate particles, the measured 10Be/9Be ratio signatures of cosmogenic isotope overproductions accurately indicate the exact stratigraphic position of the GDL in the sedimentary

  18. Longitudinal frequency variation of long-lasting EMIC Pc1-Pc2 waves localized in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.-H.; Shiokawa, K.; Mann, I. R.; Park, J.-S.; Kwon, H.-J.; Hyun, K.; Jin, H.; Connors, M.

    2016-02-01

    Long-lasting (> 20 h) electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) Pc1-Pc2 waves were observed by the Athabasca (L =˜ 4.6) induction magnetometer and Canadian Array for Realtime Investigations of Magnetic Activity (L =˜ 4-6) fluxgate magnetometers on 5 April 2007. These waves showed a systematic frequency change with local time, the minimum frequency near dusk, and the maximum frequency near dawn. Assuming the plasmapause as a potential source region of the waves, we estimated the plasmapause location from localized proton enhancement (LPE) events observed at NOAA-Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites and METOP-2 satellites. We found that the longitudinal frequency variation of EMIC waves has a clear correlation with the estimated plasmapause location and that the waves are in the frequency band between the equatorial helium and oxygen gyrofrequencies at the estimated plasmapause. With our analysis results we suggest that the LPE events are caused by wave-particle interaction with the helium band EMIC waves generated near the plasmapause.

  19. Variational full wave calculation of fast wave current drive in DIII-D using the ALCYON code

    SciTech Connect

    Becoulet, A.; Moreau, D.

    1992-04-01

    Initial fast wave current drive simulations performed with the ALCYON code for the 60 MHz DIII-D experiment are presented. Two typical shots of the 1991 summer campaign were selected with magnetic field intensities of 1 and 2 teslas respectively. The results for the wave electromagnetic field in the plasma chamber are displayed. They exhibit a strong enrichment of the poloidal mode number m-spectrum which leads to the upshift of the parallel wavenumber, {kappa}{perpendicular}, and to the wave absorption. The m-spectrum is bounded when the local poloidal wavenumber reaches the Alfven wavenumber and the {kappa}{perpendicular} upshifts do not destroy the wave directionality. Linear estimations of the driven current are made. The current density profiles are found to be peaked and we find that about 88 kA can be driven in the 1 tesla/1.7 keV phase with 1.7 MW coupled to the electrons. In the 2 tesla/3.4 keV case, 47 kA are driven with a total power of 1.5 MW, 44% of which are absorbed on the hydrogen minority, through the second harmonic ion cyclotron resonance. The global efficiency is then 0.18 {times} 10{sup 19} A m{sup {minus}2}W{sup {minus}1} if one considers only the effective power going to the electrons.

  20. Variation of fundamental mode Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion in Iran and the surrounding region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rham, D.; Priestley, K.; Tatar, M.; Paul, A.; Hatzfeld, D.; Radjaee, A.; Nowrouzi, G.; Kaviani, A.; Tiberi, C.

    2005-12-01

    We present group velocity dispersion results from a study of regional fundamental mode Rayleigh waves propagating across Iran and the surrounding region. Data for these measurements come from field deployments within Iran by the University of Cambridge (UK) and the Universite Joseph-Fourier (FRA) in conjunction with International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (Iran), within Oman by the Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris (FRA), in addition to data from IRIS and Geofone. 1D path-averaged dispersion measurements have been made for ~800 source-receiver paths using multiple filter analysis. We combine these observations in a tomographic inversion to produce group velocity images between 15 and 60~s period. Because of the dense path coverage, these images have substantially higher lateral resolution for this region than is currently available from global and regional group velocity studies. We observe variations in short-period group velocity which is consistent with the surface geology. Low group velocity (2.45-2.55~km/s) at short periods (15-20~s) is observed beneath the south Caspian Basin, northern Iran, the Persian Gulf, the Zagros, the Makran, northern Afghanistan and southern Pakistan. Somewhat higher group velocity (2.60-2.70~km/s) at these periods occurs in central Iran. At intermediate periods (30-40~s) group velocities over most of the region are low (2.90-3.10~km/s) compared to Arabia. At longer periods (50-60~s) group velocities remain low (3.35-3.45~km/s) over most of Iran but there is a suggestion of higher group velocities beneath the northern and central Zagros.

  1. Decomposing variations of geopotential height in the troposphere and stratosphere into stationary and travelling waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guryanov, Vladimir; Eliseev, Alexey

    2016-07-01

    The ERA-Interim geopotential height in the Northern Hemisphere from November to March, 1992-2015 in the layer from between pressure levels 1000 mb and 1 mb is expanded into stationary and travelling zonal waves with zonal wavenumbers, k, from 1 to 10, and with periods, T, from 2 to 156 days (the so called Hayashi spectra). Among the studied waves, the largest amplitude is attained by the stationary and travelling waves with zonal wavenumber k=1 and with periods from 3 to 4 weeks in the upper stratosphere over the latitudinal belt 60-70oN. The stationary waves with k from 1 to 3 and with T from 2 to 3 weeks are most pronounced in the stratosphere. In turn, the largest amplitudes of the travelling waves with zonal wavenumbers k ≥ 5 are found in the troposphere. The dominant periods of the latter waves are about 1 week or slightly higher, and this dominant period basically decrease with increasing wavenumber. In the upper stratosphere, the eastward travelling waves generally dominate over westward ones. The only exception is the longest zonal mode with k=1, for which the amplitude of the westward travelling wave is larger than that for the eastward one. The period of the travelling waves dominating in the upper stratosphere is close to 3 weeks. In the upper troposphere, the amplitudes of the eastward waves with k from 4 to 10 is several-fold larger than those for their westward counterparts. The latter is reflected in the larger average wavenumber of the eastward travelling wave in comparison to that of the westarward one. The period of the gravest of the dominant travelling waves in the upper troposphere is close to one week, and it decreases to 2-4 days for the dominant travelling waves with k=8-10.

  2. Geomagnetic Pulsation Amplitude and Spectrum Variations Accompanying the Ionospheric Heating by High-Power Radio waves from the Sura Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogor, L. F.; Frolov, V. L.

    2014-10-01

    Aperiodic and quasiperiodic variations in the geomagnetic pulsation amplitude in a range of periods from 40 to 1000 s, which accompany the quasicontinuous and periodic impact on the ionospheric plasma by high-power radio waves from the SURA facility near Nizhny Novgorod (Russia) were recorded near Kharkov (Ukraine) using a magnetometer-fluxmeter. The main parameters of aperiodic and quasiperiodic disturbances of the geomagnetic field are determined. The mechanisms for generation and propagation of detected disturbances are discussed.

  3. On the variation and growth of wave-slope spectra in the capillary-gravity range with increasing wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, S. R.; Huang, N. E.

    1976-01-01

    A new laser device has been used to make direct wave-slope measurements in the capillary-gravity range. Owing to the design principles, the digital nature of the system and the use of a laser beam as a probe, the earlier problems of intensity variations and meniscus effects were avoided. Using this new technique, wave-slope spectra both down and across the channel were obtained for different wind conditions, along with corresponding mean-square slope values. Comparisons are made with existing data. The results indicate that a quasi-equilibrium state may exist for each wind speed and that it increases in intensity with increasing wind, which may imply an asymptotic nature for the equilibrium-range coefficient. From the data, two significant frictional velocities, 17.5 and 31 cm/s respectively, are identified as critical values for different ranges of wave development.

  4. Effects of water depth and spectral bandwidth on Stokes drift estimation based on short-term variation of wave conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrhaug, Dag; Wang, Hong; Holmedal, Lars Erik

    2016-04-01

    The Stokes drift represents an important transport component of ocean circulation models. Locally it is responsible for transport of e.g. contaminated ballast water from ships, oil spills, plankton and larvae. It also plays an important role in mixing processes across the interphase between the atmosphere and the ocean. The Stokes drift is the mean Lagrangian velocity obtained from the water particle trajectory in the wave propagation direction; it is maximum at the surface, decreasing rapidly with the depth below the surface. The total mean mass transport is obtained by integrating the Stokes drift over the water depth; this is also referred to as the volume Stokes transport. The paper provides a simple analytical method which can be used to give estimates of the Stokes drift in moderate intermediate water depth based on short-term variation of wave conditions. This is achieved by using a joint distribution of individual wave heights and wave periods together with an explicit solution of the wave dispersion equation. The mean values of the surface Stokes drift and the volume Stokes transport for individual random waves within a sea state are presented, and the effects of water depth and spectral bandwidth parameter are discussed. Furthermore, example of results corresponding to typical field conditions are presented to demonstrate the application of the method, including the Stokes drift profile in the water column beneath the surface. Thus, the present analytical method can be used to estimate the Stokes drift in moderate intermediate water depth for random waves within a sea state based on available wave statistics.

  5. Wave run up statistics on a meso-tidal, steeply-sloping beach: effect of wave forcing and tidal variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vousdoukas, M. I.; Kirupakaramoorthy, T.; Ferreira, O.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the probability distributions of shoreline elevation, swash height and swash maxima is important for several applications like numerical modeling of dune erosion and stochastic modeling of swash zone processes. In the present contribution we analyze wave run-up time series obtained from a total of 456 timestack images and acquired, during a 2 years period, from a coastal video monitoring station installed at Faro Beach, S. Portugal. All transformations from image to world coordinates took place considering the daily beach topography measured during 40 RTK-DGPS surveys and the timestack images were processed in an open-access, freely-available Graphical User Interface software (Vousdoukas et al. 2012, Oc. Dyn., 62), developed to extract and process time-series of the cross-shore position of the swash extrema. The shoreline elevation probability distribution was found to be in good agreement with Rayleigh distribution, while comparisons with a standard normal PDF showed no statistically significant match. The Kumaraswamy distribution was found to reproduce even better the measured probability distributions. Following, the 456 swash series were separated into classes according to the significant wave height and water level, among others, and ensemble average distributions were generated for each 'bin'. Low wave height distributions were shown to be better represented by power-law PDFs and only more energetic conditions resulted in good match with the Rayleigh distribution. High tide series were characterized by lower kurtosis compared to low tide ones. The Kumaraswamy distribution (f(x)=pqxp-1(1-xp)q-1) was found to reproduce better all the probability distributions of the different cases, as it is a very versatile due to the 2 shape coefficients p, q. Preliminary results showed that it is possible to parameterize the 2 Kumaraswamy distribution shape coefficients as a function of the wave and tidal parameters (p=0.28Hs+0.27ηs; q=0.85Hs+1.16ηs), in

  6. Modeling the variations of reflection coefficient of Earth's lower ionosphere using very low frequency radio wave data by artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Keyvan; Khakian Ghomi, Mehdi; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Marbouti, Marjan; Tan, Le Minh

    2016-08-01

    The ionized atmosphere lying from 50 to 600 km above surface, known as ionosphere, contains high amount of electrons and ions. Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio waves with frequencies between 3 and 30 kHz are reflected from the lower ionosphere specifically D-region. A lot of applications in long range communications and navigation systems have been inspired by this characteristic of ionosphere. There are several factors which affect the ionization rate in this region, such as: time of day (presence of sun in the sky), solar zenith angle (seasons) and solar activities. Due to nonlinear response of ionospheric reflection coefficient to these factors, finding an accurate relation between these parameters and reflection coefficient is an arduous task. In order to model these kinds of nonlinear functionalities, some numerical methods are employed. One of these methods is artificial neural network (ANN). In this paper, the VLF radio wave data of 4 sudden ionospheric disturbance (SID) stations are given to a multi-layer perceptron ANN in order to simulate the variations of reflection coefficient of D region ionosphere. After training, validation and testing the ANN, outputs of ANN and observed values are plotted together for 2 random cases of each station. By evaluating the results using 2 parameters of pearson correlation coefficient and root mean square error, a satisfying agreement was found between ANN outputs and real observed data.

  7. Pulse Wave Variation during the Menstrual Cycle in Women with Menstrual Pain.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Soo Hyung; Kim, Kyu Kon; Lee, In Seon; Lee, Yong Tae; Kim, Gyeong Cheol; Chi, Gyoo Yong; Cho, Hye Sook; Kang, Hee Jung; Kim, Jong Won

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study is performed to obtain objective diagnostic indicators associated with menstrual pain using pulse wave analysis. Methods. Using a pulse diagnostic device, we measured the pulse waves of 541 women aged between 19 and 30 years, placed in either an experimental group with menstrual pain (n = 329) or a control group with little or no menstrual pain (n = 212). Measurements were taken during both the menstrual and nonmenstrual periods, and comparative analysis was performed. Results. During the nonmenstrual period, the experimental group showed a significantly higher value in the left radial artery for the radial augmentation index (RAI) (p = 0.050) but significantly lower values for pulse wave energy (p = 0.021) and time to first peak from baseline (T1) (p = 0.035) in the right radial artery. During the menstrual period, the experimental group showed significantly lower values in the left radial artery for cardiac diastole and pulse wave area during diastole and significantly higher values for pulse wave area during systole, ratio of systolic phase to the full heartbeat, and systolic-diastolic ratio. Conclusion. We obtained indicators of menstrual pain in women during the menstrual period, including prolonged systolic and shortened diastolic phases, increases in pulse wave energy and area of representative pulse wave, and increased blood vessel resistance. PMID:27579304

  8. Pulse Wave Variation during the Menstrual Cycle in Women with Menstrual Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Soo Hyung; Kim, Kyu Kon; Lee, In Seon; Lee, Yong Tae; Kim, Gyeong Cheol; Chi, Gyoo Yong; Cho, Hye Sook; Kang, Hee Jung

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study is performed to obtain objective diagnostic indicators associated with menstrual pain using pulse wave analysis. Methods. Using a pulse diagnostic device, we measured the pulse waves of 541 women aged between 19 and 30 years, placed in either an experimental group with menstrual pain (n = 329) or a control group with little or no menstrual pain (n = 212). Measurements were taken during both the menstrual and nonmenstrual periods, and comparative analysis was performed. Results. During the nonmenstrual period, the experimental group showed a significantly higher value in the left radial artery for the radial augmentation index (RAI) (p = 0.050) but significantly lower values for pulse wave energy (p = 0.021) and time to first peak from baseline (T1) (p = 0.035) in the right radial artery. During the menstrual period, the experimental group showed significantly lower values in the left radial artery for cardiac diastole and pulse wave area during diastole and significantly higher values for pulse wave area during systole, ratio of systolic phase to the full heartbeat, and systolic-diastolic ratio. Conclusion. We obtained indicators of menstrual pain in women during the menstrual period, including prolonged systolic and shortened diastolic phases, increases in pulse wave energy and area of representative pulse wave, and increased blood vessel resistance. PMID:27579304

  9. The seasonal variation of the D region as inferred from propagation characteristics of LF radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishimine, T.; Ishii, T.; Echizenya, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The propagation data of JG2AS 40 kHz (Japanese Standard Frequency), Loran C 100 kHz radio waves, and meteorological data were analyzed to study the association of propagation characteristics of LF radio waves with the atmospheric circulation in the mesosphere. The monthly averaged electric fields were depicted on the complex plane for typical summer and winter months, June and November. The locus traced out by the electric field vector during daytime is nearly circular. This is because during daytime the amplitude of the sky wave remains nearly constant while its phase changes in accord with the height change of the reflection layer, and thus the electric field vector traces out a circular locus with its center at the tip of the supposed ground wave vector. The locus has a loop during the sunrise or sunset period, which seems to arise from interference of two waves reflected by two different layers. In June the amplitude of the sky wave decreases rapidly before the dawn or increases after the dusk. In November such rapid change is not observed. During nighttime, the sky wave phase changes in such a way as to suggest that the reflection height moves upwards with time before midnight or lowers after midnight in November. In June it changes similarly before midnight, but after midnight it varies erratically. These characteristics are closely related to the structure of the D region, which is clearly shown by simulating the loci traced out by electric fields.

  10. Models for electrostatic drift waves with density variations along magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, O. E.; Pécseli, H. L.

    2013-11-01

    Drift waves with vertical magnetic fields in gravitational ionospheres are considered where the unperturbed plasma density is enhanced in a magnetic flux tube. The gravitational field gives rise to an overall decrease of plasma density for increasing altitude. Simple models predict that drift waves with finite vertical wave vector components can increase in amplitude merely due to a conservation of energy density flux of the waves. Field-aligned currents are some of the mechanisms that can give rise to fluctuations that are truly unstable. We suggest a self-consistent generator or "battery" mechanism that in the polar ionospheres can give rise to magnetic field-aligned currents even in the absence of electron precipitation. The free energy here is supplied by steady state electric fields imposed in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field in the collisional lower parts of the ionosphere or by neutral winds that have similar effects.

  11. Variation of Langmuir wave polarization with electron beam speed in type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Malaspina, David M.; Cairns, Iver H.; Ergun, Robert E.

    2013-06-13

    Observations by the twin STEREO spacecraft of in-situ electric field waveforms and radio signatures associated with type III radio bursts have demonstrated that the polarization of electron beam-driven waves near the local plasma frequency depends strongly on the speed of the driving electron beam. We expand upon a previous study by including all radio bursts with in-situ waveforms observed by STEREO in 2011. The expanded data set contains five times more radio bursts (35 up from 7) and three times as many Langmuir waves (663 up from 168). While this expanded study supports the results of the original study, that faster (slower) beam electrons drive waves with strong (weak) electric fields perpendicular to the local magnetic field, the larger data set emphasizes that the observation of strong perpendicular electric fields at high electron beam speeds is probabilistic rather than definite. This property supports the interpretation of wave polarization dependence on beam speed as Langmuir/z-mode waves shifted to small wave number through interaction with turbulent solar wind density fluctuations.

  12. Variational Optimization of the Second-Order Density Matrix Corresponding to a Seniority-Zero Configuration Interaction Wave Function.

    PubMed

    Poelmans, Ward; Van Raemdonck, Mario; Verstichel, Brecht; De Baerdemacker, Stijn; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Massaccesi, Gustavo E; Alcoba, Diego R; Bultinck, Patrick; Van Neck, Dimitri

    2015-09-01

    We perform a direct variational determination of the second-order (two-particle) density matrix corresponding to a many-electron system, under a restricted set of the two-index N-representability P-, Q-, and G-conditions. In addition, we impose a set of necessary constraints that the two-particle density matrix must be derivable from a doubly occupied many-electron wave function, i.e., a singlet wave function for which the Slater determinant decomposition only contains determinants in which spatial orbitals are doubly occupied. We rederive the two-index N-representability conditions first found by Weinhold and Wilson and apply them to various benchmark systems (linear hydrogen chains, He, N2, and CN(-)). This work is motivated by the fact that a doubly occupied many-electron wave function captures in many cases the bulk of the static correlation. Compared to the general case, the structure of doubly occupied two-particle density matrices causes the associate semidefinite program to have a very favorable scaling as L(3), where L is the number of spatial orbitals. Since the doubly occupied Hilbert space depends on the choice of the orbitals, variational calculation steps of the two-particle density matrix are interspersed with orbital-optimization steps (based on Jacobi rotations in the space of the spatial orbitals). We also point to the importance of symmetry breaking of the orbitals when performing calculations in a doubly occupied framework. PMID:26575902

  13. Effects of planetary-scale waves on temporal wind variations in the Venusian thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, N.; Fujiwara, H.; Takagi, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Kasaba, Y.

    2008-12-01

    In recent years, the importance of planetary-scale waves for dynamics of the Venusian upper atmosphere has been recognized. For example, Forbes and Knopliv [2007] suggested propagations of planetary-scale waves originated in the cloud deck to the thermosphere from reanalysis of the Magellan spacecraft data. In addition, recent simulation studies suggest importance of tidal waves for the superrotation in the Venusian cloud deck [Takagi and Matsuda, 2007]. Venus Climate Orbiter (VCO), which will be launched in 2010 as the second Japanese planetary mission, is expected to provide precious information about upward propagating planetary scale-waves which can't be obtained by Venus Express because of the polar orbit and the close-up observations. In order to understand effects of the planetary-scale waves propagating from the cloud top on the thermospheric circulation, we have developed a new general circulation model (GCM) which includes about 80-200 km altitude region. The GCM solves the primitive equations for momentum, energy and composition. The solar EUV heating, NIR heating and 15μm Radiative cooling are considered. We also consider O, CO and CO2 as the major composition of the Venusian mesosphere and thermosphere. The horizontal and vertical resolutions are 10° in longitude, 20° in latitude, and 0.5 scale height in altitude, respectively. In this study, we perform GCM simulations with use of global distributions of planetary-scale waves taking into account the recent simulation results [e.g., Takagi and Matsuda, 2007] and the past observations [e.g., Del genio and Rossow, 1990]. We will also develop a method for GCM simulations with the VCO data.

  14. Application of TVD schemes for the Euler equations of gas dynamics. [method of Total Variation Diminishing for shock wave computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Warming, R. F.; Harten, A.

    1985-01-01

    Highly accurate and yet stable shock-capturing finite difference schemes have been designed for the computation of the Euler equations of gas dynamics. Four different principles for the construction of high resolution total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes are available, including hybrid schemes, a second-order extension of Godunov's scheme by van Leer (1979), the modified flux approach of Harten (1983, 1984), and the numerical fluctuation approach of Roe (1985). The present paper has the objective to review the class of second-order TVD schemes via the modified flux approach. Attention is given to first-order TVD schemes, a second-order accurate explicit TVD scheme, the global order of accuracy of the second-order TVD scheme, extensions to systems and two-dimensional conservation laws, numerical experiments with a second-order explicit TVD scheme, implicit TVD schemes, and second-order implicit TVD schemes.

  15. Improved techniques for outgoing wave variational principle calculations of converged state-to-state transition probabilities for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Steven L.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schwenke, David W.

    1991-01-01

    Improved techniques and well-optimized basis sets are presented for application of the outgoing wave variational principle to calculate converged quantum mechanical reaction probabilities. They are illustrated with calculations for the reactions D + H2 yields HD + H with total angular momentum J = 3 and F + H2 yields HF + H with J = 0 and 3. The optimization involves the choice of distortion potential, the grid for calculating half-integrated Green's functions, the placement, width, and number of primitive distributed Gaussians, and the computationally most efficient partition between dynamically adapted and primitive basis functions. Benchmark calculations with 224-1064 channels are presented.

  16. A statistical study of variations of internal gravity wave energy characteristics in meteor zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavrilov, N. M.; Kalov, E. D.

    1987-01-01

    Internal gravity wave (IGW) parameters obtained by the radiometer method have been considered by many other researchers. The results of the processing of regular radiometeor measurements taken during 1979 to 1980 in Obninsk (55.1 deg N, 36.6 deg E) are presented.

  17. Seascape-level variation in turbulence- and wave-generated hydrodynamic signals experienced by plankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Heidi L.; Gerbi, Gregory P.

    2016-02-01

    Plankton exhibit diverse and dramatic responses to fluid motions, and these behaviors are likely critical for survival and fitness. Fluid motions can be generated by organisms or by physical processes, including turbulence and surface gravity waves. Physical processes vary geographically in their intensity and generate hydrodynamic signals experienced by plankton as fluid forces on their sensory receptors. In this synthesis, we review how turbulence and waves vary in space, the scales and statistics of their motions, and the forces exerted on plankton. We then quantify the hydrodynamic signals produced by turbulence and waves in four seascape types - surf zones, inlets and estuaries, the continental shelf, and the open ocean - using published dissipation rates, wind and wave data from buoys, and observations from two coastal sites in Massachusetts, USA. We relate these geographic patterns in signals to the observed behaviors of example species and to the forces sensed by typical plankters with different receptor types. Turbulence-generated shears are largest in the surf zone, inlets and estuaries, while wave-generated accelerations are larger offshore; as a result, each seascape exhibits some range of combined shears and accelerations that is distinct. These signals generate forces on plankton that vary among habitats and with plankton size and swimming speed. Spatial patterns in fluid forces create a potential mechanism for dispersing larvae to distinguish habitats by their hydrodynamic signatures. However, turbulence can be strong in all seascapes and may cause widespread interference in signaling among predators and prey. Plankton with a single receptor type could identify nearshore habitats, while those with multiple receptor types potentially could distinguish inshore vs. offshore seascapes or decode signals produced by physical processes and by other organisms.

  18. Parasitic analysis and π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke model for complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor Lamb wave resonator with accurate two-port Y-parameter characterizations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Goh, Wang Ling; Chai, Kevin T-C; Mu, Xiaojing; Hong, Yan; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Je, Minkyu

    2016-04-01

    The parasitic effects from electromechanical resonance, coupling, and substrate losses were collected to derive a new two-port equivalent-circuit model for Lamb wave resonators, especially for those fabricated on silicon technology. The proposed model is a hybrid π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke (PiBVD) model that accounts for the above mentioned parasitic effects which are commonly observed in Lamb-wave resonators. It is a combination of interdigital capacitor of both plate capacitance and fringe capacitance, interdigital resistance, Ohmic losses in substrate, and the acoustic motional behavior of typical Modified Butterworth-Van Dyke (MBVD) model. In the case studies presented in this paper using two-port Y-parameters, the PiBVD model fitted significantly better than the typical MBVD model, strengthening the capability on characterizing both magnitude and phase of either Y11 or Y21. The accurate modelling on two-port Y-parameters makes the PiBVD model beneficial in the characterization of Lamb-wave resonators, providing accurate simulation to Lamb-wave resonators and oscillators. PMID:27131699

  19. Parasitic analysis and π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke model for complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor Lamb wave resonator with accurate two-port Y-parameter characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Goh, Wang Ling; Chai, Kevin T.-C.; Mu, Xiaojing; Hong, Yan; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Je, Minkyu

    2016-04-01

    The parasitic effects from electromechanical resonance, coupling, and substrate losses were collected to derive a new two-port equivalent-circuit model for Lamb wave resonators, especially for those fabricated on silicon technology. The proposed model is a hybrid π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke (PiBVD) model that accounts for the above mentioned parasitic effects which are commonly observed in Lamb-wave resonators. It is a combination of interdigital capacitor of both plate capacitance and fringe capacitance, interdigital resistance, Ohmic losses in substrate, and the acoustic motional behavior of typical Modified Butterworth-Van Dyke (MBVD) model. In the case studies presented in this paper using two-port Y-parameters, the PiBVD model fitted significantly better than the typical MBVD model, strengthening the capability on characterizing both magnitude and phase of either Y11 or Y21. The accurate modelling on two-port Y-parameters makes the PiBVD model beneficial in the characterization of Lamb-wave resonators, providing accurate simulation to Lamb-wave resonators and oscillators.

  20. Variation of P-Wave Velocity before the Bear Valley, California, Earthquake of 24 February 1972.

    PubMed

    Robinson, R; Wesson, R L; Ellsworth, W L

    1974-06-21

    Residuals for P-wave traveltimes at a seismnograph station near Bear Valley, California, for small, precisely located local earthquakes at distances of 20 to 70 kilometers show a sharp increase of nearly 0.3 second about 2 months before a magnitude 5.0 earthquake that occurred within a few kilometers of the station. This indicates that velocity changes observed elsewhere premonitory to earthquakes, possibly related to dilatancy, occur along the central section of the San Andreas fault system. PMID:17784227

  1. Modeling Mars Cyclogenesis and Frontal Waves: Seasonal Variations and Implications on Dust Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollingsworth, J. L.; Kahre, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Between late autumn through early spring,middle and high latitudes onMars exhibit strong equator-to-polemean temperature contrasts (i.e., "baroclinicity"). Data collected during the Viking era and observations from both the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) indicate that such strong baroclinicity supports vigorous, large-scale eastward traveling weather systems (i.e., transient synoptic period waves) [1, 2]. For a rapidly rotating, differentially heated, shallow atmosphere such as on Earth and Mars, these large-scale, extratropical weather disturbances are critical components of the global circulation. The wave-like disturbances serve as agents in the transport of heat and momentum between low and high latitudes of the planet. Through cyclonic/anticyclonic winds, intense shear deformations, contractions-dilatations in temperature and density, and sharp perturbations amongst atmospheric tracers (i.e., dust, volatiles (e.g., water vapor) and condensates (e.g., water-ice cloud particles)), Mars' extratropical weather systems have significant sub-synoptic scale ramifications by supporting atmospheric frontal waves (Fig. 1).

  2. Monthly variation of some parameters about internal solitary waves in the South China sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Shuqun; Xie, Jieshuo; Xu, Jiexin; Wang, Dongxiao; Chen, Zhiwu; Deng, Xiaodong; Long, Xiaomin

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, by non-dimensional analysis, it is found that finite-depth theory is more appropriate to the study of internal solitary waves (ISWs) in the South China Sea (SCS) than shallow-water theory. The 1-degree grid data of monthly mean temperature and salinity data at standard levels in the SCS are used to solve the linearized vertical eigenvalue problem. The nonlinear parameter and the wave phase speed are computed, then the nonlinear phase speed and the characteristic half-width of ISWs are calculated respectively by two different theories to investigate the difference between these two parameters in the SCS. The nonlinearity is the strongest near the continental slope of the SCS or islands where the bottom topography changes sharply, it is stronger in summer than that in winter; it increases (decreases) as pycnocline depth deepens (shallows), stratification strengthens (weakens) and pycnocline thickness thins (thickens). The nonlinear wave phase speed and the characteristic half-width are the largest in deep sea area, they then reduce peripherally in shallower water. The nonlinear wave phase speed in the SCS changes slightly with time, but the characteristic half-width changes somewhat larger with time. In most of the SCS basin, the nonlinear wave phase speed derived from shallow-water theory is very close to that derived from finite-depth theory, but the characteristic half-width derived from shallow-water theory is about 0.2-0.6 times larger than that derived from finite-depth theory. The ISW induced horizontal current velocity derived from shallow-water theory is larger than that derived from finite-depth theory. Some observed and numerical modeled ISW characteristic half-widths are compared with those derived from shallow-water and finite-depth theories, respectively. It is shown that, the characteristic half-widths derived from finite-depth theory agree better with observational and numerical modeled results than those derived from shallow

  3. Variation in crossover frequency of EMIC waves in plasmasphere estimated from ion cyclotron whistler waves observed by Van Allen Probe A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Shoya; Kasahara, Yoshiya; Kletzing, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    We report variations in the propagation of the H+ band ion cyclotron whistlers observed by Van Allen Probe A. Ion cyclotron whistlers are one of the EMIC (electromagnetic ion cyclotron) waves generated by mode conversion from lightning whistlers. Crossover frequency is an important frequency for the ion cyclotron whistlers, which is a function of the variations in the local heavy-ion composition. We surveyed waveform data obtained by the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument and Integrated Science instrument and found that 3461 H+ band ion cyclotron whistlers were observed from 572 km to 5992 km in altitude. The main finding is that the crossover frequencies of the observed events decreased with increasing altitude. These results support the hypothesis that the total heavy-ion density decreases with increasing altitude. Furthermore, in 96% of all observed events, the crossover frequencies exceeded 0.5fH+, which suggests that the EMIC dispersion relation contains a frequency gap of around 0.5fH+.

  4. The Effects of Variations in Jet Width on the Growth of Baroclinic Waves: Implications for Midwinter Pacific Storm Track Variability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnik, Nili; Chang, Edmund K. M.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of variations in jet width on the downstream growth of baroclinic waves are studied, using a simple quasigeostrophic model with a vertically varying basic state and variable channel width, as well as a simplified primitive equation model with a basic state that varies in latitude and height. This study is motivated by observations that in midwinter in the Pacific the storm track is weaker and the jet is narrower during years when the jet is strong.The linear models are able to reproduce the observed decrease of spatial growth rate with shear, if the narrowing of the jet is accounted for by assuming it decreases the meridional wavelength of the perturbations, which hampers their growth. A common suggestion has been that perturbations are weaker when the jet is strong because they move faster out of the unstable storm track region. The authors find that one needs to take into account that the jet narrows when it strengthens; otherwise, the increase of growth rate is strong enough to counteract the effect of increased advection speed.It is also found that, when the model basic state is Eady-like (small or zero meridional potential vorticity gradients in the troposphere), the short-wave cutoff for instability moves to large-scale waves as shear is increased, due to the accompanying increase in meridional wavenumber. This results in a transition from a regime where upper-level perturbations spin up a surface circulation very rapidly, and normal-mode growth ensues, to a regime where the initial perturbations take a very long time to excite growth. Since waves slow down when a surface perturbation develops, this can explain the observations that the storm track perturbations are more “upper level” during strong jet years and their group velocities increase faster than linearly with shear.

  5. NDSC millimeter wave ozone observations at Lauder, New Zealand, 1992-1998: Improved methodology, validation, and variation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, J. J.; Connor, B. J.; Parrish, A.; Pierce, R. B.; Boyd, I. S.; Bodeker, G. E.; Chu, W. P.; Russell, J. M.; Swart, D. P. J.; McGee, T. J.

    2000-01-01

    A ground-based millimeter wave radiometer for the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC) was installed at Lauder, New Zealand (45°S, 169.7°E) in November 1992. It has been monitoring the middle atmospheric ozone with nearly continuous operation since then. Owing to special complications in the observing conditions at this southern midlatitude site, three refinements to the data analysis and calibration techniques were proposed: (1) the use of a radiative model of local tropospheric climate adopted to the low surface elevation of the observing site, (2) the correction of observing angle measurements due to the settling of the foundation of the site, and (3) the improved method of radiometric temperature determination of calibration sources. All data from 1992 to 1998 were reprocessed with these modifications implemented. The retrieved ozone profiles are compared to sonde, two lidars, and satellite (Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE), Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II)) overpass measurements. The agreement is very good, with mean differences from 56 to 1 mbar of generally 2-3% for the comparisons with sonde, HALOE, and SAGE II, and generally <5% for the comparisons with lidars when large samples are considered. The root-mean-square scatter about the mean differences is mostly consistent with the expected (combined) precision. In comparisons with these correlative measurements, the millimeter wave ozone observations are found to have no seasonal bias, no comparison bias due to the a priori profiles used in millimeter wave data retrievals, and no observable instrument drift from 1992 to 1998. Better agreement is found in the comparison with sonde data if suspected vertical shifts in the sonde profiles are considered. The variations seen in the 6 year millimeter wave ozone data are shown to be mostly in line with photochemistry and dynamic transport processes in the mid austral latitudes. These processes, however, are apparently

  6. Thermospheric gravity waves near the source - Comparison of variations in neutral temperature and vertical velocity at Sondre Stromfjord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, F. A.; Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Varosi, F.; Meriwether, J. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical predictions of thermospheric gravity wave oscillations are compared with observed neutral temperatures and velocities. The data were taken in February 1983 using a Fabry-Perot interferometer located on Greenland, close to impulse heat sources in the auroral oval. The phenomenon was modeled in terms of linearized equations of motion of the atmosphere on a slowly rotating sphere. Legendre polynomials were used as eigenfunctions and the transfer function amplitude surface was characterized by maxima in the wavenumber frequency plane. Good agreement for predicted and observed velocities and temperatures was attained in the 250-300 km altitude. The amplitude of the vertical velocity, however, was not accurately predicted, nor was the temperature variability. The vertical velocity did exhibit maxima and minima in response to corresponding temperature changes.

  7. Effects of the planetary-scale waves on the temporal variations of the O2-1.27μm nightglow in the Venusian upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, N.; Fujiwara, H.; Takagi, M.; Kasaba, Y.; Takahashi, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The O2-1.27 μm nightglow distribution, which has the peak intensity in the depression region of the day-to-night flow, gives us information of the wind field at about 95 km in Venus. The past nightglow observations [Crisp et al., 1996] showed that the intensity of the nightglow in the brightness region changed by 20 % in about one hour, and the brightness region disappeared in less than one day. The observation results obtained by Venus Express (VEX) also showed the temporal variations of the nightglow emission. Some simulation studies suggested contributions of gravity waves generated in the cloud deck (50-70 km) to the temporal variations. However, the causes of the temporal variations are still unknown. In recent years, the importance of planetary-scale waves for the dynamics of the Venusian atmosphere has been recognized. For example, Takagi and Matsuda [2006] suggested that the atmospheric superrotation was driven by the momentum transport due to the vertical propagation of the thermal tides generated in the Venus cloud deck. In order to estimate effects of the planetary-scale waves on the temporal variations of the nightglow, we have performed numerical simulations with a general circulation model (GCM), which includes the altitude region of 80 - about 200 km. The planetary-scale waves (thermal tides, Kelvin wave and Rosbby wave) are imposed at the lower boundary. The amplitudes and phase velocities of the waves are assumed from the study by Del Genio and Rossow [1990]. The nightglow intensity and its global distribution are calculated from the GCM results assuming the chemical equilibration. In this study, we investigate contributions of the planetary-scale waves on the temporal variations of the nightglow shown by past observations. In addition, we show the characteristics of the wave propagation and the interactions between the waves in the Venusian upper atmosphere. Venus Climate Orbiter (VCO), which will be launched in 2010 as the second Japanese

  8. Mass variation of a thin liquid film driven by an acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batson, W.; Agnon, Y.; Oron, A.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we investigate the dynamics of a thin liquid film subjected to an acoustic field in its bounding vapor space. For large acoustic wavelengths, the field imposes a spatially uniform, temporally periodic temperature and pressure at the vapor side of the film interface, which leads to a periodic driving force for mass exchange with the vapor. Neglecting the dynamics of the vapor space, we adopt the "one-sided" model for evaporation/condensation of thin liquid films. In the interest of determining the effect of oscillatory mass exchange on film stability, we consider films in thermodynamic equilibrium with the mean vapor conditions. The effects of oscillatory phase change on both linear stability and nonlinear dynamics are investigated for slightly inclined ceiling films that are destabilized by gravity and subject to thermocapillary effects. At linear order, this mass exchange is not found to alter the band of unstable wave numbers and only marginally affects the growth rates. Additionally, the mass exchanged during evaporation is balanced by condensation so that the total mass of the liquid film is conserved. However, due to nonlinear effects, we find that traveling waves encouraged by the inclination are subject to net mass loss. It is then found that normal thermocapillary effects enhance this loss, and that anomalous thermocapillarity mitigates or even reverses the loss to a mass gain.

  9. Variational properties and orbital stability of standing waves for NLS equation on a star graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, Riccardo; Cacciapuoti, Claudio; Finco, Domenico; Noja, Diego

    2014-11-01

    We study standing waves for a nonlinear Schrödinger equation on a star graph G, i.e. N halflines joined at a vertex. At the vertex an interaction occurs described by a boundary condition of delta type with strength α⩽0. The nonlinearity is of focusing power type. The dynamics is given by an equation of the form iddtΨt=HΨt-|2μΨt, where H is the Hamiltonian operator which generates the linear Schrödinger dynamics. We show the existence of several families of standing waves for every sign of the coupling at the vertex for every ω>α2N2. Furthermore, we determine the ground states, as minimizers of the action on the Nehari manifold, and order the various families. Finally, we show that the ground states are orbitally stable for every allowed ω if the nonlinearity is subcritical or critical, and for ω<ω* otherwise.

  10. Mass variation of a thin liquid film driven by an acoustic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Batson, W.; Agnon, Y.; Oron, A.

    2015-06-15

    In this work, we investigate the dynamics of a thin liquid film subjected to an acoustic field in its bounding vapor space. For large acoustic wavelengths, the field imposes a spatially uniform, temporally periodic temperature and pressure at the vapor side of the film interface, which leads to a periodic driving force for mass exchange with the vapor. Neglecting the dynamics of the vapor space, we adopt the “one-sided” model for evaporation/condensation of thin liquid films. In the interest of determining the effect of oscillatory mass exchange on film stability, we consider films in thermodynamic equilibrium with the mean vapor conditions. The effects of oscillatory phase change on both linear stability and nonlinear dynamics are investigated for slightly inclined ceiling films that are destabilized by gravity and subject to thermocapillary effects. At linear order, this mass exchange is not found to alter the band of unstable wave numbers and only marginally affects the growth rates. Additionally, the mass exchanged during evaporation is balanced by condensation so that the total mass of the liquid film is conserved. However, due to nonlinear effects, we find that traveling waves encouraged by the inclination are subject to net mass loss. It is then found that normal thermocapillary effects enhance this loss, and that anomalous thermocapillarity mitigates or even reverses the loss to a mass gain.

  11. Accurate rest frequencies for the submillimetre-wave lines of C{3}O in ground and vibrationally excited states below 400 cm-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzocchi, L.; Degli Esposti, C.; Dore, L.

    2008-12-01

    The submillimetre-wave spectrum of C3O (X^1Σ^+) has been investigated in the laboratory using a source-modulation microwave spectrometer equipped with a gas-phase flow pyrolysis system for the production of unstable chemical species. C3O was produced by thermal decomposition of fumaryl chloride at 900 °C. Thirty-seven new rotational transitions were observed in the frequency range 307-740 GHz for the ground vibrational state, reaching a J quantum number as high as 76. Additionally, new millimetre-wave and submillimetre-wave lines were recorded for the bending fundamental v5 = 1, and for its overtones v5 = 2 and v5 = 3 whose rotational spectra have been identified for the first time. The new laboratory measurements provide much improved rest frequencies in the submillimetre spectral region for the ground state spectra of C3O, and for the first levels of its low-energy v5 vibrational ladder, useful for the radioastronomical identification of their rotational lines in the ISM. Tables 5 to 8 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/492/875

  12. Variation of coda wave attenuation in the Alborz region and central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, H.; Motaghi, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Hamzehloo, H.

    2010-06-01

    More than 340 earthquakes recorded by the Institute of Geophysics, University of Tehran (IGUT) short period stations from 1996 to 2004 were analysed to estimate the S-coda attenuation in the Alborz region, the northern part of the Alpine-Himalayan orogen in western Asia, and in central Iran, which is the foreland of this orogen. The coda quality factor, Qc, was estimated using the single backscattering model in frequency bands of 1-25 Hz. In this research, lateral and depth variation of Qc in the Alborz region and central Iran are studied. It is observed that in the Alborz region there is absence of significant lateral variation in Qc. The average frequency relation for this region is Qc = 79 +/- 2f1.07+/-0.08. Two anomalous high-attenuation areas in central Iran are recognized around the stations LAS and RAZ. The average frequency relation for central Iran excluding the values of these two stations is Qc = 94 +/- 2f0.97+/-0.12. To investigate the attenuation variation with depth, Qc value was calculated for 14 lapse times (25, 30, 35,... 90s) for two data sets having epicentral distance range R < 100 km (data set 1) and 100 < R < 200 km (data set 2) in each area. It is observed that Qc increases with depth. However, the rate of increase of Qc with depth is not uniform in our study area. Beneath central Iran the rate of increase of Qc is greater at depths less than 100 km compared to that at larger depths indicating the existence of a high attenuation anomalous structure under the lithosphere of central Iran. In addition, below ~180 km, the Qc value does not vary much with depth under both study areas, indicating the presence of a transparent mantle under them.

  13. Fiber-optic voltage sensor with cladded fiber and evanescent wave variation detection

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Charles B.

    1992-01-01

    A fiber optic voltage sensor is described which includes a source of light, a reference fiber for receiving a known percentage of the light and an electrostrictive element having terminals across which is applied, a voltage to be measured. The electrostrictive element is responsive to the applied voltage to assume an altered physical state. A measuring fiber also receives a known percentage of light from the light source and is secured about the electrostrictive element. The measuring fiber is provided with a cladding and exhibits an evanescent wave in the cladding. The measuring fiber has a known length which is altered when the electrostrictive element assumes its altered physical state. A differential sensor is provided which senses the intensity of light in both the reference fiber and the measuring fiber and provides an output indicative of the difference between the intensities.

  14. Fiber-optic voltage sensor with cladded fiber and evanescent wave variation detection

    DOEpatents

    Wood, C.B.

    1992-12-15

    A fiber optic voltage sensor is described which includes a source of light, a reference fiber for receiving a known percentage of the light and an electrostrictive element having terminals across which is applied, a voltage to be measured. The electrostrictive element is responsive to the applied voltage to assume an altered physical state. A measuring fiber also receives a known percentage of light from the light source and is secured about the electrostrictive element. The measuring fiber is provided with a cladding and exhibits an evanescent wave in the cladding. The measuring fiber has a known length which is altered when the electrostrictive element assumes its altered physical state. A differential sensor is provided which senses the intensity of light in both the reference fiber and the measuring fiber and provides an output indicative of the difference between the intensities. 3 figs.

  15. Shear wave velocity variation across the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand, from receiver function inversion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bannister, S.; Bryan, C.J.; Bibby, H.M.

    2004-01-01

    The Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand is a region characterized by very high magma eruption rates and extremely high heat flow, which is manifest in high-temperature geothermal waters. The shear wave velocity structure across the region is inferred using non-linear inversion of receiver functions, which were derived from teleseismic earthquake data. Results from the non-linear inversion, and from forward synthetic modelling, indicate low S velocities at ???6- 16 km depth near the Rotorua and Reporoa calderas. We infer these low-velocity layers to represent the presence of high-level bodies of partial melt associated with the volcanism. Receiver functions at other stations are complicated by reverberations associated with near-surface sedimentary layers. The receiver function data also indicate that the Moho lies between 25 and 30 km, deeper than the 15 ?? 2 km depth previously inferred for the crust-mantle boundary beneath the TVZ. ?? 2004 RAS.

  16. QuantiSNP: an Objective Bayes Hidden-Markov Model to detect and accurately map copy number variation using SNP genotyping data.

    PubMed

    Colella, Stefano; Yau, Christopher; Taylor, Jennifer M; Mirza, Ghazala; Butler, Helen; Clouston, Penny; Bassett, Anne S; Seller, Anneke; Holmes, Christopher C; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    2007-01-01

    Array-based technologies have been used to detect chromosomal copy number changes (aneuploidies) in the human genome. Recent studies identified numerous copy number variants (CNV) and some are common polymorphisms that may contribute to disease susceptibility. We developed, and experimentally validated, a novel computational framework (QuantiSNP) for detecting regions of copy number variation from BeadArray SNP genotyping data using an Objective Bayes Hidden-Markov Model (OB-HMM). Objective Bayes measures are used to set certain hyperparameters in the priors using a novel re-sampling framework to calibrate the model to a fixed Type I (false positive) error rate. Other parameters are set via maximum marginal likelihood to prior training data of known structure. QuantiSNP provides probabilistic quantification of state classifications and significantly improves the accuracy of segmental aneuploidy identification and mapping, relative to existing analytical tools (Beadstudio, Illumina), as demonstrated by validation of breakpoint boundaries. QuantiSNP identified both novel and validated CNVs. QuantiSNP was developed using BeadArray SNP data but it can be adapted to other platforms and we believe that the OB-HMM framework has widespread applicability in genomic research. In conclusion, QuantiSNP is a novel algorithm for high-resolution CNV/aneuploidy detection with application to clinical genetics, cancer and disease association studies. PMID:17341461

  17. Systematic variation in anisotropy beneath the mantle wedge in the Java-Sumatra subduction system from shear-wave splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, J. O. S.; Wookey, J.; Kaneshima, S.; Inoue, H.; Yamashina, T.; Harjadi, P.

    2010-02-01

    The tectonic context of south-east Asia is dominated by subduction. One such major convergent boundary is the Java-Sunda trench, where the Australian-Indian plates are being subducted beneath the Eurasian plate. We measure shear-wave splitting in local and teleseismic data from 12 broadband stations across Sumatra and Java to study the anisotropic characteristics of this subduction system, which can provide important constraints on dynamical processes involved. Splitting in S-waves from local earthquakes between 75 and 300 km deep show roughly trench parallel fast directions, and with time-lags 0.1-1.3 s (92% ≤0.6 s). Splitting from deeper local events and SKS, however, shows larger time-lags (0.8-2.0 s) and significant variation in fast direction. In order to infer patterns of deformation in the slab we apply a hybrid modelling scheme. We raytrace through an isotropic subduction zone velocity model, obtaining event to station raypaths in the upper mantle. We then apply appropriately rotated olivine elastic constants to various parts of the subduction zone, and predict the shear-wave splitting accrued along the raypath. Finally, we perform grid searches for orientation of deformation, and attempt to minimise the misfit between predicted and observed shear-wave splitting. Splitting from the shallow local events is best explained by anisotropy confined to a 40 km over-riding plate with horizontal, trench parallel deformation. However, in order to explain the larger lag times from SKS and deeper events, we must consider an additional region of seismic anisotropy in or around the slab. The slab geometry in the model is constrained by seismicity and regional tomography models, and many SKS raypaths travel large distances within the slab. Models placing anisotropy in the slab produce smaller misfits than those with anisotropy outside for most stations. There is a strong indication that inferred flow directions are different for sub-Sumatran stations than for sub

  18. Evaluation of lexicon size variations on a verification and rejection system based on SVM, for accurate and robust recognition of handwritten words

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricquebourg, Yann; Coüasnon, Bertrand; Guichard, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    The transcription of handwritten words remains a still challenging and difficult task. When processing full pages, approaches are limited by the trade-off between automatic recognition errors and the tedious aspect of human user verification. In this article, we present our investigations to improve the capabilities of an automatic recognizer, so as to be able to reject unknown words (not to take wrong decisions) while correctly rejecting (i.e. to recognize as much as possible from the lexicon of known words). This is the active research topic of developing a verification system that optimize the trade-off between performance and reliability. To minimize the recognition errors, a verification system is usually used to accept or reject the hypotheses produced by an existing recognition system. Thus, we re-use our novel verification architecture1 here: the recognition hypotheses are re-scored by a set of support vector machines, and validated by a verification mechanism based on multiple rejection thresholds. In order to tune these (class-dependent) rejection thresholds, an algorithm based on dynamic programming has been proposed which focus on maximizing the recognition rate for a given error rate. Experiments have been carried out on the RIMES database in three steps. The first two showed that this approach results in a performance superior or equal to other state-of-the-art rejection methods. We focus here on the third one showing that this verification system also greatly improves results of keywords extraction in a set of handwritten words, with a strong robustness to lexicon size variations (21 lexicons have been tested from 167 entries up to 5,600 entries) which is particularly relevant to our application context cooperating with humans, and only made possible thanks to the rejection ability of this proposed system. The proposed verification system, compared to a HMM with simple rejection, improves on average the recognition rate by 57% (resp. 33% and 21%) for

  19. Variational solution of the three-dimensional Schrödinger equation using plane waves in adaptive coordinates.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Jordá, José M

    2011-11-28

    A series of improvements for the solution of the three-dimensional Schrödinger equation over a method introduced by Gygi [F. Gygi, Europhys. Lett. 19, 617 (1992); F. Gygi, Phys. Rev. B 48, 11692 (1993)] are presented. As in the original Gygi's method, the solution (orbital) is expressed by means of plane waves in adaptive coordinates u, where u is mapped from Cartesian coordinates, u=f(r). The improvements implemented are threefold. First, maps are introduced that allow the application of the method to atoms and molecules without the assistance of the supercell approximation. Second, the electron-nucleus singularities are exactly removed, so that pseudo-potentials are no longer required. Third, the sampling error during integral evaluation is made negligible, which results in a true variational, second-order energy error procedure. The method is tested on the hydrogen atom (ground and excited states) and the H(2)(+) molecule, resulting in milli-Hartree accuracy with a moderate number of plane waves. PMID:22128925

  20. Mixed augmented variational formulation (MAVF) for lower hybrid full-wave calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peysson, Y.; Roche, J. R.; Bertrand, P.; Chatenet, J.-H.; Kirsch, C.; Mokrani, A.; Labrunie, S.

    2009-11-01

    In the continuation of the works led in cylindrical geometry [2], a full toroidal description for an arbitrary poloidal cross-section of the plasma has been developed. For simulation purpose a mixed augmented variational formulation (MAVF), which is particularly well suited for solving Maxwell equations, is considered [4]. The discretization of the MAVF is carried out using Taylor-Hood P2-iso-P1 finite elements. This formulation provide a natural implementation for parallel processing, a particularly important aspect when simulations for plasmas of large size must be considered. Details on the specific application of the MAVF to the LH problem are presented, as well as the structure of the corresponding matrices. A first application to a realistic small tokamak configuration is considered.

  1. Interannual variation of the quasi-two-day wave at 22.7 S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Lourivaldo; Jacobi, Christoph; Batista, Paulo; Rodrigues de Araujo, Luciana; Rodrigues, Chayenny E. S.; Lilienthal, Friederike

    2016-07-01

    In the present investigation, the mesosphere/lower thermosphere winds at Cachoeira Paulista (22.7° S, 45.0° W) obtained by a VHF all sky interferometric meteor radar have been used to investigate the interannual variability of the quasi-two-day wave (QTDW) amplitudes at a low latitude in the Southern Hemisphere. The wind data were obtained from December 1999 to July 2006, from September 2007 to October 2008 and from December 2013 to April 2015. The analysis shows that meridional amplitudes for QTDW are larger than zonal amplitudes and the strongest amplitudes occur after austral summer solstice in January-February. Besides semiannual and annual oscillations, the QTDW amplitudes in the meridional winds also show weak quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO). The summer QTDW in the meridional winds also shows a possible correlation with solar activity. The amplitudes are nearly in phase with the 11 year solar cycle, and the solar maxima leads the QTDW maxima by one year. Finally, larger QTDW amplifications have been observed during 2003, 2004, 2006 and 2015 summers. The unusual major sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) event suggests a coupling between QTDW amplification and SSW during Jan-Feb 2006. The mechanistic global circulation model MUAM of the middle and upper atmosphere has been used to simulate the dynamic configuration during January major and minor SSW events.

  2. Toward efficient light diffraction and intensity variations by using wide bandwidth surface acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Ok; Chen, Fu; Lee, Kee Keun

    2016-06-01

    We have developed acoustic-optic (AO) based display units for implementing a handheld hologram display by modulating light deflection through wide bandwidth surface acoustic wave (SAW). The developed AO device consists of a metal layer, a ZnS waveguide layer, SAW inter digital transducers (IDTs), and a screen for display. When RF power with a particular resonant frequency was applied to IDTs, SAW was radiated and interfered with confined beam propagating along ZnS waveguide layer. The AO interacted beam was deflected laterally toward a certain direction depending on Bragg diffraction condition, exited out of the waveguide layer and then directed to the viewing screen placed at a certain distance from the device to form a single pixel. The deflected angles was adjusted by modulating the center frequency of the SAW IDT (SAW grating), the RF power of SAW, and the angles between propagating light beam path along waveguide and radiating SAW. The diffraction efficiency was also characterized in terms of waveguide thickness, SAW RF input power, and aperture length. Coupling of mode (COM) modeling was fulfilled to find optimal device parameters prior to fabrication. All the parameters affecting the deflection angle and efficiency to form a pixel for a three-dimensional (3D) hologram image were characterized and then discussed.

  3. Influence of resonant transducer variations on long range guided wave monitoring of rail track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveday, Philip W.; Long, Craig S.

    2016-02-01

    The ability of certain guided wave modes to propagate long distances in continuously welded rail track is exploited in permanently installed monitoring systems. Previous work demonstrated that reflections from thermite welds could be measured at distances of the order of 1 km from a transducer array. The availability of numerous thermite welds is useful during the development of a monitoring system as real defects are not available. Measurements of reflections from welds were performed over an eleven month period with two permanently installed transducers. Phased array processing was performed and the true location of a weld is indicated by a strong reflection but there is generally also a smaller, spurious replica reflection, at the same distance but in the incorrect direction. In addition, the relative reflection from different welds appears to change over time. The influence of differences between the two resonant transducers was investigated using a model. It was found that estimating the attenuation in either direction and scaling the reflections in either direction decreased the variability in the reflection measurements. Transducer interaction effects, where the transducer closer to the weld records a greater reflection than the second transducer were observed and can be used to determine the direction of a weld. This feature was used to demonstrate a simple alternative to phased array processing that can be used with resonant transducers.

  4. A comprehensive survey of atmospheric quasi 3 day planetary-scale waves and their impacts on the day-to-day variations of the equatorial ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guiping; England, Scott L.; Immel, Thomas J.; Frey, Harald U.; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Mitchell, Nicholas J.

    2015-04-01

    This study reports a comprehensive survey of quasi 3 day (2.5-4.5 day period) planetary-scale waves in the low-latitude mesosphere and lower thermosphere using the temperature observations from Thermosphere Ionosphere and Mesosphere Electric Dynamics/Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry throughout 2002-2012. Occurrences and properties of the waves, including the eastward propagating zonal wave numbers of 1-3 (E1-E3) and vertical wavelengths, are determined for each case. The impacts of these waves on the equatorial ionosphere are investigated by searching for the corresponding variations with the same periods and wave numbers in total electron content (TEC) from the concurrent observations of the ground-based GPS network. For a threshold amplitude of 4 K in temperature, a total of 300 waves are identified, of which there are 186 E1, 63 E2, and 51 E3 events. The mean amplitudes and vertical wavelengths of these waves are calculated to be about 7.9 K and 34 km for the E1, 5.7 K and 29 km for the E2, and 5.1 K and 27 km for the E3, having the standard deviations of 1.5 K and 6.5 km, 0.6 K and 5.6 km, and 0.5 K and 6.7 km. Occurrences of the E1 cases are not observed to depend on season, but the large-amplitude (>8 K) cases occur more often during solstices than at equinoxes. Similarly, the E2 and E3 cases are observed to occur most often in January-February and May-August. Among these waves, 199 cases (66%) are found to have the corresponding variations in the equatorial ionosphere with amplitudes ≥4.2% relative to the mean TEC values (corresponding to 90th percentile). Most of these waves have long vertical wavelengths and large amplitudes (˜3 times more than short vertical wavelength and small-amplitude waves). Because no seasonal or solar cycle dependence on the frequency at which these waves have corresponding variations in the ionosphere at this TEC perturbation threshold is observed, we conclude that there is no seasonal and solar

  5. Nadir sensitivity of passive millimeter and submillimeter wave channels to clear air temperature and water vapor variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Marian; Gasiewski, Albin J.

    2000-07-01

    The upwelling microwave-to-submillimeter wave brightness temperature observed from above the Earth's atmosphere is sensitive to parameters such as pressure, temperature, water vapor, and hydrometeor content, and this sensitivity has been successfully used for passive vertical sounding of temperature and water vapor profiles. To determine optimal satellite observation strategies for future passive microwave instruments operating at frequencies above those now used, a study of the potential clear-air vertical sounding capabilities of all significant microwave oxygen and water vapor absorption lines in the frequency range from approximately 10 to 1000 GHz has been performed. The study is based on a second-order statistical climatological model covering four seasons, three latitudinal zones, and altitudes up to ˜70 km. The climatological model was developed by comparing data from three sources: the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite Halogen Occultation Experiment (UARS HALOE) instrument, the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) Initial Guess Retrieval radiosonde set, and the NOAA advanced microwave sounder unit (AMSU) radiosonde set. The Liebe MPM87 absorption model is used for water vapor and oxygen absorption and considers the effects of ozone and isotope absorption. Variations in the vertical sounding capabilities due to statistical variations of water vapor and temperature with latitude and season around each line are considered, and useful channel sets for geostationary microwave vertical sounding are suggested.

  6. Local time variation of high-frequency gravity wave momentum flux and its relationship with background wind derived from LIDAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agner, R. M.; Liu, A. Z.

    2013-12-01

    Gravity waves and atmospheric tides have strong interactions in the mesopause region and is a major contributor to the large variabilities in this region. How these two large perturbations interact with each other is not well understood. Observational studies of their relationships are needed to help clarify some contradictory results from modeling studies. Due to large differences in temporal and spatial scales between gravity waves and tides, they are not easily observed simultaneously and consistently with extended periods of time. In this work, we use four-hundred hours of Na LIDAR observation at Starfire Optical Range (SOR, 35.0 N, 106.5 W), New Mexico to derive the local time variation of gravity wave momentum flux and corresponding background wind. Their relationship is then examined in detail. The effects of gravity waves on the background wind at the tidal time scale are deduced. These results are explained through gravity wave propagation in a varying background atmosphere.

  7. Is scoring system of computed tomography based metric parameters can accurately predicts shock wave lithotripsy stone-free rates and aid in the development of treatment strategies?

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Yasser Ali; Abdelaziz, Alsayed Saad; Shehab, Mohamed Ahmed; Mohamed, Hazem Abdelsabour Dief; Emara, Absel-Aziz Ali; Elnabtity, Ali Mohamed Ali; Ghanem, Maged Mohammed; ELHelaly, Hesham Abdel Azim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to determine the predicting success of shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) using a combination of computed tomography based metric parameters to improve the treatment plan. Patients and Methods: Consecutive 180 patients with symptomatic upper urinary tract calculi 20 mm or less were enrolled in our study underwent extracorporeal SWL were divided into two main groups, according to the stone size, Group A (92 patients with stone ≤10 mm) and Group B (88 patients with stone >10 mm). Both groups were evaluated, according to the skin to stone distance (SSD) and Hounsfield units (≤500, 500–1000 and >1000 HU). Results: Both groups were comparable in baseline data and stone characteristics. About 92.3% of Group A rendered stone-free, whereas 77.2% were stone-free in Group B (P = 0.001). Furthermore, in both group SWL success rates was a significantly higher for stones with lower attenuation <830 HU than with stones >830 HU (P < 0.034). SSD were statistically differences in SWL outcome (P < 0.02). Simultaneous consideration of three parameters stone size, stone attenuation value, and SSD; we found that stone-free rate (SFR) was 100% for stone attenuation value <830 HU for stone <10 mm or >10 mm but total number SWL sessions and shock waves required for the larger stone group were higher than in the smaller group (P < 0.01). Furthermore, SFR was 83.3% and 37.5% for stone <10 mm, mean HU >830, SSD 90 mm and SSD >120 mm, respectively. On the other hand, SFR was 52.6% and 28.57% for stone >10 mm, mean HU >830, SSD <90 mm and SSD >120 mm, respectively. Conclusion: Stone size, stone density (HU), and SSD is simple to calculate and can be reported by radiologists to applying combined score help to augment predictive power of SWL, reduce cost, and improving of treatment strategies. PMID:27141192

  8. A New Global Model for 3-D variations in P Wave Speed in Earth's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karason, H.; van der Hilst, R. D.; Li, C.

    2003-12-01

    In an effort to improve the resolution of mantle structure we have combined complementary data sets of short- and long period (absolute and differential) travel time residuals. Our new model is based on short period P (N\\~7.7x10**6), pP (N\\~2.3x10**5), and PKP (N\\~16x10**4) data from the catalog by Engdahl et al (BSSA, 1998), short-period PKP differential times (N\\~1600) measured by McSweeney & Creager, and long-period differential PP-P times - N\\~20,000 measured by Bolton & Masters and N\\~18,000 by Ritsema - and Pdiff-PKP (N\\~560) measured by Wysession. Inversion tests, spectral analysis, and comparison with geology indicate that the large-scale upper mantle structure is better constrained with the addition of PP-P, whereas the Pdiff and PKP data help constrain deep mantle structure (Karason & Van der Hilst, JGR, 2001). The long period data were measured by cross-correlation. We solved the system of equations using 400 iterations of the iterative algorithm LSQR For the short period (1 Hz) data we use a high frequency approximation and trace rays through a fine grid of constant slowness cells to invert for mantle structure. For low frequency Pdiff and PP data we account for sensitivity to structure away from the optical ray path with 3-D Frechet derivatives (sensitivity kernels) estimated from single forward scattering and projected onto basis functions (constant slowness blocks) used for model parameterization. With such kernels the low frequency data can constrain long wavelength heterogeneity without keeping the short period data from mapping details in densely sampled regions. In addition to finite frequency sensitivity kernels we optimized the localization by using a parameterization that adapts to spatial resolution, with small cells in regions of dense sampling and larger cells in regions where sampling is more sparse (the total number of cells was \\~ 350,000). Finally, we corrected all travel times and surface reflections for lateral variations in

  9. Features of amplitude and Doppler frequency variation of ELF/VLF waves generated by "beat-wave" HF heating at high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tereshchenko, E. D.; Shumilov, O. I.; Kasatkina, E. A.; Gomonov, A. D.

    2014-07-01

    Observations of extremely low frequency (ELF, 3-3000 Hz) radio waves generated by a "beat-wave" (BW) high frequency (~ 4.04-4.9 MHz) ionospheric heating are presented. ELF waves were registered with the ELF receiver located at Lovozero (68°N, 35°E), 660 km east from the European Incoherent Scatter Tromso heating facility (69.6°N, 19.2°E). Frequency shifts between the generated beat-wave and received ELF waves were detected in all sessions. It is shown that the amplitudes of ELF waves depend on the auroral electrojet current strength. Our results showing a strong dependence of ELF signal intensities on the substorm development seem to support the conclusion that electrojet currents may affect the BW generation of ELF/VLF waves.

  10. Effects of the gravitational waves emission on the orbit of the binary neutron stars considering the mass variation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabrouk, Zeinab; Rahoma, W. A.

    2016-07-01

    Gravitational waves which have been announced finally to be detected in February 11, 2016 are believed to be emitted from many sources and phenomena in the universe, the binary neutron stars systems specially the inspirals are one kind of them. In this paper we are going to calculate the effects of this emission on the elements of the elliptical orbits of such binary neutron stars before the onset of the mass exchange. We based our work on the Imshennik and Popov (1994) paper then we do some modifications. The main and important results that Imshennik and Popov get were the rate of change of the eccentricity e, the rate of change of the semi major axis a, and the monotonic dependence between them a=a(e). Finally they concluded the smallness of the final eccentricity which make the orbits to be near-circular due to the emission of the gravitational waves. Our modification is to consider the masses of the two binary stars to be varied using the famous Eddington-Jeams law, then we expand them around the time t using Taylor expansion. we do this variation first for one mass with the constancy of the second one, then we let both mosses to vary together. We start the algorithm from the beginning substituting with our new series of masses in the two main equations, the average rate of change of the total energy of the system (dE/dt) , and the average rate of change of the angular momentum (dJ/dt). This modification leads to new expressions of the previous mentioned rate of changes of the orbital elements obtained by Imshennik and Popov, some of them we obtained and still working in the rest.

  11. Variational solution of the Schrödinger equation using plane waves in adaptive coordinates: The radial case.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Jordá, José M

    2010-01-14

    A new method for solving the Schrödinger equation is proposed, based on the following details. First, a map u=u(r) from Cartesian coordinates r to a new coordinate system u is chosen. Second, the solution (orbital) psi(r) is written in terms of a function U depending on u so that psi(r)=/J(u)/(-1/2)U(u), where /J(u)/ is the Jacobian determinant of the map. Third, U is expressed as a linear combination of plane waves in the u coordinate, U(u)= sum (k)c(k)e(ik x u). Finally, the coefficients c(k) are variationally optimized to obtain the best energy, using a generalization of an algorithm originally developed for the Coulomb potential [J. M. Perez-Jorda, Phys. Rev. B 58, 1230 (1998)]. The method is tested for the radial Schrödinger equation in the hydrogen atom, resulting in micro-Hartree accuracy or better for the energy of ns and np orbitals (with n up to 5) using expansions of moderate length. PMID:20095666

  12. Interdecadal variations and trends of the Urban Heat Island in Athens (Greece) and its response to heat waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Founda, D.; Pierros, F.; Petrakis, M.; Zerefos, C.

    2015-07-01

    The study explores the interdecadal and seasonal variability of the urban heat island (UHI) intensity in the city of Athens. Daily air temperature data from a set of urban and surrounding non urban stations over the period 1970-2004 were used. Nighttime and daytime heat island revealed different characteristics as regards the mean amplitude, seasonal variability and temporal variation and trends. The difference of the annual mean air temperature between urban and rural stations exhibited a progressive statistically significant increase over the studied period, with rates equal to + 0.2 °C/decade. A gradual and constant increase of the daytime UHI intensity was detected, in contrast to the nighttime UHI intensity which increases only in summer, after the mid 1980s. UHI phenomenon was found to be related to higher increasing rates of hot days frequency at the urban stations. It was found that the interaction between heat waves and heat island in Athens, results to pronounced amplification of nocturnal UHI intensity under exceptionally hot weather.

  13. Lower Hybrid Wave Induced SOL Emissivity Variation at High Density on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, I.; Terry, J. L.; Reinke, M. L.; Meneghini, O.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G. M.; Parker, R. R.; Schmidt, A. E.; Wilson, J. R.

    2011-12-23

    Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak provides current profile control for the generation of Advanced Tokamak (AT) plasmas. Non-thermal electron bremsstrahlung emission decreases dramatically at n-bar{sub e}>1{center_dot}10{sup 20}[m{sup -3}] for diverted discharges, indicating low current drive efficiency. It is suggested that Scrape-Off-Layer (SOL) collisional absorption of LH waves is the cause for the absence of non-thermal electrons at high density. VUV and visible spectroscopy in the SOL provide direct information on collision excitation processes. Deuterium Balmer-, Lyman- and He-I transition emission measurements were used for initial characterization of SOL electron-neutral collisional absorption. Data from Helium and Deuterium LHCD discharges were characterized by an overall increase in the emissivity as well as an outward radial shift in the emissivity profile with increasing plasma density and applied LHCD power. High-temperature, high-field (T{sub e} = 5keV,B{sub t} = 8T) helium discharges at high density display increased non-thermal signatures as well as reduced SOL emissivity. Variations in emissivity due to LHCD were seen in SOL regions not magnetically connected to the LH Launcher, indicating global SOL effects due to LHCD.

  14. Dissipation of atmospheric waves: An asymptotic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Oleg A.

    2014-05-01

    Wave energy dissipation through irreversible thermodynamic processes is a major factor influencing propagation of acoustic and gravity waves in the Earth's atmosphere. Accurate modeling of the wave dissipation is important in a wide range of problems from understanding the momentum and energy transport by waves into the upper atmosphere to predicting long-range propagation of infrasound to the acoustic remote sensing of mesospheric and thermospheric winds. Variations with height of the mass density, kinematic viscosity, and other physical parameters of the atmosphere have a profound effect on the wave dissipation and its frequency dependence. To characterize the wave dissipation, it is typical to consider an idealized environment, which admits plane-wave solutions. For instance, kinematic viscosity is often assumed to be constant in derivations of dispersion equations of acoustic-gravity waves in the atmosphere. While the assumption of constant shear viscosity coefficient would be much more realistic, it does not lead to plane-wave solutions. Here, we use an asymptotic approach to derivation of dispersion equations of acoustic-gravity waves in dissipative fluids. The approach does not presuppose existence of any plane-wave solutions and relies instead on the assumption that spatial variations of environmental parameters are gradual. The atmosphere is modeled as a neutral, horizontally stratified, moving ideal gas of variable composition. Linearized hydrodynamic equations for compressible fluids in a gravity field are solved asymptotically, leading to a self-consistent version of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation for acoustic-gravity waves. Dissipative processes are found to affect both the eikonal and the geometric (Berry) phase of the wave. Newly found expressions for acoustic-gravity wave attenuation due to viscosity and thermal conductivity of the air are compared to results previously reported in the literature. Effects of the wind on the wave

  15. Energies and wave functions of an off-centre donor in hemispherical quantum dot: Two-dimensional finite difference approach and ritz variational principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakra Mohajer, Soukaina; El Harouny, El Hassan; Ibral, Asmaa; El Khamkhami, Jamal; Assaid, El Mahdi

    2016-09-01

    Eigenvalues equation solutions of a hydrogen-like donor impurity, confined in a hemispherical quantum dot deposited on a wetting layer and capped by an insulating matrix, are determined in the framework of the effective mass approximation. Conduction band alignments at interfaces between quantum dot and surrounding materials are described by infinite height barriers. Ground and excited states energies and wave functions are determined analytically and via one-dimensional finite difference approach in case of an on-center donor. Donor impurity is then moved from center to pole of hemispherical quantum dot and eigenvalues equation is solved via Ritz variational principle, using a trial wave function where Coulomb attraction between electron and ionized donor is taken into account, and by two-dimensional finite difference approach. Numerical codes developed enable access to variations of donor total energy, binding energy, Coulomb correlation parameter, spatial extension and radial probability density with respect to hemisphere radius and impurity position inside the quantum dot.

  16. Seasonal variation of wave activities near the mesopause region observed at King Sejong Station (62.22°S, 58.78°W), Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changsup; Kim, Yong Ha; Kim, Jeong-Han; Jee, Geonhwa; Won, Young-In; Wu, Dong L.

    2013-12-01

    We analyzed the neutral wind data at altitudes of 80-100 km obtained from a VHF meteor radar at King Sejong Station (KSS, 62.22°S, 58.78°W), a key location to study wave activities above the stratospheric vortex near the Antarctic Peninsula. The seasonal behavior of the semidiurnal tides is generally consistent with the prediction of Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM02) except in the altitude region above ~96 km. Gravity wave (GW) activities inferred from the neutral wind variances show a seasonal variation very similar to the semidiurnal tide amplitudes, suggesting a strong interaction between gravity waves and the tide. Despite the consistent seasonal variations of the GW wind variances observed at the adjacent Rothera station, the magnitudes of the wind variance obtained at KSS are much larger than those at Rothera, especially during May-September. The enhanced GW activity at KSS is also observed by Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) from space in its temperature variance. The observed large wind variances at KSS imply that the Antarctic vortex in the stratosphere may act as an effective filter and source for the GWs in the upper atmosphere.

  17. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  18. Evaluating future flooding risks by using a probabilistic approach to include wave height distributions in sea level variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leijala, Ulpu; Björkqvist, Jan-Victor; Kahma, Kimmo K.; Johansson, Milla M.; Pellikka, Hilkka; Särkkä, Jani

    2016-04-01

    Assessing sea flood risks has an essential role in future coastal planning as climate change drives forward the global sea level rise. Safe planning of land utilization and building in coastal areas requires capability to estimate sea level behaviour all the way to 100-200 years ahead. The coastal effect of the sea level is always affected also by the wave conditions, which may vary greatly depending on location. An archipelago acts as an efficient shield against the largest waves penetrating to the shoreline. However, part of the energy of the waves passes through the archipelago and coastal wave height conditions, depending for example on the shape of the shoreline and topography of the seabed, must be evaluated close to the shore separately. The probability of high sea level and wind generated high waves occurring simultaneously is lower than the probability of one of the components occurring alone. Summing the maximum sea level and maximum wave height components together can thus lead to an overestimation of the joint effect. For this reason a method based on probability distributions is reasonable and preferable. In this study, a method of combining sea level and wave height distributions using a location specific probability approach is introduced. First estimates of the joint effect of high sea level and high waves at several locations at the archipelago area on the southern coast of Finland are presented. Constructing sea level scenarios including the effect of wind waves until the end of the century demands knowledge of both sea level and wave height variability in the past, and global mean sea level predictions for the future. In our study, an estimate of short-term sea level variability is based on 30 years (1982-2011) of hourly data from the Helsinki tide gauge located on the coast of the Gulf of Finland. Future predictions for the long-term mean sea level changes at Helsinki are based on scenarios taking into account the global mean sea level rise

  19. The 27-day versus 13.5-day variations in the solar Lyman-alpha radiation and the radio wave absorption in the lower ionosphere over Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delamorena, B. A.; Lastovicka, Jan; Rapoport, Z. TS.; Alberca, L.

    1989-01-01

    In order to clarify the question of solar periods in absorption, the pattern was studied of the solar Lyman-alpha radiation (the principal ionizing agent of the lower ionosphere) and of the radio wave absorption at five widely spaced places in Europe. When the solar Lyman-alpha flux variability is very well developed, then it dominates in the lower ionospheric variability. The most pronounced Lyman-alpha variation on time scale day-month is the solar rotation variation (about 27 days). When the Lyman-alpha variability is developed rather poorly, as it is typical for periods dominated by the 13.5 day variability, then the lower ionospheric variability appears to be dominated by variations of meteorological origin. The conclusions hold for all five widely spaced placed in Europe.

  20. Effect of spatial density variation and O+ concentration on the growth and evolution of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Denton, R. E.; Jordanova, V. K.; Fraser, B. J.

    2014-10-01

    We simulate electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave growth and evolution within three regions, the plasmasphere (or plasmaspheric plume), the plasmapause, and the low-density plasmatrough outside the plasmapause. First, we use a ring current simulation with a plasmasphere model to model the particle populations that give rise to the instability for conditions observed on 9 June 2001. Then, using two different models for the cold ion composition, we do a full scale hybrid code simulation in dipole coordinates of the EMIC waves on a meridional plane at MLT = 18 and at 1900 UT within a range of L shell frommore » L = 4.9 to 6.7. EMIC waves were observed during June 9, 2001 by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) spacecraft. While an exact comparison between observed and simulated spectra is not possible here, we do find significant similarities between the two, at least at one location within the region of largest wave growth. We find that the plasmapause is not a preferred region for EMIC wave growth, though waves can grow in that region. The density gradient within the plasmapause does, however, affect the orientation of wave fronts and wave vector both within the plasmapause and in adjacent regions. There is a preference for EMIC waves to be driven in the He+ band (frequencies between the O+ and He+ gyrofrequencies) within the plasmasphere, although they can also grow in the plasmatrough. If present, H+ band waves are more likely to grow in the plasmatrough. This fact, plus L dependence of the frequency and possible time evolution toward lower frequency waves, can be explained by a simple model. Large O+ concentration limits the frequency range of or even totally quenches EMIC waves. This is more likely to occur in the plasmatrough at solar maximum. Such large O+ concentration significantly affects the H+ cutoff frequency and hence the width in frequency of the stop band above the He+ gyrofrequency. EMIC wave surfaces predicted by cold

  1. Effect of spatial density variation and O+ concentration on the growth and evolution of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, R. E.; Jordanova, V. K.; Fraser, B. J.

    2014-10-01

    We simulate electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave growth and evolution within three regions, the plasmasphere (or plasmaspheric plume), the plasmapause, and the low-density plasmatrough outside the plasmapause. First, we use a ring current simulation with a plasmasphere model to model the particle populations that give rise to the instability for conditions observed on 9 June 2001. Then, using two different models for the cold ion composition, we do a full scale hybrid code simulation in dipole coordinates of the EMIC waves on a meridional plane at MLT = 18 and at 1900 UT within a range of L shell from L = 4.9 to 6.7. EMIC waves were observed during June 9, 2001 by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) spacecraft. While an exact comparison between observed and simulated spectra is not possible here, we do find significant similarities between the two, at least at one location within the region of largest wave growth. We find that the plasmapause is not a preferred region for EMIC wave growth, though waves can grow in that region. The density gradient within the plasmapause does, however, affect the orientation of wave fronts and wave vector both within the plasmapause and in adjacent regions. There is a preference for EMIC waves to be driven in the He+ band (frequencies between the O+ and He+ gyrofrequencies) within the plasmasphere, although they can also grow in the plasmatrough. If present, H+ band waves are more likely to grow in the plasmatrough. This fact, plus L dependence of the frequency and possible time evolution toward lower frequency waves, can be explained by a simple model. Large O+ concentration limits the frequency range of or even totally quenches EMIC waves. This is more likely to occur in the plasmatrough at solar maximum. Such large O+ concentration significantly affects the H+ cutoff frequency and hence the width in frequency of the stop band above the He+ gyrofrequency. EMIC wave surfaces predicted by cold plasma theory

  2. Evidence for MAC waves at the top of Earth's core and implications for variations in length of day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffett, Bruce; Knezek, Nicholas; Holme, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Earth's liquid core hosts a diverse set of waves with periods ranging from days to thousands of years. One class of waves with periods of several decades is known to arise from an interplay between magnetic, Archimedes and Coriolis forces. These so-called MAC waves are thought to be relevant for interpreting historical fluctuations in the geomagnetic field. In this study, we show that MAC waves provide a good description of time-dependent zonal flow at the top of the core. The same collection of waves also offers a simple explanation for observed fluctuations in the dipole field. Both of these predictions require a stratified layer at the top of the core with a thickness of 130-140 km and a buoyancy frequency comparable to Earth's rotation rate. We extend these predictions to include changes in the length of day (LOD) and find that MAC waves can account for about half of the observed fluctuation at decadal periods. Larger fluctuations are possible when electromagnetic stresses couple MAC waves to flow in the interior of the core. In fact, an idealized model for the coupled motion overestimates the LOD fluctuations, probably reflecting limitations in this idealized model. Our results offer support for stable stratification at the top of the core and suggest a common origin for decadal fluctuations in the geomagnetic field and the LOD.

  3. Coupling alongshore variations in wave energy to beach morphologic change using the SWAN wave model at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eshleman, Jodi L.; Barnard, Patrick L.; Erikson, Li H.; Hanes, Daniel M.

    2007-01-01

    Coastal managers have faced increasing pressure to manage their resources wisely over the last century as a result of heightened development and changing environmental forcing. It is crucial to understand seasonal changes in beach volume and shape in order to identify areas vulnerable to accelerated erosion. Shepard (1950) was among the first to quantify seasonal beach cycles. Sonu and Van Beek (1971) and Wright et al. (1985) described commonly occurring beach states. Most studies utilize widest spaced 2-D cross shore profiles or shorelines extracted from aerial photographs (e.g. Winant et al. 1975; Aubrey, 1979, Aubrey and Ross, 1985; Larson and Kraus, 1994; Jimenez et al., 1977; Lacey and Peck, 1998; Guillen et al., 1999; Norcorss et al., 2002) to analyzed systematic changes in beach evolution. But with the exception of established field stations, such as Duck, NC (Birkemeier and Mason, 1984), ans Hazaki Oceanographical Research Station (HORS) in Japan (Katoh, 1997), there are very few beach change data sets with high temporal and spatial resolutions (e.g. Dail et al., 2000; Ruggiero et al., 2005; Yates et al., in press). Comprehensive sets of nearshore morphological data and local in situ measurements outside of these field stations are very rare and virtually non-existent high-energy coasts. Studied that have attempted to relate wave statistics to beach morphology change require some knowledge of the nearshore wave climate, and have had limited success using offshore measurement (Sonu and Van Beek, 1971; Dail et al., 2000). The primary objective of this study is to qualitatively compare spatially variable nearshore wave predictions to beach change measurements in order to understand the processes responsible for a persistent erosion 'hotspot' at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA. Local wave measurements are used to calibrate and validate a wave model that provides nearshore wave prediction along the beach. The model is run for thousands of binned offshore wave

  4. Diurnal variations and modulation by easterly waves of the size distribution of convective cloud clusters over West Africa and the Atlantic Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, L.A.T.; Duvel, J.Ph.; Desbois, M. )

    1993-01-01

    Short time-scale fluctuations of the size distribution of tropical convective cloud clusters for July to September 1989 were studied using Meteosat data. A cluster at a given brightness-temperature threshold was defined as the area covered by adjacent cloudy pixels with brightness temperature lower than the threshold. The clusters were classified according to the area covered and the position of their center of mass. Over land regions of West Africa the size distribution underwent a coherent diurnal behavior with development of small cells between noon and 1500 LST. Over the Atlantic Ocean, the highest cloudiness had a weak maximum extent in early morning, while cloudiness at lower levels was more extended in the afternoon. This diurnal behavior was primarily due to large cloud clusters, suggesting that the diurnal variation over the ocean resulted from internal variations of large convective systems and not from the initiation of convection at a given hour of the day. This was confirmed by the analysis of 15 large convective systems propagating over the ocean. The authors have ascertained that the high cloud cover was maximized within the trough of eastrly waves. The cluster size was dependent upon the wave amplitude with a larger mean cluster size when the amplitude was largr. The trough phase of the wave was found to promote the development of large clusters more than it favored the initial stage of convection. 30 refs., 11 figs.

  5. Spatio-temporal variations in the structure of the attenuation field of the S-wave in the region of Nevada nuclear test site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopnichev, Yu. F.; Sokolova, I. N.; Sokolov, K. N.

    2013-11-01

    The characteristics of the attenuation field of short-period shear waves in the region of Nevada nuclear test site (NNTS) are studied. The seismograms of underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) and earthquakes recorded by three seismic stations in 1975-2012 at the epicentral distances of up to 1000 km are processed by the methods based on the analysis of the amplitude ratios of Sn to Pn and Lg to Pg waves, as well as the S-coda envelopes for close events. It is shown that the structure of the attenuation field in the Earth's crust and upper mantle in the NNTS region experienced significant temporal variations during the interval of nuclear operations. The strongest variations were associated with UNEs conducted in the Pahute Mesa area, which held about two-thirds of the most intense explosions. Our data indicate that temporal variations in the structure of the attenuation field are related to the migration of deep fluids. A comparison of the general characteristics of the attenuation field in the regions of the three large nuclear test sites is presented.

  6. Recognition of wave-dominated, tide-influenced shoreline systems in the rock record: Variations from a microtidal shoreline model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakarelov, Boyan K.; Ainsworth, R. Bruce; MacEachern, James A.

    2012-11-01

    Existing wave-dominated facies models are based on microtidal coastlines and do not adequately address wave-dominated environments influenced by significant tidal ranges. Observations from modern environments show that such systems are abundant along tide-influenced shorelines facing wide shelves and large embayments, such as much of the northern Australia coast; yet equivalent deposits have been rarely recognized from the ancient record. Geomorphological literature shows that tidal influence on wave-dominated shorelines has the effect of shifting the shoaling, breaking, and swash wave zones up and down the beach profile; when the tidal range is appreciable, sedimentation is affected significantly. Many macrotidal, wave-dominated systems (tidal range > 4 m), for example, are non-barred and are characterized by poor development of dune-scale bedforms in the subtidal zone and along the beach profile. Other systems do develop cross stratification, but this occurs in the intertidal zone rather than the subtidal zone as is implied in existing wave-dominated facies models. The association of many wave-dominated, tide-influenced environments with shallow shelves also suggests that major storms may be capable of reworking sediment significant distances from the shoreline. We present an ancient example of a wave-dominated, tide-influenced, fluvial-affected system (Wtf) from the Campanian Bearpaw to Horseshoe Canyon Formation transition near Drumheller, Alberta, Canada, which has been described in closely spaced outcrop exposures and core. Wave domination in the coarsening-upward interval is unambiguous and is represented by abundance of micro-hummocky cross stratification and other storm beds in the mudstone-dominated portions, a well-defined swaley cross stratified sandstone interval, and an up to four meter thick, horizontal planar stratified interval interpreted to have been formed by swash waves. Tide influence is suggested by common double carbonaceous and mud drapes

  7. Study of stress-induced velocity variation in concrete under direct tensile force and monitoring of the damage level by using thermally-compensated Coda Wave Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxiang; Abraham, Odile; Grondin, Frédéric; Loukili, Ahmed; Tournat, Vincent; Le Duff, Alain; Lascoup, Bertrand; Durand, Olivier

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we describe an experimental study of concrete behavior under a uniaxial tensile load by use of the thermally-compensated Coda Wave Interferometry (CWI) analysis. Under laboratory conditions, uniaxial tensile load cycles are imposed on a cylindrical concrete specimen, with continuous ultrasonic measurements being recorded within the scope of bias control protocols. A thermally-compensated CWI analysis of multiple scattering waves is performed in order to evaluate the stress-induced velocity variation. Concrete behavior under a tensile load can then be studied, along with CWI results from both its elastic performance (acoustoelasticity) and plastic performance (microcracking corresponding to the Kaiser effect). This work program includes a creep test with a sustained, high tensile load; the acoustoelastic coefficients are estimated before and after conducting the creep test and then used to demonstrate the effect of creep load. PMID:22989948

  8. Study of obliquely propagating dust acoustic solitary waves in magnetized tropical mesospheric plasmas with effect of dust charge variations and rotation of the plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mushtaq, A.; Shah, H.A.; Rubab, N.; Murtaza, G.

    2006-06-15

    The characteristics of obliquely propagating Dust Acoustic Waves (DAWs) in rotating and magnetized dusty plasma in the dayside tropical mesosphere are examined by incorporating adiabatic dust charge fluctuations. A Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived, which may support a nonlinear dust acoustic wave on a very slow time scale. The meteoritic dust in mesospheric plasmas on the dayside is charged positively due to photo- and thermionic emissions. The dynamics of the DAW with electronic, ionic, thermionic, and photoelectric currents along with obliqueness and effective gyrofrequency are studied. It is observed that the amplitude of the soliton depends directly on the obliqueness {theta} and dust charge variation, respectively, while the width is modified inversely with these parameters. It is also observed that the effective gyrofrequency modifies the width inversely.

  9. Accurate calculation of phase shifts for electron collisions with positive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gien, T. T.

    2003-06-01

    The Harris-Nesbet variational method was considered for the calculation of phase shifts of electron collisions with hydrogen-like ions (Li2+, Be3+, and B4+). Calculations were carried out for both singlet and triplet scattering. Very accurate results of phase shift of electron collisions with these ionic targets were obtained for the first time for partial waves of L up to six. The phase shifts that we obtained for low partial wave (S, P, and D) scattering were compared with those available in the literature by a few other research groups employing different numerical methods.

  10. Effect of latitudinal variations in low-level baroclinicity on eddy life cycles and upper-tropospheric wave-breaking processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivière, G.

    2009-09-01

    Storm tracks play a crucial role in the dynamics of the general circulation of the atmosphere and particularly of the teleconnections such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Baroclinic waves may displace the large-scale jets during their breaking with anticyclonic and cyclonic wave breaking leading generally to a northward and southward displacement of the jets respectively. For example, it has been recently shown by different authors that the positive and the negative phases of the NAO are closely related to anticyclonic and cyclonic wave breaking respectively. The purpose of our study is to look at the reverse side: the impact of the jet latitude onto wave-breaking processes by performing idealized numerical simulations using a primitive-equation model on the sphere (the PUMA model). We first focus on normal mode analysis. By prescribing different types of jets, we study the effects of their latitude on normal mode structures and their breaking using nonlinear simulations. A second stage consists in forcing the model by relaxing the temperature field toward a given restoration temperature. Sensitivity runs are performed by using different restoration temperature fields to look at the effect of the latitude of the low-level baroclinicity on eddy life cycles. Implication for the eddy feedback onto the large-scale circulation is more precisely investigated. Our results reveal that eddies exert a positive feedback onto the latitudinal variations of the large-scale jets. Finally, these results are used to interpret some wave-breaking processes found in the observations of the Northern Hemisphere.

  11. Diurnal ozone variations in the stratosphere revealed in observations from the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) on board the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakazaki, Takatoshi; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Mitsuda, Chihiro; Imai, Koji; Manago, Naohiro; Naito, Yoko; Nakamura, Tetsu; Akiyoshi, Hideharu; Kinnison, Douglas; Sano, Takuki; Suzuki, Makoto; Shiotani, Masato

    2013-04-01

    Considerable uncertainties remain in the global pattern of diurnal variation in stratospheric ozone, particularly lower to middle stratospheric ozone, which is the principal contributor to total column ozone. The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) attached to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on board the International Space Station (ISS) was developed to gather high-quality global measurements of stratospheric ozone at various local times, with the aid of superconducting mixers cooled to 4K by a compact mechanical cooler. Using the SMILES dataset, as well as data from nudged chemistry-climate models (MIROC3.2-CTM and SD-WACCM), we show that the SMILES observational data have revealed the global pattern of diurnal ozone variations throughout the stratosphere. We also found that these variations can be explained by both photochemistry and dynamics. The peak-to-peak difference in the stratospheric ozone mixing ratio (total column ozone) reached 8% (1%) over the course of a day. This variation needs to be considered when merging ozone data from different satellite measurements and even from measurements made using one specific instrument at different local times.

  12. Diurnal ozone variations in the stratosphere revealed in observations from the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) onboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakazaki, Takatoshi; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Mitsuda, Chihiro; Imai, Koji; Manago, Naohiro; Naito, Yoko; Nakamura, Tetsu; Akiyoshi, Hideharu; Kinnison, Douglas; Sano, Takuki; Suzuki, Makoto; Shiotani, Masato

    2013-04-01

    Considerable uncertainties remain in the global pattern of diurnal variation in stratospheric ozone, particularly lower to middle stratospheric ozone, which is the principal contributor to total column ozone. The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) attached to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on board the International Space Station (ISS), was developed to gather high-quality global measurements of stratospheric ozone at various local times, with the aid of superconducting mixers cooled to 4 K by a compact mechanical cooler. Using the SMILES dataset, as well as data from nudged chemistry-climate models (MIROC3.2-CTM and SD-WACCM), we show that the SMILES observational data have revealed the global pattern of diurnal ozone variations throughout the stratosphere. We also found that these variations can be explained by both photochemistry and dynamics. The peak-to-peak difference in the stratospheric ozone mixing ratio (total column ozone) reached 8% (1%) over the course of a day. This variation needs to be considered when merging ozone data from different satellite measurements and even from measurements made using one specific instrument at different local times.

  13. On the altitude-variation of electron acceleration by HF radio-waves in the F-region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Bjorn

    2016-07-01

    I will talk about artificial aurora, the descending layers we have observed at HAARP and the altitude-variations we have observed in enhanced ion and plasma-lines with the EISCAT UHF-radar, and present an empirical model describing these phenomena.

  14. Accurate Cross Sections for Microanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Rez, Peter

    2002-01-01

    To calculate the intensity of x-ray emission in electron beam microanalysis requires a knowledge of the energy distribution of the electrons in the solid, the energy variation of the ionization cross section of the relevant subshell, the fraction of ionizations events producing x rays of interest and the absorption coefficient of the x rays on the path to the detector. The theoretical predictions and experimental data available for ionization cross sections are limited mainly to K shells of a few elements. Results of systematic plane wave Born approximation calculations with exchange for K, L, and M shell ionization cross sections over the range of electron energies used in microanalysis are presented. Comparisons are made with experimental measurement for selected K shells and it is shown that the plane wave theory is not appropriate for overvoltages less than 2.5 V. PMID:27446747

  15. Numerical simulation of surface wave dynamics of liquid metal MHD flow on an inclined plane in a magnetic field with spatial variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Donghong

    Interest in utilizing liquid metal film flows to protect the plasma-facing solid structures places increasing demand on understanding the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) of such flows in a magnetic field with spatial variation. The field gradient effect is studied by a two-dimensional (2D) model in Cartesian coordinates. The thin film flow down an inclined plane in spanwise (z-direction) magnetic field with constant streamwise gradient and applied current is analyzed. The solution to the equilibrium flow shows forcefully the M-shaped velocity profile and dependence of side layer thickness on Ha-1/2 whose definition is based on field gradient. The major part of the dissertation is the numerical simulation of free surface film flows and understanding the results. The VOF method is employed to track the free surface, and the CSF model is combined with VOF method to account for surface dynamics condition. The code is validated with respect to Navier-Stokes solver and MHD implementation by computations of ordinary wavy films, MHD flat films and a colleague proposed film flow. The comparisons are performed against respective experimental, theoretical or numerical solutions, and the results are well matched with them. It is found for the ordinary water falling films, at low frequency and high flowrate, the small forcing disturbance at inlet flowrate develops into big roll waves preceded by small capillary bow waves; at high frequency and low Re, it develops into nearly sinusoidal waves with small amplitude and without fore-running capillary waves. The MHD surface instability is investigated for two kinds of film flows in constant streamwise field gradient: one with spatial disturbance and without surface tension, the other with inlet forcing disturbance and with surface tension. At no surface tension condition, the finite amplitude disturbance is rapidly amplified and degrades to irregular shape. With surface tension to maintain smooth interface, finite amplitude regular waves

  16. Diurnal variations of the propagation conditions of short-wave signals on a high-latitude path in the winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingalev, V. S.; Orlova, M. I.; Evlashina, M. L.; Krivilev, V. N.; Mingaleva, G. I.

    1987-08-01

    The propagation trajectories of short waves on a path from the North Magnetic Pole to Murmansk in the course of a complete winter day is calculated on the basis of the electron density distribution determined using a numerical model of the convective polar ionosphere. It is shown that the propagation of the signals may be impossible at certain hours of local time, while, at those hours when it is possible, the ray trajectories can be of different types: beat, channeled between the E and F layers, ricocheting with chord propagation, and their combinations.

  17. Accurate ab Initio Spin Densities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of α and β electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740]. PMID:22707921

  18. Noise, transient dynamics, and the generation of realistic interspike interval variation in square-wave burster neurons.

    PubMed

    Marin, Bóris; Pinto, Reynaldo Daniel; Elson, Robert C; Colli, Eduardo

    2014-10-01

    First return maps of interspike intervals for biological neurons that generate repetitive bursts of impulses can display stereotyped structures (neuronal signatures). Such structures have been linked to the possibility of multicoding and multifunctionality in neural networks that produce and control rhythmical motor patterns. In some cases, isolating the neurons from their synaptic network reveals irregular, complex signatures that have been regarded as evidence of intrinsic, chaotic behavior. We show that incorporation of dynamical noise into minimal neuron models of square-wave bursting (either conductance-based or abstract) produces signatures akin to those observed in biological examples, without the need for fine tuning of parameters or ad hoc constructions for inducing chaotic activity. The form of the stochastic term is not strongly constrained and can approximate several possible sources of noise, e.g., random channel gating or synaptic bombardment. The cornerstone of this signature generation mechanism is the rich, transient, but deterministic dynamics inherent in the square-wave (saddle-node and homoclinic) mode of neuronal bursting. We show that noise causes the dynamics to populate a complex transient scaffolding or skeleton in state space, even for models that (without added noise) generate only periodic activity (whether in bursting or tonic spiking mode). PMID:25375534

  19. Geomagnetically conjugate observations of ionospheric and thermospheric variations accompanied with a midnight brightness wave at low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, D.; Shiokawa, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Kubota, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Nishioka, M.; Komonjinda, S.; Yatini, C. Y.

    2014-12-01

    A midnight brightness wave (MBW) is the phenomenon that the OI (630-nm) airglow enhancement propagates poleward once at local midnight. In this study, we first conducted geomagnetically conjugate observations of 630nm airglow for an MBW at conjugate stations. An airglow enhancement which is considered to be an MBW was observed in the 630-nm airglow images at Kototabang, Indonesia (geomagnetic latitude (MLAT): 10.0S) at around local midnight from 1540 to 1730 UT (from 2240 to 2430 LT) on 7 February 2011. This MBW was propagating south-southwestward, which is geomagnetically poleward, with a velocity of 290 m/s. However, similar wave was not observed in the 630-nm airglow images at Chiang Mai, Thailand (MLAT: 8.9N), which is close to being conjugate point of Kototabang. This result indicates that the MBW does not have geomagnetic conjugacy. We simultaneously observed thermospheric neutral winds observed by a co-located Fabry-Perot interferometer at Kototabang. The observed meridional winds turned from northward (geomagnetically equatorward) to southward (geomagnetically poleward) just before the MBW was observed. The bottomside ionospheric heights observed by ionosondes rapidly decreased at Kototabang and slightly increased at Chiang Mai simultaneously with the MBW passage. In the presentation, we discuss the MBW generation by the observed poleward neutral winds at Kototabang, and the cause of the coinciding small height increase at Chiang Mai by the polarization electric field inside the observed MBW at Kototabang.

  20. Measurements of Diurnal Variations of Upper Stratospheric ClO with a Ground-based Millimeter-wave Radiometer at Atacama, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, T.; Mizuno, A.; Nagahama, T.; Maezawa, H.; Toriyama, N.; Kojima, Y.

    2010-12-01

    We present the first results of measuring the stratospheric chlorine monoxide (ClO) with a ground-based millimeter-wave radiometer at Atacama highland (23S, 68W, Alt. 4800 m), Chile. The chlorine chemistry plays an essential role in the ozone depletion in the upper stratosphere, and ClO is a key molecule for better understandings of the chlorines chemistry and the ozone recovery processes. However, measurements of the ClO distribution in the upper stratosphere are still limited at present because the ClO spectrum can be measured only in millimeter-wave region and its intensity is considerably weak. Therefore, we had newly installed a ground-based millimeter-wave radiometer equipped with a high sensitivity receiver at Atacama highland, Chile in 2004, and started monitoring the vertical profiles of the stratospheric ClO in 2008. Atacama highland is in a desert area of the northern part of Chile, being one of the most suitable places for millimeter-wave observations. Our instrument equips a superconducting (SIS) mixer receiver whose noise temperature is 170 K in double sideband at 204 GHz and a digital FFT spectrometer covering 1 GHz bandwidth with 70 kHz frequency resolution. We had continuously observed ClO spectra in 204 GHz band every 2 minutes from December 2009 to January 2010, and had obtained 11466 spectra. Vertical profiles of ClO in the upper stratosphere were retrieved from the spectra integrated every 2 hours in local time (LT) taken during 4 and 16 December. From these data, we have clearly detected a diurnal variation of ClO at 40 km. Comparing ClO mixing ratio obtained with our radiometer with those of AURA/MLS taken over our site at 12:00 - 15:00 LT, we had confirmed that they are consistent in range of errors. In this presentation, we will show the details of the diurnal variations of upper stratospheric ClO and comparisons among our results, AURA/MLS and JEM/SMILES.

  1. Determination of Bedrock Variations and S-wave Velocity Structure in the NW part of Turkey for Earthquake Hazard Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozel, A. O.; Arslan, M. S.; Aksahin, B. B.; Genc, T.; Isseven, T.; Tuncer, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Tekirdag region (NW Turkey) is quite close to the North Anatolian Fault which is capable of producing a large earthquake. Therefore, earthquake hazard mitigation studies are important for the urban areas close to the major faults. From this point of view, integration of different geophysical methods has important role for the study of seismic hazard problems including seismotectonic zoning. On the other hand, geological mapping and determining the subsurface structure, which is a key to assist management of new developed areas, conversion of current urban areas or assessment of urban geological hazards can be performed by integrated geophysical methods. This study has been performed in the frame of a national project, which is a complimentary project of the cooperative project between Turkey and Japan (JICA&JST), named as "Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation in the Marmara Region and Disaster Education". With this principal aim, this study is focused on Tekirdag and its surrounding region (NW of Turkey) where some uncertainties in subsurface knowledge (maps of bedrock depth, thickness of quaternary sediments, basin geometry and seismic velocity structure,) need to be resolved. Several geophysical methods (microgravity, magnetic and single station and array microtremor measurements) are applied and the results are evaluated to characterize lithological changes in the region. Array microtremor measurements with several radiuses are taken in 30 locations and 1D-velocity structures of S-waves are determined by the inversion of phase velocities of surface waves, and the results of 1D structures are verified by theoretical Rayleigh wave modelling. Following the array measurements, single-station microtremor measurements are implemented at 75 locations to determine the predominant frequency distribution. The predominant frequencies in the region range from 0.5 Hz to 8 Hz in study area. On the other hand, microgravity and magnetic measurements are performed on

  2. Reflection-induced linear polarization rotation and phase modulation between orthogonal waves for refractive index variation measurement.

    PubMed

    Twu, Ruey-Ching; Wang, Jhao-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    An optical phase interrogation is proposed to study reflection-induced linear polarization rotation in a common-path homodyne interferometer. This optical methodology can also be applied to the measurement of the refractive index variation of a liquid solution. The performance of the refractive index sensing structure is discussed theoretically, and the experimental results demonstrated a very good ability based on the proposed schemes. Compared with a conventional common-path heterodyne interferometer, the proposed homodyne interferometer with only a single channel reduced the usage of optic elements. PMID:27192320

  3. Short baseline variations in site response and wave-propagation effects and their structural causes: Four examples in and around the santa clara valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Ramirez-Guzman, L.; Carver, D.; Liu, P.

    2010-01-01

    Ground motion records of local and regional events from a portable array are used to investigate the structural causes of variations in ground motion over distances of a few hundred meters to a few kilometers in the sedimentary basin environment of the Santa Clara Valley, California, and its margins. Arrays of portable seismic stations are used to target four study areas with different ground motion patterns: (1) an edge of the alluvial basin extending up onto a marginal ridge (Blossom Hill), (2) a Cenozoic basin with a nearly flat bottom (Cupertino Basin), (3) a long, narrow Cenozoic basin with a steep V profile (Evergreen Basin), and (4) a line perpendicular to the trace of the Hayward fault. Average peak velocities on Blossom Hill from local earthquakes are a factor of 2.5 times higher than nearby valley sites. Three-dimensional (3D) modeling is used to conclude that the majority of the amplification is due to lower shear-wave velocities along a local fault zone (Shannon–Berrocal). Site amplification over the Cupertino Basin in the frequency band 0.5–4 Hz is generally low (less than 2.0 relative to a Mesozoic rock site) and spatially uniform. This response is attributed to the shallow, flat-bottomed shape of the basin and the uniform, flat-laying sedimentary fill. In contrast, site amplification in the Evergreen Basin generally exceeds 3.0 and is attributed to the deep, V-shaped geometry of the basin and younger sedimentary fill. 3D waveform modeling shows the elongated shape of the Evergreen Basin causes more efficient trapping of long-period waves for sources along the long axis of the basin. A low-velocity zone is postulated along the Hayward fault with a width between 100 and 200 m, based on elevated site response along the fault trace and 4.5-Hz fault zone guided waves on the horizontal components of stations near the fault.

  4. SWDreader: A Wavelet-Based Algorithm Using Spectral Phase to Characterize Spike-Wave Morphological Variation in Genetic Models of Absence Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Richard, CD; Tanenbaum, A; Audit, B; Arneodo, A; Khalil, A; Frankel, WN

    2014-01-01

    Background Spike-wave discharges (SWD) found in neuroelectrical recordings are pathognomonic to absence epilepsy. The characteristic spike-wave morphology of the spike-wave complex (SWC) constituents of SWDs can be mathematically described by a subset of possible spectral power and phase values. Morlet wavelet transform (MWT) generates time-frequency representations well-suited to identifying this SWC-associated subset. New method MWT decompositions of SWDs reveal spectral power concentrated at harmonic frequencies. The phase relationships underlying SWC morphology were identified by calculating the differences between phase values at SWD fundamental frequency and the 2nd, 3rd and 4th harmonics. The three phase differences were then used as coordinates to generate a density distribution in a {360° × 360° × 360°} phase difference space. Strain-specific density distributions were generated from SWDs of mice carrying the Gria4, Gabrg2 or Scn8a mutations to determine whether SWC morphological variants reliably mapped to the same regions of the distribution, and if distribution values could be used to detect SWD. Comparison with existing methods To the best of our knowledge, this algorithm is the first to employ spectral phase to quantify SWC morphology, making it possible to computationally distinguish SWC subtypes and detect SWDs. Results/conclusions Proof-of-concept testing of the SWDreader algorithm shows: (1) a major pattern of variation in SWC morphology maps to one axis of the phase difference distribution, (2) variability between the strain-specific distributions reflects differences in the proportion of SWC subtypes generated during SWD, and (3) regularities in the spectral power and phase profiles of SWCs can be used to detect waveforms possessing SWC-like morphology. PMID:25549550

  5. Feedback about More Accurate versus Less Accurate Trials: Differential Effects on Self-Confidence and Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected by feedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On Day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of…

  6. Stochastic modeling of inhomogeneous ocean waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, P. B.; Janssen, T. T.; Herbers, T. H. C.

    2015-12-01

    Refraction of swell waves in coastal waters can result in fast-scale variations of wave statistics due to wave interference. These variations cannot be resolved by wave models based on the radiative transport equation. More advanced models based on quasi-coherent theory, a generalization of the radiative transfer equation, can be coupled or nested into larger-scale models to resolve such local inhomogeneous effects. However, source terms for quasi-coherent models to account for non-conservative and nonlinear effects are not available, which hampers their operational use. In the present work we revisit the derivation of quasi-coherent theory to consistently include a source term for dissipation associated with depth-induced wave breaking. We demonstrate how general source terms can be incorporated in this class of models and compare model simulations with the new dissipation term to laboratory observations of focusing and breaking waves over a submerged shoal. The results show that a consistent derivation of source terms is essential to accurately capture coherent effects in coastal areas. Specifically, our results show that if coherent effects are ignored in the dissipation term, interference effects are strongly exaggerated. With the development of source terms for quasi-coherent models they can be effectively nested inside or otherwise coupled to larger-scale wave models to efficiently improve operational predictive capability of wave models near the coast.

  7. On the variational computation of a large number of vibrational energy levels and wave functions for medium-sized molecules.

    PubMed

    Mátyus, Edit; Simunek, Ján; Császár, Attila G

    2009-08-21

    In a recent publication [J. Chem. Phys. 127, 084102 (2007)], the nearly variational DEWE approach (DEWE denotes Discrete variable representation of the Watson Hamiltonian using the Eckart frame and an Exact inclusion of a potential energy surface expressed in arbitrarily chosen coordinates) was developed to compute a large number of (ro)vibrational eigenpairs for medium-sized semirigid molecules having a single well-defined minimum. In this publication, memory, CPU, and hard disk usage requirements of DEWE, and thus of any DEWE-type approach, are carefully considered, analyzed, and optimized. Particular attention is paid to the sparse matrix-vector multiplication, the most expensive part of the computation, and to rate-determining steps in the iterative Lanczos eigensolver, including spectral transformation, reorthogonalization, and restart of the iteration. Algorithmic improvements are discussed in considerable detail. Numerical results are presented for the vibrational band origins of the (12)CH(4) and (12)CH(2)D(2) isotopologues of the methane molecule. The largest matrix handled on a personal computer during these computations is of the size of (4x10(8))x(4x10(8)). The best strategy for determining vibrational eigenpairs depends largely on the actual details of the required computation. Nevertheless, for a usual scenario requiring a large number of the lowest eigenpairs of the Hamiltonian matrix the combination of the thick-restart Lanczos method, shift-fold filtering, and periodic reorthogonalization appears to result in the computationally most feasible approach. PMID:19708731

  8. Ion cyclotron waves at Mars: Occurrence and wave properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H. Y.; Cowee, M. M.; Russell, C. T.; Leinweber, H. K.

    2014-07-01

    Ion cyclotron waves (ICWs) are generated during the interaction between the solar wind and the Martian exosphere in a process called ion pickup. Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) detected waves near the proton gyrofrequency, indicating pickup of the exospheric hydrogen. To analyze these waves, we first improve the zero levels of the MGS magnetic field data taken during the first aerobreaking phase and then perform a statistical study of the ICWs observed from just outside the Martian bow shock to over 14 Mars radii away. These ICW events typically last for 5 to 30 min but can occasionally last for hours. The wave power decreases slowly with distance on both the upstream and downstream sides. From the variation of wave properties with the strength of the background field, we find that there are likely still remaining offsets in at least some the data sets even after applying our calibration technique. Thus, we use the events with a strong background field to examine the wave properties that depend on an accurate determination of the field direction and strength. We find the pickup angle associated with the largest occurrence rate of ICWs to be around 45°, but neither the wave amplitude, nor wave frequency, nor wave duration appear to vary with pickup angle. Finally, we find the waves with background field strength greater than 4 nT occur on both the positive and negative electric field sides of Mars but have a larger occurrence rate on the side of Mars in the positive electric field direction (which is defined as the direction of the cross product of the magnetic field vector and solar wind flow vector).

  9. Grading More Accurately

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rom, Mark Carl

    2011-01-01

    Grades matter. College grading systems, however, are often ad hoc and prone to mistakes. This essay focuses on one factor that contributes to high-quality grading systems: grading accuracy (or "efficiency"). I proceed in several steps. First, I discuss the elements of "efficient" (i.e., accurate) grading. Next, I present analytical results…

  10. Variational calculations of positronium scattering with hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Denton

    Positronium-hydrogen (Ps-H) scattering is of interest, as it is a fundamental four-body Coulomb problem. We have investigated low-energy Ps-H scattering below the Ps(n=2) excitation threshold using the Kohn variational method and variants of the method with a trial wavefunction that includes highly correlated Hylleraas-type short-range terms. We give an elegant formalism that combines all Kohn-type variational methods into a single form. Along with this, we have also developed a general formalism for Kohn-type matrix elements that allows us to evaluate arbitrary partial waves with a single codebase. Computational strategies we have developed and use in this work will also be discussed. With these methods, we have computed phase shifts for the first six partial waves for both the singlet and triplet states. The 1S and 1P phase shifts are highly accurate results and could potentially be viewed as benchmark results. Resonance positions and widths for the 1S-, 1P-, 1D-, and 1F-waves have been calculated. We present elastic integrated, elastic differential, and momentum transfer cross sections using all six partial waves and note interesting features of each. We use multiple effective range theories, including several that explicitly take into account the long-range van der Waals interaction, to investigate scattering lengths for the 1,3S and 1,3P partial waves and effective ranges for the 1,3S-wave.

  11. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  12. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  13. Turbulent boundary layers under irregular waves and currents: Experiments and the equivalent-wave concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jing

    2016-04-01

    A full-scale experimental study of turbulent boundary layer flows under irregular waves and currents is conducted with the primary objective to investigate the equivalent-wave concept by Madsen (1994). Irregular oscillatory flows following the bottom-velocity spectrum under realistic surface irregular waves are produced over two fixed rough bottoms in an oscillatory water tunnel, and flow velocities are measured using a Particle Image Velocimetry. The root-mean-square (RMS) value and representative phase lead of wave velocities have vertical variations very similar to those of the first-harmonic velocity of periodic wave boundary layers, e.g., the RMS wave velocity follows a logarithmic distribution controlled by the physical bottom roughness in the very near-bottom region. The RMS wave bottom shear stress and the associated representative phase lead can be accurately predicted using the equivalent-wave approach. The spectra of wave bottom shear stress and boundary layer velocity are found to be proportional to the spectrum of free-stream velocity. Currents in the presence of irregular waves exhibit the classic two-log-profile structure with the lower log-profile controlled by the physical bottom roughness and the upper log-profile controlled by a much larger apparent roughness. Replacing the irregular waves by their equivalent sinusoidal waves virtually makes no difference for the coexisting currents. These observations, together with the excellent agreement between measurements and model predictions, suggest that the equivalent-wave representation adequately characterizes the basic wave-current interaction under irregular waves.

  14. Aeroacoustic Flow Phenomena Accurately Captured by New Computational Fluid Dynamics Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blech, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    One of the challenges in the computational fluid dynamics area is the accurate calculation of aeroacoustic phenomena, especially in the presence of shock waves. One such phenomenon is "transonic resonance," where an unsteady shock wave at the throat of a convergent-divergent nozzle results in the emission of acoustic tones. The space-time Conservation-Element and Solution-Element (CE/SE) method developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center can faithfully capture the shock waves, their unsteady motion, and the generated acoustic tones. The CE/SE method is a revolutionary new approach to the numerical modeling of physical phenomena where features with steep gradients (e.g., shock waves, phase transition, etc.) must coexist with those having weaker variations. The CE/SE method does not require the complex interpolation procedures (that allow for the possibility of a shock between grid cells) used by many other methods to transfer information between grid cells. These interpolation procedures can add too much numerical dissipation to the solution process. Thus, while shocks are resolved, weaker waves, such as acoustic waves, are washed out.

  15. Variational wave functions for the S =1/2 Heisenberg model on the anisotropic triangular lattice: Spin liquids and spiral orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbani, Elaheh; Tocchio, Luca F.; Becca, Federico

    2016-02-01

    By using variational wave functions and quantum Monte Carlo techniques, we investigate the complete phase diagram of the Heisenberg model on the anisotropic triangular lattice, where two out of three bonds have superexchange couplings J and the third one has instead J'. This model interpolates between the square lattice and the isotropic triangular one, for J'/J ≤1 , and between the isotropic triangular lattice and a set of decoupled chains, for J /J'≤1 . We consider all the fully symmetric spin liquids that can be constructed with the fermionic projective-symmetry group classification (Zhou and Wen, arXiv:cond-mat/0210662) and we compare them with the spiral magnetic orders that can be accommodated on finite clusters. Our results show that, for J'/J ≤1 , the phase diagram is dominated by magnetic orderings, even though a spin-liquid state may be possible in a small parameter window, i.e., 0.7 ≲J'/J ≲0.8 . In contrast, for J /J'≤1 , a large spin-liquid region appears close to the limit of decoupled chains, i.e., for J /J'≲0.6 , while magnetically ordered phases with spiral order are stabilized close to the isotropic point.

  16. ADVANCED WAVE-EQUATION MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    L. HUANG; M. C. FEHLER

    2000-12-01

    Wave-equation migration methods can more accurately account for complex wave phenomena than ray-tracing-based Kirchhoff methods that are based on the high-frequency asymptotic approximation of waves. With steadily increasing speed of massively parallel computers, wave-equation migration methods are becoming more and more feasible and attractive for imaging complex 3D structures. We present an overview of several efficient and accurate wave-equation-based migration methods that we have recently developed. The methods are implemented in the frequency-space and frequency-wavenumber domains and hence they are called dual-domain methods. In the methods, we make use of different approximate solutions of the scalar-wave equation in heterogeneous media to recursively downward continue wavefields. The approximations used within each extrapolation interval include the Born, quasi-Born, and Rytov approximations. In one of our dual-domain methods, we use an optimized expansion of the square-root operator in the one-way wave equation to minimize the phase error for a given model. This leads to a globally optimized Fourier finite-difference method that is a hybrid split-step Fourier and finite-difference scheme. Migration examples demonstrate that our dual-domain migration methods provide more accurate images than those obtained using the split-step Fourier scheme. The Born-based, quasi-Born-based, and Rytov-based methods are suitable for imaging complex structures whose lateral variations are moderate, such as the Marmousi model. For this model, the computational cost of the Born-based method is almost the same as the split-step Fourier scheme, while other methods takes approximately 15-50% more computational time. The globally optimized Fourier finite-difference method significantly improves the accuracy of the split-step Fourier method for imaging structures having strong lateral velocity variations, such as the SEG/EAGE salt model, at an approximately 30% greater

  17. Accurate measurement of time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itano, Wayne M.; Ramsey, Norman F.

    1993-07-01

    The paper discusses current methods for accurate measurements of time by conventional atomic clocks, with particular attention given to the principles of operation of atomic-beam frequency standards, atomic hydrogen masers, and atomic fountain and to the potential use of strings of trapped mercury ions as a time device more stable than conventional atomic clocks. The areas of application of the ultraprecise and ultrastable time-measuring devices that tax the capacity of modern atomic clocks include radio astronomy and tests of relativity. The paper also discusses practical applications of ultraprecise clocks, such as navigation of space vehicles and pinpointing the exact position of ships and other objects on earth using the GPS.

  18. Feedback about more accurate versus less accurate trials: differential effects on self-confidence and activation.

    PubMed

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-06-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected byfeedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of two conditions: one group received feedback on the most accurate trials, whereas another group received feedback on the least accurate trials. On day 2, participants completed an anxiety questionnaire and performed a retention test. Shin conductance level, as a measure of arousal, was determined. The results indicated that feedback about more accurate trials resulted in more effective learning as well as increased self-confidence. Also, activation was a predictor of performance. PMID:22808705

  19. Benchmark calculations with correlated molecular wave functions. V. The determination of accurate [ital ab] [ital initio] intermolecular potentials for He[sub 2], Ne[sub 2], and Ar[sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Woon, D.E. )

    1994-02-15

    Dimer interactions of helium, neon, and argon have been studied using the augmented correlation consistent basis sets of Dunning and co-workers. Two correlation methods have been employed throughout; Moller--Plesset perturbation theory through fourth-order (MP4) and single and double excitation coupled-cluster theory with perturbative treatment of triple excitations [CCSD(T)]. Full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations were performed on He[sub 2] for some basis sets. In general, only valence electrons were correlated, although some calculations which also correlated the [ital n]=2 shell of Ar[sub 2] were performed. Dimer potential energy curves were determined using the supermolecule method with and without the counterpoise correction. A series of additional basis sets beyond the augmented correlation consistent sets were explored in which the diffuse region of the radial function space has been systematically saturated. In combination with the systematic expansion across angular function space which is inherent to the correlation consistent prescription, this approach guarantees very accurate atomic polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities and should lead to an accurate description of dispersion forces. The best counterpoise-corrected MP4 values for the well depths of the three dimers are (in microhartrees, empirical values in parentheses) He[sub 2], 31.9 (34.6); Ne[sub 2], 123 (134); and Ar[sub 2], 430 (454). The corresponding CCSD(T) values are He[sub 2], 33.1; Ne[sub 2], 128; and Ar[sub 2], 417. Although these values are very good, the nearly exponential convergence of well depth as a function of basis quality afforded by using the various series of correlation consistent basis sets allows estimation of complete basis set (CBS) limiting values. The MP4 estimated CBS limits are He[sub 2], 32.2; Ne[sub 2], 126; and Ar[sub 2], 447.

  20. Gravitational wave detection by a spherical antenna: The angular sensitivity of resonators in the truncated icosahedral gravitational wave antenna configuration and its variation with sidereal time and galactic longitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparini, Maria Alice

    2005-11-01

    Experimental projects using spherical antennas to detect gravitational waves are nowadays a concrete reality. The main purpose of this paper is to give a possible way of interpreting output data from such a system. Responses of the five fundamental quadrupole modes and of the six resonators in truncated icosahedral gravitational wave antenna (TIGA) collocations are shown as a function of the incoming direction of the incident wave. Then, for a source lying in the galactic plane, sidereal time and galactic longitude dependence is given. Thus, once a candidate source of gravitational waves is considered, we can exactly predict the resonators’ response as a function of time.

  1. Wave form variations in auditory event-related potentials evoked by a memory-scanning task and their relationship with tests of intellectual function.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, L; Holly, M; Slade, T; Hayward, M; Barrett, G; Blumhardt, L D

    1992-01-01

    The inter-subject wave form variability of auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) evoked by digit probe identification in a memory-scanning task (Sternberg paradigm) and the effects of reaction time (RT) and task difficulty were studied in 26 healthy subjects. The response wave forms were compared with the performance of psychological tests of intelligence and memory. ERPs to 1-digit sets consisted of a sequence of waves identified as P100, N170, P250, N290, P400, P560 and N640. The major inter-subject difference in the response wave form was either the presence or absence of the late parietal positive wave P560. This wave occurred significantly more often in responses associated with larger memory sets and slow RT, suggesting that its presence reflects subjective difficulty in performing a task. With increasing set size, the P400 showed variable effects in different subjects, ranging from relative preservation of amplitude, through attenuation, to replacement or overlap by a broad surface-negative wave. This predominantly 'negative-going' effect of increasing task difficulty on the P400 was significantly correlated with scores of psychological tests; the greater the amplitude difference between the responses to easy and more difficult tasks, the better the scores, suggesting that these wave form changes reflect a more effective cognitive processing mechanism. PMID:1378004

  2. Real-time Ocean Wave Prediction for Optimal Performance of a Wave Energy Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaglieri, Daniele; Bewley, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in renewable energy. Among all the available possibilities, wave energy conversion, due to the huge availability of energy that the ocean could provide, represents nowadays one of the most promising solutions. However, the efficiency of a wave energy converter for ocean wave energy harvesting is still far from making it competitive with more mature fields of renewable energy, such as solar and wind energy. One of the main problems is related to the inability to accurately predict the profile of oncoming waves approaching the wave energy converter. For this reason, we developed a new hybrid method for state estimation of nonlinear systems, which is based on a variational formulation of an ensemble smoother, combined with the formulation of the ensemble Kalman smoother. This method has been employed for the optimal forecasting of ocean waves via sensors placed on an array of wave energy converters. The coupled simulation of ocean waves and energy devices has been carried out leveraging a nonlinear High Order Spectral code.

  3. Multiple scattering of electromagnetic waves by rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsolakis, A.; Stutzman, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    As the operating frequencies of communications systems move higher into the millimeter wave region, the effects of multiple scattering in precipitation media become more significant. In this paper, general formulations are presented for single, first-order multiple, and complete multiple scattering. Included specifically are distributions of particle size, shape, and orientation angle, as well as variation in the medium density along the direction of wave propagation. Calculations are performed for rain. It is shown that the effects of higher-order scattering are not noticeable in either attenuation or channel isolation on a dual-polarized system until frequencies of about 30 GHz are reached. The complete multiple-scattering formulation presented gives accurate results at high millimeter wave frequencies as well as including realistic medium parameter distributions. Furthermore, it is numerically efficient.

  4. Adaptive re-tracking algorithm for retrieval of water level variations and wave heights from satellite altimetry data for middle-sized inland water bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Lebedev, Sergey; Soustova, Irina; Rybushkina, Galina; Papko, Vladislav; Baidakov, Georgy; Panyutin, Andrey

    by the improved threshold algorithm. The possibility of determination of significant wave height (SWH) in the lakes through a two-step adaptive retracking is also studied. Calculation of the parameter SWH for Gorky Reservoir from May 2010 to March 2014 showed the anomalously high values of SWH, derived from altimetry data [15], which means that the calibration of this SWH for inland waters is required. Calibration ground measurements were performed at Gorky reservoir in 2011-2013, when wave height, wind speed and air temperature were collected by equipment placed on a buoy [15] collocated with Jason-1 and Jason-2 altimetry data acquisition. The results obtained on the basis of standard algorithm and method for adaptive re-tracking at Rybinsk , Gorky , Kuibyshev , Saratov and Volgograd reservoirs and middle-sized lakes of Russia: Chany, Segozero, Hanko, Oneko, Beloye, water areas of which are intersected by the Jason-1,2 tracks, were compared and their correlation with the observed data of hydrological stations in reservoirs and lakes was investigated. It was noted that the Volgograd reservoir regional re-tracking to determine the water level , while the standard GDR data are practically absent. REFERENCES [1] AVISO/Altimetry. User Handbook. Merged TOPEX/ POSEIDON Products. Edition 3.0. AVISO. Toulouse., 1996. [2] C.M. Birkett et al., “Surface water dynamics in the Amazon Basin: Application of satellite radar altimetry,” J. Geophys. Res., vol. 107, pp. 8059, 2002. [3] G. Brown, “The average impulse response of a rough surface and its applications,” IEEE Trans. Antennas Propagat., vol. 25, pp. 67-74, 1977. [4] I.O. Campos et al., “Temporal variations of river basin waters from Topex/Poseidon satellite altimetry. Application to the Amazon basin,” Earth and Planetary Sciences, vol. 333, pp. 633-643, 2001. [5] A.V. Kouraev et al., “Ob’ river discharge from TOPEX/Poseidon satellite altimetry (1992-2002),” Rem. Sens. Environ., vol. 93, pp. 238-245, 2004

  5. Localized parallel parametric generation of spin waves in a Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} waveguide by spatial variation of the pumping field

    SciTech Connect

    Brächer, T.; Pirro, P.; Heussner, F.; Serga, A. A.; Hillebrands, B.

    2014-03-03

    We present the experimental observation of localized parallel parametric generation of spin waves in a transversally in-plane magnetized Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} magnonic waveguide. The localization is realized by combining the threshold character of parametric generation with a spatially confined enhancement of the amplifying microwave field. The latter is achieved by modulating the width of the microstrip transmission line which is used to provide the pumping field. By employing microfocussed Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy, we analyze the spatial distribution of the generated spin waves and compare it with numerical calculations of the field distribution along the Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} waveguide. This provides a local spin-wave excitation in transversally in-plane magnetized waveguides for a wide wave-vector range which is not restricted by the size of the generation area.

  6. Seasonal and height variations of gravity waves in the middle atmosphere over Syowa Station (69S, 40E) in the Antarctic using Rayleigh/Raman lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takuji; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Ejiri, Mitsumu K.; Nishiyama, Takanori; Tomikawa, Yoshihiro; Kogure, Masaru

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves generated in the lower atmosphere, or near the surface, propagate upward and transfer significant momentum and energy into the middle atmosphere/lower thermosphere. Recently it is known gravity waves are extensively generated in the high latitudes in the southern hemisphere, but not many have been reported on the generation, propagation and dissipation of such waves. In this study, we investigated gravity wave profiles in the high latitude southern hemisphere by potential energy (Ep) in the height range of 15-70 km from May 2011 to October 2013 by using Rayleigh/Raman lidar located at Syowa station (69S, 40E), in the Antarctic. Above 35km altitude, Ep was maximized during winter. The seasonal dependence of Ep over Syowa was similar to those observed at Davis (69S,79E) [Alexander et al., 2011]. Below 35 km altitude, Ep was enhanced in around May, and did not decrease in September. Almost all monthly mean profiles showed similar growth rate (corresponding scale height of about 12-14 km) above 30 km altitude. Furthermore, almost all Ep profiles have a local minimum around 25 km altitude and a local maximum around 20 km altitude, suggesting significant loss of the gravity waves between 20-25 km. In October 2012, The profile of Ep in October 2012 was quite different from those in the other months. Comparisons with zonal wind in the NASA/MERRA reanalysis data suggests that a height region of weak zonal winds descended earlier in 2012 than in the other years. This also suggests gravity waves below stratosphere include waves with slow phase speed.

  7. Longitudinal wave motion in width-constrained auxetic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Teik-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the longitudinal wave velocity in auxetic plates in comparison to conventional ones, in which the plate is constrained from motion in the width direction. By taking into account the thickness change of the plate and its corresponding change in density, the developed wave velocity is casted not only as a function of Young’s modulus and density, but also in terms of Poisson’s ratio and longitudinal strain. Results show that density and thickness variations compensate for one another when the Poisson’s ratio is positive, but add up when the Poisson’s ratio is negative. Results also reveal that the classical model of longitudinal wave velocity for the plate is accurate when the Poisson’s ratio is about 1/3; at this Poisson’s ratio the influence from density and thickness variations cancel each other. Comparison between the current corrected model and the density-corrected Rayleigh–Lamb model reveals a number of consistent trends, while the discrepancies are elucidated. If the plate material possesses a negative Poisson’s ratio, the deviation of the actual wave velocity from the classical model becomes significant; auxeticity suppresses and enhances the wave velocity in compressive and tensile impacts, respectively. Hence the use of the corrected model is proposed when predicting longitudinal waves in width-constrained auxetic plates, and auxetic materials can be harnessed for effectively controlling wave velocities in thin-walled structures.

  8. Coupled wind-forced controls of the Bering-Chukchi shelf circulation and the Bering Strait throughflow: Ekman transport, continental shelf waves, and variations of the Pacific-Arctic sea surface height gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, Seth L.; Weingartner, Thomas J.; Hedstrom, Katherine S.; Aagaard, Knut; Woodgate, Rebecca; Curchitser, Enrique; Stabeno, Phyllis J.

    2014-06-01

    We develop a conceptual model of the closely co-dependent Bering shelf, Bering Strait, and Chukchi shelf circulation fields by evaluating the effects of wind stress over the North Pacific and western Arctic using atmospheric reanalyses, current meter observations, satellite-based sea surface height (SSH) measurements, hydrographic profiles, and numerical model integrations. This conceptual model suggests Bering Strait transport anomalies are primarily set by the longitudinal location of the Aleutian Low, which drives oppositely signed anomalies at synoptic and annual time scales. Synoptic time scale variations in shelf currents result from local wind forcing and remotely generated continental shelf waves, whereas annual variations are driven by basin scale adjustments to wind stress that alter the magnitude of the along-strait (meridional) pressure gradient. In particular, we show that storms centered over the Bering Sea excite continental shelf waves on the eastern Bering shelf that carry northward velocity anomalies northward through Bering Strait and along the Chukchi coast. The integrated effect of these storms tends to decrease the northward Bering Strait transport at annual to decadal time scales by imposing cyclonic wind stress curl over the Aleutian Basin and the Western Subarctic Gyre. Ekman suction then increases the water column density through isopycnal uplift, thereby decreasing the dynamic height, sea surface height, and along-strait pressure gradient. Storms displaced eastward over the Gulf of Alaska generate an opposite set of Bering shelf and Aleutian Basin responses. While Ekman pumping controls Canada Basin dynamic heights (Proshutinsky et al., 2002), we do not find evidence for a strong relation between Beaufort Gyre sea surface height variations and the annually averaged Bering Strait throughflow. Over the western Chukchi and East Siberian seas easterly winds promote coastal divergence, which also increases the along-strait pressure head, as

  9. Evidence for a chemical-thermal structure at base of mantle from sharp lateral P-wave variations beneath Central America

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xinlei; Song, Xiaodong; Zheng, Sihua; Helmberger, Don V.

    2007-01-01

    Compressional waves that sample the lowermost mantle west of Central America show a rapid change in travel times of up to 4 s over a sampling distance of 300 km and a change in waveforms. The differential travel times of the PKP waves (which traverse Earth's core) correlate remarkably well with predictions for S-wave tomography. Our modeling suggests a sharp transition in the lowermost mantle from a broad slow region to a broad fast region with a narrow zone of slowest anomaly next to the boundary beneath the Cocos Plate and the Caribbean Plate. The structure may be the result of ponding of ancient subducted Farallon slabs situated near the edge of a thermal and chemical upwelling. PMID:17182740

  10. Photoelectron wave function in photoionization: plane wave or Coulomb wave?

    PubMed

    Gozem, Samer; Gunina, Anastasia O; Ichino, Takatoshi; Osborn, David L; Stanton, John F; Krylov, Anna I

    2015-11-19

    The calculation of absolute total cross sections requires accurate wave functions of the photoelectron and of the initial and final states of the system. The essential information contained in the latter two can be condensed into a Dyson orbital. We employ correlated Dyson orbitals and test approximate treatments of the photoelectron wave function, that is, plane and Coulomb waves, by comparing computed and experimental photoionization and photodetachment spectra. We find that in anions, a plane wave treatment of the photoelectron provides a good description of photodetachment spectra. For photoionization of neutral atoms or molecules with one heavy atom, the photoelectron wave function must be treated as a Coulomb wave to account for the interaction of the photoelectron with the +1 charge of the ionized core. For larger molecules, the best agreement with experiment is often achieved by using a Coulomb wave with a partial (effective) charge smaller than unity. This likely derives from the fact that the effective charge at the centroid of the Dyson orbital, which serves as the origin of the spherical wave expansion, is smaller than the total charge of a polyatomic cation. The results suggest that accurate molecular photoionization cross sections can be computed with a modified central potential model that accounts for the nonspherical charge distribution of the core by adjusting the charge in the center of the expansion. PMID:26509428

  11. Quantum mechanical algebraic variational methods for inelastic and reactive molecular collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Haug, Kenneth; Zhao, Meishan; Truhlar, Donald G.; Sun, Yan

    1988-01-01

    The quantum mechanical problem of reactive or nonreactive scattering of atoms and molecules is formulated in terms of square-integrable basis sets with variational expressions for the reactance matrix. Several formulations involving expansions of the wave function (the Schwinger variational principle) or amplitude density (a generalization of the Newton variational principle), single-channel or multichannel distortion potentials, and primitive or contracted basis functions are presented and tested. The test results, for inelastic and reactive atom-diatom collisions, suggest that the methods may be useful for a variety of collision calculations and may allow the accurate quantal treatment of systems for which other available methods would be prohibitively expensive.

  12. Improving Constraints on Centroid Depth from Joint Inversion of Teleseismic Body-Wave and Spectral Amplitude of Rayleigh Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Z.; Ni, S.

    2014-12-01

    Reliable and accurate focal depth of moderate size earthquakes (Mw5.5-Mw7) is important in many aspects of seismological studies, such as mapping the thermal-mechanical fault structure variation and revealing depth-dependent plate tectonics process. Identification of teleseismic depth phase (e.g. pP and sP) is usually performed to determine focal depth. However, as for shallow events, a relatively long source rupture duration may cause waveform interference to picking of depth phase. Fortunately, both long period teleseismic body-wave and Rayleigh wave spectral amplitude are sensitive to variation of centroid depth. In order to combine depth phase signals in teleseismic body-wave and broadband frequency information in Rayleigh wave's spectral amplitude, we propose a new joint inversion method performed using grid search for centroid depth. Because of the increased global coverage of seismometer networks and relatively high signal-to-noise ratio of teleseismic recording, firstly, focal mechanism is determined based on Cut-and-Paste method of teleseismic body-wave. Then an optimal centroid depth is inverted to best fit observed teleseismic body-wave and regional Rayleigh wave spectral amplitude. Application of this joint method to several well studied moderate size earthquakes verify not only robustness of the method, but also quantitatively improved accuracy of estimates of centroid depth.

  13. NNLOPS accurate associated HW production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astill, William; Bizon, Wojciech; Re, Emanuele; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2016-06-01

    We present a next-to-next-to-leading order accurate description of associated HW production consistently matched to a parton shower. The method is based on reweighting events obtained with the HW plus one jet NLO accurate calculation implemented in POWHEG, extended with the MiNLO procedure, to reproduce NNLO accurate Born distributions. Since the Born kinematics is more complex than the cases treated before, we use a parametrization of the Collins-Soper angles to reduce the number of variables required for the reweighting. We present phenomenological results at 13 TeV, with cuts suggested by the Higgs Cross section Working Group.

  14. Highly Accurate Schemes for Wave Propagation Systems: Application in Aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, Nathalie; Mazet, Pierre-Alain; Mouysset, Vincent; Rogier, François

    2010-09-01

    The Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is considered for computational aeroacoustic. A software has been developed to make it possible to test a large variety of configurations (non-conform grid, variable polynomial order). To deal with instationary phenomena involved by some shear flows, a compromise between time computation and accuracy is deduced from some numerical experiments.

  15. Kinetics of the reaction of the heaviest hydrogen atom with H2, the 4Heμ + H2 → 4HeμH + H reaction: experiments, accurate quantal calculations, and variational transition state theory, including kinetic isotope effects for a factor of 36.1 in isotopic mass.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Donald G; Arseneau, Donald J; Sukhorukov, Oleksandr; Brewer, Jess H; Mielke, Steven L; Truhlar, Donald G; Schatz, George C; Garrett, Bruce C; Peterson, Kirk A

    2011-11-14

    The neutral muonic helium atom (4)Heμ, in which one of the electrons of He is replaced by a negative muon, may be effectively regarded as the heaviest isotope of the hydrogen atom, with a mass of 4.115 amu. We report details of the first muon spin rotation (μSR) measurements of the chemical reaction rate constant of (4)Heμ with molecular hydrogen, (4)Heμ + H(2) → (4)HeμH + H, at temperatures of 295.5, 405, and 500 K, as well as a μSR measurement of the hyperfine coupling constant of muonic He at high pressures. The experimental rate constants, k(Heμ), are compared with the predictions of accurate quantum mechanical (QM) dynamics calculations carried out on a well converged Born-Huang (BH) potential energy surface, based on complete configuration interaction calculations and including a Born-Oppenheimer diagonal correction. At the two highest measured temperatures the agreement between the quantum theory and experiment is good to excellent, well within experimental uncertainties that include an estimate of possible systematic error, but at 295.5 K the quantum calculations for k(Heμ) are below the experimental value by 2.1 times the experimental uncertainty estimates. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Variational transition state theory calculations with multidimensional tunneling have also been carried out for k(Heμ) on the BH surface, and they agree with the accurate QM rate constants to within 30% over a wider temperature range of 200-1000 K. Comparisons between theory and experiment are also presented for the rate constants for both the D + H(2) and Mu + H(2) reactions in a novel study of kinetic isotope effects for the H + H(2) reactions over a factor of 36.1 in isotopic mass of the atomic reactant. PMID:22088068

  16. How to accurately bypass damage

    PubMed Central

    Broyde, Suse; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation can cause cancer through DNA damage — specifically, by linking adjacent thymine bases. Crystal structures show how the enzyme DNA polymerase η accurately bypasses such lesions, offering protection. PMID:20577203

  17. Accurate Evaluation of Quantum Integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, David C.; Goorvitch, D.

    1994-01-01

    Combining an appropriate finite difference method with Richardson's extrapolation results in a simple, highly accurate numerical method for solving a Schr\\"{o}dinger's equation. Important results are that error estimates are provided, and that one can extrapolate expectation values rather than the wavefunctions to obtain highly accurate expectation values. We discuss the eigenvalues, the error growth in repeated Richardson's extrapolation, and show that the expectation values calculated on a crude mesh can be extrapolated to obtain expectation values of high accuracy.

  18. Time-dependent many-variable variational Monte Carlo method for nonequilibrium strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ido, Kota; Ohgoe, Takahiro; Imada, Masatoshi

    2015-12-01

    We develop a time-dependent variational Monte Carlo (t-VMC) method for quantum dynamics of strongly correlated electrons. The t-VMC method has been recently applied to bosonic systems and quantum spin systems. Here we propose a time-dependent trial wave function with many variational parameters, which is suitable for nonequilibrium strongly correlated electron systems. As the trial state, we adopt the generalized pair-product wave function with correlation factors and quantum-number projections. This trial wave function has been proven to accurately describe ground states of strongly correlated electron systems. To show the accuracy and efficiency of our trial wave function in nonequilibrium states as well, we present our benchmark results for relaxation dynamics during and after interaction quench protocols of fermionic Hubbard models. We find that our trial wave function well reproduces the exact results for the time evolution of physical quantities such as energy, momentum distribution, spin structure factor, and superconducting correlations. These results show that the t-VMC with our trial wave function offers an efficient and accurate way to study challenging problems of nonequilibrium dynamics in strongly correlated electron systems.

  19. Unexpected tidal variation of the ocean-acoustic velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, H.; Fukao, Y.; Hibiya, T.

    2004-12-01

    Ocean sound velocity significantly varies at tidal frequency in not only shallow but also deep pert. Unexpected largely semidiurnal fluctuation of ocean-acoustic waves (T-waves), which propagate through the SOFAR channel, is found on the ocean bottom seismometer records for the 1999 submarine volcanic swarm in northern Mariana. The amplitude is one order larger than any previous artificial experiments. Here we report the first in situ evidence that T-wave travel time provide information about vertical movement of seawater due to internal tides. Numerical 3-D modelling shows the internal tide excited by external tidal forcing is particularly large along the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Ridge because of rough topography. A semidiurnal up-and-down movement associated with the internal tide cause an undulation of the SOFAR channel on the order of 100 m, which causes T-wave travel time variations consistent with the observed ones. The results are consistent with the observed travel time variations both in amplitude and phase, demonstrating that T-waves from volcanic swarms can be used to detect oceanic internal tides. Generation of internal tides is an important sink of the external tidal energy so that accurate estimate of conversion of the external to internal tides is essential to close the global tidal energy budget and to understand the Earth-Moon system evolution.

  20. Lateral variation in upper mantle temperature and composition beneath mid-ocean ridges inferred from shear-wave propagation, geoid, and bathymetry. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheehan, Anne Francis

    1991-01-01

    Resolution of both the extent and mechanism of lateral heterogeneity in the upper mantle constraints the nature and scales of mantle convection. Oceanic regions are of particular interest as they are likely to provide the closest glimpse at the patterns of temperature anomalies and convective flow in the upper mantle because of their young age and simple crustal structure relative to continental regions. Lateral variations were determined in the seismic velocity and attenuation structure of the lithosphere and astenosphere beneath the oceans, and these seismological observations were combined with the data and theory of geoid and bathymetry anomalies in order to test and improve current models for seafloor spreading and mantle convection. Variations were determined in mantle properties on a scale of about 1000 km, comparable to the thickness of the upper mantle. Seismic velocity, geoid, and bathymetry anomalies are all sensitive to variations in upper mantle density, and inversions were formulated to combine quantitatively these different data and to search for a common origin. Variations in mantle density can be either of thermal or compositional origin and are related to mantle convection or differentiation.

  1. Wave propagation in solids and fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental principles of mathematical analysis for wave phenomena in gases, solids, and liquids are presented in an introduction for scientists and engineers. Chapters are devoted to oscillatory phenomena, the physics of wave propagation, partial differential equations for wave propagation, transverse vibration of strings, water waves, and sound waves. Consideration is given to the dynamics of viscous and inviscid fluids, wave propagation in elastic media, and variational methods in wave phenomena. 41 refs.

  2. Demonstration of Systematic Improvements in Application of the Variational Method to Strongly Bound Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ninemire, B.; Mei, W. N.

    2004-01-01

    In applying the variational method, six different sets of trial wave functions are used to calculate the ground state and first excited state energies of the strongly bound potentials, i.e. V(x)=x[2m], where m = 4, 5 and 6. It is shown that accurate results can be obtained from thorough analysis of the asymptotic behaviour of the solutions.…

  3. Temperature Variation and Heat Wave and Cold Spell Impacts on Years of Life Lost Among the Urban Poor Population of Nairobi, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Egondi, Thaddaeus; Kyobutungi, Catherine; Rocklöv, Joacim

    2015-01-01

    Weather extremes are associated with adverse health outcomes, including mortality. Studies have investigated the mortality risk of temperature in terms of excess mortality, however, this risk estimate may not be appealing to policy makers assessing the benefits expected for any interventions to be adopted. To provide further evidence of the burden of extreme temperatures, we analyzed the effect of temperature on years of life lost (YLL) due to all-cause mortality among the population in two urban informal settlements. YLL was generated based on the life expectancy of the population during the study period by applying a survival analysis approach. Association between daily maximum temperature and YLL was assessed using a distributed lag nonlinear model. In addition, cold spell and heat wave effects, as defined according to different percentiles, were investigated. The exposure-response curve between temperature and YLL was J-shaped, with the minimum mortality temperature (MMT) of 26 °C. An average temperature of 21 °C compared to the MMT was associated with an increase of 27.4 YLL per day (95% CI, 2.7–52.0 years). However, there was no additional effect for extended periods of cold spells, nor did we find significant associations between YLL to heat or heat waves. Overall, increased YLL from all-causes were associated with cold spells indicating the need for initiating measure for reducing health burdens. PMID:25739007

  4. Variational methods for field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Menahem, S.

    1986-09-01

    Four field theory models are studied: Periodic Quantum Electrodynamics (PQED) in (2 + 1) dimensions, free scalar field theory in (1 + 1) dimensions, the Quantum XY model in (1 + 1) dimensions, and the (1 + 1) dimensional Ising model in a transverse magnetic field. The last three parts deal exclusively with variational methods; the PQED part involves mainly the path-integral approach. The PQED calculation results in a better understanding of the connection between electric confinement through monopole screening, and confinement through tunneling between degenerate vacua. This includes a better quantitative agreement for the string tensions in the two approaches. Free field theory is used as a laboratory for a new variational blocking-truncation approximation, in which the high-frequency modes in a block are truncated to wave functions that depend on the slower background modes (Boron-Oppenheimer approximation). This ''adiabatic truncation'' method gives very accurate results for ground-state energy density and correlation functions. Various adiabatic schemes, with one variable kept per site and then two variables per site, are used. For the XY model, several trial wave functions for the ground state are explored, with an emphasis on the periodic Gaussian. A connection is established with the vortex Coulomb gas of the Euclidean path integral approach. The approximations used are taken from the realms of statistical mechanics (mean field approximation, transfer-matrix methods) and of quantum mechanics (iterative blocking schemes). In developing blocking schemes based on continuous variables, problems due to the periodicity of the model were solved. Our results exhibit an order-disorder phase transition. The transfer-matrix method is used to find a good (non-blocking) trial ground state for the Ising model in a transverse magnetic field in (1 + 1) dimensions.

  5. MHD Wave in Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sych, Robert

    2016-02-01

    The study of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves and oscillations in the solar atmosphere is one of the fastest developing fields in solar physics, and lies in the mainstream of using solar instrumentation data. This chapter first addresses the spatial frequency morphology of sources of sunspot oscillations and waves, including their localization, size, oscillation periods, and height localization with the mechanism of cutoff frequency that forms the observed emission variability. Then, it presents a review dynamic of sunspot wave processes, provides the information about the structure of wave fronts and their time variations, and investigates the oscillation frequency transformation depending on the wave energy. The chapter also addresses the initializing solar flares caused by trigger agents like magnetoacoustic waves, accelerated particle beams, and shocks. Special attention is paid to the relation between the flare reconnection periodic initialization and the dynamics of sunspot slow magnetoacoustic waves.

  6. Experimental investigation of the generation of large-amplitude internal solitary wave and its interaction with a submerged slender body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Gang; Du, Hui; Xu, XiaoHui; Zhang, YuanMing; Qu, ZiYun; Hu, TianQun; You, YunXiang

    2014-01-01

    A principle of generating the nonlinear large-amplitude internal wave in a stratified fluid tank with large cross-section is proposed according to the `jalousie' control mode. A new wave-maker based on the principle was manufactured and the experiments on the generation and evolution of internal solitary wave were conducted. Both the validity of the new device and applicability range of the KdV-type internal soliton theory were tested. Furthermore, a measurement technique of hydrodynamic load of internal waves was developed. By means of accurately measuring slight variations of internal wave forces exerted on a slender body in the tank, their interaction characteristics were determined. It is shown that through establishing the similarity between the model scale in the stratified fluid tank and the full scale in the numerical simulation the obtained measurement results of internal wave forces are confirmed to be correct.

  7. Kinetics of the Reaction of the Heaviest Hydrogen Atom with H2, the 4Heμ + H2 -> 4HeμΗ + H Reaction: Experiments, Accurate Quantal Calculations, and Variational Transition State Theory, including Kinetic Isotope Effects for a Factor of 36.1 in Isotopic Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Donald G.; Arseneau, Donald J.; Sukhorukov, Oleksandr; Brewer, Jess H.; Mielke, Steven L.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schatz, George C.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2011-11-14

    The neutral muonic helium atom {sup 4}He{mu}, in which one of the electrons of He is replaced by a negative muon, may be effectively regarded as the heaviest isotope of the hydrogen atom, with a mass of 4.115 amu. We report details of the first muon spin rotation ({mu}SR) measurements of the chemical reaction rate constant of {sup 4}He{mu} with molecular hydrogen, {sup 4}He{mu} + H{sub 2} {yields} {sup 4}He{mu}H + H, at temperatures of 295.5, 405, and 500 K, as well as a {mu}SR measurement of the hyperfine coupling constant of muonic He at high pressures. The experimental rate constants, k{sub He{mu}}, are compared with the predictions of accurate quantum mechanical (QM) dynamics calculations carried out on a well converged Born-Huang (BH) potential energy surface, based on complete configuration interaction calculations and including a Born-Oppenheimer diagonal correction. At the two highest measured temperatures the agreement between the quantum theory and experiment is good to excellent, well within experimental uncertainties that include an estimate of possible systematic error, but at 295.5 K the quantum calculations for k{sub He{mu}} are below the experimental value by 2.1 times the experimental uncertainty estimates. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Variational transition state theory calculations with multidimensional tunneling have also been carried out for k{sub He{mu}} on the BH surface, and they agree with the accurate QM rate constants to within 30% over a wider temperature range of 200-1000 K. Comparisons between theory and experiment are also presented for the rate constants for both the D + H{sub 2} and Mu + H{sub 2} reactions in a novel study of kinetic isotope effects for the H + H{sub 2} reactions over a factor of 36.1 in isotopic mass of the atomic reactant.

  8. Improving horizontal resolution of high-frequency surface-wave methods using travel-time tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaofei; Xu, Hongrui; Wang, Limin; Hu, Yue; Shen, Chao; Sun, Shida

    2016-03-01

    In surface-wave methods, horizontal resolution can be defined as the ability to distinguish anomalous objects that are laterally displaced from each other. The horizontal length of a recognizable geological anomalous body is measured by the lateral variation of shear (S)-wave velocity. Multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) is an efficient tool to determine near-surface S-wave velocities. The acquisition of the MASW method involves the same source-receiver configuration moved successively by a fixed distance interval (a few to several stations) along a linear survey line, which is called a roll-along acquisition geometry. A pseudo-2D S-wave velocity section is constructed by aligning 1D models, and each inverted 1D S-wave velocity model reflects the vertical S-wave velocity variation at the midpoint of each geophone spread. Although the MASW method can improve the horizontal resolution of S-wave velocity sections to some degree, the amount of fieldwork is increased by the roll-along acquisition geometry. We propose surface-wave tomography method to investigate horizontal resolution of surface-wave exploration. Phase-velocity dispersion curves are calculated by a pair of traces within a multichannel record through cross-correlation combined with a phase-shift scanning method. Then with the utilization of travel-time tomography, we can obtain high resolution pure-path dispersion curves with diverse sizes of grids at different frequencies. Finally, the pseudo-2D S-wave velocity structure is reconstructed by inverting the pure-path dispersion curves. Travel-time tomography of surface waves can extract accurate dispersion curves from a record with a short receiver spacing, and it can effectively enhance the ability of random noise immunity. Synthetic tests and a real-world example have indicated that travel-time tomography has a great potential for improving the horizontal resolution of surface waves using multi-channel analysis.

  9. Computation of viscous blast wave flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, Christopher A.

    1991-01-01

    A method to determine unsteady solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations was developed and applied. The structural finite-volume, approximately factored implicit scheme uses Newton subiterations to obtain the spatially and temporally second-order accurate time history of the interaction of blast-waves with stationary targets. The inviscid flux is evaluated using MacCormack's modified Steger-Warming flux or Roe flux difference splittings with total variation diminishing limiters, while the viscous flux is computed using central differences. The use of implicit boundary conditions in conjunction with a telescoping in time and space method permitted solutions to this strongly unsteady class of problems. Comparisons of numerical, analytical, and experimental results were made in two and three dimensions. These comparisons revealed accurate wave speed resolution with nonoscillatory discontinuity capturing. The purpose of this effort was to address the three-dimensional, viscous blast-wave problem. Test cases were undertaken to reveal these methods' weaknesses in three regimes: (1) viscous-dominated flow; (2) complex unsteady flow; and (3) three-dimensional flow. Comparisons of these computations to analytic and experimental results provided initial validation of the resultant code. Addition details on the numerical method and on the validation can be found in the appendix. Presently, the code is capable of single zone computations with selection of any permutation of solid wall or flow-through boundaries.

  10. An overview of millimeter-wave spectroscopic measurements of chlorine monoxide at Thule, Greenland, February-March, 1992: Vertical profiles, diurnal variation, and longer-term trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Zafra, R. L.; Emmons, L. K.; Reeves, J. M.; Shindell, D. T.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of chlorine monoxide in the stratosphere over Thule, Greenland (73.6 N, 68.4 W) were made quasi-continuously during the period February 8 to March 24, 1992, using a high-sensitivity ground based mm-wave spectrometer. These observations give diurnal, short term, and long term changes in the mixing ratio and vertical distribution of ClO. At an equivalent time after the Antarctic winter solstice, very large concentrations (up to approximately 1.5 ppbv) occur in lower stratospheric ClO, resulting in massive ozone destruction. We saw no evidence for large (approximately 1 top 1.5 ppbv) amounts of ClO in the 16-25 km range over Thule in February or March, in agreement with UARS (satellite) observations by the MLS mm-wave spectrometer for this period, and in marked contrast to UARS/MLS and ER-2 aircraft measurements over northern Europe and eastern Canada, respectively, during January, 1992. We have evidence for smaller enhancements (approximately 0.2 to 0.5 ppbv) in the 18-30 km range during late February-early March, which could result from transport of residual low NO2 air following earlier polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) processing (the last of which occurred at least one month earlier, however) or the result of chemical processing by Pinatubo aerosols. Direct influence of Pinatubo aerosols on Arctic ozone during the spring of 1992 has been difficult to assess, and this enhancement of low-altitude ClO might be a significant indicator of aerosol effects.

  11. Accurate Sound Velocity Measurement in Ocean Near-Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizarralde, D.; Xu, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate sound velocity measurement is essential in oceanography because sound is the only wave that can propagate in sea water. Due to its measuring difficulties, sound velocity is often not measured directly but instead calculated from water temperature, salinity, and depth, which are much easier to obtain. This research develops a new method to directly measure the sound velocity in the ocean's near-surface layer using multi-channel seismic (MCS) hydrophones. This system consists of a device to make a sound pulse and a long cable with hundreds of hydrophones to record the sound. The distance between the source and each receiver is the offset. The time it takes the pulse to arrive to each receiver is the travel time.The errors of measuring offset and travel time will affect the accuracy of sound velocity if we calculated with just one offset and one travel time. However, by analyzing the direct arrival signal from hundreds of receivers, the velocity can be determined as the slope of a straight line in the travel time-offset graph. The errors in distance and time measurement result in only an up or down shift of the line and do not affect the slope. This research uses MCS data of survey MGL1408 obtained from the Marine Geoscience Data System and processed with Seismic Unix. The sound velocity can be directly measured to an accuracy of less than 1m/s. The included graph shows the directly measured velocity verses the calculated velocity along 100km across the Mid-Atlantic continental margin. The directly measured velocity shows a good coherence to the velocity computed from temperature and salinity. In addition, the fine variations in the sound velocity can be observed, which is hardly seen from the calculated velocity. Using this methodology, both large area acquisition and fine resolution can be achieved. This directly measured sound velocity will be a new and powerful tool in oceanography.

  12. Efficient and accurate sound propagation using adaptive rectangular decomposition.

    PubMed

    Raghuvanshi, Nikunj; Narain, Rahul; Lin, Ming C

    2009-01-01

    Accurate sound rendering can add significant realism to complement visual display in interactive applications, as well as facilitate acoustic predictions for many engineering applications, like accurate acoustic analysis for architectural design. Numerical simulation can provide this realism most naturally by modeling the underlying physics of wave propagation. However, wave simulation has traditionally posed a tough computational challenge. In this paper, we present a technique which relies on an adaptive rectangular decomposition of 3D scenes to enable efficient and accurate simulation of sound propagation in complex virtual environments. It exploits the known analytical solution of the Wave Equation in rectangular domains, and utilizes an efficient implementation of the Discrete Cosine Transform on Graphics Processors (GPU) to achieve at least a 100-fold performance gain compared to a standard Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) implementation with comparable accuracy, while also being 10-fold more memory efficient. Consequently, we are able to perform accurate numerical acoustic simulation on large, complex scenes in the kilohertz range. To the best of our knowledge, it was not previously possible to perform such simulations on a desktop computer. Our work thus enables acoustic analysis on large scenes and auditory display for complex virtual environments on commodity hardware. PMID:19590105

  13. The Application of Guided Wave Travel Time Tomography to Bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno; Luiten, Erik; Bloom, Joost

    2010-02-01

    The concept of predictive maintenance using permanent sensors that monitor the integrity of an installation is an interesting addition to the current method of periodic inspections. The method should be capable of providing quantitative wall thickness information for both straight pipes and bends. The wave propagation in bends is far more complicated than in straight pipes because natural focusing occurs due to geometrical path differences. Numerical simulations clearly show this effect. Travel time tomography requires accurate modeling of travel times that can be translated to spatial wall thickness variations. Therefore, a ray tracing algorithm has been developed to calculate travel times as part of the tomographic inversion kernel. Numerical results show that a tomographic inversion on simple simulated data provides accurate results. The focusing effect due to the shape of the bend yields a phase rotation of the wavelet, which complicates accurate timing picking. This effect was excluded in the simulated ray tracing data. Based on these observations it is concluded that a more accurate, wave equation based forward modeling algorithm is required to obtain accurate inversion results on realistic data.

  14. MJO-related intraseasonal variation of gravity waves in the Southern Hemisphere tropical stratosphere revealed by high-resolution AIRS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Chikara; Sato, Kaoru; Alexander, M. Joan; Hoffmann, Lars

    2016-07-01

    The intraseasonal variability of gravity waves (GWs) in the austral summer middle stratosphere was examined using dedicated high-resolution temperature retrieval from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder data. Composite maps were made of stratospheric GW temperature variances, large-scale zonal winds around the tropopause, and precipitation based on the real-time multivariate Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) index. Regional distributions of these quantities are synchronized with the MJO: The GW variances are larger for stronger precipitation and for more strongly westward wind around the tropopause at a given precipitation. These results suggest that the GWs observed by Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) in the stratosphere originate from convection. Moreover, it is shown that the zonal wind around the tropopause likely controls the GW propagation into the stratosphere by a critical level filtering mechanism and/or the GW generation by an obstacle source effect. This means that the MJO can modulate the middle atmospheric circulation by regulating the GWs in two ways, namely, generation and propagation.

  15. Evidence for Chiral d-Wave Superconductivity in URu2Si2 from the Field-Angle Variation of Its Specific Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittaka, Shunichiro; Shimizu, Yusei; Sakakibara, Toshiro; Haga, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Ōnuki, Yoshichika; Tsutsumi, Yasumasa; Nomoto, Takuya; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Machida, Kazushige

    2016-03-01

    Low-energy quasiparticle (QP) excitations in the heavy-fermion superconductor URu2Si2 were investigated by specific-heat C(T,H,φ ,θ ) measurements of a high-quality single crystal. The occurrence of QP excitations due to the Doppler-shift effect was detected regardless of the field direction in C(H) of the present clean sample, which is in sharp contrast to a previous report. Furthermore, the polar-angle-dependent C(θ) measured under a rotating magnetic field within the ac plane exhibits a shoulder-like anomaly at θ ˜ 45° and a sharp dip at θ = 90° (H || a) in the moderate-field region. These features are supported by theoretical analyses based on microscopic calculations assuming the gap symmetry of kz(kx + iky), whose gap structure is characterized by a combination of a horizontal line node at the equator and point nodes at the poles. The present results have settled the previous controversy over the gap structure of URu2Si2 and have authenticated its chiral d-wave superconductivity.

  16. Must Kohn-Sham oscillator strengths be accurate at threshold?

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Zenghui; Burke, Kieron; Faassen, Meta van

    2009-09-21

    The exact ground-state Kohn-Sham (KS) potential for the helium atom is known from accurate wave function calculations of the ground-state density. The threshold for photoabsorption from this potential matches the physical system exactly. By carefully studying its absorption spectrum, we show the answer to the title question is no. To address this problem in detail, we generate a highly accurate simple fit of a two-electron spectrum near the threshold, and apply the method to both the experimental spectrum and that of the exact ground-state Kohn-Sham potential.

  17. Development of Operational Wave-Tide-Storm surges Coupling Prediction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, S. H.; Park, S. W.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, K. L.

    2009-04-01

    The Korean Peninsula is surrounded by the Yellow Sea, East China Sea, and East Sea. This complex oceanographic system includes large tides in the Yellow Sea and seasonally varying monsoon and typhoon events. For Korea's coastal regions, floods caused by wave and storm surges are among the most serious threats. To predict more accurate wave and storm surges, the development of coupling wave-tide-storm surges prediction system is essential. For the time being, wave and storm surges predictions are still made separately in KMA (Korea Meteorological Administration) and most operational institute. However, many researchers have emphasized the effects of tides and storm surges on wind waves and recommended further investigations into the effects of wave-tide-storm surges interactions and coupling module. In Korea, especially, tidal height and current give a great effect on the wave prediction in the Yellow sea where is very high tide and related research is not enough. At present, KMA has operated the wave (RWAM : Regional Wave Model) and storm surges/tide prediction system (STORM : Storm Surges/Tide Operational Model) for ocean forecasting. The RWAM is WAVEWATCH III which is a third generation wave model developed by Tolman (1989). The STORM is based on POM (Princeton Ocean Model, Blumberg and Mellor, 1987). The RWAM and STORM cover the northwestern Pacific Ocean from 115°E to 150°E and from 20°N to 52°N. The horizontal grid intervals are 1/12° in both latitudinal and longitudinal directions. These two operational models are coupled to simulate wave heights for typhoon case. The sea level and current simulated by storm surge model are used for the input of wave model with 3 hour interval. The coupling simulation between wave and storm surge model carried out for Typhoon Nabi (0514), Shanshan(0613) and Nari (0711) which were effected on Korea directly. We simulated significant wave height simulated by wave model and coupling model and compared difference between

  18. Accurate Weather Forecasting for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddalena, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    The NRAO Green Bank Telescope routinely observes at wavelengths from 3 mm to 1 m. As with all mm-wave telescopes, observing conditions depend upon the variable atmospheric water content. The site provides over 100 days/yr when opacities are low enough for good observing at 3 mm, but winds on the open-air structure reduce the time suitable for 3-mm observing where pointing is critical. Thus, to maximum productivity the observing wavelength needs to match weather conditions. For 6 years the telescope has used a dynamic scheduling system (recently upgraded; www.gb.nrao.edu/DSS) that requires accurate multi-day forecasts for winds and opacities. Since opacity forecasts are not provided by the National Weather Services (NWS), I have developed an automated system that takes available forecasts, derives forecasted opacities, and deploys the results on the web in user-friendly graphical overviews (www.gb.nrao.edu/ rmaddale/Weather). The system relies on the "North American Mesoscale" models, which are updated by the NWS every 6 hrs, have a 12 km horizontal resolution, 1 hr temporal resolution, run to 84 hrs, and have 60 vertical layers that extend to 20 km. Each forecast consists of a time series of ground conditions, cloud coverage, etc, and, most importantly, temperature, pressure, humidity as a function of height. I use the Liebe's MWP model (Radio Science, 20, 1069, 1985) to determine the absorption in each layer for each hour for 30 observing wavelengths. Radiative transfer provides, for each hour and wavelength, the total opacity and the radio brightness of the atmosphere, which contributes substantially at some wavelengths to Tsys and the observational noise. Comparisons of measured and forecasted Tsys at 22.2 and 44 GHz imply that the forecasted opacities are good to about 0.01 Nepers, which is sufficient for forecasting and accurate calibration. Reliability is high out to 2 days and degrades slowly for longer-range forecasts.

  19. Nerve conduction velocity measurements: improved accuracy using superimposed response waves.

    PubMed

    Halar, E M; Venkatesh, B

    1976-10-01

    A new procedure of serial motor nerve conduction velocity (NCV) measurements with the use of "superimposed response waves" technique (or double stimulus technique) was performed on 29 normal subjects. Six peripheral nerves were tested once a week for four to six weeks. A total of 760 NCV measurements were thus obtained to try to assess the magnitude of error in serial NCV testings. With the double stimulus technique employed, a significant reduction in variations of serial NCV measurements was found. The overall standard deviation of four to six consecutive NCV measurements in the 34 subjects was 1.3 meters per second with a coefficient of variation of 2.4%. These findings obtained with the double stimulus technique have proven to be approximately three times more accurate than results obtained by investigators who studied nerve conduction velocity measurement variation with single stimulus standard NCV testing techniques. PMID:184754

  20. Predict amine solution properties accurately

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.; Meisen, A.; Chakma, A.

    1996-02-01

    Improved process design begins with using accurate physical property data. Especially in the preliminary design stage, physical property data such as density viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat can affect the overall performance of absorbers, heat exchangers, reboilers and pump. These properties can also influence temperature profiles in heat transfer equipment and thus control or affect the rate of amine breakdown. Aqueous-amine solution physical property data are available in graphical form. However, it is not convenient to use with computer-based calculations. Developed equations allow improved correlations of derived physical property estimates with published data. Expressions are given which can be used to estimate physical properties of methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), monoethanolamine (MEA) and diglycolamine (DGA) solutions.

  1. Evaluation of waveform data processing in Wave-Particle Interaction Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikishima, Mitsuru; Katoh, Yuto; Kojima, Hirotsugu

    2014-12-01

    The Wave-Particle Interaction Analyzer (WPIA) is a software function installed on the Exploration of energization and Radiation in Geospace (ERG) satellite. The WPIA directly measures the quantity of energy transfer between whistler-mode chorus waves and resonant energetic electrons by using plasma wave vectors and velocity vectors of plasma particles. The phase differences of the WPIA require accurate phase angles of waves and electrons in order to statistically evaluate the significance of the quantity of energy transfer. We propose a technical method for efficient waveform processing in order to conduct the WPIA measurement precisely. In the WPIA measurement, the various waves detected by the onboard instrument appear as noise in the calculation of the quantity of energy transfer for whistler-mode chorus waves. The characteristic frequency variation of the chorus waves makes waveform processing difficult. A chorus waveform is used for the WPIA processing through passband filtering by selecting appropriate data processing length and frequency resolution. We implement overlapping processing of wave data in order to reduce the induced error of the wave phase. The results of waveform processing indicate that the phase errors are successfully reduced and statistical fluctuations are suppressed. The proposed waveform processing method is a necessary and applicative processing for the calculations of the WPIA in the ERG mission.

  2. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Cameron J.; Slattery, Ashley D.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Gibson, Christopher T.

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  3. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-14

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10{sup −12} at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H{sub 2}, HD, HT, D{sub 2}, DT, and T{sub 2} has been determined. For the ground state of H{sub 2} the estimated precision is 3 × 10{sup −7} cm{sup −1}, which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels.

  4. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10-12 at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H2, HD, HT, D2, DT, and T2 has been determined. For the ground state of H2 the estimated precision is 3 × 10-7 cm-1, which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels.

  5. Magnetic field induced spin-wave energy focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Noel; Lopez-Diaz, Luis

    2015-07-01

    Local temperature variations induced by spin-wave propagation are studied using a model that couples nonuniform magnetization dynamics and heat flow. We show that the remote heating at the sample edge reported recently [T. An et al., Nat. Mater. 12, 549 (2013)], 10.1038/nmat3628 is due to the geometry-induced gradual reduction of the effective field. We demonstrate that the same effect can be achieved by a reduction in the external field instead of a constriction at the edge and, furthermore, that both the location and the amount of energy to be delivered to the lattice can be controlled accurately this way.

  6. Seismic Surface-Wave Tomography of Waste Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Leland Timothy Long

    2002-12-17

    Surface-wave group-velocity tomography is an efficient way to obtain images of the group velocity over a test area. Because Rayleigh-wave group velocity depends on frequency, there are separate images for each frequency. Thus, at each point in these images the group velocities define a dispersion curve, a curve that relates group velocity to frequency. The objective of this study has been to find an accurate and efficient way to find the shear-wave structure from these dispersion curves. The conventional inversion techniques match theoretical and observed dispersion curves to determine the structure. These conventional methods do not always succeed in correctly differentiating the fundamental and higher modes, and for some velocity structures can become unstable. In this research a perturbation technique was developed. The perturbation method allows the pre-computation of a global inversion matrix which improves efficiency in obtaining solutions for the structure. Perturbation methods are stable and mimic the averaging process in wave propagation; hence. leading to more accurate solutions. Finite difference techniques and synthetic trace generation techniques were developed to define the perturbations. A new differential trace technique was developed for slight variations in dispersion. The improvements in analysis speed and the accuracy of the solution could lead to real-time field analysis systems, making it possible to obtain immediate results or to monitor temporal change in structure, such as might develop in using fluids for soil remediation.

  7. Conservation laws of wave action and potential enstrophy for Rossby waves in a stratified atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straus, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    The evolution of wave energy, enstrophy, and wave motion for atmospheric Rossby waves in a variable mean flow are discussed from a theoretical and pedagogic standpoint. In the absence of mean flow gradients, the wave energy density satisfies a local conservation law, with the appropriate flow velocity being the group velocity. In the presence of mean flow variations, wave energy is not conserved, but wave action is, provided the mean flow is independent of longitude. Wave enstrophy is conserved for arbitrary variations of the mean flow. Connections with Eiiassen-Palm flux are also discussed.

  8. Conservation laws of wave action and potential enstrophy for Rossby waves in a stratified atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straus, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    The evolution of wave energy, enstrophy, and wave motion for atmospheric Rossby waves in a variable mean flow are discussed from a theoretical and pedagogic standpoint. In the absence of mean flow gradients, the wave energy density satisfies a local conservation law, with the appropriate flow velocity being the group velocity. In the presence of mean flow variations, wave energy is not conserved, but wave action is, provided the mean flow is independent of longitude. Wave enstrophy is conserved for arbitrary variations of the mean flow. Connections with Eliassen-Palm flux are also discussed.

  9. Electromagnetic wave energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Electromagnetic wave energy is converted into electric power with an array of mutually insulated electromagnetic wave absorber elements each responsive to an electric field component of the wave as it impinges thereon. Each element includes a portion tapered in the direction of wave propagation to provide a relatively wideband response spectrum. Each element includes an output for deriving a voltage replica of the electric field variations intercepted by it. Adjacent elements are positioned relative to each other so that an electric field subsists between adjacent elements in response to the impinging wave. The electric field results in a voltage difference between adjacent elements that is fed to a rectifier to derive dc output power.

  10. Variational optimization with infinite projected entangled-pair states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corboz, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    We present a scheme to perform an iterative variational optimization with infinite projected entangled-pair states, a tensor network ansatz for a two-dimensional wave function in the thermodynamic limit, to compute the ground state of a local Hamiltonian. The method is based on a systematic summation of Hamiltonian contributions using the corner-transfer-matrix method. Benchmark results for challenging problems are presented, including the two-dimensional Heisenberg model, the Shastry-Sutherland model, and the t -J model, which show that the variational scheme yields considerably more accurate results than the previously best imaginary-time evolution algorithm, with a similar computational cost and with a faster convergence towards the ground state.

  11. The structure of irregular mesospheric variations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.

    1972-01-01

    The daily difference method developed by Woodrum and Justus (1968) has been used to analyze the existing data in the height range from 50 to 200 km for irregular variations which could be due to gravity waves. The results presented establish the magnitude as well as the vertical and latitudinal structure of the irregular atmospheric variations. It is pointed out that results obtained by Theon et al. (1969) indicate strong seasonal variation in the magnitude of upper atmospheric waves at high latitudes.

  12. Accurate, meshless methods for magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Raives, Matthias J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we explored new meshless finite-volume Lagrangian methods for hydrodynamics: the `meshless finite mass' (MFM) and `meshless finite volume' (MFV) methods; these capture advantages of both smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) schemes. We extend these to include ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The MHD equations are second-order consistent and conservative. We augment these with a divergence-cleaning scheme, which maintains nabla \\cdot B≈ 0. We implement these in the code GIZMO, together with state-of-the-art SPH MHD. We consider a large test suite, and show that on all problems the new methods are competitive with AMR using constrained transport (CT) to ensure nabla \\cdot B=0. They correctly capture the growth/structure of the magnetorotational instability, MHD turbulence, and launching of magnetic jets, in some cases converging more rapidly than state-of-the-art AMR. Compared to SPH, the MFM/MFV methods exhibit convergence at fixed neighbour number, sharp shock-capturing, and dramatically reduced noise, divergence errors, and diffusion. Still, `modern' SPH can handle most test problems, at the cost of larger kernels and `by hand' adjustment of artificial diffusion. Compared to non-moving meshes, the new methods exhibit enhanced `grid noise' but reduced advection errors and diffusion, easily include self-gravity, and feature velocity-independent errors and superior angular momentum conservation. They converge more slowly on some problems (smooth, slow-moving flows), but more rapidly on others (involving advection/rotation). In all cases, we show divergence control beyond the Powell 8-wave approach is necessary, or all methods can converge to unphysical answers even at high resolution.

  13. Accurate, reliable prototype earth horizon sensor head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F.; Cohen, H.

    1973-01-01

    The design and performance is described of an accurate and reliable prototype earth sensor head (ARPESH). The ARPESH employs a detection logic 'locator' concept and horizon sensor mechanization which should lead to high accuracy horizon sensing that is minimally degraded by spatial or temporal variations in sensing attitude from a satellite in orbit around the earth at altitudes in the 500 km environ 1,2. An accuracy of horizon location to within 0.7 km has been predicted, independent of meteorological conditions. This corresponds to an error of 0.015 deg-at 500 km altitude. Laboratory evaluation of the sensor indicates that this accuracy is achieved. First, the basic operating principles of ARPESH are described; next, detailed design and construction data is presented and then performance of the sensor under laboratory conditions in which the sensor is installed in a simulator that permits it to scan over a blackbody source against background representing the earth space interface for various equivalent plant temperatures.

  14. Kinesthetic Transverse Wave Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantidos, Panagiotis; Patapis, Stamatis

    2005-09-01

    This is a variation on the String and Sticky Tape demonstration "The Wave Game," suggested by Ron Edge. A group of students stand side by side, each one holding a card chest high with both hands. The teacher cues the first student to begin raising and lowering his card. When he starts lowering his card, the next student begins to raise his. As succeeding students move their cards up and down, a wave such as that shown in the figure is produced. To facilitate the process, students' motions were synchronized with the ticks of a metronome (without such synchronization it was nearly impossible to generate a satisfactory wave). Our waves typically had a frequency of about 1 Hz and a wavelength of around 3 m. We videotaped the activity so that the students could analyze the motions. The (17-year-old) students had not received any prior instruction regarding wave motion and did not know beforehand the nature of the exercise they were about to carry out. During the activity they were asked what a transverse wave is. Most of them quickly realized, without teacher input, that while the wave propagated horizontally, the only motion of the transmitting medium (them) was vertical. They located the equilibrium points of the oscillations, the crests and troughs of the waves, and identified the wavelength. The teacher defined for them the period of the oscillations of the motion of a card to be the total time for one cycle. The students measured this time and then several asserted that it was the same as the wave period. Knowing the length of the waves and the number of waves per second, the next step can easily be to find the wave speed.

  15. Random focusing of tsunami waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, Henri; Metzger, Jakob J.; Geisel, Theo; Fleischmann, Ragnar

    2016-03-01

    Tsunamis exhibit surprisingly strong height fluctuations. An in-depth understanding of the mechanisms that lead to these variations in wave height is a prerequisite for reliable tsunami forecasting. It is known, for example, that the presence of large underwater islands or the shape of the tsunami source can affect the wave heights. Here we show that the consecutive effect of even tiny fluctuations in the profile of the ocean floor (the bathymetry) can cause unexpectedly strong fluctuations in the wave height of tsunamis, with maxima several times higher than the average wave height. A novel approach combining stochastic caustic theory and shallow water wave dynamics allows us to determine the typical propagation distance at which the strongly focused waves appear. We demonstrate that owing to this mechanism the small errors present in bathymetry measurements can lead to drastic variations in predicted tsunami heights. Our results show that a precise knowledge of the ocean's bathymetry is absolutely indispensable for reliable tsunami forecasts.

  16. WINDII atmospheric wave airglow imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, W.T.; Hoppe, U.-P.; Solheim, B.H.; Shepherd, G.G.

    1996-12-31

    Preliminary WINDII nighttime airglow wave-imaging data in the UARS rolldown attitude has been analyzed with the goal to survey gravity waves near the upper boundary of the middle atmosphere. Wave analysis is performed on O[sub 2](0,0) emissions from a selected 1[sup 0] x 1[sup 0] oblique view of the airglow layer at approximately 95 km altitude, which has no direct earth background and only an atmospheric background which is optically thick for the 0[sub 2](0,0) emission. From a small data set, orbital imaging of atmospheric wave structures is demonstrated, with indication of large variations in wave activity across land and sea. Comparison ground-based imagery is discussed with respect to similarity of wave variations across land/sea boundaries and future orbital mosaic image construction.

  17. Ab initio molecular dynamics with noisy and cheap quantum Monte Carlo forces: accurate calculation of vibrational frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ye; Sorella, Sandro

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a general and efficient method for the calculation of vibrational frequencies of electronic systems, ranging from molecules to solids. By performing damped molecular dynamics with ab initio forces, we show that quantum vibrational frequencies can be evaluated by diagonalizing the time averaged position-position or force-force correlation matrices, although the ionic motion is treated on the classical level within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The novelty of our approach is to evaluate atomic forces with QMC by means of a highly accurate and correlated variational wave function which is optimized simultaneously during the dynamics. QMC is an accurate and promising many-body technique for electronic structure calculation thanks to massively parallel computers. However, since infinite statistics is not feasible, property evaluation may be affected by large noise that is difficult to harness. Our approach controls the QMC stochastic bias systematically and gives very accurate results with moderate computational effort, namely even with noisy forces. We prove the accuracy and efficiency of our method on the water monomer[A. Zen et al., JCTC 9 (2013) 4332] and dimer. We are currently working on the challenging problem of simulating liquid water at ambient conditions.

  18. Accurate Method for Determining Adhesion of Cantilever Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Michalske, T.A.; de Boer, M.P.

    1999-01-08

    Using surface micromachined samples, we demonstrate the accurate measurement of cantilever beam adhesion by using test structures which are adhered over long attachment lengths. We show that this configuration has a deep energy well, such that a fracture equilibrium is easily reached. When compared to the commonly used method of determining the shortest attached beam, the present method is much less sensitive to variations in surface topography or to details of capillary drying.

  19. Accurate method for determining adhesion of cantilever beams

    SciTech Connect

    de Boer, M.P.; Michalske, T.A.

    1999-07-01

    Using surface micromachined samples, we demonstrate the accurate measurement of cantilever beam adhesion by using test structures which are adhered over long attachment lengths. We show that this configuration has a deep energy well, such that a fracture equilibrium is easily reached. When compared to the commonly used method of determining the shortest attached beam, the present method is much less sensitive to variations in surface topography or to details of capillary drying. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Accurate non-Born-Oppenheimer calculations of the complete pure vibrational spectrum of D2 with including relativistic corrections.

    PubMed

    Bubin, Sergiy; Stanke, Monika; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2011-08-21

    In this work we report very accurate variational calculations of the complete pure vibrational spectrum of the D(2) molecule performed within the framework where the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation is not assumed. After the elimination of the center-of-mass motion, D(2) becomes a three-particle problem in this framework. As the considered states correspond to the zero total angular momentum, their wave functions are expanded in terms of all-particle, one-center, spherically symmetric explicitly correlated Gaussian functions multiplied by even non-negative powers of the internuclear distance. The nonrelativistic energies of the states obtained in the non-BO calculations are corrected for the relativistic effects of the order of α(2) (where α = 1/c is the fine structure constant) calculated as expectation values of the operators representing these effects. PMID:21861559

  1. Distortion of surface plasmon polariton propagation on graphene due to chemical potential variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanatiadis, Stamatios; Kantartzis, Nikolaos

    2016-04-01

    The variation of graphene chemical potential owing to surface plasmon polariton excitation and its influence on the propagation properties of the latter is systematically examined in this paper. Although the chemical potential is controlled via a constant electric field bias, the excitation of the highly confined surface wave can considerably affect it, thus disrupting the wave natural propagation. To this aim, the propagation properties of the surface wave are extracted to reliably estimate the aforesaid distortion effect with regard to frequency. Numerical results, obtained in terms of an accurate finite-difference time-domain scheme, certify this interesting convention. Furthermore, the electrodynamic forces on the free electrons of the graphene layer are calculated to justify the electrostatic assumption.

  2. A spectrally accurate algorithm for electromagnetic scattering in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, M.; Hawkins, S.

    2006-09-01

    In this work we develop, implement and analyze a high-order spectrally accurate algorithm for computation of the echo area, and monostatic and bistatic radar cross-section (RCS) of a three dimensional perfectly conducting obstacle through simulation of the time-harmonic electromagnetic waves scattered by the conductor. Our scheme is based on a modified boundary integral formulation (of the Maxwell equations) that is tolerant to basis functions that are not tangential on the conductor surface. We test our algorithm with extensive computational experiments using a variety of three dimensional perfect conductors described in spherical coordinates, including benchmark radar targets such as the metallic NASA almond and ogive. The monostatic RCS measurements for non-convex conductors require hundreds of incident waves (boundary conditions). We demonstrate that the monostatic RCS of small (to medium) sized conductors can be computed using over one thousand incident waves within a few minutes (to a few hours) of CPU time. We compare our results with those obtained using method of moments based industrial standard three dimensional electromagnetic codes CARLOS, CICERO, FE-IE, FERM, and FISC. Finally, we prove the spectrally accurate convergence of our algorithm for computing the surface current, far-field, and RCS values of a class of conductors described globally in spherical coordinates.

  3. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  4. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  5. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  6. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  7. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  8. Shock-wave surfing

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, Stuart J; Deiterding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    A phenomenon referred to as shock-wave surfing , in which a body moves in such a way as to follow the shock wave generated by another upstream body, is investigated numerically and theoretically. This process can lead to the downstream body accumulating a significantly higher lateral velocity than would otherwise be possible, and thus is of importance in situations such as meteoroid fragmentation, in which the fragment separation behaviour following disruption is determined to a large extent by aerodynamic effects. The surfing effect is first investigated in the context of interactions between a sphere and a planar oblique shock. Numerical simulations are performed and a simple theoretical model is developed to determine the forces acting on the sphere. A phase-plane description is employed to elucidate features of the system dynamics. The theoretical model is then generalised to the more complex situation of aerodynamic interactions between two spheres, and, through comparisons with further computations, is shown to adequately predict, in particular, the final separation velocity of the surfing sphere in initially touching configurations. Both numerical simulations and theory indicate a strong influence of the body radius ratio on the separation process and predict a critical radius ratio for initially touching fragments that delineates entrainment of the smaller fragment within the larger fragment s shock from expulsion; this critical ratio also results in the most extended surfing. Further, these results show that an earlier prediction for the separation velocity to scale with the square root of the radius ratio does not accurately describe the separation behaviour. The theoretical model is then employed to investigate initial configurations with varying relative sphere positions and initial velocities. A phase-space description is also shown to be useful in elucidating the dynamics of the sphere-sphere system. With regard to meteoroid fragmentation, it is shown

  9. New Hybridized Surface Wave Approach for Geotechnical Modeling of Shear Wave Velocity at Strong Motion Recording Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayen, R.; Carkin, B.; Minasian, D.

    2006-12-01

    Strong motion recording (SMR) networks often have little or no shear wave velocity measurements at stations where characterization of site amplification and site period effects is needed. Using the active Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (SASW) method, and passive H/V microtremor method we have investigated nearly two hundred SMR sites in California, Alaska, Japan, Australia, China and Taiwan. We are conducting these studies, in part, to develop a new hybridized method of site characterization that utilizes a parallel array of harmonic-wave sources for active-source SASW, and a single long period seismometer for passive-source microtremor measurement. Surface wave methods excel in their ability to non-invasively and rapidly characterize the variation of ground stiffness properties with depth below the surface. These methods are lightweight, inexpensive to deploy, and time-efficient. They have been shown to produce accurate and deep soil stiffness profiles. By placing and wiring shakers in a large parallel circuit, either side-by-side on the ground or in a trailer-mounted array, a strong in-phase harmonic wave can be produced. The effect of arraying many sources in parallel is to increase the amplitude of waves received at far-away spaced seismometers at low frequencies so as to extend the longest wavelengths of the captured dispersion curve. The USGS system for profiling uses this concept by arraying between two and eight electro-mechanical harmonic-wave shakers. With large parallel arrays of vibrators, a dynamic force in excess of 1000 lb can be produced to vibrate the ground and produce surface waves. We adjust the harmonic wave through a swept-sine procedure to profile surface wave dispersion down to a frequency of 1 Hz and out to surface wave-wavelengths of 200-1000 meters, depending on the site stiffness. The parallel-array SASW procedure is augmented using H/V microtremor data collected with the active source turned off. Passive array microtremor data

  10. Electromagnetic wave scattering by Schwarzschild black holes.

    PubMed

    Crispino, Luís C B; Dolan, Sam R; Oliveira, Ednilton S

    2009-06-12

    We analyze the scattering of a planar monochromatic electromagnetic wave incident upon a Schwarzschild black hole. We obtain accurate numerical results from the partial wave method for the electromagnetic scattering cross section and show that they are in excellent agreement with analytical approximations. The scattering of electromagnetic waves is compared with the scattering of scalar, spinor, and gravitational waves. We present a unified picture of the scattering of all massless fields for the first time. PMID:19658920

  11. PNNL Expert Doug McMakin Discusses Millimeter Wave Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Doug McMakin

    2011-10-01

    Electrical Engineer Doug McMakin discusses Millimeter Wave Holographic technology, which uses non-harmful, ultrahigh-frequency radio waves to penetrate clothing to detect and identify concealed objects, as well as obtain accurate body measurements.

  12. PNNL Expert Doug McMakin Discusses Millimeter Wave Technology

    ScienceCinema

    Doug McMakin

    2012-12-31

    Electrical Engineer Doug McMakin discusses Millimeter Wave Holographic technology, which uses non-harmful, ultrahigh-frequency radio waves to penetrate clothing to detect and identify concealed objects, as well as obtain accurate body measurements.

  13. Accuracy of Satellite-Measured Wave Heights in the Australian Region for Wave Power Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meath, Sian E.; Aye, Lu; Haritos, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the accuracy of satellite data, which may then be used in wave power applications. The satellite data are compared to data from wave buoys, which are currently considered to be the most accurate of the devices available for measuring wave characteristics. This article presents an analysis of satellite- (Topex/Poseidon) and…

  14. Relativistic electron scattering by magnetosonic waves: Effects of discrete wave emission and high wave amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Artemyev, A. V.; Mourenas, D.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we study relativistic electron scattering by fast magnetosonic waves. We compare results of test particle simulations and the quasi-linear theory for different spectra of waves to investigate how a fine structure of the wave emission can influence electron resonant scattering. We show that for a realistically wide distribution of wave normal angles θ (i.e., when the dispersion δθ≥0.5{sup °}), relativistic electron scattering is similar for a wide wave spectrum and for a spectrum consisting in well-separated ion cyclotron harmonics. Comparisons of test particle simulations with quasi-linear theory show that for δθ>0.5{sup °}, the quasi-linear approximation describes resonant scattering correctly for a large enough plasma frequency. For a very narrow θ distribution (when δθ∼0.05{sup °}), however, the effect of a fine structure in the wave spectrum becomes important. In this case, quasi-linear theory clearly fails in describing accurately electron scattering by fast magnetosonic waves. We also study the effect of high wave amplitudes on relativistic electron scattering. For typical conditions in the earth's radiation belts, the quasi-linear approximation cannot accurately describe electron scattering for waves with averaged amplitudes >300 pT. We discuss various applications of the obtained results for modeling electron dynamics in the radiation belts and in the Earth's magnetotail.

  15. Wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    Wave turbulence is the statistical mechanics of random waves with a broadband spectrum interacting via non-linearity. To understand its difference from non-random well-tuned coherent waves, one could compare the sound of thunder to a piece of classical music. Wave turbulence is surprisingly common and important in a great variety of physical settings, starting with the most familiar ocean waves to waves at quantum scales or to much longer waves in astrophysics. We will provide a basic overview of the wave turbulence ideas, approaches and main results emphasising the physics of the phenomena and using qualitative descriptions avoiding, whenever possible, involved mathematical derivations. In particular, dimensional analysis will be used for obtaining the key scaling solutions in wave turbulence - Kolmogorov-Zakharov (KZ) spectra.

  16. Benchmarking accurate spectral phase retrieval of single attosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hui; Le, Anh-Thu; Morishita, Toru; Yu, Chao; Lin, C. D.

    2015-02-01

    A single extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse or pulse train in the time domain is fully characterized if its spectral amplitude and phase are both determined. The spectral amplitude can be easily obtained from photoionization of simple atoms where accurate photoionization cross sections have been measured from, e.g., synchrotron radiations. To determine the spectral phase, at present the standard method is to carry out XUV photoionization in the presence of a dressing infrared (IR) laser. In this work, we examine the accuracy of current phase retrieval methods (PROOF and iPROOF) where the dressing IR is relatively weak such that photoelectron spectra can be accurately calculated by second-order perturbation theory. We suggest a modified method named swPROOF (scattering wave phase retrieval by omega oscillation filtering) which utilizes accurate one-photon and two-photon dipole transition matrix elements and removes the approximations made in PROOF and iPROOF. We show that the swPROOF method can in general retrieve accurate spectral phase compared to other simpler models that have been suggested. We benchmark the accuracy of these phase retrieval methods through simulating the spectrogram by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation numerically using several known single attosecond pulses with a fixed spectral amplitude but different spectral phases.

  17. Accurate theoretical chemistry with coupled pair models.

    PubMed

    Neese, Frank; Hansen, Andreas; Wennmohs, Frank; Grimme, Stefan

    2009-05-19

    Quantum chemistry has found its way into the everyday work of many experimental chemists. Calculations can predict the outcome of chemical reactions, afford insight into reaction mechanisms, and be used to interpret structure and bonding in molecules. Thus, contemporary theory offers tremendous opportunities in experimental chemical research. However, even with present-day computers and algorithms, we cannot solve the many particle Schrodinger equation exactly; inevitably some error is introduced in approximating the solutions of this equation. Thus, the accuracy of quantum chemical calculations is of critical importance. The affordable accuracy depends on molecular size and particularly on the total number of atoms: for orientation, ethanol has 9 atoms, aspirin 21 atoms, morphine 40 atoms, sildenafil 63 atoms, paclitaxel 113 atoms, insulin nearly 800 atoms, and quaternary hemoglobin almost 12,000 atoms. Currently, molecules with up to approximately 10 atoms can be very accurately studied by coupled cluster (CC) theory, approximately 100 atoms with second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), approximately 1000 atoms with density functional theory (DFT), and beyond that number with semiempirical quantum chemistry and force-field methods. The overwhelming majority of present-day calculations in the 100-atom range use DFT. Although these methods have been very successful in quantum chemistry, they do not offer a well-defined hierarchy of calculations that allows one to systematically converge to the correct answer. Recently a number of rather spectacular failures of DFT methods have been found-even for seemingly simple systems such as hydrocarbons, fueling renewed interest in wave function-based methods that incorporate the relevant physics of electron correlation in a more systematic way. Thus, it would be highly desirable to fill the gap between 10 and 100 atoms with highly correlated ab initio methods. We have found that one of the earliest (and now

  18. Discovery of a general method of solving the Schrödinger and dirac equations that opens a way to accurately predictive quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuji, Hiroshi

    2012-09-18

    Just as Newtonian law governs classical physics, the Schrödinger equation (SE) and the relativistic Dirac equation (DE) rule the world of chemistry. So, if we can solve these equations accurately, we can use computation to predict chemistry precisely. However, for approximately 80 years after the discovery of these equations, chemists believed that they could not solve SE and DE for atoms and molecules that included many electrons. This Account reviews ideas developed over the past decade to further the goal of predictive quantum chemistry. Between 2000 and 2005, I discovered a general method of solving the SE and DE accurately. As a first inspiration, I formulated the structure of the exact wave function of the SE in a compact mathematical form. The explicit inclusion of the exact wave function's structure within the variational space allows for the calculation of the exact wave function as a solution of the variational method. Although this process sounds almost impossible, it is indeed possible, and I have published several formulations and applied them to solve the full configuration interaction (CI) with a very small number of variables. However, when I examined analytical solutions for atoms and molecules, the Hamiltonian integrals in their secular equations diverged. This singularity problem occurred in all atoms and molecules because it originates from the singularity of the Coulomb potential in their Hamiltonians. To overcome this problem, I first introduced the inverse SE and then the scaled SE. The latter simpler idea led to immediate and surprisingly accurate solution for the SEs of the hydrogen atom, helium atom, and hydrogen molecule. The free complement (FC) method, also called the free iterative CI (free ICI) method, was efficient for solving the SEs. In the FC method, the basis functions that span the exact wave function are produced by the Hamiltonian of the system and the zeroth-order wave function. These basis functions are called complement

  19. Variational Method for Two-Electron Atoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srivastava, M. K.; Bhaduri, R. K.

    1977-01-01

    Proposes a simple two-parameter trial wave function for the helium atom and helium-like ions. Shows that a variational calculation for the ground-state energy yields better results than the usual one-parameter example. (MLH)

  20. Accuracy of electronic wave functions in quantum Monte Carlo: The effect of high-order correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chien-Jung; Umrigar, C. J.; Nightingale, M. P.

    1997-08-01

    Compact and accurate wave functions can be constructed by quantum Monte Carlo methods. Typically, these wave functions consist of a sum of a small number of Slater determinants multiplied by a Jastrow factor. In this paper we study the importance of including high-order, nucleus-three-electron correlations in the Jastrow factor. An efficient algorithm based on the theory of invariants is used to compute the high-body correlations. We observe significant improvements in the variational Monte Carlo energy and in the fluctuations of the local energies but not in the fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo energies. Improvements for the ground states of physical, fermionic atoms are found to be smaller than those for the ground states of fictitious, bosonic atoms, indicating that errors in the nodal surfaces of the fermionic wave functions are a limiting factor.

  1. An asymptotic theory for waves guided by diffraction gratings or along microstructured surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Antonakakis, T.; Craster, R. V.; Guenneau, S.; Skelton, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    An effective surface equation, that encapsulates the detail of a microstructure, is developed to model microstructured surfaces. The equations deduced accurately reproduce a key feature of surface wave phenomena, created by periodic geometry, that are commonly called Rayleigh–Bloch waves, but which also go under other names, for example, spoof surface plasmon polaritons in photonics. Several illustrative examples are considered and it is shown that the theory extends to similar waves that propagate along gratings. Line source excitation is considered, and an implicit long-scale wavelength is identified and compared with full numerical simulations. We also investigate non-periodic situations where a long-scale geometrical variation in the structure is introduced and show that localized defect states emerge which the asymptotic theory explains. PMID:24399920

  2. Heat Waves

    MedlinePlus

    Heat Waves Dangers we face during periods of very high temperatures include: Heat cramps: These are muscular pains and spasms due ... that the body is having trouble with the heat. If a heat wave is predicted or happening… - ...

  3. Accurate estimation of sigma(exp 0) using AIRSAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holecz, Francesco; Rignot, Eric

    1995-01-01

    During recent years signature analysis, classification, and modeling of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data as well as estimation of geophysical parameters from SAR data have received a great deal of interest. An important requirement for the quantitative use of SAR data is the accurate estimation of the backscattering coefficient sigma(exp 0). In terrain with relief variations radar signals are distorted due to the projection of the scene topography into the slant range-Doppler plane. The effect of these variations is to change the physical size of the scattering area, leading to errors in the radar backscatter values and incidence angle. For this reason the local incidence angle, derived from sensor position and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data must always be considered. Especially in the airborne case, the antenna gain pattern can be an additional source of radiometric error, because the radar look angle is not known precisely as a result of the the aircraft motions and the local surface topography. Consequently, radiometric distortions due to the antenna gain pattern must also be corrected for each resolution cell, by taking into account aircraft displacements (position and attitude) and position of the backscatter element, defined by the DEM data. In this paper, a method to derive an accurate estimation of the backscattering coefficient using NASA/JPL AIRSAR data is presented. The results are evaluated in terms of geometric accuracy, radiometric variations of sigma(exp 0), and precision of the estimated forest biomass.

  4. Evaluation of Fracture Azimuth by EM Wave and Elastic Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Wang, Q.; Liu, C.; Lu, Q.; Zeng, Z.; Liang, W.; Yu, Y.; Ren, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Fracture system plays an important role in the development of underground energy, for example enhanced geothermal system (EGS), oil shale and shale gas, etc. Therefore, it becomes more and more important to detect and evaluate the fracture system. Geophysical prospecting is an useful method to evaluate the characteristics of the subsurface fractures. Currently, micro-seismology, multi-wave seismic exploration, and electromagnetic (EM) survey are reported to be used for the purpose. We are studying a method using both elastic wave and EM wave to detect and evaluate the fracture azimuth in laboratory. First, we build a 3D horizontal transverse isotropy (HTI) model, shown in the figure 1, by dry parallel fractures system, which was constructed by plexiglass plates and papers. Then, we used the ultrasonic system to obtain reflected S-wave data. Depending on the shear wave splitting, we evaluated the fracture azimuth by the algorithm of Pearson correlation coefficient. In addition, we used the full Polarimetric ultra wide band electromagnetic (FP-UWB-EM) wave System, shown in the figure 2, to obtain full polarimetric reflected EM-wave data. Depending on the rotation of the EM wave polarimetry, we evaluated the fracture azimuth by the the ration between maximum amplitude of co-polarimetric EM wave and maximum amplitude of cross-polarimetric EM wave. Finally, we used both EM-wave data and S-wave data to evaluate the fracture azimuth by the method of cross plot and statistical mathematics. To sum up, we found that FP-UWB-EM wave can be used to evaluated the fracture azimuth and is more accurate than ultrasound wave. Also joint evaluation using both data could improve the precision.

  5. Chemically accurate description of aromatic rings interaction using quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadi, Sam

    We present an accurate study of interactions between benzene molecules using wave function based quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. We compare our QMC results with density functional theory (DFT) using various van der Waals (vdW) functionals. This comparison enables us to tune vdW functionals. We show that highly optimizing the wave function and introducing more dynamical correlation into the wave function are crucial to calculate the weak chemical binding energy between benzene molecules. The good agreement among our results, experiments and quantum chemistry methods, is an important sign of the capability of the wave function based QMC methods to provide accurate description of very weak intermolecular interactions based on vdW dispersive forces.

  6. Upper atmospheric planetary-wave and gravity-wave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Woodrum, A.

    1973-01-01

    Previously collected data on atmospheric pressure, density, temperature and winds between 25 and 200 km from sources including Meteorological Rocket Network data, ROBIN falling sphere data, grenade release and pitot tube data, meteor winds, chemical release winds, satellite data, and others were analyzed by a daily-difference method, and results on the magnitude of atmospheric perturbations interpreted as gravity waves and planetary waves are presented. Traveling planetary-wave contributions in the 25-85 km range were found to have significant height and latitudinal variation. It was found that observed gravity-wave density perturbations and wind are related to one another in the manner predicted by gravity-wave theory. It was determined that, on the average, gravity-wave energy deposition or reflection occurs at all altitudes except the 55-75 km region of the mesosphere.

  7. Gravity Waves

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Gravity Waves Ripple over Marine Stratocumulus Clouds ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), a fingerprint-like gravity wave feature occurs over a deck of marine stratocumulus clouds. Similar ... that occur when a pebble is thrown into a still pond, such "gravity waves" sometimes appear when the relatively stable and stratified air ...

  8. Common Genetic Variation in the 3-BCL11B Gene Desert Is Associated With Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity and Excess Cardiovascular Disease Risk The AortaGen Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Gary F.; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Isaacs, Aaron; Smith, Albert V.; Yasmin; Rietzschel, Ernst R.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Liu, Yongmei; Parsa, Afshin; Najjar, Samer S.; O’Shaughnessy, Kevin M.; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; De Buyzere, Marc L.; Larson, Martin G.; Sie, Mark P.S.; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Post, Wendy S.; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U.S.; McEniery, Carmel M.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Segers, Patrick; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; van Rijn, Marie Josee E.; Howard, Timothy D.; McArdle, Patrick F.; Dehghan, Abbas; Jewell, Elizabeth; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Bekaert, Sofie; Hamburg, Naomi M.; Newman, Anne B.; Hofman, Albert; Scuteri, Angelo; De Bacquer, Dirk; Ikram, Mohammad Arfan; Psaty, Bruce; Fuchsberger, Christian; Olden, Matthias; Wain, Louise V.; Elliott, Paul; Smith, Nicholas L.; Felix, Janine F.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Vita, Joseph A.; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Sijbrands, Eric J.G.; Sanna, Serena; Launer, Lenore J.; De Meyer, Tim; Johnson, Andrew D.; Schut, Anna F.C.; Herrington, David M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uda, Manuela; Wilkinson, Ian B.; Aspelund, Thor; Gillebert, Thierry C.; Van Bortel, Luc; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Oostra, Ben A.; Ding, Jingzhong; Gibson, Quince; Uitterlinden, André G.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Cockcroft, John R.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; De Backer, Guy G.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Harris, Tamara B.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Levy, Daniel; Lakatta, Edward G.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (CFPWV) is a heritable measure of aortic stiffness that is strongly associated with increased risk for major cardiovascular disease events. Methods and Results We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association data in 9 community-based European ancestry cohorts consisting of 20,634 participants. Results were replicated in 2 additional European ancestry cohorts involving 5,306 participants. Based on a preliminary analysis of 6 cohorts, we identified a locus on chromosome 14 in the 3′-BCL11B gene desert that is associated with CFPWV (rs7152623, minor allele frequency = 0.42, beta=−0.075±0.012 SD/allele, P = 2.8 x 10−10; replication beta=−0.086±0.020 SD/allele, P = 1.4 x 10−6). Combined results for rs7152623 from 11 cohorts gave beta=−0.076±0.010 SD/allele, P=3.1x10−15. The association persisted when adjusted for mean arterial pressure (beta=−0.060±0.009 SD/allele, P = 1.0 x 10−11). Results were consistent in younger (<55 years, 6 cohorts, N=13,914, beta=−0.081±0.014 SD/allele, P = 2.3 x 10−9) and older (9 cohorts, N=12,026, beta=−0.061±0.014 SD/allele, P=9.4x10−6) participants. In separate meta-analyses, the locus was associated with increased risk for coronary artery disease (hazard ratio [HR]=1.05, confidence interval [CI]=1.02 to 1.08, P=0.0013) and heart failure (HR=1.10, CI=1.03 to 1.16, P=0.004). Conclusions Common genetic variation in a locus in the BCL11B gene desert that is thought to harbor one or more gene enhancers is associated with higher CFPWV and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Elucidation of the role this novel locus plays in aortic stiffness may facilitate development of therapeutic interventions that limit aortic stiffening and related cardiovascular disease events. PMID:22068335

  9. Transversally periodic solitary gravity-capillary waves.

    PubMed

    Milewski, Paul A; Wang, Zhan

    2014-01-01

    When both gravity and surface tension effects are present, surface solitary water waves are known to exist in both two- and three-dimensional infinitely deep fluids. We describe here solutions bridging these two cases: travelling waves which are localized in the propagation direction and periodic in the transverse direction. These transversally periodic gravity-capillary solitary waves are found to be of either elevation or depression type, tend to plane waves below a critical transverse period and tend to solitary lumps as the transverse period tends to infinity. The waves are found numerically in a Hamiltonian system for water waves simplified by a cubic truncation of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator. This approximation has been proved to be very accurate for both two- and three-dimensional computations of fully localized gravity-capillary solitary waves. The stability properties of these waves are then investigated via the time evolution of perturbed wave profiles. PMID:24399922

  10. Diagnostic Criteria for the Characterization of Electrode Reactions with Chemically Coupled Reactions Preceding the Electron Transfer by Cyclic Square Wave Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Helfrick, John C; Mann, Megan A; Bottomley, Lawrence A

    2016-08-18

    Theory for cyclic square wave voltammetry of electrode reactions with chemical reactions preceding the electron transfer is presented. Theoretical voltammograms were calculated following systematic variation of empirical parameters to assess their impact on the shape of the voltammogram. From the trends obtained, diagnostic criteria for this mechanism were deduced. When properly applied, these criteria will enable non-experts in voltammetry to assign the electrode reaction mechanism and accurately measure reaction kinetics. PMID:27443581

  11. Method for Accurately Calibrating a Spectrometer Using Broadband Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Stephen; Youngquist, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A novel method has been developed for performing very fine calibration of a spectrometer. This process is particularly useful for modern miniature charge-coupled device (CCD) spectrometers where a typical factory wavelength calibration has been performed and a finer, more accurate calibration is desired. Typically, the factory calibration is done with a spectral line source that generates light at known wavelengths, allowing specific pixels in the CCD array to be assigned wavelength values. This method is good to about 1 nm across the spectrometer s wavelength range. This new method appears to be accurate to about 0.1 nm, a factor of ten improvement. White light is passed through an unbalanced Michelson interferometer, producing an optical signal with significant spectral variation. A simple theory can be developed to describe this spectral pattern, so by comparing the actual spectrometer output against this predicted pattern, errors in the wavelength assignment made by the spectrometer can be determined.

  12. Equatorial waves in the stratosphere of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinson, David P.; Magalhaes, Julio A.

    1991-01-01

    Analyses of radio occultation data from Voyager 2 have led to the discovery and characterization of an equatorial wave in the Uranus stratosphere. The observed quasi-periodic vertical atmospheric density variations are in close agreement with theoretical predictions for a wave that propagates vertically through the observed background structure of the stratosphere. Quantitative comparisons between measurements obtained at immersion and at emersion yielded constraints on the meridional and zonal structure of the wave; the fact that the two sets of measurements are correlated suggests a wave of planetary scale. Two equatorial wave models are proposed for the wave.

  13. Point Measurement of Detonation Wave Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, F. K.; Gupta, N. K. M.; Wilson, D. R.

    Accurate determination of the speed of a detonation wave is important for studies of detonation phenomena. Different types of sensors that measure pressure, ion and flame have been used for this purpose.

  14. Amplitude, phase, and period variations of the quasi 2-day wave in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere over London, Canada (43°N, 81°W), during 1993 and 1994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayaparan, T.; Hocking, W. K.; MacDougall, J.

    1997-04-01

    Because there is as yet no conclusive evidence pointing to the source of the quasi 2-day wave, further observations are required in order to resolve questions about the generating mechanism as well as to better understand the role of the wave in the middle atmosphere. In this paper we investigate the period, amplitude, phase, and vertical wavelength for the quasi 2-day wave in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere, using the University of Western Ontario 2 MHz radar near London, Canada, and in addition, we look at possible coupling with atmospheric tides. The results of the present study bring out certain new aspects of the quasi 2-day wave at midlatitude in the northern hemisphere that have not been previously reported. In particular, we show that the period of the quasi 2-day wave determined from our study is smaller (46-47 hours) than the 51- to 52-h period generally suggested by other northern hemisphere results, and our periods also showed variability as a function of time. We also draw attention to the annual variability and especially highlight the occurrence of the wave in nonsummer months. For example, a brief occurrence in April is not uncommon. Our study also contributes additional midlatitude geographical data that should aid in developing a better picture of the quasi 2-day wave.

  15. The Schwinger Variational Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.

    1995-01-01

    Variational methods have proven invaluable in theoretical physics and chemistry, both for bound state problems and for the study of collision phenomena. The application of the Schwinger variational (SV) method to e-molecule collisions and molecular photoionization has been reviewed previously. The present chapter discusses the implementation of the SV method as applied to e-molecule collisions. Since this is not a review of cross section data, cross sections are presented only to server as illustrative examples. In the SV method, the correct boundary condition is automatically incorporated through the use of Green's function. Thus SV calculations can employ basis functions with arbitrary boundary conditions. The iterative Schwinger method has been used extensively to study molecular photoionization. For e-molecule collisions, it is used at the static exchange level to study elastic scattering and coupled with the distorted wave approximation to study electronically inelastic scattering.

  16. Diffraction and Dissipation of Atmospheric Waves in the Vicinity of Caustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, O. A.

    2015-12-01

    A large and increasing number of ground-based and satellite-borne instruments has been demonstrated to reliably reveal ionospheric manifestations of natural hazards such as large earthquakes, strong tsunamis, and powerful tornadoes. To transition from detection of ionospheric manifestations of natural hazards to characterization of the hazards for the purposes of improving early warning systems and contributing to disaster recovery, it is necessary to relate quantitatively characteristics of the observed ionospheric disturbances and the underlying natural hazard and, in particular, accurately model propagation of atmospheric waves from the ground or ocean surface to the ionosphere. The ray theory has been used extensively to model propagation of atmospheric waves and proved to be very efficient in elucidating the effects of atmospheric variability on ionospheric signatures of natural hazards. However, the ray theory predicts unphysical, divergent values of the wave amplitude and needs to be modified in the vicinity of caustics. This paper presents an asymptotic theory that describes diffraction, focusing and increased dissipation of acoustic-gravity waves in the vicinity of caustics and turning points. Air temperature, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and wind velocity are assumed to vary gradually with height and horizontal coordinates, and slowness of these variations determines the large parameter of the problem. Uniform asymptotics of the wave field are expressed in terms of Airy functions and their derivatives. The geometrical, or Berry, phase, which arises in the consistent WKB approximation for acoustic-gravity waves, plays an important role in the caustic asymptotics. In addition to the wave field in the vicinity of the caustic, these asymptotics describe wave reflection from the caustic and the evanescent wave field beyond the caustic. The evanescent wave field is found to play an important role in ionospheric manifestations of tsunamis.

  17. Boundary condition determined wave functions for the ground states of one- and two-electron homonuclear molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, S. H.; Tang, K. T.; Toennies, J. P.

    1999-10-01

    Simple analytical wave functions satisfying appropriate boundary conditions are constructed for the ground states of one-and two-electron homonuclear molecules. Both the asymptotic condition when one electron is far away and the cusp condition when the electron coalesces with a nucleus are satisfied by the proposed wave function. For H2+, the resulting wave function is almost identical to the Guillemin-Zener wave function which is known to give very good energies. For the two electron systems H2 and He2++, the additional electron-electron cusp condition is rigorously accounted for by a simple analytic correlation function which has the correct behavior not only for r12→0 and r12→∞ but also for R→0 and R→∞, where r12 is the interelectronic distance and R, the internuclear distance. Energies obtained from these simple wave functions agree within 2×10-3 a.u. with the results of the most sophisticated variational calculations for all R and for all systems studied. This demonstrates that rather simple physical considerations can be used to derive very accurate wave functions for simple molecules thereby avoiding laborious numerical variational calculations.

  18. Scallops skeletons as tools for accurate proxy calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorrain, A.; Paulet, Y.-M.; Chauvaud, L.; Dunbar, R.; Mucciarone, D.; Pécheyran, C.; Amouroux, D.; Fontugne, M.

    2003-04-01

    Bivalves skeletons are able to produce great geochemical proxies. But general calibration of those proxies are based on approximate time basis because of misunderstanding of growth rhythm. In this context, the Great scallop, Pecten maximus, appears to be a powerful tool as a daily growth deposit has been clearly identified for this species (Chauvaud et al, 1998; Lorrain et al, 2000), allowing accurate environmental calibration. Indeed, using this species, a date can be affiliated to each growth increment, and as a consequence environmental parameters can be closely compared (at a daily scale) to observed chemical and structural shell variations. This daily record provides an unequivocal basis to calibrate proxies. Isotopic (Delta-13C and Delta-15N) and trace element analysis (LA-ICP-MS) have been performed on several individuals and different years depending on the analysed parameter. Seawater parameters measured one meter above the sea-bottom were compared to chemical variations in the calcitic shell. Their confrontation showed that even with a daily basis for data interpretation, calibration is still a challenge. Inter-individual variations are found and correlations are not always reproducible from one year to the others. The first explanation could be an inaccurate appreciation of the proximate environment of the animal, notably the water-sediment interface could best represent Pecten maximus environment. Secondly, physiological parameters could be inferred for those discrepancies. In particular, calcification takes places in the extrapallial fluid, which composition might be very different from external environment. Accurate calibration of chemical proxies should consider biological aspects to gain better insights into the processes controlling the incorporation of those chemical elements. The characterisation of isotopic and trace element composition of the extrapallial fluid and hemolymph could greatly help our understanding of chemical shell variations.

  19. SURFACE ALFVEN WAVES IN SOLAR FLUX TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Goossens, M.; Andries, J.; Soler, R.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Arregui, I.; Terradas, J.

    2012-07-10

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere. Alfven waves and magneto-sonic waves are particular classes of MHD waves. These wave modes are clearly different and have pure properties in uniform plasmas of infinite extent only. Due to plasma non-uniformity, MHD waves have mixed properties and cannot be classified as pure Alfven or magneto-sonic waves. However, vorticity is a quantity unequivocally related to Alfven waves as compression is for magneto-sonic waves. Here, we investigate MHD waves superimposed on a one-dimensional non-uniform straight cylinder with constant magnetic field. For a piecewise constant density profile, we find that the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves have the same properties as surface Alfven waves at a true discontinuity in density. Contrary to the classic Alfven waves in a uniform plasma of infinite extent, vorticity is zero everywhere except at the cylinder boundary. If the discontinuity in density is replaced with a continuous variation of density, vorticity is spread out over the whole interval with non-uniform density. The fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves do not need compression to exist unlike the radial overtones. In thin magnetic cylinders, the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves with phase velocities between the internal and the external Alfven velocities can be considered as surface Alfven waves. On the contrary, the radial overtones can be related to fast-like magneto-sonic modes.

  20. Mill profiler machines soft materials accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Mill profiler machines bevels, slots, and grooves in soft materials, such as styrofoam phenolic-filled cores, to any desired thickness. A single operator can accurately control cutting depths in contour or straight line work.

  1. Remote balance weighs accurately amid high radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggenberger, D. N.; Shuck, A. B.

    1969-01-01

    Commercial beam-type balance, modified and outfitted with electronic controls and digital readout, can be remotely controlled for use in high radiation environments. This allows accurate weighing of breeder-reactor fuel pieces when they are radioactively hot.

  2. Tunnel effect wave energy detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Waltman, Steven B. (Inventor); Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for measuring gravitational and inertial forces, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy acting on an object or fluid in space provide an electric tunneling current through a gap between an electrode and that object or fluid in space and vary that gap with any selected one of such forces, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy acting on that object or fluid. These methods and apparatus sense a corresponding variation in an electric property of that gap and determine the latter force, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy in response to that corresponding variation, and thereby sense or measure such parameters as acceleration, position, particle mass, velocity, magnetic field strength, presence or direction, or wave or radiant energy intensity, presence or direction.

  3. Understanding the Code: keeping accurate records.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    2015-10-01

    In his continuing series looking at the legal and professional implications of the Nursing and Midwifery Council's revised Code of Conduct, Richard Griffith discusses the elements of accurate record keeping under Standard 10 of the Code. This article considers the importance of accurate record keeping for the safety of patients and protection of district nurses. The legal implications of records are explained along with how district nurses should write records to ensure these legal requirements are met. PMID:26418404

  4. Satellite observations of the QBO wave driving by Kelvin waves and gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ern, Manfred; Preusse, Peter; Kalisch, Silvio; Riese, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) of the zonal wind in the tropical stratosphere is an important process in atmospheric dynamics influencing a wide range of altitudes and latitudes. Effects of the QBO are found also in the mesosphere and in the extra-tropics. The QBO even has influence on the surface weather and climate, for example during winter in the northern hemisphere at midlatitudes. Still, climate models have large difficulties in reproducing a realistic QBO. One reason for this deficiency are uncertainties in the wave driving by planetary waves and, in particular, gravity waves that are usually too small-scale to be resolved in global models. Different global equatorial wave modes (e.g., Kelvin waves) have been identified by longitude-time 2D spectral analysis in Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) satellite temperature data, as well as ECMWF temperatures. We find good agreement between SABER satellite observations and ECMWF wave variances in both QBO-related temporal variations and their magnitude. Slow phase speed waves are strongly modulated by the QBO, higher phase speed waves are almost unaffected by the QBO, and ultra-fast equatorial waves can even reach the MLT region. Momentum fluxes and zonal wind drag due to Kelvin waves are derived, and the relative contribution of Kelvin waves to the QBO wind reversal from westward to eastward wind is estimated to be about 30% of the total wave driving. This is in good agreement with the general assumption that gravity waves (GWs) are probably more important for the QBO driving than global-scale waves. This is further supported by SABER and High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) satellite observations of gravity wave drag in the equatorial region. These observations are compared with the drag still missing in the ECMWF ERA Interim (ERAI) tropical momentum budget after considering zonal wind tendency, Coriolis force, advection terms and drag of resolved global

  5. Molecular Properties by Quantum Monte Carlo: An Investigation on the Role of the Wave Function Ansatz and the Basis Set in the Water Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Zen, Andrea; Luo, Ye; Sorella, Sandro; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods are accurate and promising many body techniques for electronic structure calculations which, in the last years, are encountering a growing interest thanks to their favorable scaling with the system size and their efficient parallelization, particularly suited for the modern high performance computing facilities. The ansatz of the wave function and its variational flexibility are crucial points for both the accurate description of molecular properties and the capabilities of the method to tackle large systems. In this paper, we extensively analyze, using different variational ansatzes, several properties of the water molecule, namely, the total energy, the dipole and quadrupole momenta, the ionization and atomization energies, the equilibrium configuration, and the harmonic and fundamental frequencies of vibration. The investigation mainly focuses on variational Monte Carlo calculations, although several lattice regularized diffusion Monte Carlo calculations are also reported. Through a systematic study, we provide a useful guide to the choice of the wave function, the pseudopotential, and the basis set for QMC calculations. We also introduce a new method for the computation of forces with finite variance on open systems and a new strategy for the definition of the atomic orbitals involved in the Jastrow-Antisymmetrised Geminal power wave function, in order to drastically reduce the number of variational parameters. This scheme significantly improves the efficiency of QMC energy minimization in case of large basis sets. PMID:24526929

  6. Accurate interlaminar stress recovery from finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessler, Alexander; Riggs, H. Ronald

    1994-01-01

    The accuracy and robustness of a two-dimensional smoothing methodology is examined for the problem of recovering accurate interlaminar shear stress distributions in laminated composite and sandwich plates. The smoothing methodology is based on a variational formulation which combines discrete least-squares and penalty-constraint functionals in a single variational form. The smoothing analysis utilizes optimal strains computed at discrete locations in a finite element analysis. These discrete strain data are smoothed with a smoothing element discretization, producing superior accuracy strains and their first gradients. The approach enables the resulting smooth strain field to be practically C1-continuous throughout the domain of smoothing, exhibiting superconvergent properties of the smoothed quantity. The continuous strain gradients are also obtained directly from the solution. The recovered strain gradients are subsequently employed in the integration o equilibrium equations to obtain accurate interlaminar shear stresses. The problem is a simply-supported rectangular plate under a doubly sinusoidal load. The problem has an exact analytic solution which serves as a measure of goodness of the recovered interlaminar shear stresses. The method has the versatility of being applicable to the analysis of rather general and complex structures built of distinct components and materials, such as found in aircraft design. For these types of structures, the smoothing is achieved with 'patches', each patch covering the domain in which the smoothed quantity is physically continuous.

  7. High-resolution seismic array imaging using teleseismic scattered waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, P.; Liu, Q.; Chen, C.; Basini, P.; Komatitsch, D.

    2013-12-01

    The advent of dense seismic networks, new modeling and imaging techniques, and increased HPC capacity makes it feasible to resolve subsurface interfaces and structural anomalies beneath seismic arrays at unprecedented details based on teleseismic scattered records. To accurately and efficiently simulate the full propagation of teleseismic waves beneath receiver arrays at the frequencies relevant to scattering imaging, we develop a hybrid method that interfaces a frequency-wavenumber (FK) calculation, which provides semi-analytical solutions to one-dimensional layered background models, with a 2D/3D spectral-element (SEM) numerical solver to calculate synthetic responses of local media to plane-wave incidence. This hybrid method accurately deals with local heterogeneities and discontinuity undulations, and represents an efficient tool for the forward modelling of teleseismic coda (including converted and scattered) waves. Meanwhile, adjoint tomography is a powerful tool for high-resolution imaging in heterogeneous media, which can resolve large velocity contrasts through the use of 2D/3D initial models and full numerical simulations for forward wavefields and sensitivity kernels. In the framework of adjont tomography and hybrid method, we compute sensitivity kernels for teleseismic coda waves, which provide the basis for mapping variations in subsurface discontinuities, density and velocity structures through nonlinear conjugate-gradient methods. Various 2D synthetic imaging examples show that inversion of teleseismic coda phases based on the 2D SEM-FK hybrid method and adjoint techniques is a promising tool for structural imaging beneath dense seismic arrays. 3D synthetic experiments will be performed to test the feasibility of seismic array imaging using adjoint method and 3D SEM-FK hybrid method. We will also apply this hybrid imaging techniques to realistic seismic data, such as the recorded SsPmP phases in central Tibet, to explore high-resolution subsurface

  8. The determination of accurate dipole polarizabilities alpha and gamma for the noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Julia E.; Taylor, Peter R.; Lee, Timothy J.; Almlof, Jan

    1991-01-01

    Accurate static dipole polarizabilities alpha and gamma of the noble gases He through Xe were determined using wave functions of similar quality for each system. Good agreement with experimental data for the static polarizability gamma was obtained for Ne and Xe, but not for Ar and Kr. Calculations suggest that the experimental values for these latter ions are too low.

  9. A novel T wave cancellation method based on MAP estimation for P wave extraction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chang-An; Dai, Huhe

    2015-01-01

    P wave and T wave in human-body electrocardiogram (ECG) signals often fuse together when atrial premature contract (APC) occurs. P waves within the fused signals are valuable for the measurement of P wave parameters as well as diagnosis of supra-ventricular arrhythmias. However, the problem of extracting P wave from the fused signals is seldom addressed. In this study, a novel T wave cancellation method for P wave extraction based on maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation is proposed. In order to accurately cancel the T wave within the fused signal, T wave and the timing point of T wave peak are estimated simultaneously. The estimated timing point of T wave peak is used as alignment reference point for T wave subtraction. Simulation results show that the proposed method outperform the traditional T wave cancellation method in terms of both normalized mean square error and cross-correlation index. The results for real ECGs with APC demonstrate that the extracted P waves using the proposed method are more similar to the non-overlapping P waves in terms of morphology than the ones using the traditional T wave cancellation method. PMID:26405921

  10. Combination of nonlinear ultrasonics and guided wave tomography for imaging the micro-defects.

    PubMed

    Li, Weibin; Cho, Younho

    2016-02-01

    The use of guided wave tomography has become an attractive alternative to convert ultrasonic wave raw data to visualized results for quantitative signal interpretation. For more accurate life prediction and efficient management strategies for critical structural components, there is a demand of imaging micro-damages in early stage. However, there is rarely investigation on guided wave tomographic imaging of micro-defects. One of the reasons for this might be that it becomes challenging to monitor tiny signal difference coefficient in a reliable manner for wave propagation in the specimens with micro-damages. Nonlinear acoustic signal whose frequency differs from that of the input signal can be found in the specimens with micro-damages. Therefore, the combination of guided wave tomography and nonlinear acoustic response induced by micro-damages could be a feasibility study for imaging micro-damages. In this paper, the nonlinear Rayleigh surface wave tomographic method is investigated to locate and size micro-corrosive defect region in an isotropic solid media. The variations of acoustic nonlinear responses of ultrasonic waves in the specimens with and without defects are used in guided wave tomographic algorithm to construct the images. The comparisons between images obtained by experimental signals and real defect region induced by hydrogen corrosion are presented in this paper. Results show that the images of defect regions with different shape, size and location are successfully obtained by this novel technique, while there is no visualized result constructed by conventional linear ultrasonic tomographic one. The present approach shows a potential for inspecting, locating and imaging micro-defects by nonlinear Rayleigh surface wave tomography. PMID:26552636

  11. Third Wave.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Chris

    2000-01-01

    Third Wave is a Christian charity based in Derby (England) that offers training in vocational skills, preindustrial crafts, horticultural and agricultural skills, environmental education, and woodland survival skills to disadvantaged people at city and farm locations. Third Wave employs a holistic approach to personal development in a community…

  12. Microfluidic waves.

    PubMed

    Utz, Marcel; Begley, Matthew R; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    2011-11-21

    The propagation of pressure waves in fluidic channels with elastic covers is discussed in view of applications to flow control in microfluidic devices. A theory is presented which describes pressure waves in the fluid that are coupled to bending waves in the elastic cover. At low frequencies, the lateral bending of the cover dominates over longitudinal bending, leading to propagating, non-dispersive longitudinal pressure waves in the channel. The theory addresses effects due to both the finite viscosity and compressibility of the fluid. The coupled waves propagate without dispersion, as long as the wave length is larger than the channel width. It is shown that in channels of typical microfluidic dimensions, wave velocities in the range of a few 10 m s(-1) result if the channels are covered by films of a compliant material such as PDMS. The application of this principle to design microfluidic band pass filters based on standing waves is discussed. Characteristic frequencies in the range of a few kHz are readily achieved with quality factors above 30. PMID:21966667

  13. Multichannel analysis of surface waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, C.B.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.

    1999-01-01

    The frequency-dependent properties of Rayleigh-type surface waves can be utilized for imaging and characterizing the shallow subsurface. Most surface-wave analysis relies on the accurate calculation of phase velocities for the horizontally traveling fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave acquired by stepping out a pair of receivers at intervals based on calculated ground roll wavelengths. Interference by coherent source-generated noise inhibits the reliability of shear-wave velocities determined through inversion of the whole wave field. Among these nonplanar, nonfundamental-mode Rayleigh waves (noise) are body waves, scattered and nonsource-generated surface waves, and higher-mode surface waves. The degree to which each of these types of noise contaminates the dispersion curve and, ultimately, the inverted shear-wave velocity profile is dependent on frequency as well as distance from the source. Multichannel recording permits effective identification and isolation of noise according to distinctive trace-to-trace coherency in arrival time and amplitude. An added advantage is the speed and redundancy of the measurement process. Decomposition of a multichannel record into a time variable-frequency format, similar to an uncorrelated Vibroseis record, permits analysis and display of each frequency component in a unique and continuous format. Coherent noise contamination can then be examined and its effects appraised in both frequency and offset space. Separation of frequency components permits real-time maximization of the S/N ratio during acquisition and subsequent processing steps. Linear separation of each ground roll frequency component allows calculation of phase velocities by simply measuring the linear slope of each frequency component. Breaks in coherent surface-wave arrivals, observable on the decomposed record, can be compensated for during acquisition and processing. Multichannel recording permits single-measurement surveying of a broad depth range, high levels of

  14. Joint inversion of shear wave travel time residuals and geoid and depth anomalies for long-wavelength variations in upper mantle temperature and composition along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheehan, Anne F.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements were carried out for SS-S differential travel time residuals for nearly 500 paths crossing the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge, assuming that the residuals are dominated by contributions from the upper mantle near the surface bounce point of the reflected phase SS. Results indicate that the SS-S travel time residuals decrease linearly with square root of age, to an age of 80-100 Ma, in general agreement with the plate cooling model. A joint inversion was formulated of travel time residuals and geoid and bathymetric anomalies for lateral variation in the upper mantle temperature and composition. The preferred inversion solutions were found to have variations in upper mantle temperature along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge of about 100 K. It was calculated that, for a constant bulk composition, such a temperature variation would produce about a 7-km variation in crustal thickness, larger than is generally observed.

  15. Wave-Like Ozone Movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldugin, V. C.; Nikulin, G. N.; Henriksen, K.

    The wave-like character of the total ozone variations is examined from the Aral Sea and Karaganda observatories in Middle Asia, and from Tromsø and Murmansk in the Arctic. The waves have a period of 10-20 days and an amplitude of about 20-50 DU. They are seen practically every year when the ozone data do not contain too many gaps. In Middle Asia waves with the same periods are found in geopotential height and tropopause pressure variations. The ozone waves are caused by dynamic meteorological disturbances near the tropopause. The passing of a wave crest in the pressure field causes the convergence of ozone poor air under the tropopause and the divergence of ozone rich air above the tropopause giving rise to a total ozone content decrease. The passing of a wave trough stimulates the opposite process. By crosscorrelation analysis the wave-like movement was determined as eastward for both pairs of stations with a velocity of 11-15 °/day.

  16. Z-scan theoretical and experimental studies for accurate measurements of the nonlinear refractive index and absorption of optical glasses near damage threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, Thomas; Billard, Franck; Akhouayri, Hassan

    2004-06-01

    Self-focusing is one of the dramatic phenomena that may occur during the propagation of a high power laser beam in a nonlinear material. This phenomenon leads to a degradation of the wave front and may also lead to a photoinduced damage of the material. Realistic simulations of the propagation of high power laser beams require an accurate knowledge of the nonlinear refractive index γ. In the particular case of fused silica and in the nanosecond regime, it seems that electronic mechanisms as well as electrostriction and thermal effects can lead to a significant refractive index variation. Compared to the different methods used to measure this parmeter, the Z-scan method is simple, offers a good sensitivity and may give absolute measurements if the incident beam is accurately studied. However, this method requires a very good knowledge of the incident beam and of its propagation inside a nonlinear sample. We used a split-step propagation algorithm to simlate Z-scan curves for arbitrary beam shape, sample thickness and nonlinear phase shift. According to our simulations and a rigorous analysis of the Z-scan measured signal, it appears that some abusive approximations lead to very important errors. Thus, by reducing possible errors on the interpretation of Z-scan experimental studies, we performed accurate measurements of the nonlinear refractive index of fused silica that show the significant contribution of nanosecond mechanisms.

  17. A highly accurate interatomic potential for argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Ronald A.

    1993-09-01

    A modified potential based on the individually damped model of Douketis, Scoles, Marchetti, Zen, and Thakkar [J. Chem. Phys. 76, 3057 (1982)] is presented which fits, within experimental error, the accurate ultraviolet (UV) vibration-rotation spectrum of argon determined by UV laser absorption spectroscopy by Herman, LaRocque, and Stoicheff [J. Chem. Phys. 89, 4535 (1988)]. Other literature potentials fail to do so. The potential also is shown to predict a large number of other properties and is probably the most accurate characterization of the argon interaction constructed to date.

  18. A robust and accurate formulation of molecular and colloidal electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Klaseboer, Evert; Chan, Derek Y C

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a re-formulation of the boundary integral method for the Debye-Hückel model of molecular and colloidal electrostatics that removes the mathematical singularities that have to date been accepted as an intrinsic part of the conventional boundary integral equation method. The essence of the present boundary regularized integral equation formulation consists of subtracting a known solution from the conventional boundary integral method in such a way as to cancel out the singularities associated with the Green's function. This approach better reflects the non-singular physical behavior of the systems on boundaries with the benefits of the following: (i) the surface integrals can be evaluated accurately using quadrature without any need to devise special numerical integration procedures, (ii) being able to use quadratic or spline function surface elements to represent the surface more accurately and the variation of the functions within each element is represented to a consistent level of precision by appropriate interpolation functions, (iii) being able to calculate electric fields, even at boundaries, accurately and directly from the potential without having to solve hypersingular integral equations and this imparts high precision in calculating the Maxwell stress tensor and consequently, intermolecular or colloidal forces, (iv) a reliable way to handle geometric configurations in which different parts of the boundary can be very close together without being affected by numerical instabilities, therefore potentials, fields, and forces between surfaces can be found accurately at surface separations down to near contact, and (v) having the simplicity of a formulation that does not require complex algorithms to handle singularities will result in significant savings in coding effort and in the reduction of opportunities for coding errors. These advantages are illustrated using examples drawn from molecular and colloidal electrostatics. PMID:27497538

  19. A robust and accurate formulation of molecular and colloidal electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiang; Klaseboer, Evert; Chan, Derek Y. C.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a re-formulation of the boundary integral method for the Debye-Hückel model of molecular and colloidal electrostatics that removes the mathematical singularities that have to date been accepted as an intrinsic part of the conventional boundary integral equation method. The essence of the present boundary regularized integral equation formulation consists of subtracting a known solution from the conventional boundary integral method in such a way as to cancel out the singularities associated with the Green's function. This approach better reflects the non-singular physical behavior of the systems on boundaries with the benefits of the following: (i) the surface integrals can be evaluated accurately using quadrature without any need to devise special numerical integration procedures, (ii) being able to use quadratic or spline function surface elements to represent the surface more accurately and the variation of the functions within each element is represented to a consistent level of precision by appropriate interpolation functions, (iii) being able to calculate electric fields, even at boundaries, accurately and directly from the potential without having to solve hypersingular integral equations and this imparts high precision in calculating the Maxwell stress tensor and consequently, intermolecular or colloidal forces, (iv) a reliable way to handle geometric configurations in which different parts of the boundary can be very close together without being affected by numerical instabilities, therefore potentials, fields, and forces between surfaces can be found accurately at surface separations down to near contact, and (v) having the simplicity of a formulation that does not require complex algorithms to handle singularities will result in significant savings in coding effort and in the reduction of opportunities for coding errors. These advantages are illustrated using examples drawn from molecular and colloidal electrostatics.

  20. Characterization of Detonation Wave Propagation in LX-17 Near the Critical Diameter

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T D; Tarver, C M; Maienschein, J; Lewis, P; Pastrone, R; Lee, R S; Roeske, F

    2002-06-14

    A new Detonation Profile Test (DPT) was developed to measure simultaneously the detonation wave breakout profile and the average detonation velocity at the breakout surface. The test evaluated small cylindrical samples with diameter up to 19.08 mm and length up to 33 mm. The experiment involved initiating a LX-17 cylindrical specimen and recording the wave breakout using a fast streaking electronic camera. The initiation was done using a PBX-9407 pellet (1.630 g/cm{sup 3}), which has a Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) pressure close to that of LX-17. The acceptor breakout surface had a 2 mm wide by 1 mm deep groove that provided a step in the recorded breakout profile for velocity determination. A 532-nm laser light illuminated the specimen surface. A streak camera looking perpendicular to the groove, recorded the extinction of the laser light as the detonation wave emerged from the surface. This technique provided a high-resolution spatial and temporal profile of the wave curvature as well as accurate timing of the propagating wave over the last millimeter of the sample. The measured groove depth and recorded travel time were then used to calculate the average detonation wave velocity. Results for 12.7 mm diameter unconfined LX-17 charges showed detonation velocity in the range between 6.79 and 7.06 km/s for parts up to 33 mm long. Since LX-17 can not sustain detonation at less than 7.3 km/s , these waves were definitely failing. Experiments with confined 12.7 mm diameter and unconfined 19.1 mm diameter samples showed wave velocities in the range of 7.4-7.6 km/s, values approaching steady state conditions at infinite diameter. Both unconfined and confined charges show no sensitivity to density variations in the range between 1.890-1.915 g/cm{sup 3}. Experiments with 15.88 mm and 19.08 mm diameters gave velocities in the range between 7.2-7.45 km/s, values close to that expected for failure. The velocity measurement has an estimated experimental error in the range of 2

  1. Ion Cyclotron Waves in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H. Y.; Jian, L. K.; Russell, C. T.; Omidi, N.

    2016-02-01

    The ion cyclotron waves (ICWs) refer to electromagnetic transverse waves with nearly field-aligned propagation, circular polarization, and frequencies near the proton gyro-frequency. This chapter presents the ICW studies observed in the solar wind over a wide range of heliocentric distances, at all solar longitudes, and at locations far from planets or comets. To better understand the wave source region, case studies have been performed on a special group of ICW storm events, in which the left-handed (LH) and right-handed (RH) waves were observed simultaneously in the spacecraft frame. The study in the chapter assumes the waves are generated through one possible mechanism (i.e., the temperature anisotropy instability). The variations of the wave properties with heliocentric distances may also provide information on the possible wave generation sources and the effects of the wave to the solar wind plasma.

  2. Correction of optical absorption and scattering variations in laser speckle rheology measurements

    PubMed Central

    Hajjarian, Zeinab; Nadkarni, Seemantini K.

    2014-01-01

    Laser Speckle Rheology (LSR) is an optical technique to evaluate the viscoelastic properties by analyzing the temporal fluctuations of backscattered speckle patterns. Variations of optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients further modulate speckle fluctuations, posing a critical challenge for quantitative evaluation of viscoelasticity. We compare and contrast two different approaches applicable for correcting and isolating the collective influence of absorption and scattering, to accurately measure mechanical properties. Our results indicate that the numerical approach of Monte-Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) reliably compensates for any arbitrary optical variations. When scattering dominates absorption, yet absorption is non-negligible, diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) formalisms perform similar to MCRT, superseding other analytical compensation approaches such as Telegrapher equation. The computational convenience of DWS greatly simplifies the extraction of viscoelastic properties from LSR measurements in a number of chemical, industrial, and biomedical applications. PMID:24663983

  3. Correction of optical absorption and scattering variations in Laser Speckle Rheology measurements.

    PubMed

    Hajjarian, Zeinab; Nadkarni, Seemantini K

    2014-03-24

    Laser Speckle Rheology (LSR) is an optical technique to evaluate the viscoelastic properties by analyzing the temporal fluctuations of backscattered speckle patterns. Variations of optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients further modulate speckle fluctuations, posing a critical challenge for quantitative evaluation of viscoelasticity. We compare and contrast two different approaches applicable for correcting and isolating the collective influence of absorption and scattering, to accurately measure mechanical properties. Our results indicate that the numerical approach of Monte-Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) reliably compensates for any arbitrary optical variations. When scattering dominates absorption, yet absorption is non-negligible, diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) formalisms perform similar to MCRT, superseding other analytical compensation approaches such as Telegrapher equation. The computational convenience of DWS greatly simplifies the extraction of viscoelastic properties from LSR measurements in a number of chemical, industrial, and biomedical applications. PMID:24663983

  4. Atmospheric Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    With its Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), half of the Ralph instrument, New Horizons captured several pictures of mesoscale gravity waves in Jupiter's equatorial atmosphere. Buoyancy waves of this type are seen frequently on Earth - for example, they can be caused when air flows over a mountain and a regular cloud pattern forms downstream. In Jupiter's case there are no mountains, but if conditions in the atmosphere are just right, it is possible to form long trains of these small waves. The source of the wave excitation seems to lie deep in Jupiter's atmosphere, below the visible cloud layers at depths corresponding to pressures 10 times that at Earth's surface. The New Horizons measurements showed that the waves move about 100 meters per second faster than surrounding clouds; this is about 25% of the speed of sound on Earth and is much greater than current models of these waves predict. Scientists can 'read' the speed and patterns these waves to learn more about activity and stability in the atmospheric layers below.

  5. Quasitravelling waves

    SciTech Connect

    Beklaryan, Leva A

    2011-02-11

    A finite difference analogue of the wave equation with potential perturbation is investigated, which simulates the behaviour of an infinite rod under the action of an external longitudinal force field. For a homogeneous rod, describing solutions of travelling wave type is equivalent to describing the full space of classical solutions to an induced one-parameter family of functional differential equations of point type, with the characteristic of the travelling wave as parameter. For an inhomogeneous rod, the space of solutions of travelling wave type is trivial, and their 'proper' extension is defined as solutions of 'quasitravelling' wave type. By contrast to the case of a homogeneous rod, describing the solutions of quasitravelling wave type is equivalent to describing the quotient of the full space of impulsive solutions to an induced one-parameter family of point-type functional differential equations by an equivalence relation connected with the definition of solutions of quasitravelling wave type. Stability of stationary solutions is analyzed. Bibliography: 9 titles.

  6. Moreton Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    "Moreton waves," named for the observer who popularized them, are a solar phenomenon also known in scientific literature as "Moreton-Ramsey wave," "flare waves," "flare-associated waves," "MHD blast waves," "chromospheric shock fronts" and various other combinations of terms which connote violently propagating impulsive disturbances. It is unclear whether all of the observations to which these terms have been applied pertain to a single physical phenomenon: there has perhaps been some overlap between the observations and the assumed physical properties of the observed occurrence. Moreton waves are ideally observed in the wings of H alpha, and appear as semi-circular fronts propagating at speeds ranging from several hundred to over a thousand km/sec. They form an arc, or "brow shape" which can span up to 180 degrees. Extrapolating the speed and locations of the arc indicates that the phenomenon's origin intersects well with the impulsive phase of the associated H alpha flare (if the flare exhibits an impulsive phase). However, the arc may not form or may not be observable until it is tens of megameters from the flaring region, and subsequently can propagate to distances exceeding 100 megameters. The high speeds and distances of propagation, plus the associated radio and energetic particle observations, provided strong evidence of a coronal, rather than a chromospheric origin. The H alpha manifestation of the wave is assumed to be the "ground track" or "skirt" of a three-dimensional disturbance.

  7. Ship waves and lee waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharman, R. D.; Wurtele, M. G.

    1983-01-01

    Dynamics analogous to those of surface ship waves on water of finite depth are noted for the three-dimensional trapped lee wave modes produced by an isolated obstacle in a stratified fluid. This vertical trapping of wave energy is modeled by uniform upstream flow and stratification, bounded above by a rigid lid, and by a semiinfinite fluid of uniform stability whose wind velocity increases exponentially with height, representing the atmosphere. While formal asymptotic solutions are produced, limited quantitative usefulness is obtained through them because of the limitations of the approximations and the infinity of modes in the solution. Time-dependent numerical models are accordingly developed for both surface ship waves and internal and atmospheric ship waves, yielding a variety of results.

  8. Wave Propagation in the Vicinities of Rock Fractures Under Obliquely Incident Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yang; Li, Jianchun; He, Lei; laloui, Lyesse; Zhao, Jian

    2016-05-01

    Though obliquely incident plane wave across rock fractures has been extensively investigated by theoretical analysis, the quantitative identification of each wave emerged from fractures has not been achieved either in numerical simulation or laboratory experiment. On the other hand, there are no theoretical results describing the stress/velocity state of the rocks beside a fracture. The superposition of the multiple waves propagating in the media results in the variation of the stress/velocity state. To understand the superposition of the wave components in the adjacent rocks of a facture, based on the geometrical analysis of the wave paths, the lag times among passing waves at an arbitrary point are determined. The normalised critical distances from the fracture to the measuring locations where the corresponding harmonic waves depart from other waves for a certain duration are then derived. Discussion on the correction for an arbitrary incident wave is then carried out considering the changes of the duration of the reflected and transmitted waves. Under the guidance of the analysis, wave superposition is performed for theoretical results and separated waves are obtained from numerical model. They are demonstrated to be consistent with each other. The measurement and the data processing provide an approach for wave separation in a relatively unbounded media. In addition, based on the mechanical analysis on the wave front, an indirect wave separation method is proposed which provides a possibility for laboratory experiments of wave propagation with an arbitrary incident angle.

  9. Accurate pointing of tungsten welding electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegelmeier, P.

    1971-01-01

    Thoriated-tungsten is pointed accurately and quickly by using sodium nitrite. Point produced is smooth and no effort is necessary to hold the tungsten rod concentric. The chemically produced point can be used several times longer than ground points. This method reduces time and cost of preparing tungsten electrodes.

  10. Leveraging Two Kinect Sensors for Accurate Full-Body Motion Capture

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhiquan; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Yu; Du, Sidan

    2015-01-01

    Accurate motion capture plays an important role in sports analysis, the medical field and virtual reality. Current methods for motion capture often suffer from occlusions, which limits the accuracy of their pose estimation. In this paper, we propose a complete system to measure the pose parameters of the human body accurately. Different from previous monocular depth camera systems, we leverage two Kinect sensors to acquire more information about human movements, which ensures that we can still get an accurate estimation even when significant occlusion occurs. Because human motion is temporally constant, we adopt a learning analysis to mine the temporal information across the posture variations. Using this information, we estimate human pose parameters accurately, regardless of rapid movement. Our experimental results show that our system can perform an accurate pose estimation of the human body with the constraint of information from the temporal domain. PMID:26402681

  11. Leveraging Two Kinect Sensors for Accurate Full-Body Motion Capture.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhiquan; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Yu; Du, Sidan

    2015-01-01

    Accurate motion capture plays an important role in sports analysis, the medical field and virtual reality. Current methods for motion capture often suffer from occlusions, which limits the accuracy of their pose estimation. In this paper, we propose a complete system to measure the pose parameters of the human body accurately. Different from previous monocular depth camera systems, we leverage two Kinect sensors to acquire more information about human movements, which ensures that we can still get an accurate estimation even when significant occlusion occurs. Because human motion is temporally constant, we adopt a learning analysis to mine the temporal information across the posture variations. Using this information, we estimate human pose parameters accurately, regardless of rapid movement. Our experimental results show that our system can perform an accurate pose estimation of the human body with the constraint of information from the temporal domain. PMID:26402681

  12. Development and application of one-way elastic wave propagators in generally-anisotropic, heterogeneous, three-dimensional media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, Douglas A.

    A finite-difference narrow-angle one-way wave equation is implemented and is applied to various wave propagation problems to verify the method as well as to study frequency-dependent three-component waveform effects. The narrow-angle wave equation is the most approximate, yet most computationally practical, of the one-way wave equations derived by Thomson (1999). Although the vector narrow-angle wave equation is limited to a certain propagation distance, it is still a viable and powerful modelling approach to wave propagation in three-dimensional elastic media. A FORTRAN finite-difference code is developed that is second-order accurate in the lateral and forward propagation direction and requires only three extrapolation planes to be stored during each propagation step. Numerical analysis of the finite-difference algorithm indicates that the scheme is stable for appropriate initial conditions and, for the propagation path-lengths of interest, angular range of forward propagation and source-pulse spectral content, numerical grid-anisotropy is minimal. The narrow-angle propagator is sufficiently accurate for angles up to +/-15° to the preferred direction of propagation and is stable within singular regions of slowness space. For reasonable velocity gradients, the travel-times and amplitudes of transmitted and converted body-waves are in good agreement with an exact reference solution. The conical-point singularity is the main focus of the homogeneous, anisotropic wave propagation examples, because it represents the most extreme anisotropic singularity and poses the greatest difficulty for ray-based methods. The results of wave propagation along the acoustic axis display characteristic and potentially diagnostic waveform effects, such as wavefront folding and tearing, merging and splitting pulses, growth of anomalous components and bipolar waveforms. The results of wave propagation in isotropic heterogeneous media are consistent with various published results. Some

  13. Middle Atmosphere Dynamics with Gravity Wave Interactions in the Numerical Spectral Model: Tides and Planetary Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Mengel, J. G.; Chan, K. L.; Huang, F. T.

    2010-01-01

    As Lindzen (1981) had shown, small-scale gravity waves (GW) produce the observed reversals of the zonal-mean circulation and temperature variations in the upper mesosphere. The waves also play a major role in modulating and amplifying the diurnal tides (DT) (e.g., Waltersheid, 1981; Fritts and Vincent, 1987; Fritts, 1995a). We summarize here the modeling studies with the mechanistic numerical spectral model (NSM) with Doppler spread parameterization for GW (Hines, 1997a, b), which describes in the middle atmosphere: (a) migrating and non-migrating DT, (b) planetary waves (PW), and (c) global-scale inertio gravity waves. Numerical experiments are discussed that illuminate the influence of GW filtering and nonlinear interactions between DT, PW, and zonal mean variations. Keywords: Theoretical modeling, Middle atmosphere dynamics, Gravity wave interactions, Migrating and non-migrating tides, Planetary waves, Global-scale inertio gravity waves.

  14. Spreading speeds for plant populations in landscapes with low environmental variation.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Mark A; Gaffney, Eamonn A; Bullock, James M; White, Steven M

    2014-12-21

    ) variation can be positive or negative, which is in contrast to the reduction in wave-speed caused by intrinsic stochasticity. To deal with the loss of accuracy as ϵ increases, we formulate a second-order approximation to the wave-speed for periodic landscapes and compare both approximations against the results of numerical simulation and show that they are both accurate for the range of landscapes considered. PMID:25152218

  15. Wave-particle interaction in the Faraday waves.

    PubMed

    Francois, N; Xia, H; Punzmann, H; Shats, M

    2015-10-01

    Wave motion in disordered Faraday waves is analysed in terms of oscillons or quasi-particles. The motion of these oscillons is measured using particle tracking tools and it is compared with the motion of fluid particles on the water surface. Both the real floating particles and the oscillons, representing the collective fluid motion, show Brownian-type dispersion exhibiting ballistic and diffusive mean squared displacement at short and long times, respectively. While the floating particles motion has been previously explained in the context of two-dimensional turbulence driven by Faraday waves, no theoretical description exists for the random walk type motion of oscillons. It is found that the r.m.s velocity ⟨μ̃(osc)⟩(rms) of oscillons is directly related to the turbulent r.m.s. velocity ⟨μ̃⟩(rms) of the fluid particles in a broad range of vertical accelerations. The measured ⟨μ̃(osc)⟩(rms) accurately explains the broadening of the frequency spectra of the surface elevation observed in disordered Faraday waves. These results suggest that 2D turbulence is the driving force behind both the randomization of the oscillons motion and the resulting broadening of the wave frequency spectra. The coupling between wave motion and hydrodynamic turbulence demonstrated here offers new perspectives for predicting complex fluid transport from the knowledge of wave field spectra and vice versa. PMID:26420468

  16. Development of an accurate transmission line fault locator using the global positioning system satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Harry

    1994-01-01

    A highly accurate transmission line fault locator based on the traveling-wave principle was developed and successfully operated within B.C. Hydro. A transmission line fault produces a fast-risetime traveling wave at the fault point which propagates along the transmission line. This fault locator system consists of traveling wave detectors located at key substations which detect and time tag the leading edge of the fault-generated traveling wave as if passes through. A master station gathers the time-tagged information from the remote detectors and determines the location of the fault. Precise time is a key element to the success of this system. This fault locator system derives its timing from the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. System tests confirmed the accuracy of locating faults to within the design objective of +/-300 meters.

  17. Accurate solution of the Dirac equation on Lagrange meshes.

    PubMed

    Baye, Daniel; Filippin, Livio; Godefroid, Michel

    2014-04-01

    The Lagrange-mesh method is an approximate variational method taking the form of equations on a grid because of the use of a Gauss quadrature approximation. With a basis of Lagrange functions involving associated Laguerre polynomials related to the Gauss quadrature, the method is applied to the Dirac equation. The potential may possess a 1/r singularity. For hydrogenic atoms, numerically exact energies and wave functions are obtained with small numbers n+1 of mesh points, where n is the principal quantum number. Numerically exact mean values of powers -2 to 3 of the radial coordinate r can also be obtained with n+2 mesh points. For the Yukawa potential, a 15-digit agreement with benchmark energies of the literature is obtained with 50 or fewer mesh points. PMID:24827362

  18. Accurate solution of the Dirac equation on Lagrange meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baye, Daniel; Filippin, Livio; Godefroid, Michel

    2014-04-01

    The Lagrange-mesh method is an approximate variational method taking the form of equations on a grid because of the use of a Gauss quadrature approximation. With a basis of Lagrange functions involving associated Laguerre polynomials related to the Gauss quadrature, the method is applied to the Dirac equation. The potential may possess a 1/r singularity. For hydrogenic atoms, numerically exact energies and wave functions are obtained with small numbers n +1 of mesh points, where n is the principal quantum number. Numerically exact mean values of powers -2 to 3 of the radial coordinate r can also be obtained with n +2 mesh points. For the Yukawa potential, a 15-digit agreement with benchmark energies of the literature is obtained with 50 or fewer mesh points.

  19. Constant Group Velocity Ultrasonic Guided Wave Inspection for Corrosion and Erosion Monitoring in Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Instanes, Geir; Pedersen, Audun; Toppe, Mads; Nagy, Peter B.

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes a novel ultrasonic guided wave inspection technique for the monitoring of internal corrosion and erosion in pipes, which exploits the fundamental flexural mode to measure the average wall thickness over the inspection path. The inspection frequency is chosen so that the group velocity of the fundamental flexural mode is essentially constant throughout the wall thickness range of interest, while the phase velocity is highly dispersive and changes in a systematic way with varying wall thickness in the pipe. Although this approach is somewhat less accurate than the often used transverse resonance methods, it smoothly integrates the wall thickness over the whole propagation length, therefore it is very robust and can tolerate large and uneven thickness variations from point to point. The constant group velocity (CGV) method is capable of monitoring the true average of the wall thickness over the inspection length with an accuracy of 1% even in the presence of one order of magnitude larger local variations. This method also eliminates spurious variations caused by changing temperature, which can cause fairly large velocity variations, but do not significantly influence the dispersion as measured by the true phase angle in the vicinity of the CGV point. The CGV guided wave CEM method was validated in both laboratory and field tests.

  20. Visualization of terahertz surface waves propagation on metal foils

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinke; Wang, Sen; Sun, Wenfeng; Feng, Shengfei; Han, Peng; Yan, Haitao; Ye, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Exploitation of surface plasmonic devices (SPDs) in the terahertz (THz) band is always beneficial for broadening the application potential of THz technologies. To clarify features of SPDs, a practical characterization means is essential for accurately observing the complex field distribution of a THz surface wave (TSW). Here, a THz digital holographic imaging system is employed to coherently exhibit temporal variations and spectral properties of TSWs activated by a rectangular or semicircular slit structure on metal foils. Advantages of the imaging system are comprehensively elucidated, including the exclusive measurement of TSWs and fall-off of the time consumption. Numerical simulations of experimental procedures further verify the imaging measurement accuracy. It can be anticipated that this imaging system will provide a versatile tool for analyzing the performance and principle of SPDs. PMID:26729652

  1. Visualization of terahertz surface waves propagation on metal foils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinke; Wang, Sen; Sun, Wenfeng; Feng, Shengfei; Han, Peng; Yan, Haitao; Ye, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Exploitation of surface plasmonic devices (SPDs) in the terahertz (THz) band is always beneficial for broadening the application potential of THz technologies. To clarify features of SPDs, a practical characterization means is essential for accurately observing the complex field distribution of a THz surface wave (TSW). Here, a THz digital holographic imaging system is employed to coherently exhibit temporal variations and spectral properties of TSWs activated by a rectangular or semicircular slit structure on metal foils. Advantages of the imaging system are comprehensively elucidated, including the exclusive measurement of TSWs and fall-off of the time consumption. Numerical simulations of experimental procedures further verify the imaging measurement accuracy. It can be anticipated that this imaging system will provide a versatile tool for analyzing the performance and principle of SPDs. PMID:26729652

  2. Development and Validation of a Multidisciplinary Tool for Accurate and Efficient Rotorcraft Noise Prediction (MUTE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yi; Anusonti-Inthra, Phuriwat; Diskin, Boris

    2011-01-01

    A physics-based, systematically coupled, multidisciplinary prediction tool (MUTE) for rotorcraft noise was developed and validated with a wide range of flight configurations and conditions. MUTE is an aggregation of multidisciplinary computational tools that accurately and efficiently model the physics of the source of rotorcraft noise, and predict the noise at far-field observer locations. It uses systematic coupling approaches among multiple disciplines including Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Computational Structural Dynamics (CSD), and high fidelity acoustics. Within MUTE, advanced high-order CFD tools are used around the rotor blade to predict the transonic flow (shock wave) effects, which generate the high-speed impulsive noise. Predictions of the blade-vortex interaction noise in low speed flight are also improved by using the Particle Vortex Transport Method (PVTM), which preserves the wake flow details required for blade/wake and fuselage/wake interactions. The accuracy of the source noise prediction is further improved by utilizing a coupling approach between CFD and CSD, so that the effects of key structural dynamics, elastic blade deformations, and trim solutions are correctly represented in the analysis. The blade loading information and/or the flow field parameters around the rotor blade predicted by the CFD/CSD coupling approach are used to predict the acoustic signatures at far-field observer locations with a high-fidelity noise propagation code (WOPWOP3). The predicted results from the MUTE tool for rotor blade aerodynamic loading and far-field acoustic signatures are compared and validated with a variation of experimental data sets, such as UH60-A data, DNW test data and HART II test data.

  3. Numerical modeling of wave propagation in functionally graded materials using time-domain spectral Chebyshev elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayatrasa, Saeid; Bui, Tinh Quoc; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Lim, Chee Wah

    2014-02-01

    Numerical modeling of the Lamb wave propagation in functionally graded materials (FGMs) by a two-dimensional time-domain spectral finite element method (SpFEM) is presented. The high-order Chebyshev polynomials as approximation functions are used in the present formulation, which provides the capability to take into account the through thickness variation of the material properties. The efficiency and accuracy of the present model with one and two layers of 5th order spectral elements in modeling wave propagation in FGM plates are analyzed. Different excitation frequencies in a wide range of 28-350 kHz are investigated, and the dispersion properties obtained by the present model are verified by reference results. The through thickness wave structure of two principal Lamb modes are extracted and analyzed by the symmetry and relative amplitude of the vertical and horizontal oscillations. The differences with respect to Lamb modes generated in homogeneous plates are explained. Zero-crossing and wavelet signal processing-spectrum decomposition procedures are implemented to obtain phase and group velocities and their dispersion properties. So it is attested how this approach can be practically employed for simulation, calibration and optimization of Lamb wave based nondestructive evaluation techniques for the FGMs. The capability of modeling stress wave propagation through the thickness of an FGM specimen subjected to impact load is also investigated, which shows that the present method is highly accurate as compared with other existing reference data.

  4. New model accurately predicts reformate composition

    SciTech Connect

    Ancheyta-Juarez, J.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. )

    1994-01-31

    Although naphtha reforming is a well-known process, the evolution of catalyst formulation, as well as new trends in gasoline specifications, have led to rapid evolution of the process, including: reactor design, regeneration mode, and operating conditions. Mathematical modeling of the reforming process is an increasingly important tool. It is fundamental to the proper design of new reactors and revamp of existing ones. Modeling can be used to optimize operating conditions, analyze the effects of process variables, and enhance unit performance. Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo has developed a model of the catalytic reforming process that accurately predicts reformate composition at the higher-severity conditions at which new reformers are being designed. The new AA model is more accurate than previous proposals because it takes into account the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate constants of each chemical reaction.

  5. Accurate colorimetric feedback for RGB LED clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Kwong; Ashdown, Ian

    2006-08-01

    We present an empirical model of LED emission spectra that is applicable to both InGaN and AlInGaP high-flux LEDs, and which accurately predicts their relative spectral power distributions over a wide range of LED junction temperatures. We further demonstrate with laboratory measurements that changes in LED spectral power distribution with temperature can be accurately predicted with first- or second-order equations. This provides the basis for a real-time colorimetric feedback system for RGB LED clusters that can maintain the chromaticity of white light at constant intensity to within +/-0.003 Δuv over a range of 45 degrees Celsius, and to within 0.01 Δuv when dimmed over an intensity range of 10:1.

  6. Accurate mask model for advanced nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zine El Abidine, Nacer; Sundermann, Frank; Yesilada, Emek; Ndiaye, El Hadji Omar; Mishra, Kushlendra; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Bork, Ingo; Buck, Peter; Toublan, Olivier; Schanen, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    Standard OPC models consist of a physical optical model and an empirical resist model. The resist model compensates the optical model imprecision on top of modeling resist development. The optical model imprecision may result from mask topography effects and real mask information including mask ebeam writing and mask process contributions. For advanced technology nodes, significant progress has been made to model mask topography to improve optical model accuracy. However, mask information is difficult to decorrelate from standard OPC model. Our goal is to establish an accurate mask model through a dedicated calibration exercise. In this paper, we present a flow to calibrate an accurate mask enabling its implementation. The study covers the different effects that should be embedded in the mask model as well as the experiment required to model them.

  7. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  8. Two highly accurate methods for pitch calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniel, K.; Härtig, F.; Osawa, S.; Sato, O.

    2009-11-01

    Among profiles, helix and tooth thickness pitch is one of the most important parameters of an involute gear measurement evaluation. In principle, coordinate measuring machines (CMM) and CNC-controlled gear measuring machines as a variant of a CMM are suited for these kinds of gear measurements. Now the Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (NMIJ/AIST) and the German national metrology institute the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have each developed independently highly accurate pitch calibration methods applicable to CMM or gear measuring machines. Both calibration methods are based on the so-called closure technique which allows the separation of the systematic errors of the measurement device and the errors of the gear. For the verification of both calibration methods, NMIJ/AIST and PTB performed measurements on a specially designed pitch artifact. The comparison of the results shows that both methods can be used for highly accurate calibrations of pitch standards.

  9. Accurate modeling of parallel scientific computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Townsend, James C.

    1988-01-01

    Scientific codes are usually parallelized by partitioning a grid among processors. To achieve top performance it is necessary to partition the grid so as to balance workload and minimize communication/synchronization costs. This problem is particularly acute when the grid is irregular, changes over the course of the computation, and is not known until load time. Critical mapping and remapping decisions rest on the ability to accurately predict performance, given a description of a grid and its partition. This paper discusses one approach to this problem, and illustrates its use on a one-dimensional fluids code. The models constructed are shown to be accurate, and are used to find optimal remapping schedules.

  10. Accurate Guitar Tuning by Cochlear Implant Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  11. Excitation of parasitic waves near cutoff in forward-wave amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.; Sinitsyn, Oleksandr V.; Antonsen, Thomas M. Jr.

    2010-10-15

    In this paper, excitation of parasitic waves near cutoff in forward-wave amplifiers is studied in a rather general form. This problem is important for developing high-power sources of coherent, phase controlled short-wavelength electromagnetic radiation because just the waves which can be excited near cutoff have low group velocities. Since the wave coupling to an electron beam is inversely proportional to the group velocity, these waves are the most dangerous parasitic waves preventing stable amplification of desired signal waves. Two effects are analyzed in the paper. The first one is the effect of signal wave parameters on the self-excitation conditions of such parasitic waves. The second effect is the role of the beam geometry on excitation of these parasitic waves in forward-wave amplifiers with spatially extended interaction space, such as sheet-beam devices. It is shown that a large-amplitude signal wave can greatly influence the self-excitation conditions of the parasitic waves which define stability of operation. Therefore the effect described is important for accurate designing of high-power amplifiers of electromagnetic waves.

  12. Micro-scale environmental variation amplifies physiological variation among individual mussels.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Ana Gabriela; Jayawardene, Sarah; Alves, Shaina; Dallmer, Jeremiah; Dowd, W Wesley

    2015-12-01

    The contributions of temporal and spatial environmental variation to physiological variation remain poorly resolved. Rocky intertidal zone populations are subjected to thermal variation over the tidal cycle, superimposed with micro-scale variation in individuals' body temperatures. Using the sea mussel (Mytilus californianus), we assessed the consequences of this micro-scale environmental variation for physiological variation among individuals, first by examining the latter in field-acclimatized animals, second by abolishing micro-scale environmental variation via common garden acclimation, and third by restoring this variation using a reciprocal outplant approach. Common garden acclimation reduced the magnitude of variation in tissue-level antioxidant capacities by approximately 30% among mussels from a wave-protected (warm) site, but it had no effect on antioxidant variation among mussels from a wave-exposed (cool) site. The field-acclimatized level of antioxidant variation was restored only when protected-site mussels were outplanted to a high, thermally stressful site. Variation in organismal oxygen consumption rates reflected antioxidant patterns, decreasing dramatically among protected-site mussels after common gardening. These results suggest a highly plastic relationship between individuals' genotypes and their physiological phenotypes that depends on recent environmental experience. Corresponding context-dependent changes in the physiological mean-variance relationships within populations complicate prediction of responses to shifts in environmental variability that are anticipated with global change. PMID:26645201

  13. Direct computation of parameters for accurate polarizable force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Verstraelen, Toon Vandenbrande, Steven; Ayers, Paul W.

    2014-11-21

    We present an improved electronic linear response model to incorporate polarization and charge-transfer effects in polarizable force fields. This model is a generalization of the Atom-Condensed Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (DFT), approximated to second order (ACKS2): it can now be defined with any underlying variational theory (next to KS-DFT) and it can include atomic multipoles and off-center basis functions. Parameters in this model are computed efficiently as expectation values of an electronic wavefunction, obviating the need for their calibration, regularization, and manual tuning. In the limit of a complete density and potential basis set in the ACKS2 model, the linear response properties of the underlying theory for a given molecular geometry are reproduced exactly. A numerical validation with a test set of 110 molecules shows that very accurate models can already be obtained with fluctuating charges and dipoles. These features greatly facilitate the development of polarizable force fields.

  14. Accurate 12D dipole moment surfaces of ethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delahaye, Thibault; Nikitin, Andrei V.; Rey, Michael; Szalay, Péter G.; Tyuterev, Vladimir G.

    2015-10-01

    Accurate ab initio full-dimensional dipole moment surfaces of ethylene are computed using coupled-cluster approach and its explicitly correlated counterpart CCSD(T)-F12 combined respectively with cc-pVQZ and cc-pVTZ-F12 basis sets. Their analytical representations are provided through 4th order normal mode expansions. First-principles prediction of the line intensities using variational method up to J = 30 are in excellent agreement with the experimental data in the range of 0-3200 cm-1. Errors of 0.25-6.75% in integrated intensities for fundamental bands are comparable with experimental uncertainties. Overall calculated C2H4 opacity in 600-3300 cm-1 range agrees with experimental determination better than to 0.5%.

  15. Accurate object tracking system by integrating texture and depth cues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ju-Chin; Lin, Yu-Hang

    2016-03-01

    A robust object tracking system that is invariant to object appearance variations and background clutter is proposed. Multiple instance learning with a boosting algorithm is applied to select discriminant texture information between the object and background data. Additionally, depth information, which is important to distinguish the object from a complicated background, is integrated. We propose two depth-based models that can compensate texture information to cope with both appearance variants and background clutter. Moreover, in order to reduce the risk of drifting problem increased for the textureless depth templates, an update mechanism is proposed to select more precise tracking results to avoid incorrect model updates. In the experiments, the robustness of the proposed system is evaluated and quantitative results are provided for performance analysis. Experimental results show that the proposed system can provide the best success rate and has more accurate tracking results than other well-known algorithms.

  16. An accurate registration technique for distorted images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delapena, Michele; Shaw, Richard A.; Linde, Peter; Dravins, Dainis

    1990-01-01

    Accurate registration of International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) images is crucial because the variability of the geometrical distortions that are introduced by the SEC-Vidicon cameras ensures that raw science images are never perfectly aligned with the Intensity Transfer Functions (ITFs) (i.e., graded floodlamp exposures that are used to linearize and normalize the camera response). A technique for precisely registering IUE images which uses a cross correlation of the fixed pattern that exists in all raw IUE images is described.

  17. Accurate maser positions for MALT-45

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Christopher; Bains, Indra; Voronkov, Maxim; Lo, Nadia; Jones, Paul; Muller, Erik; Cunningham, Maria; Burton, Michael; Brooks, Kate; Green, James; Fuller, Gary; Barnes, Peter; Ellingsen, Simon; Urquhart, James; Morgan, Larry; Rowell, Gavin; Walsh, Andrew; Loenen, Edo; Baan, Willem; Hill, Tracey; Purcell, Cormac; Breen, Shari; Peretto, Nicolas; Jackson, James; Lowe, Vicki; Longmore, Steven

    2013-10-01

    MALT-45 is an untargeted survey, mapping the Galactic plane in CS (1-0), Class I methanol masers, SiO masers and thermal emission, and high frequency continuum emission. After obtaining images from the survey, a number of masers were detected, but without accurate positions. This project seeks to resolve each maser and its environment, with the ultimate goal of placing the Class I methanol maser into a timeline of high mass star formation.

  18. Wave dissipation by muddy seafloors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgar, Steve; Raubenheimer, Britt

    2008-04-01

    Muddy seafloors cause tremendous dissipation of ocean waves. Here, observations and numerical simulations of waves propagating between 5- and 2-m water depths across the muddy Louisiana continental shelf are used to estimate a frequency- and depth-dependent dissipation rate function. Short-period sea (4 s) and swell (7 s) waves are shown to transfer energy to long-period (14 s) infragravity waves, where, in contrast with theories for fluid mud, the observed dissipation rates are highest. The nonlinear energy transfers are most rapid in shallow water, consistent with the unexpected strong increase of the dissipation rate with decreasing depth. These new results may explain why the southwest coast of India offers protection for fishing (and for the 15th century Portuguese fleet) only after large waves and strong currents at the start of the monsoon move nearshore mud banks from about 5- to 2-m water depth. When used with a numerical nonlinear wave model, the new dissipation rate function accurately simulates the large reduction in wave energy observed in the Gulf of Mexico.

  19. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R; Holmes, William M

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models. PMID:27111139

  20. Accurate Molecular Polarizabilities Based on Continuum Electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Truchon, Jean-François; Nicholls, Anthony; Iftimie, Radu I.; Roux, Benoît; Bayly, Christopher I.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach for representing the intramolecular polarizability as a continuum dielectric is introduced to account for molecular electronic polarization. It is shown, using a finite-difference solution to the Poisson equation, that the Electronic Polarization from Internal Continuum (EPIC) model yields accurate gas-phase molecular polarizability tensors for a test set of 98 challenging molecules composed of heteroaromatics, alkanes and diatomics. The electronic polarization originates from a high intramolecular dielectric that produces polarizabilities consistent with B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ and experimental values when surrounded by vacuum dielectric. In contrast to other approaches to model electronic polarization, this simple model avoids the polarizability catastrophe and accurately calculates molecular anisotropy with the use of very few fitted parameters and without resorting to auxiliary sites or anisotropic atomic centers. On average, the unsigned error in the average polarizability and anisotropy compared to B3LYP are 2% and 5%, respectively. The correlation between the polarizability components from B3LYP and this approach lead to a R2 of 0.990 and a slope of 0.999. Even the F2 anisotropy, shown to be a difficult case for existing polarizability models, can be reproduced within 2% error. In addition to providing new parameters for a rapid method directly applicable to the calculation of polarizabilities, this work extends the widely used Poisson equation to areas where accurate molecular polarizabilities matter. PMID:23646034

  1. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R.; Holmes, William M.

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models.

  2. Accurate and consistent automatic seismocardiogram annotation without concurrent ECG.

    PubMed

    Laurin, A; Khosrow-Khavar, F; Blaber, A P; Tavakolian, Kouhyar

    2016-09-01

    Seismocardiography (SCG) is the measurement of vibrations in the sternum caused by the beating of the heart. Precise cardiac mechanical timings that are easily obtained from SCG are critically dependent on accurate identification of fiducial points. So far, SCG annotation has relied on concurrent ECG measurements. An algorithm capable of annotating SCG without the use any other concurrent measurement was designed. We subjected 18 participants to graded lower body negative pressure. We collected ECG and SCG, obtained R peaks from the former, and annotated the latter by hand, using these identified peaks. We also annotated the SCG automatically. We compared the isovolumic moment timings obtained by hand to those obtained using our algorithm. Mean  ±  confidence interval of the percentage of accurately annotated cardiac cycles were [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text] for levels of negative pressure 0, -20, -30, -40, and  -50 mmHg. LF/HF ratios, the relative power of low-frequency variations to high-frequency variations in heart beat intervals, obtained from isovolumic moments were also compared to those obtained from R peaks. The mean differences  ±  confidence interval were [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text] for increasing levels of negative pressure. The accuracy and consistency of the algorithm enables the use of SCG as a stand-alone heart monitoring tool in healthy individuals at rest, and could serve as a basis for an eventual application in pathological cases. PMID:27510446

  3. Validation of a Wave Data Assimilation System Based on SWAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flampourisi, Stylianos; Veeramony, Jayaram; Orzech, Mark D.; Ngodock, Hans E.

    2013-04-01

    SWAN is one of the most broadly used models for wave predictions in the nearshore, with known and extensively studied limitations due to the physics and/or to the numerical implementation. In order to improve the performance of the model, a 4DVAR data assimilation system based on a tangent linear code and the corresponding adjoint from the numerical SWAN model has been developed at NRL(Orzech et. al., 2013), by implementing the methodology of Bennett 2002. The assimilation system takes into account the nonlinear triad and quadruplet interactions, depth-limited breaking, wind forcing, bottom friction and white-capping. Using conjugate gradient method, the assimilation system minimizes a quadratic penalty functional (which represents the overall error of the simulation) and generates the correction of the forward simulation in spatial, temporal and spectral domain. The weights are given to the output of the adjoint by calculating the covariance to an ensemble of forward simulations according to Evensen 2009. This presentation will focus on the extension of the system to a weak-constrainted data assimilation system and on the extensive validation of the system by using wave spectra for forcing, assimilation and validation, from FRF Duck, North Carolina, during August 2011. During this period, at the 17 m waverider buoy location, the wind speed was up to 35 m/s (due to Hurricane Irene) and the significant wave height varied from 0.5 m to 6 m and the peak period between 5 s and 18 s. In general, this study shows significant improvement of the integrated spectral properties, but the main benefit of assimilating the wave spectra (and not only their integrated properties) is that the accurate simulation of separated, in frequency and in direction, wave systems is possible even nearshore, where non-linear phenomena are dominant. The system is ready to be used for more precise reanalysis of the wave climate and climate variability, and determination of coastal hazards in

  4. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  5. Formation of accurate 1-nm gaps using the electromigration method during metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naitoh, Yasuhisa; Wei, Qingshuo; Mukaida, Masakazu; Ishida, Takao

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the origin of fabricated nanogap width variations using the electromigration method during metal deposition. This method also facilitates improved control over the nanogap width. A large suppression in the variation is achieved by sample annealing at 373 K during the application of bias voltages for electromigration, which indicates that the variation is caused by structural changes. This electromigration method during metal deposition for the fabrication of an accurate 1-nm gap electrode is useful for single-molecule-sized electronics. Furthermore, it opens the door for future research on integrated sub-1-nm-sized nanogap devices.

  6. Novel wave power analysis linking pressure-flow waves, wave potential, and the forward and backward components of hydraulic power.

    PubMed

    Mynard, Jonathan P; Smolich, Joseph J

    2016-04-15

    Wave intensity analysis provides detailed insights into factors influencing hemodynamics. However, wave intensity is not a conserved quantity, so it is sensitive to diameter variations and is not distributed among branches of a junction. Moreover, the fundamental relation between waves and hydraulic power is unclear. We, therefore, propose an alternative to wave intensity called "wave power," calculated via incremental changes in pressure and flow (dPdQ) and a novel time-domain separation of hydraulic pressure power and kinetic power into forward and backward wave-related components (ΠP±and ΠQ±). Wave power has several useful properties:1) it is obtained directly from flow measurements, without requiring further calculation of velocity;2) it is a quasi-conserved quantity that may be used to study the relative distribution of waves at junctions; and3) it has the units of power (Watts). We also uncover a simple relationship between wave power and changes in ΠP±and show that wave reflection reduces transmitted power. Absolute values of ΠP±represent wave potential, a recently introduced concept that unifies steady and pulsatile aspects of hemodynamics. We show that wave potential represents the hydraulic energy potential stored in a compliant pressurized vessel, with spatial gradients producing waves that transfer this energy. These techniques and principles are verified numerically and also experimentally with pressure/flow measurements in all branches of a central bifurcation in sheep, under a wide range of hemodynamic conditions. The proposed "wave power analysis," encompassing wave power, wave potential, and wave separation of hydraulic power provides a potent time-domain approach for analyzing hemodynamics. PMID:26873972

  7. Mouse models of human AML accurately predict chemotherapy response

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Johannes; Radtke, Ina; Pardee, Timothy S.; Zhao, Zhen; Rappaport, Amy R.; Luo, Weijun; McCurrach, Mila E.; Yang, Miao-Miao; Dolan, M. Eileen; Kogan, Scott C.; Downing, James R.; Lowe, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of cancer influences the trajectory of tumor progression and may underlie clinical variation in therapy response. To model such heterogeneity, we produced genetically and pathologically accurate mouse models of common forms of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and developed methods to mimic standard induction chemotherapy and efficiently monitor therapy response. We see that murine AMLs harboring two common human AML genotypes show remarkably diverse responses to conventional therapy that mirror clinical experience. Specifically, murine leukemias expressing the AML1/ETO fusion oncoprotein, associated with a favorable prognosis in patients, show a dramatic response to induction chemotherapy owing to robust activation of the p53 tumor suppressor network. Conversely, murine leukemias expressing MLL fusion proteins, associated with a dismal prognosis in patients, are drug-resistant due to an attenuated p53 response. Our studies highlight the importance of genetic information in guiding the treatment of human AML, functionally establish the p53 network as a central determinant of chemotherapy response in AML, and demonstrate that genetically engineered mouse models of human cancer can accurately predict therapy response in patients. PMID:19339691

  8. Mouse models of human AML accurately predict chemotherapy response.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Johannes; Radtke, Ina; Pardee, Timothy S; Zhao, Zhen; Rappaport, Amy R; Luo, Weijun; McCurrach, Mila E; Yang, Miao-Miao; Dolan, M Eileen; Kogan, Scott C; Downing, James R; Lowe, Scott W

    2009-04-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of cancer influences the trajectory of tumor progression and may underlie clinical variation in therapy response. To model such heterogeneity, we produced genetically and pathologically accurate mouse models of common forms of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and developed methods to mimic standard induction chemotherapy and efficiently monitor therapy response. We see that murine AMLs harboring two common human AML genotypes show remarkably diverse responses to conventional therapy that mirror clinical experience. Specifically, murine leukemias expressing the AML1/ETO fusion oncoprotein, associated with a favorable prognosis in patients, show a dramatic response to induction chemotherapy owing to robust activation of the p53 tumor suppressor network. Conversely, murine leukemias expressing MLL fusion proteins, associated with a dismal prognosis in patients, are drug-resistant due to an attenuated p53 response. Our studies highlight the importance of genetic information in guiding the treatment of human AML, functionally establish the p53 network as a central determinant of chemotherapy response in AML, and demonstrate that genetically engineered mouse models of human cancer can accurately predict therapy response in patients. PMID:19339691

  9. Accurate and Precise Zinc Isotope Ratio Measurements in Urban Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, D.; Gioia, S. M. C. L.; Coles, B.; Arnold, T.; Babinski, M.

    2009-04-01

    We developed an analytical method and constrained procedural boundary conditions that enable accurate and precise Zn isotope ratio measurements in urban aerosols. We also demonstrate the potential of this new isotope system for air pollutant source tracing. The procedural blank is around 5 ng and significantly lower than published methods due to a tailored ion chromatographic separation. Accurate mass bias correction using external correction with Cu is limited to Zn sample content of approximately 50 ng due to the combined effect of blank contribution of Cu and Zn from the ion exchange procedure and the need to maintain a Cu/Zn ratio of approximately 1. Mass bias is corrected for by applying the common analyte internal standardization method approach. Comparison with other mass bias correction methods demonstrates the accuracy of the method. The average precision of δ66Zn determinations in aerosols is around 0.05 per mil per atomic mass unit. The method was tested on aerosols collected in Sao Paulo City, Brazil. The measurements reveal significant variations in δ66Zn ranging between -0.96 and -0.37 per mil in coarse and between -1.04 and 0.02 per mil in fine particular matter. This variability suggests that Zn isotopic compositions distinguish atmospheric sources. The isotopic light signature suggests traffic as the main source.

  10. Learning fast accurate movements requires intact frontostriatal circuits

    PubMed Central

    Shabbott, Britne; Ravindran, Roshni; Schumacher, Joseph W.; Wasserman, Paula B.; Marder, Karen S.; Mazzoni, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    The basal ganglia are known to play a crucial role in movement execution, but their importance for motor skill learning remains unclear. Obstacles to our understanding include the lack of a universally accepted definition of motor skill learning (definition confound), and difficulties in distinguishing learning deficits from execution impairments (performance confound). We studied how healthy subjects and subjects with a basal ganglia disorder learn fast accurate reaching movements. We addressed the definition and performance confounds by: (1) focusing on an operationally defined core element of motor skill learning (speed-accuracy learning), and (2) using normal variation in initial performance to separate movement execution impairment from motor learning abnormalities. We measured motor skill learning as performance improvement in a reaching task with a speed-accuracy trade-off. We compared the performance of subjects with Huntington's disease (HD), a neurodegenerative basal ganglia disorder, to that of premanifest carriers of the HD mutation and of control subjects. The initial movements of HD subjects were less skilled (slower and/or less accurate) than those of control subjects. To factor out these differences in initial execution, we modeled the relationship between learning and baseline performance in control subjects. Subjects with HD exhibited a clear learning impairment that was not explained by differences in initial performance. These results support a role for the basal ganglia in both movement execution and motor skill learning. PMID:24312037

  11. Strong acoustic wave action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhberg, M. B.

    1983-07-01

    Experiments devoted to acoustic action on the atmosphere-magnetosphere-ionosphere system using ground based strong explosions are reviewed. The propagation of acoustic waves was observed by ground observations over 2000 km in horizontal direction and to an altitude of 200 km. Magnetic variations up to 100 nT were detected by ARIEL-3 satellite near the epicenter of the explosion connected with the formation of strong field aligned currents in the magnetosphere. The enhancement of VLF emission at 800 km altitude is observed.

  12. Wavefield Analysis of Rayleigh Waves for Near-Surface Shear-Wave Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chong

    2011-12-01

    Shear (S)-wave velocity is a key property of near-surface materials and is the fundamental parameter for many environmental and engineering geophysical studies. Directly acquiring accurate S-wave velocities from a seismic shot gather is usually difficult due to the poor signal-to-noise ratio. The relationship between Rayleigh-wave phase velocity and frequency has been widely utilized to estimate the S-wave velocities in shallow layers using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) technique. Hence, Rayleigh wave is a main focus of most near-surface seismic studies. Conventional dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves assumes that the earth is laterally homogeneous and the free surface is horizontally flat, which limits the application of surface-wave methods to only 1D earth models or very smooth 2D models. In this study I extend the analysis of Rayleigh waves to a 2D domain by employing the 2D full elastic wave equation so as to address the lateral heterogeneity problem. I first discuss the accurate simulation of Rayleigh waves through finite-difference method and the boundary absorbing problems in the numerical modeling with a high Poisson's ratio (> 0.4), which is a unique near-surface problem. Then I develop an improved vacuum formulation to generate accurate synthetic seismograms focusing on Rayleigh waves in presence of surface topography and internal discontinuities. With these solutions to forward modeling of Rayleigh waves, I evaluate the influence of surface topography to conventional dispersion analysis in 2D and 3D domains by numerical investigations. At last I examine the feasibility of inverting waveforms of Rayleigh waves for shallow S-wave velocities using a genetic algorithm. Results of the study show that Rayleigh waves can be accurately simulated in near surface using the improved vacuum formulation. Spurious reflections during the numerical modeling can be efficiently suppressed by the simplified multiaxial perfectly matched layers. The

  13. Liquid propellant rocket engine combustion simulation with a time-accurate CFD method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. S.; Shang, H. M.; Liaw, Paul; Hutt, J.

    1993-01-01

    Time-accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) algorithms are among the basic requirements as an engineering or research tool for realistic simulations of transient combustion phenomena, such as combustion instability, transient start-up, etc., inside the rocket engine combustion chamber. A time-accurate pressure based method is employed in the FDNS code for combustion model development. This is in connection with other program development activities such as spray combustion model development and efficient finite-rate chemistry solution method implementation. In the present study, a second-order time-accurate time-marching scheme is employed. For better spatial resolutions near discontinuities (e.g., shocks, contact discontinuities), a 3rd-order accurate TVD scheme for modeling the convection terms is implemented in the FDNS code. Necessary modification to the predictor/multi-corrector solution algorithm in order to maintain time-accurate wave propagation is also investigated. Benchmark 1-D and multidimensional test cases, which include the classical shock tube wave propagation problems, resonant pipe test case, unsteady flow development of a blast tube test case, and H2/O2 rocket engine chamber combustion start-up transient simulation, etc., are investigated to validate and demonstrate the accuracy and robustness of the present numerical scheme and solution algorithm.

  14. Accurately Mapping M31's Microlensing Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, Arlin

    2004-07-01

    We propose to augment an existing microlensing survey of M31 with source identifications provided by a modest amount of ACS {and WFPC2 parallel} observations to yield an accurate measurement of the masses responsible for microlensing in M31, and presumably much of its dark matter. The main benefit of these data is the determination of the physical {or "einstein"} timescale of each microlensing event, rather than an effective {"FWHM"} timescale, allowing masses to be determined more than twice as accurately as without HST data. The einstein timescale is the ratio of the lensing cross-sectional radius and relative velocities. Velocities are known from kinematics, and the cross-section is directly proportional to the {unknown} lensing mass. We cannot easily measure these quantities without knowing the amplification, hence the baseline magnitude, which requires the resolution of HST to find the source star. This makes a crucial difference because M31 lens m ass determinations can be more accurate than those towards the Magellanic Clouds through our Galaxy's halo {for the same number of microlensing events} due to the better constrained geometry in the M31 microlensing situation. Furthermore, our larger survey, just completed, should yield at least 100 M31 microlensing events, more than any Magellanic survey. A small amount of ACS+WFPC2 imaging will deliver the potential of this large database {about 350 nights}. For the whole survey {and a delta-function mass distribution} the mass error should approach only about 15%, or about 6% error in slope for a power-law distribution. These results will better allow us to pinpoint the lens halo fraction, and the shape of the halo lens spatial distribution, and allow generalization/comparison of the nature of halo dark matter in spiral galaxies. In addition, we will be able to establish the baseline magnitude for about 50, 000 variable stars, as well as measure an unprecedentedly deta iled color-magnitude diagram and luminosity

  15. Accurate measurement of unsteady state fluid temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, two accurate methods for determining the transient fluid temperature were presented. Measurements were conducted for boiling water since its temperature is known. At the beginning the thermometers are at the ambient temperature and next they are immediately immersed into saturated water. The measurements were carried out with two thermometers of different construction but with the same housing outer diameter equal to 15 mm. One of them is a K-type industrial thermometer widely available commercially. The temperature indicated by the thermometer was corrected considering the thermometers as the first or second order inertia devices. The new design of a thermometer was proposed and also used to measure the temperature of boiling water. Its characteristic feature is a cylinder-shaped housing with the sheath thermocouple located in its center. The temperature of the fluid was determined based on measurements taken in the axis of the solid cylindrical element (housing) using the inverse space marching method. Measurements of the transient temperature of the air flowing through the wind tunnel using the same thermometers were also carried out. The proposed measurement technique provides more accurate results compared with measurements using industrial thermometers in conjunction with simple temperature correction using the inertial thermometer model of the first or second order. By comparing the results, it was demonstrated that the new thermometer allows obtaining the fluid temperature much faster and with higher accuracy in comparison to the industrial thermometer. Accurate measurements of the fast changing fluid temperature are possible due to the low inertia thermometer and fast space marching method applied for solving the inverse heat conduction problem.

  16. Accurate upwind methods for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1993-01-01

    A new class of piecewise linear methods for the numerical solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations of gas dynamics is presented. These methods are uniformly second-order accurate, and can be considered as extensions of Godunov's scheme. With an appropriate definition of monotonicity preservation for the case of linear convection, it can be shown that they preserve monotonicity. Similar to Van Leer's MUSCL scheme, they consist of two key steps: a reconstruction step followed by an upwind step. For the reconstruction step, a monotonicity constraint that preserves uniform second-order accuracy is introduced. Computational efficiency is enhanced by devising a criterion that detects the 'smooth' part of the data where the constraint is redundant. The concept and coding of the constraint are simplified by the use of the median function. A slope steepening technique, which has no effect at smooth regions and can resolve a contact discontinuity in four cells, is described. As for the upwind step, existing and new methods are applied in a manner slightly different from those in the literature. These methods are derived by approximating the Euler equations via linearization and diagonalization. At a 'smooth' interface, Harten, Lax, and Van Leer's one intermediate state model is employed. A modification for this model that can resolve contact discontinuities is presented. Near a discontinuity, either this modified model or a more accurate one, namely, Roe's flux-difference splitting. is used. The current presentation of Roe's method, via the conceptually simple flux-vector splitting, not only establishes a connection between the two splittings, but also leads to an admissibility correction with no conditional statement, and an efficient approximation to Osher's approximate Riemann solver. These reconstruction and upwind steps result in schemes that are uniformly second-order accurate and economical at smooth regions, and yield high resolution at discontinuities.

  17. The first accurate description of an aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    2006-12-01

    As technology has advanced, the scientific study of auroral phenomena has increased by leaps and bounds. A look back at the earliest descriptions of aurorae offers an interesting look into how medieval scholars viewed the subjects that we study.Although there are earlier fragmentary references in the literature, the first accurate description of the aurora borealis appears to be that published by the German Catholic scholar Konrad von Megenberg (1309-1374) in his book Das Buch der Natur (The Book of Nature). The book was written between 1349 and 1350.

  18. Are Kohn-Sham conductances accurate?

    PubMed

    Mera, H; Niquet, Y M

    2010-11-19

    We use Fermi-liquid relations to address the accuracy of conductances calculated from the single-particle states of exact Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory. We demonstrate a systematic failure of this procedure for the calculation of the conductance, and show how it originates from the lack of renormalization in the KS spectral function. In certain limits this failure can lead to a large overestimation of the true conductance. We also show, however, that the KS conductances can be accurate for single-channel molecular junctions and systems where direct Coulomb interactions are strongly dominant. PMID:21231333

  19. Accurate density functional thermochemistry for larger molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavachari, K.; Stefanov, B. B.; Curtiss, L. A.; Lucent Tech.

    1997-06-20

    Density functional methods are combined with isodesmic bond separation reaction energies to yield accurate thermochemistry for larger molecules. Seven different density functionals are assessed for the evaluation of heats of formation, Delta H 0 (298 K), for a test set of 40 molecules composed of H, C, O and N. The use of bond separation energies results in a dramatic improvement in the accuracy of all the density functionals. The B3-LYP functional has the smallest mean absolute deviation from experiment (1.5 kcal mol/f).

  20. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material. PMID:11366835

  1. Ocean Wave Measurement Using GPS Buoys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joodaki, G.; Nahavandchi, H.; Cheng, K.

    2013-09-01

    The observation of ocean wave parameters is necessary to improve forecasts of ocean wave conditions. In this paper, we investigate the viability of using a single GPS receiver to measure ocean-surface waves, and present a method to enhance the accuracy of the estimated wave parameters. The application of high-pass filtering to GPS data in conjunction with directional wave spectral theory is a core concept in this article. Laboratory experiments were conducted to test the viability and accuracy measurements of wave parameters made by a single GPS receiver buoy. These tests identified an error of less than 1% for the rotational arm measurement (wave height) and an error of 1% in verifications of the wave direction and wave period, and showed a 0.488 s bias; this is sufficiently accurate for many specific purposes. These results are based on the best cut-off frequency value derived in this study. A moored-sea GPS buoy on the Taiwanese coast was used to estimate the GPS-derived wave parameters. Our results indicate that data from a single GPS receiver, processed with the presented method to reduce the error of the estimated parameters, can provide measurements of ocean surface wave to reasonable accuracy.

  2. Use of shear wave reflection amplitude in geotechnial investigations: new concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, R.

    2003-04-01

    Shear waves are important to the geotechnical engineers because shear-wave velocity (V_S) offers the small-strain (˜10-6) rigidity (G_0) of the subsoil layers. G_0 is the key parameter used in evaluating the soil behaviour under any kind of dynamic loading e.g., vibrations, earthquakes, etc. Traditionally, the one-way traveltime of shear-wave is measured in a borehole as a function of depth, and the profile of in-situ G_o is obtained. As an alternative, the 1-D V_S structure is derived by the inversion of surface wave dispersion curves. In geotechnical engineering, surface seismic using shear waves has remained restricted to refraction surveys and some reflection works using large sledgehammer sources to map laterally the soil layers. The amplitude of shear waves has not yet been used in geotechnical site investigation. The difficulties to obtain reliable amplitudes of the shallow reflection events and the field acquisition challenges that are specific to shear-wave surveys have been the main obstacles. Recently, we have investigated the information potential of the shear-wave reflection amplitudes in the shallow subsoil, and evaluated the geotechnical merits. The use of an electromagnetic vibrator recently developed for generating high-frequency shear waves has been crucial to make breakthrough progress in our understanding of the potential of shear-wave reflections. Special attention has been paid to accurately monitor the amplitude and the phase of the shear-wave source. This, in turn, has allowed us to perform deterministic source signature deconvolution of the raw vibrograms. The resolution is significantly improved. Shot-to-shot variation is minimized. The receiver coupling effect still needs to be corrected for. However, once the source function is uniformly removed from the raw data, the amplitude information of the high-resolution reflection events reveal remarkable, new features of the subsoil that were otherwise not visible. Further, from the angle

  3. Full wave description of VLF wave penetration through the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzichev, Ilya; Shklyar, David

    2010-05-01

    Of the many problems in whistler study, wave propagation through the ionosphere is among the most important, and the most difficult at the same time. Both satellite and ground-based investigations of VLF waves include considerations of this problem, and it has been in the focus of research since the beginning of whistler study (Budden [1985]; Helliwell [1965]). The difficulty in considering VLF wave passage through the ionosphere is, after all, due to fast variation of the lower ionosphere parameters as compared to typical VLF wave number. This makes irrelevant the consideration in the framework of geometrical optics, which, along with a smooth variations of parameters, is always based on a particular dispersion relation. Although the full wave analysis in the framework of cold plasma approximation does not require slow variations of plasma parameters, and does not assume any particular wave mode, the fact that the wave of a given frequency belongs to different modes in various regions makes numerical solution of the field equations not simple. More specifically, as is well known (e.g. Ginzburg and Rukhadze [1972]), in a cold magnetized plasma, there are, in general, two wave modes related to a given frequency. Both modes, however, do not necessarily correspond to propagating waves. In particular, in the frequency range related to whistler waves, the other mode is evanescent, i.e. it has a negative value of N2 (the refractive index squared). It means that one of solutions of the relevant differential equations is exponentially growing, which makes a straightforward numerical approach to these equations despairing. This well known difficulty in the problem under discussion is usually identified as numerical swamping (Budden [1985]). Resolving the problem of numerical swamping becomes, in fact, a key point in numerical study of wave passage through the ionosphere. As it is typical of work based on numerical simulations, its essential part remains virtually hidden

  4. Accurate basis set truncation for wavefunction embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Taylor A.; Goodpaster, Jason D.; Manby, Frederick R.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) provides a formally exact framework for performing embedded subsystem electronic structure calculations, including DFT-in-DFT and wavefunction theory-in-DFT descriptions. In the interest of efficiency, it is desirable to truncate the atomic orbital basis set in which the subsystem calculation is performed, thus avoiding high-order scaling with respect to the size of the MO virtual space. In this study, we extend a recently introduced projection-based embedding method [F. R. Manby, M. Stella, J. D. Goodpaster, and T. F. Miller III, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2564 (2012)], 10.1021/ct300544e to allow for the systematic and accurate truncation of the embedded subsystem basis set. The approach is applied to both covalently and non-covalently bound test cases, including water clusters and polypeptide chains, and it is demonstrated that errors associated with basis set truncation are controllable to well within chemical accuracy. Furthermore, we show that this approach allows for switching between accurate projection-based embedding and DFT embedding with approximate kinetic energy (KE) functionals; in this sense, the approach provides a means of systematically improving upon the use of approximate KE functionals in DFT embedding.

  5. Accurate radiative transfer calculations for layered media.

    PubMed

    Selden, Adrian C

    2016-07-01

    Simple yet accurate results for radiative transfer in layered media with discontinuous refractive index are obtained by the method of K-integrals. These are certain weighted integrals applied to the angular intensity distribution at the refracting boundaries. The radiative intensity is expressed as the sum of the asymptotic angular intensity distribution valid in the depth of the scattering medium and a transient term valid near the boundary. Integrated boundary equations are obtained, yielding simple linear equations for the intensity coefficients, enabling the angular emission intensity and the diffuse reflectance (albedo) and transmittance of the scattering layer to be calculated without solving the radiative transfer equation directly. Examples are given of half-space, slab, interface, and double-layer calculations, and extensions to multilayer systems are indicated. The K-integral method is orders of magnitude more accurate than diffusion theory and can be applied to layered scattering media with a wide range of scattering albedos, with potential applications to biomedical and ocean optics. PMID:27409700

  6. Fast and accurate propagation of coherent light

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, R. D.; Beylkin, G.; Monzón, L.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a fast algorithm to propagate, for any user-specified accuracy, a time-harmonic electromagnetic field between two parallel planes separated by a linear, isotropic and homogeneous medium. The analytical formulation of this problem (ca 1897) requires the evaluation of the so-called Rayleigh–Sommerfeld integral. If the distance between the planes is small, this integral can be accurately evaluated in the Fourier domain; if the distance is very large, it can be accurately approximated by asymptotic methods. In the large intermediate region of practical interest, where the oscillatory Rayleigh–Sommerfeld kernel must be applied directly, current numerical methods can be highly inaccurate without indicating this fact to the user. In our approach, for any user-specified accuracy ϵ>0, we approximate the kernel by a short sum of Gaussians with complex-valued exponents, and then efficiently apply the result to the input data using the unequally spaced fast Fourier transform. The resulting algorithm has computational complexity , where we evaluate the solution on an N×N grid of output points given an M×M grid of input samples. Our algorithm maintains its accuracy throughout the computational domain. PMID:24204184

  7. How Accurately can we Calculate Thermal Systems?

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D; Blomquist, R N; Dean, C; Heinrichs, D; Kalugin, M A; Lee, M; Lee, Y; MacFarlan, R; Nagaya, Y; Trkov, A

    2004-04-20

    I would like to determine how accurately a variety of neutron transport code packages (code and cross section libraries) can calculate simple integral parameters, such as K{sub eff}, for systems that are sensitive to thermal neutron scattering. Since we will only consider theoretical systems, we cannot really determine absolute accuracy compared to any real system. Therefore rather than accuracy, it would be more precise to say that I would like to determine the spread in answers that we obtain from a variety of code packages. This spread should serve as an excellent indicator of how accurately we can really model and calculate such systems today. Hopefully, eventually this will lead to improvements in both our codes and the thermal scattering models that they use in the future. In order to accomplish this I propose a number of extremely simple systems that involve thermal neutron scattering that can be easily modeled and calculated by a variety of neutron transport codes. These are theoretical systems designed to emphasize the effects of thermal scattering, since that is what we are interested in studying. I have attempted to keep these systems very simple, and yet at the same time they include most, if not all, of the important thermal scattering effects encountered in a large, water-moderated, uranium fueled thermal system, i.e., our typical thermal reactors.

  8. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  9. Accurate pose estimation for forensic identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merckx, Gert; Hermans, Jeroen; Vandermeulen, Dirk

    2010-04-01

    In forensic authentication, one aims to identify the perpetrator among a series of suspects or distractors. A fundamental problem in any recognition system that aims for identification of subjects in a natural scene is the lack of constrains on viewing and imaging conditions. In forensic applications, identification proves even more challenging, since most surveillance footage is of abysmal quality. In this context, robust methods for pose estimation are paramount. In this paper we will therefore present a new pose estimation strategy for very low quality footage. Our approach uses 3D-2D registration of a textured 3D face model with the surveillance image to obtain accurate far field pose alignment. Starting from an inaccurate initial estimate, the technique uses novel similarity measures based on the monogenic signal to guide a pose optimization process. We will illustrate the descriptive strength of the introduced similarity measures by using them directly as a recognition metric. Through validation, using both real and synthetic surveillance footage, our pose estimation method is shown to be accurate, and robust to lighting changes and image degradation.

  10. Accurate determination of characteristic relative permeability curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Michael H.; Benson, Sally M.

    2015-09-01

    A recently developed technique to accurately characterize sub-core scale heterogeneity is applied to investigate the factors responsible for flowrate-dependent effective relative permeability curves measured on core samples in the laboratory. The dependency of laboratory measured relative permeability on flowrate has long been both supported and challenged by a number of investigators. Studies have shown that this apparent flowrate dependency is a result of both sub-core scale heterogeneity and outlet boundary effects. However this has only been demonstrated numerically for highly simplified models of porous media. In this paper, flowrate dependency of effective relative permeability is demonstrated using two rock cores, a Berea Sandstone and a heterogeneous sandstone from the Otway Basin Pilot Project in Australia. Numerical simulations of steady-state coreflooding experiments are conducted at a number of injection rates using a single set of input characteristic relative permeability curves. Effective relative permeability is then calculated from the simulation data using standard interpretation methods for calculating relative permeability from steady-state tests. Results show that simplified approaches may be used to determine flowrate-independent characteristic relative permeability provided flow rate is sufficiently high, and the core heterogeneity is relatively low. It is also shown that characteristic relative permeability can be determined at any typical flowrate, and even for geologically complex models, when using accurate three-dimensional models.

  11. Comparing the Robustness of High-Frequency Traveling-Wave Tube Slow-Wave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, Christine T.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Kory, Carol L.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional electromagnetic field simulation software package was used to compute the cold-test parameters, phase velocity, on-axis interaction impedance, and attenuation, for several high-frequency traveling-wave tube slow-wave circuit geometries. This research effort determined the effects of variations in circuit dimensions on cold-test performance. The parameter variations were based on the tolerances of conventional micromachining techniques.

  12. A quasi-optimal coarse problem and an augmented Krylov solver for the variational theory of complex rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevsky, Louis; Gosselet, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    The Variational Theory of Complex Rays (VTCR) is an indirect Trefftz method designed to study systems governed by Helmholtz-like equations. It uses wave functions to represent the solution inside elements, which reduces the dispersion error compared to classical polynomial approaches but the resulting system is prone to be ill conditioned. This paper gives a simple and original presentation of the VTCR using the discontinuous Galerkin framework and it traces back the ill-conditioning to the accumulation of eigenvalues near zero for the formulation written in terms of wave amplitude. The core of this paper presents an efficient solving strategy that overcomes this issue. The key element is the construction of a search subspace where the condition number is controlled at the cost of a limited decrease of attainable precision. An augmented LSQR solver is then proposed to solve efficiently and accurately the complete system. The approach is successfully applied to different examples.

  13. WAVE: Interactive Wave-based Sound Propagation for Virtual Environments.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Ravish; Rungta, Atul; Golas, Abhinav; Ming Lin; Manocha, Dinesh

    2015-04-01

    We present an interactive wave-based sound propagation system that generates accurate, realistic sound in virtual environments for dynamic (moving) sources and listeners. We propose a novel algorithm to accurately solve the wave equation for dynamic sources and listeners using a combination of precomputation techniques and GPU-based runtime evaluation. Our system can handle large environments typically used in VR applications, compute spatial sound corresponding to listener's motion (including head tracking) and handle both omnidirectional and directional sources, all at interactive rates. As compared to prior wave-based techniques applied to large scenes with moving sources, we observe significant improvement in runtime memory. The overall sound-propagation and rendering system has been integrated with the Half-Life 2 game engine, Oculus-Rift head-mounted display, and the Xbox game controller to enable users to experience high-quality acoustic effects (e.g., amplification, diffraction low-passing, high-order scattering) and spatial audio, based on their interactions in the VR application. We provide the results of preliminary user evaluations, conducted to study the impact of wave-based acoustic effects and spatial audio on users' navigation performance in virtual environments. PMID:26357093

  14. Global Simulation of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on ring current (RC) ion and radiation belt (RB) electron dynamics strongly depend on such particle/wave characteristics as the phase-space distribution function, frequency, wave-normal angle, wave energy, and the form of wave spectral energy density. The consequence is that accurate modeling of EMIC waves and RC particles requires robust inclusion of the interdependent dynamics of wave growth/damping, wave propagation, and particles. Such a self-consistent model is being progressively developed by Khazanov et al. [2002 - 2007]. This model is based on a system of coupled kinetic equations for the RC and EMIC wave power spectral density along with the ray tracing equations. We will discuss the recent progress in understanding EMIC waves formation mechanisms in the inner magnetosphere. This problem remains unsettled in spite of many years of experimental and theoretical studies. Modern satellite observations by CRRES, Polar and Cluster still do not reveal the whole picture experimentally since they do not stay long enough in the generation region to give a full account of all the spatio-temporal structure of EMIC waves. The complete self-consistent theory taking into account all factors significant for EMIC waves generation remains to be developed. Several mechanisms are discussed with respect to formation of EMIC waves, among them are nonlinear modification of the ionospheric reflection by precipitating energetic protons, modulation of ion-cyclotron instability by long-period (Pc3/4) pulsations, reflection of waves from layers of heavy-ion gyroresonances, and nonlinearities of wave generation process. We show that each of these mechanisms have their attractive features and explains certain part experimental data but any of them, if taken alone, meets some difficulties when compared to observations. We conclude that development of a refined nonlinear theory and further correlated analysis

  15. Global Simulation of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2007-01-01

    It is very well known that the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on ring current (RC) ion and radiation belt (RB) electron dynamics strongly depend on such particle/wave characteristics as the phase-space distribution function, frequency, wave-normal angle, wave energy, and the form of wave spectral energy density. The consequence is that accurate modeling of EMIC waves and RC particles requires robust inclusion of the interdependent dynamics of wave growth/damping, wave propagation, and particles. Such a self-consistent model is being progressively developed by Khazanov et al. This model is based on a system of coupled kinetic equations for the RC and EMIC wave power spectral density along with the ray tracing equations. We will discuss the recent progress in understanding EMIC waves formation mechanisms in the inner magnetosphere. This problem remains unsettled in spite of many years of experimental and theoretical studies. Modern satellite observations by CRRES, Polar and Cluster still do not reveal the whole picture experimentally since they do not stay long enough in the generation region to give a full account of all the spatio-temporal structure of EMIC waves. The complete self-consistent theory taking into account all factors significant for EMIC waves generation remains to be developed. Several mechanisms are discussed with respect to formation of EMIC waves, among them are nonlinear modification of the ionospheric reflection by precipitating energetic protons, modulation of ion-cyclotron instability by long-period (Pc3/4) pulsations, reflection of waves from layers of heavy-ion gyroresonances, and nonlinearities of wave generation process. We show that each of these mechanisms have their attractive features and explains certain part experimental data but any of them, if taken alone, meets some difficulties when compared to observations. We conclude that development of a refined nonlinear theory and further correlated analysis of modern

  16. Quasi-periodic variations in the Doppler shift of HF signals scattered by artificial ionospheric turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Belenov, A.F.; Ponomarenko, P.V.; Sinitsyn, V.G.; Yampol`skii, Yu.M.

    1994-06-01

    The results of an experimental study of quasi-periodic variations of the Doppler shift (DS) of decimeter-wave signals scattered by artificial ionospheric turbulence are presented. It is suggested that ionospheric MHD waves of natural origin are a possible cause of such variations. The amplitude of the magnetic component of such waves that leads to observable values of DS variations is estimated to be 1{gamma}.

  17. Quasi-periodic variations in the Doppler shift of HF signals scattered by artificial ionospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belenov, A. F.; Ponomarenko, P. V.; Sinitsyn, V. G.; Yampol'Skii, Yu. M.

    1993-12-01

    The results of an experimental study of quasi-periodic variations of the Doppler shift (DS) of decimeter-wave signals scattered by artificial ionospheric turbulence are presented. It is suggested that ionospheric MHD waves of natural origin are a possible cause of such variations. The amplitude of the magnetic component of such waves that leads to observable values of DS variations is estimated to be 1γ.

  18. The variational two-electron reduced-density-matrix method for extended systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Nicholas C.

    In this thesis we develop the variational two-electron reduced-density-matrix method for extended systems. Extended systems are represented in two ways: i) lattice models describing the dominant valence electronic structure with periodic boundaries to account for their extended nature and ii) a crystalline-orbital basis built from atomic orbitals using the generalization of molecular orbital theory to polymers. The first part of this thesis (Ch. 3--4) examines the performance of the variational 2-RDM method on lattice systems with tunable electron correlation. The first of these systems is the classic Hubbard model with linear and ladder lattice topologies. Because electron correlation functions, such as charge- and spin-ordering, are linear functions of the 2-RDM, the difference in electronic structure between one- and quasi-one-dimensional systems is accurately characterized. The second model contains only two-body interactions and is unique among typical spin models in that it does not have a mean-field reference wave function. The ground state wave functions from all Hamiltonians in the model have the same 1-electron reduced density matrix; consequently, one-electron theories are largely inapplicable. The superconducting eta-pairing ground states make the model a unique tool for demonstrating the necessary N-representability in highly correlated environments. The second part of this thesis (Ch. 5--6) develops a formalism for modeling materials by solving the full Schrodinger equation. Crystalline-orbital Hartree-Fock provides a set of orbitals and integral tensors for the variational 2-RDM method. We demonstrate that time-reversal symmetry, which is implicitly included in position space electronic structure calculations, must be explicitly included as an N-representability constraint on the 2-RDM when using a momentum space basis. The necessity of these equality constraints is demonstrated by the accurate recovery of the binding energy of two polymers and the

  19. Higher-order accurate Osher schemes with application to compressible boundary layer stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandervegt, J. J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Two fourth order accurate Osher schemes are presented which maintain higher order accuracy on nonuniform grids. They use either a conservative finite difference or finite volume discretization. Both methods are successfully used for direct numerical simulations of flat plate boundary layer instability at different Mach numbers. Results of growth rates of Tollmien-Schlichting waves compare well with direct simulations of incompressible flow and for compressible flow with results obtained by solving the parabolic stability equations.

  20. Statistics of unidirectional random breaking water-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemer, Lev; Sergeeva, Anna

    2011-11-01

    Quasi-random wave groups were studied experimentally in a 300 m long Large Wave Chanel in Hannover. Multiple realizations of several spectral shapes each having random phases of individual harmonics were excited by a computer-controlled wavemaker. Wave field evolution along the tank was recorded by 28 wave gauges and the variation of waves' statistical parameters with the distance from the wavemaker was analyzed. An attempt was made to identify individual breaking events based on the spectrum variation between consecutive wave gauges. It was concluded that energy decay in the high frequency part of the spectrum can serve as a reliable criterion for breaking localization in each realization. The data processing based on the adopted criterion resulted in constructing separate ensembles of events with and without breaking. Statistical processing of those ensembles enabled to assess the effect of breaking on such wave field characteristics as probability of appearance of extremely steep (rogue, or freak) waves, as well on skewness and kurtosis.

  1. Polarizing phase shifting interferometry of total internal reflection light for measurement of refractive index and its spatial variation in liquid samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Tania; Bhattacharya, Kallol

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that the phase change in total internal reflection (TIR) is a function of the refractive indices of the pair of media involved. The spatial phase variations in a totally internally reflected beam are accurately measured using a Mach Zehnder interferometer employing polarization phase shifting technique. The evaluated phase change is then related to the refractive index variations of the rarer medium. One of the salient features of the proposed technique is that, unlike most interferometric methods where the measured phase is a function of the sample thickness, TIR phase is independent of the sample thickness as long as the evanescent wave field is fully confined within the sample. The theory of the technique is discussed and experimental results showing the three-dimensional profiles of the measured refractive indices and its spatial variations are presented.

  2. On shallow water rogue wave formation in strongly inhomogeneous channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenkulova, Ira; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2016-05-01

    Rogue wave formation in shallow water is often governed by dispersive focusing and wave-bottom interaction. In this study we try to combine these mechanisms by considering dispersive nonreflecting wave propagation in shallow strongly inhomogeneous channels. Nonreflecting wave propagation provides extreme wave amplification and the transfer of wave energy over large distances, while dispersive effects allow formation of a short-lived wave of extreme height (rogue wave). We found several types of water channels, where this mechanism can be realized, including (i) channels with a monotonically decreasing cross-section (normal dispersion), (ii) an inland basin described by a half of elliptic paraboloid (abnormal dispersion) and (iii) an underwater hill described by a half of hyperbolic paraboloid (normal dispersion). Conditions for variations of local frequency in the wave train providing optimal focusing of the wave train are also found.

  3. Accurate Thermal Stresses for Beams: Normal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Pilkey, Walter D.

    2003-01-01

    Formulations for a general theory of thermoelasticity to generate accurate thermal stresses for structural members of aeronautical vehicles were developed in 1954 by Boley. The formulation also provides three normal stresses and a shear stress along the entire length of the beam. The Poisson effect of the lateral and transverse normal stresses on a thermally loaded beam is taken into account in this theory by employing an Airy stress function. The Airy stress function enables the reduction of the three-dimensional thermal stress problem to a two-dimensional one. Numerical results from the general theory of thermoelasticity are compared to those obtained from strength of materials. It is concluded that the theory of thermoelasticity for prismatic beams proposed in this paper can be used instead of strength of materials when precise stress results are desired.

  4. Accurate Thermal Stresses for Beams: Normal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Pilkey, Walter D.

    2002-01-01

    Formulations for a general theory of thermoelasticity to generate accurate thermal stresses for structural members of aeronautical vehicles were developed in 1954 by Boley. The formulation also provides three normal stresses and a shear stress along the entire length of the beam. The Poisson effect of the lateral and transverse normal stresses on a thermally loaded beam is taken into account in this theory by employing an Airy stress function. The Airy stress function enables the reduction of the three-dimensional thermal stress problem to a two-dimensional one. Numerical results from the general theory of thermoelasticity are compared to those obtained from strength of materials. It is concluded that the theory of thermoelasticity for prismatic beams proposed in this paper can be used instead of strength of materials when precise stress results are desired.

  5. Highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-12-30

    Disclosed is a highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine, comprising a revolute joint, comprising a circular encoder wheel, having an axis of rotation; a plurality of marks disposed around at least a portion of the circumference of the encoder wheel; bearing means for supporting the encoder wheel, while permitting free rotation of the encoder wheel about the wheel's axis of rotation; and a sensor, rigidly attached to the bearing means, for detecting the motion of at least some of the marks as the encoder wheel rotates; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the encoder wheel, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the sensor, for converting the output of the sensor into a set of cylindrical coordinates representing the position of the probe tip relative to a reference cylindrical coordinate system.

  6. Practical aspects of spatially high accurate methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Andrew G.; Mitchell, Curtis R.; Walters, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    The computational qualities of high order spatially accurate methods for the finite volume solution of the Euler equations are presented. Two dimensional essentially non-oscillatory (ENO), k-exact, and 'dimension by dimension' ENO reconstruction operators are discussed and compared in terms of reconstruction and solution accuracy, computational cost and oscillatory behavior in supersonic flows with shocks. Inherent steady state convergence difficulties are demonstrated for adaptive stencil algorithms. An exact solution to the heat equation is used to determine reconstruction error, and the computational intensity is reflected in operation counts. Standard MUSCL differencing is included for comparison. Numerical experiments presented include the Ringleb flow for numerical accuracy and a shock reflection problem. A vortex-shock interaction demonstrates the ability of the ENO scheme to excel in simulating unsteady high-frequency flow physics.

  7. The thermodynamic cost of accurate sensory adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Yuhai

    2015-03-01

    Living organisms need to obtain and process environment information accurately in order to make decisions critical for their survival. Much progress have been made in identifying key components responsible for various biological functions, however, major challenges remain to understand system-level behaviors from the molecular-level knowledge of biology and to unravel possible physical principles for the underlying biochemical circuits. In this talk, we will present some recent works in understanding the chemical sensory system of E. coli by combining theoretical approaches with quantitative experiments. We focus on addressing the questions on how cells process chemical information and adapt to varying environment, and what are the thermodynamic limits of key regulatory functions, such as adaptation.

  8. Accurate numerical solutions of conservative nonlinear oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Najeeb Alam; Nasir Uddin, Khan; Nadeem Alam, Khan

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to present an investigation to analyze the vibration of a conservative nonlinear oscillator in the form u" + lambda u + u^(2n-1) + (1 + epsilon^2 u^(4m))^(1/2) = 0 for any arbitrary power of n and m. This method converts the differential equation to sets of algebraic equations and solve numerically. We have presented for three different cases: a higher order Duffing equation, an equation with irrational restoring force and a plasma physics equation. It is also found that the method is valid for any arbitrary order of n and m. Comparisons have been made with the results found in the literature the method gives accurate results.

  9. Accurate Telescope Mount Positioning with MEMS Accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, L.; Jaskó, A.; Pál, A.; Csépány, G.

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes the advantages and challenges of applying microelectromechanical accelerometer systems (MEMS accelerometers) in order to attain precise, accurate, and stateless positioning of telescope mounts. This provides a completely independent method from other forms of electronic, optical, mechanical or magnetic feedback or real-time astrometry. Our goal is to reach the subarcminute range which is considerably smaller than the field-of-view of conventional imaging telescope systems. Here we present how this subarcminute accuracy can be achieved with very cheap MEMS sensors and we also detail how our procedures can be extended in order to attain even finer measurements. In addition, our paper discusses how can a complete system design be implemented in order to be a part of a telescope control system.

  10. Accurate metacognition for visual sensory memory representations.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Annelinde R E; Sligte, Ilja G; Barrett, Adam B; Seth, Anil K; Fahrenfort, Johannes J; Lamme, Victor A F

    2014-04-01

    The capacity to attend to multiple objects in the visual field is limited. However, introspectively, people feel that they see the whole visual world at once. Some scholars suggest that this introspective feeling is based on short-lived sensory memory representations, whereas others argue that the feeling of seeing more than can be attended to is illusory. Here, we investigated this phenomenon by combining objective memory performance with subjective confidence ratings during a change-detection task. This allowed us to compute a measure of metacognition--the degree of knowledge that subjects have about the correctness of their decisions--for different stages of memory. We show that subjects store more objects in sensory memory than they can attend to but, at the same time, have similar metacognition for sensory memory and working memory representations. This suggests that these subjective impressions are not an illusion but accurate reflections of the richness of visual perception. PMID:24549293

  11. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperaes in the range of about 1800.degree. to 2700.degree. C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  12. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, D.D.

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperatures in the range of about 1800/sup 0/ to 2700/sup 0/C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  13. Toward Accurate and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S

    2016-08-25

    Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable accurate comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. PMID:27565341

  14. The importance of accurate atmospheric modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Dylan; Schroeder, John; Liang, Pang

    2014-11-01

    This paper will focus on the effect of atmospheric conditions on EO sensor performance using computer models. We have shown the importance of accurately modeling atmospheric effects for predicting the performance of an EO sensor. A simple example will demonstrated how real conditions for several sites in China will significantly impact on image correction, hyperspectral imaging, and remote sensing. The current state-of-the-art model for computing atmospheric transmission and radiance is, MODTRAN® 5, developed by the US Air Force Research Laboratory and Spectral Science, Inc. Research by the US Air Force, Navy and Army resulted in the public release of LOWTRAN 2 in the early 1970's. Subsequent releases of LOWTRAN and MODTRAN® have continued until the present. Please verify that (1) all pages are present, (2) all figures are correct, (3) all fonts and special characters are correct, and (4) all text and figures fit within the red margin lines shown on this review document. Complete formatting information is available at http://SPIE.org/manuscripts Return to the Manage Active Submissions page at http://spie.org/submissions/tasks.aspx and approve or disapprove this submission. Your manuscript will not be published without this approval. Please contact author_help@spie.org with any questions or concerns. The paper will demonstrate the importance of using validated models and local measured meteorological, atmospheric and aerosol conditions to accurately simulate the atmospheric transmission and radiance. Frequently default conditions are used which can produce errors of as much as 75% in these values. This can have significant impact on remote sensing applications.

  15. The high cost of accurate knowledge.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Kathleen M; Weber, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    Many business thinkers believe it's the role of senior managers to scan the external environment to monitor contingencies and constraints, and to use that precise knowledge to modify the company's strategy and design. As these thinkers see it, managers need accurate and abundant information to carry out that role. According to that logic, it makes sense to invest heavily in systems for collecting and organizing competitive information. Another school of pundits contends that, since today's complex information often isn't precise anyway, it's not worth going overboard with such investments. In other words, it's not the accuracy and abundance of information that should matter most to top executives--rather, it's how that information is interpreted. After all, the role of senior managers isn't just to make decisions; it's to set direction and motivate others in the face of ambiguities and conflicting demands. Top executives must interpret information and communicate those interpretations--they must manage meaning more than they must manage information. So which of these competing views is the right one? Research conducted by academics Sutcliffe and Weber found that how accurate senior executives are about their competitive environments is indeed less important for strategy and corresponding organizational changes than the way in which they interpret information about their environments. Investments in shaping those interpretations, therefore, may create a more durable competitive advantage than investments in obtaining and organizing more information. And what kinds of interpretations are most closely linked with high performance? Their research suggests that high performers respond positively to opportunities, yet they aren't overconfident in their abilities to take advantage of those opportunities. PMID:12747164

  16. Seismic Wave Propagation in Fully Anisotropic Axisymmetric Media: Applications and Practical Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel, Martin; Nissen-Meyer, Tarje; Stähler, Simon; Waszek, Lauren; Hempel, Stefanie; Auer, Ludwig; Deuss, Arwen

    2014-05-01

    We present a numerical method to compute high-frequency 3D elastic waves in fully anisotropic axisymmetric media. The method is based on a decomposition of the wavefield into a series of uncoupled 2D equations, for which the dependence of the wavefield on the azimuth can be solved analytically. The remaining 2D problems are then solved using a spectral element method (AxiSEM). AxiSEM was recently published open-source (Nissen-Meyer et al. 2014) as a production ready code capable to compute global seismic wave propagation up to frequencies of ~2Hz. It accurately models visco-elastic dissipation and anisotropy (van Driel et al., submitted to GJI) and runs efficiently on HPC resources using up to 10K cores. At very short period, the Fresnel Zone of body waves is narrow and sensitivity is focused around the geometrical ray. In cases where the azimuthal variations of structural heterogeneity exhibit long spatial wavelengths, so called 2.5D simulations (3D wavefields in 2D models) provide a good approximation. In AxiSEM, twodimensional variations in the source-receiver plane are effectively modelled as ringlike structures extending in the out-of-plane direction. In contrast to ray-theory, which is widely used in high-frequency applications, AxiSEM provides complete waveforms, thus giving access to frequency dependency, amplitude variations, and peculiar wave effects such as diffraction and caustics. Here we focus on the practical implications of the inherent axisymmetric geometry and show how the 2.5D-features of our method method can be used to model realistic anisotropic structures, by applying it to problems such as the D" region and the inner core.

  17. A Lagrangian description of nearshore hydrodynamics and rip currents forced by a random wave field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leandro, S.; Cienfuegos, R.; Escauriaza, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Nonlinear processes become important for waves propagating in the shoaling and surf zones. Wave shape changes when approaching the coast under the influence of bathymetry, becoming increasingly asymmetric until reaching the breaking limit. In the shoaling zone, non-linearities induce a net velocity in the direction of wave propagation, a phenomenon called Stokes drift, while in the surf zone, currents are mainly driven by spatio-temporal variations in energy dissipation gradients. In this work we aim at investigating and characterizing the nearshore circulation forced by a random wave field propagating over a variable bathymetry. We carry out numerical simulations over a laboratory experiment conducted in a wave basin over a realistic bathymetry [Michallet et al. 2010]. For the hydrodynamics, we use a 2D shock-capturing finite-volume model that solves the non-linear shallow water equations, taking into account energy dissipation by breaking, friction, bed-slope variations, and an accurate description for the moving shoreline in the swash zone [Marche et al. 2007;Guerra et al. 2010]. Model predictions are compared and validated against experimental data giving confidence for its use in the description of wave propagation in the surf/swash zone, together with mean eulerian velocities. The resulting wave propagation and circulation provided by the 2D model will then be used to describe drifter's patterns in the surf zone and construct Lagrangian particle tracking. The chosen experimental configuration is of great interest due to the random wave forcing (slowly modulated), the beach non-uniformities, and the existence of several bar-rip channels that enhance quasi-periodic rip instabilities. During the experiment, balloons filled with water, with a diameter between 5 and 10 cm, were placed in the surf zone in order to characterize circulation in a Lagrangian framework [Castelle et al. 2010]. The time-location of the balloons was continuously tracked by a shore

  18. A Fast and Accurate Unconstrained Face Detector.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shengcai; Jain, Anil K; Li, Stan Z

    2016-02-01

    We propose a method to address challenges in unconstrained face detection, such as arbitrary pose variations and occlusions. First, a new image feature called Normalized Pixel Difference (NPD) is proposed. NPD feature is computed as the difference to sum ratio between two pixel values, inspired by the Weber Fraction in experimental psychology. The new feature is scale invariant, bounded, and is able to reconstruct the original image. Second, we propose a deep quadratic tree to learn the optimal subset of NPD features and their combinations, so that complex face manifolds can be partitioned by the learned rules. This way, only a single soft-cascade classifier is needed to handle unconstrained face detection. Furthermore, we show that the NPD features can be efficiently obtained from a look up table, and the detection template can be easily scaled, making the proposed face detector very fast. Experimental results on three public face datasets (FDDB, GENKI, and CMU-MIT) show that the proposed method achieves state-of-the-art performance in detecting unconstrained faces with arbitrary pose variations and occlusions in cluttered scenes. PMID:26761729

  19. Approaching system equilibrium with accurate or not accurate feedback information in a two-route system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-mei; Xie, Dong-fan; Li, Qi

    2015-02-01

    With the development of intelligent transport system, advanced information feedback strategies have been developed to reduce traffic congestion and enhance the capacity. However, previous strategies provide accurate information to travelers and our simulation results show that accurate information brings negative effects, especially in delay case. Because travelers prefer to the best condition route with accurate information, and delayed information cannot reflect current traffic condition but past. Then travelers make wrong routing decisions, causing the decrease of the capacity and the increase of oscillations and the system deviating from the equilibrium. To avoid the negative effect, bounded rationality is taken into account by introducing a boundedly rational threshold BR. When difference between two routes is less than the BR, routes have equal probability to be chosen. The bounded rationality is helpful to improve the efficiency in terms of capacity, oscillation and the gap deviating from the system equilibrium.

  20. Clinically accurate fetal ECG parameters acquired from maternal abdominal sensors

    PubMed Central

    CLIFFORD, Gari; SAMENI, Reza; WARD, Mr. Jay; ROBINSON, Julian; WOLFBERG, Adam J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the accuracy of a novel system for measuring fetal heart rate and ST-segment changes using non-invasive electrodes on the maternal abdomen. STUDY DESIGN Fetal ECGs were recorded using abdominal sensors from 32 term laboring women who had a fetal scalp electrode (FSE) placed for a clinical indication. RESULTS Good quality data for FHR estimation was available in 91.2% of the FSE segments, and 89.9% of the abdominal electrode segments. The root mean square (RMS) error between the FHR data calculated by both methods over all processed segments was 0.36 beats per minute. ST deviation from the isoelectric point ranged from 0 to 14.2% of R-wave amplitude. The RMS error between the ST change calculated by both methods averaged over all processed segments was 3.2%. CONCLUSION FHR and ST change acquired from the maternal abdomen is highly accurate and on average is clinically indistinguishable from FHR and ST change calculated using FSE data. PMID:21514560