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Sample records for accurately identify patients

  1. Postmortem CT is more accurate than clinical diagnosis for identifying the immediate cause of death in hospitalized patients: a prospective autopsy-based study.

    PubMed

    Inai, Kunihiro; Noriki, Sakon; Kinoshita, Kazuyuki; Sakai, Toyohiko; Kimura, Hirohiko; Nishijima, Akihiko; Iwasaki, Hiromichi; Naiki, Hironobu

    2016-07-01

    Despite 75 to 90 % physician accuracy in determining the underlying cause of death, precision of determination of the immediate cause of death is approximately 40 %. In contrast, two thirds of immediate causes of death in hospitalized patients are correctly diagnosed by postmortem computed tomography (CT). Postmortem CT might provide an alternative approach to verifying the immediate cause of death. To evaluate the effectiveness of postmortem CT as an alternative method to determine the immediate cause of death in hospitalized patients, an autopsy-based prospective study was performed. Of 563 deaths from September 2011 to August 2013, 50 consecutive cadavers undergoing hospital autopsies with consent for additional postmortem CT at the University of Fukui were enrolled. The accuracy of determination of the immediate cause of death by postmortem CT was evaluated in these patients. Diagnostic discrepancy was also compared between radiologists and attending physicians. The immediate cause of death was correctly diagnosed in 37 of 50 subjects using postmortem CT (74 %), concerning 29 cases of respiratory failure, 4 of hemorrhage, 3 of liver failure and 1 of septic shock. Six cases of organ failure involving 13 patients were not identified as the cause of death by postmortem CT. Regarding the immediate cause of death, accuracy of clinical diagnosis was significantly lower than that of postmortem CT (46 vs 74 %, P < 0.01). Postmortem CT may be more useful than clinical diagnosis for identifying the immediate cause of death in hospitalized patients not undergoing autopsy. PMID:27085336

  2. Using an Educational Electronic Documentation System to Help Nursing Students Accurately Identify Nursing Diagnoses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pobocik, Tamara J.

    2013-01-01

    The use of technology and electronic medical records in healthcare has exponentially increased. This quantitative research project used a pretest/posttest design, and reviewed how an educational electronic documentation system helped nursing students to identify the accurate related to statement of the nursing diagnosis for the patient in the case…

  3. Are general practitioners able to accurately diagnose dementia and identify Alzheimer's disease? A comparison with an outpatient memory clinic.

    PubMed Central

    van Hout, H; Vernooij-Dassen, M; Poels, P; Hoefnagels, W; Grol, R

    2000-01-01

    Since the introduction of agents for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, and in order to increase understanding of a patient's changed behaviour, it has become particularly important that dementia is both diagnosed at an early stage and differentiated into its subtypes. This study aims to ascertain whether GPs were able to diagnose dementia and identify the type of dementia accurately and confidently. GPs were well able to assess the firmness of their own dementia diagnoses, which supposes that they are able to make appropriate selection for referral. Diagnostic support from a specialised team can particularly contribute to identifying the type of dementia. PMID:10897518

  4. SNP-microarrays can accurately identify the presence of an individual in complex forensic DNA mixtures.

    PubMed

    Voskoboinik, Lev; Ayers, Sheri B; LeFebvre, Aaron K; Darvasi, Ariel

    2015-05-01

    Common forensic and mass disaster scenarios present DNA evidence that comprises a mixture of several contributors. Identifying the presence of an individual in such mixtures has proven difficult. In the current study, we evaluate the practical usefulness of currently available "off-the-shelf" SNP microarrays for such purposes. We found that a set of 3000 SNPs specifically selected for this purpose can accurately identify the presence of an individual in complex DNA mixtures of various compositions. For example, individuals contributing as little as 5% to a complex DNA mixture can be robustly identified even if the starting DNA amount was as little as 5.0ng and had undergone whole-genome amplification (WGA) prior to SNP analysis. The work presented in this study represents proof-of-principle that our previously proposed approach, can work with real "forensic-type" samples. Furthermore, in the absence of a low-density focused forensic SNP microarray, the use of standard, currently available high-density SNP microarrays can be similarly used and even increase statistical power due to the larger amount of available information.

  5. A Maximum NEC Criterion for Compton Collimation to Accurately Identify True Coincidences in PET

    PubMed Central

    Chinn, Garry; Levin, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we propose a new method to increase the accuracy of identifying true coincidence events for positron emission tomography (PET). This approach requires 3-D detectors with the ability to position each photon interaction in multi-interaction photon events. When multiple interactions occur in the detector, the incident direction of the photon can be estimated using the Compton scatter kinematics (Compton Collimation). If the difference between the estimated incident direction of the photon relative to a second, coincident photon lies within a certain angular range around colinearity, the line of response between the two photons is identified as a true coincidence and used for image reconstruction. We present an algorithm for choosing the incident photon direction window threshold that maximizes the noise equivalent counts of the PET system. For simulated data, the direction window removed 56%–67% of random coincidences while retaining > 94% of true coincidences from image reconstruction as well as accurately extracted 70% of true coincidences from multiple coincidences. PMID:21317079

  6. Prognostic breast cancer signature identified from 3D culture model accurately predicts clinical outcome across independent datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Katherine J.; Patrick, Denis R.; Bissell, Mina J.; Fournier, Marcia V.

    2008-10-20

    One of the major tenets in breast cancer research is that early detection is vital for patient survival by increasing treatment options. To that end, we have previously used a novel unsupervised approach to identify a set of genes whose expression predicts prognosis of breast cancer patients. The predictive genes were selected in a well-defined three dimensional (3D) cell culture model of non-malignant human mammary epithelial cell morphogenesis as down-regulated during breast epithelial cell acinar formation and cell cycle arrest. Here we examine the ability of this gene signature (3D-signature) to predict prognosis in three independent breast cancer microarray datasets having 295, 286, and 118 samples, respectively. Our results show that the 3D-signature accurately predicts prognosis in three unrelated patient datasets. At 10 years, the probability of positive outcome was 52, 51, and 47 percent in the group with a poor-prognosis signature and 91, 75, and 71 percent in the group with a good-prognosis signature for the three datasets, respectively (Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, p<0.05). Hazard ratios for poor outcome were 5.5 (95% CI 3.0 to 12.2, p<0.0001), 2.4 (95% CI 1.6 to 3.6, p<0.0001) and 1.9 (95% CI 1.1 to 3.2, p = 0.016) and remained significant for the two larger datasets when corrected for estrogen receptor (ER) status. Hence the 3D-signature accurately predicts breast cancer outcome in both ER-positive and ER-negative tumors, though individual genes differed in their prognostic ability in the two subtypes. Genes that were prognostic in ER+ patients are AURKA, CEP55, RRM2, EPHA2, FGFBP1, and VRK1, while genes prognostic in ER patients include ACTB, FOXM1 and SERPINE2 (Kaplan-Meier p<0.05). Multivariable Cox regression analysis in the largest dataset showed that the 3D-signature was a strong independent factor in predicting breast cancer outcome. The 3D-signature accurately predicts breast cancer outcome across multiple datasets and holds prognostic

  7. PoopMD, a Mobile Health Application, Accurately Identifies Infant Acholic Stools

    PubMed Central

    Franciscovich, Amy; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Doyle, Joe; Bolinger, Josh; Capdevila, Montserrat; Rice, Marcus; Hancock, Leslie; Mahr, Tanya; Mogul, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is the leading cause of pediatric end-stage liver disease in the United States. Education of parents in the perinatal period with stool cards depicting acholic and normal stools has been associated with improved time-to-diagnosis and survival in BA. PoopMD is a mobile application that utilizes a smartphone’s camera and color recognition software to analyze an infant’s stool and determine if additional follow-up is indicated. PoopMD was developed using custom HTML5/CSS3 and wrapped to work on iOS and Android platforms. In order to define the gold standard regarding stool color, seven pediatricians were asked to review 45 photographs of infant stool and rate them as acholic, normal, or indeterminate. Samples for which 6+ pediatricians demonstrated agreement defined the gold standard, and only these samples were included in the analysis. Accuracy of PoopMD was assessed using an iPhone 5s with incandescent lighting. Variability in analysis of stool photographs as acholic versus normal with intermediate rating weighted as 50% agreement (kappa) was compared between three laypeople and one expert user. Variability in output was also assessed between an iPhone 5s and a Samsung Galaxy S4, as well as between incandescent lighting and compact fluorescent lighting. Six-plus pediatricians agreed on 27 normal and 7 acholic photographs; no photographs were defined as indeterminate. The sensitivity was 7/7 (100%). The specificity was 24/27 (89%) with 3/27 labeled as indeterminate; no photos of normal stool were labeled as acholic. The Laplace-smoothed positive likelihood ratio was 6.44 (95% CI 2.52 to 16.48) and the negative likelihood ratio was 0.13 (95% CI 0.02 to 0.83). kappauser was 0.68, kappaphone was 0.88, and kappalight was 0.81. Therefore, in this pilot study, PoopMD accurately differentiates acholic from normal color with substantial agreement across users, and almost perfect agreement across two popular smartphones and ambient light settings

  8. PoopMD, a Mobile Health Application, Accurately Identifies Infant Acholic Stools.

    PubMed

    Franciscovich, Amy; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Doyle, Joe; Bolinger, Josh; Capdevila, Montserrat; Rice, Marcus; Hancock, Leslie; Mahr, Tanya; Mogul, Douglas B

    2015-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is the leading cause of pediatric end-stage liver disease in the United States. Education of parents in the perinatal period with stool cards depicting acholic and normal stools has been associated with improved time-to-diagnosis and survival in BA. PoopMD is a mobile application that utilizes a smartphone's camera and color recognition software to analyze an infant's stool and determine if additional follow-up is indicated. PoopMD was developed using custom HTML5/CSS3 and wrapped to work on iOS and Android platforms. In order to define the gold standard regarding stool color, seven pediatricians were asked to review 45 photographs of infant stool and rate them as acholic, normal, or indeterminate. Samples for which 6+ pediatricians demonstrated agreement defined the gold standard, and only these samples were included in the analysis. Accuracy of PoopMD was assessed using an iPhone 5s with incandescent lighting. Variability in analysis of stool photographs as acholic versus normal with intermediate rating weighted as 50% agreement (kappa) was compared between three laypeople and one expert user. Variability in output was also assessed between an iPhone 5s and a Samsung Galaxy S4, as well as between incandescent lighting and compact fluorescent lighting. Six-plus pediatricians agreed on 27 normal and 7 acholic photographs; no photographs were defined as indeterminate. The sensitivity was 7/7 (100%). The specificity was 24/27 (89%) with 3/27 labeled as indeterminate; no photos of normal stool were labeled as acholic. The Laplace-smoothed positive likelihood ratio was 6.44 (95% CI 2.52 to 16.48) and the negative likelihood ratio was 0.13 (95% CI 0.02 to 0.83). kappauser was 0.68, kappaphone was 0.88, and kappalight was 0.81. Therefore, in this pilot study, PoopMD accurately differentiates acholic from normal color with substantial agreement across users, and almost perfect agreement across two popular smartphones and ambient light settings. Poop

  9. PoopMD, a Mobile Health Application, Accurately Identifies Infant Acholic Stools.

    PubMed

    Franciscovich, Amy; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Doyle, Joe; Bolinger, Josh; Capdevila, Montserrat; Rice, Marcus; Hancock, Leslie; Mahr, Tanya; Mogul, Douglas B

    2015-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is the leading cause of pediatric end-stage liver disease in the United States. Education of parents in the perinatal period with stool cards depicting acholic and normal stools has been associated with improved time-to-diagnosis and survival in BA. PoopMD is a mobile application that utilizes a smartphone's camera and color recognition software to analyze an infant's stool and determine if additional follow-up is indicated. PoopMD was developed using custom HTML5/CSS3 and wrapped to work on iOS and Android platforms. In order to define the gold standard regarding stool color, seven pediatricians were asked to review 45 photographs of infant stool and rate them as acholic, normal, or indeterminate. Samples for which 6+ pediatricians demonstrated agreement defined the gold standard, and only these samples were included in the analysis. Accuracy of PoopMD was assessed using an iPhone 5s with incandescent lighting. Variability in analysis of stool photographs as acholic versus normal with intermediate rating weighted as 50% agreement (kappa) was compared between three laypeople and one expert user. Variability in output was also assessed between an iPhone 5s and a Samsung Galaxy S4, as well as between incandescent lighting and compact fluorescent lighting. Six-plus pediatricians agreed on 27 normal and 7 acholic photographs; no photographs were defined as indeterminate. The sensitivity was 7/7 (100%). The specificity was 24/27 (89%) with 3/27 labeled as indeterminate; no photos of normal stool were labeled as acholic. The Laplace-smoothed positive likelihood ratio was 6.44 (95% CI 2.52 to 16.48) and the negative likelihood ratio was 0.13 (95% CI 0.02 to 0.83). kappauser was 0.68, kappaphone was 0.88, and kappalight was 0.81. Therefore, in this pilot study, PoopMD accurately differentiates acholic from normal color with substantial agreement across users, and almost perfect agreement across two popular smartphones and ambient light settings. Poop

  10. Pseudonymization of patient identifiers for translational research

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The usage of patient data for research poses risks concerning the patients’ privacy and informational self-determination. Next-generation-sequencing technologies and various other methods gain data from biospecimen, both for translational research and personalized medicine. If these biospecimen are anonymized, individual research results from genomic research, which should be offered to patients in a clinically relevant timeframe, cannot be associated back to the individual. This raises an ethical concern and challenges the legitimacy of anonymized patient samples. In this paper we present a new approach which supports both data privacy and the possibility to give feedback to patients about their individual research results. Methods We examined previously published privacy concepts regarding a streamlined de-pseudonymization process and a patient-based pseudonym as applicable to research with genomic data and warehousing approaches. All concepts identified in the literature review were compared to each other and analyzed for their applicability to translational research projects. We evaluated how these concepts cope with challenges implicated by personalized medicine. Therefore, both person-centricity issues and a separation of pseudonymization and de-pseudonymization stood out as a central theme in our examination. This motivated us to enhance an existing pseudonymization method regarding a separation of duties. Results The existing concepts rely on external trusted third parties, making de-pseudonymization a multistage process involving additional interpersonal communication, which might cause critical delays in patient care. Therefore we propose an enhanced method with an asymmetric encryption scheme separating the duties of pseudonymization and de-pseudonymization. The pseudonymization service provider is unable to conclude the patient identifier from the pseudonym, but assigns this ability to an authorized third party (ombudsman) instead. To solve

  11. Identifying Accurate Equivalents between Turkish and Arabic for Foreign Language Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadizade, Esma Dumanli

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to make a list of accurate equivalents between Turkish and Arabic in order to help Arabic-speaking students learn Turkish as a second language, and offer teachers a guide to categorize and teach these lists. Equivalence between the different dialects of Turkish has been studied intensively by linguists. However, a review…

  12. Oxygen-Enhanced MRI Accurately Identifies, Quantifies, and Maps Tumor Hypoxia in Preclinical Cancer Models.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, James P B; Boult, Jessica K R; Jamin, Yann; Babur, Muhammad; Finegan, Katherine G; Williams, Kaye J; Little, Ross A; Jackson, Alan; Parker, Geoff J M; Reynolds, Andrew R; Waterton, John C; Robinson, Simon P

    2016-02-15

    There is a clinical need for noninvasive biomarkers of tumor hypoxia for prognostic and predictive studies, radiotherapy planning, and therapy monitoring. Oxygen-enhanced MRI (OE-MRI) is an emerging imaging technique for quantifying the spatial distribution and extent of tumor oxygen delivery in vivo. In OE-MRI, the longitudinal relaxation rate of protons (ΔR1) changes in proportion to the concentration of molecular oxygen dissolved in plasma or interstitial tissue fluid. Therefore, well-oxygenated tissues show positive ΔR1. We hypothesized that the fraction of tumor tissue refractory to oxygen challenge (lack of positive ΔR1, termed "Oxy-R fraction") would be a robust biomarker of hypoxia in models with varying vascular and hypoxic features. Here, we demonstrate that OE-MRI signals are accurate, precise, and sensitive to changes in tumor pO2 in highly vascular 786-0 renal cancer xenografts. Furthermore, we show that Oxy-R fraction can quantify the hypoxic fraction in multiple models with differing hypoxic and vascular phenotypes, when used in combination with measurements of tumor perfusion. Finally, Oxy-R fraction can detect dynamic changes in hypoxia induced by the vasomodulator agent hydralazine. In contrast, more conventional biomarkers of hypoxia (derived from blood oxygenation-level dependent MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI) did not relate to tumor hypoxia consistently. Our results show that the Oxy-R fraction accurately quantifies tumor hypoxia noninvasively and is immediately translatable to the clinic.

  13. Fluorescent labeling reliably identifies Chlamydia trachomatis in living human endometrial cells and rapidly and accurately quantifies chlamydial inclusion forming units.

    PubMed

    Vicetti Miguel, Rodolfo D; Henschel, Kevin J; Dueñas Lopez, Fiorela C; Quispe Calla, Nirk E; Cherpes, Thomas L

    2015-12-01

    Chlamydia replication requires host lipid acquisition, allowing flow cytometry to identify Chlamydia-infected cells that accumulated fluorescent Golgi-specific lipid. Herein, we describe modifications to currently available methods that allow precise differentiation between uninfected and Chlamydia trachomatis-infected human endometrial cells and rapidly and accurately quantify chlamydial inclusion forming units.

  14. USING AN ACCURATE MASS, TRIPLE QUADRUPOLE MASS SPECTROMETER AND AN ION CORRELATION PROGRAM TO IDENTIFY COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most compounds are not found in mass spectral libraries and must be identified by other means. Often, compound identities can be deduced from the compositions of the ions in their mass spectra and review of the chemical literature. Confirmation is provided by mass spectra and r...

  15. Do Ecological Niche Models Accurately Identify Climatic Determinants of Species Ranges?

    PubMed

    Searcy, Christopher A; Shaffer, H Bradley

    2016-04-01

    Defining species' niches is central to understanding their distributions and is thus fundamental to basic ecology and climate change projections. Ecological niche models (ENMs) are a key component of making accurate projections and include descriptions of the niche in terms of both response curves and rankings of variable importance. In this study, we evaluate Maxent's ranking of environmental variables based on their importance in delimiting species' range boundaries by asking whether these same variables also govern annual recruitment based on long-term demographic studies. We found that Maxent-based assessments of variable importance in setting range boundaries in the California tiger salamander (Ambystoma californiense; CTS) correlate very well with how important those variables are in governing ongoing recruitment of CTS at the population level. This strong correlation suggests that Maxent's ranking of variable importance captures biologically realistic assessments of factors governing population persistence. However, this result holds only when Maxent models are built using best-practice procedures and variables are ranked based on permutation importance. Our study highlights the need for building high-quality niche models and provides encouraging evidence that when such models are built, they can reflect important aspects of a species' ecology. PMID:27028071

  16. An extended set of yeast-based functional assays accurately identifies human disease mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Song; Yang, Fan; Tan, Guihong; Costanzo, Michael; Oughtred, Rose; Hirschman, Jodi; Theesfeld, Chandra L.; Bansal, Pritpal; Sahni, Nidhi; Yi, Song; Yu, Analyn; Tyagi, Tanya; Tie, Cathy; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Andrews, Brenda J.; Boone, Charles; Dolinski, Kara; Roth, Frederick P.

    2016-01-01

    We can now routinely identify coding variants within individual human genomes. A pressing challenge is to determine which variants disrupt the function of disease-associated genes. Both experimental and computational methods exist to predict pathogenicity of human genetic variation. However, a systematic performance comparison between them has been lacking. Therefore, we developed and exploited a panel of 26 yeast-based functional complementation assays to measure the impact of 179 variants (101 disease- and 78 non-disease-associated variants) from 22 human disease genes. Using the resulting reference standard, we show that experimental functional assays in a 1-billion-year diverged model organism can identify pathogenic alleles with significantly higher precision and specificity than current computational methods. PMID:26975778

  17. An extended set of yeast-based functional assays accurately identifies human disease mutations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Song; Yang, Fan; Tan, Guihong; Costanzo, Michael; Oughtred, Rose; Hirschman, Jodi; Theesfeld, Chandra L; Bansal, Pritpal; Sahni, Nidhi; Yi, Song; Yu, Analyn; Tyagi, Tanya; Tie, Cathy; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Andrews, Brenda J; Boone, Charles; Dolinski, Kara; Roth, Frederick P

    2016-05-01

    We can now routinely identify coding variants within individual human genomes. A pressing challenge is to determine which variants disrupt the function of disease-associated genes. Both experimental and computational methods exist to predict pathogenicity of human genetic variation. However, a systematic performance comparison between them has been lacking. Therefore, we developed and exploited a panel of 26 yeast-based functional complementation assays to measure the impact of 179 variants (101 disease- and 78 non-disease-associated variants) from 22 human disease genes. Using the resulting reference standard, we show that experimental functional assays in a 1-billion-year diverged model organism can identify pathogenic alleles with significantly higher precision and specificity than current computational methods. PMID:26975778

  18. An extended set of yeast-based functional assays accurately identifies human disease mutations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Song; Yang, Fan; Tan, Guihong; Costanzo, Michael; Oughtred, Rose; Hirschman, Jodi; Theesfeld, Chandra L; Bansal, Pritpal; Sahni, Nidhi; Yi, Song; Yu, Analyn; Tyagi, Tanya; Tie, Cathy; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Andrews, Brenda J; Boone, Charles; Dolinski, Kara; Roth, Frederick P

    2016-05-01

    We can now routinely identify coding variants within individual human genomes. A pressing challenge is to determine which variants disrupt the function of disease-associated genes. Both experimental and computational methods exist to predict pathogenicity of human genetic variation. However, a systematic performance comparison between them has been lacking. Therefore, we developed and exploited a panel of 26 yeast-based functional complementation assays to measure the impact of 179 variants (101 disease- and 78 non-disease-associated variants) from 22 human disease genes. Using the resulting reference standard, we show that experimental functional assays in a 1-billion-year diverged model organism can identify pathogenic alleles with significantly higher precision and specificity than current computational methods.

  19. Accurate structure prediction of peptide–MHC complexes for identifying highly immunogenic antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Min-Sun; Park, Sung Yong; Miller, Keith R.; Collins, Edward J.; Lee, Ha Youn

    2013-11-01

    Designing an optimal HIV-1 vaccine faces the challenge of identifying antigens that induce a broad immune capacity. One factor to control the breadth of T cell responses is the surface morphology of a peptide–MHC complex. Here, we present an in silico protocol for predicting peptide–MHC structure. A robust signature of a conformational transition was identified during all-atom molecular dynamics, which results in a model with high accuracy. A large test set was used in constructing our protocol and we went another step further using a blind test with a wild-type peptide and two highly immunogenic mutants, which predicted substantial conformational changes in both mutants. The center residues at position five of the analogs were configured to be accessible to solvent, forming a prominent surface, while the residue of the wild-type peptide was to point laterally toward the side of the binding cleft. We then experimentally determined the structures of the blind test set, using high resolution of X-ray crystallography, which verified predicted conformational changes. Our observation strongly supports a positive association of the surface morphology of a peptide–MHC complex to its immunogenicity. Our study offers the prospect of enhancing immunogenicity of vaccines by identifying MHC binding immunogens.

  20. High expression of CD26 accurately identifies human bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted MAIT cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Prabhat K; Wong, Emily B; Napier, Ruth J; Bishai, William R; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Kasprowicz, Victoria O; Lewinsohn, Deborah A; Lewinsohn, David M; Gold, Marielle C

    2015-01-01

    Mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express the semi-invariant T-cell receptor TRAV1–2 and detect a range of bacteria and fungi through the MHC-like molecule MR1. However, knowledge of the function and phenotype of bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted TRAV1–2+ MAIT cells from human blood is limited. We broadly characterized the function of MR1-restricted MAIT cells in response to bacteria-infected targets and defined a phenotypic panel to identify these cells in the circulation. We demonstrated that bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells shared effector functions of cytolytic effector CD8+ T cells. By analysing an extensive panel of phenotypic markers, we determined that CD26 and CD161 were most strongly associated with these T cells. Using FACS to sort phenotypically defined CD8+ subsets we demonstrated that high expression of CD26 on CD8+ TRAV1–2+ cells identified with high specificity and sensitivity, bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells from human blood. CD161hi was also specific for but lacked sensitivity in identifying all bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells, some of which were CD161dim. Using cell surface expression of CD8, TRAV1–2, and CD26hi in the absence of stimulation we confirm that bacteria-reactive T cells are lacking in the blood of individuals with active tuberculosis and are restored in the blood of individuals undergoing treatment for tuberculosis. PMID:25752900

  1. Four DNA methylation biomarkers in biliary brush samples accurately identify the presence of cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, Kim; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Vedeld, Hege Marie; Honne, Hilde; Jebsen, Peter; Hektoen, Merete; Wadsworth, Christopher A.; Clausen, Ole Petter; Lundin, Knut E.A.; Paulsen, Vemund; Foss, Aksel; Mathisen, Øystein; Aabakken, Lars; Schrumpf, Erik; Lothe, Ragnhild A.

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of the highly aggressive malignancy cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) remains a challenge but has the potential to render the tumor curable by surgical removal. This study evaluates a biomarker panel for the diagnosis of CCA by DNA methylation analyses of biliary brush samples. The methylation status of 13 candidate genes (CDO1, CNRIP1, DCLK1, FBN1, INA, MAL, SEPT9, SFRP1, SNCA, SPG20, TMEFF2, VIM, and ZSCAN18) was investigated in 93 tissue samples (39 CCAs and 54 nonmalignant controls) using quantitative methylation‐specific polymerase chain reaction. The 13 genes were further analyzed in a test series of biliary brush samples (15 CCAs and 20 nonmalignant primary sclerosing cholangitis controls), and the methylation status of the four best performing markers was validated (34 CCAs and 34 primary sclerosing cholangitis controls). Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were used to evaluate the performance of individual biomarkers and the combination of biomarkers. The 13 candidate genes displayed a methylation frequency of 26%‐82% in tissue samples. The four best‐performing genes (CDO1, CNRIP1, SEPT9, and VIM) displayed individual methylation frequencies of 45%‐77% in biliary brushes from CCA patients. Across the test and validation biliary brush series, this four‐gene biomarker panel achieved a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 98%, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.944. Conclusion: We report a straightforward biomarker assay with high sensitivity and specificity for CCA, outperforming standard brush cytology, and suggest that the biomarker panel, potentially in combination with cytological evaluation, may improve CCA detection, particularly among primary sclerosing cholangitis patients. (Hepatology 2015;61:1651–1659) PMID:25644509

  2. Identity cards help patients identify their doctors.

    PubMed

    Zucco, Liana; Desmond, Gabrielle; Carpenter, Bernadette

    2014-01-01

    Patients admitted to hospital are immediately overloaded with information from staff in A&E, to subsequent acute medical and inpatient wards. Essential details are conveyed to patients at each step, including diagnosis, management and identification of various team members involved in their care. An initial audit within our South London hospital revealed only one third of patients admitted onto a single medical ward could recall the name of a single member of their treating team, and less than 10% retained that information over 5 days. Identification (ID) cards were devised to facilitate clear transfer of information detailing the patient's treating team. These ID cards were piloted through a series of PDSA cycles on one inpatient medical ward following a consultant led ward round. Post intervention, 67% managed to recall a single member of the treating team, with 67% retaining this information 5 days later, a dramatic improvement. ID cards were then trialed on one surgical ward, demonstrating equally impressive results with over 87% of patients recalling their named consultant following ID card implementation, up from 54% initially. Similar trends were demonstrated for recalling other treating team members. This simple measure improved patients ability to recall and retain names of a least a single member of their treating team, encouraged communication between patients and medical team and ultimately improved patient satisfaction and quality of care. ID cards were quick and easy to implement and have been approved by the hospital patient safety committee to implement throughout the Trust.

  3. Are housestaff identifying malnourished hospitalized medicine patients?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Michael A; Duerksen, Donald R; Rahman, Adam

    2014-10-01

    Clinical nutrition and nutritional assessment are often a neglected component of medical school curriculums despite the high prevalence of malnutrition in hospitalized patients. This study found that medical housestaff performed nutritional assessments in only 4% of admitted patients despite a high rate of malnutrition (57%). Survey results show housestaff lack knowledge in the area of malnutrition. Medical schools and training programs must place greater emphasis of providing qualified physician nutrition specialists to implement effective nutrition instruction. PMID:25061765

  4. Probabilistic techniques for obtaining accurate patient counts in Clinical Data Warehouses.

    PubMed

    Myers, Risa B; Herskovic, Jorge R

    2011-12-01

    Proposal and execution of clinical trials, computation of quality measures and discovery of correlation between medical phenomena are all applications where an accurate count of patients is needed. However, existing sources of this type of patient information, including Clinical Data Warehouses (CDWs) may be incomplete or inaccurate. This research explores applying probabilistic techniques, supported by the MayBMS probabilistic database, to obtain accurate patient counts from a Clinical Data Warehouse containing synthetic patient data. We present a synthetic Clinical Data Warehouse, and populate it with simulated data using a custom patient data generation engine. We then implement, evaluate and compare different techniques for obtaining patients counts. We model billing as a test for the presence of a condition. We compute billing's sensitivity and specificity both by conducting a "Simulated Expert Review" where a representative sample of records are reviewed and labeled by experts, and by obtaining the ground truth for every record. We compute the posterior probability of a patient having a condition through a "Bayesian Chain", using Bayes' Theorem to calculate the probability of a patient having a condition after each visit. The second method is a "one-shot" approach that computes the probability of a patient having a condition based on whether the patient is ever billed for the condition. Our results demonstrate the utility of probabilistic approaches, which improve on the accuracy of raw counts. In particular, the simulated review paired with a single application of Bayes' Theorem produces the best results, with an average error rate of 2.1% compared to 43.7% for the straightforward billing counts. Overall, this research demonstrates that Bayesian probabilistic approaches improve patient counts on simulated patient populations. We believe that total patient counts based on billing data are one of the many possible applications of our Bayesian framework. Use of

  5. TIMP2•IGFBP7 biomarker panel accurately predicts acute kidney injury in high-risk surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Gunnerson, Kyle J.; Shaw, Andrew D.; Chawla, Lakhmir S.; Bihorac, Azra; Al-Khafaji, Ali; Kashani, Kianoush; Lissauer, Matthew; Shi, Jing; Walker, Michael G.; Kellum, John A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important complication in surgical patients. Existing biomarkers and clinical prediction models underestimate the risk for developing AKI. We recently reported data from two trials of 728 and 408 critically ill adult patients in whom urinary TIMP2•IGFBP7 (NephroCheck, Astute Medical) was used to identify patients at risk of developing AKI. Here we report a preplanned analysis of surgical patients from both trials to assess whether urinary tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2) and insulin-like growth factor–binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) accurately identify surgical patients at risk of developing AKI. STUDY DESIGN We enrolled adult surgical patients at risk for AKI who were admitted to one of 39 intensive care units across Europe and North America. The primary end point was moderate-severe AKI (equivalent to KDIGO [Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes] stages 2–3) within 12 hours of enrollment. Biomarker performance was assessed using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, integrated discrimination improvement, and category-free net reclassification improvement. RESULTS A total of 375 patients were included in the final analysis of whom 35 (9%) developed moderate-severe AKI within 12 hours. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] alone was 0.84 (95% confidence interval, 0.76–0.90; p < 0.0001). Biomarker performance was robust in sensitivity analysis across predefined subgroups (urgency and type of surgery). CONCLUSION For postoperative surgical intensive care unit patients, a single urinary TIMP2•IGFBP7 test accurately identified patients at risk for developing AKI within the ensuing 12 hours and its inclusion in clinical risk prediction models significantly enhances their performance. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE Prognostic study, level I. PMID:26816218

  6. Accurate Identification of MCI Patients via Enriched White-Matter Connectivity Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Chong-Yaw; Yap, Pew-Thian; Brownyke, Jeffery N.; Potter, Guy G.; Steffens, David C.; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen; Wang, Lihong; Shen, Dinggang

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI), often a prodromal phase of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is frequently considered to be a good target for early diagnosis and therapeutic interventions of AD. Recent emergence of reliable network characterization techniques have made understanding neurological disorders at a whole brain connectivity level possible. Accordingly, we propose a network-based multivariate classification algorithm, using a collection of measures derived from white-matter (WM) connectivity networks, to accurately identify MCI patients from normal controls. An enriched description of WM connections, utilizing six physiological parameters, i.e., fiber penetration count, fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), and principal diffusivities (λ 1, λ 2, λ 3), results in six connectivity networks for each subject to account for the connection topology and the biophysical properties of the connections. Upon parcellating the brain into 90 regions-of-interest (ROIs), the average statistics of each ROI in relation to the remaining ROIs are extracted as features for classification. These features are then sieved to select the most discriminant subset of features for building an MCI classifier via support vector machines (SVMs). Cross-validation results indicate better diagnostic power of the proposed enriched WM connection description than simple description with any single physiological parameter.

  7. Toward optimizing patient-specific IMRT QA techniques in the accurate detection of dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable patient plans

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, Elizabeth M.; Balter, Peter A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Jones, Jimmy; Followill, David S.; Kry, Stephen F.

    2014-12-15

    was no significant difference in the performance of any device between gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm, 3%/3 mm, and 5%/3 mm. Finally, optimal cutoffs (e.g., percent of pixels passing gamma) were determined for each device and while clinical practice commonly uses a threshold of 90% of pixels passing for most cases, these results showed variability in the optimal cutoff among devices. Conclusions: IMRT QA devices have differences in their ability to accurately detect dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable plans. Field-by-field analysis with a MapCheck device and use of the MapCheck with a MapPhan phantom while delivering at planned rotational gantry angles resulted in a significantly poorer ability to accurately sort acceptable and unacceptable plans compared with the other techniques examined. Patient-specific IMRT QA techniques in general should be thoroughly evaluated for their ability to correctly differentiate acceptable and unacceptable plans. Additionally, optimal agreement thresholds should be identified and used as common clinical thresholds typically worked very poorly to identify unacceptable plans.

  8. New Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Their Use for an Accurate Cardiovascular Risk Assessment in Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    TAUTU, Oana-Florentina; DARABONT, Roxana; ONCIUL, Sebastian; DEACONU, Alexandru; COMANESCU, Ioana; ANDREI, Radu Dan; DRAGOESCU, Bogdan; CINTEZA, Mircea; DOROBANTU, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the predictive value of new cardiovascular (CV) risk factors for CV risk assessment in the adult Romanian hypertensive (HT) population. Methods: Hypertensive adults aged between 40-65 years of age, identified in national representative SEPHAR II survey were evaluated by anthropometric, BP and arterial stiffness measurements: aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVao), aortic augmentation index (AIXao), revers time (RT) and central systolic blood pressure (SBPao), 12 lead ECGs and laboratory workup. Values above the 4th quartile of mean SBP' standard deviation (s.d.) defined increased BP variability. Log(TG/HDL-cholesterol) defined atherogenic index of plasma (AIP). Serum uric acid levels above 5.70 mg/dl for women and 7.0 mg/dl for males defined hyperuricemia (HUA). CV risk was assessed based on SCORE chart for high CV risk countries. Binary logistic regression using a stepwise likelihood ratio method (adjustments for major confounders and colliniarity analysis) was used in order to validate predictors of high and very high CV risk class. Results: The mean SBP value of the study group was 148.46±19.61 mmHg. Over forty percent of hypertensives had a high and very high CV risk. Predictors of high/very high CV risk category validated by regression analysis were: increased visit-to-visit BP variability (OR: 2.49; 95%CI: 1.67-3.73), PWVao (OR: 1.12; 95%CI: 1.02-1.22), RT (OR: 0.95; 95% CI: 0.93-0.98), SBPao (OR: 1.01; 95%CI: 1.01-1.03) and AIP (OR: 7.08; 95%CI: 3.91-12.82). Conclusion: The results of our study suggests that the new CV risk factors such as increased BP variability, arterial stiffness indices and AIP are useful tools for a more accurate identification of hypertensives patients at high and very high CV risk. PMID:25705267

  9. Modern Matrons: can they be easily identified by hospital patients?

    PubMed

    Bufton, Sally

    The Modern Matron was introduced into hospital Trusts in April 2002 to improve the basics of patient care. They were to be easily identifiable, highly visible and authoritative figures. This article reports on a quantitative study done to ascertain if patients can identify the Modern Matron in one acute NHS Trust. A researcher-developed questionnaire was sent to 20 Modern Matrons and a different questionnaire was distributed to 72 randomly selected patients. The results demonstrated that only 5% of patients surveyed were able to correctly identify the Modern Matron by their uniform. This may be explained by the response from the Modern Matrons when asked how much time was spent with patients; 67% of their normal working day was taken up with management of staff, paperwork and meetings, leaving very little direct patient time.

  10. How Accurate Are Blood (or Breath) Tests for Identifying Self-Reported Heavy Drinking Among People with Alcohol Dependence?

    PubMed Central

    Bertholet, Nicolas; Winter, Michael R.; Cheng, Debbie M.; Samet, Jeffrey H.; Saitz, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Aims Managing patients with alcohol dependence includes assessment for heavy drinking, typically by asking patients. Some recommend biomarkers to detect heavy drinking but evidence of accuracy is limited. Methods Among people with dependence, we assessed the performance of disialo-carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (%dCDT, ≥1.7%), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT, ≥66 U/l), either %dCDT or GGT positive, and breath alcohol (> 0) for identifying 3 self-reported heavy drinking levels: any heavy drinking (≥4 drinks/day or >7 drinks/week for women, ≥5 drinks/day or >14 drinks/week for men), recurrent (≥5 drinks/day on ≥5 days) and persistent heavy drinking (≥5 drinks/day on ≥7 consecutive days). Subjects (n = 402) with dependence and current heavy drinking were referred to primary care and assessed 6 months later with biomarkers and validated self-reported calendar method assessment of past 30-day alcohol use. Results The self-reported prevalence of any, recurrent and persistent heavy drinking was 54, 34 and 17%. Sensitivity of %dCDT for detecting any, recurrent and persistent self-reported heavy drinking was 41, 53 and 66%. Specificity was 96, 90 and 84%, respectively. %dCDT had higher sensitivity than GGT and breath test for each alcohol use level but was not adequately sensitive to detect heavy drinking (missing 34–59% of the cases). Either %dCDT or GGT positive improved sensitivity but not to satisfactory levels, and specificity decreased. Neither a breath test nor GGT was sufficiently sensitive (both tests missed 70–80% of cases). Conclusions Although biomarkers may provide some useful information, their sensitivity is low the incremental value over self-report in clinical settings is questionable. PMID:24740846

  11. Detection and accurate identification of new or emerging bacteria in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Bittar, F; Rolain, J-M

    2010-07-01

    Respiratory infections remain a major threat to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The detection and correct identification of the bacteria implicated in these infections is critical for the therapeutic management of patients. The traditional methods of culture and phenotypic identification of bacteria lack both sensitivity and specificity because many bacteria can be missed and/or misidentified. Molecular analyses have recently emerged as useful means to resolve these problems, including molecular methods for accurate identification or detection of bacteria and molecular methods for evaluation of microbial diversity. These recent molecular technologies have increased the list of new and/or emerging pathogens and epidemic strains associated with CF patients. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of intact cells has also emerged recently as a powerful and rapid method for the routine identification of bacteria in clinical microbiology laboratories and will certainly represent the method of choice also for the routine identification of bacteria in the context of CF. Finally, recent data derived from molecular culture-independent analyses indicate the presence of a previously underestimated, complex microbial community in sputa from CF patients. Interestingly, full genome sequencing of some bacteria frequently recovered from CF patients has highlighted the fact that the lungs of CF patients are hotspots for lateral gene transfer and the adaptation of these ecosystems to a specific chronic condition.

  12. Accurate determination of renal function in patients with intestinal urinary diversions

    SciTech Connect

    McDougal, W.S.; Koch, M.O.

    1986-06-01

    The regular determination of renal function is a critical part of the management of patients who have had the urinary tract reconstructed with intestinal segments. These intestinal segments reabsorb urinary solutes and, thereby, complicate the determination of renal function by conventional methods. Urinary clearances of urea, creatinine and inulin were performed in patients with intestinal segments in the urinary tract and controls under varying diuretic conditions. Patients with intestinal diversions also underwent radioisotopic determination of renal function. The urinary clearances of urea, creatinine and inulin are highly dependent on the rate of urine flow in patients with intestinal segments in the urinary tract. Diuresis maximizes the urinary clearances of these solutes by minimizing intestinal reabsorption. Creatinine clearance prediction from the serum creatinine underestimates true glomerular filtration rate. Radioisotopic determination of renal function correlates poorly with true glomerular filtration rate. Only creatinine clearance measured under diuretic conditions correlates well with true renal function. Urine concentrating ability cannot be assessed accurately in patients with intestinal segments in the urinary tract, since osmolality rapidly equilibrates across the segments.

  13. Identity Management Systems in Healthcare: The Issue of Patient Identifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soenens, Els

    According to a recent recommendation of the European Commission, now is the time for Europe to enhance interoperability in eHealth. Although interoperability of patient identifiers seems promising for matters of patient mobility, patient empowerment and effective access to care, we see that today there is indeed a considerable lack of interoperability in the field of patient identification. Looking from a socio-technical rather than a merely technical point of view, one can understand the fact that the development and implementation of an identity management system in a specific healthcare context is influenced by particular social practices, affected by socio-economical history and the political climate and regulated by specific data protection legislations. Consequently, the process of making patient identification in Europe more interoperable is a development beyond semantic and syntactic levels. In this paper, we gives some examples of today’s patient identifier systems in Europe, discuss the issue of interoperability of (unique) patient identifiers from a socio-technical point of view and try not to ignore the ‘privacy side’ of the story.

  14. Identifying the needs of brain tumor patients and their caregivers.

    PubMed

    Parvataneni, Rupa; Polley, Mei-Yin; Freeman, Teresa; Lamborn, Kathleen; Prados, Michael; Butowski, Nicholas; Liu, Raymond; Clarke, Jennifer; Page, Margaretta; Rabbitt, Jane; Fedoroff, Anne; Clow, Emelia; Hsieh, Emily; Kivett, Valerie; Deboer, Rebecca; Chang, Susan

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the needs of brain tumor patients and their caregivers to provide improved health services to these populations. Two different questionnaires were designed for patients and caregivers. Both questionnaires contained questions pertaining to three realms: disease symptoms/treatment, health care provider, daily living/finances. The caregivers' questionnaires contained an additional domain on emotional needs. Each question was evaluated for the degree of importance and satisfaction. Exploratory analyses determined whether baseline characteristics affect responder importance or satisfaction. Also, areas of high agreement/disagreement in satisfaction between the participating patient-caregiver pairs were identified. Questions for which >50% of the patients and caregivers thought were "very important" but >30% were dissatisfied include: understanding the cause of brain tumors, dealing with patients' lower energy, identifying healthful foods and activities for patients, telephone access to health care providers, information on medical insurance coverage, and support from their employer. In the emotional realm, caregivers identified 9 out of 10 items as important but need further improvement. Areas of high disagreement in satisfaction between participating patient-caregiver pairs include: getting help with household chores (P value = 0.006) and finding time for personal needs (P value < 0.001). This study provides insights into areas to improve services for brain tumor patients and their caregivers. The caregivers' highest amount of burden is placed on their emotional needs, emphasizing the importance of providing appropriate medical and psychosocial support for caregivers to cope with emotional difficulties they face during the patients' treatment process.

  15. Identifying patients with asthma in primary care electronic medical record systems

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Nancy; Wallace, Rebecca; Agarwal, Gina; Chan, David; Gershon, Andrea; Gupta, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop and test a variety of electronic medical record (EMR) search algorithms to allow clinicians to accurately identify their patients with asthma in order to enable improved care. Design A retrospective chart analysis identified 5 relevant unique EMR information fields (electronic disease registry, cumulative patient profile, billing diagnostic code, medications, and chart notes); asthma-related search terms were designated for each field. The accuracy of each term was tested for its ability to identify the asthma patients among all patients whose charts were reviewed. Increasingly sophisticated search algorithms were then designed and evaluated by serially combining individual searches with Boolean operators. Setting Two large academic primary care clinics in Hamilton, Ont. Participants Charts for 600 randomly selected patients aged 16 years and older identified in an initial EMR search as likely having asthma (n = 150), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 150), other respiratory conditions (n = 150), or nonrespiratory conditions (n = 150) were reviewed until 100 patients per category were identified (or until all available names were exhausted). A total of 398 charts were reviewed in full and included. Main outcome measures Sensitivity and specificity of each search for asthma diagnosis (against the reference standard of a physician chart review–based diagnosis). Results Two physicians reviewed the charts identified in the initial EMR search using a standardized data collection form and ascribed the following diagnoses in 398 patients: 112 (28.1%) had asthma, 81 (20.4%) had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 104 (26.1%) had other respiratory conditions, and 101 (25.4%) had nonrespiratory conditions. Concordance between reviewers in chart abstraction diagnosis was high (κ = 0.89, 95% CI 0.80 to 0.97). Overall, the algorithm searching for patients who had asthma in their cumulative patient profiles or for whom an asthma billing code

  16. Accurate patient dosimetry of kilovoltage cone-beam CT in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, George X.; Duggan, Dennis M.; Coffey, Charles W.

    2008-03-15

    The increased utilization of x-ray imaging in image-guided radiotherapy has dramatically improved the radiation treatment and the lives of cancer patients. Daily imaging procedures, such as cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), for patient setup may significantly increase the dose to the patient's normal tissues. This study investigates the dosimetry from a kilovoltage (kV) CBCT for real patient geometries. Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the kV beams from a Varian on-board imager integrated into the Trilogy accelerator. The Monte Carlo calculated results were benchmarked against measurements and good agreement was obtained. The authors developed a novel method to calibrate Monte Carlo simulated beams with measurements using an ionization chamber in which the air-kerma calibration factors are obtained from an Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory. The authors have introduced a new Monte Carlo calibration factor, f{sub MCcal}, which is determined from the calibration procedure. The accuracy of the new method was validated by experiment. When a Monte Carlo simulated beam has been calibrated, the simulated beam can be used to accurately predict absolute dose distributions in the irradiated media. Using this method the authors calculated dose distributions to patient anatomies from a typical CBCT acquisition for different treatment sites, such as head and neck, lung, and pelvis. Their results have shown that, from a typical head and neck CBCT, doses to soft tissues, such as eye, spinal cord, and brain can be up to 8, 6, and 5 cGy, respectively. The dose to the bone, due to the photoelectric effect, can be as much as 25 cGy, about three times the dose to the soft tissue. The study provides detailed information on the additional doses to the normal tissues of a patient from a typical kV CBCT acquisition. The methodology of the Monte Carlo beam calibration developed and introduced in this study allows the user to calculate both relative and absolute

  17. Cocaine withdrawal symptoms identify "Type B" cocaine-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Kampman, Kyle; Dackis, Charles; Sparkman, Thorne; Pettinati, Helen

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies of substance dependence typologies briefly show that multivariate systems originally developed for identifying subtypes of alcoholics, such as Babor's Type A and B system, may also be valid in abusers of other substances, such as cocaine. Type B patients are characterized by an earlier onset of addiction and more severe symptoms of their addiction, psychopathology, and impulsivity. The Type B classification has also been associated with deficits in serotonergic function. We have found that patients who exhibit more severe cocaine withdrawal symptoms, as measured by scores on the Cocaine Selective Severity Assessment (CSSA), have poor treatment outcome and share many characteristics with "Type B" patients. In this paper, we review baseline characteristics of cocaine-dependent patients from several recently completed outpatient cocaine dependence treatment trials to assess the association of cocaine withdrawal symptom severity and the Type B profile. Identifying subtypes of cocaine-dependent patients may improve our ability to treat cocaine dependence by targeting treatments for specific subtypes of patients. We examined the ability of the CSSA scores to capture Type B characteristics in cocaine dependence by analyzing a series of cocaine medication trials that included 255 cocaine-dependent subjects. High CSSA scores at baseline were associated with a history of violent behavior, a family history of substance abuse, antisocial personality disorder, higher addiction severity, and co-morbid psychiatric diseases. Patients with high CSSA scores are also more likely to meet criteria for Type B (Type II) cocaine dependence. Identifying Type B cocaine-dependent patients may help to develop targeted psychosocial or pharmacological treatments for these difficult-to-treat patients.

  18. MRI accurately identifies early murine mammary cancers and reliably differentiates between in situ and invasive cancer: Correlation of MRI with histology

    PubMed Central

    Mustafi, Devkumar; Zamora, Marta; Fan, Xiaobing; Markiewicz, Erica; Mueller, Jeffrey; Conzen, Suzanne D.; Karczmar, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    MRI methods that accurately identify various stages of mouse mammary cancer could provide new knowledge that directly impacts management of breast cancer in patients. This research evaluates whether MRI can accurately follow the progression from in situ to invasive cancer, by evaluating in vivo and ex vivo MRI, and compared to histology as the gold standard for diagnosing and staging cancer. Six C3(1)SV40Tag virgin female mice between the age of 12-16 weeks were studied. At this age, these mice develop in situ cancer that resembles human DCIS. Fast spin echo images of inguinal mammary glands were acquired at 9.4 Tesla. After in vivo MRI, mice were sacrificed; inguinal mammary glands were excised and fixed in formalin for ex vivo MRI. 3D volume-rendered in vivo and ex vivo MR images were then correlated with histology. High resolution ex vivo scans facilitated comparison of in vivo scans with histology. The sizes of mammary cancers classified as in situ based on histology ranged from 150 to 400 microns in largest diameter, and average signal intensity relative to muscle was 1.40±0.18 on T2-weighted images. Cancers classified as invasive based on histology were >400 microns in largest diameter, and average intensity relative to muscle on T2-weighted images was 2.34±0.26. Using a cutoff of 400 microns in largest diameter to distinguish between in situ and invasive cancers, T2-weighted signal intensity of at least 1.4 times that of muscle for in situ cancer, and at least 2.3 times that of muscle for invasive cancer, 96% of in situ and 100% of invasive cancers were correctly identified on in vivo MRI, using histology as the gold standard. Precise MRI-histology correlation demonstrates that MRI reliably detects early in situ cancer and differentiates in situ from invasive cancers in the SV40Tag mouse model of human breast cancer. PMID:26152557

  19. Which Clinician Questions Elicit Accurate Disclosure of Antiretroviral Non-adherence When Talking to Patients?

    PubMed

    Callon, Wynne; Saha, Somnath; Korthuis, P Todd; Wilson, Ira B; Moore, Richard D; Cohn, Jonathan; Beach, Mary Catherine

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated how clinicians assess antiretroviral (ARV) adherence in clinical encounters, and which questions elicit accurate responses. We conducted conversation analysis of audio-recorded encounters between 34 providers and 58 patients reporting ARV non-adherence in post-encounter interviews. Among 42 visits where adherence status was unknown by providers, 4 providers did not discuss ARVs (10 %), 6 discussed ARVs but did not elicit non-adherence disclosure (14 %), and 32 discussed ARVs which prompted disclosure (76 %). Questions were classified as: (1) clarification of medication ("Are you still taking the Combivir?"); (2) broad ("How's it going with your meds?"); (3) positively-framed ("Are you taking your medications regularly?"); (4) negatively-framed ("Have you missed any doses?"). Clinicians asked 75 ARV-related questions: 23 clarification, 12 broad, 17 positively-framed, and 23 negatively-framed. Negatively-framed questions were 3.8 times more likely to elicit accurate disclosure than all other question types (p < 0.0001). Providers can improve disclosure probability by asking directly about missed doses. PMID:26499336

  20. Genome-wide karyomapping accurately identifies the inheritance of single-gene defects in human preimplantation embryos in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Natesan, Senthilkumar A.; Bladon, Alex J.; Coskun, Serdar; Qubbaj, Wafa; Prates, Renata; Munne, Santiago; Coonen, Edith; Dreesen, Joseph C.F.M.; Stevens, Servi J.C.; Paulussen, Aimee D.C.; Stock-Myer, Sharyn E.; Wilton, Leeanda J.; Jaroudi, Souraya; Wells, Dagan; Brown, Anthony P.C.; Handyside, Alan H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Our aim was to compare the accuracy of family- or disease-specific targeted haplotyping and direct mutation-detection strategies with the accuracy of genome-wide mapping of the parental origin of each chromosome, or karyomapping, by single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping of the parents, a close relative of known disease status, and the embryo cell(s) used for preimplantation genetic diagnosis of single-gene defects in a single cell or small numbers of cells biopsied from human embryos following in vitro fertilization. Methods: Genomic DNA and whole-genome amplification products from embryo samples, which were previously diagnosed by targeted haplotyping, were genotyped for single-nucleotide polymorphisms genome-wide detection and retrospectively analyzed blind by karyomapping. Results: Single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping and karyomapping were successful in 213/218 (97.7%) samples from 44 preimplantation genetic diagnosis cycles for 25 single-gene defects with various modes of inheritance distributed widely across the genome. Karyomapping was concordant with targeted haplotyping in 208 (97.7%) samples, and the five nonconcordant samples were all in consanguineous regions with limited or inconsistent haplotyping results. Conclusion: Genome-wide karyomapping is highly accurate and facilitates analysis of the inheritance of almost any single-gene defect, or any combination of loci, at the single-cell level, greatly expanding the range of conditions for which preimplantation genetic diagnosis can be offered clinically without the need for customized test development. PMID:24810687

  1. Unilateral Prostate Cancer Cannot be Accurately Predicted in Low-Risk Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Isbarn, Hendrik; Karakiewicz, Pierre I.; Vogel, Susanne

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Hemiablative therapy (HAT) is increasing in popularity for treatment of patients with low-risk prostate cancer (PCa). The validity of this therapeutic modality, which exclusively treats PCa within a single prostate lobe, rests on accurate staging. We tested the accuracy of unilaterally unremarkable biopsy findings in cases of low-risk PCa patients who are potential candidates for HAT. Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 243 men with clinical stage {<=}T2a, a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration of <10 ng/ml, a biopsy-proven Gleason sum of {<=}6, and a maximum of 2 ipsilateral positive biopsy results out of 10 or more cores. All men underwent a radical prostatectomy, and pathology stage was used as the gold standard. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression models were tested for significant predictors of unilateral, organ-confined PCa. These predictors consisted of PSA, %fPSA (defined as the quotient of free [uncomplexed] PSA divided by the total PSA), clinical stage (T2a vs. T1c), gland volume, and number of positive biopsy cores (2 vs. 1). Results: Despite unilateral stage at biopsy, bilateral or even non-organ-confined PCa was reported in 64% of all patients. In multivariable analyses, no variable could clearly and independently predict the presence of unilateral PCa. This was reflected in an overall accuracy of 58% (95% confidence interval, 50.6-65.8%). Conclusions: Two-thirds of patients with unilateral low-risk PCa, confirmed by clinical stage and biopsy findings, have bilateral or non-organ-confined PCa at radical prostatectomy. This alarming finding questions the safety and validity of HAT.

  2. Patient safety measures in burn care: do National reporting systems accurately reflect quality of burn care?

    PubMed

    Mandell, Samuel P; Robinson, Ellen F; Cooper, Claudette L; Klein, Matthew B; Gibran, Nicole S

    2010-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been placed on quality of care metrics and patient safety. Groups such as the University Health-System Consortium (UHC) collect and review patient safety data, monitor healthcare facilities, and often report data using mortality and complication rates as outcomes. The purpose of this study was to analyze the UHC database to determine if it differentiates quality of care across burn centers. We reviewed UHC clinical database (CDB) fields and available data from 2006 to 2008 for the burn product line. Based on the September 2008 American Burn Association (ABA) list of verified burn centers, we categorized centers as American Burn Association-verified burn centers, self-identified burn centers, and other centers that are not burn units but admit some burn patients. We compared total burn admissions, risk pool, complication rates, and mortality rates. Overall mortality was compared between the UHC and National Burn Repository. The UHC CDB provides fields for number of admissions, % intensive care unit admission, risk pool, length of stay, complication profiles, and mortality index. The overall numbers of burn patients in the database for the study period included 17,740 patients admitted to verified burn centers (mean 631 admissions/burn center/yr or per 2 years), 10,834 for self-identified burn centers (mean 437 admissions/burn center/yr or per 2 years), and 1,487 for other centers (mean 11.5 admissions/burn center/yr or per 2 years). Reported complication rates for verified burn centers (21.6%), self-identified burn centers (21.3%), and others (20%) were similar. Mortality rates were highest for self-identified burn centers (3.06%), less for verified centers (2.88%), and lowest for other centers (0.74%). However, these outcomes data may be misleading, because the risk pool criteria do not include burn-specific risk factors, and the inability to adjust for injury severity prevents rigorous comparison across centers. Databases such as the

  3. Clinical assessment tools identify functional deficits in fragility fracture patients

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Tyler D; Wee, Corinne E; Le, Khoi M; Wang, Tiffany L; Bishop, Julie Y; Phieffer, Laura S; Quatman, Carmen E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify inexpensive, noninvasive, portable, clinical assessment tools that can be used to assess functional performance measures that may put older patients at risk for falls such as balance, handgrip strength, and lumbopelvic control. Patients and methods Twenty fragility fracture patients and 21 healthy control subjects were evaluated using clinical assessment tools (Nintendo Wii Balance Board [WBB], a handheld dynamometer, and an application for the Apple iPod Touch, the Level Belt) that measure functional performance during activity of daily living tasks. The main outcome measurements were balance (WBB), handgrip strength (handheld dynamometer), and lumbopelvic control (iPod Touch Level Belt), which were compared between fragility fracture patients and healthy controls. Results Fragility fracture patients had lower scores on the vertical component of the WBB Torso Twist task (P=0.042) and greater medial–lateral lumbopelvic sway during a 40 m walk (P=0.026) when compared to healthy controls. Unexpectedly, the fracture patients had significantly higher scores on the left leg (P=0.020) and total components (P=0.010) of the WBB Single Leg Stand task as well as less faults during the left Single Leg Stand task (P=0.003). Conclusion The clinical assessment tools utilized in this study are relatively inexpensive and portable tools of performance measures capable of detecting differences in postural sway between fragility fracture patients and controls. PMID:27217738

  4. Patient Identified Disease Burden in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nicholas E; Quinn, Christine; Eastwood, Eileen; Tawil, Rabi; Heatwole, Chad R

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The multitude of symptoms associated with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) disease burden are of varying importance. The extent of these symptoms and their cumulative effect on the FSHD population is unknown. Methods We conducted interviews with adult FSHD patients to identify which symptoms have the greatest effect on their lives. Each interview was recorded, transcribed, coded, and analyzed using a qualitative framework technique, triangulation, and 3-investigator consensus approach. Results 1375 quotes were obtained through 20 patient interviews. 251 symptoms of importance were identified representing 14 themes of FSHD disease burden. Symptoms associated with mobility impairment, activity limitation, and social role limitation were most frequently mentioned by participants. Conclusions There are multiple themes and symptoms, some previously under-recognized, that play a key role in FSHD disease burden. PMID:23225386

  5. ZCURVE 3.0: identify prokaryotic genes with higher accuracy as well as automatically and accurately select essential genes.

    PubMed

    Hua, Zhi-Gang; Lin, Yan; Yuan, Ya-Zhou; Yang, De-Chang; Wei, Wen; Guo, Feng-Biao

    2015-07-01

    In 2003, we developed an ab initio program, ZCURVE 1.0, to find genes in bacterial and archaeal genomes. In this work, we present the updated version (i.e. ZCURVE 3.0). Using 422 prokaryotic genomes, the average accuracy was 93.7% with the updated version, compared with 88.7% with the original version. Such results also demonstrate that ZCURVE 3.0 is comparable with Glimmer 3.02 and may provide complementary predictions to it. In fact, the joint application of the two programs generated better results by correctly finding more annotated genes while also containing fewer false-positive predictions. As the exclusive function, ZCURVE 3.0 contains one post-processing program that can identify essential genes with high accuracy (generally >90%). We hope ZCURVE 3.0 will receive wide use with the web-based running mode. The updated ZCURVE can be freely accessed from http://cefg.uestc.edu.cn/zcurve/ or http://tubic.tju.edu.cn/zcurveb/ without any restrictions. PMID:25977299

  6. ZCURVE 3.0: identify prokaryotic genes with higher accuracy as well as automatically and accurately select essential genes.

    PubMed

    Hua, Zhi-Gang; Lin, Yan; Yuan, Ya-Zhou; Yang, De-Chang; Wei, Wen; Guo, Feng-Biao

    2015-07-01

    In 2003, we developed an ab initio program, ZCURVE 1.0, to find genes in bacterial and archaeal genomes. In this work, we present the updated version (i.e. ZCURVE 3.0). Using 422 prokaryotic genomes, the average accuracy was 93.7% with the updated version, compared with 88.7% with the original version. Such results also demonstrate that ZCURVE 3.0 is comparable with Glimmer 3.02 and may provide complementary predictions to it. In fact, the joint application of the two programs generated better results by correctly finding more annotated genes while also containing fewer false-positive predictions. As the exclusive function, ZCURVE 3.0 contains one post-processing program that can identify essential genes with high accuracy (generally >90%). We hope ZCURVE 3.0 will receive wide use with the web-based running mode. The updated ZCURVE can be freely accessed from http://cefg.uestc.edu.cn/zcurve/ or http://tubic.tju.edu.cn/zcurveb/ without any restrictions.

  7. Identifying and managing patients with delirium in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Bond, Penny; Goudie, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is an acute medical emergency affecting about one in eight acute hospital inpatients. It is associated with poor outcomes, is more prevalent in older people and it is estimated that half of all patients receiving intensive care or surgery for a hip fracture will be affected. Despite its prevalence and impact, delirium is not reliably identified or well managed. Improving the identification and management of patients with delirium has been a focus for the national improving older people's acute care work programme in NHS Scotland. A delirium toolkit has been developed, which includes the 4AT rapid assessment test, information for patients and carers and a care bundle for managing delirium based on existing guidance. This toolkit has been tested and implemented by teams from a range of acute care settings to support improvements in the identification and immediate management of delirium.

  8. High Concentrations of Measles Neutralizing Antibodies and High-Avidity Measles IgG Accurately Identify Measles Reinfection Cases

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Jennifer S.; Hickman, Carole J.; Mercader, Sara; Redd, Susan; McNall, Rebecca J.; Williams, Nobia; McGrew, Marcia; Walls, M. Laura; Rota, Paul A.; Bellini, William J.

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, approximately 9% of the measles cases reported from 2012 to 2014 occurred in vaccinated individuals. Laboratory confirmation of measles in vaccinated individuals is challenging since IgM assays can give inconclusive results. Although a positive reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay result from an appropriately timed specimen can provide confirmation, negative results may not rule out a highly suspicious case. Detection of high-avidity measles IgG in serum samples provides laboratory evidence of a past immunologic response to measles from natural infection or immunization. High concentrations of measles neutralizing antibody have been observed by plaque reduction neutralization (PRN) assays among confirmed measles cases with high-avidity IgG, referred to here as reinfection cases (RICs). In this study, we evaluated the utility of measuring levels of measles neutralizing antibody to distinguish RICs from noncases by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Single and paired serum samples with high-avidity measles IgG from suspected measles cases submitted to the CDC for routine surveillance were used for the analysis. The RICs were confirmed by a 4-fold rise in PRN titer or by RT-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay, while the noncases were negative by both assays. Discrimination accuracy was high with serum samples collected ≥3 days after rash onset (area under the curve, 0.953; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.854 to 0.993). Measles neutralizing antibody concentrations of ≥40,000 mIU/ml identified RICs with 90% sensitivity (95% CI, 74 to 98%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 82 to 100%). Therefore, when serological or RT-qPCR results are unavailable or inconclusive, suspected measles cases with high-avidity measles IgG can be confirmed as RICs by measles neutralizing antibody concentrations of ≥40,000 mIU/ml. PMID:27335386

  9. Genomic Models of Short-Term Exposure Accurately Predict Long-Term Chemical Carcinogenicity and Identify Putative Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Gusenleitner, Daniel; Auerbach, Scott S.; Melia, Tisha; Gómez, Harold F.; Sherr, David H.; Monti, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite an overall decrease in incidence of and mortality from cancer, about 40% of Americans will be diagnosed with the disease in their lifetime, and around 20% will die of it. Current approaches to test carcinogenic chemicals adopt the 2-year rodent bioassay, which is costly and time-consuming. As a result, fewer than 2% of the chemicals on the market have actually been tested. However, evidence accumulated to date suggests that gene expression profiles from model organisms exposed to chemical compounds reflect underlying mechanisms of action, and that these toxicogenomic models could be used in the prediction of chemical carcinogenicity. Results In this study, we used a rat-based microarray dataset from the NTP DrugMatrix Database to test the ability of toxicogenomics to model carcinogenicity. We analyzed 1,221 gene-expression profiles obtained from rats treated with 127 well-characterized compounds, including genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. We built a classifier that predicts a chemical's carcinogenic potential with an AUC of 0.78, and validated it on an independent dataset from the Japanese Toxicogenomics Project consisting of 2,065 profiles from 72 compounds. Finally, we identified differentially expressed genes associated with chemical carcinogenesis, and developed novel data-driven approaches for the molecular characterization of the response to chemical stressors. Conclusion Here, we validate a toxicogenomic approach to predict carcinogenicity and provide strong evidence that, with a larger set of compounds, we should be able to improve the sensitivity and specificity of the predictions. We found that the prediction of carcinogenicity is tissue-dependent and that the results also confirm and expand upon previous studies implicating DNA damage, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, and regenerative pathology in the response to carcinogen exposure. PMID:25058030

  10. High Concentrations of Measles Neutralizing Antibodies and High-Avidity Measles IgG Accurately Identify Measles Reinfection Cases.

    PubMed

    Sowers, Sun B; Rota, Jennifer S; Hickman, Carole J; Mercader, Sara; Redd, Susan; McNall, Rebecca J; Williams, Nobia; McGrew, Marcia; Walls, M Laura; Rota, Paul A; Bellini, William J

    2016-08-01

    In the United States, approximately 9% of the measles cases reported from 2012 to 2014 occurred in vaccinated individuals. Laboratory confirmation of measles in vaccinated individuals is challenging since IgM assays can give inconclusive results. Although a positive reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay result from an appropriately timed specimen can provide confirmation, negative results may not rule out a highly suspicious case. Detection of high-avidity measles IgG in serum samples provides laboratory evidence of a past immunologic response to measles from natural infection or immunization. High concentrations of measles neutralizing antibody have been observed by plaque reduction neutralization (PRN) assays among confirmed measles cases with high-avidity IgG, referred to here as reinfection cases (RICs). In this study, we evaluated the utility of measuring levels of measles neutralizing antibody to distinguish RICs from noncases by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Single and paired serum samples with high-avidity measles IgG from suspected measles cases submitted to the CDC for routine surveillance were used for the analysis. The RICs were confirmed by a 4-fold rise in PRN titer or by RT-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay, while the noncases were negative by both assays. Discrimination accuracy was high with serum samples collected ≥3 days after rash onset (area under the curve, 0.953; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.854 to 0.993). Measles neutralizing antibody concentrations of ≥40,000 mIU/ml identified RICs with 90% sensitivity (95% CI, 74 to 98%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 82 to 100%). Therefore, when serological or RT-qPCR results are unavailable or inconclusive, suspected measles cases with high-avidity measles IgG can be confirmed as RICs by measles neutralizing antibody concentrations of ≥40,000 mIU/ml. PMID:27335386

  11. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound improves accurate identification of appendiceal mucinous adenocarcinoma in an old patient

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jing; Ruan, Li-tao; Dang, Ying; Wang, Yun-yue; Song, Yan; Lian, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Adenocarcinoma of appendiceal origin is far rarer than other colorectal carcinomas and its preoperative diagnosis is challenging. To our knowledge, utility of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) to diagnose it is much less. Method: A 61-year-old man presented with abdominal pain in the right lower quadrant for 20 days. In order to fulfill an accurately preoperative diagnosis, he received laboratory and imaging tests such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), computer tomography (CT), CEUS and endoscope. Diagnosis and Intervention: He was initially suspected of suffering appendicitis, while his white blood cell count was normal and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in serum was remarkably increased. Both routine ultrasound and computer tomography (CT) examinations supported suppurative appendicitis. The overall data, however, failed to excluded neoplastic pathology thoroughly. Therefore, CEUS was carried out and showed an inhomogeneous enhancement intra the lesion located in the body of the appendix, which made our consideration of neoplasm. The result of the follow-up biopsy guided by endoscope was consistent with appendiceal tumor. The patient received laparoscopic right hemicolectomy. Histopathology confirmed as well differentiated mucinous adenocarcinoma of appendix origin. His postoperative course was uneventful, and he had a regular diet again without any complaint. Result: Serum CEA was remarkably increased (12.00 ng/mL). Both routine ultrasound and CT examinations supported suppurative appendicitis. However, CEUS examination showed an inhomogeneous enhancement intra the lesion located in the body of the appendix, which made our consideration of neoplasm. The follow-up biopsy guided by endoscope and surgical specimens confirmed as well differentiated mucinous adenocarcinoma of appendix origin. Conclusion: Most mucinous adenocarcinoma mimicking appendicitis results in difficult diagnosis preoperatively. Clinician and radiologist should be

  12. Rare variant mutations identified in pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rampersaud, Evadnie; Siegfried, Jill D; Norton, Nadine; Li, Duanxiang; Martin, Eden; Hershberger, Ray E

    2010-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in infants and children can be partially explained by genetic cause but the catalogue of known genes is limited. We reviewed our database of 41 cases diagnosed with DCM before 18 years of age who underwent detailed clinical and genetic evaluation, and summarize here the evidence for mutations causing DCM in these cases from 15 genes (PSEN1, PSEN2, CSRP3, LBD3, MYH7, SCN5A, TCAP, TNNT2, LMNA, MYBPC3, MYH6, TNNC1, TNNI3, TPM1, and RBM20). Thirty-five of the 41 pediatric cases had relatives with adult-onset DCM. More males (66%) were found among children diagnosed after 1 year of age with DCM. Nineteen mutations in 9 genes were identified among 15 out of 41 patients; 3 patients (diagnosed at ages 2 weeks, 9 and 13 years) had multiple mutations. Of the 19 mutations identified in 12 families, mutations in TPM1 (32%) and TNNT2 (21%) were the most commonly found. Of the 6 patients diagnosed before 1 year of age, 3 had mutations in TPM1 (including a set of identical twins), 1 in TNNT2, 1 in MYH7, and 1 with multiple mutations (MYH7 and TNNC1). Most DCM was accompanied by advanced heart failure and need for cardiac transplantation. We conclude that in some cases pediatric DCM has a genetic basis, which is complicated by allelic and locus heterogeneity as seen in adult-onset DCM. We suggest that future prospective comprehensive family-based genetic studies of pediatric DCM are indicated to further define mutation frequencies in known genes and to discover novel genetic cause. PMID:21483645

  13. Rare variant mutations identified in pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Rampersaud, Evadnie; Siegfried, Jill D; Norton, Nadine; Li, Duanxiang; Martin, Eden; Hershberger, Ray E

    2011-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in infants and children can be partially explained by genetic cause but the catalogue of known genes is limited. We reviewed our database of 41 cases diagnosed with DCM before 18 years of age who underwent detailed clinical and genetic evaluation, and summarize here the evidence for mutations causing DCM in these cases from 15 genes (PSEN1, PSEN2, CSRP3, LBD3, MYH7, SCN5A, TCAP, TNNT2, LMNA, MYBPC3, MYH6, TNNC1, TNNI3, TPM1, and RBM20). Thirty-five of the 41 pediatric cases had relatives with adult-onset DCM. More males (66%) were found among children diagnosed after 1 year of age with DCM. Nineteen mutations in 9 genes were identified among 15 out of 41 patients; 3 patients (diagnosed at ages 2 weeks, 9 and 13 years) had multiple mutations. Of the 19 mutations identified in 12 families, mutations in TPM1 (32%) and TNNT2 (21%) were the most commonly found. Of the 6 patients diagnosed before 1 year of age, 3 had mutations in TPM1 (including a set of identical twins), 1 in TNNT2, 1 in MYH7, and 1 with multiple mutations (MYH7 and TNNC1). Most DCM was accompanied by advanced heart failure and need for cardiac transplantation. We conclude that in some cases pediatric DCM has a genetic basis, which is complicated by allelic and locus heterogeneity as seen in adult-onset DCM. We suggest that future prospective comprehensive family-based genetic studies of pediatric DCM are indicated to further define mutation frequencies in known genes and to discover novel genetic cause. PMID:21483645

  14. How Accurate Are Patients at Diagnosing the Cause of Their Knee Pain With the Help of a Web-based Symptom Checker?

    PubMed Central

    Bisson, Leslie J.; Komm, Jorden T.; Bernas, Geoffrey A.; Fineberg, Marc S.; Marzo, John M.; Rauh, Michael A.; Smolinski, Robert J.; Wind, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Researching medical information is the third most popular activity online, and there are a variety of web-based symptom checker programs available. Purpose: This study evaluated a patient’s ability to self-diagnose their knee pain from a list of possible diagnoses supplied by an accurate symptom checker. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: All patients older than 18 years who presented to the office of 7 different fellowship-trained sports medicine surgeons over an 8-month period with a complaint of knee pain were asked to participate. A web-based symptom checker for knee pain was used; the program has a reported accuracy of 89%. The symptom checker generates a list of potential diagnoses after patients enter symptoms and links each diagnosis to informative content. After exploring the informative content, patients selected all diagnoses they felt could explain their symptoms. Each patient was later examined by a physician who was blinded to the differential generated by the program as well as the patient-selected diagnoses. A blinded third party compared the diagnoses generated by the program with those selected by the patient as well as the diagnoses determined by the physician. The level of matching between the patient-selected diagnoses and the physician’s diagnoses determined the patient’s ability to correctly diagnose their knee pain. Results: There were 163 male and 165 female patients, with a mean age of 48 years (range, 18-76 years). The program generated a mean 6.6 diagnoses (range, 2-15) per patient. Each patient had a mean 1.7 physician diagnoses (range, 1-4). Patients selected a mean 2 diagnoses (range, 1-9). The patient-selected diagnosis matched the physician’s diagnosis 58% of the time. Conclusion: With the aid of an accurate symptom checker, patients were able to correctly identify the cause of their knee pain 58% of the time. PMID:26962542

  15. My patient is injured: identifying foreign bodies with ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Lewis, David; Jivraj, Aman; Atkinson, Paul; Jarman, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Patients commonly present to the emergency department with a suspected retained foreign body, following penetrating injury. While plain radiography is often the first line in identifying radio-opaque foreign bodies, radiolucent foreign bodies such as wood and plastic can easily be missed. Furthermore, real-time visualization of such a foreign body can assist in its removal. This article evaluates the use of point-of-care ultrasound by emergency physicians in the identification and removal of soft-tissue foreign bodies along with describing the appropriate technique and highlighting the potential pitfalls. An illustrated case example is presented that highlights the benefits of point-of-care ultrasound foreign body detection and guided removal. PMID:27433254

  16. Identifying Patients with Depression Using Free-text Clinical Documents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Baughman, Amy W; Lei, Victor J; Lai, Kenneth H; Navathe, Amol S; Chang, Frank; Sordo, Margarita; Topaz, Maxim; Zhong, Feiran; Murrali, Madhavan; Navathe, Shamkant; Rocha, Roberto A

    2015-01-01

    About 1 in 10 adults are reported to exhibit clinical depression and the associated personal, societal, and economic costs are significant. In this study, we applied the MTERMS NLP system and machine learning classification algorithms to identify patients with depression using discharge summaries. Domain experts reviewed both the training and test cases, and classified these cases as depression with a high, intermediate, and low confidence. For depression cases with high confidence, all of the algorithms we tested performed similarly, with MTERMS' knowledge-based decision tree slightly better than the machine learning classifiers, achieving an F-measure of 89.6%. MTERMS also achieved the highest F-measure (70.6%) on intermediate confidence cases. The RIPPER rule learner was the best performing machine learning method, with an F-measure of 70.0%, and a higher precision but lower recall than MTERMS. The proposed NLP-based approach was able to identify a significant portion of the depression cases (about 20%) that were not on the coded diagnosis list.

  17. Identifying Patients with Depression Using Free-text Clinical Documents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Baughman, Amy W; Lei, Victor J; Lai, Kenneth H; Navathe, Amol S; Chang, Frank; Sordo, Margarita; Topaz, Maxim; Zhong, Feiran; Murrali, Madhavan; Navathe, Shamkant; Rocha, Roberto A

    2015-01-01

    About 1 in 10 adults are reported to exhibit clinical depression and the associated personal, societal, and economic costs are significant. In this study, we applied the MTERMS NLP system and machine learning classification algorithms to identify patients with depression using discharge summaries. Domain experts reviewed both the training and test cases, and classified these cases as depression with a high, intermediate, and low confidence. For depression cases with high confidence, all of the algorithms we tested performed similarly, with MTERMS' knowledge-based decision tree slightly better than the machine learning classifiers, achieving an F-measure of 89.6%. MTERMS also achieved the highest F-measure (70.6%) on intermediate confidence cases. The RIPPER rule learner was the best performing machine learning method, with an F-measure of 70.0%, and a higher precision but lower recall than MTERMS. The proposed NLP-based approach was able to identify a significant portion of the depression cases (about 20%) that were not on the coded diagnosis list. PMID:26262127

  18. Identifying Causal Risk Factors for Violence among Discharged Patients

    PubMed Central

    Coid, Jeremy W.; Kallis, Constantinos; Doyle, Mike; Shaw, Jenny; Ullrich, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Background Structured Professional Judgement (SPJ) is routinely administered in mental health and criminal justice settings but cannot identify violence risk above moderate accuracy. There is no current evidence that violence can be prevented using SPJ. This may be explained by routine application of predictive instead of causal statistical models when standardising SPJ instruments. Methods We carried out a prospective cohort study of 409 male and female patients discharged from medium secure services in England and Wales to the community. Measures were taken at baseline (pre-discharge), 6 and 12 months post-discharge using the Historical, Clinical and Risk-20 items version 3 (HCR-20v3) and Structural Assessment of Protective Factors (SAPROF). Information on violence was obtained via the McArthur community violence instrument and the Police National Computer. Results In a lagged model, HCR-20v3 and SAPROF items were poor predictors of violence. Eight items of the HCR-20v3 and 4 SAPROF items did not predict violent behaviour better than chance. In re-analyses considering temporal proximity of risk/ protective factors (exposure) on violence (outcome), risk was elevated due to violent ideation (OR 6.98, 95% CI 13.85–12.65, P<0.001), instability (OR 5.41, 95% CI 3.44–8.50, P<0.001), and poor coping/ stress (OR 8.35, 95% CI 4.21–16.57, P<0.001). All 3 risk factors were explanatory variables which drove the association with violent outcome. Self-control (OR 0.13, 95% CI 0.08–0.24, P<0.001) conveyed protective effects and explained the association of other protective factors with violence. Conclusions Using two standardised SPJ instruments, predictive (lagged) methods could not identify risk and protective factors which must be targeted in interventions for discharged patients with severe mental illness. Predictive methods should be abandoned if the aim is to progress from risk assessment to effective risk management and replaced by methods which identify factors

  19. Parallel bacterial evolution within multiple patients identifies candidate pathogenicity genes

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Tami D.; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Aingaran, Mythili; Potter-Bynoe, Gail; Roux, Damien; Davis, Michael R.; Skurnik, David; Leiby, Nicholas; LiPuma, John J.; Goldberg, Joanna B.; McAdam, Alexander J.; Priebe, Gregory P.; Kishony, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens evolve during the infection of their human hosts1-8, but separating adaptive and neutral mutations remains challenging9-11. Here, we identify bacterial genes under adaptive evolution by tracking recurrent patterns of mutations in the same pathogenic strain during the infection of multiple patients. We conducted a retrospective study of a Burkholderia dolosa outbreak among people with cystic fibrosis, sequencing the genomes of 112 isolates collected from 14 individuals over 16 years. We find that 17 bacterial genes acquired non-synonymous mutations in multiple individuals, which indicates parallel adaptive evolution. Mutations in these genes illuminate the genetic basis of important pathogenic phenotypes, including antibiotic resistance and bacterial membrane composition, and implicate oxygen-dependent gene regulation as paramount in lung infections. Several genes have not been previously implicated in pathogenesis, suggesting new therapeutic targets. The identification of parallel molecular evolution suggests key selection forces acting on pathogens within humans and can help predict and prepare for their future evolutionary course. PMID:22081229

  20. Patient-Specific Orbital Implants: Development and Implementation of Technology for More Accurate Orbital Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Podolsky, Dale J; Mainprize, James G; Edwards, Glenn P; Antonyshyn, Oleh M

    2016-01-01

    Fracture of the orbital floor is commonly seen in facial trauma. Accurate anatomical reconstruction of the orbital floor contour is challenging. The authors demonstrate a novel method to more precisely reconstruct the orbital floor on a 50-year-old female who sustained an orbital floor fracture following a fall. Results of the reconstruction show excellent reapproximation of the native orbital floor contour and complete resolution of her enopthalmos and facial asymmetry. PMID:26674886

  1. Use of whole-genus genome sequence data to develop a multilocus sequence typing tool that accurately identifies Yersinia isolates to the species and subspecies levels.

    PubMed

    Hall, Miquette; Chattaway, Marie A; Reuter, Sandra; Savin, Cyril; Strauch, Eckhard; Carniel, Elisabeth; Connor, Thomas; Van Damme, Inge; Rajakaruna, Lakshani; Rajendram, Dunstan; Jenkins, Claire; Thomson, Nicholas R; McNally, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The genus Yersinia is a large and diverse bacterial genus consisting of human-pathogenic species, a fish-pathogenic species, and a large number of environmental species. Recently, the phylogenetic and population structure of the entire genus was elucidated through the genome sequence data of 241 strains encompassing every known species in the genus. Here we report the mining of this enormous data set to create a multilocus sequence typing-based scheme that can identify Yersinia strains to the species level to a level of resolution equal to that for whole-genome sequencing. Our assay is designed to be able to accurately subtype the important human-pathogenic species Yersinia enterocolitica to whole-genome resolution levels. We also report the validation of the scheme on 386 strains from reference laboratory collections across Europe. We propose that the scheme is an important molecular typing system to allow accurate and reproducible identification of Yersinia isolates to the species level, a process often inconsistent in nonspecialist laboratories. Additionally, our assay is the most phylogenetically informative typing scheme available for Y. enterocolitica.

  2. Use of Whole-Genus Genome Sequence Data To Develop a Multilocus Sequence Typing Tool That Accurately Identifies Yersinia Isolates to the Species and Subspecies Levels

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Miquette; Chattaway, Marie A.; Reuter, Sandra; Savin, Cyril; Strauch, Eckhard; Carniel, Elisabeth; Connor, Thomas; Van Damme, Inge; Rajakaruna, Lakshani; Rajendram, Dunstan; Jenkins, Claire; Thomson, Nicholas R.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Yersinia is a large and diverse bacterial genus consisting of human-pathogenic species, a fish-pathogenic species, and a large number of environmental species. Recently, the phylogenetic and population structure of the entire genus was elucidated through the genome sequence data of 241 strains encompassing every known species in the genus. Here we report the mining of this enormous data set to create a multilocus sequence typing-based scheme that can identify Yersinia strains to the species level to a level of resolution equal to that for whole-genome sequencing. Our assay is designed to be able to accurately subtype the important human-pathogenic species Yersinia enterocolitica to whole-genome resolution levels. We also report the validation of the scheme on 386 strains from reference laboratory collections across Europe. We propose that the scheme is an important molecular typing system to allow accurate and reproducible identification of Yersinia isolates to the species level, a process often inconsistent in nonspecialist laboratories. Additionally, our assay is the most phylogenetically informative typing scheme available for Y. enterocolitica. PMID:25339391

  3. Identification of a 251 Gene Expression Signature That Can Accurately Detect M. tuberculosis in Patients with and without HIV Co-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dawany, Noor; Showe, Louise C.; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Chang, Celia; Ive, Prudence; Conradie, Francesca; Stevens, Wendy; Sanne, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Background Co-infection with tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death in HIV-infected individuals. However, diagnosis of TB, especially in the presence of an HIV co-infection, can be limiting due to the high inaccuracy associated with the use of conventional diagnostic methods. Here we report a gene signature that can identify a tuberculosis infection in patients co-infected with HIV as well as in the absence of HIV. Methods We analyzed global gene expression data from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples of patients that were either mono-infected with HIV or co-infected with HIV/TB and used support vector machines to identify a gene signature that can distinguish between the two classes. We then validated our results using publically available gene expression data from patients mono-infected with TB. Results Our analysis successfully identified a 251-gene signature that accurately distinguishes patients co-infected with HIV/TB from those infected with HIV only, with an overall accuracy of 81.4% (sensitivity = 76.2%, specificity = 86.4%). Furthermore, we show that our 251-gene signature can also accurately distinguish patients with active TB in the absence of an HIV infection from both patients with a latent TB infection and healthy controls (88.9–94.7% accuracy; 69.2–90% sensitivity and 90.3–100% specificity). We also demonstrate that the expression levels of the 251-gene signature diminish as a correlate of the length of TB treatment. Conclusions A 251-gene signature is described to (a) detect TB in the presence or absence of an HIV co-infection, and (b) assess response to treatment following anti-TB therapy. PMID:24587128

  4. Massively parallel sequencing of the mouse exome to accurately identify rare, induced mutations: an immediate source for thousands of new mouse models.

    PubMed

    Andrews, T D; Whittle, B; Field, M A; Balakishnan, B; Zhang, Y; Shao, Y; Cho, V; Kirk, M; Singh, M; Xia, Y; Hager, J; Winslade, S; Sjollema, G; Beutler, B; Enders, A; Goodnow, C C

    2012-05-01

    Accurate identification of sparse heterozygous single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) is a critical challenge for identifying the causative mutations in mouse genetic screens, human genetic diseases and cancer. When seeking to identify causal DNA variants that occur at such low rates, they are overwhelmed by false-positive calls that arise from a range of technical and biological sources. We describe a strategy using whole-exome capture, massively parallel DNA sequencing and computational analysis, which identifies with a low false-positive rate the majority of heterozygous and homozygous SNVs arising de novo with a frequency of one nucleotide substitution per megabase in progeny of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-mutated C57BL/6j mice. We found that by applying a strategy of filtering raw SNV calls against known and platform-specific variants we could call true SNVs with a false-positive rate of 19.4 per cent and an estimated false-negative rate of 21.3 per cent. These error rates are small enough to enable calling a causative mutation from both homozygous and heterozygous candidate mutation lists with little or no further experimental validation. The efficacy of this approach is demonstrated by identifying the causative mutation in the Ptprc gene in a lymphocyte-deficient strain and in 11 other strains with immune disorders or obesity, without the need for meiotic mapping. Exome sequencing of first-generation mutant mice revealed hundreds of unphenotyped protein-changing mutations, 52 per cent of which are predicted to be deleterious, which now become available for breeding and experimental analysis. We show that exome sequencing data alone are sufficient to identify induced mutations. This approach transforms genetic screens in mice, establishes a general strategy for analysing rare DNA variants and opens up a large new source for experimental models of human disease.

  5. Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and accurate feeling-of-knowing judgments.

    PubMed

    Lakein, D A; Fantie, B D; Grafman, J; Ross, S; O'Fallon, A; Dale, J; Straus, S E

    1997-11-01

    Many Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) patients complain of memory impairments which have been difficult to document empirically. Subjective complaints of memory impairment may be due to a deficit in metamemory judgment. CFS patients and matched controls were tested with a computerized Trivia Information Quiz that required them to rate their confidence about correctly recognizing an answer in a multiple choice format that they had been unable to remember in a fact-recall format. Even though CFS patients reported significantly greater amounts of fatigue, cognitive, and physical symptoms, the accuracy of their confidence levels and recognition responses were similar to controls. This finding suggests that a metamemory deficit is not the cause of the memory problems reported by CFS patients.

  6. Can radiation therapy treatment planning system accurately predict surface doses in postmastectomy radiation therapy patients?

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Sharon; Back, Michael; Tan, Poh Wee; Lee, Khai Mun; Baggarley, Shaun; Lu, Jaide Jay

    2012-07-01

    Skin doses have been an important factor in the dose prescription for breast radiotherapy. Recent advances in radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and new treatment schemes such as hypofractionated breast therapy have made the precise determination of the surface dose necessary. Detailed information of the dose at various depths of the skin is also critical in designing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of surface dose calculation by a clinically used treatment planning system and those measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) in a customized chest wall phantom. This study involved the construction of a chest wall phantom for skin dose assessment. Seven TLDs were distributed throughout each right chest wall phantom to give adequate representation of measured radiation doses. Point doses from the CMS Xio Registered-Sign treatment planning system (TPS) were calculated for each relevant TLD positions and results correlated. There were no significant difference between measured absorbed dose by TLD and calculated doses by the TPS (p > 0.05 (1-tailed). Dose accuracy of up to 2.21% was found. The deviations from the calculated absorbed doses were overall larger (3.4%) when wedges and bolus were used. 3D radiotherapy TPS is a useful and accurate tool to assess the accuracy of surface dose. Our studies have shown that radiation treatment accuracy expressed as a comparison between calculated doses (by TPS) and measured doses (by TLD dosimetry) can be accurately predicted for tangential treatment of the chest wall after mastectomy.

  7. Why Patient Matching Is a Challenge: Research on Master Patient Index (MPI) Data Discrepancies in Key Identifying Fields.

    PubMed

    Just, Beth Haenke; Marc, David; Munns, Megan; Sandefer, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Patient identification matching problems are a major contributor to data integrity issues within electronic health records. These issues impede the improvement of healthcare quality through health information exchange and care coordination, and contribute to deaths resulting from medical errors. Despite best practices in the area of patient access and medical record management to avoid duplicating patient records, duplicate records continue to be a significant problem in healthcare. This study examined the underlying causes of duplicate records using a multisite data set of 398,939 patient records with confirmed duplicates and analyzed multiple reasons for data discrepancies between those record matches. The field that had the greatest proportion of mismatches (nondefault values) was the middle name, accounting for 58.30 percent of mismatches. The Social Security number was the second most frequent mismatch, occurring in 53.54 percent of the duplicate pairs. The majority of the mismatches in the name fields were the result of misspellings (53.14 percent in first name and 33.62 percent in last name) or swapped last name/first name, first name/middle name, or last name/middle name pairs. The use of more sophisticated technologies is critical to improving patient matching. However, no amount of advanced technology or increased data capture will completely eliminate human errors. Thus, the establishment of policies and procedures (such as standard naming conventions or search routines) for front-end and back-end staff to follow is foundational for the overall data integrity process. Training staff on standard policies and procedures will result in fewer duplicates created on the front end and more accurate duplicate record matching and merging on the back end. Furthermore, monitoring, analyzing trends, and identifying errors that occur are proactive ways to identify data integrity issues. PMID:27134610

  8. Why Patient Matching Is a Challenge: Research on Master Patient Index (MPI) Data Discrepancies in Key Identifying Fields

    PubMed Central

    Just, Beth Haenke; Marc, David; Munns, Megan; Sandefer, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Patient identification matching problems are a major contributor to data integrity issues within electronic health records. These issues impede the improvement of healthcare quality through health information exchange and care coordination, and contribute to deaths resulting from medical errors. Despite best practices in the area of patient access and medical record management to avoid duplicating patient records, duplicate records continue to be a significant problem in healthcare. This study examined the underlying causes of duplicate records using a multisite data set of 398,939 patient records with confirmed duplicates and analyzed multiple reasons for data discrepancies between those record matches. The field that had the greatest proportion of mismatches (nondefault values) was the middle name, accounting for 58.30 percent of mismatches. The Social Security number was the second most frequent mismatch, occurring in 53.54 percent of the duplicate pairs. The majority of the mismatches in the name fields were the result of misspellings (53.14 percent in first name and 33.62 percent in last name) or swapped last name/first name, first name/middle name, or last name/middle name pairs. The use of more sophisticated technologies is critical to improving patient matching. However, no amount of advanced technology or increased data capture will completely eliminate human errors. Thus, the establishment of policies and procedures (such as standard naming conventions or search routines) for front-end and back-end staff to follow is foundational for the overall data integrity process. Training staff on standard policies and procedures will result in fewer duplicates created on the front end and more accurate duplicate record matching and merging on the back end. Furthermore, monitoring, analyzing trends, and identifying errors that occur are proactive ways to identify data integrity issues. PMID:27134610

  9. Accurate Monitoring Leads to Effective Control and Greater Learning of Patient Education Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawson, Katherine A.; O'Neil, Rochelle; Dunlosky, John

    2011-01-01

    Effective management of chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes) can depend on the extent to which patients can learn and remember disease-relevant information. In two experiments, we explored a technique motivated by theories of self-regulated learning for improving people's learning of information relevant to managing a chronic disease. Materials were…

  10. Accurate Risk Assessment of Patients with Asymptomatic Hematuria for the Presence of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Eugene K.; Tirsar, Lenuta-Ancuta; Schwentner, Christian; Hennenlotter, Joerg; Christos, Paul J.; Stenzl, Arnulf; Mian, Christine; Martini, Thomas; Pycha, Armin; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Schmitz-Dräger, Bernd J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Bladder cancer is frequently diagnosed during a workup for hematuria. However, most patients with microscopic hematuria and many with gross hematuria are not appropriately referred to urologists. We hypothesized that in patients presenting with asymptomatic hematuria, the risk of having bladder cancer can be predicted with high accuracy. Towards this end, we analyzed risk factors in patients with asymptomatic hematuria and developed a nomogram for the prediction of bladder cancer presence. Methods Data from 1,182 consecutive subjects without a history of bladder cancer undergoing initial evaluation for asymptomatic hematuria were collected at three centers. Clinical risk factors including age, gender, smoking status, and degree of hematuria were recorded. All subjects underwent standard workup including voided cytology, upper tract imaging, and cystourethroscopy. Factors associated with the presence of bladder cancer were evaluated by univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses. The multivariable analysis was used to construct a nomogram. Internal validation was performed using 200 bootstrap samples. Results Of the 1,182 subjects who presented with asymptomatic hematuria, 245 (20.7%) had bladder cancer. Increasing age (OR=1.03, p<0.0001), smoking history (OR=3.72, p<0.0001), gross hematuria (OR=1.71, p=0.002), and positive cytology (OR=14.71, p<0.0001) were independent predictors of bladder cancer presence. The multivariable model achieved 83.1% accuracy for predicting the presence of bladder cancer. Conclusions Bladder cancer presence can be predicted with high accuracy in patients who present with asymptomatic hematuria. We developed a nomogram to help optimize referral patterns (i.e., timing and prioritization) of patients with asymptomatic hematuria. PMID:23124847

  11. Patient-reported outcomes 3 months after spine surgery: is it an accurate predictor of 12-month outcome in real-world registry platforms?

    PubMed

    Parker, Scott L; Asher, Anthony L; Godil, Saniya S; Devin, Clinton J; McGirt, Matthew J

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT The health care landscape is rapidly shifting to incentivize quality of care rather than quantity of care. Quality and outcomes registry platforms lie at the center of all emerging evidence-driven reform models and will be used to inform decision makers in health care delivery. Obtaining real-world registry outcomes data from patients 12 months after spine surgery remains a challenge. The authors set out to determine whether 3-month patient-reported outcomes accurately predict 12-month outcomes and, hence, whether 3-month measurement systems suffice to identify effective versus noneffective spine care. METHODS All patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery for degenerative disease at a single medical institution over a 2-year period were enrolled in a prospective longitudinal registry. Patient-reported outcome instruments (numeric rating scale [NRS], Oswestry Disability Index [ODI], 12-Item Short Form Health Survey [SF-12], EQ-5D, and the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale) were recorded prospectively at baseline and at 3 months and 12 months after surgery. Linear regression was performed to determine the independent association of 3- and 12-month outcome. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to determine whether improvement in general health state (EQ-5D) and disability (ODI) at 3 months accurately predicted improvement and achievement of minimum clinical important difference (MCID) at 12 months. RESULTS A total of 593 patients undergoing elective lumbar surgery were included in the study. There was a significant correlation between 3-month and 12-month EQ-5D (r = 0.71; p < 0.0001) and ODI (r = 0.70; p < 0.0001); however, the authors observed a sizable discrepancy in achievement of a clinically significant improvement (MCID) threshold at 3 versus 12 months on an individual patient level. For postoperative disability (ODI), 11.5% of patients who achieved an MCID threshold at 3 months dropped below this threshold at 12 months; 10

  12. Robust and Accurate Modeling Approaches for Migraine Per-Patient Prediction from Ambulatory Data

    PubMed Central

    Pagán, Josué; Irene De Orbe, M.; Gago, Ana; Sobrado, Mónica; Risco-Martín, José L.; Vivancos Mora, J.; Moya, José M.; Ayala, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is one of the most wide-spread neurological disorders, and its medical treatment represents a high percentage of the costs of health systems. In some patients, characteristic symptoms that precede the headache appear. However, they are nonspecific, and their prediction horizon is unknown and pretty variable; hence, these symptoms are almost useless for prediction, and they are not useful to advance the intake of drugs to be effective and neutralize the pain. To solve this problem, this paper sets up a realistic monitoring scenario where hemodynamic variables from real patients are monitored in ambulatory conditions with a wireless body sensor network (WBSN). The acquired data are used to evaluate the predictive capabilities and robustness against noise and failures in sensors of several modeling approaches. The obtained results encourage the development of per-patient models based on state-space models (N4SID) that are capable of providing average forecast windows of 47 min and a low rate of false positives. PMID:26134103

  13. Identifying Elements of Patient-Centered Care in Underserved Populations: A Qualitative Study of Patient Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Sheela; Hasnain, Memoona; Vadakumchery, Tracy; Hamad, Judy; Shah, Raveena; Hoersch, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Patient-centered care is an important goal in the delivery of healthcare. However, many patients do not engage in preventive medical care. In this pilot study, we conducted twenty in depth, semi-structured qualitative interviews at the University of Illinois at Chicago Health Sciences campus in a four month time frame. Many patients were underserved and underinsured, and we wanted to understand their experiences in the healthcare system. Using content analysis, several themes emerged from the interview data. Participants discussed the need for empathy and rapport with their providers. They identified provider behaviors that fostered a positive clinical relationship, including step-by step explanations of procedures, attention to body language and clinic atmosphere, and appropriate time management. Participants identified cost as the most common barrier to engaging in preventive care and discussed children and social support as motivating factors. A long-term relationship with a provider was an important motivator for preventive care, suggesting that the therapeutic alliance was essential to many patients. Conversely, many participants discussed a sense of dehumanization in the healthcare system, reporting that their life circumstances were overlooked, or that they were judged based on insurance status or ethnicity. We discuss implications for provider training and healthcare delivery, including the importance of patient-centered medical homes. PMID:25993110

  14. Identifying elements of patient-centered care in underserved populations: a qualitative study of patient perspectives.

    PubMed

    Raja, Sheela; Hasnain, Memoona; Vadakumchery, Tracy; Hamad, Judy; Shah, Raveena; Hoersch, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Patient-centered care is an important goal in the delivery of healthcare. However, many patients do not engage in preventive medical care. In this pilot study, we conducted twenty in depth, semi-structured qualitative interviews at the University of Illinois at Chicago Health Sciences campus in a four month time frame. Many patients were underserved and underinsured, and we wanted to understand their experiences in the healthcare system. Using content analysis, several themes emerged from the interview data. Participants discussed the need for empathy and rapport with their providers. They identified provider behaviors that fostered a positive clinical relationship, including step-by step explanations of procedures, attention to body language and clinic atmosphere, and appropriate time management. Participants identified cost as the most common barrier to engaging in preventive care and discussed children and social support as motivating factors. A long-term relationship with a provider was an important motivator for preventive care, suggesting that the therapeutic alliance was essential to many patients. Conversely, many participants discussed a sense of dehumanization in the healthcare system, reporting that their life circumstances were overlooked, or that they were judged based on insurance status or ethnicity. We discuss implications for provider training and healthcare delivery, including the importance of patient-centered medical homes. PMID:25993110

  15. The index of orthognathic functional treatment need accurately prioritises those patients already selected for orthognathic surgery within the NHS.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rupal; Breeze, John; Chand, Mohit; Stockton, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The index of orthognathic functional treatment need (IOFTN) is a newly-proposed system to help to prioritise patients for orthognathic treatment. The five categories are similar to those used in orthodontics, but include additional parameters such as sleep apnoea and facial asymmetry. The aim of this audit was to validate the index and find out the potential future implications, should such a system ever be adopted by commissioners. We calculated the IOFTN category of 100 consecutive patients who had orthognathic surgery between 2010-14 using clinical notes, photographs, study models, and radiographs, and determined the number in categories 4 or 5, analogous to the current indications for orthodontic treatment within the NHS. Sufficient clinical information was available to categorise 59/100 patients, and 56 of the 59 (95%) were in either category 4 or 5. All three of the remaining patients (in categories 1-3) who were operated on were treated because of the anticipated favourable impact on their quality of life. The IOFTN has been proposed for use in future commissioning of orthognathic services within the NHS, and this study has confirmed its efficacy in prioritising treatment accurately, with 95% of patients being in categories 4 or 5. We recommend that the orthognathic treatment index be adapted to include additional psychosocial assessment so that patients who fall into the lower functional categories are not automatically excluded from this potentially life-changing treatment.

  16. Identifying the patient in George W Lambert's Chesham Street

    PubMed Central

    Hammerschlag, Keren Rosa

    2013-01-01

    This paper takes as its focus one of the Edwardian period's most dramatic and little-understood paintings of a medical examination: George Washington Lambert's Chesham Street (1910). The painting shows an upper-class male patient lifting his shirt to reveal a muscular torso for examination by the doctor in the scene and the viewers outside it. The subject of a medical examination, I argue, legitimised the scrutiny of exposed male flesh and offered an opportunity for sensual pleasure between men. By way of a comparison with other portraits of the artist from around the same period, I interpret Chesham Street as a patient self-portrait, which reveals the artist's dual personalities of bohemian artist and Australian boxer: two personae that did not combine seamlessly, as revealed by the composite nature of the patient in Chesham Street. From a discussion of the artist as patient, I move to an analysis of other self-portraits by Lambert in which the artist is shown flexing his muscles, especially in the context of his passion for boxing. I consider how these portraits serve as complex inscriptions of illness and health and how this relates to the experience of living and working as an Australian expatriate artist in London in the early twentieth century. PMID:23349514

  17. Is the new GFR equation using inulin clearance a more accurate method for Asian patients?

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom Seok; Lee, Yong Kyu; Choi, Hoon Young; Choi, Seung Ok; Shin, Sug Kyun; Ha, Sung Kyu; Lee, Kang Wook; Kim, Yang Wook; Kim, Yong Lim; Yasuda, Yoshinari; Imai, Enyu; Horio, Masaru; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Matsuo, Seiichi; Lee, Ho Yung

    2015-12-01

    Recently, a new glomerular filtration rate (GFR) equation for the Japanese population was proposed using measured inulin clearance. To expand its applicability to other Asian populations, we performed a comparative study in the Korean population. Inulin clearance was measured in 166 patients from seven participating medical centers in Korea. Patient's sera and urine were collected, and baseline clinical characteristics were measured to provide an estimated GFR (eGFR) by the Japanese GFR equation using inulin clearance (Japanese-GFR equation), the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study equation, and the Chronic Kidney Disease - Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. We compared the results to determine which equation best estimated the measured GFR (mGFR). Accuracy (95% CI) within 30% of mGFR by the Japanese-GFR equation, the CKD-EPI equation and the MDRD study equation were 66 (58 - 72), 51 (43 - 58), and 55 (47 - 62)%, respectively. Bias (mGFR minus eGFR) were 3.4 ± 22.4, -12.0 ± 22.1, and -9.7 ± 23.8 mL/min/1.73 m2, respectively. The accuracy of the Japanese-GFR equation was significantly better than MDRD study equation in subjects with mGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and in total subjects. The bias of the Japanese-GFR equation was significantly smaller compared with other two equations in total subjects. The Japanese-GFR equation has a higher accuracy with less bias than the other equations in estimating GFR in Korean populations. Further studies are required to determine if the current Japanese-GFR equation could represent the standard eGFR for other Asian populations.

  18. Network Modeling Identifies Patient-specific Pathways in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Tuncbag, Nurcan; Milani, Pamela; Pokorny, Jenny L.; Johnson, Hannah; Sio, Terence T.; Dalin, Simona; Iyekegbe, Dennis O.; White, Forest M.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Fraenkel, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive type of malignant human brain tumor. Molecular profiling experiments have revealed that these tumors are extremely heterogeneous. This heterogeneity is one of the principal challenges for developing targeted therapies. We hypothesize that despite the diverse molecular profiles, it might still be possible to identify common signaling changes that could be targeted in some or all tumors. Using a network modeling approach, we reconstruct the altered signaling pathways from tumor-specific phosphoproteomic data and known protein-protein interactions. We then develop a network-based strategy for identifying tumor specific proteins and pathways that were predicted by the models but not directly observed in the experiments. Among these hidden targets, we show that the ERK activator kinase1 (MEK1) displays increased phosphorylation in all tumors. By contrast, protein numb homolog (NUMB) is present only in the subset of the tumors that are the most invasive. Additionally, increased S100A4 is associated with only one of the tumors. Overall, our results demonstrate that despite the heterogeneity of the proteomic data, network models can identify common or tumor specific pathway-level changes. These results represent an important proof of principle that can improve the target selection process for tumor specific treatments. PMID:27354287

  19. Voxel-based registration of simulated and real patient CBCT data for accurate dental implant pose estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, António H. J.; Queirós, Sandro; Morais, Pedro; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; Correia, André Ricardo; Fernandes, Valter; Pinho, A. C. M.; Fonseca, Jaime C.; Vilaça, João. L.

    2015-03-01

    The success of dental implant-supported prosthesis is directly linked to the accuracy obtained during implant's pose estimation (position and orientation). Although traditional impression techniques and recent digital acquisition methods are acceptably accurate, a simultaneously fast, accurate and operator-independent methodology is still lacking. Hereto, an image-based framework is proposed to estimate the patient-specific implant's pose using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and prior knowledge of implanted model. The pose estimation is accomplished in a threestep approach: (1) a region-of-interest is extracted from the CBCT data using 2 operator-defined points at the implant's main axis; (2) a simulated CBCT volume of the known implanted model is generated through Feldkamp-Davis-Kress reconstruction and coarsely aligned to the defined axis; and (3) a voxel-based rigid registration is performed to optimally align both patient and simulated CBCT data, extracting the implant's pose from the optimal transformation. Three experiments were performed to evaluate the framework: (1) an in silico study using 48 implants distributed through 12 tridimensional synthetic mandibular models; (2) an in vitro study using an artificial mandible with 2 dental implants acquired with an i-CAT system; and (3) two clinical case studies. The results shown positional errors of 67+/-34μm and 108μm, and angular misfits of 0.15+/-0.08° and 1.4°, for experiment 1 and 2, respectively. Moreover, in experiment 3, visual assessment of clinical data results shown a coherent alignment of the reference implant. Overall, a novel image-based framework for implants' pose estimation from CBCT data was proposed, showing accurate results in agreement with dental prosthesis modelling requirements.

  20. New ZNF644 mutations identified in patients with high myopia

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Xinying; Wang, Tianyun; Tong, Ping; Li, Yunping; Guo, Hui; Wan, Anran; Xia, Lu; Liu, Yanling; Li, Ying; Tian, Qi; Shen, Lu; Cai, Xinzhang; Tian, Lei; Jin, Xuemin; Hu, Zhengmao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Myopia, or near-sightedness, is one of the most common human visual impairments worldwide, and high myopia is one of the leading causes of blindness. In this study, we investigated the mutation spectrum of ZNF644, a causative gene for autosomal dominant high myopia, in a high-myopia cohort from a Chinese population. Methods DNA was isolated with the standard proteinase K digestion and phenol-chloroform method from a case cohort of 186 subjects diagnosed with high myopia (spherical refractive error equal or less than −6.00 diopters). Sanger sequencing was performed to find potential mutations in all coding exons, flanking splicing sites, and untranslated regions (UTRs) of ZNF644 (NM_201269). Identified novel variants were further screened in 526 ethnically matched normal controls. Functional prediction and conservation analysis were performed using ANNOVAR. Results Five novel variants were identified. Three are missense (c.1201A>G:p.T401A, c.2867C>G:p.T956S, c.3833A>G:p.E1278G), one is synonymous (c.2565A>G:p.T855T), and one (c.-219C>A) is located in the 5′ UTR. Functional prediction indicates that c.3833A>G:p.E1278G was predicted to be damaging by SIFT and Polyphen2. Conservation analysis using PhyloP and GERP++ indicate all of the missense variants are highly conserved. None of these novel mutations was identified in 526 normal controls. Conclusions ZNF644 is associated with high myopia in a cohort from a Chinese population. ZNF644 mutations have a minor contribution to the genetic etiology of high myopia. PMID:24991186

  1. SU-E-T-475: An Accurate Linear Model of Tomotherapy MLC-Detector System for Patient Specific Delivery QA

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Mo, X; Chen, M; Olivera, G; Parnell, D; Key, S; Lu, W; Reeher, M; Galmarini, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: An accurate leaf fluence model can be used in applications such as patient specific delivery QA and in-vivo dosimetry for TomoTherapy systems. It is known that the total fluence is not a linear combination of individual leaf fluence due to leakage-transmission, tongue-and-groove, and source occlusion effect. Here we propose a method to model the nonlinear effects as linear terms thus making the MLC-detector system a linear system. Methods: A leaf pattern basis (LPB) consisting of no-leaf-open, single-leaf-open, double-leaf-open and triple-leaf-open patterns are chosen to represent linear and major nonlinear effects of leaf fluence as a linear system. An arbitrary leaf pattern can be expressed as (or decomposed to) a linear combination of the LPB either pulse by pulse or weighted by dwelling time. The exit detector responses to the LPB are obtained by processing returned detector signals resulting from the predefined leaf patterns for each jaw setting. Through forward transformation, detector signal can be predicted given a delivery plan. An equivalent leaf open time (LOT) sinogram containing output variation information can also be inversely calculated from the measured detector signals. Twelve patient plans were delivered in air. The equivalent LOT sinograms were compared with their planned sinograms. Results: The whole calibration process was done in 20 minutes. For two randomly generated leaf patterns, 98.5% of the active channels showed differences within 0.5% of the local maximum between the predicted and measured signals. Averaged over the twelve plans, 90% of LOT errors were within +/−10 ms. The LOT systematic error increases and shows an oscillating pattern when LOT is shorter than 50 ms. Conclusion: The LPB method models the MLC-detector response accurately, which improves patient specific delivery QA and in-vivo dosimetry for TomoTherapy systems. It is sensitive enough to detect systematic LOT errors as small as 10 ms.

  2. Patient Safety Indicators: using administrative data to identify potential patient safety concerns.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M R; Elixhauser, A; Zhan, C; Meyer, G S

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop Patient Safety Indicators (PSI) to identify potential in-hospital patient safety problems for the purpose of quality improvement. DATA SOURCE/STUDY DESIGN: The data source was 2,400,000 discharge records in the 1997 New York State Inpatient Database. PSI algorithms were developed using systematic literature reviews of indicators and hand searches of the ICD-9-CM code book. The prevalence of PSI events and associations between PSI events and patient-level and hospital-level characteristics, length of stay, in-hospital mortality, and hospital charges were examined. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: PSIs were developed for 12 distinct clinical situations and an overall summary measure. The 1997 event rates per 10,000 discharges varied from 1.1 for foreign bodies left during procedure to 84.7 for birth traumas. Discharge records with PSI events had twofold to threefold longer hospital stays, twofold to 20-fold higher rates of in-hospital mortality, and twofold to eightfold higher total charges than records without PSI events. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that PSI events were primarily associated with increasing age (p < .001), hospitals performing more inpatient surgery (p < .001), and hospitals with higher percentage of beds in intensive care units (p < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The PSIs provide an efficient and user-friendly tool to identify potential inhospital patient safety problems for targeted institution-level quality improvement efforts. Until better error-reporting systems are developed the PSIs can serve to shed light on the problem of medical errors not limited solely to mortality because of errors. PMID:16148964

  3. [Expression of bioinformatically identified genes in skin of psoriasis patients].

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    Gene expression analysis for EPHA2 (EPH receptor A2), EPHB2 (EPH receptor B2), S100A9 (S100 calcium binding protein A9), PBEF(nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase), LILRB2 (leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor, subfamily B (with TM and ITIM domains), member 2), PLAUR (plasminogen activator, urokinase receptor), LTB (lymphotoxin beta (TNF superfamily, member 3)), WNT5A (wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 5A) has been conducted using real-time polymerase chain reaction in specimens affected by psoriasis versus visually intact skin in 18 patients. It was revealed that the expression of the nine examined genes was upregulated in the affected by psoriasis compared to visually intact skin specimens. The highest expression was observed for S100A9, S100AS, PBEF, WNT5A2, and EPHB2 genes. S100A9 and S100A8 gene expression in the affected by psoriasis skin was 100-fold higher versus visually intact skin while PBEF, WNT5A, and EPHB2 gene expression was upregulated more than five-fold. We suggested that the high expression of these genes might be associated with the state of the pathological process in psoriasis. Moreover, the transcriptional activity of these genes might serve a molecular indicator of the efficacy of treatment in psoriasis. PMID:25508677

  4. [Expression of bioinformatically identified genes in skin of psoriasis patients].

    PubMed

    Sobolev, V V; Nikol'skaia, T A; Zolotarenko, A D; Piruzian, E S; Bruskin, S A

    2013-10-01

    Gene expression analysis for EPHA2 (EPH receptor A2), EPHB2 (EPH receptor B2), S100A9 (S100 calcium binding protein A9), PBEF(nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase), LILRB2 (leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor, subfamily B (with TM and ITIM domains), member 2), PLAUR (plasminogen activator, urokinase receptor), LTB (lymphotoxin beta (TNF superfamily, member 3)), WNT5A (wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 5A) has been conducted using real-time polymerase chain reaction in specimens affected by psoriasis versus visually intact skin in 18 patients. It was revealed that the expression of the nine examined genes was upregulated in the affected by psoriasis compared to visually intact skin specimens. The highest expression was observed for S100A9, S100AS, PBEF, WNT5A2, and EPHB2 genes. S100A9 and S100A8 gene expression in the affected by psoriasis skin was 100-fold higher versus visually intact skin while PBEF, WNT5A, and EPHB2 gene expression was upregulated more than five-fold. We suggested that the high expression of these genes might be associated with the state of the pathological process in psoriasis. Moreover, the transcriptional activity of these genes might serve a molecular indicator of the efficacy of treatment in psoriasis. PMID:25474898

  5. 42 CFR 484.11 - Condition of participation: Release of patient identifiable OASIS information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... identifiable OASIS information. 484.11 Section 484.11 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Administration § 484.11 Condition of participation: Release of patient identifiable OASIS information. The HHA... confidentiality of all patient identifiable information contained in the clinical record, including OASIS...

  6. 42 CFR 484.11 - Condition of participation: Release of patient identifiable OASIS information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... identifiable OASIS information. 484.11 Section 484.11 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Administration § 484.11 Condition of participation: Release of patient identifiable OASIS information. The HHA... confidentiality of all patient identifiable information contained in the clinical record, including OASIS...

  7. 42 CFR 484.11 - Condition of participation: Release of patient identifiable OASIS information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... identifiable OASIS information. 484.11 Section 484.11 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Administration § 484.11 Condition of participation: Release of patient identifiable OASIS information. The HHA... confidentiality of all patient identifiable information contained in the clinical record, including OASIS...

  8. 42 CFR 484.11 - Condition of participation: Release of patient identifiable OASIS information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... identifiable OASIS information. 484.11 Section 484.11 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Administration § 484.11 Condition of participation: Release of patient identifiable OASIS information. The HHA... confidentiality of all patient identifiable information contained in the clinical record, including OASIS...

  9. 42 CFR 484.11 - Condition of participation: Release of patient identifiable OASIS information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... identifiable OASIS information. 484.11 Section 484.11 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Administration § 484.11 Condition of participation: Release of patient identifiable OASIS information. The HHA... confidentiality of all patient identifiable information contained in the clinical record, including OASIS...

  10. Why Are Some GCSE Examination Questions Harder to Mark Accurately than Others? Using Kelly's Repertory Grid Technique to Identify Relevant Question Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suto, W. M. Irenka; Nadas, Rita

    2009-01-01

    It has long been established that marking accuracy in public examinations varies considerably among subjects and markers. This is unsurprising, given the diverse cognitive strategies that the marking process can entail, but what makes some questions harder to mark accurately than others? Are there distinct but subtle features of questions and…

  11. Can patients identify what triggers their back pain? Secondary analysis of a case-crossover study.

    PubMed

    Parreira, Patricia do Carmo Silva; Maher, Chris G; Latimer, Jane; Steffens, Daniel; Blyth, Fiona; Li, Qiang; Ferreira, Manuela L

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this case-crossover study was to investigate the extent to which patients can accurately nominate what triggered their new episode of sudden-onset acute low back pain (LBP). We interviewed 999 primary care patients to record exposure to 12 standard triggers and also asked the patients to nominate what they believed triggered their LBP. Exposure to the patient-nominated trigger during the case window was compared with exposure in the control window. Conditional logistic regression models were constructed to quantify the risk of LBP onset associated with the patient-nominated trigger. Sensitivity analyses were conducted varying the duration and timing of case/control windows. We compared the extent to which patient-nominated triggers matched standard triggers. The odds ratios for exposure to patient-nominated triggers ranged from 8.60 to 30.00, suggesting that exposure increases the risk of LBP. Patients' understanding of triggers however seems incomplete, as we found evidence that while some of the standard triggers were well recognised (such as lifting heavy loads), others (such as being distracted during manual tasks) were under-recognised as possible triggers of an episode of LBP. This study provides some evidence that patients can accurately nominate the activity that triggered their new episode of sudden-onset acute LBP. PMID:26039901

  12. A novel method to predict visual field progression more accurately, using intraocular pressure measurements in glaucoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Asaoka, Ryo; Fujino, Yuri; Murata, Hiroshi; Miki, Atsuya; Tanito, Masaki; Mizoue, Shiro; Mori, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Katsuyoshi; Yamashita, Takehiro; Kashiwagi, Kenji; Shoji, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Visual field (VF) data were retrospectively obtained from 491 eyes in 317 patients with open angle glaucoma who had undergone ten VF tests (Humphrey Field Analyzer, 24-2, SITA standard). First, mean of total deviation values (mTD) in the tenth VF was predicted using standard linear regression of the first five VFs (VF1-5) through to using all nine preceding VFs (VF1-9). Then an ‘intraocular pressure (IOP)-integrated VF trend analysis’ was carried out by simply using time multiplied by IOP as the independent term in the linear regression model. Prediction errors (absolute prediction error or root mean squared error: RMSE) for predicting mTD and also point wise TD values of the tenth VF were obtained from both approaches. The mTD absolute prediction errors associated with the IOP-integrated VF trend analysis were significantly smaller than those from the standard trend analysis when VF1-6 through to VF1-8 were used (p < 0.05). The point wise RMSEs from the IOP-integrated trend analysis were significantly smaller than those from the standard trend analysis when VF1-5 through to VF1-9 were used (p < 0.05). This was especially the case when IOP was measured more frequently. Thus a significantly more accurate prediction of VF progression is possible using a simple trend analysis that incorporates IOP measurements. PMID:27562553

  13. A novel method to predict visual field progression more accurately, using intraocular pressure measurements in glaucoma patients.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Visual field (VF) data were retrospectively obtained from 491 eyes in 317 patients with open angle glaucoma who had undergone ten VF tests (Humphrey Field Analyzer, 24-2, SITA standard). First, mean of total deviation values (mTD) in the tenth VF was predicted using standard linear regression of the first five VFs (VF1-5) through to using all nine preceding VFs (VF1-9). Then an 'intraocular pressure (IOP)-integrated VF trend analysis' was carried out by simply using time multiplied by IOP as the independent term in the linear regression model. Prediction errors (absolute prediction error or root mean squared error: RMSE) for predicting mTD and also point wise TD values of the tenth VF were obtained from both approaches. The mTD absolute prediction errors associated with the IOP-integrated VF trend analysis were significantly smaller than those from the standard trend analysis when VF1-6 through to VF1-8 were used (p < 0.05). The point wise RMSEs from the IOP-integrated trend analysis were significantly smaller than those from the standard trend analysis when VF1-5 through to VF1-9 were used (p < 0.05). This was especially the case when IOP was measured more frequently. Thus a significantly more accurate prediction of VF progression is possible using a simple trend analysis that incorporates IOP measurements. PMID:27562553

  14. Ultra-deep Illumina sequencing accurately identifies MHC class IIb alleles and provides evidence for copy number variation in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed

    Lighten, Jackie; van Oosterhout, Cock; Paterson, Ian G; McMullan, Mark; Bentzen, Paul

    2014-07-01

    We address the bioinformatic issue of accurately separating amplified genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) from artefacts generated during high-throughput sequencing workflows. We fit observed ultra-deep sequencing depths (hundreds to thousands of sequences per amplicon) of allelic variants to expectations from genetic models of copy number variation (CNV). We provide a simple, accurate and repeatable method for genotyping multigene families, evaluating our method via analyses of 209 b of MHC class IIb exon 2 in guppies (Poecilia reticulata). Genotype repeatability for resequenced individuals (N = 49) was high (100%) within the same sequencing run. However, repeatability dropped to 83.7% between independent runs, either because of lower mean amplicon sequencing depth in the initial run or random PCR effects. This highlights the importance of fully independent replicates. Significant improvements in genotyping accuracy were made by greatly reducing type I genotyping error (i.e. accepting an artefact as a true allele), which may occur when using low-depth allele validation thresholds used by previous methods. Only a small amount (4.9%) of type II error (i.e. rejecting a genuine allele as an artefact) was detected through fully independent sequencing runs. We observed 1-6 alleles per individual, and evidence of sharing of alleles across loci. Variation in the total number of MHC class II loci among individuals, both among and within populations was also observed, and some genotypes appeared to be partially hemizygous; total allelic dosage added up to an odd number of allelic copies. Collectively, observations provide evidence of MHC CNV and its complex basis in natural populations.

  15. The challenging nature of patient identifiers: an ethnographic study of patient identification at a London walk-in centre.

    PubMed

    Lichtner, Valentina; Wilson, Stephanie; Galliers, Julia R

    2008-06-01

    The correct identification of a patient's health record is the foundation of any safe patient record system. There is no building of a ;patient history', no sharing or integration of a patient's data without the retrieval and matching of existing records. Yet there can often be errors in this process and these may remain invisible until a safety incident occurs. This article presents the findings of an ethnographic study of patient identification at a walk-in centre in the UK. We offer a view of patient identifiers as used in practice and show how seemingly simple data, such as a person's name or date of birth, are more complex than they may at first appear and how they potentially pose problems for the use of integrated health records. We further report and discuss a dichotomy between the identifiers needed to access health records and the identifiers used by practitioners in their everyday work.

  16. Identifying risk of hospital readmission among Medicare aged patients: an approach using routinely collected data.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Adria E; Enguídanos, Susan; Wilber, Kathleen H

    2012-01-01

    Readmission provisions in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of March 2010 have created urgent fiscal accountability requirements for hospitals, dependent upon a better understanding of their specific populations, along with development of mechanisms to easily identify these at-risk patients. Readmissions are disruptive and costly to both patients and the health care system. Effectively addressing hospital readmissions among Medicare aged patients offers promising targets for resources aimed at improved quality of care for older patients. Routinely collected data, accessible via electronic medical records, were examined using logistic models of sociodemographic, clinical, and utilization factors to identify predictors among patients who required rehospitalization within 30 days. Specific comorbidities and discharge care orders in this urban, nonprofit hospital had significantly greater odds of predicting a Medicare aged patient's risk of readmission within 30 days. PMID:22656916

  17. Identifying risk of hospital readmission among Medicare aged patients: an approach using routinely collected data.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Adria E; Enguídanos, Susan; Wilber, Kathleen H

    2012-01-01

    Readmission provisions in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of March 2010 have created urgent fiscal accountability requirements for hospitals, dependent upon a better understanding of their specific populations, along with development of mechanisms to easily identify these at-risk patients. Readmissions are disruptive and costly to both patients and the health care system. Effectively addressing hospital readmissions among Medicare aged patients offers promising targets for resources aimed at improved quality of care for older patients. Routinely collected data, accessible via electronic medical records, were examined using logistic models of sociodemographic, clinical, and utilization factors to identify predictors among patients who required rehospitalization within 30 days. Specific comorbidities and discharge care orders in this urban, nonprofit hospital had significantly greater odds of predicting a Medicare aged patient's risk of readmission within 30 days.

  18. Structural and functional screening in human induced-pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes accurately identifies cardiotoxicity of multiple drug types

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, Kimberly R. Talbert, Dominique R.; Trusk, Patricia B.; Moran, Diarmuid M.; Shell, Scott A.; Bacus, Sarah

    2015-05-15

    Safety pharmacology studies that evaluate new drug entities for potential cardiac liability remain a critical component of drug development. Current studies have shown that in vitro tests utilizing human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CM) may be beneficial for preclinical risk evaluation. We recently demonstrated that an in vitro multi-parameter test panel assessing overall cardiac health and function could accurately reflect the associated clinical cardiotoxicity of 4 FDA-approved targeted oncology agents using hiPS-CM. The present studies expand upon this initial observation to assess whether this in vitro screen could detect cardiotoxicity across multiple drug classes with known clinical cardiac risks. Thus, 24 drugs were examined for their effect on both structural (viability, reactive oxygen species generation, lipid formation, troponin secretion) and functional (beating activity) endpoints in hiPS-CM. Using this screen, the cardiac-safe drugs showed no effects on any of the tests in our panel. However, 16 of 18 compounds with known clinical cardiac risk showed drug-induced changes in hiPS-CM by at least one method. Moreover, when taking into account the Cmax values, these 16 compounds could be further classified depending on whether the effects were structural, functional, or both. Overall, the most sensitive test assessed cardiac beating using the xCELLigence platform (88.9%) while the structural endpoints provided additional insight into the mechanism of cardiotoxicity for several drugs. These studies show that a multi-parameter approach examining both cardiac cell health and function in hiPS-CM provides a comprehensive and robust assessment that can aid in the determination of potential cardiac liability. - Highlights: • 24 drugs were tested for cardiac liability using an in vitro multi-parameter screen. • Changes in beating activity were the most sensitive in predicting cardiac risk. • Structural effects add in

  19. Structural and functional screening in human induced-pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes accurately identifies cardiotoxicity of multiple drug types.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Kimberly R; Talbert, Dominique R; Trusk, Patricia B; Moran, Diarmuid M; Shell, Scott A; Bacus, Sarah

    2015-05-15

    Safety pharmacology studies that evaluate new drug entities for potential cardiac liability remain a critical component of drug development. Current studies have shown that in vitro tests utilizing human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CM) may be beneficial for preclinical risk evaluation. We recently demonstrated that an in vitro multi-parameter test panel assessing overall cardiac health and function could accurately reflect the associated clinical cardiotoxicity of 4 FDA-approved targeted oncology agents using hiPS-CM. The present studies expand upon this initial observation to assess whether this in vitro screen could detect cardiotoxicity across multiple drug classes with known clinical cardiac risks. Thus, 24 drugs were examined for their effect on both structural (viability, reactive oxygen species generation, lipid formation, troponin secretion) and functional (beating activity) endpoints in hiPS-CM. Using this screen, the cardiac-safe drugs showed no effects on any of the tests in our panel. However, 16 of 18 compounds with known clinical cardiac risk showed drug-induced changes in hiPS-CM by at least one method. Moreover, when taking into account the Cmax values, these 16 compounds could be further classified depending on whether the effects were structural, functional, or both. Overall, the most sensitive test assessed cardiac beating using the xCELLigence platform (88.9%) while the structural endpoints provided additional insight into the mechanism of cardiotoxicity for several drugs. These studies show that a multi-parameter approach examining both cardiac cell health and function in hiPS-CM provides a comprehensive and robust assessment that can aid in the determination of potential cardiac liability.

  20. The Diagnostic Value of Serum C-Reactive Protein for Identifying Pneumonia in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Respiratory Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Utrillo, Laia; Bielsa, Silvia; Falguera, Miquel; Porcel, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The clinical diagnosis of pneumonia is sometimes difficult since chest radiographs are often indeterminate. In this study, we aimed to assess whether serum C-reactive protein (CRP) could assist in identifying patients with pneumonia. Methods. For one winter, all consecutive patients with acute respiratory symptoms admitted to the emergency ward of a single center were prospectively enrolled. In addition to chest radiographs, basic laboratory tests, and microbiology, serum levels of CRP were measured at entry. Results. A total of 923 (62.3%) of 1473 patients hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms were included. Subjects with a final diagnosis of pneumonia had higher serum CRP levels (median 187 mg/L) than those with exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (63 mg/L) or acute bronchitis (54 mg/L, p < 0.01). CRP was accurate in identifying pneumonia (area under the curve 0.84, 95% CI 0.82–0.87). The multilevel likelihood ratio (LR) for intervals of CRP provided useful information on the posttest probability of having pneumonia. CRP intervals above 200 mg/L were associated with LR+ > 5, for which pneumonia is likely, whereas CRP intervals below 75 mg/L were associated with LR < 0.2, for which pneumonia is unlikely. Conclusion. Serum CRP may be a useful addition for diagnosing pneumonia in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory symptoms.

  1. The Diagnostic Value of Serum C-Reactive Protein for Identifying Pneumonia in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Respiratory Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Utrillo, Laia; Bielsa, Silvia; Falguera, Miquel; Porcel, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The clinical diagnosis of pneumonia is sometimes difficult since chest radiographs are often indeterminate. In this study, we aimed to assess whether serum C-reactive protein (CRP) could assist in identifying patients with pneumonia. Methods. For one winter, all consecutive patients with acute respiratory symptoms admitted to the emergency ward of a single center were prospectively enrolled. In addition to chest radiographs, basic laboratory tests, and microbiology, serum levels of CRP were measured at entry. Results. A total of 923 (62.3%) of 1473 patients hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms were included. Subjects with a final diagnosis of pneumonia had higher serum CRP levels (median 187 mg/L) than those with exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (63 mg/L) or acute bronchitis (54 mg/L, p < 0.01). CRP was accurate in identifying pneumonia (area under the curve 0.84, 95% CI 0.82–0.87). The multilevel likelihood ratio (LR) for intervals of CRP provided useful information on the posttest probability of having pneumonia. CRP intervals above 200 mg/L were associated with LR+ > 5, for which pneumonia is likely, whereas CRP intervals below 75 mg/L were associated with LR < 0.2, for which pneumonia is unlikely. Conclusion. Serum CRP may be a useful addition for diagnosing pneumonia in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory symptoms. PMID:27610265

  2. The Diagnostic Value of Serum C-Reactive Protein for Identifying Pneumonia in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Respiratory Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-González, Agustín; Utrillo, Laia; Bielsa, Silvia; Falguera, Miquel; Porcel, José M

    2016-01-01

    Background. The clinical diagnosis of pneumonia is sometimes difficult since chest radiographs are often indeterminate. In this study, we aimed to assess whether serum C-reactive protein (CRP) could assist in identifying patients with pneumonia. Methods. For one winter, all consecutive patients with acute respiratory symptoms admitted to the emergency ward of a single center were prospectively enrolled. In addition to chest radiographs, basic laboratory tests, and microbiology, serum levels of CRP were measured at entry. Results. A total of 923 (62.3%) of 1473 patients hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms were included. Subjects with a final diagnosis of pneumonia had higher serum CRP levels (median 187 mg/L) than those with exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (63 mg/L) or acute bronchitis (54 mg/L, p < 0.01). CRP was accurate in identifying pneumonia (area under the curve 0.84, 95% CI 0.82-0.87). The multilevel likelihood ratio (LR) for intervals of CRP provided useful information on the posttest probability of having pneumonia. CRP intervals above 200 mg/L were associated with LR+ > 5, for which pneumonia is likely, whereas CRP intervals below 75 mg/L were associated with LR < 0.2, for which pneumonia is unlikely. Conclusion. Serum CRP may be a useful addition for diagnosing pneumonia in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory symptoms. PMID:27610265

  3. Deficient knowledge nursing diagnosis: identifying the learning needs of patients with cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Galdeano, Luzia Elaine; Rossi, Lídia Aparecida; Spadoti Dantas, Rosana Aparecida

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. To identify the learning needs of patients with cardiac disease and the aspects of the disease and anesthetic and surgical procedures about which Brazilian patients have the greatest gaps in knowledge. METHODS. Eighty preoperative patients answered a General Evaluation Questionnaire, a Questionnaire to Evaluate Patient Knowledge, and the Mini-Mental State Exam. FINDINGS. Fifty-nine patients had learning needs. More than 50% of the patients were mistaken or unable to answer questions about the disease, and the goals of and type of surgery to be performed and anesthesia to be used. CONCLUSIONS. Most patients had poor performance on the questionnaire that assessed their knowledge about coronary artery disease and its treatment. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS. This study can contribute to health professionals' assessment of patients' knowledge.

  4. Social Work Admission Assessment Tool for Identifying Patients in Need of Comprehensive Social Work Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boutin-Foster, Carla; Euster, Sona; Rolon, Yvette; Motal, Athena; BeLue, Rhonda; Kline, Robin; Charlson, Mary E.

    2005-01-01

    Early identification of patients who need a social work evaluation is integral to effective discharge planning. This article describes the development and application of the Social Work Admission Assessment Tool (SWAAT), a six-item scale that identifies patients with complicated discharge needs who require a social work evaluation. It addresses…

  5. A Comprehensive Approach to Identifying Intervention Targets for Patient-Safety Improvement in a Hospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Thomas R.; Geller, E. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Despite differences in approaches to organizational problem solving, healthcare managers and organizational behavior management (OBM) practitioners share a number of practices, and connecting healthcare management with OBM may lead to improvements in patient safety. A broad needs-assessment methodology was applied to identify patient-safety…

  6. Identifying priority actions for improving patient satisfaction with outpatient cancer care.

    PubMed

    Gesell, Sabina B; Gregory, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    In parallel to developing new cancer therapies, the healthcare community has the responsibility of creating positive treatment experiences for patients. Data from 5907 cancer outpatients treated at 23 hospitals across the United States were analyzed to identify the top priorities for service improvement in outpatient cancer treatment facilities. They included meeting patients' emotional needs, providing information to patients and family members, reducing waiting times, and providing convenience and coordinated care among physicians and other care providers.

  7. Using Learning Analytics to Identify Medical Student Misconceptions in an Online Virtual Patient Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poitras, Eric G.; Naismith, Laura M.; Doleck, Tenzin; Lajoie, Susanne P.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify misconceptions in medical student knowledge by mining user interactions in the MedU online learning environment. Data from 13000 attempts at a single virtual patient case were extracted from the MedU MySQL database. A subgroup discovery method was applied to identify patterns in learner-generated annotations and…

  8. Legal and ethical considerations in processing patient-identifiable data without patient consent: lessons learnt from developing a disease register.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Charlotte L; Cook, Gary A; Jones, Michael A

    2007-05-01

    The legal requirements and justifications for collecting patient-identifiable data without patient consent were examined. The impetus for this arose from legal and ethical issues raised during the development of a population-based disease register. Numerous commentaries and case studies have been discussing the impact of the Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA1998) and Caldicott principles of good practice on the uses of personal data. But uncertainty still remains about the legal requirements for processing patient-identifiable data without patient consent for research purposes. This is largely owing to ignorance, or misunderstandings of the implications of the common law duty of confidentiality and section 60 of the Health and Social Care Act 2001. The common law duty of confidentiality states that patient-identifiable data should not be provided to third parties, regardless of compliance with the DPA1998. It is an obligation derived from case law, and is open to interpretation. Compliance with section 60 ensures that collection of patient-identifiable data without patient consent is lawful despite the duty of confidentiality. Fears regarding the duty of confidentiality have resulted in a common misconception that section 60 must be complied with. Although this is not the case, section 60 support does provide the most secure basis in law for collecting such data. Using our own experience in developing a disease register as a backdrop, this article will clarify the procedures, risks and potential costs of applying for section 60 support.

  9. Barriers Prevent Patient Access to Personalized Therapies Identified by Molecular Tumor Profiling of Gynecologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, R. Tyler; Ward, Kristy; Saenz, Cheryl; McHale, Michael; Plaxe, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study was designed to evaluate the ability of commercial molecular tumor profiling to discover actionable mutations and to identify barriers that might prevent patient access to personalized therapies. Methods. We conducted an IRB-approved retrospective review of 26 patients with gynecologic malignancies who underwent commercial tumor profiling at our institution during the first 18 months of test availability. Tumor profiles reported targeted therapies and clinical trials matched to patient-specific mutations. Data analysis consisted of descriptive statistics. Results. Most patients who underwent tumor profiling had serous epithelial ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube carcinoma (46%). Patients underwent profiling after undergoing a median of two systemic therapies (range 0 to 13). A median of one targeted therapy was suggested per patient profile. Tumor profiling identified no clinically actionable mutations for seven patients (27%). Six patients sought insurance approval for a targeted therapy and two were declined (33%). One patient (4%) received a targeted therapy and this was discontinued due to tumor progression. Conclusions. There are formidable barriers to targeted therapy for patients with gynecologic malignancies. These barriers include a dearth of FDA-approved targeted agents for gynecologic malignancies, lack of third party insurance coverage and limited geographic availability of clinical trials. PMID:26011384

  10. Polymerase chain reaction amplifying mycobacterial DNA from aspirates obtained by endoscopic ultrasound allows accurate diagnosis of mycobacterial disease in HIV-positive patients with abdominal lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Nieuwoudt, Martin; Lameris, Roeland; Corcoran, Craig; Rossouw, Theresa M; Slavik, Tomas; Du Plessis, Johannie; Omoshoro-Jones, Jones A O; Stivaktas, Paraskevi; Potgieter, Fritz; Van der Merwe, Schalk W

    2014-09-01

    Abdominal lymphadenopathy in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection remains a diagnostic challenge. We performed a prospective cohort study by recruiting 31 symptomatic HIV + patients with abdominal lymphadenopathy and assessing the diagnostic yield of endoscopic ultrasound fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). Mean age was 38 years; 52% were female; and mean CD4 count and viral load were 124 cells/μL and 4 log, respectively. EUS confirmed additional mediastinal nodes in 26%. The porta hepatis was the most common abdominal site. Aspirates obtained by EUS-FNA were subjected to cytology, culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. Mycobacterial infections were confirmed in 67.7%, and 31% had reactive lymphadenopathy. Cytology and culture had low sensitivity, whereas PCR identified 90% of mycobacterial infections. By combining the appearance of aspirates obtained by EUS-FNA and cytologic specimens, we developed a diagnostic algorithm to indicate when analysis with PCR would be useful. PCR performed on material obtained by EUS-FNA was highly accurate in confirming mycobacterial disease and determining genotypic drug resistance.

  11. Patient safety in plastic surgery: identifying areas for quality improvement efforts.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; McDonald, Kathryn M; Rhoads, Kim F; Curtin, Catherine M

    2015-05-01

    Improving quality of health care is a global priority. Before quality benchmarks are established, we first must understand rates of adverse events (AEs). This project assessed risk-adjusted rates of inpatient AEs for soft tissue reconstructive procedures.Patients receiving soft tissue reconstructive procedures from 2005 to 2010 were extracted from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Inpatient AEs were identified using patient safety indicators (PSIs), established measures developed by Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.We identified 409,991 patients with soft tissue reconstruction and 16,635 (4.06%) had a PSI during their hospital stay. Patient safety indicators were associated with increased risk-adjusted mortality, longer length of stay, and decreased routine disposition (P < 0.01). Patient characteristics associated with a higher risk-adjusted rate per 1000 patients at risk included older age, men, nonwhite, and public payer (P < 0.05). Overall, plastic surgery patients had significantly lower risk-adjusted rate compared to other surgical inpatients for all events evaluated except for failure to rescue and postoperative hemorrhage or hematoma, which were not statistically different. Risk-adjusted rates of hematoma hemorrhage were significantly higher in patients receiving size-reduction surgery, and these rates were further accentuated when broken down by sex and payer. In general, plastic surgery patients had lower rates of in-hospital AEs than other surgical disciplines, but PSIs were not uncommon. With the establishment of national basal PSI rates in plastic surgery patients, benchmarks can be devised and target areas for quality improvement efforts identified. Further prospective studies should be designed to elucidate the drivers of AEs identified in this population.

  12. A peculiar aspect of patients' safety: the discriminating power of identifiers for record linkage.

    PubMed

    Quantin, Catherine; Binquet, Christine; Bourquard, Karima; Pattisina, Ronny; Gouyon-Cornet, Béatrice; Ferdynus, Cyril; Gouyon, Jean-Bernard; Allaert, François-André

    2004-01-01

    Today, one of the main stake of the interfaced health information systems or networks is to be able to gather the different parts of the medical record of a patient without any risk to mix them with those of one other patient. This objective could appear easy to reach but only in theory because in practice many name are misspelled or erroneous and a great attention has to be paid to define what is the best identifier to link medical record. As a linkage using less informative identifiers could lead to linkage errors, it is essential to quantify the information associated to each identifier. The aim of this study was to estimate the discriminating power of different identifiers susceptible to be used in a record linkage process. This work showed the interest of three identifiers when linking data concerning a same patient using an automatic procedure based on the method proposed by Jaro; the date of birth, the first and the last names seemed to be the more appropriate identifiers. Including a poorly discriminating identifier like gender did not improve the results. Moreover, adding a second christian name, often missing, increased linkage errors. On the contrary, it seemed that using a phonetic treatment adapted to the French language could improve the results of linkage in comparison to the Soundex. However, whatever, the method used it seems necessary to improve the quality of identifier collection as it could greatly influence linkage results.

  13. Absolute Measurements of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor and Interleukin-1-β mRNA Levels Accurately Predict Treatment Response in Depressed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Clarissa; Uher, Rudolf; Bocchio-Chiavetto, Luisella; Riva, Marco Andrea; Pariante, Carmine M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increased levels of inflammation have been associated with a poorer response to antidepressants in several clinical samples, but these findings have had been limited by low reproducibility of biomarker assays across laboratories, difficulty in predicting response probability on an individual basis, and unclear molecular mechanisms. Methods: Here we measured absolute mRNA values (a reliable quantitation of number of molecules) of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor and interleukin-1β in a previously published sample from a randomized controlled trial comparing escitalopram vs nortriptyline (GENDEP) as well as in an independent, naturalistic replication sample. We then used linear discriminant analysis to calculate mRNA values cutoffs that best discriminated between responders and nonresponders after 12 weeks of antidepressants. As Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor and interleukin-1β might be involved in different pathways, we constructed a protein-protein interaction network by the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins. Results: We identified cutoff values for the absolute mRNA measures that accurately predicted response probability on an individual basis, with positive predictive values and specificity for nonresponders of 100% in both samples (negative predictive value=82% to 85%, sensitivity=52% to 61%). Using network analysis, we identified different clusters of targets for these 2 cytokines, with Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor interacting predominantly with pathways involved in neurogenesis, neuroplasticity, and cell proliferation, and interleukin-1β interacting predominantly with pathways involved in the inflammasome complex, oxidative stress, and neurodegeneration. Conclusion: We believe that these data provide a clinically suitable approach to the personalization of antidepressant therapy: patients who have absolute mRNA values above the suggested cutoffs could be directed toward earlier access to more

  14. Clinical Workflow Observations to Identify Opportunities for Nurse, Physicians and Patients to Share a Patient-centered Plan of Care

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Sarah A.; Gazarian, Priscilla; Stade, Diana; McNally, Kelly; Morrison, Conny; Ohashi, Kumiko; Lehmann, Lisa; Dalal, Anuj; Bates, David W.; Dykes, Patricia C.

    2014-01-01

    Patient- and Family-Centered Care (PFCC) is essential for high quality care in the critical and acute-specialty care hospital setting. Effective PFCC requires clinicians to form an integrated interprofessional team to collaboratively engage with the patient/family and contribute to a shared patient-centered plan of care. We conducted observations on a critical care and specialty unit to understand the plan of care activities and workflow documentation requirements for nurses and physicians to inform the development of a shared patient-centered plan of care to support patient engagement. We identified siloed plan of care documentation, with workflow opportunities to converge the nurses plan of care with the physician planned To-do lists and quality and safety checklists. Integration of nurses and physicians plan of care activities into a shared plan of care is a feasible and valuable step toward interprofessional teams that effectively engage patients in plan of care activities. PMID:25954345

  15. Molecular testing of 163 patients with Morquio A (Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA) identifies 39 novel GALNS mutations.

    PubMed

    Morrone, A; Tylee, K L; Al-Sayed, M; Brusius-Facchin, A C; Caciotti, A; Church, H J; Coll, M J; Davidson, K; Fietz, M J; Gort, L; Hegde, M; Kubaski, F; Lacerda, L; Laranjeira, F; Leistner-Segal, S; Mooney, S; Pajares, S; Pollard, L; Ribeiro, I; Wang, R Y; Miller, N

    2014-06-01

    Morquio A (Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA; MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by partial or total deficiency of the enzyme galactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS; also known as N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase) encoded by the GALNS gene. Patients who inherit two mutated GALNS gene alleles have a decreased ability to degrade the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) keratan sulfate and chondroitin 6-sulfate, thereby causing GAG accumulation within lysosomes and consequently pleiotropic disease. GALNS mutations occur throughout the gene and many mutations are identified only in single patients or families, causing difficulties both in mutation detection and interpretation. In this study, molecular analysis of 163 patients with Morquio A identified 99 unique mutations in the GALNS gene believed to negatively impact GALNS protein function, of which 39 are previously unpublished, together with 26 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Recommendations for the molecular testing of patients, clear reporting of sequence findings, and interpretation of sequencing data are provided.

  16. Molecular Testing of 163 Patients with Morquio A (Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA) Identifies 39 Novel GALNS Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Morrone, A; Tylee, K.L.; Al-Sayed, M; Brusius-Facchin, A.C.; Caciotti, A.; Church, H.J.; Coll, M.J.; Davidson, K.; Fietz, M.J.; Gort, L.; Hegde, M.; Kubaski, F.; Lacerda, L.; Laranjeira, F.; Leistner-Segal, S.; Mooney, S.; Pajares, S.; Pollard, L.; Riberio, I.; Wang, R.Y.; Miller, N.

    2014-01-01

    Morquio A (Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA; MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by partial or total deficiency of the enzyme galactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS; also known as N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase) encoded by the GALNS gene. Patients who inherit two mutated GALNS gene alleles produce protein with decreased ability to degrade the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) keratan sulfate and chondroitin 6-sulfate, thereby causing GAG accumulation within lysosomes and consequently pleiotropic disease. GALNS mutations occur throughout the gene and many mutations are identified only in single patients or families, causing difficulties both in mutation detection and interpretation. In this study, molecular analysis of 163 patients with Morquio A identified 99 unique mutations in the GALNS gene believed to negatively impact GALNS protein function, of which 39 are previously unpublished, together with 26 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Recommendations for the molecular testing of patients, clear reporting of sequence findings, and interpretation of sequencing data are provided. PMID:24726177

  17. Identifying ambulatory cancer patients at risk of impaired capacity to consent to research.

    PubMed

    Casarett, David J; Karlawish, Jason H T; Hirschman, Karen B

    2003-07-01

    Ethicists and others have expressed concerns that some patients with cancer might lack adequate decision-making capacity to give consent for research. Although this concern is plausible, it is not known what patient characteristics might be used to identify those patients who are at risk and who therefore should undergo a formal assessment of decision-making capacity. Forty-five patients with cancer were presented with a description of a randomized controlled trial, accompanied by an Institutional Review Board-approved consent form. Two raters who were blind to all patient characteristics assessed decision-making capacity using the MacArthur Competency Assessment Tool for Clinical Research. These scores were summarized in overall capacity judgments using criteria established by a panel of experts. Subjects also completed a symptom rating scale and a battery of neuropsychiatric tests. No relationship was observed between symptom severity and any domain of decision-making capacity (understanding, appreciation, reasoning, ability to express a choice) or summary judgments. However, several other patient characteristics, including age, education, and selected neuropsychiatric test results, were found to be strongly associated with capacity scores. These data suggest that several patient characteristics, such as age, education, and tests of cognitive functions, may help investigators to identify patients with impaired capacity to give consent for research.

  18. Clinically relevant variants identified in thoracic aortic aneurysm patients by research exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Jeffrey A; Landis, Benjamin J; Shikany, Amy R; Hinton, Robert B; Ware, Stephanie M

    2016-05-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a genetically heterogeneous disease involving subclinical and progressive dilation of the thoracic aorta, which can lead to life-threatening complications such as dissection or rupture. Genetic testing is important for risk stratification and identification of at risk family members, and clinically available genetic testing panels have been expanding rapidly. However, when past testing results are normal, there is little evidence to guide decision-making about the indications and timing to pursue additional clinical genetic testing. Results from research based genetic testing can help inform this process. Here we present 10 TAA patients who have a family history of disease and who enrolled in research-based exome testing. Nine of these ten patients had previous clinical genetic testing that did not identify the cause of disease. We sought to determine the number of rare variants in 23 known TAA associated genes identified by research-based exome testing. In total, we found 10 rare variants in six patients. Likely pathogenic variants included a TGFB2 variant in one patient and a SMAD3 variant in another. These variants have been reported previously in individuals with similar phenotypes. Variants of uncertain significance of particular interest included novel variants in MYLK and MFAP5, which were identified in a third patient. In total, clinically reportable rare variants were found in 6/10 (60%) patients, with at least 2/10 (20%) patients having likely pathogenic variants identified. These data indicate that consideration of re-testing is important in TAA patients with previous negative or inconclusive results. PMID:26854089

  19. [The death dates of Seishu Hanaoka's patients with breast cancer: a report of newly identified three patients].

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Akitomo

    2002-06-01

    Among 155 patients with breast cancer treated by Seishu Hanaoka the exact death dates of only five patients including Kan Aiya, the first to have received a tumour excision under general anesthesia are known to us and the remaining 149 patients remain unclarified concerning their death dates. The reason is mainly due to a fact that the descriptions of "Nyugan Seimei Roku" (A Name List of Breast Cancer Patients) are inaccurate. According to recent field survey on the burial records of several temples which have been described in the "Nyugan Seimei Roku," the author could clarify the death dates of two patients. The one is the wife of Kohfuku-ji Temple's priest who died on Feb 20, 1813, and the other in the wife of Honko-ji Temple's priest, died on July 8, 1834. Both survived 1 year 4 months, and 1 year 3 months, postoperatively. One more patient's death date is identified by chance. Consequently, the death dates of eight patients among 155 have been identified so far. PMID:12398071

  20. A new screening pathway for identifying asymptomatic patients using dental panoramic radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Tatsuro; Matsumoto, Takuya; Sawagashira, Tsuyoshi; Tagami, Motoki; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Muramatsu, Chisako; Zhou, Xiangrong; Iida, Yukihiro; Matsuoka, Masato; Katagi, Kiyoji; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2012-03-01

    To identify asymptomatic patients is the challenging task and the essential first step in diagnosis. Findings of dental panoramic radiographs include not only dental conditions but also radiographic signs that are suggestive of possible systemic diseases such as osteoporosis, arteriosclerosis, and maxillary sinusitis. Detection of such signs on panoramic radiographs has a potential to provide supplemental benefits for patients. However, it is not easy for general dental practitioners to pay careful attention to such signs. We addressed the development of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system that detects radiographic signs of pathology on panoramic images, and the design of the framework of new screening pathway by cooperation of dentists and our CAD system. The performance evaluation of our CAD system showed the sensitivity and specificity in the identification of osteoporotic patients were 92.6 % and 100 %, respectively, and those of the maxillary sinus abnormality were 89.6 % and 73.6 %, respectively. The detection rate of carotid artery calcifications that suggests the need for further medical evaluation was approximately 93.6 % with 4.4 false-positives per image. To validate the utility of the new screening pathway, preliminary clinical trials by using our CAD system were conducted. To date, 223 panoramic images were processed and 4 asymptomatic patients with suspected osteoporosis, 7 asymptomatic patients with suspected calcifications, and 40 asymptomatic patients with suspected maxillary sinusitis were detected in our initial trial. It was suggested that our new screening pathway could be useful to identify asymptomatic patients with systemic diseases.

  1. Shortfalls identified in the management of tuberculosis for Mozambican patients obtaining health care services in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Muula, Adamson S; Nyasulu, Yohane; Feluzi, Henry; Magalasi, Collins

    2003-06-01

    We report findings of a pilot qualitative study in which we aimed to determine management gaps among TB patients from Mozambique obtaining health care services in Malawi. The study was conducted between April and May 2002 involved twelve health workers and 4 Mozambican patients. Semi-structured questionnaires were used and responses were followed up with in-depth interviews. Several areas of management gaps were identified. These included; language barrier if patients are formally referred with documents in Portuguese; lack of follow-up system in case of patients defaulting; no structured contact-tracing possibilities and no initiation of Isoniazid prophylaxis in the case of children living in households with a sputum smear positive adult case. We conclude that logistical management gaps exist in the management of TB patients from Mozambique obtaining care in Malawian health care facilities.

  2. Dynamic visual tests to identify and quantify visual damage and repair following demyelination in optic neuritis patients.

    PubMed

    Raz, Noa; Hallak, Michal; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Levin, Netta

    2014-04-14

    In order to follow optic neuritis patients and evaluate the effectiveness of their treatment, a handy, accurate and quantifiable tool is required to assess changes in myelination at the central nervous system (CNS). However, standard measurements, including routine visual tests and MRI scans, are not sensitive enough for this purpose. We present two visual tests addressing dynamic monocular and binocular functions which may closely associate with the extent of myelination along visual pathways. These include Object From Motion (OFM) extraction and Time-constrained stereo protocols. In the OFM test, an array of dots compose an object, by moving the dots within the image rightward while moving the dots outside the image leftward or vice versa. The dot pattern generates a camouflaged object that cannot be detected when the dots are stationary or moving as a whole. Importantly, object recognition is critically dependent on motion perception. In the Time-constrained Stereo protocol, spatially disparate images are presented for a limited length of time, challenging binocular 3-dimensional integration in time. Both tests are appropriate for clinical usage and provide a simple, yet powerful, way to identify and quantify processes of demyelination and remyelination along visual pathways. These protocols may be efficient to diagnose and follow optic neuritis and multiple sclerosis patients. In the diagnostic process, these protocols may reveal visual deficits that cannot be identified via current standard visual measurements. Moreover, these protocols sensitively identify the basis of the currently unexplained continued visual complaints of patients following recovery of visual acuity. In the longitudinal follow up course, the protocols can be used as a sensitive marker of demyelinating and remyelinating processes along time. These protocols may therefore be used to evaluate the efficacy of current and evolving therapeutic strategies, targeting myelination of the CNS.

  3. Identifying Patients Most Likely to Have a Common Bile Duct Stone After a Positive Intraoperative Cholangiogram

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Jason; Mishra, Girish; Baillie, John; Gilliam, John; Fernandez, Adolfo; Evans, John

    2014-01-01

    The false-positive rates of a positive intraoperative cholangiogram (IOC) are as high as 60%. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for stone removal is required after a positive IOC. It is unclear which clinical factors identify patients most likely to have a stone after a positive IOC. This study was conducted to identify factors predictive of common bile duct (CBD) stone(s) on ERCP after a positive IOC. A retrospective review of our endoscopic database identified all ERCP and/or endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) procedures performed for a positive IOC between August 2003 and August 2009. Collected data included patient demographics; indication for cholecystectomy; IOC findings; blood tests before and after cholecystectomy, including liver function tests, complete blood count, and amylase and lipase measurements; and ERCP and/or EUS results. Patients who had a negative EUS for CBD stones and no subsequent ERCP were contacted by phone to see if they eventually required an ERCP. Univariate and multi-variable analyses were performed. A total of 114 patients were included in the study. IOC findings included a single stone, multiple stones, nonpassage of contrast into the duodenum, dilated CBD, and poor visualization of the bile duct. Eighty-four percent of patients had ERCP only, 9% had EUS only, and 7% had EUS followed by ERCP. Sixty-five patients (57%) had CBD stones on ERCP or EUS. Older age, multiple stones, dilated CBD on IOC, and elevated postcholecystectomy bilirubin levels were the clinical variables with statistically significant differences on univariate analysis. On multivariable analysis, older age and elevated postcholecystectomy total bilirubin levels correlated with the presence of CBD stones on ERCP. Fifty-seven percent of patients referred for endoscopic evaluation after a positive IOC had CBD stones on ERCP. Patients with CBD stones after a positive IOC were more likely to be older with elevated post-cholecystectomy total serum bilirubin

  4. Linking patient outcome to high throughput protein expression data identifies novel regulators of colorectal adenocarcinoma aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    French, Christi L.; Ye, Fei; Revetta, Frank; Zhang, Bing; Coffey, Robert J.; Washington, M. Kay; Deane, Natasha G.; Beauchamp, R. Daniel; Weaver, Alissa M.

    2015-01-01

    A key question in cancer systems biology is how to use molecular data to predict the biological behavior of tumors from individual patients. While genomics data have been heavily used, protein signaling data are more directly connected to biological phenotype and might predict cancer phenotypes such as invasion, metastasis, and patient survival. In this study, we mined publicly available data for colorectal adenocarcinoma from the Cancer Genome Atlas and identified protein expression and signaling changes that are statistically associated with patient outcome. Our analysis identified a number of known and potentially new regulators of colorectal cancer. High levels of insulin growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) were associated with both recurrence and death, and this was validated by immunohistochemical staining of a tissue microarray for a secondary patient dataset. Interestingly, GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3) was the protein most frequently associated with death in our analysis, and GATA3 expression was significantly decreased in tumor samples from stage I-II deceased patients. Experimental studies using engineered colon cancer cell lines show that exogenous expression of GATA3 decreases three-dimensional colony growth and invasiveness of colon cancer cells but does not affect two-dimensional proliferation. These findings suggest that protein data are useful for biomarker discovery and identify GATA3 as a regulator of colorectal cancer  aggressiveness. PMID:26097693

  5. Identifying and improving knowledge deficits of emergency airway management of tracheotomy and laryngectomy patients: a pilot patient safety initiative.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Ivan H; Ryan, Susan; Schell, Hildy; Rappazini, Rosanne; Wang, Steven J

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the knowledge base of hospital staff regarding emergent airway management of tracheotomy and laryngectomy patients, and the impact of the introduction of a bedside airway form. Methods. Cross-sectional surveys of physicians, nurses, and respiratory therapists at a tertiary care hospital prior to and 24 months after introduction of a bedside Emergency Airway Access (EAA) form. Results. Pre- and postintervention surveys revealed several knowledge deficits. Preintervention, 37% of medical internists and 19% overall did not know that laryngectomy patients cannot be orally ventilated, and 67% of internists could not identify the purpose of stay sutures in recently created tracheotomies. Postintervention, these numbers improved for all groups. Furthermore, 80% of respiratory therapists reported encountering the EAA form in an emergent situation and found it useful. Conclusion. A knowledge deficit is identified in caregivers expected to provide emergency management of patients with airway anatomy altered by subspecialty surgeons. Safety initiatives such as the EAA form may improve knowledge among providers.

  6. Identifying patients for clinical trials using fuzzy ternary logic expressions on HL7 messages.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Raphael W; Röhrig, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Identifying eligible patients is one of the most critical parts of any clinical trial. The process of recruiting patients for the third phase of any clinical trial is usually done manually, informing relevant physicians or putting notes on bulletin boards. While most necessary information is already available in electronic hospital information systems, required data still has to be looked up individually. Most university hospitals make use of a dedicated communication server to distribute information from independent information systems, e.g. laboratory information systems, electronic health records, surgery planning systems. Thus, a theoretical model is developed to formally describe inclusion and exclusion criteria for each clinical trial using a fuzzy ternary logic expression. These expressions will then be used to process HL7 messages from a communication server in order to identify eligible patients.

  7. Case-based reasoning using electronic health records efficiently identifies eligible patients for clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Miotto, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a cost-effective, case-based reasoning framework for clinical research eligibility screening by only reusing the electronic health records (EHRs) of minimal enrolled participants to represent the target patient for each trial under consideration. Materials and Methods The EHR data—specifically diagnosis, medications, laboratory results, and clinical notes—of known clinical trial participants were aggregated to profile the “target patient” for a trial, which was used to discover new eligible patients for that trial. The EHR data of unseen patients were matched to this “target patient” to determine their relevance to the trial; the higher the relevance, the more likely the patient was eligible. Relevance scores were a weighted linear combination of cosine similarities computed over individual EHR data types. For evaluation, we identified 262 participants of 13 diversified clinical trials conducted at Columbia University as our gold standard. We ran a 2-fold cross validation with half of the participants used for training and the other half used for testing along with other 30 000 patients selected at random from our clinical database. We performed binary classification and ranking experiments. Results The overall area under the ROC curve for classification was 0.95, enabling the highlight of eligible patients with good precision. Ranking showed satisfactory results especially at the top of the recommended list, with each trial having at least one eligible patient in the top five positions. Conclusions This relevance-based method can potentially be used to identify eligible patients for clinical trials by processing patient EHR data alone without parsing free-text eligibility criteria, and shows promise of efficient “case-based reasoning” modeled only on minimal trial participants. PMID:25769682

  8. The use of fiber tractography for identifying patients with Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the usefulness of fiber tractography (FT) for identifying patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) through diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). DTI was performed on twelve patients with AD (four males and eight females, mean age: 78.1 ± 7.5 years) and an eleven patients with MCI (five males and six females, mean age: 69.3 ± 8.0 years) from January to December 2011 by using a 3.0T scanner. Two regions of interest were drawn on the pyramidal tract of Pons and the posterior limb of the internal capsule, which passed through both cortico spinal tracts on the color-cored fractional anisotropy (FA) map. The numbers of white matter fibers on the DTIs in the patients with AD and MCI were determined. The numbers of white matter fibers in the AD patients were 1055.67 ± 333.12 and 860.75 ± 355.50 on the left and the right, respectively. In the patients with MCI, the numbers of white matter fibers and were 1329.82 ± 238.99 and 1316.55 ± 215.25 on the left and the right, respectively. The difference between the right and the left sides in the AD patients was slightly higher than that in the MCI patients.

  9. Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography Does Not Accurately Predict the Need of Coronary Revascularization in Patients with Stable Angina

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sung-Jin; Her, Ae-Young; Suh, Yongsung; Won, Hoyoun; Cho, Deok-Kyu; Cho, Yun-Hyeong; Yoon, Young-Won; Lee, Kyounghoon; Kang, Woong Chol; Kim, Yong Hoon; Kim, Sang-Wook; Shin, Dong-Ho; Kim, Jung-Sun; Kim, Byeong-Keuk; Ko, Young-Guk; Choi, Byoung-Wook; Choi, Donghoon; Jang, Yangsoo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the ability of coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) to predict the need of coronary revascularization in symptomatic patients with stable angina who were referred to a cardiac catheterization laboratory for coronary revascularization. Materials and Methods Pre-angiography CCTA findings were analyzed in 1846 consecutive symptomatic patients with stable angina, who were referred to a cardiac catheterization laboratory at six hospitals and were potential candidates for coronary revascularization between July 2011 and December 2013. The number of patients requiring revascularization was determined based on the severity of coronary stenosis as assessed by CCTA. This was compared to the actual number of revascularization procedures performed in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Results Based on CCTA findings, coronary revascularization was indicated in 877 (48%) and not indicated in 969 (52%) patients. Of the 877 patients indicated for revascularization by CCTA, only 600 (68%) underwent the procedure, whereas 285 (29%) of the 969 patients not indicated for revascularization, as assessed by CCTA, underwent the procedure. When the coronary arteries were divided into 15 segments using the American Heart Association coronary tree model, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of CCTA for therapeutic decision making on a per-segment analysis were 42%, 96%, 40%, and 96%, respectively. Conclusion CCTA-based assessment of coronary stenosis severity does not sufficiently differentiate between coronary segments requiring revascularization versus those not requiring revascularization. Conventional coronary angiography should be considered to determine the need of revascularization in symptomatic patients with stable angina. PMID:27401637

  10. Phenotypic Variability and Newly Identified Mutations of the IVD Gene in Japanese Patients with Isovaleric Acidemia.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Osamu; Arai-Ichinoi, Natsuko; Mitsubuchi, Hiroshi; Chinen, Yasutsugu; Haruna, Hidenori; Maruyama, Hidehiko; Sugawara, Hidenori; Kure, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Isovaleric acidemia (IVA) is an autosomal recessive inborn error affecting leucine metabolism. It is caused by a deficiency in isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase (IVD), a mitochondrial matrix enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of isovaleryl-CoA to 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA. IVD is a FAD-containing enzyme, consisting of four identical subunits. Clinical features of IVA include poor feeding, vomiting, lethargy, developmental delay, metabolic acidosis, and a characteristic "sweaty foot" odor. IVA is one of the target disorders for newborn screening by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The human IVD gene is located on chromosome 15q. To date, over 50 disease-causing mutations have been reported worldwide. In this study, we searched for IVD mutations in five Japanese patients with IVA (neonatal type, two patients; chronic intermittent type, two patients; and mild biochemical type, one patient). The diagnosis of IVA was confirmed by urinary organic acid analysis using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. All coding exons and the flanking introns in the IVD gene were amplified by PCR and were directly sequenced. We thus identified six hitherto unknown mutations (p.G94D, p.E116K, p.M167T, p.L243P, p.L246P, and c.696+1G>T) and four previously reported (p.R53P, p.R395C, p.Y403C, and p.E411K) pathogenic mutations. All patients were compound heterozygotes, and each mutation was identified in a single patient. Pathogenicity of newly identified mutations was validated using computational programs. Among them, the p.M167T is believed to influence FAD binding, as the position 167 is present in one of the FAD-binding sites. Our results have illustrated the heterogeneous mutation spectrum and clinical presentation of IVA in the Japanese patients.

  11. The clinical impact of identifying metabolic syndrome in patients with diabetes: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Bulugahapitiya, Uditha; Siyambalapitiya, Sajith; Sithole, Jabulani; Fernando, Devaka J; Idris, Iskandar

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine whether identifying patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) (as defined by International Diabetes Federation [IDF] criteria) among patients with diabetes would affect the decision to prescribe statin for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), based on currently available public health guidelines. We analysed the most recent recorded CVD risk profiles obtained from electronic patient files from 304 general practices in England and Wales. Of 60,258 patients with diabetes, 11,005 men and women aged 30-74 years fulfilled criteria for primary CVD prevention and were not on lipid-lowering drugs. Outcome data were extrapolated to an estimated national diabetes prevalence of 3.6%. Identifying MetS in this group of patients would produce an additional 29,536 (8.4%; 95% CI: 7.7, 9.0), 104,288 (29.6%; 95% CI: 28.5, 30.7) and 147, 328 (41.9%; 95% CI: 40.8, 43.0) patients nationally who would not have been eligible otherwise for primary CVD prevention strategies with statins, based on the Joint British Societies', the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence and the General Medical Services contract guidelines, respectively. The sensitivity and positive predictive value of these different strategies to detect metabolic syndrome were 87.5% and 69.1%; 57.3% and 76.8%; and 37.8% and 70.2%, respectively. In conclusion, among individuals with diabetes, identifying patients with MetS may further increase the use of statin therapy for primary CVD prevention. PMID:19156624

  12. Incidence and clinical significance of repetitive ventricular response in patients without identifiable organic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Treese, N; Geibel, A; Kasper, W; Meinertz, T; Pop, T; Meyer, J

    1984-10-01

    We determined the incidence of repetitive ventricular response (RVR) after programmed electrical stimulation and the incidence of spontaneous ventricular arrhythmias during 24 hr Holter monitoring in 38 patients in whom extensive non-invasive and invasive diagnostic tests had excluded abnormalities suggestive of organic heart disease. A standardized stimulation protocol with single (S1S2) and double (S1S2S3) extrastimuli during ventricular drive at cycle lengths of 600, 500 and 430 msec with a current strength below 5 mA at the right ventricular apex was employed. RVR occurred in 20 patients (58%) after S1S2 and in 30 patients (79%) after S1S2S3 stimulation. Eighteen patients (47%) showed RVR with 2 echo beats and 1 patient had 3 echo beats. RVR was due to bundle branch reentry (BBR) in 20 patients independent of the mode of stimulation. RVR due to intraventricular reentry (IVR) was found in 17 patients (47%) only after S1S2S3 stimulation. The incidence of both BBR and IVR was influenced by the basic ventricular driving rate, decreasing with shorter basic cycle lengths. 17 patients had no ventricular premature depolarizations (VPDs), 12 patients had uniform, 4 multiform (Lown III), 2 consecutive (Lown IVA) VPDs, and 1 patient had parasystolic rhythm. There was no relation to the incidence of repetitive ventricular response. We conclude that in patients without identifiable organic heart disease RVR with more than 2 consecutive beats is rarely found if single and double extrastimuli are employed during ventricular drive. Both bundle branch and intraventricular reentry with one or two echo beats are a common finding in this population without relation to the incidence of spontaneous ventricular arrhythmias.

  13. Analyzing treatment aggressiveness and identifying high-risk patients in diabetic foot ulcer return to care.

    PubMed

    Remington, Austin C; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Warstadt, Nicholus M; Finnegan, Micaela A; Shaffer, Robyn; Kwong, Jereen Z; Curtin, Catherine

    2016-07-01

    Rates of diabetes and its associated comorbidities have been increasing in the United States, with diabetic foot ulcer treatment representing a large cost to the patient and healthcare system. These ulcers often result in multiple hospital admissions. This study examined readmissions following inpatient care for a diabetic foot ulcer and identified modifiable factors associated with all-cause 30-day readmissions to the inpatient or emergency department (ED) setting. We hypothesized that patients undergoing aggressive treatment would have lower 30-day readmission rates. We identified patient discharge records containing International Classification of Disease ninth revision codes for both diabetes mellitus and distal foot ulcer in the State Inpatient and Emergency Department databases from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project in Florida and New York, 2011-2012. All-cause 30-day return to care visits (ED or inpatient) were analyzed. Patient demographics and treatment characteristics were evaluated using univariate and multivariable regression models. The cohort included 25,911 discharges, having a mean age of 63 and an average of 3.8 comorbidities. The overall rate of return to care was 30%, and 21% of subjects underwent a toe or midfoot amputation during their index stay. The most common diagnosis codes upon readmission were diabetes mellitus (19%) and infection (13%). Patients with a toe or midfoot amputation procedure were less likely to be readmitted within 30 days (odds ratio: 0.78; 95% confidence interval: 0.73, 0.84). Presence of comorbidities, black and Hispanic ethnicities, and Medicare and Medicaid payer status were also associated with higher odds of readmission following initial hospitalization (p < 0.05). The study suggests that there are many factors that affect readmission rates for diabetic foot ulcer patients. Understanding patients at high-risk for readmission can improve counseling and

  14. Exploring methods for identifying related patient safety events using structured and unstructured data.

    PubMed

    Fong, Allan; Hettinger, A Zachary; Ratwani, Raj M

    2015-12-01

    Most healthcare systems have implemented patient safety event reporting systems to identify safety hazards. Searching the safety event data to find related patient safety reports and identify trends is challenging given the complexity and quantity of these reports. Structured data elements selected by the event reporter may be inaccurate and the free-text narrative descriptions are difficult to analyze. In this paper we present and explore methods for utilizing both the unstructured free-text and structured data elements in safety event reports to identify and rank similar events. We evaluate the results of three different free-text search methods, including a unique topic modeling adaptation, and structured element weights, using a patient fall use case. The various search techniques and weight combinations tended to prioritize different aspects of the event reports leading to different search and ranking results. These search and prioritization methods have the potential to greatly improve patient safety officers, and other healthcare workers, understanding of which safety event reports are related.

  15. Multiple gene mutations identified in patients infected with influenza A (H7N9) virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cuicui; Wang, Mingbang; Zhu, Zhaoqin; Qu, Jieming; Xi, Xiuhong; Tang, Xinjun; Lao, Xiangda; Seeley, Eric; Li, Tao; Fan, Xiaomei; Du, Chunling; Wang, Qin; Yang, Lin; Hu, Yunwen; Bai, Chunxue; Zhang, Zhiyong; Lu, Shuihua; Song, Yuanlin; Zhou, Wenhao

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A (H7N9) virus induced high mortality since 2013. It is important to elucidate the potential genetic variations that contribute to virus infection susceptibilities. In order to identify genetic mutations that might increase host susceptibility to infection, we performed exon sequencing and validated the SNPS by Sanger sequencing on 18 H7N9 patients. Blood samples were collected from 18 confirmed H7N9 patients. The genomic DNA was captured with the Agilent SureSelect Human All Exon kit, sequenced on the Illumina Hiseq 2000, and the resulting data processed and annotated with Genome analysis Tool. SNPs were verified by independent Sanger sequencing. The DAVID database and the DAPPLE database were used to do bioinformatics analysis. Through exon sequencing and Sanger sequencing, we identified 21 genes that were highly associated with H7N9 influenza infection. Protein-protein interaction analysis showed that direct interactions among genetic products were significantly higher than expected (p = 0.004), and DAVID analysis confirmed the defense-related functions of these genes. Gene mutation profiles of survived and non-survived patients were similar, suggesting some of genes identified in this study may be associated with H7N9 influenza susceptibility. Host specific genetic determinants of disease severity identified by this approach may provide new targets for the treatment of H7N9 influenza.

  16. Multiple gene mutations identified in patients infected with influenza A (H7N9) virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cuicui; Wang, Mingbang; Zhu, Zhaoqin; Qu, Jieming; Xi, Xiuhong; Tang, Xinjun; Lao, Xiangda; Seeley, Eric; Li, Tao; Fan, Xiaomei; Du, Chunling; Wang, Qin; Yang, Lin; Hu, Yunwen; Bai, Chunxue; Zhang, Zhiyong; Lu, Shuihua; Song, Yuanlin; Zhou, Wenhao

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A (H7N9) virus induced high mortality since 2013. It is important to elucidate the potential genetic variations that contribute to virus infection susceptibilities. In order to identify genetic mutations that might increase host susceptibility to infection, we performed exon sequencing and validated the SNPS by Sanger sequencing on 18 H7N9 patients. Blood samples were collected from 18 confirmed H7N9 patients. The genomic DNA was captured with the Agilent SureSelect Human All Exon kit, sequenced on the Illumina Hiseq 2000, and the resulting data processed and annotated with Genome analysis Tool. SNPs were verified by independent Sanger sequencing. The DAVID database and the DAPPLE database were used to do bioinformatics analysis. Through exon sequencing and Sanger sequencing, we identified 21 genes that were highly associated with H7N9 influenza infection. Protein-protein interaction analysis showed that direct interactions among genetic products were significantly higher than expected (p = 0.004), and DAVID analysis confirmed the defense-related functions of these genes. Gene mutation profiles of survived and non-survived patients were similar, suggesting some of genes identified in this study may be associated with H7N9 influenza susceptibility. Host specific genetic determinants of disease severity identified by this approach may provide new targets for the treatment of H7N9 influenza. PMID:27156515

  17. Delayed type hypersensitivity response to recall antigens does not accurately reflect immune competence in advanced stage breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Kathy; Rinn, Kristine; Disis, Mary L

    2002-07-01

    The development of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to recall antigens has long been utilized as a measure of immune competence. It is assumed that because patients with advanced stage cancers exhibit multiple immune system defects they may not be responsive to immunization. We pre-selected patients with advanced HER-2/neu (HER2) overexpressing breast and ovarian cancers for enrolment into a phase I trial designed to evaluate the immunogenicity of a HER2 peptide vaccine based on the patient's immune competence as assessed by DTH skin testing to common recall antigens (Multitest CMI, Institut Merieux, Lyon, France). At the time of a positive DTH response to tetanus toxoid (tt) peripheral blood was obtained to measure T cell responses to tt. Of 53 patients evaluated, 38 (72%) were not anergic. Among the 15 (28%) who were, seven patients with advanced stage breast cancer were re-tested a median of 26 days (range 12-150 days) after receiving a tt bopster vaccination. Five of the seven had positive DTH responses when re-challenged with tt and six had peripheral blood tetanus specific T cell response with stimulation index >2.0. Thus, the majority of patients studied with advanced stage breast or ovarian cancer were able to mount a DTH response to common recall antigens. Moreover, a negative response by DTH testing to a battery of common recall antigens was not a reflection of the breast cancer patient's ability to mount a cell-mediated immune response to a vaccinated antigen, tt.

  18. Limitations of the Patient Health Questionnaire in Identifying Anxiety and Depression: Many Cases Are Undetected

    PubMed Central

    Eack, Shaun M.; Greeno, Catherine G.; Lee, Bong-Jae

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the concordance between the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) in diagnosing anxiety and depressive disorders. Method Fifty women seeking psychiatric services for their children at two mental health centers in Western Pennsylvania were assessed for anxiety and depressive disorders using the SCID and the PHQ. Results Twenty-five women met SCID criteria for at least one anxiety disorder, 11 (44%) of whom the PHQ failed to identify. The PHQ was particularly limited in identifying individuals with anxiety disorders other than panic disorder. Seventeen women met SCID criteria for at least one major depressive disorder, 6 (35%) of whom the PHQ failed to identify. The PHQ was particularly limited in identifying depressed individuals with dysthymia. Conclusions Caution should be used when screening for anxiety and depression with the PHQ. Implications for improving diagnostic accuracy in social work practice are discussed. PMID:24465121

  19. Comparing the Ability of Anthropometric Indicators in Identifying Metabolic Syndrome in HIV Patients

    PubMed Central

    Beraldo, Rebeca Antunes; Meliscki, Gabriela Cristina; Silva, Bruna Ramos; Navarro, Anderson Marliere; Bollela, Valdes Roberto; Schmidt, André; Foss-Freitas, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Background Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) can cause side effects in HIV patients, as the metabolic syndrome. Early identification of risk for development of cardiovascular diseases using available reliable and practical methods is fundamental. On this basis, the aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of anthropometric indicators to identify metabolic syndrome in HIV patients on HAART. Methods It is a cross-sectional study. A number of 280 stable HIV patients were studied. It measured weight, height, waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HP), thigh circumference (TC) and calculated body mass index (BMI), body adiposity index (BAI), waist to hip ratio (WHR) and waist to thigh ratio (WTR). There was also a performance of biochemical tests of lipid profile and fasting glucose. Systemic blood pressure was measured. The criteria proposed by the National Cholesterol Education Program III (NCEP-ATP III) to metabolic syndrome classification was used. Individuals were divided in groups with or without metabolic alterations and their anthropometric indicators were compared. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were designed for each anthropometric indicator using the metabolic syndrome classification to identify sensitivity and specificity. Results WC was a good tool to identify each metabolic disorder separately: total cholesterol (only females, p<0.05), triglycerides (only males, p<0.001), HDL cholesterol (p<0.05), LDL cholesterol (p<005) and fasting glycemic (p<005). WC also showed the best performance to identify metabolic syndrome in both genders (areas under the curve (AUCs): 0.79 and 0.76 for male and female, respectively), while BAI proved to be an inadequate indicator (AUCs: 0.63 and 0.67 for males and females), respectively, in this population. Conclusions The central adiposity measure (WC) had the best performance to identify metabolic syndrome, and it is a convenient, cheap and reliable tool that can be used in clinical

  20. Challenges in Identifying the Foot Motor Region in Patients with Brain Tumor on Routine MRI: Advantages of fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Fisicaro, R.A.; Jiao, R.X.; Stathopoulos, C.; Brennan, N.M. Petrovich; Peck, K.K.; Holodny, A.I.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Accurate localization of the foot/leg motor homunculus is essential because iatrogenic damage can render a patient wheelchair- or bed-bound. We hypothesized the following: 1) Readers would identify the foot motor homunculus <100% of the time on routine MR imaging, 2) neuroradiologists would perform better than nonradiologists, and 3) those with fMRI experience would perform better than those without it. MATERIALSANDMETHODS Thirty-five attending-level raters (24 neuroradiologists, 11 nonradiologists) evaluated 14 brain tumors involving the frontoparietal convexity. Raters were asked to identify the location of the foot motor homunculus and determine whether the tumor involved the foot motor area and/or motor cortex by using anatomic MR imaging. Results were compared on the basis of prior fMRI experience and medical specialty by using Mann-Whitney U test statistics. RESULTS No rater was 100% correct. Raters correctly identified whether the tumor was in the foot motor cortex 77% of the time. Raters with fMRI experience were significantly better than raters without experience at foot motor fMRI centroid predictions (13 ± 6 mm versus 20 ± 13 mm from the foot motor cortex center, P = 2 × 10−6) and arrow placement in the motor gyrus (67% versus 47%, P = 7 × 10−5). Neuroradiologists were significantly better than nonradiologists at foot motor fMRI centroid predictions (15 ± 8 mm versus 20 ± 14 mm, P = .005) and arrow placement in the motor gyrus (61% versus 46%, P = .008). CONCLUSIONS The inability of experienced readers to consistently identify the location of the foot motor homunculus on routine MR imaging argues for using fMRI in the preoperative setting. Experience with fMRI leads to improved accuracy in identifying anatomic structures, even on routine MR imaging. PMID:25882288

  1. Clustering analysis to identify distinct spectral components of encephalogram burst suppression in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Zhou, David W; Westover, M Brandon; McClain, Lauren M; Nagaraj, Sunil B; Bajwa, Ednan K; Quraishi, Sadeq A; Akeju, Oluwaseun; Cobb, J Perren; Purdon, Patrick L

    2015-01-01

    Millions of patients are admitted each year to intensive care units (ICUs) in the United States. A significant fraction of ICU survivors develop life-long cognitive impairment, incurring tremendous financial and societal costs. Delirium, a state of impaired awareness, attention and cognition that frequently develops during ICU care, is a major risk factor for post-ICU cognitive impairment. Recent studies suggest that patients experiencing electroencephalogram (EEG) burst suppression have higher rates of mortality and are more likely to develop delirium than patients who do not experience burst suppression. Burst suppression is typically associated with coma and deep levels of anesthesia or hypothermia, and is defined clinically as an alternating pattern of high-amplitude "burst" periods interrupted by sustained low-amplitude "suppression" periods. Here we describe a clustering method to analyze EEG spectra during burst and suppression periods. We used this method to identify a set of distinct spectral patterns in the EEG during burst and suppression periods in critically ill patients. These patterns correlate with level of patient sedation, quantified in terms of sedative infusion rates and clinical sedation scores. This analysis suggests that EEG burst suppression in critically ill patients may not be a single state, but instead may reflect a plurality of states whose specific dynamics relate to a patient's underlying brain function. PMID:26737967

  2. Somatic mutations identify a subgroup of aplastic anemia patients who progress to myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kulasekararaj, Austin G; Jiang, Jie; Smith, Alexander E; Mohamedali, Azim M; Mian, Syed; Gandhi, Shreyans; Gaken, Joop; Czepulkowski, Barbara; Marsh, Judith C W; Mufti, Ghulam J

    2014-10-23

    The distinction between acquired aplastic anemia (AA) and hypocellular myelodysplastic syndrome (hMDS) is often difficult, especially nonsevere AA. We postulated that somatic mutations are present in a subset of AA, and predict malignant transformation. From our database, we identified 150 AA patients with no morphological evidence of MDS, who had stored bone marrow (BM) and constitutional DNA. We excluded Fanconi anemia, mutations of telomere maintenance, and a family history of BM failure (BMF) or cancer. The initial cohort of 57 patients was screened for 835 known genes associated with BMF and myeloid cancer; a second cohort of 93 patients was screened for mutations in ASXL1, DNMT3A, BCOR, TET2, and MPL. Somatic mutations were detected in 19% of AA, and included ASXL1 (n = 12), DNMT3A (n = 8) and BCOR (n = 6). Patients with somatic mutations had a longer disease duration (37 vs 8 months, P < .04), and shorter telomere lengths (median length, 0.9 vs 1.1, P < .001), compared with patients without mutations. Somatic mutations in AA patients with a disease duration of >6 months were associated with a 40% risk of transformation to MDS (P < .0002). Nearly one-fifth of AA patients harbor mutations in genes typically seen in myeloid malignancies that predicted for later transformation to MDS. PMID:25139356

  3. Identifying the optimal criteria of radiotherapeutic parameters for patients with unresectable locally advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Son, Seok Hyun; Jang, Hong Seok; Sung, Soo Yoon; Kang, Hye Jin; Lee, Sojung; Kay, Chul Seung

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the optimal criteria of the radiotherapeutic parameters in patients with unresectable locally advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). 103 patients were enrolled in this study. All patients received RT delivered using the TomoTherapy Hi-Art system between March 2006 and February 2012. We evaluated the planning target volume (PTV), total dose (Gy10), and NTNL-V(BED20) (non-target normal liver volume receiving more than a biologically effective dose of 20 Gy8) as significant radiotherapeutic parameters associated with hepatic function deterioration and local progression-free survival (PFS). A PTV of 279 cm3 or 304 cm3, a total dose of 60 Gy10, and a NTNL-V(BED20) of 40.8% were identified as the optimal cut-off values of radiotherapeutic parameters to prevent hepatic function deterioration and prolong local PFS. Based on these findings, patients were divided in a favorable and an unfavorable prognosis group. The differences in median local PFS, overall survival, and incidence of deteriorated hepatic function between the two groups were 11.2 months, 11.1 months, and 71.7%, respectively (p < 0.001 in each case). In conclusion, we suggest that the optimal criteria of the radiotherapeutic parameters for patients with unresectable locally advanced HCC are: PTV ≤ 279 cm3, total dose > 60 Gy10, and NTNL-V(BED20) ≤ 40.8%. PMID:26510905

  4. Multiple oncogenic viruses identified in Ocular surface squamous neoplasia in HIV-1 patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) is a rare cancer that has increased in incidence with the HIV pandemic in Africa. The underlying cause of this cancer in HIV-infected patients from Botswana is not well defined. Results Tissues were obtained from 28 OSSN and 8 pterygia patients. The tissues analyzed from OSSN patients were 83% positive for EBV, 75% were HPV positive, 70% were KSHV positive, 75% were HSV-1/2 positive, and 61% were CMV positive by PCR. Tissues from pterygium patients were 88% positive for EBV, 75% were HPV positive, 50% were KSHV positive, and 60% were CMV positive. None of the patients were JC or BK positive. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry analyses further identified HPV, EBV, and KSHV in a subset of the tissue samples. Conclusion We identified the known oncogenic viruses HPV, KSHV, and EBV in OSSN and pterygia tissues. The presence of these tumor viruses in OSSN suggests that they may contribute to the development of this malignancy in the HIV population. Further studies are necessary to characterize the molecular mechanisms associated with viral antigens and their potential role in the development of OSSN. PMID:20346104

  5. Correspondence between Pigmented Lesions Identified by Melanoma Patients Trained to Perform Partner-Assisted Skin Self-Examination and Dermatological Examination

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Jerod L.; Turrisi, Rob; Mallett, Kimberly A.; Robinson, June K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Skin-self examination (SSE) training interventions can increase understanding of melanoma early detection criteria and promote SSE. However, there remains a need to evaluate whether intervention participants can apply such early detection skills to accurately identify concerning, or potentially malignant, pigmented lesions during full body SSE. Methods We assessed SSE accuracy using data from a randomized control trial of a SSE skills training intervention designed to promote partner-assisted SSE among melanoma patients. In the trial, patient-partner pairs were administered the training intervention and performed monthly SSE to identify, evaluate, and track concerning pigmented skin lesions. Patients received a total body skin examination by a dermatologist approximately 4-months post-intervention. SSE accuracy was assessed as the correspondence between the specific concerning pigmented lesions identified by 274 study pairs during SSE with those identified during dermatological examination. We also examined whether lesions that were biopsied during the study were identified prior to biopsy during SSE. Results Approximately 3 in 4 of the concerning lesions identified by pairs during SSE were also identified during the dermatological exam. There were 81 biopsies performed during the study and pairs had identified 73% of the corresponding lesions during SSE. Of the 5 melanoma detected, 3 were identified during SSE. Conclusion Melanoma patients and partner taught to do SSE using an evidence-based program developed a high degree of correspondence with the study dermatologist in identifying concerning lesions. Impact This study provides novel evidence that supports the accuracy of full-body SSE for the patient identification of concerning lesions. PMID:26063475

  6. Aberrant phenotypic expression of CD15 and CD56 identifies poor prognostic acute promyelocytic leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; De Propris, Maria Stefania; Minotti, Clara; Stefanizzi, Caterina; Raponi, Sara; Colafigli, Gioia; Latagliata, Roberto; Guarini, Anna; Foà, Robin

    2014-02-01

    Limited information is available on the relationship between expression of some additional aberrant phenotypic features and outcome of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients. Here, we set out to assess the frequency of CD15 and CD56 expression, and their prognostic value in a large series of APL patients. One hundred and fourteen adult patients consecutively diagnosed with PML/RARα-positive APL and homogeneously treated with the AIDA induction schedule at a single institution were included in the study. Twelve (10.5%) and 9 (8%) of the 114 patients expressed CD15 and CD56, respectively. CD15 expression identified a subset of patients with a classic morphologic subtype (92%), a prevalent association with a bcr1 expression (67%) with an unexpectedly higher frequency of relapses (42% vs 20% for the CD15- patients, p=0.03) and a low overall survival (OS) (median OS at 5 years 58% vs 85% for the CD15- patients, p=0.01). CD56 expression was detected only in patients with a classic morphologic subtype, a prevalent bcr3 expression (67%), high incidence of differentiation syndrome (55%), higher frequency of relapse (34% vs 20% for the CD56- population, p=0.04) and a low OS (60% vs 85% for the CD56- population p=0.02). We hereby confirm the negative prognostic value of CD56 and we show that the same applies also to cases expressing CD15. These aberrant markers may be considered for the refinement of risk-adapted therapeutic strategies in APL patients.

  7. Clustering analysis to identify distinct spectral components of encephalogram burst suppression in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, David W.; Westover, M. Brandon; McClain, Lauren M.; Nagaraj, Sunil B.; Bajwa, Ednan K.; Quraishi, Sadeq A.; Akeju, Oluwaseun; Cobb, J. Perren; Purdon, Patrick L.

    2016-01-01

    Millions of patients are admitted each year to intensive care units (ICUs) in the United States. A significant fraction of ICU survivors develop life-long cognitive impairment, incurring tremendous financial and societal costs. Delirium, a state of impaired awareness, attention and cognition that frequently develops during ICU care, is a major risk factor for post-ICU cognitive impairment. Recent studies suggest that patients experiencing electroencephalogram (EEG) burst suppression have higher rates of mortality and are more likely to develop delirium than patients who do not experience burst suppression. Burst suppression is typically associated with coma and deep levels of anesthesia or hypothermia, and is defined clinically as an alternating pattern of high-amplitude “burst” periods interrupted by sustained low-amplitude “suppression” periods. Here we describe a clustering method to analyze EEG spectra during burst and suppression periods. We used this method to identify a set of distinct spectral patterns in the EEG during burst and suppression periods in critically ill patients. These patterns correlate with level of patient sedation, quantified in terms of sedative infusion rates and clinical sedation scores. This analysis suggests that EEG burst suppression in critically ill patients may not be a single state, but instead may reflect a plurality of states whose specific dynamics relate to a patient’s underlying brain function. PMID:26737967

  8. Raman spectroscopy of endoscopic colonic biopsies from patients with ulcerative colitis to identify mucosal inflammation and healing

    PubMed Central

    Addis, James; Mohammed, Noor; Rotimi, Olorunda; Magee, Derek; Jha, Animesh; Subramanian, Venkataraman

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to differentiate between mucosally healed (or quiescent) and inflamed colon tissue, as assessed endoscopically, in patients with ulcerative colitis. From the analysis of the Raman spectra of 60 biopsy tissue samples, clear differences were identified between the spectra of the quiescent and inflamed tissue. Three carotenoid peaks were found to be approximately twice as intense in the inflamed tissue. Two phospholipid peaks were found to be significantly lower in the inflamed tissue. Using multivariate statistical analysis, we show that these five peaks can be used to discriminate between endoscopically quiescent and inflamed tissue. We also correlated the Raman data with a histological assessment of the tissue. Four of the five peaks were found to be significantly different between the spectra of histologically healed (or quiescent) and histologically inflamed tissue. These findings indicate the ability of Raman spectroscopy to accurately classify colon tissue as either quiescent or inflamed, irrespective of whether an endoscopic or histological grading scheme is followed. We thus demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy could potentially be used as an early diagnosis tool for assessing the presence of mucosal healing or inflammation in patients with ulcerative colitis. PMID:27231640

  9. Exome sequencing identifies potential novel candidate genes in patients with unexplained colorectal adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Spier, Isabel; Kerick, Martin; Drichel, Dmitriy; Horpaopan, Sukanya; Altmüller, Janine; Laner, Andreas; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Peters, Sophia; Adam, Ronja; Zhao, Bixiao; Becker, Tim; Lifton, Richard P; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Perner, Sven; Thiele, Holger; Nöthen, Markus M; Hoffmann, Per; Timmermann, Bernd; Schweiger, Michal R; Aretz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In up to 30% of patients with colorectal adenomatous polyposis, no germline mutation in the known genes APC, causing familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH, causing MUTYH-associated polyposis, and POLE or POLD1, causing Polymerase-Proofreading-associated polyposis can be identified, although a hereditary etiology is likely. To uncover new causative genes, exome sequencing was performed using DNA from leukocytes and a total of 12 colorectal adenomas from seven unrelated patients with unexplained sporadic adenomatous polyposis. For data analysis and variant filtering, an established bioinformatics pipeline including in-house tools was applied. Variants were filtered for rare truncating point mutations and copy-number variants assuming a dominant, recessive, or tumor suppressor model of inheritance. Subsequently, targeted sequence analysis of the most promising candidate genes was performed in a validation cohort of 191 unrelated patients. All relevant variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. The analysis of exome sequencing data resulted in the identification of rare loss-of-function germline mutations in three promising candidate genes (DSC2, PIEZO1, ZSWIM7). In the validation cohort, further variants predicted to be pathogenic were identified in DSC2 and PIEZO1. According to the somatic mutation spectra, the adenomas in this patient cohort follow the classical pathways of colorectal tumorigenesis. The present study identified three candidate genes which might represent rare causes for a predisposition to colorectal adenoma formation. Especially PIEZO1 (FAM38A) and ZSWIM7 (SWS1) warrant further exploration. To evaluate the clinical relevance of these genes, investigation of larger patient cohorts and functional studies are required. PMID:26780541

  10. Targeted sequencing identifies patients with preclinical MDS at high risk of disease progression.

    PubMed

    Cargo, Catherine A; Rowbotham, Nicola; Evans, Paul A; Barrans, Sharon L; Bowen, David T; Crouch, Simon; Jack, Andrew S

    2015-11-19

    The diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) remains problematic due to the subjective nature of morphologic assessment. The reported high frequency of somatic mutations and increased structural variants by array-based cytogenetics have provided potential objective markers of disease; however, this has been complicated by reports of similar abnormalities in the healthy population. We aimed to identify distinguishing features between those with early MDS and reported healthy individuals by characterizing 69 patients who, following a nondiagnostic marrow, developed progressive dysplasia or acute myeloid leukemia. Targeted sequencing and array-based cytogenetics identified a driver mutation and/or structural variant in 91% (63/69) of prediagnostic samples with the mutational spectrum mirroring that in the MDS population. When compared with the reported healthy population, the mutations detected had significantly greater median variant allele fraction (40% vs 9% to 10%), and occurred more commonly with additional mutations (≥2 mutations, 64% vs 8%). Furthermore, mutational analysis identified a high-risk group of patients with a shorter time to disease progression and poorer overall survival. The mutational features in our cohort are distinct from those seen in the healthy population and, even in the absence of definitive disease, can predict outcome. Early detection may allow consideration of intervention in poor-risk patients. PMID:26392596

  11. Realization of a universal patient identifier for electronic medical records through biometric technology.

    PubMed

    Leonard, D C; Pons, Alexander P; Asfour, Shihab S

    2009-07-01

    The technology exists for the migration of healthcare data from its archaic paper-based system to an electronic one, and, once in digital form, to be transported anywhere in the world in a matter of seconds. The advent of universally accessible healthcare data has benefited all participants, but one of the outstanding problems that must be addressed is how the creation of a standardized nationwide electronic healthcare record system in the United States would uniquely identify and match a composite of an individual's recorded healthcare information to an identified individual patients out of approximately 300 million people to a 1:1 match. To date, a few solutions to this problem have been proposed that are limited in their effectiveness. We propose the use of biometric technology within our fingerprint, iris, retina scan, and DNA (FIRD) framework, which is a multiphase system whose primary phase is a multilayer consisting of these four types of biometric identifiers: 1) fingerprint; 2) iris; 3) retina scan; and 4) DNA. In addition, it also consists of additional phases of integration, consolidation, and data discrepancy functions to solve the unique association of a patient to their medical data distinctively. This would allow a patient to have real-time access to all of their recorded healthcare information electronically whenever it is necessary, securely with minimal effort, greater effectiveness, and ease. PMID:19273015

  12. Genomic analysis identifies candidate pathogenic variants in 9 of 18 patients with unexplained West syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hino-Fukuyo, Naomi; Kikuchi, Atsuo; Arai-Ichinoi, Natsuko; Niihori, Tetsuya; Sato, Ryo; Suzuki, Tasuku; Kudo, Hiroki; Sato, Yuko; Nakayama, Tojo; Kakisaka, Yosuke; Kubota, Yuki; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Funayama, Ryo; Nakayama, Keiko; Uematsu, Mitsugu; Aoki, Yoko; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Kure, Shigeo

    2015-06-01

    West syndrome, which is narrowly defined as infantile spasms that occur in clusters and hypsarrhythmia on EEG, is the most common early-onset epileptic encephalopathy (EOEE). Patients with West syndrome may have clear etiologies, including perinatal events, infections, gross chromosomal abnormalities, or cases followed by other EOEEs. However, the genetic etiology of most cases of West syndrome remains unexplained. DNA from 18 patients with unexplained West syndrome was subjected to microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH), followed by trio-based whole-exome sequencing in 14 unsolved families. We identified candidate pathogenic variants in 50% of the patients (n = 9/18). The array CGH revealed candidate pathogenic copy number variations in four cases (22%, 4/18), including an Xq28 duplication, a 16p11.2 deletion, a 16p13.1 deletion and a 19p13.2 deletion disrupting CACNA1A. Whole-exome sequencing identified candidate mutations in known epilepsy genes in five cases (36%, 5/14). Three candidate de novo mutations were identified in three cases, with two mutations occurring in two new candidate genes (NR2F1 and CACNA2D1) (21%, 3/14). Hemizygous candidate mutations in ALG13 and BRWD3 were identified in the other two cases (14%, 2/14). Evaluating a panel of 67 known EOEE genes failed to identify significant mutations. Despite the heterogeneity of unexplained West syndrome, the combination of array CGH and whole-exome sequencing is an effective means of evaluating the genetic background in unexplained West syndrome. We provide additional evidence for NR2F1 as a causative gene and for CACNA2D1 and BRWD3 as candidate genes for West syndrome. PMID:25877686

  13. Genomic analysis identifies candidate pathogenic variants in 9 of 18 patients with unexplained West syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hino-Fukuyo, Naomi; Kikuchi, Atsuo; Arai-Ichinoi, Natsuko; Niihori, Tetsuya; Sato, Ryo; Suzuki, Tasuku; Kudo, Hiroki; Sato, Yuko; Nakayama, Tojo; Kakisaka, Yosuke; Kubota, Yuki; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Funayama, Ryo; Nakayama, Keiko; Uematsu, Mitsugu; Aoki, Yoko; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Kure, Shigeo

    2015-06-01

    West syndrome, which is narrowly defined as infantile spasms that occur in clusters and hypsarrhythmia on EEG, is the most common early-onset epileptic encephalopathy (EOEE). Patients with West syndrome may have clear etiologies, including perinatal events, infections, gross chromosomal abnormalities, or cases followed by other EOEEs. However, the genetic etiology of most cases of West syndrome remains unexplained. DNA from 18 patients with unexplained West syndrome was subjected to microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH), followed by trio-based whole-exome sequencing in 14 unsolved families. We identified candidate pathogenic variants in 50% of the patients (n = 9/18). The array CGH revealed candidate pathogenic copy number variations in four cases (22%, 4/18), including an Xq28 duplication, a 16p11.2 deletion, a 16p13.1 deletion and a 19p13.2 deletion disrupting CACNA1A. Whole-exome sequencing identified candidate mutations in known epilepsy genes in five cases (36%, 5/14). Three candidate de novo mutations were identified in three cases, with two mutations occurring in two new candidate genes (NR2F1 and CACNA2D1) (21%, 3/14). Hemizygous candidate mutations in ALG13 and BRWD3 were identified in the other two cases (14%, 2/14). Evaluating a panel of 67 known EOEE genes failed to identify significant mutations. Despite the heterogeneity of unexplained West syndrome, the combination of array CGH and whole-exome sequencing is an effective means of evaluating the genetic background in unexplained West syndrome. We provide additional evidence for NR2F1 as a causative gene and for CACNA2D1 and BRWD3 as candidate genes for West syndrome.

  14. Proteomic Analysis of Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma Specimens Identifies Patient Outcome–Associated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Thomas M.; Du, Peicheng; Kawachi, Nicole; Belbin, Thomas J.; Wang, Yanhua; Schlecht, Nicolas F.; Ow, Thomas J.; Keller, Christian E.; Childs, Geoffrey J.; Smith, Richard V.; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Prystowsky, Michael B.; Lim, Jihyeon

    2015-01-01

    Context Global proteomic analysis of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma was performed to identify changes that reflect patient outcomes. Objectives To identify differentially expressed proteins associated with patient outcomes and to explore the use of imaging mass spectrometry as a clinical tool to identify clinically relevant proteins. Design Two-dimensional separation of digested peptides generated from 43 specimens with high-resolution mass spectrometry identified proteins associated with disease-specific death, distant metastasis, and loco-regional recurrence. RNA expressions had been correlated to protein levels to test transcriptional regulation of clinically relevant proteins. Imaging mass spectrometry explored an alternative platform for assessing clinically relevant proteins that would complement surgical pathologic diagnosis. Results Seventy-two peptide features were found to be associated with 3 patient outcomes: disease-specific death (9), distant metastasis (16), and loco-regional recurrence (39); 8 of them were associated with multiple outcomes. Functional ontology revealed major changes in cell adhesion and calcium binding. Thirteen RNAs showed strong correlation with their encoded proteins, implying transcriptional control. Reduction of DSP, PKP1, and TRIM29 was associated with significantly shorter time to onset of distant metastasis. Reduction of PKP1 and TRIM29 correlated with poorer disease-specific survival. Additionally, S100A8 and S100A9 reductions were verified for their association with poor prognosis using imaging mass spectrometry, a platform more adaptable for use with surgical pathology. Conclusions Using global proteomic analysis, we have identified proteins associated with clinical outcomes. The list of clinically relevant proteins observed will provide a means to develop clinical assays for prognosis and optimizing treatment selection. PMID:25295583

  15. Preoperative psychological assessment of patients seeking weight-loss surgery: identifying challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Edwards-Hampton, Shenelle A; Wedin, Sharlene

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative psychosocial assessment is the standard of care for patients seeking weight-loss surgery (WLS). However, the assessment procedure varies widely by surgery site. Comprehensive assessments can provide a wealth of information that assists both the patient and the treatment team, anticipate and prepare for challenges associated with extensive behavioral and lifestyle changes that are required postsurgery. In this review, we provide an overview of the purpose of the preoperative psychosocial assessment and domains to be included. Challenges commonly identified in the assessment are discussed, including maladaptive eating behaviors, psychiatric comorbidities, and alcohol use. Potential solutions and approaches to these challenges are provided. Additionally, patient populations requiring special consideration are presented to include adolescents, those with cognitive vulnerabilities, and aging adults. PMID:26604844

  16. Is sentinel lymph node biopsy more accurate than axillary dissection for staging nodal involvement in breast cancer patients?

    PubMed

    Marrazzo, Antonio; Taormina, Pietra; Gebbiab, Vittorio; David, Massimo; Riili, Ignazio; Lo Gerfo, Domenico; Casà, Luigi; Noto, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Today evaluation of axillary involvement can be routinely performed with the technique of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). One of the greatest advantages of SLNB is the nearly total absence of local postoperative complications. It is important to understand whether SLNB is better than axillary lymph-node dissection (ALND) for staging axillary nodal involvement. The aim of the study was to evaluate the axillary staging accuracy comparing three different methods: axillary dissection, sentinel node biopsy with the traditional 4-6 sections and sentinel node biopsy with complete analysis of the lymph node. 527 consecutive patients (525 females and 2 males) with invasive breast cancer < or = 3 cm and clinically negative axillary nodes were divided into 3 different groups: group A treated with axillary dissection, group B treated with sentinel nodal biopsy analysed with 4-6 sections, and group C treated with sentinel node biopsy with analysis of the entire node. All patients underwent a quadrantectomy to treat the tumor. Group differences and statistical significance were assessed by ANOVA. The percentages of N+ in group A and group B were 25.80% and 28% respectively, while in the third group it rose to 45%, or almost half the patients. The differences among the three groups were statistically significant (p = 0.02). From our analysis of the data it emerges that axillary dissection and sentinel node biopsy with analysis of 4-6 sections have the same accuracy in staging the nodal status of the axilla; analysis of the entire sentinel lymph node revealed an increased number of patients with axillary nodal involvement, proving more powerful in predicting nodal stage. SLNB with complete examination of the SLN removed can be considered the best method for axillary staging in breast cancer patients with clinical negative nodes. In our study, the percentage of metastases encountered after complete examination of SLN was 45% compared to the accuracy of axillary dissection that

  17. Identifying Quality Indicators Used by Patients to Choose Secondary Health Care Providers: A Mixed Methods Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Saman Sara; Kahlon, Gurnaaz Kaur; Naik, Aditi; Jessel, Amar Singh; Nanavati, Niraj; Shah, Akash; Cox, Benita; Darzi, Ara

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients in health systems across the world can now choose between different health care providers. Patients are increasingly using websites and apps to compare the quality of health care services available in order to make a choice of provider. In keeping with many patient-facing platforms, most services currently providing comparative information on different providers do not take account of end-user requirements or the available evidence base. Objective To investigate what factors were considered most important when choosing nonemergency secondary health care providers in the United Kingdom with the purpose of translating these insights into a ratings platform delivered through a consumer mHealth app. Methods A mixed methods approach was used to identify key indicators incorporating a literature review to identify and categorize existing quality indicators, a questionnaire survey to formulate a ranked list of performance indicators, and focus groups to explore rationales behind the rankings. Findings from qualitative and quantitative methodologies were mapped onto each other under the four categories identified by the literature review. Results Quality indicators were divided into four categories. Hospital access was the least important category. The mean differences between the other three categories hospital statistics, hospital staff, and hospital facilities, were not statistically significant. Staff competence was the most important indicator in the hospital staff category; cleanliness and up-to-date facilities were equally important in hospital facilities; ease of travel to the hospital was found to be most important in hospital access. All quality indicators within the hospital statistics category were equally important. Focus groups elaborated that users find it difficult to judge staff competence despite its importance. Conclusions A mixed methods approach is presented, which supported a patient-centered development and evaluation of a

  18. New strategies to identify patients harbouring antibiotic-resistant bacteria at hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Tacconelli, E

    2006-02-01

    Nosocomial infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are associated with high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Most prevention strategies focus on cross-transmission, but the endemic state inside the hospital is also maintained through the influx of patients colonised or infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria, balanced by the efflux of colonised patients following discharge. Epidemiological research has demonstrated that eradication can be achieved by preventing the influx of resistant bacteria. The presence of a central venous catheter and a history of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection or colonisation are associated significantly with methicillin-resistant staphylococcal bacteraemia at admission. Previous antibiotic therapy and transfer from long-term care facilities or nursing homes are associated with bacteraemia caused by methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci, while skin ulcer and cellulites are independent risk-factors for MRSA bacteraemia. A scoring system using point values has been developed and validated to identify patients positive for vancomycin-resistant enterococci at admission. Six variables were identified: age > 60 years (2 points); hospitalisation in the previous year (3); use of two or more antibiotics during the previous 30 days (3); transfer from another hospital or long-term care facility (3); a requirement for chronic haemodialysis (2); and a previous history of MRSA infection (4). With a point score cut-off of > or = 10, the specificity of this prediction rule is 98%. Knowledge of variables identifying patients at high risk for being colonised or infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria may assist clinicians in targeting preventive measures and streamlining the use of vancomycin. Current studies are analysing risk-factors for harbouring multiresistant Gram-negative bacteria at hospital admission. PMID:16441446

  19. A High Malaria Prevalence Identified by PCR among Patients with Acute Undifferentiated Fever in India

    PubMed Central

    Haanshuus, Christel Gill; Chandy, Sara; Manoharan, Anand; Vivek, Rosario; Mathai, Dilip; Xena, Deepika; Singh, Ashita; Langeland, Nina; Blomberg, Bjørn; Vasanthan, George; Sitaram, Usha; Appasamy, Jonathan; Nesaraj, Joel; Henry, Anil; Patil, Suvarna; Alvarez-Uria, Gerardo; Armstrong, Lois; Mørch, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Background Approximately one million malaria cases were reported in India in 2015, based on microscopy. This study aims to assess the malaria prevalence among hospitalised fever patients in India identified by PCR, and to evaluate the performance of routine diagnostic methods. Methods During June 2011-December 2012, patients admitted with acute undifferentiated fever to seven secondary level community hospitals in Assam (Tezpur), Bihar (Raxaul), Chhattisgarh (Mungeli), Maharashtra (Ratnagiri), Andhra Pradesh (Anantapur) and Tamil Nadu (Oddanchatram and Ambur) were included. The malaria prevalence was assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), routine microscopy, and a rapid diagnostic test (RDT) with PCR as a reference method. Results The malaria prevalence by PCR was 19% (268/1412) ranging from 6% (Oddanchatram, South India) to 35% (Ratnagiri, West India). Among malaria positive patients P. falciparum single infection was detected in 46%, while 38% had P. vivax, 11% mixed infections with P. falciparum and P. vivax, and 5% P. malariae. Compared to PCR, microscopy had sensitivity of 29% and specificity of 98%, while the RDT had sensitivity of 24% and specificity of 99%. Conclusions High malaria prevalence was identified by PCR in this cohort. Routine diagnostic methods had low sensitivity compared to PCR. The results suggest that malaria is underdiagnosed in rural India. However, low parasitaemia controlled by immunity may constitute a proportion of PCR positive cases, which calls for awareness of the fact that other pathogens could be responsible for the febrile disease in submicroscopic malaria. PMID:27389396

  20. Engineering Approach to Identifying Patients with Colon Tumors on the Basis of Electrophotonic Imaging Technique Data

    PubMed Central

    Yakovleva, E.G.; Korotkov, K.G.; Fedorov, E.D.; Ivanova, E.V.; Plahov, R.V.; Belonosov, S.S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Colonic neoplasms are quite a serious problem today. Screening methods play an important role in diagnosing the disease. Colorectal cancer screening is a complex undertaking, having various options, which require a lot of efforts both from the doctor and from the patient, including the use of sedatives and the necessity of the presence of an assistant for some procedures such as colonoscopy. This is why it is very important to find a method by which one can make a diagnosis quickly, easily, and painlessly. Methods: The ability to identify patients with tumors of the colon using the Electrophotonic Imaging (EPI) technique, as well as using it for differential diagnosis of tumors of the colon by their morphology, size and quantity was investigated. Selection of the most significant parameters of the EPI-graphy for the separation of the control group and the group of patients with tumors of the colon was developed. 137 people were studied with the EPI camera, with ages ranging from 16 to 86 years, including 49 males and 88 females. Based on the results of the colonoscopy and histological findings all subjects were divided into 2 groups: control group of 55 people, 9 males, 46 females; and patients with tumors (benign or malignant) of the colon - 82 people; 40 males and 42 females. Then all subjects were divided into smaller groups based on morphology, size, number of tumors and localization. Results: Based on the identified indicators decision rules to determine the patients with tumors of the colon were constructed. The specificity of the resulting function was 80.0% and sensitivity 75.6%. Decision rule was built as well with logistic regression. The specificity of the resulting function was 78.2% and sensitivity 90.0%. The accuracy of this approach was higher than using discriminant analysis. Conclusions: The results of this study have proven the ability to identify patients with tumors of the colon using EPI technology, as well as use it for

  1. Systematic Genetic Analysis Identifies Cis-eQTL Target Genes Associated with Glioblastoma Patient Survival

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qing-Rong; Hu, Ying; Yan, Chunhua; Buetow, Kenneth; Meerzaman, Daoud

    2014-01-01

    Prior expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) studies have demonstrated heritable variation determining differences in gene expression. The majority of eQTL studies were based on cell lines and normal tissues. We performed cis-eQTL analysis using glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) data sets obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to systematically investigate germline variation’s contribution to tumor gene expression levels. We identified 985 significant cis-eQTL associations (FDR<0.05) mapped to 978 SNP loci and 159 unique genes. Approximately 57% of these eQTLs have been previously linked to the gene expression in cell lines and normal tissues; 43% of these share cis associations known to be associated with functional annotations. About 25% of these cis-eQTL associations are also common to those identified in Breast Cancer from a recent study. Further investigation of the relationship between gene expression and patient clinical information identified 13 eQTL genes whose expression level significantly correlates with GBM patient survival (p<0.05). Most of these genes are also differentially expressed in tumor samples and organ-specific controls (p<0.05). Our results demonstrated a significant relationship of germline variation with gene expression levels in GBM. The identification of eQTLs-based expression associated survival might be important to the understanding of genetic contribution to GBM cancer prognosis. PMID:25133526

  2. Tim-3 identifies exhausted follicular helper T cells in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shiguang; Lin, Jun; Qiao, Guangdong; Wang, Xingmiao; Xu, Yanping

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in women worldwide. Although a series of treatment options have improved the overall 5-year survival rate to 90%, individual responses still vary from patient to patient. New evidence suggested that the infiltration of CXCL13-expressing CD4(+) follicular helper cells (Tfh) in breast tumor predicted better survival. Here, we examined the regulation of Tfh function in breast cancer patients in depth. We found that the frequencies of circulating Tfh cells were not altered in breast cancer patients compared to healthy controls. However, the expression of PD-1 and Tim-3 in Tfh cells was significantly elevated in breast cancer patients. Interestingly, we observed a preferential upregulation of PD-1 in Tim-3(+) Tfh cells compared to Tim-3(-) Tfh cells. Coexpression of PD-1 and Tim-3 is typically a hallmark of functional exhaustion in chronic virus infections and tumor. To examine whether Tim-3(+) identifies exhausted Tfh cells, we stimulated Tfh cells with anti-CD3/CD28, and found that Tim-3(+) T cells expressed reduced frequencies of chemokine CXCL13 and cytokine interleukin 21 (IL-21), and contained fewer proliferating cells, than Tim-3(-) Tfh cells. Compared to those cocultured with Tim-3(-) Tfh cells, naive B cells cocultured with Tim-3(+) Tfh cells resulted in significantly less IgM, IgG and IgA production after 12 day incubation, demonstrating a reduction in Tim-3(+) Tfh-mediated B cell help. Moreover, the frequencies of Tim-3(+) Tfh cells in resected breast tumor were further upregulated than autologous blood, suggesting a participation of Tim-3(+) Tfh cells in tumor physiology. Overall, the data presented here provided new insight in the regulation of Tfh cells in breast cancer patients.

  3. Metabolomic profile in pancreatic cancer patients: a consensus-based approach to identify highly discriminating metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Di Gangi, Iole Maria; Mazza, Tommaso; Fontana, Andrea; Copetti, Massimiliano; Fusilli, Caterina; Ippolito, Antonio; Mattivi, Fulvio; Latiano, Anna; Andriulli, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths due to its aggressive behavior and poor clinical outcome. There is a considerable variability in the frequency of serum tumor markers in cancer' patients. We performed a metabolomics screening in patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Experimental Design Two targeted metabolomic assays were conducted on 40 serum samples of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40 healthy controls. Multivariate methods and classification trees were performed. Materials and Methods Sparse partial least squares discriminant analysis (SPLS-DA) was used to reduce the high dimensionality of a pancreatic cancer metabolomic dataset, differentiating between pancreatic cancer (PC) patients and healthy subjects. Using Random Forest analysis palmitic acid, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-glycerol, lanosterol, lignoceric acid, 1-monooleoyl-rac-glycerol, cholesterol 5α,6α epoxide, erucic acid and taurolithocholic acid (T-LCA), oleoyl-L-carnitine, oleanolic acid were identified among 206 metabolites as highly discriminating between disease states. Comparison between Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves for palmitic acid and CA 19-9 showed that the area under the ROC curve (AUC) of palmitic acid (AUC=1.000; 95% confidence interval) is significantly higher than CA 19-9 (AUC=0.963; 95% confidence interval: 0.896-1.000). Conclusion Mass spectrometry-based metabolomic profiling of sera from pancreatic cancer patients and normal subjects showed significant alterations in the profiles of the metabolome of PC patients as compared to controls. These findings offer an information-rich matrix for discovering novel candidate biomarkers with diagnostic or prognostic potentials. PMID:26735340

  4. Identifying the Basal Ganglia Network Model Markers for Medication-Induced Impulsivity in Parkinson's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramani, Pragathi Priyadharsini; Chakravarthy, V. Srinivasa; Ali, Manal; Ravindran, Balaraman; Moustafa, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    Impulsivity, i.e. irresistibility in the execution of actions, may be prominent in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients who are treated with dopamine precursors or dopamine receptor agonists. In this study, we combine clinical investigations with computational modeling to explore whether impulsivity in PD patients on medication may arise as a result of abnormalities in risk, reward and punishment learning. In order to empirically assess learning outcomes involving risk, reward and punishment, four subject groups were examined: healthy controls, ON medication PD patients with impulse control disorder (PD-ON ICD) or without ICD (PD-ON non-ICD), and OFF medication PD patients (PD-OFF). A neural network model of the Basal Ganglia (BG) that has the capacity to predict the dysfunction of both the dopaminergic (DA) and the serotonergic (5HT) neuromodulator systems was developed and used to facilitate the interpretation of experimental results. In the model, the BG action selection dynamics were mimicked using a utility function based decision making framework, with DA controlling reward prediction and 5HT controlling punishment and risk predictions. The striatal model included three pools of Medium Spiny Neurons (MSNs), with D1 receptor (R) alone, D2R alone and co-expressing D1R-D2R. Empirical studies showed that reward optimality was increased in PD-ON ICD patients while punishment optimality was increased in PD-OFF patients. Empirical studies also revealed that PD-ON ICD subjects had lower reaction times (RT) compared to that of the PD-ON non-ICD patients. Computational modeling suggested that PD-OFF patients have higher punishment sensitivity, while healthy controls showed comparatively higher risk sensitivity. A significant decrease in sensitivity to punishment and risk was crucial for explaining behavioral changes observed in PD-ON ICD patients. Our results highlight the power of computational modelling for identifying neuronal circuitry implicated in learning, and its

  5. Combination of micro-dialysis and infrared spectroscopy: a multianalyte assay for accurate biofluid analysis and patient monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahlsing, Thorsten; Delbeck, Sven; Budde, Janpeter; Ihrig, Dieter; Heise, H. Michael

    2016-03-01

    Micro-dialysis can be used for continuously harvesting body fluids, while a multi-component analysis of the dialysates by infrared spectrometry offers splendid opportunities for monitoring substrates and metabolites such as glucose, lactate and others small enough to penetrate the semi-permeable dialysis membranes. However, a drawback of this process are variable recovery rates, which can be observed especially for subcutaneously implanted catheters in human subjects. Isotonic perfusates were investigated with acetate and mannitol as recovery markers for the dialysis of human serum at 37°C to mimic in vivo patient monitoring. The latter non-ionic substance has been suggested for application when other ionic substances such as bicarbonate or pH are also to be determined. Simultaneously for acetate and mannitol, the depletion of the marker substances from the perfusates using different micro-dialysis devices was investigated under various flow-rates. Relationships between relative dialysate marker concentrations and glucose recovery rates were determined based on multivariate calibrations. For quantification, classical least squares with reference spectra for modelling the serum dialysates was used, rendering a basis for reliable blood glucose and lactate measurements.

  6. The implications of sonographically identified cervical changes in patients not necessarily at risk for preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Riley, L; Frigoletto, F D; Benacerraf, B R

    1992-03-01

    Sonography of the cervix and lower uterine segment has been used in evaluating pregnancies at risk for incompetent cervix and premature labor. Shortened cervix (less than 3 cm) and open internal os with funneling of the membranes into the endocervical canal are sonographic features associated with premature delivery. We identified these sonographic signs in a group of 31 asymptomatic women who were undergoing prenatal sonography for multiple indications, not necessarily related to premature labor or cervical incompetence. Nineteen patients (61%) in this heterogeneous population had pregnancies complicated by preterm labor, clinical evidence of incompetent cervix, or preterm birth. We conclude that the presence of abnormal sonographic features of the cervix seen incidentally during prenatal sonography on asymptomatic patients warrants close clinical attention. PMID:1608077

  7. Kernel mixture survival models for identifying cancer subtypes, predicting patient's cancer types and survival probabilities.

    PubMed

    Ando, Tomohiro; Imoto, Seiya; Miyano, Satoru

    2004-01-01

    One important application of microarray gene expression data is to study the relationship between the clinical phenotype of cancer patients and gene expression profiles on the whole-genome scale. The clinical phenotype includes several different types of cancers, survival times, relapse times, drug responses and so on. Under the situation that the subtypes of cancer have not been previously identified or known to exist, we develop a new kernel mixture modeling method that performs simultaneously identification of the subtype of cancer, prediction of the probabilities of both cancer type and patient's survival, and detection of a set of marker genes on which to base a diagnosis. The proposed method is successfully performed on real data analysis and simulation studies.

  8. Guidelines for doctors on identifying and helping their patients who batter.

    PubMed

    Adams, D

    1996-01-01

    While there are a growing number of medical guides for assisting physicians to identify and help victims of domestic violence, there has been scant attention to how physicians can best respond to perpetrators. The medical model's deficient grasp of violence, combined with the minimizing and excuse-making strategies employed by batterers hinder physicians' ability to detect batterers in their practices and to prescribe the right solutions. Earlier detection is possible, however, when doctors adopt routine diagnostic procedures for all patients and ask informed follow-up questions when there are indications of domestic violence. Finally, physicians should become aware of the effective batterer treatment programs in their areas and make this information easily available to their patients who batter.

  9. Volatile organic metabolites identify patients with breast cancer, cyclomastopathy, and mammary gland fibroma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changsong; Sun, Bo; Guo, Lei; Wang, Xiaoyang; Ke, Chaofu; Liu, Shanshan; Zhao, Wei; Luo, Suqi; Guo, Zhigang; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Guowang; Li, Enyou

    2014-01-01

    The association between cancer and volatile organic metabolites in exhaled breaths has attracted increasing attention from researchers. The present study reports on a systematic study of gas profiles of metabolites in human exhaled breath by pattern recognition methods. Exhaled breath was collected from 85 patients with histologically confirmed breast disease (including 39 individuals with infiltrating ductal carcinoma, 25 individuals with cyclomastopathy and from 21 individuals with mammary gland fibroma) and 45 healthy volunteers. Principal component analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis were used to process the final data. The volatile organic metabolites exhibited significant differences between breast cancer and normal controls, breast cancer and cyclomastopathy, and breast cancer and mammary gland fibroma; 21, 6, and 8 characteristic metabolites played decisive roles in sample classification, respectively (P < 0.05). Three volatile organic metabolites in the exhaled air, 2,5,6-trimethyloctane, 1,4-dimethoxy-2,3-butanediol, and cyclohexanone, distinguished breast cancer patients from healthy individuals, mammary gland fibroma patients, and patients with cyclomastopathy (P < 0.05). The identified three volatile organic metabolites associated with breast cancer may serve as novel diagnostic biomarkers. PMID:24947160

  10. Characterization of circulating tumor cell aggregates identified in patients with epithelial tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Edward H.; Wendel, Marco; Luttgen, Madelyn; Yoshioka, Craig; Marrinucci, Dena; Lazar, Daniel; Schram, Ethan; Nieva, Jorge; Bazhenova, Lyudmila; Morgan, Alison; Ko, Andrew H.; Korn, W. Michael; Kolatkar, Anand; Bethel, Kelly; Kuhn, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been implicated as a population of cells that may seed metastasis and venous thromboembolism (VTE), two major causes of mortality in cancer patients. Thus far, existing CTC detection technologies have been unable to reproducibly detect CTC aggregates in order to address what contribution CTC aggregates may make to metastasis or VTE. We report here an enrichment-free immunofluorescence detection method that can reproducibly detect and enumerate homotypic CTC aggregates in patient samples. We identified CTC aggregates in 43% of 86 patient samples. The fraction of CTC aggregation was investigated in blood draws from 24 breast, 14 non-small cell lung, 18 pancreatic, 15 prostate stage IV cancer patients and 15 normal blood donors. Both single CTCs and CTC aggregates were measured to determine whether differences exist in the physical characteristics of these two populations. Cells contained in CTC aggregates had less area and length, on average, than single CTCs. Nuclear to cytoplasmic ratios between single CTCs and CTC aggregates were similar. This detection method may assist future studies in determining which population of cells is more physically likely to contribute to metastasis and VTE.

  11. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies Mutations in Usher Syndrome Genes in Profoundly Deaf Tunisian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Riahi, Zied; Bonnet, Crystel; Zainine, Rim; Lahbib, Saida; Bouyacoub, Yosra; Bechraoui, Rym; Marrakchi, Jihène; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Louha, Malek; Largueche, Leila; Ben Yahia, Salim; Kheirallah, Moncef; Elmatri, Leila; Besbes, Ghazi; Abdelhak, Sonia; Petit, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by combined deafness-blindness. It accounts for about 50% of all hereditary deafness blindness cases. Three clinical subtypes (USH1, USH2, and USH3) are described, of which USH1 is the most severe form, characterized by congenital profound deafness, constant vestibular dysfunction, and a prepubertal onset of retinitis pigmentosa. We performed whole exome sequencing in four unrelated Tunisian patients affected by apparently isolated, congenital profound deafness, with reportedly normal ocular fundus examination. Four biallelic mutations were identified in two USH1 genes: a splice acceptor site mutation, c.2283-1G>T, and a novel missense mutation, c.5434G>A (p.Glu1812Lys), in MYO7A, and two previously unreported mutations in USH1G, i.e. a frameshift mutation, c.1195_1196delAG (p.Leu399Alafs*24), and a nonsense mutation, c.52A>T (p.Lys18*). Another ophthalmological examination including optical coherence tomography actually showed the presence of retinitis pigmentosa in all the patients. Our findings provide evidence that USH is under-diagnosed in Tunisian deaf patients. Yet, early diagnosis of USH is of utmost importance because these patients should undergo cochlear implant surgery in early childhood, in anticipation of the visual loss. PMID:25798947

  12. Nosocomial infections in Brazilian pediatric patients: using a decision tree to identify high mortality groups.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Julia M M; Goulart, Eugenio M A; Siqueira, Arminda L; Fonseca, Inara K; Brito, Marcus V S de; Starling, Carlos E F

    2009-04-01

    Nosocomial infections (NI) are frequent events with potentially lethal outcomes. We identified predictive factors for mortality related to NI and developed an algorithm for predicting that risk in order to improve hospital epidemiology and healthcare quality programs. We made a prospective cohort NI surveillance of all acute-care patients according to the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System guidelines since 1992, applying the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1988 definitions adapted to a Brazilian pediatric hospital. Thirty-eight deaths considered to be related to NI were analyzed as the outcome variable for 754 patients with NI, whose survival time was taken into consideration. The predictive factors for mortality related to NI (p < 0.05 in the Cox regression model) were: invasive procedures and use of two or more antibiotics. The mean survival time was significantly shorter (p < 0.05 with the Kaplan-Meier method) for patients who suffered invasive procedures and for those who received two or more antibiotics. Applying a tree-structured survival analysis (TSSA), two groups with high mortality rates were identified: one group with time from admission to the first NI less than 11 days, received two or more antibiotics and suffered invasive procedures; the other group had the first NI between 12 and 22 days after admission and was subjected to invasive procedures. The possible modifiable factors to prevent mortality involve invasive devices and antibiotics. The TSSA approach is helpful to identify combinations of predictors and to guide protective actions to be taken in continuous-quality-improvement programs. PMID:20140354

  13. Predictors of Extubation Failure in Neurocritical Patients Identified by a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kaibin; Lin, Zhenzhou; Qiao, Weiguang; Pan, Suyue

    2014-01-01

    Background Prediction of extubation failure, particularly in neurocritical patients, is unique and controversial. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify the risk factors for extubation failure in these patients. Methods A literature search of databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and Web of Science) was performed up to August of 2013 to identify trials that evaluated extubation failure predictors. Included trials were either prospective or retrospective cohort studies. Results Nine studies involving 928 participants were included. The systematic review and meta-analysis revealed that the following were predictive for extubation failure: pneumonia, atelectasis, mechanical ventilation of >24 h, a low Glasgow Coma Scale score (7–9T) (OR = 4.96, 95% CI = 1.61–15.26, P = 0.005), the inability to follow commands (OR = 2.07, 95% CI = 1.15–3.71, P = 0.02), especially the command to close the eyes, thick secretion, and no intact gag reflex. Meanwhile, the following were not predictive for extubation failure: sex, secretion volume, coughing upon suctioning, and the inability to follow one command among showing two fingers, wiggling the toes, or coughing on command. Additionally, some traditional weaning parameters were shown to poorly predict extubation failure in neurocritical patients. Conclusions Besides pneumonia, atelectasis, and the duration of mechanical ventilation, other factors that should be taken into consideration in the prediction of extubation failure when neurocritical patients are weaned from tracheal intubation include neurologic abilities (Glasgow Coma Scale score and following commands), the secretion texture, and the presence of a gag reflex. PMID:25486091

  14. Rationing and life-saving treatments: should identifiable patients have higher priority?

    PubMed Central

    Hope, T.

    2001-01-01

    Health care systems across the world are unable to afford the best treatment for all patients in all situations. Choices have to be made. One key ethical issue that arises for health authorities is whether the principle of the "rule of rescue" should be adopted or rejected. According to this principle more funding should be available in order to save lives of identifiable, compared with unidentifiable, individuals. Six reasons for giving such priority to identifiable individuals are considered. All are rejected. It is concluded that the principle of the rule of rescue should not be used in determining the allocation of health resources. Key Words: "Rule of rescue" • priority setting • resource allocation • rationing • justice PMID:11417026

  15. Augmented renal clearance in septic and traumatized patients with normal plasma creatinine concentrations: identifying at-risk patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Improved methods to optimize drug dosing in the critically ill are urgently needed. Traditional prescribing culture involves recognition of factors that mandate dose reduction (such as renal impairment), although optimizing drug exposure, through more frequent or augmented dosing, represents an evolving strategy. Elevated creatinine clearance (CLCR) has been associated with sub-therapeutic antibacterial concentrations in the critically ill, a concept termed augmented renal clearance (ARC). We aimed to determine the prevalence of ARC in a cohort of septic and traumatized critically ill patients, while also examining demographic, physiological and illness severity characteristics that may help identify this phenomenon. Methods This prospective observational study was performed in a 30-bed tertiary level, university affiliated, adult intensive care unit. Consecutive traumatized and septic critically ill patients, receiving antibacterial therapy, with a plasma creatinine concentration ≤110 μmol/L, were eligible for enrolment. Pulse contour analysis (Vigileo / Flo Trac® system, Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA), was used to provide continuous cardiac index (CI) assessment over a single six-hour dosing interval. Urinary CLCR measures were obtained concurrently. Results Seventy-one patients contributed data (sepsis n = 43, multi-trauma n = 28). Overall, 57.7% of the cohort manifested ARC, although there was a greater prevalence in trauma (85.7% versus 39.5%, P <0.001). In all patients, a weak correlation was noted between CI and CLCR (r = 0.346, P = 0.003). This was mostly driven by septic patients (r = 0.508, P = 0.001), as no correlation (r = -0.012, P = 0.951) was identified in trauma. Those manifesting ARC were younger (P <0.001), male (P = 0.012), with lower acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II (P= 0.008) and modified sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores (P = 0.013), and higher cardiac indices (P = 0.013). In

  16. Using Electronic Health Record Data to Identify Prostate Cancer Patients That May Qualify for Active Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Knighton, Andrew J.; Belnap, Tom; Brunisholz, Kim; Huynh, Kelly; Bishoff, Jay T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The introduction of the protein-specific antigen (PSA) test in care means that prostate cancer (PCa) is being detected earlier and more frequently. The result of increased screening using PSA, digital rectal examination and awareness of prostate was an increase in the number of men with low risk cancers. Active surveillance has become a viable alternative to immediate treatment with surgery, radiation and other forms of localized treatment. Evidence suggests that there is no significant difference in mortality rates between AS and surgery. In addition, patients may potentially delay other complications associated with surgery, radiation or deprivation therapy. Methods: This quality improvement study using a delivery system science framework describes the electronic identification of AS candidates given an evidence-based identification criteria based upon national guidelines and clinical judgement. The study population (n=649) was drawn from health records of all patients who received a prostate biopsy (n=1731) at Intermountain Healthcare from 1/1/2013 to 12/31/2014. Automated and manual abstraction was performed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to compare AS-eligible patients to the actual treatment received to identify potential care improvement opportunities. Among those with complete data, 24.7% of this population (n=160) met “AS-eligible” criteria. 39.1% of the population had not received surgery, radiation or androgen deprivation therapy and were considered as being treated using an AS approach. 9% of AS-eligible patients did not receive AS; 27% of patients who did not meet AS-eligible criteria received AS. Estimated guideline adherence measured using area under the curve was 0.70 (95% CI: 0.66–0.73). Modest variation in criteria parameters for identifying AS-eligible patients did not significantly change estimated adherence levels. Conclusion: Implementation of evidence-based criteria for detection of AS

  17. Using Electronic Health Record Data to Identify Prostate Cancer Patients That May Qualify for Active Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Knighton, Andrew J.; Belnap, Tom; Brunisholz, Kim; Huynh, Kelly; Bishoff, Jay T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The introduction of the protein-specific antigen (PSA) test in care means that prostate cancer (PCa) is being detected earlier and more frequently. The result of increased screening using PSA, digital rectal examination and awareness of prostate was an increase in the number of men with low risk cancers. Active surveillance has become a viable alternative to immediate treatment with surgery, radiation and other forms of localized treatment. Evidence suggests that there is no significant difference in mortality rates between AS and surgery. In addition, patients may potentially delay other complications associated with surgery, radiation or deprivation therapy. Methods: This quality improvement study using a delivery system science framework describes the electronic identification of AS candidates given an evidence-based identification criteria based upon national guidelines and clinical judgement. The study population (n=649) was drawn from health records of all patients who received a prostate biopsy (n=1731) at Intermountain Healthcare from 1/1/2013 to 12/31/2014. Automated and manual abstraction was performed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to compare AS-eligible patients to the actual treatment received to identify potential care improvement opportunities. Among those with complete data, 24.7% of this population (n=160) met “AS-eligible” criteria. 39.1% of the population had not received surgery, radiation or androgen deprivation therapy and were considered as being treated using an AS approach. 9% of AS-eligible patients did not receive AS; 27% of patients who did not meet AS-eligible criteria received AS. Estimated guideline adherence measured using area under the curve was 0.70 (95% CI: 0.66–0.73). Modest variation in criteria parameters for identifying AS-eligible patients did not significantly change estimated adherence levels. Conclusion: Implementation of evidence-based criteria for detection of AS

  18. Identifying and assessing the risk of opioid abuse in patients with cancer: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, Ashley-Nicole; Morgan, Laura; Del Fabbro, Egidio

    2016-01-01

    Background The misuse and abuse of opioid medications in many developed nations is a health crisis, leading to increased health-system utilization, emergency department visits, and overdose deaths. There are also increasing concerns about opioid abuse and diversion in patients with cancer, even at the end of life. Aims To evaluate the current literature on opioid misuse and abuse, and more specifically the identification and assessment of opioid-abuse risk in patients with cancer. Our secondary aim is to offer the most current evidence of best clinical practice and suggest future directions for research. Materials and methods Our integrative review included a literature search using the key terms “identification and assessment of opioid abuse in cancer”, “advanced cancer and opioid abuse”, “hospice and opioid abuse”, and “palliative care and opioid abuse”. PubMed, PsycInfo, and Embase were supplemented by a manual search. Results We found 691 articles and eliminated 657, because they were predominantly non cancer populations or specifically excluded cancer patients. A total of 34 articles met our criteria, including case studies, case series, retrospective observational studies, and narrative reviews. The studies were categorized into screening questionnaires for opioid abuse or alcohol, urine drug screens to identify opioid misuse or abuse, prescription drug-monitoring programs, and the use of universal precautions. Conclusion Screening questionnaires and urine drug screens indicated at least one in five patients with cancer may be at risk of opioid-use disorder. Several studies demonstrated associations between high-risk patients and clinical outcomes, such as aberrant behavior, prolonged opioid use, higher morphine-equivalent daily dose, greater health care utilization, and symptom burden. PMID:27330340

  19. Experiences of patients identifying with chronic Lyme disease in the healthcare system: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic Lyme disease is a term that describes a constellation of persistent symptoms in patients with or without evidence of previous Borrelia burgdorferi infection. Patients labeled as having chronic Lyme disease have a substantial clinical burden. Little is known about chronic Lyme disease patient experiences in the healthcare system and their relationships with healthcare providers. The purpose of this study was to gather insights about the experiences of patients who carry a diagnosis of chronic Lyme disease in the United States healthcare system. Methods Qualitative, phenomenological study in 12 adult participants who identified themselves as having chronic Lyme disease. Semi-structured face-to-face in-depth interviews were conducted, 60–90 minutes in length, focusing on perceptions of disease burden and of their healthcare providers, using the dimensions of the Health Belief Model. Transcribed interviews were analyzed for emergent topics and themes in the categories of beliefs/understanding, personal history/narrative, consequences/limitations, management, and influences on care. Results Enrollment continued until theoretical saturation was obtained. Four major themes emerged from participants’ descriptions of their experiences and perceptions: 1) changes in health status and the social impact of chronic Lyme disease, 2) doubts about recovery and the future, 3) contrasting doctor-patient relationships, 4) and the use of unconventional therapies to treat chronic Lyme disease. Conclusions Participants reported a significant decline in health status associated with chronic Lyme disease and were often unsatisfied with care in conventional settings. Negative experiences were associated with reports of dismissive, patronizing, and condescending attitudes. Positive experiences were associated with providers who were reported to be attentive, optimistic, and supportive. Consultations with CAM practitioners and use of CAM therapies were common. Actively

  20. Clinical decision aids for chest pain in the emergency department: identifying low-risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Alley, William; Mahler, Simon A

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain is one of the most common presenting complaints in the emergency department, though only a small minority of patients are subsequently diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, missing the diagnosis has potential for significant morbidity and mortality. ACS presentations can be atypical, and their workups are often prolonged and costly. In order to risk-stratify patients and better direct the workup and care given, many decision aids have been developed. While each may have merit in certain clinical settings, the most useful aid in the emergency department is one that finds all cases of ACS while also identifying a substantial subset of patients at low risk who can be discharged without stress testing or coronary angiography. This review describes several of the chest pain decision aids developed and studied through the recent past, starting with the thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) risk score and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) scores, which were developed as prognostic aids for patients already diagnosed with ACS, then subsequently validated in the undifferentiated chest pain population. Asia-Pacific Evaluation of Chest Pain Trial (ASPECT); Accelerated Diagnostic Protocol to Assess Patients With Chest Pain Symptoms Using Contemporary Troponins (ADAPT); North American Chest Pain Rule (NACPR); and History, Electrocardiogram, Age, Risk factors, Troponin (HEART) score have been developed exclusively for use in the undifferentiated chest pain population as well, with improved performance compared to their predecessors. This review describes the relative merits and limitations of these decision aids so that providers can determine which tool fits the needs of their clinical practice setting. PMID:27147894

  1. A genome-wide scan identifies variants in NFIB associated with metastasis in patients with osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Mirabello, Lisa; Koster, Roelof; Moriarity, Branden S.; Spector, Logan G.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Gary, Joy; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Pankratz, Nathan; Panagiotou, Orestis A.; Largaespada, David; Wang, Zhaoming; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gorlick, Richard; Khanna, Chand; de Toledo, Silvia Regina Caminada; Petrilli, Antonio S.; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Lecanda, Fernando; Andrulis, Irene L.; Wunder, Jay S.; Gokgoz, Nalan; Serra, Massimo; Hattinger, Claudia; Picci, Piero; Scotlandi, Katia; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Tirabosco, Roberto; Amary, Maria Fernanda; Halai, Dina; Ballinger, Mandy L.; Thomas, David M.; Davis, Sean; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Marina, Neyssa; Helman, Lee; Otto, George M.; Becklin, Kelsie L.; Wolf, Natalie K.; Weg, Madison T.; Tucker, Margaret; Wacholder, Sholom; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Boland, Joseph F.; Hicks, Belynda D.; Vogt, Aurelie; Burdett, Laurie; Yeager, Meredith; Hoover, Robert N.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Savage, Sharon A.

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of death in osteosarcoma patients, the most common pediatric bone malignancy. We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study of osteosarcoma metastasis at diagnosis in 935 osteosarcoma patients to determine whether germline genetic variation contributes to risk of metastasis. We identified a SNP, rs7034162, in NFIB significantly associated with metastasis in European osteosarcoma cases, as well as in cases of African and Brazilian ancestry (meta-analysis of all cases: P=1.2×10−9, OR 2.43, 95% CI 1.83–3.24). The risk allele was significantly associated with lowered NFIB expression, which led to increased osteosarcoma cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, a transposon screen in mice identified a significant proportion of osteosarcomas harboring inactivating insertions in Nfib, and had lowered Nfib expression. These data suggest that germline genetic variation at rs7034162 is important in osteosarcoma metastasis, and that NFIB is an osteosarcoma metastasis susceptibility gene. PMID:26084801

  2. How do clinical features help identify paediatric patients with fractures following blunt wrist trauma?

    PubMed Central

    Webster, A P; Goodacre, S; Walker, D; Burke, D

    2006-01-01

    Objective Wrist injuries are a common presentation to the emergency department (ED). There are no validated decision rules to help clinicians evaluate paediatric wrist trauma. This study aimed to identify which clinical features are diagnostically useful in deciding the need for a wrist radiograph, and then to develop a clinical decision rule. Methods This prospective cohort study was carried out in the ED of Sheffield Children's Hospital. Eligible patients were recruited if presenting within 72 hours following blunt wrist trauma. A standardised data collection form was completed for all patients. The outcome measure was the presence or absence of a fracture. Univariate analysis was performed with the χ2 test. Associated variables (p<0.2) were entered into a multivariate model. Classification and regression tree (CART) analysis was used to derive the clinical decision rule. Results In total, 227 patients were recruited and 106 children were diagnosed with fractures (47%). Of 10 clinical features analysed, six were found by univariate analysis to be associated with a fracture. CART analysis identified the presence of radial tenderness, focal swelling, or an abnormal supination/pronation as the best discriminatory features. Cross fold validation of this decision rule had a sensitivity of 99.1% (95% confidence interval 94.8% to 100%) and a specificity of 24.0% (17.2% to 32.3%). The radiography rate would be 87%. Conclusions Radial tenderness, focal swelling, and abnormal supination/pronation are associated with wrist fractures in children. The clinical decision rule derived from these features had a high sensitivity, but low specificity, and would not substantially alter our current radiography rate. The potential for a clinical decision rule for paediatric wrist trauma appears limited. PMID:16627835

  3. Urinary Bladder Paragangliomas: How Immunohistochemistry Can Assist to Identify Patients With SDHB Germline and Somatic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Giubellino, Alessio; Lara, Karlena; Martucci, Victoria; Huynh, Than; Agarwal, Piyush; Pacak, Karel; Merino, Maria J

    2015-11-01

    Urinary bladder paraganglioma (paraganglioma) is a rare tumor of chromaffin cells of the sympathetic system of the urinary bladder wall. We studied 14 cases of this entity and investigated the usefulness of SDHB protein staining by immunohistochemistry (IHC) as a diagnostic tool to identify patients with bladder paragangliomas that could be associated with SDHB gene mutations, as these patients have a more aggressive disease. Eleven tumors from these patients were stained by IHC. Six of 11 tumors were negative for SDHB staining by IHC with no cytoplasmic staining in tumor cells when compared with normal tissues. Five of these 6 negative cases were confirmed to be positive for germline SDHB mutations. One case showed negative staining and no germline SDHB mutation; however, further investigation of the tumor revealed a somatic SDHB gene deletion. The remaining 5 cases showed strong cytoplasmic staining, but they were negative for the presence of SDHB mutation. They were found to be either sporadic tumors or part of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome. Staining for SDHA was positive in all cases. Our study confirms that there is very good correlation between the presence of an SDHB mutation, whether germline or sporadic, and negative SDHB IHC staining in urinary bladder paragangliomas, and this is the first study to demonstrate that somatic mutations can be recognized by IHC staining.

  4. Urinary Bladder Paragangliomas: How Immunohistochemistry Can Assist to Identify Patients With SDHB Germline and Somatic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Giubellino, Alessio; Lara, Karlena; Martucci, Victoria; Huynh, Than; Agarwal, Piyush; Pacak, Karel; Merino, Maria J

    2015-11-01

    Urinary bladder paraganglioma (paraganglioma) is a rare tumor of chromaffin cells of the sympathetic system of the urinary bladder wall. We studied 14 cases of this entity and investigated the usefulness of SDHB protein staining by immunohistochemistry (IHC) as a diagnostic tool to identify patients with bladder paragangliomas that could be associated with SDHB gene mutations, as these patients have a more aggressive disease. Eleven tumors from these patients were stained by IHC. Six of 11 tumors were negative for SDHB staining by IHC with no cytoplasmic staining in tumor cells when compared with normal tissues. Five of these 6 negative cases were confirmed to be positive for germline SDHB mutations. One case showed negative staining and no germline SDHB mutation; however, further investigation of the tumor revealed a somatic SDHB gene deletion. The remaining 5 cases showed strong cytoplasmic staining, but they were negative for the presence of SDHB mutation. They were found to be either sporadic tumors or part of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome. Staining for SDHA was positive in all cases. Our study confirms that there is very good correlation between the presence of an SDHB mutation, whether germline or sporadic, and negative SDHB IHC staining in urinary bladder paragangliomas, and this is the first study to demonstrate that somatic mutations can be recognized by IHC staining. PMID:26457353

  5. Identifying psychiatric patients with serotonergic dysfunctions by event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Hegerl, U; Juckel, G

    2000-04-01

    The increasing knowledge concerning anatomical structures and cellular processes underlying event-related potentials (ERP) as well as methodological advances in ERP data analysis (e.g. dipole source analysis) is beginning to bridge the gap between ERP and neurochemical aspects. Reliable indicators of the serotonin system are urgently needed because of its role in pathophysiology and as target of pharmacotherapeutic interventions in psychiatric disorders. Converging arguments from preclinical and clinical studies support the hypothesis that the loudness dependence of the auditory evoked N1/P2-response (LDAEP) is regulated by the level of central serotonergic neurotransmission. Dipole source analysis represents an important methodological advance in this context, because the two N1/P2-subcomponents, generated by the primary and secondary auditory cortex known to be differentially innervated by serotonergic fibres, can be separated. A pronounced LDAEP of primary auditory cortices is supposed to reflect low central serotonergic neurotransmission, and vice versa. LDAEP is a parameter with potential clinical value since subgroups of patients with a serotonergic dysfunction can be identified and can be treated more specifically. In depressed patients, a significant relationship between strong LDAEP, indicating low serotonergic function, and a favourable response to SSRI has been found. Additionally, there is evidence from several studies with patients with affective disorders that a strong LDAEP predicts favourable response to a preventive lithium treatment. PMID:12607207

  6. Identifying patient subtypes in multiple sclerosis and tailoring immunotherapy: challenges for the future.

    PubMed

    De Jager, Philip L

    2009-11-01

    The accelerating pace of technological and analytical development in the fields of genetic and phenotypic profiling has ushered in an era of great promise for multiple sclerosis (MS) research. As we continue to identify modest but meaningful associations to MS susceptibility, disease course, treatment response, and other clinical or paraclinical phenotypes, we must begin to (1) embark on the challenging set of studies that will integrate disparate observations into clinical algorithms, and (2) validate their clinical utility. Genetic data are receiving muchofthe attention today, but they are unlikelytobesufficienttooffer a personalized approach to disease management in MS. Rather, the genetic architecture of the disease, once uncovered, will offer a fixed platform upon which more dynamic molecular profiles can be assembled to deconstruct the structure of the patient population that we label with a diagnosis of MS. The tools and methods to gain insight into the heterogeneity of MS patients are available today; we must now realize their potential in enhancing the care of MS patients.

  7. Can we identify patients at risk of life-threatening allergic reactions to food?

    PubMed

    Turner, P J; Baumert, J L; Beyer, K; Boyle, R J; Chan, C-H; Clark, A T; Crevel, R W R; DunnGalvin, A; Fernández-Rivas, M; Gowland, M H; Grabenhenrich, L; Hardy, S; Houben, G F; O'B Hourihane, J; Muraro, A; Poulsen, L K; Pyrz, K; Remington, B C; Schnadt, S; van Ree, R; Venter, C; Worm, M; Mills, E N C; Roberts, G; Ballmer-Weber, B K

    2016-09-01

    Anaphylaxis has been defined as a 'severe, life-threatening generalized or systemic hypersensitivity reaction'. However, data indicate that the vast majority of food-triggered anaphylactic reactions are not life-threatening. Nonetheless, severe life-threatening reactions do occur and are unpredictable. We discuss the concepts surrounding perceptions of severe, life-threatening allergic reactions to food by different stakeholders, with particular reference to the inclusion of clinical severity as a factor in allergy and allergen risk management. We review the evidence regarding factors that might be used to identify those at most risk of severe allergic reactions to food, and the consequences of misinformation in this regard. For example, a significant proportion of food-allergic children also have asthma, yet almost none will experience a fatal food-allergic reaction; asthma is not, in itself, a strong predictor for fatal anaphylaxis. The relationship between dose of allergen exposure and symptom severity is unclear. While dose appears to be a risk factor in at least a subgroup of patients, studies report that individuals with prior anaphylaxis do not have a lower eliciting dose than those reporting previous mild reactions. It is therefore important to consider severity and sensitivity as separate factors, as a highly sensitive individual will not necessarily experience severe symptoms during an allergic reaction. We identify the knowledge gaps that need to be addressed to improve our ability to better identify those most at risk of severe food-induced allergic reactions. PMID:27138061

  8. Can we identify patients at risk of life-threatening allergic reactions to food?

    PubMed

    Turner, P J; Baumert, J L; Beyer, K; Boyle, R J; Chan, C-H; Clark, A T; Crevel, R W R; DunnGalvin, A; Fernández-Rivas, M; Gowland, M H; Grabenhenrich, L; Hardy, S; Houben, G F; O'B Hourihane, J; Muraro, A; Poulsen, L K; Pyrz, K; Remington, B C; Schnadt, S; van Ree, R; Venter, C; Worm, M; Mills, E N C; Roberts, G; Ballmer-Weber, B K

    2016-09-01

    Anaphylaxis has been defined as a 'severe, life-threatening generalized or systemic hypersensitivity reaction'. However, data indicate that the vast majority of food-triggered anaphylactic reactions are not life-threatening. Nonetheless, severe life-threatening reactions do occur and are unpredictable. We discuss the concepts surrounding perceptions of severe, life-threatening allergic reactions to food by different stakeholders, with particular reference to the inclusion of clinical severity as a factor in allergy and allergen risk management. We review the evidence regarding factors that might be used to identify those at most risk of severe allergic reactions to food, and the consequences of misinformation in this regard. For example, a significant proportion of food-allergic children also have asthma, yet almost none will experience a fatal food-allergic reaction; asthma is not, in itself, a strong predictor for fatal anaphylaxis. The relationship between dose of allergen exposure and symptom severity is unclear. While dose appears to be a risk factor in at least a subgroup of patients, studies report that individuals with prior anaphylaxis do not have a lower eliciting dose than those reporting previous mild reactions. It is therefore important to consider severity and sensitivity as separate factors, as a highly sensitive individual will not necessarily experience severe symptoms during an allergic reaction. We identify the knowledge gaps that need to be addressed to improve our ability to better identify those most at risk of severe food-induced allergic reactions.

  9. Electronic Health Record Based Algorithm to Identify Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei; Bochenek, Joseph; Doshi-Velez, Finale; Manning-Courtney, Patty; Bickel, Julie; Wildenger Welchons, Leah; Reinhold, Judy; Bing, Nicole; Ni, Yizhao; Barbaresi, William; Mentch, Frank; Basford, Melissa; Denny, Joshua; Vazquez, Lyam; Perry, Cassandra; Namjou, Bahram; Qiu, Haijun; Connolly, John; Abrams, Debra; Holm, Ingrid A.; Cobb, Beth A.; Lingren, Nataline; Solti, Imre; Hakonarson, Hakon; Kohane, Isaac S.; Harley, John; Savova, Guergana

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cohort selection is challenging for large-scale electronic health record (EHR) analyses, as International Classification of Diseases 9th edition (ICD-9) diagnostic codes are notoriously unreliable disease predictors. Our objective was to develop, evaluate, and validate an automated algorithm for determining an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) patient cohort from EHR. We demonstrate its utility via the largest investigation to date of the co-occurrence patterns of medical comorbidities in ASD. Methods We extracted ICD-9 codes and concepts derived from the clinical notes. A gold standard patient set was labeled by clinicians at Boston Children’s Hospital (BCH) (N = 150) and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and Medical Center (CCHMC) (N = 152). Two algorithms were created: (1) rule-based implementing the ASD criteria from Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Diseases 4th edition, (2) predictive classifier. The positive predictive values (PPV) achieved by these algorithms were compared to an ICD-9 code baseline. We clustered the patients based on grouped ICD-9 codes and evaluated subgroups. Results The rule-based algorithm produced the best PPV: (a) BCH: 0.885 vs. 0.273 (baseline); (b) CCHMC: 0.840 vs. 0.645 (baseline); (c) combined: 0.864 vs. 0.460 (baseline). A validation at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia yielded 0.848 (PPV). Clustering analyses of comorbidities on the three-site large cohort (N = 20,658 ASD patients) identified psychiatric, developmental, and seizure disorder clusters. Conclusions In a large cross-institutional cohort, co-occurrence patterns of comorbidities in ASDs provide further hypothetical evidence for distinct courses in ASD. The proposed automated algorithms for cohort selection open avenues for other large-scale EHR studies and individualized treatment of ASD. PMID:27472449

  10. OVSCORE - a validated score to identify ovarian cancer patients not suitable for primary surgery

    PubMed Central

    DORN, JULIA; BRONGER, HOLGER; KATES, RONALD; SLOTTA-HUSPENINA, JULIA; SCHMALFELDT, BARBARA; KIECHLE, MARION; DIAMANDIS, ELEFTHERIOS P.; SOOSAIPILLAI, ANTONINUS; SCHMITT, MANFRED; HARBECK, NADIA

    2015-01-01

    Following primary debulking surgery, the presence of a residual tumor mass is one of the most important prognostic factors in ovarian cancer. In a previous study, we established the OVSCORE, an algorithm to predict surgical outcome, based on the clinical factors of nuclear grading and ascitic fluid volume, plus the cancer biomarkers, kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs), KLK6 and KLK13. In the present study, OVSCORE performance was tested in an independent ovarian cancer patient cohort consisting of 87 patients. The impact of KLKs, KLK5, 6, 7 and 13 and other clinical factors on patient prognosis and outcome was also evaluated. The OVSCORE proved to be a strong and statistically significant predictor of surgical success in terms of area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC AUC, 0.777), as well as positive and negative predictive value in this independent study group. KLK6 and 13 individually did not show clinical relevance in this cohort, but two other KLKs, KLK5 and KLK7, were associated with advanced FIGO stage, higher nuclear grade and positive lymph node status. In the multivariate Cox regression analysis for overall survival (OS), KLK7 had a protective impact on OS. This study confirms the role of KLKs in ovarian cancer for surgical success and survival, and validates the novel OVSCORE algorithm in an independent collective. As a key clinical application, the OVSCORE could aid gynecological oncologists in identifying those ovarian cancer patients unlikely to benefit from radical surgery who could be candidates for alternative therapeutic approaches. PMID:25436002

  11. Online Discourse on Fibromyalgia: Text-Mining to Identify Clinical Distinction and Patient Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jungsik; Ryu, Young Uk

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility of using text-mining to identify clinical distinctions and patient concerns in online memoires posted by patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Material/Methods A total of 399 memoirs were collected from an FM group website. The unstructured data of memoirs associated with FM were collected through a crawling process and converted into structured data with a concordance, parts of speech tagging, and word frequency. We also conducted a lexical analysis and phrase pattern identification. After examining the data, a set of FM-related keywords were obtained and phrase net relationships were set through a web-based visualization tool. Results The clinical distinction of FM was verified. Pain is the biggest issue to the FM patients. The pains were affecting body parts including ‘muscles,’ ‘leg,’ ‘neck,’ ‘back,’ ‘joints,’ and ‘shoulders’ with accompanying symptoms such as ‘spasms,’ ‘stiffness,’ and ‘aching,’ and were described as ‘sever,’ ‘chronic,’ and ‘constant.’ This study also demonstrated that it was possible to understand the interests and concerns of FM patients through text-mining. FM patients wanted to escape from the pain and symptoms, so they were interested in medical treatment and help. Also, they seemed to have interest in their work and occupation, and hope to continue to live life through the relationships with the people around them. Conclusions This research shows the potential for extracting keywords to confirm the clinical distinction of a certain disease, and text-mining can help objectively understand the concerns of patients by generalizing their large number of subjective illness experiences. However, it is believed that there are limitations to the processes and methods for organizing and classifying large amounts of text, so these limits have to be considered when analyzing the results. The development of research methodology to overcome

  12. The logical operator map identifies novel candidate markers for critical sites in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ravelli, Flavia; Masè, Michela; Cristoforetti, Alessandro; Marini, Massimiliano; Disertori, Marcello

    2014-08-01

    The identification of suitable markers for critical patterns during atrial fibrillation (AF) may be crucial to guide an effective ablation treatment. Single parameter maps, based on dominant frequency and complex fractionated electrograms, have been proposed as a tool for electrogram-guided ablation, however the specificity of these markers is debated. Experimental studies suggest that AF critical patterns may be identified on the basis of specific rate and organization features, where rapid organized and rapid fragmented activities characterize respectively localized sources and critical substrates. In this paper we introduce the logical operator map, a novel mapping tool for a point-by-point identification and localization of AF critical sites. Based on advanced signal and image processing techniques, the approach combines in a single map electrogram-derived rate and organization features with tomographic anatomical detail. The construction of the anatomically-detailed logical operator map is based on the time-domain estimation of atrial rate and organization in terms of cycle length and wave-similarity, the logical combination of these indexes to obtain suitable markers of critical sites, and the multimodal integration of electrophysiological and anatomical information by segmentation and registration techniques. Logical operator maps were constructed in 14 patients with persistent AF, showing the capability of the combined rate and organization markers to identify with high selectivity the subset of electrograms associated with localized sources and critical substrates. The precise anatomical localization of these critical sites revealed the confinement of rapid organized sources in the left atrium with organization and rate gradients towards the surrounding tissue, and the presence of rapid fragmented electrograms in proximity of the sources. By merging in a single map the most relevant electrophysiological and anatomical features of the AF process, the

  13. Calibrating the High Density Magnetic Port within Tissue Expanders to Achieve more Accurate Dose Calculations for Postmastectomy Patients with Immediate Breast Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jasmine; Zhang, Rui; Heins, David; Castle, Katherine

    In postmastectomy radiotherapy, an increasing number of patients have tissue expanders inserted subpectorally when receiving immediate breast reconstruction. These tissue expanders are composed of silicone and are inflated with saline through an internal metallic port; this serves the purpose of stretching the muscle and skin tissue over time, in order to house a permanent implant. The issue with administering radiation therapy in the presence of a tissue expander is that the port's magnetic core can potentially perturb the dose delivered to the Planning Target Volume, causing significant artifacts in CT images. Several studies have explored this problem, and suggest that density corrections must be accounted for in treatment planning. However, very few studies accurately calibrated commercial TP systems for the high density material used in the port, and no studies employed fusion imaging to yield a more accurate contour of the port in treatment planning. We compared depth dose values in the water phantom between measurement and TPS calculations, and we were able to overcome some of the inhomogeneities presented by the image artifact by fusing the KVCT and MVCT images of the tissue expander together, resulting in a more precise comparison of dose calculations at discrete locations. We expect this method to be pivotal in the quantification of dose distribution in the PTV. Research funded by the LS-AMP Award.

  14. Prostate Cancer: Can Multiparametric MR Imaging Help Identify Patients Who Are Candidates for Active Surveillance?

    PubMed Central

    Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Aras, Omer; Ho, Jennifer; Hoang, Anthony; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R.; Agarwal, Harsh; Shah, Vijay; Bernardo, Marcelino; Pang, Yuxi; Daar, Dagane; McKinney, Yolanda L.; Linehan, W. Marston; Kaushal, Aradhana; Merino, Maria J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can help identify patients with prostate cancer who would most appropriately be candidates for active surveillance (AS) according to current guidelines and to compare the results with those of conventional clinical assessment scoring systems, including the D’Amico, Epstein, and Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) systems, on the basis of findings at prostatectomy. Materials and Methods: This institutional review board–approved HIPAA-compliant retrospectively designed study included 133 patients (mean age, 59.3 years) with a mean prostate-specific antigen level of 6.73 ng/mL (median, 4.39 ng/mL) who underwent multiparametric MR imaging at 3.0 T before radical prostatectomy. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients were then retrospectively classified as to whether they would have met AS eligibility criteria or were better served by surgery. AS eligibility criteria for prostatectomy specimens were a dominant tumor smaller than 0.5 mL without Gleason 4 or 5 patterns or extracapsular or seminal vesicle invasion. Conventional clinical assessment scores (the D’Amico, Epstein, and CAPRA scoring systems) were compared with multiparametric MR imaging findings for predicting AS candidates. The level of significance of difference between scoring systems was determined by using the χ2 test for categoric variables with the level of significance set at P < .05. Results: Among 133 patients, 14 were eligible for AS on the basis of prostatectomy results. The sensitivity, positive predictive value (PPV), and overall accuracy, respectively, were 93%, 25%, and 70% for the D’Amico system, 64%, 45%, and 88% for the Epstein criteria, and 93%, 20%, and 59% for the CAPRA scoring system for predicting AS candidates (P < .005 for all, χ2 test), while multiparametric MR imaging had a sensitivity of 93%, a PPV of 57%, and an overall accuracy of 92% (P < .005). Conclusion

  15. Identifying Patients with Bacteremia in Community-Hospital Emergency Rooms: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Takeshima, Taro; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Noguchi, Yoshinori; Maki, Nobuyuki; Gibo, Koichiro; Tsugihashi, Yukio; Doi, Asako; Fukuma, Shingo; Yamazaki, Shin; Kajii, Eiji; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives (1) To develop a clinical prediction rule to identify patients with bacteremia, using only information that is readily available in the emergency room (ER) of community hospitals, and (2) to test the validity of that rule with a separate, independent set of data. Design Multicenter retrospective cohort study. Setting To derive the clinical prediction rule we used data from 3 community hospitals in Japan (derivation). We tested the rule using data from one other community hospital (validation), which was not among the three “derivation” hospitals. Participants Adults (age ≥ 16 years old) who had undergone blood-culture testing while in the ER between April 2011 and March 2012. For the derivation data, n = 1515 (randomly sampled from 7026 patients), and for the validation data n = 467 (from 823 patients). Analysis We analyzed 28 candidate predictors of bacteremia, including demographic data, signs and symptoms, comorbid conditions, and basic laboratory data. Chi-square tests and multiple logistic regression were used to derive an integer risk score (the “ID-BactER” score). Sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (i.e., the AUC) were computed. Results There were 241 cases of bacteremia in the derivation data. Eleven candidate predictors were used in the ID-BactER score: age, chills, vomiting, mental status, temperature, systolic blood pressure, abdominal sign, white blood-cell count, platelets, blood urea nitrogen, and C-reactive protein. The AUCs was 0.80 (derivation) and 0.74 (validation). For ID-BactER scores ≥ 2, the sensitivities for derivation and validation data were 98% and 97%, and specificities were 20% and 14%, respectively. Conclusions The ID-BactER score can be computed from information that is readily available in the ERs of community hospitals. Future studies should focus on developing a score with a higher specificity while maintaining the desired sensitivity

  16. Using a family history questionnaire to identify adult patients with increased genetic risk for sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Schiavi, A.; Lavigne, J.; Turcotte, R.; Kasprzak, L.; Dumas, N.; Chong, G.; Freeman, C.; Alameldin, M.; Galiatsatos, P.; Palma, L.; Foulkes, W.D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sarcomas in adults can be associated with hereditary cancer syndromes characterized by early-onset predisposition to numerous types of cancer. Because of variability in familial presentation and the largely unexplained genetic basis of sarcomas, ascertainment of patients for whom a genetics evaluation is most indicated poses challenges. We assessed the utility of a Sarcoma Clinic Genetic Screening (scgs) questionnaire in facilitating that task. Methods Between 2008 and 2012, 169 patients (median age: 53 years; range: 17–88 years) completed a self-administered scgs questionnaire. A retrospective chart review was completed for all respondents, and descriptive statistics were reported. Probands were divided into two groups depending on whether they did or did not report a family history of Li–Fraumeni syndrome–type cancers. Results A family history of cancer (as far as 3rd-degree relatives) was reported in 113 of 163 sarcoma patients (69%). Eeles Li–Fraumeni–like (lfl) criteria were fulfilled in 46 probands (28%), Chompret lfl in 21 (13%), Birch lfl in 8 (5%), and classic Li–Fraumeni in none. In the 10 probands tested for TP53 mutations, 1 pathogenic mutation was found. Further investigation of selected families led to the discovery of germline mutations in MLH1, MSH2, and APC genes in 3 individuals. Conclusions The scgs questionnaire was useful for ascertaining probands with sarcoma who could benefit from a genetic assessment. The tool allowed us to identify high-risk families fitting the criteria for lfl and, surprisingly, other hereditary cancer syndromes. Similar questionnaires could be used in other cancer-specific clinics to increase awareness of the genetic component of these cancers. PMID:26628864

  17. Utilization of Metabolomics to Identify Serum Biomarkers for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Patients with Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Ressom, Habtom W.; Xiao, Jun Feng; Tuli, Leepika; Varghese, Rency S.; Zhou, Bin; Tsai, Tsung-Heng; Nezami Ranjbar, Mohammad R.; Zhao, Yi; Wang, Jinlian; Di Poto, Cristina; Cheema, Amrita K.; Tadesse, Mahlet G.; Goldman, Radoslav; Shetty, Kirti

    2012-01-01

    Characterizing the metabolic changes pertaining to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with liver cirrhosis is believed to contribute towards early detection, treatment, and understanding of the molecular mechanisms of HCC. In this study, we compare metabolite levels in sera of 78 HCC cases with 184 cirrhotic controls by using ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF MS). Following data preprocessing, the most relevant ions in distinguishing HCC cases from patients with cirrhosis are selected by parametric and non-parametric statistical methods. Putative metabolite identifications for these ions are obtained through mass-based database search. Verification of the identities of selected metabolites is conducted by comparing their MS/MS fragmentation patterns and retention time with those from authentic compounds. Quantitation of these metabolites is performed in a subset of the serum samples (10 HCC and 10 cirrhosis) using isotope dilution by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) on triple quadrupole linear ion trap (QqQLIT) and triple quadrupole (QqQ) mass spectrometers. The results of this analysis confirm that metabolites involved in sphingolipid metabolism and phospholipid catabolism such as sphingosine-1-phosphate (S-1-P) and lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC 17:0) are up-regulated in sera of HCC vs. those with liver cirrhosis. Down-regulated metabolites include those involved in bile acid biosynthesis (specifically cholesterol metabolism) such as glycochenodeoxycholic acid 3-sulfate (3-sulfo-GCDCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA), taurocholic acid (TCA), and taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDCA). These results provide useful insights into HCC biomarker discovery utilizing metabolomics as an efficient and cost-effective platform. Our work shows that metabolomic profiling is a promising tool to identify candidate metabolic biomarkers for early detection of HCC cases in

  18. Immunohistochemical expression pattern of MMR protein can specifically identify patients with colorectal cancer microsatellite instability.

    PubMed

    Amira, Arfaoui Toumi; Mouna, Trabelsi; Ahlem, Blel; Raoudha, Aloui; Majid, Ben Hmida; Amel, Hamza; Rachida, Zermani; Nadia, Kourdaa

    2014-07-01

    The microsatellite instability (MSI) pathway is found in most cases of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and in 12 % of sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC). It involves inactivation of deoxyribonucleic acid mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, and MSH6. MMR germline mutation detections are an important supplement to HNPCC clinical diagnosis. It enables at-risk and mutation-positive relatives to be informed about their cancer risks and to benefit from intensive surveillance programs that have been proven to reduce the incidence of CRC. In this study, we analyzed for the first time in Tunisia the potential value of immunohistochemical assessment of MMR protein to identify microsatellite instability in CRC. We evaluate by immunohistochemistry MMR protein expression loss in tumoral tissue compared to positive expression in normal mucosa. Immunohistochemistry revealed loss of expression for MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 in 15, 21, 13, and 15 % of cases, respectively. Here, we report a more elevated frequency of MSI compared to data of the literature. In fact, by immunohistochemistry, 70 % of cases were shown to be MSS phenotype, whereas 30 % of cases, in our set, were instable. Moreover, according to molecular investigation, 71 % of cases were instable (MSI-H) and remaining cases were stable (29 %). Thus, we found a perfect association between MMR immunohistochemical analyses and MSI molecular investigation. Immunohistochemical analysis of MMR gene product expression may allow one to specifically identify MSI phenotype of patients with colorectal carcinomas.

  19. Novel Carboxypeptidase A6 (CPA6) Mutations Identified in Patients with Juvenile Myoclonic and Generalized Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Sapio, Matthew R.; Vessaz, Monique; Thomas, Pierre; Genton, Pierre; Fricker, Lloyd D.; Salzmann, Annick

    2015-01-01

    Carboxypeptidase A6 (CPA6) is a peptidase that removes C-terminal hydrophobic amino acids from peptides and proteins. The CPA6 gene is expressed in the brains of humans and animals, with high levels of expression during development. It is translated with a prodomain (as proCPA6), which is removed before secretion. The active form of CPA6 binds tightly to the extracellular matrix (ECM) where it is thought to function in the processing of peptides and proteins. Mutations in the CPA6 gene have been identified in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and febrile seizures. In the present study, we screened for CPA6 mutations in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and identified two novel missense mutations: Arg36His and Asn271Ser. Patients harboring these mutations also presented with generalized epilepsy. Neither of the novel mutations was found in a control population. Asn271 is highly conserved in CPA6 and other related metallocarboxypeptidases. Arg36 is present in the prodomain and is not highly conserved. To assess structural consequences of the amino acid substitutions, both mutants were modeled within the predicted structure of the enzyme. To examine the effects of these mutations on enzyme expression and activity, we expressed the mutated enzymes in human embryonic kidney 293T cells. These analyses revealed that Asn271Ser abolished enzymatic activity, while Arg36His led to a ~50% reduction in CPA6 levels in the ECM. Pulse-chase using radio-labeled amino acids was performed to follow secretion. Newly-synthesized CPA6 appeared in the ECM with peak levels between 2-8 hours. There was no major difference in time course between wild-type and mutant forms, although the amount of radiolabeled CPA6 in the ECM was lower for the mutants. Our experiments demonstrate that these mutations in CPA6 are deleterious and provide further evidence for the involvement of CPA6 mutations in the predisposition for several types of epilepsy. PMID:25875328

  20. Empirical aspects of linking intensive care registry data to hospital discharge data without the use of direct patient identifiers.

    PubMed

    Bohensky, M A; Jolley, D; Sundararajan, V; Pilcher, D V; Evans, S; Brand, C A

    2011-03-01

    In the field of intensive care, clinical data registries are commonly used to support clinical audit and develop evidence-based practice. However, they are often restricted to the intensive care unit episode only, limiting their ability to follow long-term patient outcomes and identify patient readmissions. Data linkage can be used to supplement existing data, but a lack of unique patient identifiers may compromise the accuracy of the linkage process. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of linking the Australia/New Zealand critical care registry to a state financial claims database using a method without direct patient identifiers and to identify possible sources of bias from this method. We used a linkage method relying on indirect patient identifiers and compared the accuracy of this method to one that also included the patient medical record number and date of birth. The overall linkage rate using the method with indirect identifiers was 92.3% compared to 94.5% using the method with direct identifiers. Factors most strongly associated with not being a correct link in the first method included patients at one study hospital, admissions in 2002 and 2003 and having a hospital length of stay of 20 days or more. Linking the Australia/New Zealand critical care without direct patient identifiers is a valid linkage method that will enable the measurement of long-term patient survival and readmissions. While some sources of bias have been identified, this method provides sufficient quality linkage that will support broad analyses designed to signal future in-depth research.

  1. Novel Dielectric Coagulometer Identifies Hypercoagulability in Patients with a High CHADS2 Score without Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yuki; Hamada, Satomi; Nishimura, Takuro; Sasaki, Takeshi; Ebana, Yusuke; Kawabata, Mihoko; Goya, Masahiko; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Koyama, Takatoshi; Furukawa, Tetsushi; Hirao, Kenzo

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent reports showed that the CHADS2 score predicted the risk of strokes in patients without atrial fibrillation (AF). Although the hypercoagulability may contribute to the thrombogenesis, it has not been fully investigated due to a lack of a sensitive evaluation modality. Recently a novel dielectric blood coagulometry (DBCM) was invented for evaluating the coagulability by measuring the temporal change in whole blood dielectric permittivity. Objective We evaluated the utility of the DBCM for identifying the coagulability. Patients/Methods For fundamental experiments, 133 citrated blood samples were drawn from subjects with or without heparin administration. A DBCM analysis was performed to find the adequate coagulation index, and to delineate its measurement range by adding recombinant human tissue factor (TF) or heparin. Then the coagulability was assessed by DBCM and conventional coagulation assays in 84 subjects without AF, who were divided into 3 groups by their CHADS2 score. Another 17 patients who received warfarin were also assessed by DBCM to evaluate the effect of anticoagulants. Results and Conclusions We calculated the derivative of the dielectric permittivity change after recalcification, and extracted the end of acceleration time (EAT) as a novel index. The EAT showed a dose-dependent shortening with the addition of serial dilutions of TF (×10−2 to ×10−4), and a dose-dependent prolongation with the addition of heparin (0.05 to 0.15 U/ml). The EAT was significantly shorter in the higher CHADS2 score group (19.8 ± 4.8, 18.6 ± 3.1, and 16.3 ± 2.7 min in the CHADS2 = 0, 1, and ≥2 groups, respectively, p = 0.0065 by ANOVA). Patients receiving warfarin had a significantly more prolonged EAT than those without warfarin (18.6±4.2 vs. 25.8±7.3 min, p <0.001). DBCM detected the whole blood coagulability with a high sensitivity. Subjects with higher CHADS2 scores exhibited hypercoagulability without AF. PMID:27275926

  2. B56δ-related protein phosphatase 2A dysfunction identified in patients with intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Houge, Gunnar; Haesen, Dorien; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Mehta, Sarju; Parker, Michael J.; Wright, Michael; Vogt, Julie; McKee, Shane; Tolmie, John L.; Cordeiro, Nuno; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Willemsen, Marjolein H.; Reijnders, Margot R.F.; Berland, Siren; Hayman, Eli; Lahat, Eli; Brilstra, Eva H.; van Gassen, Koen L.I.; Zonneveld-Huijssoon, Evelien; de Bie, Charlotte I.; Hoischen, Alexander; Eichler, Evan E.; Holdhus, Rita; Steen, Vidar M.; Døskeland, Stein Ove; Hurles, Matthew E.; FitzPatrick, David R.; Janssens, Veerle

    2015-01-01

    Here we report inherited dysregulation of protein phosphatase activity as a cause of intellectual disability (ID). De novo missense mutations in 2 subunits of serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) were identified in 16 individuals with mild to severe ID, long-lasting hypotonia, epileptic susceptibility, frontal bossing, mild hypertelorism, and downslanting palpebral fissures. PP2A comprises catalytic (C), scaffolding (A), and regulatory (B) subunits that determine subcellular anchoring, substrate specificity, and physiological function. Ten patients had mutations within a highly conserved acidic loop of the PPP2R5D-encoded B56δ regulatory subunit, with the same E198K mutation present in 6 individuals. Five patients had mutations in the PPP2R1A-encoded scaffolding Aα subunit, with the same R182W mutation in 3 individuals. Some Aα cases presented with large ventricles, causing macrocephaly and hydrocephalus suspicion, and all cases exhibited partial or complete corpus callosum agenesis. Functional evaluation revealed that mutant A and B subunits were stable and uncoupled from phosphatase activity. Mutant B56δ was A and C binding–deficient, while mutant Aα subunits bound B56δ well but were unable to bind C or bound a catalytically impaired C, suggesting a dominant-negative effect where mutant subunits hinder dephosphorylation of B56δ-anchored substrates. Moreover, mutant subunit overexpression resulted in hyperphosphorylation of GSK3β, a B56δ-regulated substrate. This effect was in line with clinical observations, supporting a correlation between the ID degree and biochemical disturbance. PMID:26168268

  3. Ethnic disparity in 21-hydroxylase gene mutations identified in Pakistani congenital adrenal hyperplasia patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a group of autosomal recessive disorders caused by defects in the steroid 21 hydroxylase gene (CYP21A2). We studied the spectrum of mutations in CYP21A2 gene in a multi-ethnic population in Pakistan to explore the genetics of CAH. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted for the identification of mutations CYP21A2 and their phenotypic associations in CAH using ARMS-PCR assay. Results Overall, 29 patients were analyzed for nine different mutations. The group consisted of two major forms of CAH including 17 salt wasters and 12 simple virilizers. There were 14 phenotypic males and 15 females representing all the major ethnic groups of Pakistan. Parental consanguinity was reported in 65% cases and was equally distributed in the major ethnic groups. Among 58 chromosomes analyzed, mutations were identified in 45 (78.6%) chromosomes. The most frequent mutation was I2 splice (27%) followed by Ile173Asn (26%), Arg 357 Trp (19%), Gln319stop, 16% and Leu308InsT (12%), whereas Val282Leu was not observed in this study. Homozygosity was seen in 44% and heterozygosity in 34% cases. I2 splice mutation was found to be associated with SW in the homozygous. The Ile173Asn mutation was identified in both SW and SV forms. Moreover, Arg357Trp manifested SW in compound heterozygous state. Conclusion Our study showed that CAH exists in our population with ethnic difference in the prevalence of mutations examined. PMID:21329531

  4. Functional Study of NIPA2 Mutations Identified from the Patients with Childhood Absence Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Han; Zhang, Yuehua; Zhang, Pingping; Wang, Jingmin; Wu, Ye; Wu, Xiru; Netoff, Theoden; Jiang, Yuwu

    2014-01-01

    Recently many genetic mutations that are associated with epilepsy have been identified. The protein NIPA2 (non-imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region protein 2) is a highly selective magnesium transporter encoded by the gene NIPA2 in which we have found three mutations (p.I178F, p.N244S and p.N334_E335insD) within a population of patients with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE). In this study, immunofluorescence labeling, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), MTT metabolic rate detection and computational modeling were utilized to elucidate how these mutations result in CAE. We found in cultured neurons that NIPA2 (wild-type) proteins were localized to the cell periphery, whereas mutant proteins were not effectively trafficked to the cell membrane. Furthermore, we found a decrease in intracellular magnesium concentration in the neurons transfected with mutant NIPA2, but no effect on the survival of neurons. To understand how low intracellular magnesium resulted in hyperexcitability, we built and analyzed a computational model to simulate the effects of mutations. The model suggested that lower intracellular magnesium concentration enhanced synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) currents. This study primarily reveals that a selective magnesium transporter NIPA2 may play a role in the pathogenesis of CAE. PMID:25347071

  5. Identifying and extracting patient smoking status information from clinical narrative texts in Spanish.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Rosa L; Soto, Diego A; Pino, Esteban J

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present a system to identify and extract patient's smoking status from clinical narrative text in Spanish. The clinical narrative text was processed using natural language processing techniques, and annotated by four people with a biomedical background. The dataset used for classification had 2,465 documents, each one annotated with one of the four smoking status categories. We used two feature representations: single word token and bigrams. The classification problem was divided in two levels. First recognizing between smoker (S) and non-smoker (NS); second recognizing between current smoker (CS) and past smoker (PS). For each feature representation and classification level, we used two classifiers: Support Vector Machines (SVM) and Bayesian Networks (BN). We split our dataset as follows: a training set containing 66% of the available documents that was used to build classifiers and a test set containing the remaining 34% of the documents that was used to test and evaluate the model. Our results show that SVM together with the bigram representation performed better in both classification levels. For S vs NS classification level performance measures were: ACC=85%, Precision=85%, and Recall=90%. For CS vs PS classification level performance measures were: ACC=87%, Precision=91%, and Recall=94%. PMID:25570550

  6. Phase angle as bioelectrical marker to identify elderly patients at risk of sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Basile, Claudia; Della-Morte, David; Cacciatore, Francesco; Gargiulo, Gaetano; Galizia, Gianluigi; Roselli, Mario; Curcio, Francesco; Bonaduce, Domenico; Abete, Pasquale

    2014-10-01

    Several markers have been associated with sarcopenia in the elderly, including bioelectrical indices. Phase angle (PhA) is an impedance parameter and it has been suggested as an indicator of cellular death. Thus, the relationship between PhA and muscle mass and strength was investigated in 207 consecutively elderly participants (mean age 76.2±6.7years) admitted for multidimensional geriatric evaluation. Muscle strength by grip strength using a hand-held dynamometer and muscle mass was measured by bioimpedentiometer. PhA was calculated directly with its arctangent (resistance/reactance×180°/π). Linear relationship among muscular mass and strength and with clinical and biochemical parameters, including PhA at uni- and multivariate analysis were performed. Linear regression analysis demonstrated that lower level of PhA is associated with reduction in grip strength (y=3.16+0.08x; r=0.49; p<0.001), and even more, with muscle mass (y=3.04+0.25x; r=0.60; p<0001). Multivariate analysis confirms these relationships (grip strength β=0.245, p=0.031; muscular mass β=0.623, p<0.01). Thus, PhA is inversely related to muscle mass and strength in elderly subjects and it may be considered a good bioelectrical marker to identify elderly patients at risk of sarcopenia. PMID:25034911

  7. Functional study of NIPA2 mutations identified from the patients with childhood absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Han; Zhang, Yuehua; Zhang, Pingping; Wang, Jingmin; Wu, Ye; Wu, Xiru; Netoff, Theoden; Jiang, Yuwu

    2014-01-01

    Recently many genetic mutations that are associated with epilepsy have been identified. The protein NIPA2 (non-imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region protein 2) is a highly selective magnesium transporter encoded by the gene NIPA2 in which we have found three mutations (p.I178F, p.N244S and p.N334_E335insD) within a population of patients with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE). In this study, immunofluorescence labeling, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), MTT metabolic rate detection and computational modeling were utilized to elucidate how these mutations result in CAE. We found in cultured neurons that NIPA2 (wild-type) proteins were localized to the cell periphery, whereas mutant proteins were not effectively trafficked to the cell membrane. Furthermore, we found a decrease in intracellular magnesium concentration in the neurons transfected with mutant NIPA2, but no effect on the survival of neurons. To understand how low intracellular magnesium resulted in hyperexcitability, we built and analyzed a computational model to simulate the effects of mutations. The model suggested that lower intracellular magnesium concentration enhanced synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) currents. This study primarily reveals that a selective magnesium transporter NIPA2 may play a role in the pathogenesis of CAE. PMID:25347071

  8. Identifying and extracting patient smoking status information from clinical narrative texts in Spanish.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Rosa L; Soto, Diego A; Pino, Esteban J

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present a system to identify and extract patient's smoking status from clinical narrative text in Spanish. The clinical narrative text was processed using natural language processing techniques, and annotated by four people with a biomedical background. The dataset used for classification had 2,465 documents, each one annotated with one of the four smoking status categories. We used two feature representations: single word token and bigrams. The classification problem was divided in two levels. First recognizing between smoker (S) and non-smoker (NS); second recognizing between current smoker (CS) and past smoker (PS). For each feature representation and classification level, we used two classifiers: Support Vector Machines (SVM) and Bayesian Networks (BN). We split our dataset as follows: a training set containing 66% of the available documents that was used to build classifiers and a test set containing the remaining 34% of the documents that was used to test and evaluate the model. Our results show that SVM together with the bigram representation performed better in both classification levels. For S vs NS classification level performance measures were: ACC=85%, Precision=85%, and Recall=90%. For CS vs PS classification level performance measures were: ACC=87%, Precision=91%, and Recall=94%.

  9. Functional and transport analyses of CLCN5 genetic changes identified in Dent disease patients.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaojing; Brown, Matthew R; Cogal, Andrea G; Gauvin, Daniel; Harris, Peter C; Lieske, John C; Romero, Michael F; Chang, Min-Hwang

    2016-04-01

    Dent disease type 1, an X-linked inherited kidney disease is caused by mutations in electrogenic Cl(-)/H(+) exchanger, ClC-5. We functionally studied the most frequent mutation (S244L) and two mutations recently identified in RKSC patients, Q629X and R345W. We also studied T657S, which has a high minor-allele frequency (0.23%) in the African-American population, was published previously as pathogenic to cause Dent disease. The transport properties of CLC-5 were electrophysiologically characterized. WT and ClC-5 mutant currents were inhibited by pH 5.5, but not affected by an alkaline extracellular solution (pH 8.5). The T657S and R345W mutations showed the same anion selectivity sequence as WT ClC-5 (SCN(-)>NO3(-)≈Cl(-)>Br(-)>I(-)). However, the S244L and Q629X mutations abolished this anion conductance sequence. Cell surface CLC-5 expression was quantified using extracellular HA-tagged CLC-5 and a chemiluminescent immunoassay. Cellular localization of eGFP-tagged CLC-5 proteins was also examined in HEK293 cells with organelle-specific fluorescent probes. Functional defects of R345W and Q629X mutations were caused by the trafficking of the protein to the plasma membrane since proteins were mostly retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, and mutations showed positive correlations between surface expression and transport function. In contrast, although the S244L transport function was significantly lower than WT, cell surface, early endosome, and endoplasmic reticulum expression was equal to that of WT CLC-5. Function and trafficking of T657S was equivalent to the WT CLC-5 suggesting this is a benign variant rather than pathogenic. These studies demonstrate the useful information that can be gained by detailed functional studies of mutations predicted to be pathogenic. PMID:27117801

  10. Filaggrin-stratified transcriptomic analysis of pediatric skin identifies mechanistic pathways in patients with atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Christian; Kroboth, Karin; Schurch, Nicholas J.; Sandilands, Aileen; Sherstnev, Alexander; O'Regan, Grainne M.; Watson, Rosemarie M.; Irwin McLean, W.H.; Barton, Geoffrey J.; Irvine, Alan D.; Brown, Sara J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD; eczema) is characterized by a widespread abnormality in cutaneous barrier function and propensity to inflammation. Filaggrin is a multifunctional protein and plays a key role in skin barrier formation. Loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG) are a highly significant risk factor for atopic disease, but the molecular mechanisms leading to dermatitis remain unclear. Objective We sought to interrogate tissue-specific variations in the expressed genome in the skin of children with AD and to investigate underlying pathomechanisms in atopic skin. Methods We applied single-molecule direct RNA sequencing to analyze the whole transcriptome using minimal tissue samples. Uninvolved skin biopsy specimens from 26 pediatric patients with AD were compared with site-matched samples from 10 nonatopic teenage control subjects. Cases and control subjects were screened for FLG genotype to stratify the data set. Results Two thousand four hundred thirty differentially expressed genes (false discovery rate, P < .05) were identified, of which 211 were significantly upregulated and 490 downregulated by greater than 2-fold. Gene ontology terms for “extracellular space” and “defense response” were enriched, whereas “lipid metabolic processes” were downregulated. The subset of FLG wild-type cases showed dysregulation of genes involved with lipid metabolism, whereas filaggrin haploinsufficiency affected global gene expression and was characterized by a type 1 interferon–mediated stress response. Conclusion These analyses demonstrate the importance of extracellular space and lipid metabolism in atopic skin pathology independent of FLG genotype, whereas an aberrant defense response is seen in subjects with FLG mutations. Genotype stratification of the large data set has facilitated functional interpretation and might guide future therapy development. PMID:24880632

  11. The VACS Index Accurately Predicts Mortality and Treatment Response among Multi-Drug Resistant HIV Infected Patients Participating in the Options in Management with Antiretrovirals (OPTIMA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Sheldon T.; Tate, Janet P.; Kyriakides, Tassos C.; Kirkwood, Katherine A.; Holodniy, Mark; Goulet, Joseph L.; Angus, Brian J.; Cameron, D. William; Justice, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The VACS Index is highly predictive of all-cause mortality among HIV infected individuals within the first few years of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). However, its accuracy among highly treatment experienced individuals and its responsiveness to treatment interventions have yet to be evaluated. We compared the accuracy and responsiveness of the VACS Index with a Restricted Index of age and traditional HIV biomarkers among patients enrolled in the OPTIMA study. Methods Using data from 324/339 (96%) patients in OPTIMA, we evaluated associations between indices and mortality using Kaplan-Meier estimates, proportional hazards models, Harrel’s C-statistic and net reclassification improvement (NRI). We also determined the association between study interventions and risk scores over time, and change in score and mortality. Results Both the Restricted Index (c = 0.70) and VACS Index (c = 0.74) predicted mortality from baseline, but discrimination was improved with the VACS Index (NRI = 23%). Change in score from baseline to 48 weeks was more strongly associated with survival for the VACS Index than the Restricted Index with respective hazard ratios of 0.26 (95% CI 0.14–0.49) and 0.39(95% CI 0.22–0.70) among the 25% most improved scores, and 2.08 (95% CI 1.27–3.38) and 1.51 (95%CI 0.90–2.53) for the 25% least improved scores. Conclusions The VACS Index predicts all-cause mortality more accurately among multi-drug resistant, treatment experienced individuals and is more responsive to changes in risk associated with treatment intervention than an index restricted to age and HIV biomarkers. The VACS Index holds promise as an intermediate outcome for intervention research. PMID:24667813

  12. A Focus Group Exploration of Automated Case-Finders to Identify High-Risk Heart Failure Patients Within an Urban Safety Net Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Mark E.; Miranda, Derick; Schuman, Greg; Eaton, Christopher; Smith, Andrew; Silver, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leveraging “big data” as a means of informing cost-effective care holds potential in triaging high-risk heart failure (HF) patients for interventions within hospitals seeking to reduce 30-day readmissions. Objective: Explore provider’s beliefs and perceptions about using an electronic health record (EHR)-based tool that uses unstructured clinical notes to risk-stratify high-risk heart failure patients. Methods: Six providers from an inpatient HF clinic within an urban safety net hospital were recruited to participate in a semistructured focus group. A facilitator led a discussion on the feasibility and value of using an EHR tool driven by unstructured clinical notes to help identify high-risk patients. Data collected from transcripts were analyzed using a thematic analysis that facilitated drawing conclusions clustered around categories and themes. Results: From six categories emerged two themes: (1) challenges of finding valid and accurate results, and (2) strategies used to overcome these challenges. Although employing a tool that uses electronic medical record (EMR) unstructured text as the benchmark by which to identify high-risk patients is efficient, choosing appropriate benchmark groups could be challenging given the multiple causes of readmission. Strategies to mitigate these challenges include establishing clear selection criteria to guide benchmark group composition, and quality outcome goals for the hospital. Conclusion: Prior to implementing into practice an innovative EMR-based case-finder driven by unstructured clinical notes, providers are advised to do the following: (1) define patient quality outcome goals, (2) establish criteria by which to guide benchmark selection, and (3) verify the tool’s validity and reliability. Achieving consensus on these issues would be necessary for this innovative EHR-based tool to effectively improve clinical decision-making and in turn, decrease readmissions for high-risk patients. PMID:27683666

  13. A Focus Group Exploration of Automated Case-Finders to Identify High-Risk Heart Failure Patients Within an Urban Safety Net Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Mark E.; Miranda, Derick; Schuman, Greg; Eaton, Christopher; Smith, Andrew; Silver, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leveraging “big data” as a means of informing cost-effective care holds potential in triaging high-risk heart failure (HF) patients for interventions within hospitals seeking to reduce 30-day readmissions. Objective: Explore provider’s beliefs and perceptions about using an electronic health record (EHR)-based tool that uses unstructured clinical notes to risk-stratify high-risk heart failure patients. Methods: Six providers from an inpatient HF clinic within an urban safety net hospital were recruited to participate in a semistructured focus group. A facilitator led a discussion on the feasibility and value of using an EHR tool driven by unstructured clinical notes to help identify high-risk patients. Data collected from transcripts were analyzed using a thematic analysis that facilitated drawing conclusions clustered around categories and themes. Results: From six categories emerged two themes: (1) challenges of finding valid and accurate results, and (2) strategies used to overcome these challenges. Although employing a tool that uses electronic medical record (EMR) unstructured text as the benchmark by which to identify high-risk patients is efficient, choosing appropriate benchmark groups could be challenging given the multiple causes of readmission. Strategies to mitigate these challenges include establishing clear selection criteria to guide benchmark group composition, and quality outcome goals for the hospital. Conclusion: Prior to implementing into practice an innovative EMR-based case-finder driven by unstructured clinical notes, providers are advised to do the following: (1) define patient quality outcome goals, (2) establish criteria by which to guide benchmark selection, and (3) verify the tool’s validity and reliability. Achieving consensus on these issues would be necessary for this innovative EHR-based tool to effectively improve clinical decision-making and in turn, decrease readmissions for high-risk patients.

  14. Identifying factors that impact patient length of stay metrics for healthcare providers with advanced analytics.

    PubMed

    Kudyba, Stephan; Gregorio, Thomas

    2010-12-01

    Managing patients' length of stay is a critical task for healthcare organizations. In order to better manage the processes impacting this performance metric, providers can leverage data resources describing the network of activities that impact a patient's stay with analytic methods. Interdependencies between departmental activities exist within the patient treatment process, where inefficiency in one element of the patient care network of activities can adversely affect process outcomes.This work utilizes the method of neural networks to analyze data describing inpatient cases that incorporate radiology process variables to determine their effect on patient length of stay excesses for a major NJ based healthcare provider. The results indicate that inefficiencies at the radiology level can adversely extend a patient's length of stay beyond initial estimations. Proactive analysis of networks of activities in the patient treatment process can enhance organizational efficiencies of healthcare providers by enabling decision makers to better optimize resource allocations to increase throughput of activities.

  15. The Short Physical Performance Battery is a discriminative tool for identifying patients with COPD at risk of disability

    PubMed Central

    Bernabeu-Mora, Roberto; Medina-Mirapeix, Françesc; Llamazares-Herrán, Eduardo; García-Guillamón, Gloria; Giménez-Giménez, Luz María; Sánchez-Nieto, Juan Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background Limited mobility is a risk factor for developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-related disabilities. Little is known about the validity of the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) for identifying mobility limitations in patients with COPD. Objective To determine the clinical validity of the SPPB summary score and its three components (standing balance, 4-meter gait speed, and five-repetition sit-to-stand) for identifying mobility limitations in patients with COPD. Methods This cross-sectional study included 137 patients with COPD, recruited from a hospital in Spain. Muscle strength tests and SPPB were measured; then, patients were surveyed for self-reported mobility limitations. The validity of SPPB scores was analyzed by developing receiver operating characteristic curves to analyze the sensitivity and specificity for identifying patients with mobility limitations; by examining group differences in SPPB scores across categories of mobility activities; and by correlating SPPB scores to strength tests. Results Only the SPPB summary score and the five-repetition sit-to-stand components showed good discriminative capabilities; both showed areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves greater than 0.7. Patients with limitations had significantly lower SPPB scores than patients without limitations in nine different mobility activities. SPPB scores were moderately correlated with the quadriceps test (r>0.40), and less correlated with the handgrip test (r<0.30), which reinforced convergent and divergent validities. A SPPB summary score cutoff of 10 provided the best accuracy for identifying mobility limitations. Conclusion This study provided evidence for the validity of the SPPB summary score and the five-repetition sit-to-stand test for assessing mobility in patients with COPD. These tests also showed potential as a screening test for identifying patients with COPD that have mobility limitations. PMID:26664110

  16. Using Genetics to Identify Hereditary Colorectal Polyposis and Cancer Syndromes in Your Patient.

    PubMed

    Macaron, Carole; Heald, Brandie; Burke, Carol A

    2015-10-01

    The majority of patients with colorectal polyps and cancer do not have a Mendelian cause of the disease. Age, lifestyle, and environmental factors interact with complex genetic traits to contribute to the etiology. However, approximately 5-10 % of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and more than 40 % of patients meeting specific clinical features of the hereditary polyposis syndromes have a discoverable, actionable genetic cause which will significantly alter their medical management. PMID:26292665

  17. Next generation exome sequencing of paediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients identifies rare and novel variants in candidate genes

    PubMed Central

    Christodoulou, Katja; Wiskin, Anthony E; Gibson, Jane; Tapper, William; Willis, Claire; Afzal, Nadeem A; Upstill-Goddard, Rosanna; Holloway, John W; Simpson, Michael A; Beattie, R Mark; Collins, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple genes have been implicated by association studies in altering inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) predisposition. Paediatric patients often manifest more extensive disease and a particularly severe disease course. It is likely that genetic predisposition plays a more substantial role in this group. Objective To identify the spectrum of rare and novel variation in known IBD susceptibility genes using exome sequencing analysis in eight individual cases of childhood onset severe disease. Design DNA samples from the eight patients underwent targeted exome capture and sequencing. Data were processed through an analytical pipeline to align sequence reads, conduct quality checks, and identify and annotate variants where patient sequence differed from the reference sequence. For each patient, the entire complement of rare variation within strongly associated candidate genes was catalogued. Results Across the panel of 169 known IBD susceptibility genes, approximately 300 variants in 104 genes were found. Excluding splicing and HLA-class variants, 58 variants across 39 of these genes were classified as rare, with an alternative allele frequency of <5%, of which 17 were novel. Only two patients with early onset Crohn's disease exhibited rare deleterious variations within NOD2: the previously described R702W variant was the sole NOD2 variant in one patient, while the second patient also carried the L1007 frameshift insertion. Both patients harboured other potentially damaging mutations in the GSDMB, ERAP2 and SEC16A genes. The two patients severely affected with ulcerative colitis exhibited a distinct profile: both carried potentially detrimental variation in the BACH2 and IL10 genes not seen in other patients. Conclusion For each of the eight individuals studied, all non-synonymous, truncating and frameshift mutations across all known IBD genes were identified. A unique profile of rare and potentially damaging variants was evident for each patient with this

  18. Identifying patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms in electronic medical records in primary care: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background When medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) become persistent, it may have major implications for the patient, the general practitioner (GP) and for society. Early identification of patients with MUPS in electronic medical records (EMRs) might contribute to prevention of persistent MUPS by creating awareness among GPs and providing an opportunity to start stepped care management. However, procedures for identification of patients with MUPS in EMRs are not well established yet. In this validation study we explore the test characteristics of an EMR screening method to identify patients with MUPS. Methods The EMR screening method consists of three steps. First, all patients ≥18 years were included when they had five or more contacts in the last 12 months. Second, patients with known chronic conditions were excluded. Finally, patients were included with a MUPS syndrome or when they had three or more complaints suggestive for MUPS. We compared the results of the EMR screening method with scores on the Patient Health Questionnaire-15 (PHQ-15), which we used as reference test. We calculated test characteristics for various cut-off points. Results From the 1223 patients in our dataset who completed the PHQ-15, 609 (49/8%) scored ≥5 on the PHQ-15. The EMR screening method detected 131/1223 (10.7%) as patients with MUPS. Of those, 102 (77.9%) scored ≥5 on the PHQ-15 and 53 (40.5%) scored ≥10. When compared with the PHQ-15 cut-off point ≥10, sensitivity and specificity were 0.30 and 0.93 and positive and negative predictive values were 0.40 and 0.89, respectively. Conclusions The EMR screening method to identify patients with MUPS has a high specificity. However, many potential MUPS patients will be missed. Before using this method as a screening instrument for selecting patients who might benefit from structured care, its sensitivity needs to be improved while maintaining its specificity. PMID:24903850

  19. Using patients’ experiences to identify priorities for quality improvement in breast cancer care: patient narratives, surveys or both?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients’ experiences have become central to assessing the performance of healthcare systems worldwide and are increasingly being used to inform quality improvement processes. This paper explores the relative value of surveys and detailed patient narratives in identifying priorities for improving breast cancer services as part of a quality improvement process. Methods One dataset was collected using a narrative interview approach, (n = 13) and the other using a postal survey (n = 82). Datasets were analyzed separately and then compared to determine whether similar priorities for improving patient experiences were identified. Results There were both similarities and differences in the improvement priorities arising from each approach. Day surgery was specifically identified as a priority in the narrative dataset but included in the survey recommendations only as part of a broader priority around improving inpatient experience. Both datasets identified appointment systems, patients spending enough time with staff, information about treatment and side effects and more information at the end of treatment as priorities. The specific priorities identified by the narrative interviews commonly related to ‘relational’ aspects of patient experience. Those identified by the survey typically related to more ‘functional’ aspects and were not always sufficiently detailed to identify specific improvement actions. Conclusions Our analysis suggests that whilst local survey data may act as a screening tool to identify potential problems within the breast cancer service, they do not always provide sufficient detail of what to do to improve that service. These findings may have wider applicability in other services. We recommend using an initial preliminary survey, with better use of survey open comments, followed by an in-depth qualitative analysis to help deliver improvements to relational and functional aspects of patient experience. PMID:22913525

  20. Mining Clinicians' Electronic Documentation to Identify Heart Failure Patients with Ineffective Self-Management: A Pilot Text-Mining Study.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Maxim; Radhakrishnan, Kavita; Lei, Victor; Zhou, Li

    2016-01-01

    Effective self-management can decrease up to 50% of heart failure hospitalizations. Unfortunately, self-management by patients with heart failure remains poor. This pilot study aimed to explore the use of text-mining to identify heart failure patients with ineffective self-management. We first built a comprehensive self-management vocabulary based on the literature and clinical notes review. We then randomly selected 545 heart failure patients treated within Partners Healthcare hospitals (Boston, MA, USA) and conducted a regular expression search with the compiled vocabulary within 43,107 interdisciplinary clinical notes of these patients. We found that 38.2% (n = 208) patients had documentation of ineffective heart failure self-management in the domains of poor diet adherence (28.4%), missed medical encounters (26.4%) poor medication adherence (20.2%) and non-specified self-management issues (e.g., "compliance issues", 34.6%). We showed the feasibility of using text-mining to identify patients with ineffective self-management. More natural language processing algorithms are needed to help busy clinicians identify these patients.

  1. Mining Clinicians' Electronic Documentation to Identify Heart Failure Patients with Ineffective Self-Management: A Pilot Text-Mining Study.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Maxim; Radhakrishnan, Kavita; Lei, Victor; Zhou, Li

    2016-01-01

    Effective self-management can decrease up to 50% of heart failure hospitalizations. Unfortunately, self-management by patients with heart failure remains poor. This pilot study aimed to explore the use of text-mining to identify heart failure patients with ineffective self-management. We first built a comprehensive self-management vocabulary based on the literature and clinical notes review. We then randomly selected 545 heart failure patients treated within Partners Healthcare hospitals (Boston, MA, USA) and conducted a regular expression search with the compiled vocabulary within 43,107 interdisciplinary clinical notes of these patients. We found that 38.2% (n = 208) patients had documentation of ineffective heart failure self-management in the domains of poor diet adherence (28.4%), missed medical encounters (26.4%) poor medication adherence (20.2%) and non-specified self-management issues (e.g., "compliance issues", 34.6%). We showed the feasibility of using text-mining to identify patients with ineffective self-management. More natural language processing algorithms are needed to help busy clinicians identify these patients. PMID:27332377

  2. DNA studies are necessary for accurate patient diagnosis in compound heterozygosity for Hb Adana (HBA2:c.179>A) with deletional or nondeletional α-thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jin Ai Mary Anne; Kho, Siew Leng; Ngim, Chin Fang; Chua, Kek Heng; Goh, Ai Sim; Yeoh, Seoh Leng; George, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Haemoglobin (Hb) Adana (HBA2:c.179>A) interacts with deletional and nondeletional α-thalassaemia mutations to produce HbH disorders with varying clinical manifestations from asymptomatic to severe anaemia with significant hepatosplenomegaly. Hb Adana carriers are generally asymptomatic and haemoglobin subtyping is unable to detect this highly unstable α-haemoglobin variant. This study identified 13 patients with compound heterozygosity for Hb Adana with either the 3.7 kb gene deletion (-α(3.7)), Hb Constant Spring (HbCS) (HBA2:c.427T>C) or Hb Paksé (HBA2:429A>T). Multiplex Amplification Refractory Mutation System was used for the detection of five deletional and six nondeletional α-thalassaemia mutations. Duplex-PCR was used to confirm Hb Paksé and HbCS. Results showed 84.6% of the Hb Adana patients were Malays. Using DNA studies, compound heterozygosity for Hb Adana and HbCS (α(codon 59)α/α(CS)α) was confirmed in 11 patients. A novel point in this investigation was that DNA studies confirmed Hb Paksé for the first time in a Malaysian patient (α(codon 59)α/α(Paksé)α) after nine years of being misdiagnosis with Hb Adana and HbCS (α(codon 59)α/α(CS)α). Thus, the reliance on haematology studies and Hb subtyping to detect Hb variants is inadequate in countries where thalassaemia is prevalent and caused by a wide spectrum of mutations. PMID:27271331

  3. DNA studies are necessary for accurate patient diagnosis in compound heterozygosity for Hb Adana (HBA2:c.179>A) with deletional or nondeletional α-thalassaemia

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jin Ai Mary Anne; Kho, Siew Leng; Ngim, Chin Fang; Chua, Kek Heng; Goh, Ai Sim; Yeoh, Seoh Leng; George, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Haemoglobin (Hb) Adana (HBA2:c.179>A) interacts with deletional and nondeletional α-thalassaemia mutations to produce HbH disorders with varying clinical manifestations from asymptomatic to severe anaemia with significant hepatosplenomegaly. Hb Adana carriers are generally asymptomatic and haemoglobin subtyping is unable to detect this highly unstable α-haemoglobin variant. This study identified 13 patients with compound heterozygosity for Hb Adana with either the 3.7 kb gene deletion (-α3.7), Hb Constant Spring (HbCS) (HBA2:c.427T>C) or Hb Paksé (HBA2:429A>T). Multiplex Amplification Refractory Mutation System was used for the detection of five deletional and six nondeletional α-thalassaemia mutations. Duplex-PCR was used to confirm Hb Paksé and HbCS. Results showed 84.6% of the Hb Adana patients were Malays. Using DNA studies, compound heterozygosity for Hb Adana and HbCS (αcodon 59α/αCSα) was confirmed in 11 patients. A novel point in this investigation was that DNA studies confirmed Hb Paksé for the first time in a Malaysian patient (αcodon 59α/αPakséα) after nine years of being misdiagnosis with Hb Adana and HbCS (αcodon 59α/αCSα). Thus, the reliance on haematology studies and Hb subtyping to detect Hb variants is inadequate in countries where thalassaemia is prevalent and caused by a wide spectrum of mutations. PMID:27271331

  4. The Readmission Risk Flag: Using the Electronic Health Record to Automatically Identify Patients at Risk for 30-day Readmission

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, Charles A.; VanZandbergen, Christine; Tait, Gordon; Hanish, Asaf; Leas, Brian; French, Benjamin; Hanson, C. William; Behta, Maryam; Umscheid, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Identification of patients at high risk for readmission is a crucial step toward improving care and reducing readmissions. The adoption of electronic health records (EHR) may prove important to strategies designed to risk stratify patients and introduce targeted interventions. Objective To develop and implement an automated prediction model integrated into our health system’s EHR that identifies on admission patients at high risk for readmission within 30 days of discharge. Design Retrospective and prospective cohort. Setting Healthcare system consisting of three hospitals. Patients All adult patients admitted from August 2009 to September 2012. Interventions An automated readmission risk flag integrated into the EHR. Measures Thirty-day all-cause and 7-day unplanned healthcare system readmissions. Results Using retrospective data, a single risk factor, ≥2 inpatient admissions in the past 12 months, was found to have the best balance of sensitivity (40%), positive predictive value (31%), and proportion of patients flagged (18%), with a c-statistic of 0.62. Sensitivity (39%), positive predictive value (30%), proportion of patients flagged (18%) and c-statistic (0.61) during the 12-month period after implementation of the risk flag were similar. There was no evidence for an effect of the intervention on 30-day all-cause and 7-day unplanned readmission rates in the 12-month period after implementation. Conclusions An automated prediction model was effectively integrated into an existing EHR and identified patients on admission who were at risk for readmission within 30 days of discharge. PMID:24227707

  5. Lipidomic analysis of fibroblasts from Zellweger spectrum disorder patients identifies disease-specific phospholipid ratios.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Katharina; Pras-Raves, Mia L; Vervaart, Martin A T; Luyf, Angela C M; van Kampen, Antoine H C; Wanders, Ronald J A; Waterham, Hans R; Vaz, Frédéric M

    2016-08-01

    Peroxisomes are subcellular organelles involved in various metabolic processes, including fatty acid and phospholipid homeostasis. The Zellweger spectrum disorders (ZSDs) represent a group of diseases caused by a defect in the biogenesis of peroxisomes. Accordingly, cells from ZSD patients are expected to have an altered composition of fatty acids and phospholipids. Using an LC/MS-based lipidomics approach, we show that the phospholipid composition is characteristically altered in cultured primary skin fibroblasts from ZSD patients when compared with healthy controls. We observed a marked overall increase of phospholipid species containing very long-chain fatty acids, and a decrease of phospholipid species with shorter fatty acid species in ZSD patient fibroblasts. In addition, we detected a distinct phosphatidylcholine profile in ZSD patients with a severe and mild phenotype when compared with control cells. Based on our data, we present a set of specific phospholipid ratios for fibroblasts that clearly discriminate between mild and severe ZSD patients, and those from healthy controls. Our findings will aid in the diagnosis and prognosis of ZSD patients, including an increasing number of mild patients in whom hardly any abnormalities are observed in biochemical parameters commonly used for diagnosis. PMID:27284103

  6. Proactive Risk Assessment for Ebola-Infected Patients: A Systematic Approach to Identifying and Minimizing Risk to Healthcare Personnel.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Rosemarie; Mitchell, Steven; Ehrmantraut, Ross; Meschke, John Scott; Simcox, Nancy J; Wolz, Sarah A; Parker, Sarah Henrickson

    2016-07-01

    Performing patient care while wearing high-level personal protective equipment presents risks to healthcare providers. Our failure mode effects analysis identified 81 overall risks associated with providing hygienic care and linen change to a patient with continuous watery stool. Implementation of checklists and scheduled pauses could potentially mitigate 76.5% of all risks. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:867-871. PMID:27226216

  7. Mutations in TLR/MYD88 pathway identify a subset of young chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with favorable outcome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Trillos, Alejandra; Pinyol, Magda; Navarro, Alba; Aymerich, Marta; Jares, Pedro; Juan, Manel; Rozman, María; Colomer, Dolors; Delgado, Julio; Giné, Eva; González-Díaz, Marcos; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; Colado, Enrique; Rayón, Consolación; Payer, Angel R; Terol, Maria José; Navarro, Blanca; Quesada, Victor; Puente, Xosé S; Rozman, Ciril; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías; López-Guillermo, Armando; Villamor, Neus

    2014-06-12

    Mutations in Toll-like receptor (TLR) and myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MYD88) genes have been found in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) at low frequency. We analyzed the incidence, clinicobiological characteristics, and outcome of patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations in 587 CLL patients. Twenty-three patients (3.9%) had mutations, 19 in MYD88 (one with concurrent IRAK1 mutation), 2 TLR2 (one with concomitant TLR6 mutation), 1 IRAK1, and 1 TLR5. No mutations were found in IRAK2 and IRAK4. TLR/MYD88-mutated CLL overexpressed genes of the nuclear factor κB pathway. Patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations were significantly younger (83% age ≤50 years) than those with no mutations. TLR/MYD88 mutations were the most frequent in young patients. Patients with mutated TLR/MYD88 CLL had a higher frequency of mutated IGHV and low expression of CD38 and ZAP-70. Overall survival (OS) was better in TLR/MYD88-mutated than unmutated patients in the whole series (10-year OS, 100% vs 62%; P = .002), and in the subset of patients age ≤50 years (100% vs 70%; P = .02). In addition, relative OS of TLR/MYD88-mutated patients was similar to that in the age- and gender-matched population. In summary, TLR/MYD88 mutations identify a population of young CLL patients with favorable outcome. PMID:24782504

  8. Mutations in TLR/MYD88 pathway identify a subset of young chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with favorable outcome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Trillos, Alejandra; Pinyol, Magda; Navarro, Alba; Aymerich, Marta; Jares, Pedro; Juan, Manel; Rozman, María; Colomer, Dolors; Delgado, Julio; Giné, Eva; González-Díaz, Marcos; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; Colado, Enrique; Rayón, Consolación; Payer, Angel R; Terol, Maria José; Navarro, Blanca; Quesada, Victor; Puente, Xosé S; Rozman, Ciril; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías; López-Guillermo, Armando; Villamor, Neus

    2014-06-12

    Mutations in Toll-like receptor (TLR) and myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MYD88) genes have been found in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) at low frequency. We analyzed the incidence, clinicobiological characteristics, and outcome of patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations in 587 CLL patients. Twenty-three patients (3.9%) had mutations, 19 in MYD88 (one with concurrent IRAK1 mutation), 2 TLR2 (one with concomitant TLR6 mutation), 1 IRAK1, and 1 TLR5. No mutations were found in IRAK2 and IRAK4. TLR/MYD88-mutated CLL overexpressed genes of the nuclear factor κB pathway. Patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations were significantly younger (83% age ≤50 years) than those with no mutations. TLR/MYD88 mutations were the most frequent in young patients. Patients with mutated TLR/MYD88 CLL had a higher frequency of mutated IGHV and low expression of CD38 and ZAP-70. Overall survival (OS) was better in TLR/MYD88-mutated than unmutated patients in the whole series (10-year OS, 100% vs 62%; P = .002), and in the subset of patients age ≤50 years (100% vs 70%; P = .02). In addition, relative OS of TLR/MYD88-mutated patients was similar to that in the age- and gender-matched population. In summary, TLR/MYD88 mutations identify a population of young CLL patients with favorable outcome.

  9. Gynecologic examination and cervical biopsies after (chemo) radiation for cervical cancer to identify patients eligible for salvage surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Nijhuis, Esther R.; Zee, Ate G.J. van der; Hout, Bertha A. in 't; Boomgaard, Jantine J.; Hullu, Joanne A. de; Pras, Elisabeth; Hollema, Harry; Aalders, Jan G.; Nijman, Hans W.; Willemse, Pax H.B.; Mourits, Marian J.E. . E-mail: m.j.e.mourits@og.umcg.nl

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy of gynecologic examination under general anesthesia with cervical biopsies after (chemo) radiation for cervical cancer to identify patients with residual disease who may benefit from salvage surgery. Methods and Materials: In a retrospective cohort study data of all cervical cancer patients with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage IB1 to IVA treated with (chemo) radiation between 1994 and 2001 were analyzed. Patients underwent gynecologic examination under anesthesia 8 to 10 weeks after completion of treatment. Cervical biopsy samples were taken from patients judged to be operable. In case of residual cancer, salvage surgery was performed. Results: Between 1994 and 2001, 169 consecutive cervical cancer patients received primary (chemo) radiation, of whom 4 were lost to follow-up. Median age was 56 years (interquartile range [IQR], 44-71) and median follow-up was 3.5 years (IQR, 1.5-5.9). In each of 111 patients a biopsy sample was taken, of which 90 (81%) showed no residual tumor. Vital tumor cells were found in 21 of 111 patients (19%). Salvage surgery was performed in 13 of 21 (62%) patients; of these patients, 5 (38%) achieved long-term, complete remission after salvage surgery (median follow-up, 5.2 years; range, 3.9-8.8 years). All patients with residual disease who did not undergo operation (8/21) died of progressive disease. Locoregional control was more often obtained in patients who underwent operation (7 of 13) than in patients who were not selected for salvage surgery (0 of 8 patients) (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Gynecologic examination under anesthesia 8 to 10 weeks after (chemo) radiation with cervical biopsies allows identification of those cervical cancer patients who have residual local disease, of whom a small but significant proportion may be salvaged by surgery.

  10. Characterization of new ACADSB gene sequence mutations and clinical implications in patients with 2-methylbutyrylglycinuria identified by newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Alfardan, Jaffar; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Copeland, Sara; Ellison, Jay; Keppen-Davis, Laura; Rohrbach, Marianne; Powell, Berkley R; Gillis, Jane; Matern, Dietrich; Kant, Jeffrey; Vockley, Jerry

    2010-08-01

    Short/branched chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SBCAD) deficiency, also known as 2-methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, is a recently described autosomal recessive disorder of isoleucine metabolism. Most patients reported thus far have originated from a founder mutation in the Hmong Chinese population. While the first reported patients had severe disease, most of the affected Hmong have remained asymptomatic. In this study, we describe 11 asymptomatic non-Hmong patients brought to medical attention by elevated C5-carnitine found by newborn screening and one discovered because of clinical symptoms. The diagnosis of SBCAD deficiency was determined by metabolite analysis of blood, urine, and fibroblast samples. PCR and bidirectional sequencing were performed on genomic DNA from five of the patients covering the entire SBCAD (ACADSB) gene sequence of 11 exons. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA from each patient identified variations in the SBCAD gene not previously reported. Escherichia coli expression studies revealed that the missense mutations identified lead to inactivation or instability of the mutant SBCAD enzymes. These findings confirm that SBCAD deficiency can be identified through newborn screening by acylcarnitine analysis. Our patients have been well without treatment and call for careful follow-up studies to learn the true clinical impact of this disorder.

  11. Asaia bogorensis peritonitis identified by 16S ribosomal RNA sequence analysis in a patient receiving peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Richard W; Ruhe, Jorg; Kobrin, Sidney; Wasserstein, Alan; Doline, Christa; Nachamkin, Irving; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2004-08-01

    Here the authors report a case of refractory peritonitis leading to multiple hospitalizations and the loss of peritoneal dialysis access in a patient on automated peritoneal dialysis, caused by Asaia bogorensis, a bacterium not previously described as a human pathogen. This organism was identified by sequence analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Unusual microbial agents may cause peritonitis, and molecular microbiological techniques are important tools for identifying these agents.

  12. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  13. Circulating Tumor Cells Identify Early Recurrence in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Undergoing Radical Resection

    PubMed Central

    Cueto Ladrón de Guevara, Antonio; Puche, Jose L.; Ruiz Zafra, Javier; de Miguel-Pérez, Diego; Ramos, Abel Sánchez-Palencia; Giraldo-Ospina, Carlos Fernando; Navajas Gómez, Juan A.; Delgado-Rodriguez, Miguel; Lorente, Jose A.; Serrano, María Jose

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgery is the treatment of choice for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) stages I-IIIA. However, more than 20% of these patients develop recurrence and die due to their disease. The release of tumor cells into peripheral blood (CTCs) is one of the main causes of recurrence of cancer. The objectives of this study are to identify the prognostic value of the presence and characterization of CTCs in peripheral blood in patients undergoing radical resection for NSCLC. Patients and Methods 56 patients who underwent radical surgery for previously untreated NSCLC were enrolled in this prospective study. Peripheral blood samples for CTC analysis were obtained before and one month after surgery. In addition CTCs were phenotypically characterized by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression. Results 51.8% of the patients evaluated were positive with the presence of CTCs at baseline. A decrease in the detection rate of CTCs was observed in these patients one month after surgery (32.1%) (p = 0.035). The mean number of CTCs was 3.16 per 10 ml (range 0–84) preoperatively and 0.66 (range 0–3) in postoperative determination. EGFR expression was found in 89.7% of the patients at baseline and in 38.9% patients one month after surgery. The presence of CTCs after surgery was significantly associated with early recurrence (p = 0.018) and a shorter disease free survival (DFS) (p = .008). In multivariate analysis CTC presence after surgery (HR = 5.750, 95% CI: 1.50–21.946, p = 0.010) and N status (HR = 0.296, 95% CI: 0.091–0.961, p = 0.043) were independent prognostic factors for DFS. Conclusion CTCs can be detected and characterized in patients undergoing radical resection for non-small cell lung cancer. Their presence might be used to identify patients with increased risk of early recurrence. PMID:26913536

  14. Identifying Patients Who Need a Change in Depression Treatment and Implementing That Change.

    PubMed

    Papakostas, George I

    2016-08-01

    For patients whose depression is difficult to treat or treatment-resistant, physicians must make an educated choice to switch, augment, or combine therapies to help patients adequately respond after initial treatment selections fail. Uncover some of the complexities of this challenging diagnosis by following the case of Robert, a 55-year-old accountant whose inadequate response to treatment by his primary care doctor has prompted a referral to a specialist. PMID:27561146

  15. Broadening of cohesinopathies: exome sequencing identifies mutations in ANKRD11 in two patients with Cornelia de Lange-overlapping phenotype.

    PubMed

    Parenti, I; Gervasini, C; Pozojevic, J; Graul-Neumann, L; Azzollini, J; Braunholz, D; Watrin, E; Wendt, K S; Cereda, A; Cittaro, D; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G; Lazarevic, D; Mariani, M; Russo, S; Werner, R; Krawitz, P; Larizza, L; Selicorni, A; Kaiser, F J

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) and KBG syndrome are two distinct developmental pathologies sharing common features such as intellectual disability, psychomotor delay, and some craniofacial and limb abnormalities. Mutations in one of the five genes NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, HDAC8 or RAD21, were identified in at least 70% of the patients with CdLS. Consequently, additional causative genes, either unknown or responsible of partially merging entities, possibly account for the remaining 30% of the patients. In contrast, KBG has only been associated with mutations in ANKRD11. By exome sequencing we could identify heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in ANKRD11 in two patients with the clinical diagnosis of CdLS. Both patients show features reminiscent of CdLS such as characteristic facies as well as a small head circumference which is not described for KBG syndrome. Patient A, who carries the mutation in a mosaic state, is a 4-year-old girl with features reminiscent of CdLS. Patient B, a 15-year-old boy, shows a complex phenotype which resembled CdLS during infancy, but has developed to a more KBG overlapping phenotype during childhood. These findings point out the importance of screening ANKRD11 in young CdLS patients who were found to be negative for mutations in the five known CdLS genes. PMID:25652421

  16. AB031. Validation of claims approach to identify asthma and COPD overlap syndrome patients in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Bo; De Pietro, Michael; Wu, Bingcao; Tunceli, Ozgur; Turner, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Background With the increasing recognition of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) overlap syndrome (ACOS) and its significant disease and economic burden, knowledge about real-world patient characteristics and how they are treated is needed to aid in better understanding this phenotype. However, ACOS patient identification is challenging. Currently, there is no validated claims-based ACOS patient selection algorithm available to assist this type of research. To assess the validity of a retrospective claims-based algorithm to identify high likelihood ACOS patients using patient medical records as the criterion. Methods Patients were identified from the US based HealthCore Integrated Research Database (HIRD) between January 1, 2006 and October 31, 2014. A claims-based algorithm to identify high likelihood ACOS patients was based on the following inclusion criteria: age ≥40 years, ≥2 ICD-9 diagnoses (≥30 days apart) for asthma, (ICD-9 CM: 493.xx), ≥2 diagnoses (≥30 days apart) for COPD (ICD-9 CM: 491.xx, 492.xx, and 496.xx), ≥2 ICD-9 procedure, Current Procedural Terminology (CPT), or Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) codes (≥30 days apart) for COPD-related procedures, ≥3 prescription fills (≥30 days apart) for asthma/COPD medication, and ≥2 CPT codes for spirometry test. Patients were indexed on the earliest date when all of the inclusion criteria were met. Patients diagnosed with cancer (ICD-9 CM: 140.xx–209.3x, 230.xx–234.xx) during the 12-month pre-index period were excluded. Outpatient medical records closest to (before or after) the index date were abstracted. Based on the chart review, at least 2 features (positive history of allergic rhinitis, chronic sinusitis, eczema, positive skin test to environmental allergens or desensitization to environmental allergens, diagnosis of asthma or past medical history for asthma before 40 years of age, or family history of asthma) were needed to confirm the asthma

  17. Identifying homogenous subgroups for individual patient meta-analysis based on Rough Set Theory.

    PubMed

    Gil-Herrera, Eleazar; Tsalatsanis, Athanasios; Kumar, Ambuj; Mhaskar, Rahul; Miladinovic, Branko; Yalcin, Ali; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Failure to detect and manage heterogeneity between clinical trials included in meta-analysis may lead to misinterpretation of summary effect estimates. This may ultimately compromise the validity of the results of the meta-analysis. Typically, when heterogeneity between trials is detected, researchers use sensitivity or subgroup analysis to manage it. However, both methods fail to explain why heterogeneity existed in the first place. Here we propose a novel methodology that relies on Rough Set Theory (RST) to detect, explain, and manage the sources of heterogeneity applicable to meta-analysis performed on individual patient data (IPD). The method exploits the RST relations of discernibility and indiscernibility to create homogeneous groups of patients. We applied our methodology on a dataset of 1,111 patients enrolled in 9 randomized controlled trials studying the effect of two transplantation procedures in the management of hematologic malignancies. Our method was able to create three subgroups of patients with remarkably low statistical heterogeneity values (16.8%, 0% and 0% respectively). The proposed methodology has the potential to automatize and standardize the process of detecting and managing heterogeneity in IPD meta-analysis. Future work involves investigating the applications of the proposed methodology in analyzing treatment effects in patients belonging to different risk groups, which will ultimately assist in personalized healthcare decision making.

  18. Expression analysis of the genes identified in GWAS of the postmortem brain tissues from patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Umeda-Yano, Satomi; Hashimoto, Ryota; Yamamori, Hidenaga; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon; Yasuda, Yuka; Ohi, Kazutaka; Fujimoto, Michiko; Ito, Akira; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2014-05-01

    Many gene expression studies have examined postmortem brain tissues of patients with schizophrenia. However, only a few expression studies of the genes identified in genome-wide association study (GWAS) have been published to date. We measured the expression levels of the genes identified in GWAS (ZNF804A, OPCML, RPGRIP1L, NRGN, and TCF4) of the postmortem brain tissues of patients with schizophrenia and controls from two separate sample sets (i.e., the Australian Tissue Resource Center and Stanley Medical Research Institute). We also determined whether the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in the GWAS were related to the gene expression changes in the prefrontal cortex. No difference was observed between the patients with schizophrenia and controls from the Australian Tissue Resource Center samples in the mRNA levels of ZNF804A, OPCML, RPGRIP1L, NRGN, or TCF4. The lack of mRNA change for these five transcripts was also found in the brain samples from the Stanley Medical Research Institute. In addition, no relationship between the schizophrenia-associated SNPs identified in the GWAS and the corresponding gene expression was observed in either sample set. Our results suggest that major changes in the transcript levels of the five candidate genes identified in the GWAS may not occur in adult patients with schizophrenia. The lack of linkage between the risk gene polymorphisms and the expression levels of their major transcripts suggests that the control of pan mRNA levels may not be a prominent mechanism by which the genes identified in the GWAS contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Further studies are needed to examine how the genes identified in the GWAS contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  19. Security of the distributed electronic patient record: a case-based approach to identifying policy issues.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J G

    2000-11-01

    The growth of managed care and integrated delivery systems has created a new commodity, health information and the technology that it requires. Surveys by Deloitte and Touche indicate that over half of the hospitals in the US are in the process of implementing electronic patient record (EPR) systems. The National Research Council has established that industry spends as much as $15 billion on information technology (IT), an amount that is expanding by 20% per year. The importance of collecting, electronically storing, and using the information is undisputed. This information is needed by consumers to make informed choices; by physicians to provide appropriate quality clinical care: and by health plans to assess outcomes, control costs and monitor quality. The collection, storage and communication of a large variety of personal patient data, however, present a major dilemma. How can we provide the data required by the new forms of health care delivery and at the same time protect the personal privacy of patients? Recent debates concerning medical privacy legislation, software regulation, and telemedicine suggest that this dilemma will not be easily resolved. The problem is systemic and arises out of the routine use and flow of information throughout the health industry. Health care information is primarily transferred among authorized users. Not only is the information used for patient care and financial reimbursement, secondary users of the information include medical, nursing, and allied health education, research, social services, public health, regulation, litigation, and commercial purposes such as the development of new medical technology and marketing. The main threats to privacy and confidentiality arise from within the institutions that provide patient care as well as institutions that have access to patient data for secondary purposes.

  20. A new point mutation in the ND1 mitochondrial gene identified in a type II diabetic patient

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, V.N.; Schmidt, W.; Olek, K.

    1995-08-01

    A novel mutation in a mitochondrial gene was identified in a patient with type II diabetes mellitus. G-to-A transition was localized at the nt3316 position of gene ND1 and resulted in alanine threonine replacement at position 4 of mitochondrial NAD-H-dehydrogenase. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Orolingual angioedema to alteplase. Identify, counsel and monitor at risk patients.

    PubMed

    Timmis, Christopher; Epstein, Elliot; Salim, Mohmad

    2016-01-01

    Orolingual angioedema (OLA) is a known complication of intravenous alteplase used to treat ischaemic stroke. The incidence may be as high as 5.1%. ACE inhibitors are thought to increase the risk of developing this potentially life-threatening complication. This case report demonstrates how we may improve in the identification of risk factors in the history; the counselling of patients appropriately; in seeking alternative therapies such as mechanical thrombectomy; and in the monitoring of patients for signs of OLA once alteplase has been given. PMID:27591036

  2. Outcome in six patients with mitochondrial trifunctional protein disorders identified by newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Sperk, Astrid; Mueller, Martina; Spiekerkoetter, Ute

    2010-01-01

    Before the newborn screening era, disorders of the mitochondrial trifunctional protein (TFP) complex including long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (LCHADD) presented with high morbidity and mortality. Data on outcome and prognosis of TFP deficiency disorders since implementation of screening are scarce. We here characterize 6 screened patients with a disorder of the TFP complex (3 of those with LCHADD) with respect to clinical presentation and molecular features. Three of 6 patients were symptomatic prior availability of screening results on days 4-5 of life. Of the three asymptomatic patients recognised by screening, one acutely died at 3months at home during an infection. Two patients remained asymptomatic with preventive measures during follow-up until the age of 3years. One of them had an older sibling with identical genotype born before the screening era, who became symptomatic with 15months. We conclude that newborn screening for disorders of the TFP complex allows identification of asymptomatic cases; however, the acute presentation in 3/6 babies before screening is noteworthy and troublesome. TFP and LCHAD deficiencies remain life-threatening disorders. This is in clear contrast to other defects of long-chain fatty acid oxidation after identification by newborn screening.

  3. Blood DNA methylation markers in potentially identified Chinese patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zongying; Yan, Haixiu; Zhang, Jinshu

    2016-07-01

    To determine whether blood DNA methylation is associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) for Chinese patients, we used genome-wide DNA methylation detection to access the blood samples of Chinese patients by Illumina Human methylation 450K arrays. Sixty potentially gene locis which had different methylated levels significantly among tumor and adjacent normal tissues would be tested in this study. A previous study was conducted in China communities and followed with 7 years. The DNA from white blood cells (WBC) from 192 patients with HCC and 215 matched controls were assayed in this study. The χ2 test was used to measure data to categorize variables and t -test was used to evaluate the different characteristics among groups. Besides, odds ratios (OR) and 95%CI was calculated for matching factors by conditional logistic regression models. We found that high methylation in WNK2 was related to increased risk of HCC, and high methylation in TPO were related to decreased risk of HCC. In our multivariable conditional logistic regression models, these results all exist. Those findings support the methylated changes of WNK2 and TPO may become a new detection index for HCC patients in clinical laboratory. However, the results should be replicated in additional prospective studies with lager samples. PMID:27592479

  4. Newly identified psychiatric illness in one general practice: 12-month outcome and the influence of patients' personality.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, A F; Anderson, A J

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Relatively little is known about the natural history and outcome of psychological problems in patients who present to general practitioners. Only a small proportion of such patients are seen by specialists. Clinical experience suggests that patient personality is one of the factors influencing outcome in patients diagnosed as having psychiatric illness. AIM. This study set out to examine prospectively the progress and 12-month outcome of patients with newly identified psychiatric illness, and the association of patients' personality with outcome. METHOD. One hundred and seventy one patients with clinically significant psychiatric illness attending one practice in a Scottish new town were followed up prospectively (96 presented with psychological symptoms and 75 with somatic symptoms), and were compared with a group of 127 patients with chronic physical illness. Patients were assessed in terms of psychiatric state, social problems and personality using both computer-based and pencil and paper tests in addition to clinical assessments at each consultation during the follow-up year and structured interview one year after recruitment. RESULTS. Most of the improvement in psychiatric state scores on the 28-item general health questionnaire occurred in the first six months of the illness. Of the 171 patients with psychiatric illness 34% improved quickly and remained well, 54% had an intermittent course but had improved at 12-month follow up while 12% pursued a chronic course without improvement. The mean number of consultations in the follow-up year was 8.4 for patients presenting with psychological symptoms, 7.2 for those presenting with somatic symptoms and 6.6 for patients with chronic physical illness. The Eysenck N score proved a strong predictor of the outcome of new psychiatric illness. CONCLUSION. Only one in three patients with newly identified psychiatric illness improved quickly and and remained well, reflecting the importance of continuing care of

  5. Fatal Psychrobacter sp. infection in a pediatric patient with meningitis identified by metagenomic next-generation sequencing in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Alcántara, Joanna María; Segura-Candelas, José Miguel; Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; Gonzalez-Durán, Elizabeth; Rodríguez-Castillo, Araceli; Alcántara-Pérez, Patricia; Wong-Arámbula, Claudia; González-Villa, Maribel; León-Ávila, Gloria; García-Chéquer, Adda Jeanette; Diaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Ramírez-González, José Ernesto

    2016-03-01

    The genus Psychrobacter contains environmental, psychrophilic and halotolerant gram-negative bacteria considered rare opportunistic pathogens in humans. Metagenomics was performed on the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of a pediatric patient with meningitis. Nucleic acids were extracted, randomly amplified, and sequenced with the 454 GS FLX Titanium next-generation sequencing (NGS) system. Sequencing reads were assembled, and potential virulence genes were predicted. Phylogenomic and phylogenetic studies were performed. Psychrobacter sp. 310 was identified, and several virulence genes characteristic of pathogenic bacteria were found. The phylogenomic study and 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis showed that the closest relative of Psychrobacter sp. 310 was Psychrobacter sanguinis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a meningitis case associated with Psychrobacter sp. identified by NGS metagenomics in CSF from a pediatric patient. The metagenomic strategy based on NGS was a powerful tool to identify a rare unknown pathogen in a clinical case.

  6. A candidate gene approach to identify modifiers of the palatal phenotype in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Widdershoven, Josine C.C.; Bowser, Mark; Sheridan, Molly B.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Solot, Cynthia B.; Kirschner, Richard E.; Beemer, Frits A.; Morrow, Bernice E.; Devoto, Marcella; Emanuel, Beverly S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Palatal anomalies are one of the identifying features of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) affecting about one third of patients. To identify genetic variants that increase the risk of cleft or palatal anomalies in 22q11.2DS patients, we performed a candidate gene association study in 101 patients with 22q11.2DS genotyped with the Affymetrix genome-wide human SNP array 6.0. Methods Patients from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, USA and Wilhelmina Children's Hospital Utrecht, The Netherlands were stratified based on palatal phenotype (overt cleft, submucosal cleft, bifid uvula). SNPs in 21 candidate genes for cleft palate were analyzed for genotype-phenotype association. In addition, TBX1 sequencing was carried out. Quality control and association analyses were conducted using the software package PLINK. Results Genotype and phenotype data of 101 unrelated patients (63 non-cleft subjects (62.4%), 38 cleft subjects (37.6%)) were analyzed. A Total of 39 SNPs on 10 genes demonstrated a p-value ≤0.05 prior to correction. The most significant SNPs were found on FGF10. However none of the SNPs remained significant after correcting for multiple testing. Conclusions Although these results are promising, analysis of additional samples will be required to confirm that variants in these regions influence risk for cleft palate or palatal anomalies in 22q11.2DS patients. PMID:23121717

  7. Identifying patients infected with hepatitis B virus in sub-Saharan Africa: potential for misclassification.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Anders; Maylin, Sarah; Moh, Raoul; Gabillard, Delphine; Menan, Hervé; Mahjoub, Nadia; Danel, Christine; Anglaret, Xavier; Eholié, Serge Paul; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Zoulim, Fabien; Delaugerre, Constance; Lacombe, Karine

    2015-11-01

    Most research in sub-Saharan Africa establishes hepatitis B infection via one-time hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) testing. Of 237 HIV-infected patients from two clinical trials testing HBsAg positive (MiniVidas®), 206 (86.9%) had validated serological tests using another assay (Architect). Discrepancies could be due to inactive infection, highlighting the importance of assessing hepatitis B virus infection phase. PMID:26283522

  8. Identifying patients infected with hepatitis B virus in sub-Saharan Africa: potential for misclassification.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Anders; Maylin, Sarah; Moh, Raoul; Gabillard, Delphine; Menan, Hervé; Mahjoub, Nadia; Danel, Christine; Anglaret, Xavier; Eholié, Serge Paul; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Zoulim, Fabien; Delaugerre, Constance; Lacombe, Karine

    2015-11-01

    Most research in sub-Saharan Africa establishes hepatitis B infection via one-time hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) testing. Of 237 HIV-infected patients from two clinical trials testing HBsAg positive (MiniVidas®), 206 (86.9%) had validated serological tests using another assay (Architect). Discrepancies could be due to inactive infection, highlighting the importance of assessing hepatitis B virus infection phase.

  9. Telomere fusion threshold identifies a poor prognostic subset of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Simpson, K; Jones, R E; Grimstead, J W; Hills, R; Pepper, C; Baird, D M

    2015-06-01

    Telomere dysfunction and fusion can drive genomic instability and clonal evolution in human tumours, including breast cancer. Telomere length is a critical determinant of telomere function and has been evaluated as a prognostic marker in several tumour types, but it has yet to be used in the clinical setting. Here we show that high-resolution telomere length analysis, together with a specific telomere fusion threshold, is highly prognostic for overall survival in a cohort of patients diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast (n = 120). The telomere fusion threshold defined a small subset of patients with an extremely poor clinical outcome, with a median survival of less than 12 months (HR = 21.4 (7.9-57.6), P < 0.0001). Furthermore, this telomere length threshold was independent of ER, PGR, HER2 status, NPI, or grade and was the dominant variable in multivariate analysis. We conclude that the fusogenic telomere length threshold provides a powerful, independent prognostic marker with clinical utility in breast cancer. Larger prospective studies are now required to determine the optimal way to incorporate high-resolution telomere length analysis into multivariate prognostic algorithms for patients diagnosed with breast cancer.

  10. Walk-rotate-walk test identifies patients responding to Lempert's maneuver, with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of the horizontal canal.

    PubMed

    Rahko, T; Kotti, V

    2001-03-01

    Two hundred and fifteen patients were diagnosed and treated for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of the horizontal canal (BPPV-HC). All patients were tested with conventional positional nystagmus tests lying supine and rotating head for geotropic nystagmus, registered with Frenzels glasses, and in 109 cases with ENG. The walk-rotate-walk (WRW) test, developed by one of us (T.R.) and described in the text, was applied to all patients. The immediate good treatment results with Lempert's maneuver verify the correct diagnosis of BPPV-HC. The WRW test is a more sensitive test for BPPV-HC than earlier positional tests. The unhabituated acute phase of vestibular neuritis shows positive test results and must be eliminated with caloric tests. The WRW test identifies as a dynamic test patients with symptoms of even lesser magnitude, where the compensatory capacity of the equilibrium system suppresses the diagnostic findings with earlier positional horizontal canal tests.

  11. Persistent Maternal Cardiac Dysfunction After Preeclampsia Identifies Patients at Risk for Recurrent Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Valensise, Herbert; Lo Presti, Damiano; Gagliardi, Giulia; Tiralongo, Grazia Maria; Pisani, Ilaria; Novelli, Gian Paolo; Vasapollo, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess cardiac function in nonpregnant women with previous early preeclampsia before a second pregnancy to highlight the cardiovascular pattern, which may take a risk for recurrent preeclampsia. Seventy-five normotensive patients with previous preeclampsia and 147 controls with a previous uneventful pregnancy were enrolled in a case-control study and submitted to echocardiographic examination in the nonpregnant state 12 to 18 months after the first delivery. All patients included in the study had pregnancy within 24 months from the echocardiographic examination and were followed until term. Twenty-two (29%) of the 75 patients developed recurrent preeclampsia. In the nonpregnant state, patients with recurrent preeclampsia compared with controls and nonrecurrent preeclampsia had lower stroke volume (63 ± 14 mL versus 73 ± 12 mL and 70 ± 11 mL, P<0.05), cardiac output (4.6 ± 1.2 L versus 5.3 ± 0.9 L and 5.2 ± 1.0 L, P<0.05), higher E/E' ratio (11.02 ± 3.43 versus 7.34 ± 2.11 versus 9.03 ± 3.43, P<0.05), and higher total vascular resistance (1638 ± 261 dyne · s(-1) · cm(-5) versus 1341 ± 270 dyne · s(-1) · cm(-5) and 1383 ± 261 dyne · s(-1) · cm(-5), P<0.05). Left ventricular mass index was higher in both recurrent and nonrecurrent preeclampsia compared with controls (30.0 ± 6.3 g/m(2.7) and 30.4 ± 6.8 g/m(2.7) versus 24.8 ± 5.0 g/m(2.7), P<0.05). Signs of diastolic dysfunction and different left ventricular characteristics are present in the nonpregnant state before a second pregnancy with recurrent preeclampsia. Previous preeclamptic patients with nonrecurrent preeclampsia show left ventricular structural and functional features intermediate with respect to controls and recurrent preeclampsia.

  12. Identifying the Factors Causing Delayed Presentation of Cancer Patients to a Government Medical College of Central India

    PubMed Central

    Yogi, Veenita; Ghori, Hameed Uzzafar; Singh, Om Prakash; Peepre, Karan; Yadav, Suresh; Mohare, Chaitlal

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of cancer is increasing throughout the world. One of the prime aims of its management is early diagnosis and therapeutic intervention. Factors causing delay to either of these goals should be identified and rectified. Aim To identify the factors causing delayed initial diagnosis and subsequent management in patients presenting to the Oncology department. Materials and Methods Three hundred proven cancer patients were prospectively evaluated for the pattern of presentation to the outpatient Department of Radiation Oncology of a Government Medical College (MC) in Central India. Results The mean age of presentation was 51.05 years (range 7 months-77 years). The number of male patients was 168 while females were 132. The duration of symptoms ranged from 20 days to 3 years. The number of patients with little/no education presented mainly in advanced stages as compared to their educated counterpart and this difference was statistically significant (p<0.001). The number of patients presenting directly to the department was 108, those diagnosed outside and referred to us was 84 while those diagnosed and received some form of oncologic treatment outside and referred thereafter was 108. The difference in the primary delay between patients presenting directly to the MC versus those diagnosed outside was significant (p=0.0126). The mean duration of starting definitive treatment after presentation to the outpatient was 4.68 days (range 0-22 days) and was very significantly (p< 0.001) less than the secondary delays caused to the other two subsets of patients. Conclusion Factors causing delayed presentation are both patient and system related. It is imperative to educate the common people regarding the early signs and symptoms of cancer. At the same time, the system needs to overhaul its efficiency to avoid secondary delays that adversely affect the treatment outcome. An upgradation of the existing oncology facilities in the public sector can achieve this

  13. Use of an Interactive, Telephone-based Self-management Support Program to Identify Adverse Events Among Ambulatory Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Handley, Margaret A.; Gupta, Reena; Tang, Audrey; Murphy, Elizabeth; Seligman, Hilary K.; Shojania, Kaveh G.; Schillinger, Dean

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is growing interest in the use of interactive telephone technology to support chronic disease management. We used the implementation of an automated telephone self-management support program for diabetes patients as an opportunity to monitor patient safety. METHODS We identified adverse and potential adverse events among a diverse group of diabetes patients who participated in an automated telephone health-IT self-management program via weekly interactions augmented by targeted nurse follow-up. We defined an adverse event (AE) as an injury that results from either medical management or patient self-management, and a potential adverse event (PotAE) as an unsafe state likely to lead to an event if it persists without intervention. We distinguished between incident, or new, and prevalent, or ongoing, events. We conducted a medical record review and present summary results for event characteristics including detection trigger, preventability, potential for amelioration, and primary care provider awareness. RESULTS Among the 111 patients, we identified 111 AEs and 153 PotAEs. Eleven percent of completed calls detected an event. Events were most frequently detected through health IT–facilitated triggers (158, 59%), followed by nurse elicitation (80, 30%), and patient callback requests (28, 11%). We detected more prevalent (68%) than incident (32%) events. The majority of events (93%) were categorized as preventable or ameliorable. Primary care providers were aware of only 13% of incident and 60% of prevalent events. CONCLUSIONS Surveillance via a telephone-based, health IT–facilitated self-management support program can detect AEs and PotAEs. Events detected were frequently unknown to primary providers, and the majority were preventable or ameliorable, suggesting that this between-visit surveillance, with appropriate system-level intervention, can improve patient safety for chronic disease patients. PMID:18373145

  14. An Analysis of Moderators in the COMBINE Study: Identifying Subgroups of Patients Who Benefit from Acamprosate

    PubMed Central

    Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Wu, Ran; Tsai, Wan-Min; O’Connor, Patrick G; Fucito, Lisa; Zhang, Heping; O’Malley, Stephanie S.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to use tree-based methods to identify moderators of acamprosate effect on abstinence from heavy drinking in COMBINE, the largest study of pharmacotherapy for alcoholism in the United States to date. We used three different tree-based methods for identification of subgroups with enhanced treatment response on acamprosate based on over 100 predictors measured at baseline in COMBINE. No heavy drinking during the last two months of treatment was the considered outcome. All three methods identified consecutive days of abstinence prior to treatment as the most important moderator of treatment effect. Acamprosate was beneficial for participants with shorter abstinence (1 week or less) especially when body mass index was low or normal. In this group, 46% of participants receiving active acamprosate abstained from heavy drinking compared to 23% of those receiving placebo acamprosate. Prior treatment, age, drinking goal and cognitive inefficiency were identified as moderators of acamprosate effects by one of the three methods. In conclusion, acamprosate may be beneficial for participants with shorter abstinence who are not overweight or obese. One hypothesis for this finding is that this subgroup may have greater glutamatergic hyperactivity, a target of acamprosate, and may achieve better drug plasma levels based on their lower BMI. In contrast, those with extended pretreatment abstinence who have an otherwise good prognosis did not benefit from acamprosate. Further validation of the results in independent data sets is necessary. PMID:26141511

  15. New DNA Viruses Identified in Patients with Acute Viral Infection Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Morris S.; Kapoor, Amit; Lukashov, Vladimir V.; Simmonds, Peter; Hecht, Frederick; Delwart, Eric

    2005-01-01

    A sequence-independent PCR amplification method was used to identify viral nucleic acids in the plasma samples of 25 individuals presenting with symptoms of acute viral infection following high-risk behavior for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmission. GB virus C/hepatitis G virus was identified in three individuals and hepatitis B virus in one individual. Three previously undescribed DNA viruses were also detected, a parvovirus and two viruses related to TT virus (TTV). Nucleic acids in human plasma that were distantly related to bacterial sequences or with no detectable similarities to known sequences were also found. Nearly complete viral genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis confirmed the presence of a new parvovirus distinct from known human and animal parvoviruses and of two related TTV-like viruses highly divergent from both the TTV and TTV-like minivirus groups. The detection of two previously undescribed viral species in a small group of individuals presenting acute viral syndrome with unknown etiology indicates that a rich yield of new human viruses may be readily identifiable using simple methods of sequence-independent nucleic acid amplification and limited sequencing. PMID:15956568

  16. Functional variants of POC5 identified in patients with idiopathic scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Shunmoogum A.; Margaritte-Jeannin, Patricia; Bernard, Jean-Claude; Alix, Eudeline; Labalme, Audrey; Besson, Alicia; Girard, Simon L.; Fendri, Khaled; Fraisse, Nicolas; Biot, Bernard; Poizat, Coline; Campan-Fournier, Amandine; Abelin-Genevois, Kariman; Cunin, Vincent; Zaouter, Charlotte; Liao, Meijiang; Lamy, Raphaelle; Lesca, Gaetan; Menassa, Rita; Marcaillou, Charles; Letexier, Melanie; Sanlaville, Damien; Berard, Jerome; Rouleau, Guy A.; Clerget-Darpoux, Françoise; Drapeau, Pierre; Moldovan, Florina; Edery, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic scoliosis (IS) is a spine deformity that affects approximately 3% of the population. The underlying causes of IS are not well understood, although there is clear evidence that there is a genetic component to the disease. Genetic mapping studies suggest high genetic heterogeneity, but no IS disease-causing gene has yet been identified. Here, genetic linkage analyses combined with exome sequencing identified a rare missense variant (p.A446T) in the centriolar protein gene POC5 that cosegregated with the disease in a large family with multiple members affected with IS. Subsequently, the p.A446T variant was found in an additional set of families with IS and in an additional 3 cases of IS. Moreover, POC5 variant p.A455P was present and linked to IS in one family and another rare POC5 variant (p.A429V) was identified in an additional 5 cases of IS. In a zebrafish model, expression of any of the 3 human IS-associated POC5 variant mRNAs resulted in spine deformity, without affecting other skeletal structures. Together, these findings indicate that mutations in the POC5 gene contribute to the occurrence of IS. PMID:25642776

  17. Whole exome sequencing identifies the first STRADA point mutation in a patient with polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, and symptomatic epilepsy syndrome (PMSE).

    PubMed

    Bi, Weimin; Glass, Ian A; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Eng, Christine M; Yang, Yaping; Sun, Angela

    2016-08-01

    Polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, and symptomatic epilepsy syndrome (PMSE) is an ultra rare neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe, infantile-onset intractable epilepsy, neurocognitive delay, macrocephaly, and craniofacial dysmorphism. The molecular diagnosis of this condition has thus far only been made in 16 Old Order Mennonite patients carrying a homozygous 7 kb founder deletion of exons 9-13 of STRADA. We performed clinical whole exome sequencing (WES) on a 4-year-old Indian male with global developmental delay, history of failure to thrive, infantile spasms, repetitive behaviors, hypotonia, low muscle mass, marked joint laxity, and dysmorphic facial features including tall forehead, long face, arched eyebrows, small chin, wide mouth, and tented upper lip. A homozygous single nucleotide duplication, c.842dupA (p.D281fs), in exon 10 of STRADA was identified. Sanger sequencing confirmed the mutation in the individual and identified both parents as carriers. In light of the molecular discoveries, the patient's clinical phenotype was considered to be a good fit for PMSE. We identified for the first time a homozygous point mutation in STRADA causing PMSE. Additional bi-allelic mutations related to PMSE thus far have not been observed in Baylor ∼6,000 consecutive clinical WES cases, supporting the rarity of this disorder. Our findings may have treatment implications for the patient since previous studies have shown rapamycin as a potential therapeutic agent for the seizures and cognitive problems in PMSE patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27170158

  18. Eight Mutations of Three Genes (EDA, EDAR, and WNT10A) Identified in Seven Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Binghui; Xiao, Xue; Li, Sijie; Lu, Hui; Lu, Jiaxuan; Zhu, Ling; Yu, Dongsheng; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is characterized by abnormal development of the teeth, hair, and sweat glands. Ectodysplasin A (EDA), Ectodysplasin A receptor (EDAR), and EDAR-associated death domain (EDARADD) are candidate genes for HED, but the relationship between WNT10A and HED has not yet been validated. In this study, we included patients who presented at least two of the three ectodermal dysplasia features. The four genes were analyzed in seven HED patients by PCR and Sanger sequencing. Five EDA and one EDAR heterozygous mutations were identified in families 1–6. Two WNT10A heterozygous mutations were identified in family 7 as a compound heterozygote. c.662G>A (p.Gly221Asp) in EDA and c.354T>G (p.Tyr118*) in WNT10A are novel mutations. Bioinformatics analyses results confirmed the pathogenicity of the two novel mutations. In family 7, we also identified two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were predicted to affect the splicing of EDAR. Analysis of the patient’s total RNA revealed normal splicing of EDAR. This ascertained that the compound heterozygous WNT10A mutations are the genetic defects that led to the onset of HED. Our data revealed the genetic basis of seven HED patients and expended the mutational spectrum. Interestingly, we confirmed WNT10A as a candidate gene of HED and we propose WNT10A to be tested in EDA-negative HED patients. PMID:27657131

  19. ED-based screening programs for hepatitis C (HCV) highlight significant opportunity to identify patients, prevent downstream costs/complications.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    New data suggest there is a huge opportunity for EDs to identify patients with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) and link them into care before downstream complications lead to higher medical costs and adverse outcomes. Early results from a pilot study at the University of Alabama Medical Center in Birmingham show that at least 12% of the targeted baby boomer population being screened for HCV in the ED is testing positive for HCV, with confirmatory tests showing that about 9% of the screened population is infected with the disease. Both the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta and the US Preventive Services Task Force recommend one-time HCV screening for patients who were born between 1945 and 1965. Public health experts say 75% of HCV infections occur in patients born during the baby boomer years, and that roughly half of them are unaware of their HCV status. Researchers at UAB report that so many patients are testing positive for HCV that demand for care can quickly overwhelm the health system if new primary care/specialty resources are not identified. Administrators of ED-based HCV screening programs in both Birmingham and Houston note that EDs with existing screening programs for HIV should have the easiest time implementing HCV screening. They also stress that patients are more accepting of HCV screening, and that the counseling process is easier. PMID:24432549

  20. Identifying predictors of high sodium excretion in patients with heart failure: A mixed effect analysis of longitudinal data

    PubMed Central

    Creber, Ruth Masterson; Topaz, Maxim; Lennie, Terry A.; Lee, Christopher S.; Puzantian, Houry; Riegel, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Background A low-sodium diet is a core component of heart failure self-care but patients have difficulty following the diet. Aim The aim of this study was to identify predictors of higher than recommended sodium excretion among patients with heart failure. Methods The World Health Organization Five Dimensions of Adherence model was used to guide analysis of existing data collected from a prospective, longitudinal study of 280 community-dwelling adults with previously or currently symptomatic heart failure. Sodium excretion was measured objectively using 24-hour urine sodium measured at three time points over six months. A mixed effect logistic model identified predictors of higher than recommended sodium excretion. Results The adjusted odds of higher sodium excretion were 2.90, (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.15–4.25, p<0.001) for patients who were obese; 2.80 (95% CI: 1.33–5.89, p=0.007) for patients with diabetes; and 2.22 (95% CI: 1.09–4.53, p=0.028) for patients who were cognitively intact. Conclusion Three factors were associated with excess sodium excretion and two factors, obesity and diabetes, are modifiable by changing dietary food patterns. PMID:24366985

  1. SurvNet: a web server for identifying network-based biomarkers that most correlate with patient survival data.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Roebuck, Paul; Grünewald, Stefan; Liang, Han

    2012-07-01

    An important task in biomedical research is identifying biomarkers that correlate with patient clinical data, and these biomarkers then provide a critical foundation for the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Conventionally, such an analysis is based on individual genes, but the results are often noisy and difficult to interpret. Using a biological network as the searching platform, network-based biomarkers are expected to be more robust and provide deep insights into the molecular mechanisms of disease. We have developed a novel bioinformatics web server for identifying network-based biomarkers that most correlate with patient survival data, SurvNet. The web server takes three input files: one biological network file, representing a gene regulatory or protein interaction network; one molecular profiling file, containing any type of gene- or protein-centred high-throughput biological data (e.g. microarray expression data or DNA methylation data); and one patient survival data file (e.g. patients' progression-free survival data). Given user-defined parameters, SurvNet will automatically search for subnetworks that most correlate with the observed patient survival data. As the output, SurvNet will generate a list of network biomarkers and display them through a user-friendly interface. SurvNet can be accessed at http://bioinformatics.mdanderson.org/main/SurvNet.

  2. Albumin Homodimers in Patients with Cirrhosis: Clinical and Prognostic Relevance of a Novel Identified Structural Alteration of the Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Baldassarre, Maurizio; Domenicali, Marco; Naldi, Marina; Laggetta, Maristella; Giannone, Ferdinando A.; Biselli, Maurizio; Patrono, Daniela; Bertucci, Carlo; Bernardi, Mauro; Caraceni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Decompensated cirrhosis is associated to extensive post-transcriptional changes of human albumin (HA). This study aims to characterize the occurrence of HA homodimerization in a large cohort of patients with decompensated cirrhosis and to evaluate its association with clinical features and prognosis. HA monomeric and dimeric isoforms were identified in peripheral blood by using a HPLC-ESI-MS technique in 123 cirrhotic patients hospitalized for acute decompensation and 50 age- and sex-comparable healthy controls. Clinical and biochemical parameters were recorded and patients followed up to one year. Among the monomeric isoforms identified, the N- and C-terminal truncated and the native HA underwent homodimerization. All three homodimers were significantly more abundant in patients with cirrhosis, acute-on-chronic liver failure and correlate with the prognostic scores. The homodimeric N-terminal truncated isoform was independently associated to disease complications and was able to stratify 1-year survival. As a result of all these changes, the monomeric native HA was significantly decreased in patients with cirrhosis, being also associated with a poorer prognosis. In conclusion homodimerization is a novel described structural alteration of the HA molecule in decompensated cirrhosis and contributes to the progressive reduction of the monomeric native HA, the only isoform provided of structural and functional integrity. PMID:27782157

  3. Differential expression of neurogenes among breast cancer subtypes identifies high risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Nogueira, Patricia; Bragado, Paloma; Almendro, Vanessa; Ametller, Elisabet; Rios, Jose; Choudhury, Sibgat

    2016-01-01

    The nervous system is now recognized to be a relevant component of the tumor microenvironment. Receptors for neuropeptides and neurotransmitters have been identified in breast cancer. However, very little is known about the role of neurogenes in regulating breast cancer progression. Our purpose was to identify neurogenes associated with breast cancer tumorigenesis with a potential to be used as biomarker and/or targets for treatment. We used three databases of human genes: GeneGo, GeneCards and Eugenes to generate a list of 1266 relevant neurogenes. Then we used bioinformatics tools to interrogate two published breast cancer databases SAGE and MicMa (n=96) and generated a list of 7 neurogenes that are differentially express among breast cancer subtypes. The clinical potential was further investigated using the GOBO database (n=1881). We identified 6 neurogenes that are differentially expressed among breast cancer subtypes and whose expression correlates with prognosis. Histamine receptor1 (HRH1), neuropilin2 (NRP2), ephrin-B1 (EFNB1), neural growth factor receptor (NGFR) and amyloid precursor protein (APP) were differentially overexpressed in basal and HER2-enriched tumor samples and syntaxin 1A (STX1A) was overexpressed in HER2-enriched and luminal B tumors. Analysis of HRH1, NRP2, and STX1A expression using the GOBO database showed that their expression significantly correlated with a shorter overall survival (p < 0.0001) and distant metastasis-free survival (p < 0.0001). In contrast, elevated co-expression of NGFR, EFNB1 and APP was associated with longer overall (p < 0.0001) and metastasis-free survival (p < 0.0001). We propose that HRH1, NRP2, and STX1A can be used as prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for basal and HER2-enriched breast cancer subtypes. PMID:26673618

  4. Sonic Hedgehog Mutations Identified in Holoprosencephaly Patients Can Act in a Dominant Negative Manner

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Samer; Tokhunts, Robert; Baubet, Valerie; Goetz, John A.; Huang, Zhen Jane; Schilling, Neal S.; Black, Kendall E.; MacKenzie, Todd A.; Dahmane, Nadia; Robbins, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) plays an important instructional role in vertebrate development, as exemplified by the numerous developmental disorders that occur when the SHH pathway is disrupted. Mutations in the SHH gene are the most common cause of sporadic and inherited Holoprosencephaly (HPE), a developmental disorder that is characterized by defective prosencephalon development. SHH HPE mutations provide a unique opportunity to better understand SHH biogenesis and signaling, and to decipher its role in the development of HPE. Here, we analyzed a panel of SHH HPE missense mutations that encode changes in the amino-terminal active domain of SHH. Our results show that SHH HPE mutations affect SHH biogenesis and signaling at multiple steps, which broadly results in low levels of protein expression, defective processing of SHH into its active form and protein with reduced activity. Additionally, we found that some inactive SHH proteins were able to modulate the activity of wt SHH in a dominant negative manner, both in vitro and in vivo. These findings show for the first time the susceptibility of SHH driven developmental processes to perturbations by low-activity forms of SHH. In conclusion, we demonstrate that SHH mutations found in HPE patients affect distinct steps of SHH biogenesis to attenuate SHH activity to different levels, and suggest that these variable levels of SHH activity might contribute to some of the phenotypic variation found in HPE patients. PMID:19057928

  5. Role of SEP in identifying patients requiring temporary shunt during carotid endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Fava, E; Bortolani, E; Ducati, A; Schieppati, M

    1992-01-01

    EEGs and short-latency somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) to median nerve stimulation were recorded during 151 carotid endarterectomies, performed under general anaesthesia. Carotid occlusion did not affect either EEG or SEP in 120 cases (group A). In 31 cases the EEG showed "ischaemic" abnormalities (group B). A temporary shunt was inserted only in 16 B patients showing also severely depressed cortical SEPs within 2 min after carotid occlusion (group B shunt). In 15 B patients in whom SEPs were less affected, the operation was completed without shunt (group B no shunt). One intraoperative stroke occurred in group A and two in group B shunt. No neurological complications occurred in group B no shunt. Overall stroke rate was 2%. On retrospective analysis, latency and amplitude of N20 and P25 waves proved to be uninfluenced by carotid occlusion in group A, but were significantly affected in group B shunt. P25 amplitude alone was reduced in B no shunt. An arbitrary index (need-for-shunt index, NSI) was made in order to rate changes of P25 latency and amplitude. Its mean values were significantly different in the 3 groups. A threshold value is suggested above which shunt is required, as a useful adjunct to EEG, in order to balance prevention of brain ischaemia against the risks of shunt.

  6. Transpulmonary thermodilution-derived cardiac function index identifies cardiac dysfunction in acute heart failure and septic patients: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction There is limited clinical experience with the single-indicator transpulmonary thermodilution (pulse contour cardiac output, or PiCCO) technique in critically ill medical patients, particularly in those with acute heart failure (AHF). Therefore, we compared the cardiac function of patients with AHF or sepsis using the pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) and the PiCCO technology. Methods This retrospective observational study was conducted in the medical intensive care unit of a university hospital. Twelve patients with AHF and nine patients with severe sepsis or septic shock had four simultaneous hemodynamic measurements by PAC and PiCCO during a 24-hour observation period. Comparisons between groups were made with the use of the Mann-Whitney U test. Including all measurements, correlations between data pairs were established using linear regression analysis and are expressed as the square of Pearson's correlation coefficients (r2). Results Compared to septic patients, AHF patients had a significantly lower cardiac index, cardiac function index (CFI), global ejection fraction, mixed venous oxygen saturation (SmvO2) and pulmonary vascular permeability index, but higher pulmonary artery occlusion pressure. All patients with a CFI less than 4.5 per minute had an SmvO2 not greater than 70%. In both groups, the CFI correlated with the left ventricular stroke work index (sepsis: r2 = 0.30, P < 0.05; AHF: r2 = 0.23, P < 0.05) and cardiac power (sepsis: r2 = 0.39, P < 0.05; AHF: r2 = 0.45, P < 0.05). Conclusions In critically ill medical patients, assessment of cardiac function using transpulmonary thermodilution technique is an alternative to the PAC. A low CFI identifies cardiac dysfunction in both AHF and septic patients. PMID:19671146

  7. Building application-related patient identifiers: what solution for a European country?

    PubMed

    Quantin, Catherine; Allaert, François-André; Avillach, Paul; Fassa, Maniane; Riandey, Benoît; Trouessin, Gilles; Cohen, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    We propose a method utilizing a derived social security number with the same reliability as the social security number. We show the anonymity techniques classically based on unidirectional hash functions (such as the secure hash algorithm (SHA-2) function that can guarantee the security, quality, and reliability of information if these techniques are applied to the Social Security Number). Hashing produces a strictly anonymous code that is always the same for a given individual, and thus enables patient data to be linked. Different solutions are developed and proposed in this article. Hashing the social security number will make it possible to link the information in the personal medical file to other national health information sources with the aim of completing or validating the personal medical record or conducting epidemiological and clinical research. This data linkage would meet the anonymous data requirements of the European directive on data protection.

  8. Building Application-Related Patient Identifiers: What Solution for a European Country?

    PubMed Central

    Quantin, Catherine; Allaert, François-André; Avillach, Paul; Fassa, Maniane; Riandey, Benoît; Trouessin, Gilles; Cohen, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    We propose a method utilizing a derived social security number with the same reliability as the social security number. We show the anonymity techniques classically based on unidirectional hash functions (such as the secure hash algorithm (SHA-2) function that can guarantee the security, quality, and reliability of information if these techniques are applied to the Social Security Number). Hashing produces a strictly anonymous code that is always the same for a given individual, and thus enables patient data to be linked. Different solutions are developed and proposed in this article. Hashing the social security number will make it possible to link the information in the personal medical file to other national health information sources with the aim of completing or validating the personal medical record or conducting epidemiological and clinical research. This data linkage would meet the anonymous data requirements of the European directive on data protection. PMID:18401447

  9. Intestinal microbiome analyses identify melanoma patients at risk for checkpoint-blockade-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    Dubin, Krista; Callahan, Margaret K.; Ren, Boyu; Khanin, Raya; Viale, Agnes; Ling, Lilan; No, Daniel; Gobourne, Asia; Littmann, Eric; Huttenhower, Curtis; Pamer, Eric G.; Wolchok, Jedd D.

    2016-01-01

    The composition of the intestinal microbiota influences the development of inflammatory disorders. However, associating inflammatory diseases with specific microbial members of the microbiota is challenging, because clinically detectable inflammation and its treatment can alter the microbiota's composition. Immunologic checkpoint blockade with ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) signalling, is associated with new-onset, immune-mediated colitis. Here we conduct a prospective study of patients with metastatic melanoma undergoing ipilimumab treatment and correlate the pre-inflammation faecal microbiota and microbiome composition with subsequent colitis development. We demonstrate that increased representation of bacteria belonging to the Bacteroidetes phylum is correlated with resistance to the development of checkpoint-blockade-induced colitis. Furthermore, a paucity of genetic pathways involved in polyamine transport and B vitamin biosynthesis is associated with an increased risk of colitis. Identification of these biomarkers may enable interventions to reduce the risk of inflammatory complications following cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26837003

  10. Intestinal microbiome analyses identify melanoma patients at risk for checkpoint-blockade-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Dubin, Krista; Callahan, Margaret K; Ren, Boyu; Khanin, Raya; Viale, Agnes; Ling, Lilan; No, Daniel; Gobourne, Asia; Littmann, Eric; Huttenhower, Curtis; Pamer, Eric G; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2016-01-01

    The composition of the intestinal microbiota influences the development of inflammatory disorders. However, associating inflammatory diseases with specific microbial members of the microbiota is challenging, because clinically detectable inflammation and its treatment can alter the microbiota's composition. Immunologic checkpoint blockade with ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) signalling, is associated with new-onset, immune-mediated colitis. Here we conduct a prospective study of patients with metastatic melanoma undergoing ipilimumab treatment and correlate the pre-inflammation faecal microbiota and microbiome composition with subsequent colitis development. We demonstrate that increased representation of bacteria belonging to the Bacteroidetes phylum is correlated with resistance to the development of checkpoint-blockade-induced colitis. Furthermore, a paucity of genetic pathways involved in polyamine transport and B vitamin biosynthesis is associated with an increased risk of colitis. Identification of these biomarkers may enable interventions to reduce the risk of inflammatory complications following cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26837003

  11. The HAS-BLED Score Identifies Patients with Acute Venous Thromboembolism at High Risk of Major Bleeding Complications during the First Six Months of Anticoagulant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kooiman, Judith; van Hagen, Nadja; Iglesias del Sol, Antonio; Planken, Erwin V.; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; van der Meer, Felix J. M.; Cannegieter, Suzanne C.; Klok, Frederikus A.; Huisman, Menno V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The HAS-BLED score enables a risk estimate of major bleeds in patients with atrial fibrillation on vitamin K-antagonists (VKA) treatment, but has not been validated for patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE). We analyzed whether the HAS-BLED score accurately identifies patients at high risk of major bleeds during VKA treatment for acute VTE. Methods Medical records of 537 patients with acute VTE (primary diagnosis pulmonary embolism in 223, deep vein thrombosis in 314) starting VKA treatment between 2006-2007 were searched for items on the HAS-BLED score and the occurrence of major bleeds during the first 180 days of follow-up. The hazard ratio (HR) for the occurrence of major bleeds comparing non-high with high-risk patients as defined by a HAS-BLED score ≥ 3 points was calculated using Cox-regression analysis. Results Major bleeds occurred in 11/537 patients (2.0%, 5.2/100 person years, 95% CI 2.8-9.2). Cumulative incidences of major bleeds were 1.3% (95% CI 0.1-2.5) in the non-high (HAS-BLED < 3) and 9.6% (95%CI 2.2-17.0) in the high-risk group (HAS-BLED ≥ 3), (p <0.0001 by Log-Rank test), with a HR of 8.7 (95% CI 2.7-28.4). Of the items in the HAS-BLED score, abnormal renal function (HR 10.8, 95% CI 1.9-61.7) and a history of bleeding events (HR 10.4, 95% CI 2.5-42.5) were independent predictors of major bleeds during follow-up. Conclusion Acute VTE patients with a HAS-BLED score ≥ 3 points are at increased risk of major bleeding. These results warrant for correction of the potentially reversible risk factors for major bleeding and careful International Normalized Ratio monitoring in acute VTE patients with a high HAS-BLED score. PMID:25905638

  12. Basal Tumor Cell Isolation and Patient-Derived Xenograft Engraftment Identify High-Risk Clinical Bladder Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Skowron, K. B.; Pitroda, S. P.; Namm, J. P.; Balogun, O.; Beckett, M. A.; Zenner, M. L.; Fayanju, O.; Huang, X.; Fernandez, C.; Zheng, W.; Qiao, G.; Chin, R.; Kron, S. J.; Khodarev, N. N.; Posner, M. C.; Steinberg, G. D.; Weichselbaum, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    Strategies to identify tumors at highest risk for treatment failure are currently under investigation for patients with bladder cancer. We demonstrate that flow cytometric detection of poorly differentiated basal tumor cells (BTCs), as defined by the co-expression of CD90, CD44 and CD49f, directly from patients with early stage tumors (T1-T2 and N0) and patient-derived xenograft (PDX) engraftment in locally advanced tumors (T3-T4 or N+) predict poor prognosis in patients with bladder cancer. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of bladder tumor cells isolated from PDXs indicates unique patterns of gene expression during bladder tumor cell differentiation. We found cell division cycle 25C (CDC25C) overexpression in poorly differentiated BTCs and determined that CDC25C expression predicts adverse survival independent of standard clinical and pathologic features in bladder cancer patients. Taken together, our findings support the utility of BTCs and bladder cancer PDX models in the discovery of novel molecular targets and predictive biomarkers for personalizing oncology care for patients. PMID:27775025

  13. Peripheral Blood Cell Gene Expression Diagnostic for Identifying Symptomatic Transthyretin Amyloidosis Patients: Male and Female Specific Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Kurian, Sunil M.; Novais, Marta; Whisenant, Thomas; Gelbart, Terri; Buxbaum, Joel N.; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Coelho, Teresa; Salomon, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early diagnosis of familial transthyretin (TTR) amyloid diseases remains challenging because of variable disease penetrance. Currently, patients must have an amyloid positive tissue biopsy to be eligible for disease-modifying therapies. Endomyocardial biopsies are typically amyloid positive when cardiomyopathy is suspected, but this disease manifestation is generally diagnosed late. Early diagnosis is often difficult because patients exhibit apparent symptoms of polyneuropathy, but have a negative amyloid biopsy. Thus, there is a pressing need for an additional early diagnostic strategy for TTR-aggregation-associated polyneuropathy and cardiomyopathy. Methods and Findings: Global peripheral blood cell mRNA expression profiles from 263 tafamidis-treated and untreated V30M Familiar Amyloid Neuropathy patients, asymptomatic V30M carriers, and healthy, age- and sex-matched controls without TTR mutations were used to differentiate symptomatic from asymptomatic patients. We demonstrate that blood cell gene expression patterns reveal sex-independent, as well as male- and female-specific inflammatory signatures in symptomatic FAP patients, but not in asymptomatic carriers. These signatures differentiated symptomatic patients from asymptomatic V30M carriers with >80% accuracy. There was a global downregulation of the eIF2 pathway and its associated genes in all symptomatic FAP patients. We also demonstrated that the molecular scores based on these signatures significantly trended toward normalized values in an independent cohort of 46 FAP patients after only 3 months of tafamidis treatment. Conclusions: This study identifies novel molecular signatures that differentiate symptomatic FAP patients from asymptomatic V30M carriers as well as affected males and females. We envision using this approach, initially in parallel with amyloid biopsies, to identify individuals who are asymptomatic gene carriers that may convert to FAP patients. Upon further validation

  14. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis identifies a metabolic memory profile in patient-derived diabetic foot ulcer fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Park, Lara K; Maione, Anna G; Smith, Avi; Gerami-Naini, Behzad; Iyer, Lakshmanan K; Mooney, David J; Veves, Aristidis; Garlick, Jonathan A

    2014-10-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are a serious complication of diabetes. Previous exposure to hyperglycemic conditions accelerates a decline in cellular function through metabolic memory despite normalization of glycemic control. Persistent, hyperglycemia-induced epigenetic patterns are considered a central mechanism that activates metabolic memory; however, this has not been investigated in patient-derived fibroblasts from DFUs. We generated a cohort of patient-derived lines from DFU fibroblasts (DFUF), and site- and age-matched diabetic foot fibroblasts (DFF) and non-diabetic foot fibroblasts (NFF) to investigate global and genome-wide DNA methylation patterns using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450K array. DFFs and DFUFs demonstrated significantly lower global DNA methylation compared to NFFs (p = 0.03). Hierarchical clustering of differentially methylated probes (DMPs, p = 0.05) showed that DFFs and DFUFs cluster together and separately from NFFs. Twenty-five percent of the same probes were identified as DMPs when individually comparing DFF and DFUF to NFF. Functional annotation identified enrichment of DMPs associated with genes critical to wound repair, including angiogenesis (p = 0.07) and extracellular matrix assembly (p = 0.035). Identification of sustained DNA methylation patterns in patient-derived fibroblasts after prolonged passage in normoglycemic conditions demonstrates persistent metabolic memory. These findings suggest that epigenetic-related metabolic memory may also underlie differences in wound healing phenotypes and can potentially identify therapeutic targets.

  15. Distinct Disease Phases in Muscles of Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy Patients Identified by MR Detected Fat Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Barbara H.; Voet, Nicoline B. M.; Nabuurs, Christine I.; Kan, Hermien E.; de Rooy, Jacky W. J.; Geurts, Alexander C.; Padberg, George W.; van Engelen, Baziel G. M.; Heerschap, Arend

    2014-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an untreatable disease, characterized by asymmetric progressive weakness of skeletal muscle with fatty infiltration. Although the main genetic defect has been uncovered, the downstream mechanisms causing FSHD are not understood. The objective of this study was to determine natural disease state and progression in muscles of FSHD patients and to establish diagnostic biomarkers by quantitative MRI of fat infiltration and phosphorylated metabolites. MRI was performed at 3T with dedicated coils on legs of 41 patients (28 men/13 women, age 34–76 years), of which eleven were re-examined after four months of usual care. Muscular fat fraction was determined with multi spin-echo and T1 weighted MRI, edema by TIRM and phosphorylated metabolites by 3D 31P MR spectroscopic imaging. Fat fractions were compared to clinical severity, muscle force, age, edema and phosphocreatine (PCr)/ATP. Longitudinal intramuscular fat fraction variation was analyzed by linear regression. Increased intramuscular fat correlated with age (p<0.05), FSHD severity score (p<0.0001), inversely with muscle strength (p<0.0001), and also occurred sub-clinically. Muscles were nearly dichotomously divided in those with high and with low fat fraction, with only 13% having an intermediate fat fraction. The intramuscular fat fraction along the muscle’s length, increased from proximal to distal. This fat gradient was the steepest for intermediate fat infiltrated muscles (0.07±0.01/cm, p<0.001). Leg muscles in this intermediate phase showed a decreased PCr/ATP (p<0.05) and the fastest increase in fatty infiltration over time (0.18±0.15/year, p<0.001), which correlated with initial edema (p<0.01), if present. Thus, in the MR assessment of fat infiltration as biomarker for diseased muscles, the intramuscular fat distribution needs to be taken into account. Our results indicate that healthy individual leg muscles become diseased by entering a progressive phase

  16. Distinct disease phases in muscles of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy patients identified by MR detected fat infiltration.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Barbara H; Voet, Nicoline B M; Nabuurs, Christine I; Kan, Hermien E; de Rooy, Jacky W J; Geurts, Alexander C; Padberg, George W; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Heerschap, Arend

    2014-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an untreatable disease, characterized by asymmetric progressive weakness of skeletal muscle with fatty infiltration. Although the main genetic defect has been uncovered, the downstream mechanisms causing FSHD are not understood. The objective of this study was to determine natural disease state and progression in muscles of FSHD patients and to establish diagnostic biomarkers by quantitative MRI of fat infiltration and phosphorylated metabolites. MRI was performed at 3T with dedicated coils on legs of 41 patients (28 men/13 women, age 34-76 years), of which eleven were re-examined after four months of usual care. Muscular fat fraction was determined with multi spin-echo and T1 weighted MRI, edema by TIRM and phosphorylated metabolites by 3D (31)P MR spectroscopic imaging. Fat fractions were compared to clinical severity, muscle force, age, edema and phosphocreatine (PCr)/ATP. Longitudinal intramuscular fat fraction variation was analyzed by linear regression. Increased intramuscular fat correlated with age (p<0.05), FSHD severity score (p<0.0001), inversely with muscle strength (p<0.0001), and also occurred sub-clinically. Muscles were nearly dichotomously divided in those with high and with low fat fraction, with only 13% having an intermediate fat fraction. The intramuscular fat fraction along the muscle's length, increased from proximal to distal. This fat gradient was the steepest for intermediate fat infiltrated muscles (0.07±0.01/cm, p<0.001). Leg muscles in this intermediate phase showed a decreased PCr/ATP (p<0.05) and the fastest increase in fatty infiltration over time (0.18±0.15/year, p<0.001), which correlated with initial edema (p<0.01), if present. Thus, in the MR assessment of fat infiltration as biomarker for diseased muscles, the intramuscular fat distribution needs to be taken into account. Our results indicate that healthy individual leg muscles become diseased by entering a progressive phase

  17. AIP mutation identified in a patient with acromegaly caused by pituitary somatotroph adenoma with neuronal choristoma.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, H; Fukuoka, H; Iguchi, G; Inoshita, N; Yamada, S; Takahashi, Y

    2013-05-01

    Pituitary adenoma with neuronal choristoma (PANCH) is a rare condition that includes ganglion cells and GH-producing tumor that is characterized by sparsely granulated somatotroph cell type. However, the pathophysiology of this condition remains to be elucidated. We report a case of 46-year-old woman with acromegaly caused by PANCH. The patient had a large and invasive macroadenoma that was resistant to preoperative therapy with somatostatin analogue (SSA) and dopamine agonist. Histological examination showed typical diffuse, chromophobe-type adenoma containing ganglion cells, and sparsely granulated somatotroph cell type, which were consistent with PANCH. Genetic analysis showed heterozygous germline missense mutation in the AIP gene that results in Y261X amino acid substitution. The clinical characteristics of acromegaly associated with AIP mutations are reportedly macroadenomas with tumor extension and invasion, lower decreases in GH and IGF-I and less tumor shrinkage with SSA treatment, and sparsely granulated somatotroph cell type, which are comparable with those observed in PANCH. Taken together, the mutation in AIP gene may explain the clinical characteristics and pathogenesis of PANCH.

  18. Twelve novel HGD gene variants identified in 99 alkaptonuria patients: focus on 'black bone disease' in Italy.

    PubMed

    Nemethova, Martina; Radvanszky, Jan; Kadasi, Ludevit; Ascher, David B; Pires, Douglas E V; Blundell, Tom L; Porfirio, Berardino; Mannoni, Alessandro; Santucci, Annalisa; Milucci, Lia; Sestini, Silvia; Biolcati, Gianfranco; Sorge, Fiammetta; Aurizi, Caterina; Aquaron, Robert; Alsbou, Mohammed; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Ramadevi, Kanakasabapathi; Ranganath, Lakshminarayan R; Gallagher, James A; van Kan, Christa; Hall, Anthony K; Olsson, Birgitta; Sireau, Nicolas; Ayoob, Hana; Timmis, Oliver G; Sang, Kim-Hanh Le Quan; Genovese, Federica; Imrich, Richard; Rovensky, Jozef; Srinivasaraghavan, Rangan; Bharadwaj, Shruthi K; Spiegel, Ronen; Zatkova, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in homogentisate-1,2-dioxygenase (HGD) gene leading to the deficiency of HGD enzyme activity. The DevelopAKUre project is underway to test nitisinone as a specific treatment to counteract this derangement of the phenylalanine-tyrosine catabolic pathway. We analysed DNA of 40 AKU patients enrolled for SONIA1, the first study in DevelopAKUre, and of 59 other AKU patients sent to our laboratory for molecular diagnostics. We identified 12 novel DNA variants: one was identified in patients from Brazil (c.557T>A), Slovakia (c.500C>T) and France (c.440T>C), three in patients from India (c.469+6T>C, c.650-85A>G, c.158G>A), and six in patients from Italy (c.742A>G, c.614G>A, c.1057A>C, c.752G>A, c.119A>C, c.926G>T). Thus, the total number of potential AKU-causing variants found in 380 patients reported in the HGD mutation database is now 129. Using mCSM and DUET, computational approaches based on the protein 3D structure, the novel missense variants are predicted to affect the activity of the enzyme by three mechanisms: decrease of stability of individual protomers, disruption of protomer-protomer interactions or modification of residues in the region of the active site. We also present an overview of AKU in Italy, where so far about 60 AKU cases are known and DNA analysis has been reported for 34 of them. In this rather small group, 26 different HGD variants affecting function were described, indicating rather high heterogeneity. Twelve of these variants seem to be specific for Italy.

  19. Using Survival Analysis to Identify Risk Factors for Treatment Interruption among New and Retreatment Tuberculosis Patients in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Masini, Enos O.; Mansour, Omar; Speer, Clare E.; Addona, Vittorio; Hanson, Christy L.; Sitienei, Joseph K.; Kipruto, Hillary K.; Githiomi, Martin Muhingo; Mungai, Brenda Nyambura

    2016-01-01

    Despite high tuberculosis (TB) treatment success rate, treatment adherence is one of the major obstacles to tuberculosis control in Kenya. Our objective was to identify patient-related factors that were associated with time to TB treatment interruption and the geographic distribution of the risk of treatment interruption by county. Data of new and retreatment patients registered in TIBU, a Kenyan national case-based electronic data recording system, between 2013 and 2014 was obtained. Kaplan-Meier curves and log rank tests were used to assess the adherence patterns. Mixed-effects Cox proportional hazards modeling was used for multivariate analysis. Records from 90,170 patients were included in the study. The cumulative incidence of treatment interruption was 4.5% for new patients, and 8.5% for retreatment patients. The risk of treatment interruption was highest during the intensive phase of treatment. Having previously been lost to follow-up was the greatest independent risk factor for treatment interruption (HR: 4.79 [3.99, 5.75]), followed by being HIV-positive not on ART (HR: 1.96 [1.70, 2.26]) and TB relapse (HR: 1.70 [1.44, 2.00]). Male and underweight patients had high risks of treatment interruption (HR: 1.46 [1.35, 1.58]; 1.11 [1.03, 1.20], respectively). High rates of treatment interruption were observed in counties in the central part of Kenya while counties in the northeast had the lowest risk of treatment interruption. A better understanding of treatment interruption risk factors is necessary to improve adherence to treatment. Interventions should focus on patients during the intensive phase, patients who have previously been lost to follow-up, and promotion of integrated TB and HIV services among public and private facilities. PMID:27706230

  20. Whole exome analysis identifies dominant COL4A1 mutations in patients with complex ocular phenotypes involving microphthalmia.

    PubMed

    Deml, B; Reis, L M; Maheshwari, M; Griffis, C; Bick, D; Semina, E V

    2014-11-01

    Anophthalmia/microphthalmia (A/M) is a developmental ocular malformation defined as complete absence or reduction in size of the eye. A/M is a heterogenous disorder with numerous causative genes identified; however, about half the cases lack a molecular diagnosis. We undertook whole exome sequencing in an A/M family with two affected siblings, two unaffected siblings, and unaffected parents; the ocular phenotype was isolated with only mild developmental delay/learning difficulties reported and a normal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the proband at 16 months. No pathogenic mutations were identified in 71 known A/M genes. Further analysis identified a shared heterozygous mutation in COL4A1, c.2317G>A, p.(Gly773Arg) that was not seen in the unaffected parents and siblings. Analysis of 24 unrelated A/M exomes identified a novel c.2122G>A, p.(Gly708Arg) mutation in an additional patient with unilateral microphthalmia, bilateral microcornea and Peters anomaly; the mutation was absent in the unaffected mother and the unaffected father was not available. Mutations in COL4A1 have been linked to a spectrum of human disorders; the most consistent feature is cerebrovascular disease with variable ocular anomalies, kidney and muscle defects. This study expands the spectrum of COL4A1 phenotypes and indicates screening in patients with A/M regardless of MRI findings or presumed inheritance pattern.

  1. Association Between IHC and MSI Testing to Identify Mismatch Repair–Deficient Patients with Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Cragun, Deborah; Thompson, Zachary; Coppola, Domenico; Nicosia, Santo V.; Akbari, Mohammad; Zhang, Shiyu; McLaughlin, John; Narod, Steven; Schildkraut, Joellen; Sellers, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In epithelial ovarian cancer, concordance between results of microsatellite instability (MSI) and immunohistochemical (IHC) testing has not been demonstrated. This study evaluated the association of MSI-high (MSI-H) status with loss of expression (LoE) of mismatch repair (MMR) proteins on IHC and assessed for potential factors affecting the strength of the association. Methods: Tumor specimens from three population-based studies of epithelial ovarian cancer were stained for MMR proteins through manual or automated methods, and results were interpreted by one of two pathologists. Tumor and germline DNA was extracted and MSI testing performed. Multivariable logistic regression models were fitted to predict loss of IHC expression based on MSI status after adjusting for staining method and reading pathologist. Results: Of 834 cases, 564 (67.6%) were concordant; 41 were classified as MSI-H with LoE and 523 as microsatellite stable (MSS) with no LoE. Of the 270 discordant cases, 83 were MSI-H with no LoE and 187 were MSS with LoE. Both IHC staining method and reading pathologist were strongly associated with discordant results. Conclusions: Lack of concordance in the current study may be related to inconsistencies in IHC testing methods and interpretation. Results support the need for validation studies before routine screening of ovarian tumors is implemented in clinical practice for the purpose of identifying Lynch syndrome. PMID:24592941

  2. VEGF Polymorphisms Related to Higher Serum Levels of Protein Identify Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Rafael Fernandes; Pinhel, Marcela Augusta de Souza; da Silva, Renato Ferreira; Fucuta, Patrícia da Silva; Souza, Dorotéia Rossi Silva

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary neoplasia of the liver. Major risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma include chronic liver diseases, carcinogenic agents, and genetic alterations as well as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) involved in angiogenesis process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of VEGF-A (C936T and A1154G) with HCC and cirrhosis, in addition to serum levels of VEGF, clinical profile, lifestyle habits, and comorbidities. A total of 346 individuals were studied: 102 with HCC (G1), 117 with cirrhosis (G2), and 127 controls (G3). Polymorphisms were analysed by PCR/RFLP and serum levels of VEGF by ELISA. Alpha error was set at 5%. The wild-type genotype of both polymorphisms prevailed (P > 0.05). In G1, 23% of the patients died, with no relation to genetic profile (P > 0.05). Increased VEGF level was observed in G1 and G3, related to the mutant allele of VEGF-C936T and VEGF-A1154G, respectively, and compared with the wild-type genotype (P = 0.0285; P = 0.0284, resp.) as well as G1 versus G2 and G3 for VEGF-C936T and G1 versus G2 for VEGF-A1154G (P < 0.05 for both). In conclusion, there is a relationship between mutant alleles of VEGF-C936T and VEGF-A1154G polymorphisms and higher VEGF level, making them potential markers for HCC.

  3. Accelerated bone turnover identifies hemiplegic patients at higher risk of demineralization.

    PubMed

    Del Puente, A; Pappone, N; Servodio Iammarrone, C; Esposito, A; Scarpa, R; Costa, L; Caso, F; Bardoscia, A; Del Puente, A

    2016-01-01

    Immobilization osteoporosis represents a severe complication in hemiplegic patients (HPs), causing fragility fractures, which may occur during rehabilitation reducing functional recovery and survival. The aim of the study was to investigate determinants of bone loss, independent from length of immobilization, which may be useful in early identification of HPs at higher risk of demineralization. Forty-eight HPs of both sexes underwent anthropometric measurements, evaluation of scores of spasticity and of lower limb motory capacity. Laboratory tests were performed. On serum: calcium; phosphorus; creatinine; ALP; iPTH; 25(OH) vitamin-D; sex hormones; Δ4-androstenedione; DHEA-S; insulin; IGF-1; FT3; FT4; TSH; c-AMP. On urine: c-AMP and calcium/creatinine ratio. Two bone turnover markers were measured: serum osteocalcin (BGP) and urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPD). Bone mineral density was determined at both femoral necks, defining a percentage difference in bone loss between paretic and non-paretic limb, thus controlling for the complex cofactors involved. Only bone turnover markers significantly and directly correlated with the entity of demineralization, controlling for age, sex and length of immobilization in the multivariate analysis (BGP coefficient estimate=0.008; SE=0.003; p=0.020; DPD coefficient estimate=0.005; SE=0.002; p=0.036). BGP and DPD are not dependent on anthropometric and endocrine-metabolic parameters, disability patterns and duration of immobilization, thus represent independent determinants of the degree of demineralization. A cutoff was defined for BGP and DPD above which subjects show significantly greater risk of demineralization. The immobilization event generates more severe bone loss when it occurs in subjects with higher bone turnover. BGP and DPD measurements may be of primary importance for early identification of HPs at risk, with relevant preventive implications. PMID:27049105

  4. Accelerated bone turnover identifies hemiplegic patients at higher risk of demineralization.

    PubMed

    Del Puente, A; Pappone, N; Servodio Iammarrone, C; Esposito, A; Scarpa, R; Costa, L; Caso, F; Bardoscia, A; Del Puente, A

    2016-01-01

    Immobilization osteoporosis represents a severe complication in hemiplegic patients (HPs), causing fragility fractures, which may occur during rehabilitation reducing functional recovery and survival. The aim of the study was to investigate determinants of bone loss, independent from length of immobilization, which may be useful in early identification of HPs at higher risk of demineralization. Forty-eight HPs of both sexes underwent anthropometric measurements, evaluation of scores of spasticity and of lower limb motory capacity. Laboratory tests were performed. On serum: calcium; phosphorus; creatinine; ALP; iPTH; 25(OH) vitamin-D; sex hormones; Δ4-androstenedione; DHEA-S; insulin; IGF-1; FT3; FT4; TSH; c-AMP. On urine: c-AMP and calcium/creatinine ratio. Two bone turnover markers were measured: serum osteocalcin (BGP) and urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPD). Bone mineral density was determined at both femoral necks, defining a percentage difference in bone loss between paretic and non-paretic limb, thus controlling for the complex cofactors involved. Only bone turnover markers significantly and directly correlated with the entity of demineralization, controlling for age, sex and length of immobilization in the multivariate analysis (BGP coefficient estimate=0.008; SE=0.003; p=0.020; DPD coefficient estimate=0.005; SE=0.002; p=0.036). BGP and DPD are not dependent on anthropometric and endocrine-metabolic parameters, disability patterns and duration of immobilization, thus represent independent determinants of the degree of demineralization. A cutoff was defined for BGP and DPD above which subjects show significantly greater risk of demineralization. The immobilization event generates more severe bone loss when it occurs in subjects with higher bone turnover. BGP and DPD measurements may be of primary importance for early identification of HPs at risk, with relevant preventive implications.

  5. VEGF Polymorphisms Related to Higher Serum Levels of Protein Identify Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Rafael Fernandes; Pinhel, Marcela Augusta de Souza; da Silva, Renato Ferreira; Fucuta, Patrícia da Silva; Souza, Dorotéia Rossi Silva

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary neoplasia of the liver. Major risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma include chronic liver diseases, carcinogenic agents, and genetic alterations as well as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) involved in angiogenesis process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of VEGF-A (C936T and A1154G) with HCC and cirrhosis, in addition to serum levels of VEGF, clinical profile, lifestyle habits, and comorbidities. A total of 346 individuals were studied: 102 with HCC (G1), 117 with cirrhosis (G2), and 127 controls (G3). Polymorphisms were analysed by PCR/RFLP and serum levels of VEGF by ELISA. Alpha error was set at 5%. The wild-type genotype of both polymorphisms prevailed (P > 0.05). In G1, 23% of the patients died, with no relation to genetic profile (P > 0.05). Increased VEGF level was observed in G1 and G3, related to the mutant allele of VEGF-C936T and VEGF-A1154G, respectively, and compared with the wild-type genotype (P = 0.0285; P = 0.0284, resp.) as well as G1 versus G2 and G3 for VEGF-C936T and G1 versus G2 for VEGF-A1154G (P < 0.05 for both). In conclusion, there is a relationship between mutant alleles of VEGF-C936T and VEGF-A1154G polymorphisms and higher VEGF level, making them potential markers for HCC. PMID:27660750

  6. Accurate documentation and wound measurement.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Sylvie

    This article, part 4 in a series on wound management, addresses the sometimes routine yet crucial task of documentation. Clear and accurate records of a wound enable its progress to be determined so the appropriate treatment can be applied. Thorough records mean any practitioner picking up a patient's notes will know when the wound was last checked, how it looked and what dressing and/or treatment was applied, ensuring continuity of care. Documenting every assessment also has legal implications, demonstrating due consideration and care of the patient and the rationale for any treatment carried out. Part 5 in the series discusses wound dressing characteristics and selection.

  7. Identifying Measures Used for Assessing Quality of YouTube Videos with Patient Health Information: A Review of Current Literature

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Luque, Luis; Armayones, Manuel; Lau, Annie YS

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent publications on YouTube have advocated its potential for patient education. However, a reliable description of what could be considered quality information for patient education on YouTube is missing. Objective To identify topics associated with the concept of quality information for patient education on YouTube in the scientific literature. Methods A literature review was performed in MEDLINE, ISI Web of Knowledge, Scopus, and PsychINFO. Abstract selection was first conducted by two independent reviewers; discrepancies were discussed in a second abstract review with two additional independent reviewers. Full text of selected papers were analyzed looking for concepts, definitions, and topics used by its authors that focused on the quality of information on YouTube for patient education. Results In total, 456 abstracts were extracted and 13 papers meeting eligibility criteria were analyzed. Concepts identified related to quality of information for patient education are categorized as expert-driven, popularity-driven, or heuristic-driven measures. These include (in descending order): (1) quality of content in 10/13 (77%), (2) view count in 9/13 (69%), (3) health professional opinion in 8/13 (62%), (4) adequate length or duration in 6/13 (46%), (5) public ratings in 5/13 (39%), (6) adequate title, tags, and description in 5/13 (39%), (7) good description or a comprehensive narrative in 4/13 (31%), (8) evidence-based practices included in video in 4/13 (31%), (9) suitability as a teaching tool in 4/13 (31%), (10) technical quality in 4/13 (31%), (11) credentials provided in video in 4/13 (31%), (12) enough amount of content to identify its objective in 3/13 (23%), and (13) viewership share in 2/13 (15%). Conclusions Our review confirms that the current topics linked to quality of information for patient education on YouTube are unclear and not standardized. Although expert-driven, popularity-driven, or heuristic-driven measures are used as proxies to

  8. 12-Chemokine Gene Signature Identifies Lymph Node-like Structures in Melanoma: Potential for Patient Selection for Immunotherapy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Jane L.; Fenstermacher, David A.; Eschrich, Steven; Qu, Xiaotao; Berglund, Anders E.; Lloyd, Mark C.; Schell, Michael J.; Sondak, Vernon K.; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Mulé, James J.

    2012-10-01

    We have interrogated a 12-chemokine gene expression signature (GES) on genomic arrays of 14,492 distinct solid tumors and show broad distribution across different histologies. We hypothesized that this 12-chemokine GES might accurately predict a unique intratumoral immune reaction in stage IV (non-locoregional) melanoma metastases. The 12-chemokine GES predicted the presence of unique, lymph node-like structures, containing CD20+ B cell follicles with prominent areas of CD3+ T cells (both CD4+ and CD8+ subsets). CD86+, but not FoxP3+, cells were present within these unique structures as well. The direct correlation between the 12-chemokine GES score and the presence of unique, lymph nodal structures was also associated with better overall survival of the subset of melanoma patients. The use of this novel 12-chemokine GES may reveal basic information on in situ mechanisms of the anti-tumor immune response, potentially leading to improvements in the identification and selection of melanoma patients most suitable for immunotherapy.

  9. Plasma long noncoding RNA expression profile identified by microarray in patients with Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Liu, Jiang; Zhao, Hui-Ying; Chen, Yi-Peng; Xiang, Zun; Jin, Xi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression pattern of plasma long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in Chrohn’s disease (CD) patients. METHODS: Microarray screening and qRT-PCR verification of lncRNAs and mRNAs were performed in CD and control subjects, followed by hierarchy clustering, GO and KEGG pathway analyses. Significantly dysregulated lncRNAs were categorized into subgroups of antisense lncRNAs, enhancer lncRNAs and lincRNAs. To predict the regulatory effect of lncRNAs on mRNAs, a CNC network analysis was performed and cross linked with significantly changed lncRNAs. The overlapping lncRNAs were randomly selected and verified by qRT-PCR in a larger cohort. RESULTS: Initially, there were 1211 up-regulated and 777 down-regulated lncRNAs as well as 1020 up-regulated and 953 down-regulated mRNAs after microarray analysis; a heat map based on these results showed good categorization into the CD and control groups. GUSBP2 and AF113016 had the highest fold change of the up- and down-regulated lncRNAs, whereas TBC1D17 and CCL3L3 had the highest fold change of the up- and down-regulated mRNAs. Six (SNX1, CYFIP2, CD6, CMTM8, STAT4 and IGFBP7) of 10 mRNAs and 8 (NR_033913, NR_038218, NR_036512, NR_049759, NR_033951, NR_045408, NR_038377 and NR_039976) of 14 lncRNAs showed the same change trends on the microarray and qRT-PCR results with statistical significance. Based on the qRT-PCR verified mRNAs, 1358 potential lncRNAs with 2697 positive correlations and 2287 negative correlations were predicted by the CNC network. CONCLUSION: The plasma lncRNAs profiles provide preliminary data for the non-invasive diagnosis of CD and a resource for further specific lncRNA-mRNA pathway exploration. PMID:27217703

  10. Elevated PEM (Phasic Electromyographic Metric) Rates Identify Rapid Eye Movement Behavior Disorder Patients on Nights Without Behavioral Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Bliwise, Donald L.; Rye, David B.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine the validity of the phasic electromyographic metric (PEM) to differentiate patients with a history suggestive of rapid eye movement behavior disorder (REMBD) on laboratory nights without overt dream-enactment behavior. Methods: PEM was quantified as the % of 2.5-sec intervals with phasic muscle activity of 100-msec duration with an amplitude of at least 4 times background activity in 11 patients and 31 elderly controls. Data were derived from both REM and NREM sleep from 5 muscle groups (mentalis, left/right anterior tibialis, left/right brachioradialis). Results: Relative to controls, REMBD patients had significantly higher levels of PEM activity in all recordings. The largest differences occurred during REM sleep for the mentalis and brachioradialis channels. Similar results were obtained by limiting quantification of PEM to the final REM period of the night and could be accomplished by individuals with no previous familiarity with polysomnography. Discussion: PEM may be a useful metric to characterize the REM related phasic muscle activity on patients with a history of REMBD, even when no overt dream-enactment behaviors are detected on a laboratory night. Citation: Bliwise DL; Rye DB. Elevated PEM (phasic electromyographic metric) rates identify rapid eye movement behavior disorder patients on nights without behavioral abnormalities. SLEEP 2008;31(6):853–857. PMID:18548830

  11. The level of red cell distribution width cannot identify deep vein thrombosis in patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhihong; Li, Lan; Shi, Dongquan; Chen, Dongyang; Dai, Jin; Yao, Yao; Teng, Huajian; Jiang, Qing

    2015-04-01

    Recently, studies have reported that increased level of red cell distribution width (RDW) is associated with deep vein thrombosis (DVT). We are aiming to evaluate the validity of RDW in DVT in patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty (TJA). A total of 110 patients (55 patients with DVT and 55 control individuals undergoing TJA) were included in this retrospective cross-sectional study. Age, sex, RDW, red blood cell count, D-dimer, hematocrit and hemoglobin levels of patients were matched. The relationship between RDW and DVT has been estimated. There is no statistical difference of RDW levels between the DVT group and the control group (13.12 ± 0.12 vs. 13.08 ± 0.13; P = 0.84). Pearson's correlation analysis showed that there were no significant associations between RDW and other referral groups. Logistic regression analysis indicated that RDW, red blood cell count, hemoglobin and hematocrit were not associated with DVT. Meanwhile, age, sex and D-dimer were independently associated with DVT. The receiver-operating characteristic curve and area under the curve demonstrated low accuracy of RDW in predicting DVT. Although D-dimer may identify the risk of venous thrombosis, the specificity and sensitivity were low. Preoperative level of RDW does not show predictive value for diagnosis of DVT in patients undergoing TJA. PMID:25806961

  12. Analysis of the discrepancies identified during medication reconciliation on patient admission in cardiology units: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Natália Fracaro; Mendes, Antonio Eduardo Matoso; Lucchetta, Rosa Camila; Reis, Wálleri Christini Torelli; Fávero, Maria Luiza Drechsel; Correr, Cassyano Januário

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: this observational study aimed to describe the discrepancies identified during medication reconciliation on patient admission to cardiology units in a large hospital. Methods: the medication history of patients was collected within 48 hours after admission, and intentional and unintentional discrepancies were classified as omission, duplication, dose, frequency, timing, and route of drug administration. Results: most of the patients evaluated were women (58.0%) with a mean age of 59 years, and 75.5% of the patients had a Charlson comorbidity index score between 1 and 3. Of the 117 discrepancies found, 50.4% were unintentional. Of these, 61.0% involved omission, 18.6% involved dosage, 18.6% involved timing, and 1.7% involved the route of drug administration. Conclusion: this study revealed a high prevalence of discrepancies, most of which were related to omissions, and 50% were unintentional. These results reveal the number of drugs that are not reincorporated into the treatment of patients, which can have important clinical consequences. PMID:27533269

  13. MicroRNA Fingerprints Identify miR-150 as a Plasma Prognostic Marker in Patients with Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Masayoshi; Tudor, Stefan; Veronese, Angelo; Ferracin, Manuela; Nicoloso, Milena S.; Barbarotto, Elisa; Popa, Monica; Stanciulea, Oana; Fernandez, Michael H.; Tulbure, Dan; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E.; Negrini, Massimo; Calin, George A.

    2009-01-01

    Background The physiopathology of sepsis continues to be poorly understood, and despite recent advances in its management, sepsis is still a life-threatening condition with a poor outcome. If new diagnostic markers related to sepsis pathogenesis will be identified, new specific therapies might be developed and mortality reduced. Small regulatory non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), were recently linked to various diseases; the aim of our prospective study was to identify miRNAs that can differentiate patients with early-stage sepsis from healthy controls and to determine if miRNA levels correlate with the severity assessed by the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score. Methodology/Principal Findings By using genome-wide miRNA profiling by microarray in peripheral blood leukocytes, we found that miR-150, miR-182, miR-342-5p, and miR-486 expression profiles differentiated sepsis patients from healthy controls. We also proved by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction that miR-150 levels were significantly reduced in plasma samples of sepsis patients and correlated with the level of disease severity measured by the SOFA score, but were independent of the white blood counts (WBC). We found that plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-10, and interleukin-18, all genes with sequence complementarity to miR-150, were negatively correlated with the plasma levels of this miRNA. Furthermore, we identified that the plasma levels ratio for miR-150/interleukin-18 can be used for assessing the severity of the sepsis. Conclusions/Significance We propose that miR-150 levels in both leukocytes and plasma correlate with the aggressiveness of sepsis and can be used as a marker of early sepsis. Furthermore, we envision miR-150 restoration as a future therapeutic option in sepsis patients. PMID:19823581

  14. Genome-wide interrogation identifies YAP1 variants associated with survival of small-cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen; Xu, Binghe; Yuan, Peng; Miao, Xiaoping; Liu, Yu; Guan, Yin; Yu, Dianke; Xu, Jian; Zhang, Tongwen; Shen, Hongbing; Wu, Tangchun; Lin, Dongxin

    2010-12-01

    Although most patients with small-cell lung cancer respond to chemotherapy, the survival time is highly diverse. We conducted a genome-wide analysis to examine whether germline genetic variations are prognostic factors in small-cell lung cancer patients treated with the same chemotherapy regimen. Genome-wide scan of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) was performed using blood DNA to identify genotypes associated with overall survival in 245 patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy, and the results were replicated in another independent set of 305 patients. Associations were estimated by Cox models and function of the variants was examined by biochemical assays. We found that rs1820453 T>G SNP within the promoter region of YAP1 on chromosome 11q22 and rs716274 A>G SNP in the region of downstream of DYNC2H1 on chromosome 11q22.3 are associated with small-cell lung cancer survival. In pooled analysis of 2 independent cohorts, the adjusted hazard ratio for patients with the rs1820453 TG or GG genotype was 1.49 (95% CI, 1.19-1.85; P = 0.0004) and 1.65 (95% CI, 1.36-2.01; P = 4.76 × 10(-7)), respectively, compared with the TT genotype; and for patients with the rs716274 AG or GG genotype was 1.83 (95% CI, 1.47-2.29; P = 8.74 × 10(-8)) and 2.96 (95% CI, 1.90-4.62; P = 1.59 × 10(-6)), respectively, compared with the AA genotype. Functional analysis showed that the rs1820453 T>G change creates a transcriptional factor binding site and results in downregulation of YAP1 expression. These results suggest that YAP1 may play an important role in prognosis of small-cell lung cancer patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy.

  15. Plasma Uromodulin Correlates With Kidney Function and Identifies Early Stages in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Steubl, Dominik; Block, Matthias; Herbst, Victor; Nockher, Wolfgang Andreas; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; Satanovskij, Robin; Angermann, Susanne; Hasenau, Anna-Lena; Stecher, Lynne; Heemann, Uwe; Renders, Lutz; Scherberich, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Uromodulin, released from tubular cells of the ascending limb into the blood, may be associated with kidney function. This work studies the relevance of plasma uromodulin as a biomarker for kidney function in an observational cohort of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and subjects without CKD (CKD stage 0). It should be further evaluated if uromodulin allows the identification of early CKD stages.Plasma uromodulin, serum creatinine, cystatin C, blood-urea-nitrogen (BUN) concentrations, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR CKD-EPIcrea-cystatin) were assessed in 426 individuals of whom 71 were CKD stage 0 and 355 had CKD. Besides descriptive statistics, univariate correlations between uromodulin and biomarkers/eGFR were calculated using Pearson-correlation coefficient. Multiple linear regression modeling was applied to establish the association between uromodulin and eGFR adjusted for demographic parameters and pharmacologic treatment. Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis adjusted for demographic parameters was performed to test if uromodulin allows differentiation of subjects with CKD stage 0 and CKD stage I.Mean uromodulin plasma levels were 85.7 ± 60.5 ng/mL for all CKD stages combined. Uromodulin was correlated with all biomarkers/eGFR in univariate analysis (eGFR: r = 0.80, creatinine: r = -0.76, BUN: r = -0.72, and cystatin C: r = -0.79). Multiple linear regression modeling showed significant association between uromodulin and eGFR (coefficient estimate β = 0.696, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.603-0.719, P < 0.001). In ROC analysis uromodulin was the only parameter that significantly improved a model containing demographic parameters to differentiate between CKD 0° and I° (area under the curve [AUC] 0.831, 95% CI 0.746-0.915, P = 0.008) compared to creatinine, cystatin C, BUN, and eGFR (AUC for creatinine: 0.722, P = 0.056, cystatin C: 0.668, P = 0.418, BUN: 0.653, P = 0.811, and e

  16. Plasma Uromodulin Correlates With Kidney Function and Identifies Early Stages in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Steubl, Dominik; Block, Matthias; Herbst, Victor; Nockher, Wolfgang Andreas; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; Satanovskij, Robin; Angermann, Susanne; Hasenau, Anna-Lena; Stecher, Lynne; Heemann, Uwe; Renders, Lutz; Scherberich, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Uromodulin, released from tubular cells of the ascending limb into the blood, may be associated with kidney function. This work studies the relevance of plasma uromodulin as a biomarker for kidney function in an observational cohort of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and subjects without CKD (CKD stage 0). It should be further evaluated if uromodulin allows the identification of early CKD stages. Plasma uromodulin, serum creatinine, cystatin C, blood-urea-nitrogen (BUN) concentrations, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR CKD-EPIcrea-cystatin) were assessed in 426 individuals of whom 71 were CKD stage 0 and 355 had CKD. Besides descriptive statistics, univariate correlations between uromodulin and biomarkers/eGFR were calculated using Pearson-correlation coefficient. Multiple linear regression modeling was applied to establish the association between uromodulin and eGFR adjusted for demographic parameters and pharmacologic treatment. Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis adjusted for demographic parameters was performed to test if uromodulin allows differentiation of subjects with CKD stage 0 and CKD stage I. Mean uromodulin plasma levels were 85.7 ± 60.5 ng/mL for all CKD stages combined. Uromodulin was correlated with all biomarkers/eGFR in univariate analysis (eGFR: r = 0.80, creatinine: r = −0.76, BUN: r = −0.72, and cystatin C: r = −0.79). Multiple linear regression modeling showed significant association between uromodulin and eGFR (coefficient estimate β = 0.696, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.603–0.719, P < 0.001). In ROC analysis uromodulin was the only parameter that significantly improved a model containing demographic parameters to differentiate between CKD 0° and I° (area under the curve [AUC] 0.831, 95% CI 0.746–0.915, P = 0.008) compared to creatinine, cystatin C, BUN, and eGFR (AUC for creatinine: 0.722, P = 0.056, cystatin C: 0.668, P = 0.418, BUN: 0.653, P

  17. Exome Sequencing of Cell-Free DNA from Metastatic Cancer Patients Identifies Clinically Actionable Mutations Distinct from Primary Disease.

    PubMed

    Butler, Timothy M; Johnson-Camacho, Katherine; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J; Macey, Tara A; Korkola, James E; Koppie, Theresa M; Corless, Christopher L; Gray, Joe W; Spellman, Paul T

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular drivers of cancer by sequencing is the backbone of precision medicine and the basis of personalized therapy; however, biopsies of primary tumors provide only a snapshot of the evolution of the disease and may miss potential therapeutic targets, especially in the metastatic setting. A liquid biopsy, in the form of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing, has the potential to capture the inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity present in metastatic disease, and, through serial blood draws, track the evolution of the tumor genome. In order to determine the clinical utility of cfDNA sequencing we performed whole-exome sequencing on cfDNA and tumor DNA from two patients with metastatic disease; only minor modifications to our sequencing and analysis pipelines were required for sequencing and mutation calling of cfDNA. The first patient had metastatic sarcoma and 47 of 48 mutations present in the primary tumor were also found in the cell-free DNA. The second patient had metastatic breast cancer and sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation in the cfDNA and metastatic site, but not in the primary tumor. This likely explains tumor progression on Anastrozole. Significant heterogeneity between the primary and metastatic tumors, with cfDNA reflecting the metastases, suggested separation from the primary lesion early in tumor evolution. This is best illustrated by an activating PIK3CA mutation (H1047R) which was clonal in the primary tumor, but completely absent from either the metastasis or cfDNA. Here we show that cfDNA sequencing supplies clinically actionable information with minimal risks compared to metastatic biopsies. This study demonstrates the utility of whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic disease. cfDNA sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation, potentially explaining a patient's resistance to aromatase inhibition, and gave insight into how metastatic lesions differ from the primary tumor.

  18. A Plaque Disruption Index Identifies Patients with Non-STE-Type 1 Myocardial Infarction within 24 Hours of Troponin Positivity

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mohaissen, Maha A.; Carere, Ronald G.; Mancini, G. B. John; Humphries, Karin H.; Whalen, Beth A.; Lee, Terry; Scheuermeyer, Frank X.; Ignaszewski, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Markers of plaque destabilization and disruption may have a role in identifying non-STE- type 1 Myocardial Infarction in patients presenting with troponin elevation. We hypothesized that a plaque disruption index (PDI) derived from multiple biomarkers and measured within 24 hours from the first detectable troponin in patients with acute non-STE- type 1 MI (NSTEMI-A) will confirm the diagnosis and identify these patients with higher specificity when compared to individual markers and coronary angiography. Methods We examined 4 biomarkers of plaque destabilization and disruption: myeloperoxidase (MPO), high-sensitivity interleukin-6, myeloid-related protein 8/14 (MRP8/14) and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) in 83 consecutive patients in 4 groups: stable non-obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), stable obstructive CAD, NSTEMI-A (enrolled within 24 hours of troponin positivity), and NSTEMI-L (Late presentation NSTEMI, enrolled beyond the 24 hour limit). The PDI was calculated and the patients’ coronary angiograms were reviewed for evidence of plaque disruption. The diagnostic performance of the PDI and angiography were compared. Results Compared to other biomarkers, MPO had the highest specificity (83%) for NSTEMI-A diagnosis (P<0.05). The PDI computed from PAPP-A, MRP8/14 and MPO was higher in NSTEMI-A patients compared to the other three groups (p<0.001) and had the highest diagnostic specificity (87%) with 79% sensitivity and 86% accuracy, which were higher compared to those obtained with MPO, but did not reach statistical significance (P>0.05 for all comparisons). The PDI had higher specificity and accuracy for NSTEMI-A diagnosis compared to coronary angiography (P<0.05). Conclusions A PDI measured within 24 hour of troponin positivity has potential to identify subjects with acute Non-ST-elevation type 1 MI. Additional evidence using other marker combinations and investigation in a sufficiently large non-selected cohort is warranted

  19. Identifying barriers and improving communication between cancer service providers and Aboriginal patients and their families: the perspective of service providers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aboriginal Australians experience poorer outcomes from cancer compared to the non-Aboriginal population. Some progress has been made in understanding Aboriginal Australians’ perspectives about cancer and their experiences with cancer services. However, little is known of cancer service providers’ (CSPs) thoughts and perceptions regarding Aboriginal patients and their experiences providing optimal cancer care to Aboriginal people. Communication between Aboriginal patients and non-Aboriginal health service providers has been identified as an impediment to good Aboriginal health outcomes. This paper reports on CSPs’ views about the factors impairing communication and offers practical strategies for promoting effective communication with Aboriginal patients in Western Australia (WA). Methods A qualitative study involving in-depth interviews with 62 Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal CSPs from across WA was conducted between March 2006 - September 2007 and April-October 2011. CSPs were asked to share their experiences with Aboriginal patients and families experiencing cancer. Thematic analysis was carried out. Our analysis was primarily underpinned by the socio-ecological model, but concepts of Whiteness and privilege, and cultural security also guided our analysis. Results CSPs’ lack of knowledge about the needs of Aboriginal people with cancer and Aboriginal patients’ limited understanding of the Western medical system were identified as the two major impediments to communication. For effective patient–provider communication, attention is needed to language, communication style, knowledge and use of medical terminology and cross-cultural differences in the concept of time. Aboriginal marginalization within mainstream society and Aboriginal people’s distrust of the health system were also key issues impacting on communication. Potential solutions to effective Aboriginal patient-provider communication included recruiting more Aboriginal staff

  20. Exome sequencing identifies frequent mutation of MLL2 in non-small cell lung carcinoma from Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shanye; Yang, Jing; Lin, Bin; Deng, Wenjun; Zhang, Yuchao; Yi, Xianfu; Shi, Yufang; Tao, Yong; Cai, Jun; Wu, Chung-I; Zhao, Guoping; Hurst, Laurence D; Zhang, Jie; Hu, Landian; Kong, Xiangyin

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality worldwide, with an estimated 1.4 million deaths each year. Here we report whole-exome sequencing of nine tumor/normal tissue pairs from Chinese patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). This allows us to identify a number of significantly mutated genes in NSCLC, which were highly enriched in DNA damage repair, NF-κB pathway, JAK/STAT signaling and chromatin modification. Notably, we identify a histone-lysine methyltransferase gene, namely, MLL2, as one of the most significantly mutated genes in our screen. In a following validation study, we identify deleterious mutations of MLL2 in 12 out of 105 (11.4%) NSCLC patients. Additionally, reduced or lost expression of MLL2 was commonly observed in tumor tissues as compared with paired adjacent non-tumor tissues regardless of mutation status. Together, our study defines the landscape of somatic mutations in Chinese NSCLC and supports the role of MLL2 mutation in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:25112956

  1. Analysis of the chromosome X exome in patients with autism spectrum disorders identified novel candidate genes, including TMLHE

    PubMed Central

    Nava, C; Lamari, F; Héron, D; Mignot, C; Rastetter, A; Keren, B; Cohen, D; Faudet, A; Bouteiller, D; Gilleron, M; Jacquette, A; Whalen, S; Afenjar, A; Périsse, D; Laurent, C; Dupuits, C; Gautier, C; Gérard, M; Huguet, G; Caillet, S; Leheup, B; Leboyer, M; Gillberg, C; Delorme, R; Bourgeron, T; Brice, A; Depienne, C

    2012-01-01

    The striking excess of affected males in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) suggests that genes located on chromosome X contribute to the etiology of these disorders. To identify new X-linked genes associated with ASD, we analyzed the entire chromosome X exome by next-generation sequencing in 12 unrelated families with two affected males. Thirty-six possibly deleterious variants in 33 candidate genes were found, including PHF8 and HUWE1, previously implicated in intellectual disability (ID). A nonsense mutation in TMLHE, which encodes the ɛ-N-trimethyllysine hydroxylase catalyzing the first step of carnitine biosynthesis, was identified in two brothers with autism and ID. By screening the TMLHE coding sequence in 501 male patients with ASD, we identified two additional missense substitutions not found in controls and not reported in databases. Functional analyses confirmed that the mutations were associated with a loss-of-function and led to an increase in trimethyllysine, the precursor of carnitine biosynthesis, in the plasma of patients. This study supports the hypothesis that rare variants on the X chromosome are involved in the etiology of ASD and contribute to the sex-ratio disequilibrium. PMID:23092983

  2. Subspecificities of anticentromeric protein A antibodies identify systemic sclerosis patients at higher risk of pulmonary vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Perosa, Federico; Favoino, Elvira; Favia, Isabella Eleonora; Vettori, Serena; Prete, Marcella; Corrado, Addolorata; Cantatore, Francesco Paolo; Valentini, Gabriele

    2016-06-01

    Patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) who express autoantibodies to centromeric proteins (CENPs) are at risk of developing pulmonary vascular disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension without fibrosis. Currently no biomarkers are available to predict these complications. We previously characterized the fine specificity of anti-CENP-A antibodies in SSc by screening a phage display library (expressing random 12-mer peptides), and identified phage clones whose peptides were differentially recognized by patients' autoantibodies. Here, we examined if subgroups of SSc patients with different anti-CENP-A antibody subspecificities also differ clinically, and if serum reactivity to phage-displayed peptides can predict pulmonary vascular disease.Clinical data and serum samples were collected from 84 anti-CENP-A-positive SSc patients. Indirect ELISAs were used to test serum reactivity. Pulmonary vascular disease was defined as high systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (sPAP) and low diffusing lung capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO; percent of predicted values).Sera were screened for reactivity to peptides expressed by phage clones pc4.2 and pc14.1, confirming our earlier observation of differential specificities. Linear regression showed that the levels of antibodies specific for the 2 phage clones were associated with clinical features of pulmonary vascular disease, but in opposite ways: anti-pc4.2 antibodies were positively associated with sPAP and inversely associated with DLCO, whereas anti-pc14.1 antibodies were inversely associated with sPAP and positively associated with DLCO. Anti-pc4.2 and anti-pc14.1 antibody levels predicted sPAP independently of DLCO. These associations were confirmed by logistic regression using antibodies as predictors and dichotomized sPAP (cutoff, 45 mm Hg) as outcome. The ratio of the 2 antibody levels was a useful marker in predicting high sPAP.This study demonstrates that some SSc clinical features associate with subspecificities of

  3. Comparison of methods to identify aberrant expression patterns in individual patients: augmenting our toolkit for precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient-specific aberrant expression patterns in conjunction with functional screening assays can guide elucidation of the cancer genome architecture and identification of therapeutic targets. Since most statistical methods for expression analysis are focused on differences between experimental groups, the performance of approaches for patient-specific expression analyses are currently less well characterized. A comparison of methods for the identification of genes that are dysregulated relative to a single sample in a given set of experimental samples, to our knowledge, has not been performed. Methods We systematically evaluated several methods including variations on the nearest neighbor based outlying degree method, as well as the Zscore and a robust variant for their suitability to detect patient-specific events. The methods were assessed using both simulations and expression data from a cohort of pediatric acute B lymphoblastic leukemia patients. Results We first assessed power and false discovery rates using simulations and found that even under optimal conditions, high effect sizes (>4 unit differences) were necessary to have acceptable power for any method (>0.9) though high false discovery rates (>0.1) were pervasive across simulation conditions. Next we introduced a technical factor into the simulation and found that performance was reduced for all methods and that using weights with the outlying degree could provide performance gains depending on the number of samples and genes affected by the technical factor. In our use case that highlights the integration of functional assays and aberrant expression in a patient cohort (the identification of gene dysregulation events associated with the targets from a siRNA screen), we demonstrated that both the outlying degree and the Zscore can successfully identify genes dysregulated in one patient sample. However, only the outlying degree can identify genes dysregulated across several patient samples

  4. Validation of a Patient-Level Medication Regimen Complexity Index as a Possible Tool to Identify Patients for Medication Therapy Management Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Jan D; Metz, Kelli R; Hosokawa, Patrick W; Libby, Anne M

    2014-01-01

    Background The Medication Regimen Complexity Index (MRCI) is a 65-item instrument that can be used to quantify medication regimen complexity at the patient level, capturing all prescribed and over-the-counter medications. Although the MRCI has been used in several studies, the narrow scope of the initial validation limits application at a population or clinical practice level. Purpose To conduct a MRCI validation pertinent to the desired clinical use to identify patients for medication therapy management interventions. Methods An expert panel of clinical pharmacists ranked medication regimen complexity for two samples of cases: a single-disease cohort (diabetes mellitus) and a multiple-disease cohort (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, human immunodeficiency virus infection, geriatric depression). Cases for expert panel review were selected from 400 ambulatory clinic patients, and each case description included data that were available via claims or electronic medical records (EMRs). Construct validity was assessed using patient-level MRCI scores, medication count, and additional patient data. Concordance was evaluated using weighted κ agreement statistic, and correlations were determined using Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient (ρ) or Kendall τ. Results Moderate to good concordance between patient-level MRCI scores and expert medication regimen complexity ranking was observed (claims data, consensus ranking: single-disease cohort 0.55, multiple disease cohort 0.63). In contrast, only fair to moderate concordance was observed for medication count (single-disease cohort 0.33, multiple-disease cohort 0.48). Adding more-detailed administration directions from EMR data did not improve concordance. MRCI convergent validity was supported by strong correlations with medication count (all cohorts 0.90) and moderate correlations with morbidity measures (e.g., all cohorts; number of comorbidities 0.46, Chronic Disease Score 0.46). Nonsignificant correlation

  5. A cohort study to identify simple clinical tests for chronic respiratory failure in obese patients with sleep-disordered breathing

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, S; Suh, E S; Boleat, E; Asher, W; Kamalanathan, M; Lee, K; Douiri, A; Murphy, P B; Steier, J; Hart, N

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic respiratory failure complicating sleep-disordered breathing in obese patients has important adverse clinical implications in terms of morbidity, mortality and healthcare utilisation. Screening strategies are essential to identify obese patients with chronic respiratory failure. Method Prospective data were collected from patients with obesity-related sleep-disordered breathing admitted for respiratory assessment at a UK national sleep and ventilation centre. Hypercapnia was defined as an arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide of >6kPa. Results 245 obese patients (56±13 years) with a body mass index of 48±12 kg/m2, forced vital capacity (FVC) of 2.1±1.1 L, daytime oximetry (SpO2) of 91±6% and abnormal overnight oximetry were included in the analysis. Receiver operator curve analysis for the whole group showed that an FVC ≤3 L had a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 41% in predicting hypercapnia, and an SpO2 ≤95% had a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 63% in predicting hypercapnia. Gender differences were observed and receiver operator curve analysis demonstrated ‘cut-offs’ for (1) SpO2 of ≤95% for men and ≤93% for women and (2) FVC of ≤3.5 L for men and ≤2.3 L for women, in predicting hypercapnia. Conclusions The measurement of FVC and clinic SpO2 in obese patients with abnormal overnight limited respiratory studies predicted hypercapnia. This may have clinical utility in stratifying patients attending sleep clinics. PMID:25478174

  6. Identify-Isolate-Inform: A Tool for Initial Detection and Management of Measles Patients in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Kristi L.; Alassaf, Wajdan; Burns, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Measles (rubeola) is a highly contagious airborne disease that was declared eliminated in the U.S. in the year 2000. Only sporadic U.S. cases and minor outbreaks occurred until the larger outbreak beginning in 2014 that has become a public health emergency. The “Identify-Isolate-Inform” tool will assist emergency physicians to be better prepared to detect and manage measles patients presenting to the emergency department. Measles typically presents with a prodrome of high fever, and cough/coryza/conjunctivitis, sometimes accompanied by the pathognomonic Koplik spots. Two to four days later, an erythematous maculopapular rash begins on the face and spreads down the body. Suspect patients must be immediately isolated with airborne precautions while awaiting laboratory confirmation of disease. Emergency physicians must rapidly inform the local public health department and hospital infection control personnel of suspected measles cases. PMID:25834659

  7. Recessive RYR1 mutations in a patient with severe congenital nemaline myopathy with ophthalomoplegia identified through massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Eri; Nishimura, Takafumi; Kosho, Tomoki; Inaba, Yuji; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Ishida, Takefumi; Baba, Atsushi; Koike, Kenichi; Nishino, Ichizo; Nonaka, Ikuya; Furukawa, Toru; Saito, Kayoko

    2012-04-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a group of congenital myopathies, characterized by the presence of distinct rod-like inclusions "nemaline bodies" in the sarcoplasm of skeletal muscle fibers. To date, ACTA1, NEB, TPM3, TPM2, TNNT1, and CFL2 have been found to cause NM. We have identified recessive RYR1 mutations in a patient with severe congenital NM, through high-throughput screening of congenital myopathy/muscular dystrophy-related genes using massively parallel sequencing with target gene capture. The patient manifested fetal akinesia, neonatal severe hypotonia with muscle weakness, respiratory insufficiency, swallowing disturbance, and ophthalomoplegia. Skeletal muscle histology demonstrated nemaline bodies and small type 1 fibers, but without central cores or minicores. Congenital myopathies, a molecularly, histopathologically, and clinically heterogeneous group of disorders are considered to be a good candidate for massively parallel sequencing. PMID:22407809

  8. Investigation of First Identified mcr-1 Gene in an Isolate from a U.S. Patient - Pennsylvania, 2016.

    PubMed

    Kline, Kelly E; Shover, Jordan; Kallen, Alexander J; Lonsway, David R; Watkins, Sharon; Miller, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, scientists reported the emergence of the plasmid-encoded mcr-1 gene conferring bacterial resistance to the antibiotic colistin (1), signaling potential emergence of a pandrug-resistant bacterium. In May 2016, mcr-1-positive Escherichia coli was first isolated from a specimen from a U.S. patient (2) when a Pennsylvania woman was evaluated for a urinary tract infection. The urine culture and subsequent testing identified the gene in an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli with reduced susceptibility to colistin. The patient had no international travel for approximately 1 year, no livestock exposure, and a limited role in meal preparation with store-bought groceries; however, she had multiple and repeated admissions to four medical facilities during 2016. PMID:27631164

  9. Metagenomic sequencing of bile from gallstone patients to identify different microbial community patterns and novel biliary bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hongzhang; Ye, Fuqiang; Xie, Lu; Yang, Jianfeng; Li, Zhen; Xu, Peisong; Meng, Fei; Li, Lei; Chen, Ying; Bo, Xiaochen; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high worldwide prevalence of gallstone disease, the role of the biliary microbiota in gallstone pathogenesis remains obscure. Next-generation sequencing offers advantages for systematically understanding the human microbiota; however, there have been few such investigations of the biliary microbiome. Here, we performed whole-metagenome shotgun (WMS) sequencing and 16S rRNA sequencing on bile samples from 15 Chinese patients with gallstone disease. Microbial communities of most individuals were clustered into two types, according to the relative enrichment of different intestinal bacterial species. In the bile samples, oral cavity/respiratory tract inhabitants were more prevalent than intestinal inhabitants and existed in both community types. Unexpectedly, the two types were not associated with fever status or surgical history, and many bacteria were patient-specific. We identified 13 novel biliary bacteria based on WMS sequencing, as well as genes encoding putative proteins related to gallstone formation and bile resistance (e.g., β-glucuronidase and multidrug efflux pumps). Bile samples from gallstone patients had reduced microbial diversity compared to healthy faecal samples. Patient samples were enriched in pathways related to oxidative stress and flagellar assembly, whereas carbohydrate metabolic pathways showed varying behaviours. As the first biliary WMS survey, our study reveals the complexity and specificity of biliary microecology. PMID:26625708

  10. Identifying clinical and support-service resources and network practices for cancer patients and survivors in southern Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Eida M.; Jiménez, Julio C.; Quinn, Gwendolyn; García, Myra; Colón, Yesenia; Ramos, Axel; Brandon, Thomas; Simmons, Vani; Gwede, Clement; Vadaparampil, Susan; Nazario, Cruz María

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to identify cancer-related health care services and to explore the presence of inter-organizational interactions among clinical and support oncology services in southern Puerto Rico. Methods From January through July of 2010, a survey was completed by 54 health care organizations offering clinical, supportive, or both services to cancer patients/survivors (CPS) in southern PR. Survey data were compiled and descriptive analyses performed using the software Statistical Package for a Social Science (SPSS), version 18.0. Results The distribution of the primary services provided by the participating organizations was the following: 26 had clinical services, 16 had support services, and 12 offered a combination of clinical and support services. Only 24% of the surveyed organizations offered their services exclusively to patients diagnosed with cancer. In terms of referral practices, 61% of the responses were for medical specialists, 43% were for mental health services, and 37% were referrals for primary care services. The most common reason for interacting (n = 27) was to provide a given patient both an referral and information. Conclusion Findings suggest gaps in both the availability of oncology services and the delivery of integrated health care. Lack of communication among clinical and support organizations (for cancer patients, specifically) could negatively impact the quality of the services that they offer. Further network analysis studies are needed to confirm these gaps. Until systemic, structural changes occur, more efforts are needed to facilitate communication and collaboration among these kinds of organization. PMID:25249352

  11. Identifying the Zheng in psoriatic patients based on latent class analysis of traditional Chinese medicine symptoms and signs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are approximately five Zhengs reported in psoriatic patients. Systematic data collection and proper analysis for the classification of psoriasis have been lacking. This study aims to cluster the Zhengs in psoriatic patients based on the application of a checklist of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) symptoms and signs followed by latent class analysis (LCA). Methods A cross-sectional study of 507 psoriatic patients aged above 10 years was performed in Yunnan Provincial Hospital of TCM and the First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medicine University from October 2010 to September 2011 using a TCM symptoms and signs checklist obtained from 16 TCM experts by the Delphi technique. LCA was applied to obtain the best fitted model for clustering of symptoms and signs that can be interpreted as underlying Zhengs of psoriasis. Results The LCA identified three Zhengs: dampness-heat Zheng (35.1%); blood heat Zheng (34.7%); and yin deficiency and blood dryness Zheng (30.2%). The first Zheng was associated with winter, the second with male sex, old age, smoking, and drinking alcohol, and the third with outpatient status, which reflected a mild disease course. Conclusions In this study, 507 psoriasis patients were clustered into three Zhengs, which had different associated factors. PMID:24387737

  12. Catalytically impaired hMYH and NEIL1 mutant proteins identified in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Forsbring, Monika; Vik, Erik S.; Dalhus, Bjørn; Karlsen, Tom H.; Bergquist, Annika; Schrumpf, Erik; Bjørås, Magnar; Boberg, Kirsten M.; Alseth, Ingrun

    2009-01-01

    The human hMYH and NEIL1 genes encode DNA glycosylases involved in repair of oxidative base damage and mutations in these genes are associated with certain cancers. Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), a chronic cholestatic liver disease characterized by inflammatory destruction of the biliary tree, is often complicated by the development of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Here, we aimed to investigate the influence of genetic variations in the hMYH and NEIL1 genes on risk of CCA in PSC patients. The hMYH and NEIL1 gene loci in addition to the DNA repair genes hOGG1, NTHL1 and NUDT1 were analyzed in 66 PSC patients (37 with CCA and 29 without cancer) by complete genomic sequencing of exons and adjacent intronic regions. Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms and mutations were identified and severe impairment of protein function was observed for three non-synonymous variants. The NEIL1 G83D mutant was dysfunctional for the major oxidation products 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8oxoG), thymine glycol and dihydrothymine in duplex DNA, and the ability to perform δ-elimination at abasic sites was significantly reduced. The hMYH R260Q mutant had severe defect in adenine DNA glycosylase activity, whereas hMYH H434D could excise adenines from A:8oxoG pairs but not from A:G mispairs. We found no overall associations between the 18 identified variants and susceptibility to CCA in PSC patients; however, the impaired variants may be of significance for carcinogenesis in general. Our findings demonstrate the importance of complete resequencing of selected candidate genes in order to identify rare genetic variants and their possible contribution to individual susceptibility to cancer development. PMID:19443904

  13. Sentinel lymph node (SLN) procedure with patent V blue dye in 153 patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC): is it an accurate staging method?

    PubMed

    Rubello, D; Nanni, C; Merante Boschin, I; Toniato, A; Piotto, A; Rampin, L; Mariani, G; Al-Nahhas, A; Pelizzo, M R

    2006-12-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the accuracy of sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping performed by intratumoral injection of blue dye in a large series of patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). 153 consecutive patients were enrolled in the study. All patients had a preoperative cytological diagnosis of PTC, and none had clinical or ultrasonographic (US) evidence of nodal involvement. At surgery, vital patent V blue dye was injected into the malignant thyroid nodule. Subsequently, total thyroidectomy, central compartment (CC) node dissection, and median inferior jugulocarotid node dissection of laterocervical compartment, ipsilateral to the primary tumour, were performed. The excised thyroid, the blue-positive SLN and blue-negative lymph nodes were sent for frozen section and definitive histophatologic analysis. At surgery, blue-positive SLN were found in 107/153 patients (69.9%), of whom 36 (33.6%) had micrometastasis in SLN; moreover, in 13 of these 36 patients (36.1%), other nodes were found to be metastatic. In the remaining 71/107 blue-positive SLN patients, both the SLN itself and the other removed nodes were found negative for the presence of metastatic disease. In 4 cases, a normal parathyroid gland and in 3 cases fibro-adipous tissue were blue-stained and mistakenly removed as SLN (7 false positive results). On the other hand, SLN was blue-negative in 46/153 patients (30.1%), of whom 7 patients (15.2%) had micrometastases in blue-negative lymph nodes. On the basis of these data, the blue dye procedure for SLN detection appears inappropriate as a standard of care in PTC due to a relatively high number of false negative and false positive results.

  14. Circulating microRNA Profiling Identifies a Subset of Metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients with Evidence of Cancer-Associated Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Kroh, Evan M.; Dowell, Alexander E.; Chéry, Lisly; Siddiqui, Javed; Nelson, Peter S.; Vessella, Robert L.; Knudsen, Beatrice S.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Morrissey, Colm; Tewari, Muneesh

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (∼22 nucleotide) non-coding RNAs that regulate a myriad of biological processes and are frequently dysregulated in cancer. Cancer-associated microRNAs have been detected in serum and plasma and hold promise as minimally invasive cancer biomarkers, potentially for assessing disease characteristics in patients with metastatic disease that is difficult to biopsy. Here we used miRNA profiling to identify cancer-associated miRNAs that are differentially expressed in sera from patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) as compared to healthy controls. Of 365 miRNAs profiled, we identified five serum miRNAs (miR-141, miR-200a, miR-200c, miR-210 and miR-375) that were elevated in cases compared to controls across two independent cohorts. One of these, miR-210, is a known transcriptional target of the hypoxia-responsive HIF-1α signaling pathway. Exposure of cultured prostate cancer cells to hypoxia led to induction of miR-210 and its release into the extracellular environment. Moreover, we found that serum miR-210 levels varied widely amongst mCRPC patients undergoing therapy, and correlated with treatment response as assessed by change in PSA. Our results suggest that (i) cancer-associated hypoxia is a frequent, previously under-appreciated characteristic of mCRPC, and (ii) serum miR-210 may be further developed as a predictive biomarker in patients with this distinct disease biology. PMID:23935962

  15. Exome sequencing identifies recessive CDK5RAP2 variants in patients with isolated agenesis of corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Jouan, Loubna; Ouled Amar Bencheikh, Bouchra; Daoud, Hussein; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; Dobrzeniecka, Sylvia; Spiegelman, Dan; Rochefort, Daniel; Hince, Pascale; Szuto, Anna; Lassonde, Maryse; Barbelanne, Marine; Tsang, William Y; Dion, Patrick A; Théoret, Hugo; Rouleau, Guy A

    2016-04-01

    Agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) is a common brain malformation which can be observed either as an isolated condition or as part of numerous congenital syndromes. Therefore, cognitive and neurological involvements in patients with ACC are variable, from mild linguistic and behavioral impairments to more severe neurological deficits. To date, the underlying genetic causes of isolated ACC remains elusive and causative genes have yet to be identified. We performed exome sequencing on three acallosal siblings from the same non-consanguineous family and identified compound heterozygous variants, p.[Gly94Arg];[Asn1232Ser], in the protein encoded by the CDK5RAP2 gene, also known as MCPH3, a gene previously reported to cause autosomal recessive primary microcephaly. Our findings suggest a novel role for this gene in the pathogenesis of isolated ACC. PMID:26197979

  16. NDM-1-Producing Citrobacter freundii, Escherichia coli, and Acinetobacter baumannii Identified from a Single Patient in China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Min; Zhong, Lan-Lan; Zhang, Xue-Fei; Hu, Hang-Tong; Li, Yu-Qi; Yang, Xiao-Rong; Feng, Lian-Qiang; Huang, Xi; Tian, Guo-Bao

    2015-08-01

    We identified New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM-1)-producing Citrobacter freundii GB032, Escherichia coli GB102, and Acinetobacter baumannii GB661 in urine and stool samples from a single patient in China. Plasmid profiling and Southern blotting indicated that blaNDM-1 from GB032 and that from GB102 were likely located on the same plasmid, while blaNDM-1 from GB661 was located on a very large (>400-kb) plasmid. This case underscores the broad host range of blaNDM-1 and its potential to spread between members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and A. baumannii.

  17. Neither too much, nor too little. The dilemma of identifying personality disorders in adolescents patients with self-reports.

    PubMed

    Magallón-Neri, Ernesto; De la Fuente, José Eugenio; Canalda, Gloria; Forns, Maria; García, Raquel; González, Esther; Lara, Anais; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina

    2014-03-30

    The study aimed to compare methods of identification of Personality Disorders (PD) in adolescent patients with psychiatric disorders. A sample of 120 Spanish adolescents with clinical disorders was assessed using the International Personality Disorder Examination (IPDE) interview, its Screening Questionnaires (IPDE-SQ) comprising the ICD-10 and DSM-IV modules, and also the Temperament Character Inventory (TCI) to identify risk of PD. The IPDE-SQ identified a risk of PD around 92-97% of the sample; 61.7% when adjusting the stricter cut-off points. The TCI showed a PD risk of 20%, whereas the prevalence of PD identified by the IPDE clinical interview was around 36-38%. The differences between the IPDE, IPDE-SQ and TCI were significant, and a low agreement among instruments was obtained. Large discrepancy between self-report instruments in identifying PD with regard to the clinical interview raises several questions concerning the use of these instruments in clinical settings on adolescents with psychiatric disorders.

  18. Profitable capitation requires accurate costing.

    PubMed

    West, D A; Hicks, L L; Balas, E A; West, T D

    1996-01-01

    In the name of costing accuracy, nurses are asked to track inventory use on per treatment basis when more significant costs, such as general overhead and nursing salaries, are usually allocated to patients or treatments on an average cost basis. Accurate treatment costing and financial viability require analysis of all resources actually consumed in treatment delivery, including nursing services and inventory. More precise costing information enables more profitable decisions as is demonstrated by comparing the ratio-of-cost-to-treatment method (aggregate costing) with alternative activity-based costing methods (ABC). Nurses must participate in this costing process to assure that capitation bids are based upon accurate costs rather than simple averages. PMID:8788799

  19. Ankylosing spondylitis diagnosis in US patients with back pain: identifying providers involved and factors associated with rheumatology referral delay.

    PubMed

    Deodhar, Atul; Mittal, Manish; Reilly, Patrick; Bao, Yanjun; Manthena, Shivaji; Anderson, Jaclyn; Joshi, Avani

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to identify providers involved in diagnosing ankylosing spondylitis (AS) following back pain diagnosis in the USA and to identify factors leading to the delay in rheumatology referrals. The Truven Health MarketScan® US Commercial Database was searched for patients aged 18-64 years with back pain diagnosis in a non-rheumatology setting followed by AS diagnosis in any setting during January 2000-December 2012. Patients with a rheumatologist visit on or before AS diagnosis were considered referred. Cox regression was used to determine factors associated with referral time after adjusting for age, sex, comorbidities, physician specialty, drug therapy, and imaging procedures. Of 3336 patients included, 1244 (37 %) were referred to and diagnosed by rheumatologists; the others were diagnosed in primary care (25.7 %), chiropractic/physical therapy (7 %), orthopedic surgery (3.8 %), pain clinic (3.6 %), acute care (3.4 %), and other (19.2 %) settings. Median time from back pain diagnosis to rheumatology referral was 307 days and from first rheumatologist visit to AS diagnosis was 28 days. Referred patients were more likely to be younger (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.986; p < 0.0001), male (HR = 1.15; p = 0.0163), diagnosed with uveitis (HR = 1.49; p = 0.0050), referred by primary care physicians (HR = 1.96; p < 0.0001), prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (HR = 1.55; p < 0.0001), disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (HR = 1.33; p < 0.0001), and tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (HR = 1.40; p = 0.0036), and to have had spinal/pelvic X-ray prior to referral (HR = 1.28; p = 0.0003). During 2000-2012, most patients with AS were diagnosed outside of rheumatology practices. The delay before referral to rheumatology was 10 months; AS diagnosis generally followed within a month. Earlier referral of patients with AS signs and symptoms may lead to more timely diagnosis and appropriate

  20. Ankylosing spondylitis diagnosis in US patients with back pain: identifying providers involved and factors associated with rheumatology referral delay.

    PubMed

    Deodhar, Atul; Mittal, Manish; Reilly, Patrick; Bao, Yanjun; Manthena, Shivaji; Anderson, Jaclyn; Joshi, Avani

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to identify providers involved in diagnosing ankylosing spondylitis (AS) following back pain diagnosis in the USA and to identify factors leading to the delay in rheumatology referrals. The Truven Health MarketScan® US Commercial Database was searched for patients aged 18-64 years with back pain diagnosis in a non-rheumatology setting followed by AS diagnosis in any setting during January 2000-December 2012. Patients with a rheumatologist visit on or before AS diagnosis were considered referred. Cox regression was used to determine factors associated with referral time after adjusting for age, sex, comorbidities, physician specialty, drug therapy, and imaging procedures. Of 3336 patients included, 1244 (37 %) were referred to and diagnosed by rheumatologists; the others were diagnosed in primary care (25.7 %), chiropractic/physical therapy (7 %), orthopedic surgery (3.8 %), pain clinic (3.6 %), acute care (3.4 %), and other (19.2 %) settings. Median time from back pain diagnosis to rheumatology referral was 307 days and from first rheumatologist visit to AS diagnosis was 28 days. Referred patients were more likely to be younger (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.986; p < 0.0001), male (HR = 1.15; p = 0.0163), diagnosed with uveitis (HR = 1.49; p = 0.0050), referred by primary care physicians (HR = 1.96; p < 0.0001), prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (HR = 1.55; p < 0.0001), disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (HR = 1.33; p < 0.0001), and tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (HR = 1.40; p = 0.0036), and to have had spinal/pelvic X-ray prior to referral (HR = 1.28; p = 0.0003). During 2000-2012, most patients with AS were diagnosed outside of rheumatology practices. The delay before referral to rheumatology was 10 months; AS diagnosis generally followed within a month. Earlier referral of patients with AS signs and symptoms may lead to more timely diagnosis and appropriate

  1. Subspecificities of anticentromeric protein A antibodies identify systemic sclerosis patients at higher risk of pulmonary vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Perosa, Federico; Favoino, Elvira; Favia, Isabella Eleonora; Vettori, Serena; Prete, Marcella; Corrado, Addolorata; Cantatore, Francesco Paolo; Valentini, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) who express autoantibodies to centromeric proteins (CENPs) are at risk of developing pulmonary vascular disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension without fibrosis. Currently no biomarkers are available to predict these complications. We previously characterized the fine specificity of anti-CENP-A antibodies in SSc by screening a phage display library (expressing random 12-mer peptides), and identified phage clones whose peptides were differentially recognized by patients’ autoantibodies. Here, we examined if subgroups of SSc patients with different anti-CENP-A antibody subspecificities also differ clinically, and if serum reactivity to phage-displayed peptides can predict pulmonary vascular disease. Clinical data and serum samples were collected from 84 anti-CENP-A-positive SSc patients. Indirect ELISAs were used to test serum reactivity. Pulmonary vascular disease was defined as high systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (sPAP) and low diffusing lung capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO; percent of predicted values). Sera were screened for reactivity to peptides expressed by phage clones pc4.2 and pc14.1, confirming our earlier observation of differential specificities. Linear regression showed that the levels of antibodies specific for the 2 phage clones were associated with clinical features of pulmonary vascular disease, but in opposite ways: anti-pc4.2 antibodies were positively associated with sPAP and inversely associated with DLCO, whereas anti-pc14.1 antibodies were inversely associated with sPAP and positively associated with DLCO. Anti-pc4.2 and anti-pc14.1 antibody levels predicted sPAP independently of DLCO. These associations were confirmed by logistic regression using antibodies as predictors and dichotomized sPAP (cutoff, 45 mm Hg) as outcome. The ratio of the 2 antibody levels was a useful marker in predicting high sPAP. This study demonstrates that some SSc clinical features associate with

  2. The CUPIC algorithm: an accurate model for the prediction of sustained viral response under telaprevir or boceprevir triple therapy in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Boursier, J; Ducancelle, A; Vergniol, J; Veillon, P; Moal, V; Dufour, C; Bronowicki, J-P; Larrey, D; Hézode, C; Zoulim, F; Fontaine, H; Canva, V; Poynard, T; Allam, S; De Lédinghen, V

    2015-12-01

    Triple therapy using boceprevir or telaprevir remains the reference treatment for genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C in countries where new interferon-free regimens have not yet become available. Antiviral treatment is highly required in cirrhotic patients, but they represent a difficult-to-treat population. We aimed to develop a simple algorithm for the prediction of sustained viral response (SVR) in cirrhotic patients treated with triple therapy. A total of 484 cirrhotic patients from the ANRS CO20 CUPIC cohort treated with triple therapy were randomly distributed into derivation and validation sets. A total of 52.1% of patients achieved SVR. In the derivation set, a D0 score for the prediction of SVR before treatment initiation included the following independent predictors collected at day 0: prior treatment response, gamma-GT, platelets, telaprevir treatment, viral load. To refine the prediction at the early phase of the treatment, a W4 score included as additional parameter the viral load collected at week 4. The D0 and W4 scores were combined in the CUPIC algorithm defining three subgroups: 'no treatment initiation or early stop at week 4', 'undetermined' and 'SVR highly probable'. In the validation set, the rates of SVR in these three subgroups were, respectively, 11.1%, 50.0% and 82.2% (P < 0.001). By replacing the variable 'prior treatment response' with 'IL28B genotype', another algorithm was derived for treatment-naïve patients with similar results. The CUPIC algorithm is an easy-to-use tool that helps physicians weigh their decision between immediately treating cirrhotic patients using boceprevir/telaprevir triple therapy or waiting for new drugs to become available in their country. PMID:26216230

  3. Identifying Gene Disruptions in Novel Balanced de novo Constitutional Translocations in Childhood Cancer Patients by Whole Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Deborah I.; Haines, Katherine; Cheung, Hannah; Davis, Caleb F.; Lau, Ching C.; Berg, Jonathan S.; Brown, Chester W.; Thompson, Patrick A.; Gibbs, Richard; Wheeler, David A.; Plon, Sharon E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We applied whole genome sequencing to children diagnosed with neoplasms and found to carry apparently balanced constitutional translocations, to discover novel genic disruptions. Methods We applied SV calling programs CREST, Break Dancer, SV-STAT and CGAP-CNV, and developed an annotative filtering strategy to achieve nucleotide resolution at the translocations. Results We identified the breakpoints for t(6;12) (p21.1;q24.31) disrupting HNF1A in a patient diagnosed with hepatic adenomas and Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY). Translocation as the disruptive event of HNF1A, a gene known to be involved in MODY3, has not been previously reported. In a subject with Hodgkin’s lymphoma and subsequent low-grade glioma, we identified t(5;18) (q35.1;q21.2), disrupting both SLIT3 and DCC, genes previously implicated in both glioma and lymphoma. Conclusions These examples suggest that implementing clinical whole genome sequencing in the diagnostic work-up of patients with novel but apparently balanced translocations may reveal unanticipated disruption of disease-associated genes and aid in prediction of the clinical phenotype. PMID:25569436

  4. Identify-Isolate-Inform: A Tool for Initial Detection and Management of Zika Virus Patients in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Kristi L; Almadhyan, Abdulmajeed; Burns, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    First isolated in 1947 from a monkey in the Zika forest in Uganda, and from mosquitoes in the same forest the following year, Zika virus has gained international attention due to concerns for infection in pregnant women potentially causing fetal microcephaly. More than one million people have been infected since the appearance of the virus in Brazil in 2015. Approximately 80% of infected patients are asymptomatic. An association with microcephaly and other birth defects as well as Guillain-Barre Syndrome has led to a World Health Organization declaration of Zika virus as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern in February 2016. Zika virus is a vector-borne disease transmitted primarily by the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Male to female sexual transmission has been reported and there is potential for transmission via blood transfusions. After an incubation period of 2-7 days, symptomatic patients develop rapid onset fever, maculopapular rash, arthralgia, and conjunctivitis, often associated with headache and myalgias. Emergency department (ED) personnel must be prepared to address concerns from patients presenting with symptoms consistent with acute Zika virus infection, especially those who are pregnant or planning travel to Zika-endemic regions, as well as those women planning to become pregnant and their partners. The identify-isolate-inform (3I) tool, originally conceived for initial detection and management of Ebola virus disease patients in the ED, and later adjusted for measles and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, can be adapted for real-time use for any emerging infectious disease. This paper reports a modification of the 3I tool for initial detection and management of patients under investigation for Zika virus. Following an assessment of epidemiologic risk, including travel to countries with mosquitoes that transmit Zika virus, patients are further investigated if clinically indicated. If after a rapid evaluation, Zika or other arthropod

  5. Identify-Isolate-Inform: A Tool for Initial Detection and Management of Zika Virus Patients in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Kristi L.; Almadhyan, Abdulmajeed; Burns, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    First isolated in 1947 from a monkey in the Zika forest in Uganda, and from mosquitoes in the same forest the following year, Zika virus has gained international attention due to concerns for infection in pregnant women potentially causing fetal microcephaly. More than one million people have been infected since the appearance of the virus in Brazil in 2015. Approximately 80% of infected patients are asymptomatic. An association with microcephaly and other birth defects as well as Guillain-Barre Syndrome has led to a World Health Organization declaration of Zika virus as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern in February 2016. Zika virus is a vector-borne disease transmitted primarily by the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Male to female sexual transmission has been reported and there is potential for transmission via blood transfusions. After an incubation period of 2–7 days, symptomatic patients develop rapid onset fever, maculopapular rash, arthralgia, and conjunctivitis, often associated with headache and myalgias. Emergency department (ED) personnel must be prepared to address concerns from patients presenting with symptoms consistent with acute Zika virus infection, especially those who are pregnant or planning travel to Zika-endemic regions, as well as those women planning to become pregnant and their partners. The identify-isolate-inform (3I) tool, originally conceived for initial detection and management of Ebola virus disease patients in the ED, and later adjusted for measles and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, can be adapted for real-time use for any emerging infectious disease. This paper reports a modification of the 3I tool for initial detection and management of patients under investigation for Zika virus. Following an assessment of epidemiologic risk, including travel to countries with mosquitoes that transmit Zika virus, patients are further investigated if clinically indicated. If after a rapid evaluation, Zika or other arthropod

  6. Identify-Isolate-Inform: A Tool for Initial Detection and Management of Zika Virus Patients in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Kristi L; Almadhyan, Abdulmajeed; Burns, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    First isolated in 1947 from a monkey in the Zika forest in Uganda, and from mosquitoes in the same forest the following year, Zika virus has gained international attention due to concerns for infection in pregnant women potentially causing fetal microcephaly. More than one million people have been infected since the appearance of the virus in Brazil in 2015. Approximately 80% of infected patients are asymptomatic. An association with microcephaly and other birth defects as well as Guillain-Barre Syndrome has led to a World Health Organization declaration of Zika virus as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern in February 2016. Zika virus is a vector-borne disease transmitted primarily by the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Male to female sexual transmission has been reported and there is potential for transmission via blood transfusions. After an incubation period of 2-7 days, symptomatic patients develop rapid onset fever, maculopapular rash, arthralgia, and conjunctivitis, often associated with headache and myalgias. Emergency department (ED) personnel must be prepared to address concerns from patients presenting with symptoms consistent with acute Zika virus infection, especially those who are pregnant or planning travel to Zika-endemic regions, as well as those women planning to become pregnant and their partners. The identify-isolate-inform (3I) tool, originally conceived for initial detection and management of Ebola virus disease patients in the ED, and later adjusted for measles and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, can be adapted for real-time use for any emerging infectious disease. This paper reports a modification of the 3I tool for initial detection and management of patients under investigation for Zika virus. Following an assessment of epidemiologic risk, including travel to countries with mosquitoes that transmit Zika virus, patients are further investigated if clinically indicated. If after a rapid evaluation, Zika or other arthropod

  7. In-111 polyclonal HIG identifies patients but not atherosclerotic lesions at risk - a 5 years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Berent, Robert; Auer, Johann; Granegger, Susanne; Sinzinger, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    There is a strong need for non-invasive detection of human atherosclerotic lesions. One of the radioisotopic approaches using Indium-111-HIG has been shown to accumulate in oxidized LDL-rich foam cells and inflammatory vascular lesions. Earlier human studies in 200 patients, 100 with peripheral vascular disease and 100 with carotid artery disease comparing In-111-HIG scintigraphy with sonographic data revealed a high sensitivity (70%-77%) but a very low specificity (33%-41%). At this time we concluded the approach "not promising" for human studies. However, clinical follow-up over 5 years now shows that those patients with positive In-111-HIG scintigraphy exhibited a significantly higher vascular morbidity (P<0,01) and mortality (P<0,01), especially in the immediate follow-up period. Retrospective analysis discovered higher CRP and isoprostane (8-epi-prostaglandin (PG) F2α) levels in HIG-positive patients at the time of scintigraphy. These findings indicate that In-111-HIG reflecting vascular lesions with a high inflammatory component, probably more prone to rupture, may identify a population at high vascular risk rather than a lesion at risk. The clinical impact of this finding should be assessed in prospective studies.

  8. Identifying patients in target customer segments using a two-stage clustering-classification approach: a hospital-based assessment.

    PubMed

    Chen, You-Shyang; Cheng, Ching-Hsue; Lai, Chien-Jung; Hsu, Cheng-Yi; Syu, Han-Jhou

    2012-02-01

    Identifying patients in a Target Customer Segment (TCS) is important to determine the demand for, and to appropriately allocate resources for, health care services. The purpose of this study is to propose a two-stage clustering-classification model through (1) initially integrating the RFM attribute and K-means algorithm for clustering the TCS patients and (2) then integrating the global discretization method and the rough set theory for classifying hospitalized departments and optimizing health care services. To assess the performance of the proposed model, a dataset was used from a representative hospital (termed Hospital-A) that was extracted from a database from an empirical study in Taiwan comprised of 183,947 samples that were characterized by 44 attributes during 2008. The proposed model was compared with three techniques, Decision Tree, Naive Bayes, and Multilayer Perceptron, and the empirical results showed significant promise of its accuracy. The generated knowledge-based rules provide useful information to maximize resource utilization and support the development of a strategy for decision-making in hospitals. From the findings, 75 patients in the TCS, three hospital departments, and specific diagnostic items were discovered in the data for Hospital-A. A potential determinant for gender differences was found, and the age attribute was not significant to the hospital departments. PMID:22177941

  9. Massively Parallel DNA Sequencing Successfully Identifies New Causative Mutations in Deafness Genes in Patients with Cochlear Implantation and EAS

    PubMed Central

    Miyagawa, Maiko; Nishio, Shin-ya; Ikeda, Takuo; Fukushima, Kunihiro; Usami, Shin-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Genetic factors, the most common etiology in severe to profound hearing loss, are one of the key determinants of Cochlear Implantation (CI) and Electric Acoustic Stimulation (EAS) outcomes. Satisfactory auditory performance after receiving a CI/EAS in patients with certain deafness gene mutations indicates that genetic testing would be helpful in predicting CI/EAS outcomes and deciding treatment choices. However, because of the extreme genetic heterogeneity of deafness, clinical application of genetic information still entails difficulties. Target exon sequencing using massively parallel DNA sequencing is a new powerful strategy to discover rare causative genes in Mendelian disorders such as deafness. We used massive sequencing of the exons of 58 target candidate genes to analyze 8 (4 early-onset, 4 late-onset) Japanese CI/EAS patients, who did not have mutations in commonly found genes including GJB2, SLC26A4, or mitochondrial 1555A>G or 3243A>G mutations. We successfully identified four rare causative mutations in the MYO15A, TECTA, TMPRSS3, and ACTG1 genes in four patients who showed relatively good auditory performance with CI including EAS, suggesting that genetic testing may be able to predict the performance after implantation. PMID:24130743

  10. Identifying and Managing a Malpositioned Endotracheal Tube Bite Block in an Orotracheally Intubated Patient: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hui-Ling; Ruan, Sheng-Yuan; Wu, Huey-Dong

    2016-03-01

    The universal bite block is increasingly used in orotracheally intubated patients. Here, we report a case of pilot tube dysfunction caused by a malpositioned universal bite block in an orotracheally intubated patient. We summarize the key points on identifying and managing a malpositioned universal bite block from this case and literature review.A 74-year-old woman was emergently intubated during an episode of hyperkalemia-related cardiac arrest. A universal bite block was used for fixing the endotracheal tube. After her condition stabilized, ventilator weaning was attempted; however, a positive cuff-leak test result was observed.The cuff-leak test revealed a lack of elasticity of the pilot balloon, which was completely deflated after 2 mL of air was removed. Pilot tube dysfunction was highly suspected. The bite block was slightly pulled out, and 8 mL of air was aspirated from the pilot tube. The patient was successfully extubated without stridor and respiratory distress.Our case highlighted that a malpositioned bite block may obstruct the pilot tube, causing unfavorable consequences. While fixing the bite block on an endotracheal tube, it is crucial to ensure that the takeoff point of the pilot tube is located within the C-notch of the bite block.

  11. Identifying vulnerable patients: role of the EAT-10 and the multidisciplinary team for early intervention and comprehensive dysphagia care.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Kala; Ekberg, Olle

    2012-01-01

    There is underdiagnosis and low awareness of dysphagia despite that the condition is modifiable and poorly managed symptoms diminish psychological well-being and overall quality of life. Frontline clinicians are in a unique position to be alert to the high prevalence of swallowing difficulty among elderly, evaluate and identify those who need intervention, and assure that individuals receive appropriate care. Proper diagnosis and treatment of oral-pharyngeal dysphagia involves a multidisciplinary healthcare team effort and starts with systematic screening of at-risk patients. The presence of a medical condition such as acute stroke, head and neck cancer, head trauma, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, pneumonia or bronchitis is adequate basis for predicting high risk. Systematic screening of dysphagia and resulting malnutrition among at-risk older adults is justified in an effort to avoid pneumonia and is recommended by clinical practice guidelines. Systematic screening with a validated method (e.g. the 10-item Eating Assessment Tool, EAT-10) as part of a comprehensive care protocol enables multidisciplinary teams to more effectively manage the condition, reduce the economic and societal burden, and improve patient quality of life. In fact, care settings with a systematic dysphagia screening program attain significantly better patient outcomes including reduced cases of pneumonia (by 55%) and reduced hospital length of stay.

  12. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  13. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  14. hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes from Brugada Syndrome patients without identified mutations do not exhibit clear cellular electrophysiological abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Veerman, Christiaan C.; Mengarelli, Isabella; Guan, Kaomei; Stauske, Michael; Barc, Julien; Tan, Hanno L.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Verkerk, Arie O.; Bezzina, Connie R.

    2016-01-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a rare cardiac rhythm disorder associated with sudden cardiac death. Mutations in the sodium channel gene SCN5A are found in ~20% of cases while mutations in other genes collectively account for <5%. In the remaining patients the genetic defect and the underlying pathogenic mechanism remain obscure. To provide insight into the mechanism of BrS in individuals without identified mutations, we here studied electrophysiological properties of cardiomyocytes (CMs) generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from 3 BrS patients who tested negative for mutations in the known BrS-associated genes. Patch clamp studies revealed no differences in sodium current (INa) in hiPSC-CMs from the 3 BrS patients compared to 2 unrelated controls. Moreover, action potential upstroke velocity (Vmax), reflecting INa, was not different between hiPSC-CMs from the BrS patients and the controls. hiPSC-CMs harboring the BrS-associated SCN5A-1795insD mutation exhibited a reduction in both INa and Vmax, demonstrating our ability to detect reduced sodium channel function. hiPSC-CMs from one of the BrS lines demonstrated a mildly reduced action potential duration, however, the transient outward potassium current (Ito) and the L-type calcium current (ICa,L), both implicated in BrS, were not different compared to the controls. Our findings indicate that ion channel dysfunction, in particular in the cardiac sodium channel, may not be a prerequisite for BrS. PMID:27485484

  15. Validation of genome-wide association study (GWAS)-identified disease risk alleles with patient-specific stem cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin; Li, Yao; Chan, Lawrence; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Nguyen, Huy V.; Hsu, Chun-Wei; Li, Xiaorong; Brown, Lewis M.; Egli, Dieter; Sparrow, Janet R.; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    While the past decade has seen great progress in mapping loci for common diseases, studying how these risk alleles lead to pathology remains a challenge. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) affects 9 million older Americans, and is characterized by the loss of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Although the closely linked genome-wide association studies ARMS2/HTRA1 genes, located at the chromosome 10q26 locus, are strongly associated with the risk of AMD, their downstream targets are unknown. Low population frequencies of risk alleles in tissue banks make it impractical to study their function in cells derived from autopsied tissue. Moreover, autopsy eyes from end-stage AMD patients, where age-related RPE atrophy and fibrosis are already present, cannot be used to determine how abnormal ARMS2/HTRA1 expression can initiate RPE pathology. Instead, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived RPE from patients provides us with earlier stage AMD patient-specific cells and allows us to analyze the underlying mechanisms at this critical time point. An unbiased proteome screen of A2E-aged patient-specific iPS-derived RPE cell lines identified superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2)-mediated antioxidative defense in the genetic allele's susceptibility of AMD. The AMD-associated risk haplotype (T-in/del-A) impairs the ability of the RPE to defend against aging-related oxidative stress. SOD2 defense is impaired in RPE homozygous for the risk haplotype (T-in/del-A; T-in/del-A), while the effect was less pronounced in RPE homozygous for the protective haplotype (G–Wt–G; G–Wt–G). ARMS2/HTRA1 risk alleles decrease SOD2 defense, making RPE more susceptible to oxidative damage and thereby contributing to AMD pathogenesis. PMID:24497574

  16. Derivation of Urine Output Thresholds That Identify a Very High Risk of AKI in Patients with Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Leedahl, David D.; Schramm, Garrett E.; Dierkhising, Ross A.; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Chawla, Lakhmir S.; Kashani, Kianoush B.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives To promote early detection of AKI, recently proposed pretest probability models combine sub–Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) AKI criteria with baseline AKI risk. The primary objective of this study was to determine sub-KDIGO thresholds that identify patients with septic shock at highest risk for AKI. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This was a retrospective analysis of 390 adult patients admitted to the medical intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary, academic medical center with septic shock between January 2008 and December 2010. Hourly urine output was collected from the time of septic shock recognition (hour 0) to hour 96, urine catheter removal, or ICU discharge (whichever occurred first). All available serum creatinine (SCr) measurements were collected until hour 96. The AKI pretest probability model was assessed during the first 12 hours of resuscitation and included the initial episode of oliguria, increase from baseline to peak SCr level, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) III score in a multivariable receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis. The primary outcome was the incidence of stage II or III (stage II+) AKI defined by KDIGO criteria. Secondary outcomes included the need for RRT and 28-day mortality. Results Ninety-eight (25%) patients developed stage II+ AKI after septic shock recognition. APACHE III score and increase in SCr level in the first 12 hours were not statistically associated with stage II+ AKI in multivariable ROC analysis. Consecutive oliguria for 3 hours had fair predictive ability for achieving stage II+ AKI criteria (area under ROC curve, 0.73; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.68 to 0.78), and oliguria for 5 hours demonstrated optimal accuracy (82%; 95% CI, 79% to 86%). Conclusions Three to 5 hours of consecutive oliguria in patients with septic shock may provide a valuable measure of AKI risk. Further validation to support this finding is

  17. hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes from Brugada Syndrome patients without identified mutations do not exhibit clear cellular electrophysiological abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Veerman, Christiaan C.; Mengarelli, Isabella; Guan, Kaomei; Stauske, Michael; Barc, Julien; Tan, Hanno L.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Verkerk, Arie O.; Bezzina, Connie R.

    2016-01-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a rare cardiac rhythm disorder associated with sudden cardiac death. Mutations in the sodium channel gene SCN5A are found in ~20% of cases while mutations in other genes collectively account for <5%. In the remaining patients the genetic defect and the underlying pathogenic mechanism remain obscure. To provide insight into the mechanism of BrS in individuals without identified mutations, we here studied electrophysiological properties of cardiomyocytes (CMs) generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from 3 BrS patients who tested negative for mutations in the known BrS-associated genes. Patch clamp studies revealed no differences in sodium current (INa) in hiPSC-CMs from the 3 BrS patients compared to 2 unrelated controls. Moreover, action potential upstroke velocity (Vmax), reflecting INa, was not different between hiPSC-CMs from the BrS patients and the controls. hiPSC-CMs harboring the BrS-associated SCN5A-1795insD mutation exhibited a reduction in both INa and Vmax, demonstrating our ability to detect reduced sodium channel function. hiPSC-CMs from one of the BrS lines demonstrated a mildly reduced action potential duration, however, the transient outward potassium current (Ito) and the L-type calcium current (ICa,L), both implicated in BrS, were not different compared to the controls. Our findings indicate that ion channel dysfunction, in particular in the cardiac sodium channel, may not be a prerequisite for BrS. PMID:27485484

  18. Deficient Phosphorylation of Stat1 in Leukocytes Identifies Neutralizing Antibodies in Multiple Sclerosis Patients Treated with Interferon-Beta

    PubMed Central

    Gavasso, Sonia; Mosleth, Ellen Faergestad; Marøy, Tove; Jørgensen, Katarina; Nakkestad, Hanne-Linda; Gjertsen, Bjørn-Tore; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Vedeler, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Background Anti interferon-beta (IFN-β) neutralizing antibodies (NAb) affect efficacy of treatment of multiple sclerosis patients, but exactly when the detrimental effects of NAbs offset therapeutic efficacy is debated. Quantification of intracellular pathway-specific phosphorylation by phospho-specific flow cytometry (phosphoflow) is a promising tool for evaluation of these effects in primary immune cells from treated patients at the single-cell level. Method Samples for phosphoflow and gene expression changes were collected before administration of IFN-β and at four, six, and eight hours thereafter. Patients were NAb negative (n = 3) or were NAb positive with low/medium (n = 1) or high (n = 2) NAb titers. Levels of phosphorylation of six Stat transcription factors (pStat) in seven cell subtypes and expression levels of 71 pathway-specific genes in whole blood were measured. The data was subjected to principal component analysis (PCA), fifty-fifty MANOVA, ANOVA, and partial least square regression (PLSR). Results PCA of pStat levels clustered patients according to NAb class independently of time. PCA of gene expression data clustered patients according to NAb class but was affected by time and treatment. In the fifty-fifty MANOVA, NAb class was significant for both pStat levels and gene expression data. The ANOVA identified pStat1 protein in several cell subtypes as significantly affected by NAb class. The best fitting model for NAb prediction based on PLSR included pStat1 in monocytes, T cells, or lymphocytes and pStat3 in monocytes (r = 0.97). Gene expression data were slightly less predictive of NAb titers. Conclusion Based on this proof of concept study, we hypothesize that NAb effects can be monitored by evaluation of a single biomarker, pStat1, in either monocytes or T cells by phosphoflow directly after IFN-β administration. The method will significantly reduce cost relative to labor intensive in vitro methods and offers a patient

  19. Long term follow up of prosthetic valve endocarditis: what characteristics identify patients who were treated successfully with antibiotics alone?

    PubMed Central

    Truninger, K; Jost, C; Seifert, B; Vogt, P; Follath, F; Schaffner, A; Jenni, R

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To identify predictors for the safe use of antibiotic treatment without reoperation in patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis.
SETTING—Retrospective study in a tertiary care centre.
SUBJECTS AND DESIGN—All 49 episodes of definite prosthetic valve endocarditis (Duke criteria) diagnosed at one institution between 1980 to 1997 were analysed. Ten episodes (20%) were treated with antibiotics only (antibiotic group) and 39 episodes (80%) with combined antibiotic and surgical treatment (surgery group). The analysis included detailed study of hospital records and data on long term follow up which were obtained in all patients by a questionnaire or telephone contact with physician or patient. The length of follow up (mean (SD)) was 41 (32) months in the antibiotic group and 45 (24) months in the surgery group (NS). Long term survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and compared by the log-rank test.
RESULTS—There was no significant difference in age, history of previous endocarditis, number of previous heart operations, vegetations, emboli, type of prosthesis, or percentage of early prosthetic valve endocarditis and positive blood cultures between the two groups. In the antibiotic group, there were more enterococcal (50%; p = 0.005) and in the surgery group more staphylococcal infections (55%; p = 0.048). Annular abscesses (p < 0.0001) and aortoventricular dehiscence (p = 0.02) were more common in the surgery group. No patient in the antibiotic group had heart failure. Long term follow up showed no significant difference between the surgery and antibiotic groups regarding late mortality (14% v 18%) and five year rates of recurrent endocarditis (14% v 16%), event related mortality (14% v 3%, log-rank test), and the need for reoperation (14% v 19%; log-rank test). The only patient with conservatively treated staphylococcal prosthetic valve endocarditis died after reoperation for recurrence

  20. Genetic screening test for psoriatic arthritis and UVB irradiation potential responders: A new tool to identify psoriasis subpopulation patients?

    PubMed

    Lotti, Torello; Tognetti, Linda; Galeone, Massimiliano; Bruscino, Nicola; Moretti, Silvia; Giorgini, Simonetta

    2011-07-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a psoriasis-associated inflammatory disease of the joints and enthuses. The occurrence of PsA is linked to the complex interplay of gene environment, and immune system. Genetic factors have long been recognized to play an important role in PsA. Genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region have been shown to be associated with PsA. These include genes coded in the HLA region, (especially Class I antigens) and non-HLA genes (i.e., MHC class I chain-related antigen A, MICA, and TNF-α genes). Association studies in PsA have also identified a number of genes outside MHC region, including interleukin-1 (IL-1) gene cluster, killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), and IL-23R genes. Established systemic treatments for moderate-severe psoriasis and PsA may be potentially dangerous and usually time consuming for the patient and often expensive for the National Health Systems. Tests which could predict which subset of psoriatic patients could develop the most severe forms of the disease (i.e., PsA) or will respond to well-established (UVB irradiation) or other systemic treatments are now required. The goal of genetic test screening is to rapidly and safely identify subjects for preventive or early treatment or extended surveillance prior to the onset of signs and symptoms. Genetic tests today represent a reliable investigation procedure which could rapidly and consistently improve the diagnostic ability of the dermatologist and contribute to the early and correct treatment of the different subsets of PsA.

  1. Expression of variant forms of insulin receptor substrate-1 identified in patients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Imai, Y; Philippe, N; Sesti, G; Accili, D; Taylor, S I

    1997-12-01

    Several polymorphisms have been identified in the amino acid sequence of human insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). Some of the variant sequences have been reported to be increased in prevalence among patients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). This observation led to the hypothesis that these amino acid substitutions may impair the function of IRS-1, thereby causing the insulin resistance seen in patients with NIDDM. To address this question, we have designed studies to evaluate the effects of three variant sequences identified in our laboratory: Gly819-->Arg, Gly972-->Arg, and Arg1221-->Cys. We constructed four IRS-1 expression vectors for transfection in COS-7 cells: wild-type, single mutant (Gly819-->Arg), double mutant (Gly819-->Arg; Gly972-->Arg), and triple mutant (Gly819-->Arg; Gly972-->Arg; Arg1221-->Cys) IRS-1. The mutations did not alter the level of expression or the extent of insulin receptor-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of recombinant IRS-1. Moreover, the mutations did not lead to a detectable impairment in the association of recombinant IRS-1 with important downstream effectors, including the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and growth factor receptor-binding protein-2. We conclude that these amino acid substitutions do not appear to cause a major defect in the function of IRS-1, as judged by our assays. However, this type of assay probably lacks the sensitivity to detect subtle functional defects. In light of the suggestive associations observed in epidemiological studies, it is premature to totally discard the hypothesis that variant sequences of IRS-1 may contribute to the pathogenesis of NIDDM. Nevertheless, our studies cannot be interpreted as lending support to that hypothesis. PMID:9398740

  2. Genetic screening test for psoriatic arthritis and UVB irradiation potential responders: A new tool to identify psoriasis subpopulation patients?

    PubMed Central

    Lotti, Torello; Tognetti, Linda; Galeone, Massimiliano; Bruscino, Nicola; Moretti, Silvia; Giorgini, Simonetta

    2011-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a psoriasis-associated inflammatory disease of the joints and enthuses. The occurrence of PsA is linked to the complex interplay of gene environment, and immune system. Genetic factors have long been recognized to play an important role in PsA. Genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region have been shown to be associated with PsA. These include genes coded in the HLA region, (especially Class I antigens) and non-HLA genes (i.e., MHC class I chain-related antigen A, MICA, and TNF-α genes). Association studies in PsA have also identified a number of genes outside MHC region, including interleukin-1 (IL-1) gene cluster, killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), and IL-23R genes. Established systemic treatments for moderate-severe psoriasis and PsA may be potentially dangerous and usually time consuming for the patient and often expensive for the National Health Systems. Tests which could predict which subset of psoriatic patients could develop the most severe forms of the disease (i.e., PsA) or will respond to well-established (UVB irradiation) or other systemic treatments are now required. The goal of genetic test screening is to rapidly and safely identify subjects for preventive or early treatment or extended surveillance prior to the onset of signs and symptoms. Genetic tests today represent a reliable investigation procedure which could rapidly and consistently improve the diagnostic ability of the dermatologist and contribute to the early and correct treatment of the different subsets of PsA. PMID:23130225

  3. Automated analysis of vital signs to identify patients with substantial bleeding before hospital arrival: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianbo; Khitrov, Maxim Y; Gates, Jonathan D; Odom, Stephen R; Havens, Joaquim M; de Moya, Marc A; Wilkins, Kevin; Wedel, Suzanne K; Kittell, Erin O; Reifman, Jaques; Reisner, Andrew T

    2015-05-01

    Trauma outcomes are improved by protocols for substantial bleeding, typically activated after physician evaluation at a hospital. Previous analysis suggested that prehospital vital signs contained patterns indicating the presence or absence of substantial bleeding. In an observational study of adults (aged ≥18 years) transported to level I trauma centers by helicopter, we investigated the diagnostic performance of the Automated Processing of the Physiological Registry for Assessment of Injury Severity (APPRAISE) system, a computational platform for real-time analysis of vital signs, for identification of substantial bleeding in trauma patients with explicitly hemorrhagic injuries. We studied 209 subjects prospectively and 646 retrospectively. In our multivariate analysis, prospective performance was not significantly different from retrospective. The APPRAISE system was 76% sensitive for 24-h packed red blood cells of 9 or more units (95% confidence interval, 59% - 89%) and significantly more sensitive (P < 0.05) than any prehospital Shock Index of 1.4 or higher; sensitivity, 59%; initial systolic blood pressure (SBP) less than 110 mmHg, 50%; and any prehospital SBP less than 90 mmHg, 50%. The APPRAISE specificity for 24-h packed red blood cells of 0 units was 87% (88% for any Shock Index ≥1.4, 88% for initial SBP <110 mmHg, and 90% for any prehospital SBP <90 mmHg). Median APPRAISE hemorrhage notification time was 20 min before arrival at the trauma center. In conclusion, APPRAISE identified bleeding before trauma center arrival. En route, this capability could allow medics to focus on direct patient care rather than the monitor and, via advance radio notification, could expedite hospital interventions for patients with substantial blood loss. PMID:25664983

  4. Proteomic profiling of patient-derived glioblastoma xenografts identifies a subset with activated EGFR: implications for drug development.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kristine E; Chagoya, Gustavo; Kwatra, Shawn G; Yen, Timothy; Keir, Stephen T; Cooter, Mary; Hoadley, Katherine A; Rasheed, Ahmed; Lipp, Eric S; Mclendon, Roger; Ali-Osman, Francis; Bigner, Darell D; Sampson, John H; Kwatra, Madan M

    2015-06-01

    The development of drugs to inhibit glioblastoma (GBM) growth requires reliable pre-clinical models. To date, proteomic level validation of widely used patient-derived glioblastoma xenografts (PDGX) has not been performed. In the present study, we characterized 20 PDGX models according to subtype classification based on The Cancer Genome Atlas criteria, TP53, PTEN, IDH 1/2, and TERT promoter genetic analysis, EGFR amplification status, and examined their proteomic profiles against those of their parent tumors. The 20 PDGXs belonged to three of four The Cancer Genome Atlas subtypes: eight classical, eight mesenchymal, and four proneural; none neural. Amplification of EGFR gene was observed in 9 of 20 xenografts, and of these, 3 harbored the EGFRvIII mutation. We then performed proteomic profiling of PDGX, analyzing expression/activity of several proteins including EGFR. Levels of EGFR phosphorylated at Y1068 vary considerably between PDGX samples, and this pattern was also seen in primary GBM. Partitioning of 20 PDGX into high (n = 5) and low (n = 15) groups identified a panel of proteins associated with high EGFR activity. Thus, PDGX with high EGFR activity represent an excellent pre-clinical model to develop therapies for a subset of GBM patients whose tumors are characterized by high EGFR activity. Further, the proteins found to be associated with high EGFR activity can be monitored to assess the effectiveness of targeting EGFR. The development of drugs to inhibit glioblastoma (GBM) growth requires reliable pre-clinical models. We validated proteomic profiles using patient-derived glioblastoma xenografts (PDGX), characterizing 20 PDGX models according to subtype classification based on The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) criteria, TP53, PTEN, IDH 1/2, and TERT promoter genetic analysis, EGFR amplification status, and examined their proteomic profiles against those of their parent tumors. Proteins found to be associated with high EGFR activity represent potential

  5. Automated analysis of vital signs to identify patients with substantial bleeding before hospital arrival: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianbo; Khitrov, Maxim Y; Gates, Jonathan D; Odom, Stephen R; Havens, Joaquim M; de Moya, Marc A; Wilkins, Kevin; Wedel, Suzanne K; Kittell, Erin O; Reifman, Jaques; Reisner, Andrew T

    2015-05-01

    Trauma outcomes are improved by protocols for substantial bleeding, typically activated after physician evaluation at a hospital. Previous analysis suggested that prehospital vital signs contained patterns indicating the presence or absence of substantial bleeding. In an observational study of adults (aged ≥18 years) transported to level I trauma centers by helicopter, we investigated the diagnostic performance of the Automated Processing of the Physiological Registry for Assessment of Injury Severity (APPRAISE) system, a computational platform for real-time analysis of vital signs, for identification of substantial bleeding in trauma patients with explicitly hemorrhagic injuries. We studied 209 subjects prospectively and 646 retrospectively. In our multivariate analysis, prospective performance was not significantly different from retrospective. The APPRAISE system was 76% sensitive for 24-h packed red blood cells of 9 or more units (95% confidence interval, 59% - 89%) and significantly more sensitive (P < 0.05) than any prehospital Shock Index of 1.4 or higher; sensitivity, 59%; initial systolic blood pressure (SBP) less than 110 mmHg, 50%; and any prehospital SBP less than 90 mmHg, 50%. The APPRAISE specificity for 24-h packed red blood cells of 0 units was 87% (88% for any Shock Index ≥1.4, 88% for initial SBP <110 mmHg, and 90% for any prehospital SBP <90 mmHg). Median APPRAISE hemorrhage notification time was 20 min before arrival at the trauma center. In conclusion, APPRAISE identified bleeding before trauma center arrival. En route, this capability could allow medics to focus on direct patient care rather than the monitor and, via advance radio notification, could expedite hospital interventions for patients with substantial blood loss.

  6. DNA Repair Alterations in Children With Pediatric Malignancies: Novel Opportunities to Identify Patients at Risk for High-Grade Toxicities

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebe, Claudia E.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a pilot study, the phosphorylated H2AX ({gamma}H2AX) foci approach for identifying patients with double-strand break (DSB) repair deficiencies, who may overreact to DNA-damaging cancer therapy. Methods and Materials: The DSB repair capacity of children with solid cancers was analyzed compared with that of age-matched control children and correlated with treatment-related normal-tissue responses (n = 47). Double-strand break repair was investigated by counting {gamma}H2AX foci in blood lymphocytes at defined time points after irradiation of blood samples. Results: Whereas all healthy control children exhibited proficient DSB repair, 3 children with tumors revealed clearly impaired DSB repair capacities, and 2 of these repair-deficient children developed life-threatening or even lethal normal-tissue toxicities. The underlying mutations affecting regulatory factors involved in DNA repair pathways were identified. Moreover, significant differences in mean DSB repair capacity were observed between children with tumors and control children, suggesting that childhood cancer is based on genetic alterations affecting DSB repair function. Conclusions: Double-strand break repair alteration in children may predispose to cancer formation and may affect children's susceptibility to normal-tissue toxicities. Phosphorylated H2AX analysis of blood samples allows one to detect DSB repair deficiencies and thus enables identification of children at risk for high-grade toxicities.

  7. Gain-of-function mutation in TRPV4 identified in patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Wayne; Sonkusare, Swapnil K; Wang, Tracy; Azeddine, Bouziane; Pupavac, Mihaela; Carrot-Zhang, Jian; Hong, Kwangseok; Majewski, Jacek; Harvey, Edward J; Russell, Laura; Chalk, Colin; Rosenblatt, David S; Nelson, Mark T; Séguin, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a debilitating disease that involves impaired blood supply to the femoral head and leads to femoral head collapse. Methods We use whole-exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing to analyse a family with inherited osteonecrosis of the femoral head and fluorescent Ca2+ imaging to functionally characterise the variant protein. Results We report a family with four siblings affected with inherited osteonecrosis of the femoral head and the identification of a c.2480_2483delCCCG frameshift deletion followed by a c.2486T>A substitution in one allele of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) gene. TRPV4 encodes a Ca2+-permeable cation channel known to play a role in vasoregulation and osteoclast differentiation. While pathogenic TRPV4 mutations affect the skeletal or nervous systems, association with osteonecrosis of the femoral head is novel. Functional measurements of Ca2+ influx through mutant TRPV4 channels in HEK293 cells and patient-derived dermal fibroblasts identified a TRPV4 gain of function. Analysis of channel open times, determined indirectly from measurement of TRPV4 activity within a cluster of TRPV4 channels, revealed that the TRPV4 gain of function was caused by longer channel openings. Conclusions These findings identify a novel TRPV4 mutation implicating TRPV4 and altered calcium homeostasis in the pathogenesis of osteonecrosis while reinforcing the importance of TRPV4 in bone diseases and vascular endothelium. PMID:27330106

  8. A rare duplication on chromosome 16p11.2 is identified in patients with psychosis in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaojing; Demirci, F Yesim; Barmada, M Michael; Richardson, Gale A; Lopez, Oscar L; Sweet, Robert A; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Feingold, Eleanor

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological and genetic studies suggest that schizophrenia and autism may share genetic links. Besides common single nucleotide polymorphisms, recent data suggest that some rare copy number variants (CNVs) are risk factors for both disorders. Because we have previously found that schizophrenia and psychosis in Alzheimer's disease (AD+P) share some genetic risk, we investigated whether CNVs reported in schizophrenia and autism are also linked to AD+P. We searched for CNVs associated with AD+P in 7 recurrent CNV regions that have been previously identified across autism and schizophrenia, using the Illumina HumanOmni1-Quad BeadChip. A chromosome 16p11.2 duplication CNV (chr16: 29,554,843-30,105,652) was identified in 2 of 440 AD+P subjects, but not in 136 AD subjects without psychosis, or in 593 AD subjects with intermediate psychosis status, or in 855 non-AD individuals. The frequency of this duplication CNV in AD+P (0.46%) was similar to that reported previously in schizophrenia (0.46%). This duplication CNV was further validated using the NanoString nCounter CNV Custom CodeSets. The 16p11.2 duplication has been associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability, behavioral problems, autism, schizophrenia (SCZ), and bipolar disorder. These two AD+P patients had no personal of, nor any identified family history of, SCZ, bipolar disorder and autism. To the best of our knowledge, our case report is the first suggestion that 16p11.2 duplication is also linked to AD+P. Although rare, this CNV may have an important role in the development of psychosis. PMID:25379732

  9. Identifying high-cost patients using data mining techniques and a small set of non-trivial attributes.

    PubMed

    Izad Shenas, Seyed Abdolmotalleb; Raahemi, Bijan; Hossein Tekieh, Mohammad; Kuziemsky, Craig

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we use data mining techniques, namely neural networks and decision trees, to build predictive models to identify very high-cost patients in the top 5 percentile among the general population. A large empirical dataset from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey with 98,175 records was used in our study. After pre-processing, partitioning and balancing the data, the refined dataset of 31,704 records was modeled by Decision Trees (including C5.0 and CHAID), and Neural Networks. The performances of the models are analyzed using various measures including accuracy, G-mean, and Area under ROC curve. We concluded that the CHAID classifier returns the best G-mean and AUC measures for top performing predictive models ranging from 76% to 85%, and 0.812 to 0.942 units, respectively. We also identify a small set of 5 non-trivial attributes among a primary set of 66 attributes to identify the top 5% of the high cost population. The attributes are the individual׳s overall health perception, age, history of blood cholesterol check, history of physical/sensory/mental limitations, and history of colonic prevention measures. The small set of attributes are what we call non-trivial and does not include visits to care providers, doctors or hospitals, which are highly correlated with expenditures and does not offer new insight to the data. The results of this study can be used by healthcare data analysts, policy makers, insurer, and healthcare planners to improve the delivery of health services.

  10. The accuracy with which the 5 times sit-to-stand test, versus gait speed, can identify poor exercise tolerance in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bernabeu-Mora, Roberto; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc; Llamazares-Herrán, Eduardo; de Oliveira-Sousa, Silvana Loana; Sánchez-Martinez, Mª Piedad; Escolar-Reina, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Identifying those patients who underperform in the 6-minute walk test (6MWT <350 m), and the reasons for their poor performance, is a major concern in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. To explore the accuracy and relevance of the 4-m gait-speed (4MGS) test, and the 5-repetition sit-to-stand (5STS) test, as diagnostic markers, and clinical determinants, of poor performance in the 6MWT. We recruited 137 patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to participate in our cross-sectional study. Patients completed the 4MGS and 5STS tests, with quantitative (in seconds) and qualitative ordinal data collected; the latter were categorized using a scale of 0 to 4. The following potential covariates and clinical determinants of poor 6MWT were collated: age, quadriceps muscle-strength (QMS), health status, dyspnea, depression, and airflow limitation. Area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve data (AUC) was used to assess accuracy, with logistic regression used to explore relevance as clinical determinants. The AUCs generated using the 4MGS and 5STS tests were comparable, at 0.719 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.629–0.809) and 0.711 (95% CI 0.613–0.809), respectively. With ordinal data, the 5STS test was most accurate (AUC of 0.732; 95% CI 0.645–0.819); the 4MGS test showed poor discriminatory power (AUC <0.7), although accuracy improved (0.726, 95% CI 0.637–0.816) when covariates were included. Unlike the 4MGS test, the 5STS test provided a significant clinical determinant of a poor 6MWT (odds ratio 1.23, 95% CI 1.05–1.44). The 5STS test reliably predicts a poor 6MWT, especially when using ordinal data. Used alone, the 4MGS test is reliable when measured with continuous data. PMID:27583918

  11. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  12. NOTE: How accurate is a CT-based dose calculation on a pencil beam TPS for a patient with a metallic prosthesis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Ralph

    2001-09-01

    The accuracy of a CT-based dose calculation on a treatment planning system (TPS) for a radiotherapy patient with a metallic prosthesis has not previously been reported. In this study, the accuracy of the CT-based inhomogeneity correction on a pencil beam TPS (Helax TMS) was determined in a phantom containing a metallic prosthesis. A steel prosthesis phantom and a titanium prosthesis phantom were investigated. The phantoms were CT-scanned and dose plans produced on the TPS, using the CT images to provide density information for the inhomogeneity corrections. Verification measurements were performed on a linear accelerator for 6 and 15 MV x-rays. Measured dose profiles at three different depths were compared to the calculations of the TPS. For the titanium prosthesis and for 6 MV x-rays, the TPS overestimated the beam attenuation by approximately 20% at 15 and 20 cm depths in the phantom. This is due to a limitation in the density allocation of this TPS: any Hounsfield number (HN) above a certain threshold is allocated the density of steel. For the steel prosthesis, the TPS performed the correct mapping of HN to mass density. The dose calculation was within 6% for 6 MV x-rays at 15 and 20 cm depths. However, the accuracy of dose calculation varied with beam energy and depth, with large errors in the region close to the prosthesis. The TPS overestimated the dose by 11% for 6 MV and 15% for 15 MV x-rays at 11 cm depth, 2.5 cm beyond the steel prosthesis. These results highlight the limitations in the density allocation of this TPS and demonstrate shortcomings in the pencil beam dose calculation.

  13. Blood Plasma-Derived Anti-Glycan Antibodies to Sialylated and Sulfated Glycans Identify Ovarian Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pochechueva, Tatiana; Chinarev, Alexander; Schoetzau, Andreas; Fedier, André; Bovin, Nicolai V.; Hacker, Neville F.; Jacob, Francis; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola

    2016-01-01

    Altered levels of naturally occurring anti-glycan antibodies (AGA) circulating in human blood plasma are found in different pathologies including cancer. Here the levels of AGA directed against 22 negatively charged (sialylated and sulfated) glycans were assessed in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC, n = 22) patients and benign controls (n = 31) using our previously developed suspension glycan array (SGA). Specifically, the ability of AGA to differentiate between controls and HGSOC, the most common and aggressive type of ovarian cancer with a poor outcome was determined. Results were compared to CA125, the commonly used ovarian cancer biomarker. AGA to seven glycans that significantly (P<0.05) differentiated between HGSOC and control were identified: AGA to top candidates SiaTn and 6-OSulfo-TF (both IgM) differentiated comparably to CA125. The area under the curve (AUC) of a panel of AGA to 5 glycans (SiaTn, 6-OSulfo-TF, 6-OSulfo-LN, SiaLea, and GM2) (0.878) was comparable to CA125 (0.864), but it markedly increased (0.985) when combined with CA125. AGA to SiaTn and 6-OSulfo-TF were also valuable predictors for HGSOC when CA125 values appeared inconclusive, i.e. were below a certain threshold. AGA-glycan binding was in some cases isotype-dependent and sensitive to glycosidic linkage switch (α2–6 vs. α2–3), to sialylation, and to sulfation of the glycans. In conclusion, plasma-derived AGA to sialylated and sulfated glycans including SiaTn and 6-OSulfo-TF detected by SGA present a valuable alternative to CA125 for differentiating controls from HGSOC patients and for predicting the likelihood of HGSOC, and may be potential HGSOC tumor markers. PMID:27764122

  14. A point process approach to identifying and tracking transitions in neural spiking dynamics in the subthalamic nucleus of Parkinson's patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xinyi; Eskandar, Emad N.; Eden, Uri T.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the role of rhythmic dynamics in normal and diseased brain function is an important area of research in neural electrophysiology. Identifying and tracking changes in rhythms associated with spike trains present an additional challenge, because standard approaches for continuous-valued neural recordings—such as local field potential, magnetoencephalography, and electroencephalography data—require assumptions that do not typically hold for point process data. Additionally, subtle changes in the history dependent structure of a spike train have been shown to lead to robust changes in rhythmic firing patterns. Here, we propose a point process modeling framework to characterize the rhythmic spiking dynamics in spike trains, test for statistically significant changes to those dynamics, and track the temporal evolution of such changes. We first construct a two-state point process model incorporating spiking history and develop a likelihood ratio test to detect changes in the firing structure. We then apply adaptive state-space filters and smoothers to track these changes through time. We illustrate our approach with a simulation study as well as with experimental data recorded in the subthalamic nucleus of Parkinson's patients performing an arm movement task. Our analyses show that during the arm movement task, neurons underwent a complex pattern of modulation of spiking intensity characterized initially by a release of inhibitory control at 20-40 ms after a spike, followed by a decrease in excitatory influence at 40-60 ms after a spike.

  15. Identifying the symptom and functional domains in patients with fibromyalgia: results of a cross-sectional Internet-based survey in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Salaffi, Fausto; Mozzani, Flavio; Draghessi, Antonella; Atzeni, Fabiola; Catellani, Rosita; Ciapetti, Alessandro; Di Carlo, Marco; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of this cross-sectional study were to investigate the usefulness of using an Internet survey of patients with fibromyalgia in order to obtain information concerning symptoms and functionality and identify clusters of clinical features that can distinguish patient subsets. Methods An Internet website has been used to collect data. Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire Revised version, self-administered Fibromyalgia Activity Score, and Self-Administered Pain Scale were used as questionnaires. Hierarchical agglomerative clustering was applied to the data obtained in order to identify symptoms and functional-based subgroups. Results Three hundred and fifty-three patients completed the study (85.3% women). The highest scored items were those related to sleep quality, fatigue/energy, pain, stiffness, degree of tenderness, balance problems, and environmental sensitivity. A high proportion of patients reported pain in the neck (81.4%), upper back (70.1%), and lower back (83.2%). A three-cluster solution best fitted the data. The variables were significantly different (P<0.0001) among the three clusters: cluster 1 (117 patients) reflected the lowest average scores across all symptoms, cluster 3 (116 patients) the highest scores, and cluster 2 (120 patients) captured moderate symptom levels, with low depression and anxiety. Conclusion Three subgroups of fibromyalgia samples in a large cohort of patients have been identified by using an Internet survey. This approach could provide rationale to support the study of individualized clinical evaluation and may be used to identify optimal treatment strategies. PMID:27257392

  16. The role of technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate in myocardial imaging to recognize, localize and identify extension of acute myocardial infarction in patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willerson, J. T.; Parkey, R. W.; Bonte, F. J.; Stokely, E. M.; Buja, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    The ability of technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate myocardial scintigrams to aid diagnostically in recognizing, localizing, and identifying extension of acute myocardial infarction in patients was evaluated. The present study is an extension of previous animal and patient evaluations that were recently performed utilizing this myocardial imaging agent.

  17. Accurate Optical Reference Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, N.

    2006-08-01

    Current and near future all-sky astrometric catalogs on the ICRF are reviewed with the emphasis on reference star data at optical wavelengths for user applications. The standard error of a Hipparcos Catalogue star position is now about 15 mas per coordinate. For the Tycho-2 data it is typically 20 to 100 mas, depending on magnitude. The USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC) observing program was completed in 2004 and reductions toward the final UCAC3 release are in progress. This all-sky reference catalogue will have positional errors of 15 to 70 mas for stars in the 10 to 16 mag range, with a high degree of completeness. Proper motions for the about 60 million UCAC stars will be derived by combining UCAC astrometry with available early epoch data, including yet unpublished scans of the complete set of AGK2, Hamburg Zone astrograph and USNO Black Birch programs. Accurate positional and proper motion data are combined in the Naval Observatory Merged Astrometric Dataset (NOMAD) which includes Hipparcos, Tycho-2, UCAC2, USNO-B1, NPM+SPM plate scan data for astrometry, and is supplemented by multi-band optical photometry as well as 2MASS near infrared photometry. The Milli-Arcsecond Pathfinder Survey (MAPS) mission is currently being planned at USNO. This is a micro-satellite to obtain 1 mas positions, parallaxes, and 1 mas/yr proper motions for all bright stars down to about 15th magnitude. This program will be supplemented by a ground-based program to reach 18th magnitude on the 5 mas level.

  18. SERIAL NECK ULTRASOUND IS MORE LIKELY TO IDENTIFY FALSE-POSITIVE ABNORMALITIES THAN CLINICALLY SIGNIFICANT DISEASE IN LOW-RISK PAPILLARY THYROID CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Samantha Peiling; Bach, Ariadne M.; Tuttle, R. Michael; Fish, Stephanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective American Thyroid Association (ATA) low-risk papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) patients without structural evidence of disease on initial posttreatment evaluation have a low risk of recurrence. Despite this, most patients undergo frequent surveillance neck ultrasound (US). The objective of the study was to evaluate the clinical utility of routine neck US in ATA low-risk PTC patients with no structural evidence of disease after their initial thyroid surgery. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 171 ATA low-risk PTC patients after total thyroidectomy, with or without radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation, who had a neck US without suspicious findings after therapy. The main outcome measure was a comparison of the frequency of finding false-positive US abnormalities and the frequency of identifying structural disease recurrence. Results Over a median follow-up of 8 years, 171 patients underwent a median of 5 neck US (range 2–17). Structural recurrence with low-volume disease (≤1 cm) was identified in 1.2% (2/171) of patients at a median of 2.8 years (range 1.6–4.1 years) after their initial diagnosis. Recurrence was associated with rising serum thyroglobulin (Tg) level in 1 of the 2 patients and was detected without signs of biochemical recurrence in the other patient. Conversely, false-positive US abnormalities were identified in 67% (114/171) of patients after therapy, leading to additional testing without identifying clinically significant disease. Conclusion In ATA low-risk patients without structural evidence of disease on initial surveillance evaluation, routine screening US is substantially more likely to identify false-positive results than clinically significant structural disease recurrence. PMID:26372300

  19. Whole transcriptome profiling of patient-derived xenograft models as a tool to identify both tumor and stromal specific biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Bradford, James R; Wappett, Mark; Beran, Garry; Logie, Armelle; Delpuech, Oona; Brown, Henry; Boros, Joanna; Camp, Nicola J; McEwen, Robert; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; Barry, Simon T

    2016-04-12

    The tumor microenvironment is emerging as a key regulator of cancer growth and progression, however the exact mechanisms of interaction with the tumor are poorly understood. Whilst the majority of genomic profiling efforts thus far have focused on the tumor, here we investigate RNA-Seq as a hypothesis-free tool to generate independent tumor and stromal biomarkers, and explore tumor-stroma interactions by exploiting the human-murine compartment specificity of patient-derived xenografts (PDX).Across a pan-cancer cohort of 79 PDX models, we determine that mouse stroma can be separated into distinct clusters, each corresponding to a specific stromal cell type. This implies heterogeneous recruitment of mouse stroma to the xenograft independent of tumor type. We then generate cross-species expression networks to recapitulate a known association between tumor epithelial cells and fibroblast activation, and propose a potentially novel relationship between two hypoxia-associated genes, human MIF and mouse Ddx6. Assessment of disease subtype also reveals MMP12 as a putative stromal marker of triple-negative breast cancer. Finally, we establish that our ability to dissect recruited stroma from trans-differentiated tumor cells is crucial to identifying stem-like poor-prognosis signatures in the tumor compartment.In conclusion, RNA-Seq is a powerful, cost-effective solution to global analysis of human tumor and mouse stroma simultaneously, providing new insights into mouse stromal heterogeneity and compartment-specific disease markers that are otherwise overlooked by alternative technologies. The study represents the first comprehensive analysis of its kind across multiple PDX models, and supports adoption of the approach in pre-clinical drug efficacy studies, and compartment-specific biomarker discovery. PMID:26980748

  20. Whole transcriptome profiling of patient-derived xenograft models as a tool to identify both tumor and stromal specific biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, James R.; Wappett, Mark; Beran, Garry; Logie, Armelle; Delpuech, Oona; Brown, Henry; Boros, Joanna; Camp, Nicola J.; McEwen, Robert; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; Barry, Simon T.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is emerging as a key regulator of cancer growth and progression, however the exact mechanisms of interaction with the tumor are poorly understood. Whilst the majority of genomic profiling efforts thus far have focused on the tumor, here we investigate RNA-Seq as a hypothesis-free tool to generate independent tumor and stromal biomarkers, and explore tumor-stroma interactions by exploiting the human-murine compartment specificity of patient-derived xenografts (PDX). Across a pan-cancer cohort of 79 PDX models, we determine that mouse stroma can be separated into distinct clusters, each corresponding to a specific stromal cell type. This implies heterogeneous recruitment of mouse stroma to the xenograft independent of tumor type. We then generate cross-species expression networks to recapitulate a known association between tumor epithelial cells and fibroblast activation, and propose a potentially novel relationship between two hypoxia-associated genes, human MIF and mouse Ddx6. Assessment of disease subtype also reveals MMP12 as a putative stromal marker of triple-negative breast cancer. Finally, we establish that our ability to dissect recruited stroma from trans-differentiated tumor cells is crucial to identifying stem-like poor-prognosis signatures in the tumor compartment. In conclusion, RNA-Seq is a powerful, cost-effective solution to global analysis of human tumor and mouse stroma simultaneously, providing new insights into mouse stromal heterogeneity and compartment-specific disease markers that are otherwise overlooked by alternative technologies. The study represents the first comprehensive analysis of its kind across multiple PDX models, and supports adoption of the approach in pre-clinical drug efficacy studies, and compartment-specific biomarker discovery. PMID:26980748

  1. Whole transcriptome profiling of patient-derived xenograft models as a tool to identify both tumor and stromal specific biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Bradford, James R; Wappett, Mark; Beran, Garry; Logie, Armelle; Delpuech, Oona; Brown, Henry; Boros, Joanna; Camp, Nicola J; McEwen, Robert; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; Barry, Simon T

    2016-04-12

    The tumor microenvironment is emerging as a key regulator of cancer growth and progression, however the exact mechanisms of interaction with the tumor are poorly understood. Whilst the majority of genomic profiling efforts thus far have focused on the tumor, here we investigate RNA-Seq as a hypothesis-free tool to generate independent tumor and stromal biomarkers, and explore tumor-stroma interactions by exploiting the human-murine compartment specificity of patient-derived xenografts (PDX).Across a pan-cancer cohort of 79 PDX models, we determine that mouse stroma can be separated into distinct clusters, each corresponding to a specific stromal cell type. This implies heterogeneous recruitment of mouse stroma to the xenograft independent of tumor type. We then generate cross-species expression networks to recapitulate a known association between tumor epithelial cells and fibroblast activation, and propose a potentially novel relationship between two hypoxia-associated genes, human MIF and mouse Ddx6. Assessment of disease subtype also reveals MMP12 as a putative stromal marker of triple-negative breast cancer. Finally, we establish that our ability to dissect recruited stroma from trans-differentiated tumor cells is crucial to identifying stem-like poor-prognosis signatures in the tumor compartment.In conclusion, RNA-Seq is a powerful, cost-effective solution to global analysis of human tumor and mouse stroma simultaneously, providing new insights into mouse stromal heterogeneity and compartment-specific disease markers that are otherwise overlooked by alternative technologies. The study represents the first comprehensive analysis of its kind across multiple PDX models, and supports adoption of the approach in pre-clinical drug efficacy studies, and compartment-specific biomarker discovery.

  2. Comprehensive genetic testing identifies targetable genomic alterations in most patients with non-small cell lung cancer, specifically adenocarcinoma, single institute investigation

    PubMed Central

    Won, Brian M.; Patton, Kathryn Alexa; Villaflor, Victoria M.; Hoffman, Philip C.; Hensing, Thomas; Hogarth, D. Kyle; Malik, Renuka; MacMahon, Heber; Mueller, Jeffrey; Simon, Cassie A.; Vigneswaran, Wickii T.; Wigfield, Christopher H.; Ferguson, Mark K.; Husain, Aliya N.; Vokes, Everett E.; Salgia, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    This study reviews extensive genetic analysis in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients in order to: describe how targetable mutation genes interrelate with the genes identified as variants of unknown significance; assess the percentage of patients with a potentially targetable genetic alterations; evaluate the percentage of patients who had concurrent alterations, previously considered to be mutually exclusive; and characterize the molecular subset of KRAS. Thoracic Oncology Research Program Databases at the University of Chicago provided patient demographics, pathology, and results of genetic testing. 364 patients including 289 adenocarcinoma underwent genotype testing by various platforms such as FoundationOne, Caris Molecular Intelligence, and Response Genetics Inc. For the entire adenocarcinoma cohort, 25% of patients were African Americans; 90% of KRAS mutations were detected in smokers, including current and former smokers; 46% of EGFR and 61% of ALK alterations were detected in never smokers. 99.4% of patients, whose samples were analyzed by next-generation sequencing (NGS), had genetic alterations identified with an average of 10.8 alterations/tumor throughout different tumor subtypes. However, mutations were not mutually exclusive. NGS in this study identified potentially targetable genetic alterations in the majority of patients tested, detected concurrent alterations and provided information on variants of unknown significance at this time but potentially targetable in the future. PMID:26934441

  3. Usefulness of cardiac meta-iodobenzylguanidine imaging to identify patients with chronic heart failure and left ventricular ejection fraction <35% at low risk for sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Tsutomu; Yamada, Takahisa; Tamaki, Shunsuke; Morita, Takashi; Furukawa, Yoshio; Iwasaki, Yusuke; Kawasaki, Masato; Kikuchi, Atsushi; Kondo, Takumi; Takahashi, Satoshi; Ishimi, Masashi; Hakui, Hideyuki; Ozaki, Tatsuhisa; Sato, Yoshihiro; Seo, Masahiro; Sakata, Yasushi; Fukunami, Masatake

    2015-06-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) at risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) are often treated with implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs). However, current criteria for device use that is based largely on left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) lead to many patients receiving ICDs that never deliver therapy. It is of clinical significance to identify patients who do not require ICDs. Although cardiac I-123 meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging provides prognostic information about CHF, whether it can identify patients with CHF who do not require an ICD remains unclear. We studied 81 patients with CHF and LVEF <35%, assessed by cardiac MIBG imaging at enrollment. The heart-to-mediastinal ratio (H/M) in delayed images and washout rates were divided into 6 grades from 0 to 5, according to the degree of deviation from control values. The study patients were classified into 3 groups: low (1 to 4), intermediate (5 to 7), and high (8 to 10), according to the MIBG scores defined as the sum of the H/M and washout rate scores. Sixteen patients died of SCD during a follow-up period. Patients with low MIBG score had a significantly lower risk of SCD than those with intermediate and high scores (low [n = 19], 0%; intermediate [n = 37], 19%; high [n = 25], 36%; p = 0.001). The positive predictive value of low MIBG score for identifying patients without SCD was 100%. In conclusion, the MIBG score can identify patients with CHF and LVEF <35% who have low risk of developing SCD. PMID:25851796

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging after Completion of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Can Accurately Discriminate between No Residual Carcinoma and Residual Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Patients with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seho; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Sohn, Joohyuk; Park, Hyung Seok; Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Seung Il; Park, Byeong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background The accurate evaluation of favorable response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) is critical to determine the extent of surgery. We investigated independent clinicopathological and radiological predictors to discriminate no residual carcinoma (ypT0) from residual ductal carcinoma in situ (ypTis) in breast cancer patients who received NCT. Patients and Methods Parameters of 117 patients attaining pathological complete response (CR) in the breast after NCT between January 2010 and December 2013 were retrospectively evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. All patients underwent mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after NCT. Results There were 67 (57.3%) patients with ypT0. These patients were associated with hormone receptor-negative status, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-negative tumors, and a higher likelihood of breast-conservation surgery. Baseline mammographic and MRI presentation of the main lesion, absence of associated microcalcifications, shape, posterior features, and absence of calcifications on ultrasound were significantly associated with ypT0. CR in mammography, ultrasound, or MRI after NCT was also related to ypT0. By multivariate analysis, independent predictors of ypT0 were the triple-negative subtype [Odds ratio (OR), 4.23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11–16.09] and CR in MRI after NCT (OR, 5.23; 95% CI, 1.53–17.85). Stratified analysis by breast cancer subtype demonstrated that MRI well predicted ypT0 in all subtypes except the HER2-positive subtype. In particular, of 40 triple-negative subtypes, 22 showed CR in MRI and 21 (95.5%) were ypT0 after NCT. Conclusion Among imaging modalities, breast MRI can potentially distinguish between ypT0 and ypTis after NCT, especially in patients with triple-negative breast cancer. This information can help clinicians evaluate tumor response to NCT and plan surgery for breast cancer patients of all subtypes except for those with HER2

  5. The use of Mycobacterium tuberculosis HspX and GlcB proteins to identify latent tuberculosis in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Bruna Daniella Souza; Tannus-Silva, Daniela Graner Schuwartz; Rabahi, Marcelo Fouad; Kipnis, Andre; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterised by the destruction of articular cartilage and bone damage. The chronic treatment of RA patients causes a higher susceptibility to infectious diseases such as tuberculosis (TB); one-third of the world’s population is latently infected (LTBI) with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The tuberculin skin test is used to identify individuals LTBI, but many studies have shown that this test is not suitable for RA patients. The goal of this work was to test the specific cellular immune responses to the Mtb malate synthase (GlcB) and heat shock protein X (HspX) antigens of RA patients and to correlate those responses with LTBI status. The T-helper (Th)1, Th17 and Treg-specific immune responses to the GlcB and HspX Mtb antigens were analysed in RA patients candidates for tumour necrosis factor-α blocker treatment. Our results demonstrated that LTBI RA patients had Th1-specific immune responses to GlcB and HspX. Patients were followed up over two years and 14.3% developed active TB. After the development of active TB, RA patients had increased numbers of Th17 and Treg cells, similar to TB patients. These results demonstrate that a GlcB and HspX antigen assay can be used as a diagnostic test to identify LTBI RA patients. PMID:24626307

  6. Subcortical and cortical gray matter differences between Kraepelinian and non-Kraepelinian schizophrenia patients identified using voxel-based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Molina, Vicente; Hernández, Juan A; Sanz, Javier; Paniagua, Juan C; Hernández, Ana I; Martín, Carmen; Matías, Juan; Calama, Julia; Bote, Berta

    2010-10-30

    The long-term outcome of schizophrenia patients may differ depending on their brain structure. This would be reflected in significant structural differences between poor-outcome (i.e., Kraepelinian) and non-Kraepelinian patients. To assess this possibility, we have evaluated the degree of deviation in brain structure in Kraepelinian patients with respect to controls and non-Kraepelinian schizophrenia patients. We used voxel-brain morphometry (VBM) to assess the differences in gray matter volume across the brain in the Kraepelinian group with respect to the healthy controls and non-Kraepelinian patients. Twenty-six Kraepelinian and 18 non-Kraepelinian schizophrenia patients and 41 healthy controls were included. With respect to the healthy controls, the Kraepelinian patients showed a very significant decrease in gray matter in the frontal, occipital, and limbic cortices, and, at a subcortical level, bilaterally in the striatum and thalamus. In comparison with the non-Kraepelinian patients, the Kraepelinian individuals continued to show a similar subcortical decrease. Thus, Kraepelinian patients may be characterized by a distinct pattern of brain abnormalities, in particular, in subcortical regions.

  7. Merging Children’s Oncology Group Data with an External Administrative Database Using Indirect Patient Identifiers: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yimei; Hall, Matt; Fisher, Brian T.; Seif, Alix E.; Huang, Yuan-Shung; Bagatell, Rochelle; Getz, Kelly D.; Alonzo, Todd A.; Gerbing, Robert B.; Sung, Lillian; Adamson, Peter C.; Gamis, Alan; Aplenc, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Clinical trials data from National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded cooperative oncology group trials could be enhanced by merging with external data sources. Merging without direct patient identifiers would provide additional patient privacy protections. We sought to develop and validate a matching algorithm that uses only indirect patient identifiers. Methods We merged the data from two Phase III Children’s Oncology Group (COG) trials for de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with the Pediatric Health Information Systems (PHIS). We developed a stepwise matching algorithm that used indirect identifiers including treatment site, gender, birth year, birth month, enrollment year and enrollment month. Results from the stepwise algorithm were compared against the direct merge method that used date of birth, treatment site, and gender. The indirect merge algorithm was developed on AAML0531 and validated on AAML1031. Results Of 415 patients enrolled on the AAML0531 trial at PHIS centers, we successfully matched 378 (91.1%) patients using the indirect stepwise algorithm. Comparison to the direct merge result suggested that 362 (95.7%) matches identified by the indirect merge algorithm were concordant with the direct merge result. When validating the indirect stepwise algorithm using the AAML1031 trial, we successfully matched 157 out of 165 patients (95.2%) and 150 (95.5%) of the indirectly merged matches were concordant with the directly merged matches. Conclusions These data demonstrate that patients enrolled on COG clinical trials can be successfully merged with PHIS administrative data using a stepwise algorithm based on indirect patient identifiers. The merged data sets can be used as a platform for comparative effectiveness and cost effectiveness studies. PMID:26606521

  8. Pediatric emergency department overcrowding: electronic medical record for identification of frequent, lower acuity visitors. Can we effectively identify patients for enhanced resource utilization?

    PubMed

    Simon, Harold K; Hirsh, Daniel A; Rogers, Alexander J; Massey, Robert; Deguzman, Michael A

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to utilize the electronic medical record system to identify frequent lower acuity patients presenting to the Pediatric Emergency Department and to evaluate their impact on Pediatric Emergency Department overcrowding and resource utilization. The electronic medical records (EMR) of two pediatric emergency centers were reviewed from August 2002 to November 2004. Pediatric Emergency Department encounters that met any of the following criteria were classified as Visits Necessitating Pediatric Emergency Department care (VNEC): Disposition of admission, transfer or deceased; Intravenous fluids (IVF) or medications (excluding single antipyretic or antihistamine); Radiology or laboratory tests (excluding Rapid Strep); Fractures, dislocations, and febrile seizures. All other visits were classified as non-VNEC. ICD-9 (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision) codes from the Pediatric Emergency Department encounters were defined as representing chronic or non-chronic conditions. Patients were then evaluated for utilization patterns, frequency of Emergency Department (ED) visits, chronic illness, and VNEC status. There were 153,390 patients identified, representing 255,496 visits (1.7 visits/patient, range 1-49). Overall, 189,998 visits (74%) required defined ED services and were categorized as VNEC, with the remaining 65,498 visits (26%) categorized as non-VNEC. With increasing visits, a steady decline in those requiring ED services was observed, with a plateau by visit six (VNEC 77% @ one visit, 64% @ six visits, p < 0.001). There were 141,765 patients seen fewer than four times, representing 92% of the patients and 74% of all visits (1.3 visits/patient, 225 visits/day). In contrast, 2664 patients disproportionately utilized the ED more than six times (maximum 49), representing 1.7% of patients and 9.8% of visits (9.4 visit/patient, 30 visits/day, p < 0.001). Excluding patients with chronic illness, 1074 patients also

  9. A computer-based interview to identify HIV risk behaviors and to assess patient preferences for HIV-related health states.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, G. D.; Owens, D. K.; Padian, N.; Cardinalli, A. B.; Sullivan, A. N.; Nease, R. F.

    1994-01-01

    We developed a computer-based utility assessment tool to assess the preferences of patients towards HIV-related health states and identify risk behaviors (both sexual and drug related) of the patient being interviewed. The reliability of the computer-based interview was assessed through comparison with person-to-person interviews. Our pilot study included 22 patients. Twelve of these patients were also interviewed by the research assistants in person-to-person interviews. The agreement between the person-to-person and computer-based interviews was excellent (3 discrepancies of 180 compared answers), and the majority of the patients preferred to use the computer to disclose sensitive information regarding risk behaviors. Our study suggests that assessment of patient preferences and risk factors can be performed reliably through a computer-based interview. PMID:7949919

  10. Incorporating the Last Four Digits of Social Security Numbers Substantially Improves Linking Patient Data from De-identified Hospital Claims Databases

    PubMed Central

    Naessens, James M; Visscher, Sue L; Peterson, Stephanie M; Swanson, Kristi M; Johnson, Matthew G; Rahman, Parvez A; Schindler, Joe; Sonneborn, Mark; Fry, Donald E; Pine, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective Assess algorithms for linking patients across de-identified databases without compromising confidentiality. Data Sources/Study Setting Hospital discharges from 11 Mayo Clinic hospitals during January 2008–September 2012 (assessment and validation data). Minnesota death certificates and hospital discharges from 2009 to 2012 for entire state (application data). Study Design Cross-sectional assessment of sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) for four linking algorithms tested by identifying readmissions and posthospital mortality on the assessment data with application to statewide data. Data Collection/Extraction Methods De-identified claims included patient gender, birthdate, and zip code. Assessment records were matched with institutional sources containing unique identifiers and the last four digits of Social Security number (SSNL4). Principal Findings Gender, birthdate, and five-digit zip code identified readmissions with a sensitivity of 98.0 percent and a PPV of 97.7 percent and identified postdischarge mortality with 84.4 percent sensitivity and 98.9 percent PPV. Inclusion of SSNL4 produced nearly perfect identification of readmissions and deaths. When applied statewide, regions bordering states with unavailable hospital discharge data had lower rates. Conclusion Addition of SSNL4 to administrative data, accompanied by appropriate data use and data release policies, can enable trusted repositories to link data with nearly perfect accuracy without compromising patient confidentiality. States maintaining centralized de-identified databases should add SSNL4 to data specifications. PMID:26073819

  11. Early assessment of minimal residual disease identifies patients at very high relapse risk in NPM-ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Damm-Welk, Christine; Mussolin, Lara; Zimmermann, Martin; Pillon, Marta; Klapper, Wolfram; Oschlies, Ilske; d'Amore, Emanuele S G; Reiter, Alfred; Woessmann, Wilhelm; Rosolen, Angelo

    2014-01-16

    Detection of minimal disseminated disease (MDD) at diagnosis correlates with relapse risk in children with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL). We investigated whether minimal residual disease (MRD) positivity by qualitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for Nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK during treatment identifies patients at the highest relapse risk. Blood and/or bone marrow of 180 patients with NPM-ALK-positive ALCL treated with Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster-type protocols were screened for NPM-ALK transcripts at diagnosis; 103 were found to be MDD-positive. MRD before the second therapy course could be evaluated in 52 MDD-positive patients. MRD positivity correlated with uncommon histology. The cumulative incidence of relapses (CIR) of 26 MDD-positive/MRD-positive patients (81% ± 8%) was significantly higher than the CIR of 26 MDD-positive/MRD-negative (31% ± 9%) and 77 MDD-negative patients (15% ± 5%) (P < .001). Five-year survival of MDD-negative and MDD-positive/MRD-negative patients was 91% ± 3% and 92% ± 5%, respectively, compared with 65% ± 9% of MDD-positive/MRD-positive patients (P < .001). Early evaluation of MRD in NPM-ALK-positive ALCL identifies patients with a very high relapse risk and inferior survival.

  12. Genome-wide association study identifies variants at 16p13 associated with survival in multiple myeloma patients

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Donglei; Martino, Alessandro; Serie, Daniel; Curtin, Karen; Campa, Daniele; Aftab, Blake; Bracci, Paige; Buda, Gabriele; Zhao, Yi; Caswell-Jin, Jennifer; Diasio, Robert; Dumontet, Charles; Dudziński, Marek; Fejerman, Laura; Greenberg, Alexandra; Huntsman, Scott; Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Jurczyszyn, Artur; Kumar, Shaji; Atanackovic, Djordje; Glenn, Martha; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.; Jones, Brandt; Lee, Adam; Marques, Herlander; Martin, Thomas; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin; Rajkumar, Vincent; Sainz, Juan; Vangsted, Annette Juul; Wątek, Marzena; Wolf, Jeffrey; Slager, Susan; Camp, Nicola J; Canzian, Federico; Vachon, Celine

    2015-01-01

    Here we perform the first genome wide association study (GWAS) of multiple myeloma (MM) survival. In a meta-analysis of 306 MM patients treated at UCSF and 239 patients treated at the Mayo clinic, we find a significant association between SNPs near the gene FOPNL on chromosome 16p13 and survival (rs72773978; p=6 × 10−10). Patients with the minor allele are at increased risk for mortality (HR 2.65; 95% CI: 1.94 – 3.58) relative to patients homozygous for the major allele. We replicate the association in the IMMEnSE cohort including 772 patients, and a University of Utah cohort including 318 patients (rs72773978 p=0.044). Using publically available data, we find that the minor allele was associated with increased expression of FOPNL and increased expression of FOPNL was associated with higher expression of centrosomal genes and with shorter survival.. Polymorphisms at the FOPNL locus are associated with survival among MM patients. PMID:26198393

  13. Genome-wide association study identifies variants at 16p13 associated with survival in multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Ziv, Elad; Dean, Eric; Hu, Donglei; Martino, Alessandro; Serie, Daniel; Curtin, Karen; Campa, Daniele; Aftab, Blake; Bracci, Paige; Buda, Gabriele; Zhao, Yi; Caswell-Jin, Jennifer; Diasio, Robert; Dumontet, Charles; Dudziński, Marek; Fejerman, Laura; Greenberg, Alexandra; Huntsman, Scott; Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Jurczyszyn, Artur; Kumar, Shaji; Atanackovic, Djordje; Glenn, Martha; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A; Jones, Brandt; Lee, Adam; Marques, Herlander; Martin, Thomas; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin; Rajkumar, Vincent; Sainz, Juan; Vangsted, Annette Juul; Wątek, Marzena; Wolf, Jeffrey; Slager, Susan; Camp, Nicola J; Canzian, Federico; Vachon, Celine

    2015-01-01

    Here we perform the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of multiple myeloma (MM) survival. In a meta-analysis of 306 MM patients treated at UCSF and 239 patients treated at the Mayo clinic, we find a significant association between SNPs near the gene FOPNL on chromosome 16p13 and survival (rs72773978; P=6 × 10(-10)). Patients with the minor allele are at increased risk for mortality (HR: 2.65; 95% CI: 1.94-3.58) relative to patients homozygous for the major allele. We replicate the association in the IMMEnSE cohort including 772 patients, and a University of Utah cohort including 318 patients (rs72773978 P=0.044). Using publicly available data, we find that the minor allele was associated with increased expression of FOPNL and increased expression of FOPNL was associated with higher expression of centrosomal genes and with shorter survival. Polymorphisms at the FOPNL locus are associated with survival among MM patients. PMID:26198393

  14. Clinical Prediction Rule for Patient Outcome after In-Hospital CPR: A New Model, Using Characteristics Present at Hospital Admission, to Identify Patients Unlikely to Benefit from CPR after In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Merja, Satyam; Lilien, Ryan H; Ryder, Hilary F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Physicians and patients frequently overestimate likelihood of survival after in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Discussions and decisions around resuscitation after in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest often take place without adequate or accurate information. METHODS We conducted a retrospective chart review of 470 instances of resuscitation after in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. Individuals were randomly assigned to a derivation cohort and a validation cohort. Logistic Regression and Linear Discriminant Analysis were used to perform multivariate analysis of the data. The resultant best performing rule was converted to a weighted integer tool, and thresholds of survival and nonsurvival were determined with an attempt to optimize sensitivity and specificity for survival. RESULTS A 10-feature rule, using thresholds for survival and nonsurvival, was created; the sensitivity of the rule on the validation cohort was 42.7% and specificity was 82.4%. In the Dartmouth Score (DS), the features of age (greater than 70 years of age), history of cancer, previous cardiovascular accident, and presence of coma, hypotension, abnormal PaO2, and abnormal bicarbonate were identified as the best predictors of nonsurvival. Angina, dementia, and chronic respiratory insufficiency were selected as protective features. CONCLUSIONS Utilizing information easily obtainable on admission, our clinical prediction tool, the DS, provides physicians individualized information about their patients’ probability of survival after in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. The DS may become a useful addition to medical expertise and clinical judgment in evaluating and communicating an individual’s probability of survival after in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest after it is validated by other cohorts. PMID:26448686

  15. Identifying the unmet health needs of patients with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism using a web-based needs assessment: implications for online interventions and peer-to-peer support

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with rare diseases such as congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) are dispersed, often challenged to find specialized care and face other health disparities. The internet has the potential to reach a wide audience of rare disease patients and can help connect patients and specialists. Therefore, this study aimed to: (i) determine if web-based platforms could be effectively used to conduct an online needs assessment of dispersed CHH patients; (ii) identify the unmet health and informational needs of CHH patients and (iii) assess patient acceptability regarding patient-centered, web-based interventions to bridge shortfalls in care. Methods A sequential mixed-methods design was used: first, an online survey was conducted to evaluate health promoting behavior and identify unmet health and informational needs of CHH men. Subsequently, patient focus groups were held to explore specific patient-identified targets for care and to examine the acceptability of possible online interventions. Descriptive statistics and thematic qualitative analyses were used. Results 105 male participants completed the online survey (mean age 37 ± 11, range 19–66 years) representing a spectrum of patients across a broad socioeconomic range and all but one subject had adequate healthcare literacy. The survey revealed periods of non-adherence to treatment (34/93, 37%) and gaps in healthcare (36/87, 41%) exceeding one year. Patient focus groups identified lasting psychological effects related to feelings of isolation, shame and body-image concerns. Survey respondents were active internet users, nearly all had sought CHH information online (101/105, 96%), and they rated the internet, healthcare providers, and online community as equally important CHH information sources. Focus group participants were overwhelmingly positive regarding online interventions/support with links to reach expert healthcare providers and for peer-to-peer support. Conclusion The web

  16. Patient-Based Transcriptome-Wide Analysis Identify Interferon and Ubiquination Pathways as Potential Predictors of Influenza A Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Long Truong; Tolfvenstam, Thomas; Ooi, Eng Eong; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Naim, Ahmand Nazri Mohamed; Ho, Eliza Xin Pei; Ong, Swee Hoe; Wertheim, Heiman F.; Fox, Annette; Van Vinh Nguyen, Chau; Nghiem, Ngoc My; Ha, Tuan Manh; Thi Ngoc Tran, Anh; Tambayah, Paul; Lin, Raymond; Sangsajja, Chariya; Manosuthi, Weerawat; Chuchottaworn, Chareon; Sansayunh, Piamlarp; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee; Suntarattiwong, Piyarat; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; de Jong, Menno D.; Farrar, Jeremy; van Doorn, H. Rogier; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd

    2014-01-01

    Background The influenza A virus is an RNA virus that is responsible for seasonal epidemics worldwide with up to five million cases of severe illness and 500,000 deaths annually according to the World Health Organization estimates. The factors associated with severe diseases are not well defined, but more severe disease is more often seen among persons aged >65 years, infants, pregnant women, and individuals of any age with underlying health conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings Using gene expression microarrays, the transcriptomic profiles of influenza-infected patients with severe (N = 11), moderate (N = 40) and mild (N = 83) symptoms were compared with the febrile patients of unknown etiology (N = 73). We found that influenza-infected patients, regardless of their clinical outcomes, had a stronger induction of antiviral and cytokine responses and a stronger attenuation of NK and T cell responses in comparison with those with unknown etiology. More importantly, we found that both interferon and ubiquitination signaling were strongly attenuated in patients with the most severe outcomes in comparison with those with moderate and mild outcomes, suggesting the protective roles of these pathways in disease pathogenesis. Conclusion/Significances The attenuation of interferon and ubiquitination pathways may associate with the clinical outcomes of influenza patients. PMID:25365328

  17. Long-term nursing care of elderly people: identifying ethically problematic experiences among patients, relatives and nurses in Finland.

    PubMed

    Teeri, Sari; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Välimäki, Maritta

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore ethically problematic situations in the long-term nursing care of elderly people. It was assumed that greater awareness of ethical problems in caring for elderly people helps to ensure ethically high standards of nursing care. To obtain a broad perspective on the current situation, the data for this study were collected among elderly patients, their relatives and nurses in one long-term care institution in Finland. The patients (n = 10) were interviewed, while the relatives, (n = 17) and nurses (n = 9) wrote an essay. Interpretation of the data was based on qualitative content analysis. Problematic experiences were divided into three categories concerning patients' psychological, physical and social integrity. In the case of psychological integrity, the problems were seen as being related to treatment, self-determination and obtaining information; for physical integrity, they were related to physical abuse and lack of individualized care; and for social integrity, to loneliness and social isolation. This study provided no information on the prevalence of ethical problems. However, it is clear from the results that patient integrity warrants more attention in the nursing care of elderly patients.

  18. ST-T isointegral analysis of exercise stress body surface mapping for identifying ischemic areas in patients with angina pectoris

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, T.; Kawakubo, K.; Toda, I.; Mashima, S.; Ohtake, T.; Iio, M.; Sugimoto, T.

    1988-05-01

    ST-T isointegral analysis of body surface mapping was used in an attempt to localize ischemic areas on exercise tests. In 28 patients with angina pectoris and 10 healthy subjects, body surface potential was recorded with 87 leads, and ST isopotential and ST-T isointegral maps were constructed. In all 10 healthy subjects, the basic pattern of the ST-T isointegral map showed no significant change after exercise. In 23 of 28 patients with angina pectoris (82%), alterations in the ST-T isointegral map after exercise were observed. They were divided into four types (anterior, inferoposterior, lateral, and global) according to the distribution of negative values, which were well correlated with the extent of ischemic area determined by thallium myocardial scintigraphy and coronary angiography. The postexercise ST-T isointegral map was normalized after administration of nitroglycerin in four of five patients. In five patients (18%) who did not show abnormalities on the postexercise ST-T isointegral map, the magnitude of maximal ST depression was significantly smaller than that observed in the other 23 patients with angina pectoris (0.14 vs 0.23 mV on the average, p less than 0.05). It was concluded that the exercise test with ST-T isointegral mapping is a new method for noninvasive detection of location and severity of ischemic regions.

  19. Application of systematic coronary risk evaluation chart to identify chronic myeloid leukemia patients at risk of cardiovascular diseases during nilotinib treatment.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Molica, Matteo; Zacheo, Irene; Serrao, Alessandra; Alimena, Giuliana

    2015-03-01

    atherosclerotic events at 48 months was 8.5 % (95 % CI, 4.55-14.07): None of the low-risk patients according to the SCORE chart experienced atherosclerotic events compared to 10 % in the moderate risk category and 29 % in the high risk (p = 0.002). Atherosclerotic-free survival was 100, 89, and 69 % in the low, moderate, and high-risk population, respectively (p = 0.001). SCORE chart evaluation at disease baseline could be a valid tool to identify patients at high risk of atherosclerotic events during nilotinib treatment.

  20. Application of systematic coronary risk evaluation chart to identify chronic myeloid leukemia patients at risk of cardiovascular diseases during nilotinib treatment.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Molica, Matteo; Zacheo, Irene; Serrao, Alessandra; Alimena, Giuliana

    2015-03-01

    atherosclerotic events at 48 months was 8.5 % (95 % CI, 4.55-14.07): None of the low-risk patients according to the SCORE chart experienced atherosclerotic events compared to 10 % in the moderate risk category and 29 % in the high risk (p = 0.002). Atherosclerotic-free survival was 100, 89, and 69 % in the low, moderate, and high-risk population, respectively (p = 0.001). SCORE chart evaluation at disease baseline could be a valid tool to identify patients at high risk of atherosclerotic events during nilotinib treatment. PMID:25304102

  1. Identifying core nursing sensitive outcomes associated with the most frequently used North American Nursing Diagnosis Association-International nursing diagnoses for patients with cerebrovascular disease in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunjoo; Park, Hyejin; Whyte, James; Kim, Youngae; Park, Sang Youn

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the core nursing sensitive outcomes according to the most frequently used five North American Nursing Diagnosis Association-International for patients with cerebrovascular disease using the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC). A cross-sectional survey design was used. First, nursing problems were identified through 78 charts review, and then linkages between each of nursing problems and nursing sensitive outcomes were established and validated by an expert group for questionnaires. Second, 80 nurses working in the neurosurgical intensive care unit and neurosurgery departments of five Korean hospitals were asked to evaluate how important each outcome is and how often each outcome used to evaluate patient outcomes using 5-point Likert scale. Although there were some differences in the core outcomes identified for each of the nursing problem, consciousness, cognitive orientation, neurologic status and communication were considered the most critical nursing sensitive outcomes for patients suffering cerebrovascular disease. Core nursing sensitive outcomes of patients suffering cerebrovascular disease using NOC were identified to measure the effectiveness of nursing care.

  2. Application of a human factors classification framework for patient safety to identify precursor and contributing factors to adverse clinical incidents in hospital.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Rebecca J; Williamson, Ann; Molesworth, Brett

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify temporal precursor and associated contributing factors for adverse clinical incidents in a hospital setting using the Human Factors Classification Framework (HFCF) for patient safety. A random sample of 498 clinical incidents were reviewed. The framework identified key precursor events (PE), contributing factors (CF) and the prime causes of incidents. Descriptive statistics and correspondence analysis were used to examine incident characteristics. Staff action was the most common type of PE identified. Correspondence analysis for all PEs that involved staff action by error type showed that rule-based errors were strongly related to performing medical or monitoring tasks or the administration of medication. Skill-based errors were strongly related to misdiagnoses. Factors relating to the organisation (66.9%) or the patient (53.2%) were the most commonly identified CFs. The HFCF for patient safety was able to identify patterns of causation for the clinical incidents, highlighting the need for targeted preventive approaches, based on an understanding of how and why incidents occur. PMID:26360210

  3. Simple Prognostic Criteria can Definitively Identify Patients who Develop Severe Versus Non-Severe Dengue Disease, or Have Other Febrile Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Falconar, Andrew K.I.; Romero-Vivas, Claudia M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Severe dengue disease (SDD) (DHF/DSS: dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome) results from either primary or secondary dengue virus (DENV) infections, which occur 4 - 6 days after the onset of fever. As yet, there are no definitive clinical or hematological criteria that can specifically identify SDD patients during the early acute febrile-phase of disease (day 0 - 3: < 72 hours). This study was performed during a SDD (DHF/DSS) epidemic to: 1) identify the DENV serotypes that caused SDD during primary or secondary DENV infections; 2) identify simple clinical and hematological criteria that could significantly discriminate between patients who subsequently developed SDD versus non-SDD (N-SDD), or had a non-DENV fever of unknown origin (FUO) during day 0 - 3 of fever; 3) assess whether DENV serotype co-infections resulted in SDD. Methods First serum samples, with clinical and hematological criteria, were collected from 100 patients during the early acute febrile-phase (day 0 - 3: < 72 hours), assessed for DENV or FUO infections by IgM- and IgG-capture ELISAs on paired serum samples and by DENV isolations, and subsequently graded as SDD, N-SDD or FUO patients. Results In this study: 1) Thirty-three patients had DENV infections, predominantly secondary DENV-2 infections, including each SDD (DHF/DSS) case; 2) Secondary DENV-2/-3 and DENV-2/-4 serotype co-infections however resulted in N-SDD; 3) Each patient who subsequently developed SDD, but none of the others, displayed three clinical criteria: abdominal pain, conjunctival injection and veni-puncture bleeding, therefore each of these criteria provided definitively significant prognostic (P < 0.001) values; 4) Petechia, positive tourniquet tests and hepatomegaly, and neutrophilia or leukopenia also significantly identified those who: a) subsequently developed SDD versus N-SDD, or had a FUO; b) subsequently developed SDD versus N-SDD; c) subsequently developed N-SDD versus FUOs, respectively

  4. Limitations of the Patient Health Questionnaire in Identifying Anxiety and Depression in Community Mental Health: Many Cases Are Undetected

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eack, Shaun M.; Greeno, Catherine G.; Lee, Bong-Jae

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the concordance between the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) in diagnosing anxiety and depressive disorders. Method: Fifty women seeking psychiatric services for their children at two mental health centers in western Pennsylvania were assessed for anxiety and…

  5. Dual isotope thallium and indium antimyosin SPECT imaging to identify acute infarct patients at further ischemic risk

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.L.; Seldin, D.W.; Keller, A.M.; Wall, R.M.; Bhatia, K.; Bingham, C.O. III; Tresgallo, M.E. )

    1990-01-01

    Forty-two patients (28 men and 14 women) with acute myocardial infarction (35 Q, seven non-Q wave) were injected with 2.0 mCi indium 111-labeled antimyosin (AM) monoclonal antibody (111In AM) within 48 hours of the onset of chest pain. Forty-eight hours later (72-96 hours after onset of chest pain), patients were injected with 2.2 mCi thallium 201, and two sets of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images were obtained simultaneously using dual energy windows set for the 247 keV indium photopeak and the 70 keV thallium peak. Seventeen patients had repeat scans at 4 hours. 111In AM uptake and 201Tl defects were localized to one or more of 24 coronal and sagittal segments. Scans with only 201Tl defects and corresponding 111In AM uptake were classified as matches; scans with unmatched 201Tl defects in addition to matching regions corresponding to electrocardiographic infarct location were classified as mismatches; and scans with 201Tl and 111In AM uptake in the same segments were classified as overlap. Scan patterns were correlated with clinical evidence for residual ischemia occurring within 6 weeks of infarct and including infarct extension, recurrent angina, and positive predischarge low-level or 6-week symptom-limited stress tests and with coronary anatomy. Fourteen patients had only matching patterns (group 1), 23 had mismatches (group 2), and five had 201Tl-111In overlap as the predominant pattern. None of the patients in group 1 had previous myocardial infarction; in each, the matched area corresponded to the Q wave location on electrocardiogram, and none had further in-hospital ischemic events or positive stress tests.

  6. The dilemma of complicated shunt valves: How to identify patients with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus after aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage who will benefit from a simple valve?

    PubMed Central

    von der Brelie, Christian; Meier, Ullrich; Gräwe, Alexander; Lemcke, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sophisticated shunt valves provide the possibility of pressure adjustment and antisiphon control but have a higher probability of valve dysfunction especially in a posthemorrhagic setting. The aim of the present study is to analyze the clinical outcome of patients with shunt dependent posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus after aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in order to identify patients who would benefit from a simple differential pressure valve. Methods: From 2000 to 2013, 547 patients with aneurysmatic SAH were treated at our institution, 114 underwent ventricular shunt placement (21.1%). 47 patients with available pre- and post-operative computed tomography scans, and an available follow-up of minimum 6 months were included. In order to measure the survival time which a nonprogrammable differential pressure valve would have had in an individual patient we defined the initial equalized shunt survival time (IESS). IESS is the time until surgical revisions of fixed differential pressure or flow-regulated valves for the treatment of over- or under-drainage as well as re-programming of adjustable valves due to over- or under-drainage. Results: Twenty patients were treated with fixed differential pressure valves, 15 patients were treated with flow-regulated valves, and 12 underwent ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt placement with differential pressure valves assisted by a gravitational unit. Patients who reacted with remarkable changes of the ventricular width after the insertion of external ventricular drainage (EVD), before shunt placement, showed a significantly longer IESS. Conclusions: Decline of the ventricular width after EVD placement was a predictor for successful VP shunt therapy in the later course of disease. Possibly, this could allow identifying patients who benefit from a simple differential pressure valve or a flow-regulated valve, and thus could possibly avoid valve-associated complications of a programmable valve in the later course of

  7. Immunoglobulin heavy/light chain ratios improve paraprotein detection and monitoring, identify residual disease and correlate with survival in multiple myeloma patients

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, H; Milosavljevic, D; Zojer, N; Faint, J M; Bradwell, A R; Hübl, W; Harding, S J

    2013-01-01

    The novel heavy/light chain (HLC) assay was used for the detection and measurement of monoclonal immunoglobulins, response evaluation and prognostication. This test allows identification and quantification of the different light chain types of each immunoglobulin class (for example, IgGκ and IgGλ) and enables calculation of ratios of monoclonal/polyclonal immunoglobulin (HLC ratio). Sequential sera of 156 patients with IgG or IgA myeloma started on first-line therapy and followed for a median of 46.1 months were analyzed. Results were compared with those obtained with conventional techniques (serum protein electrophoresis (SPEP), immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE), nephelometry (NEPH), and the free light chain test (FLC)). Our data show that the HLC assay allowed quantification of monoclonal proteins not accurately measurable by SPEP or NEPH. When both HLC and FLC testing were applied for response assessment, clonal excess was noted in 14/31 patients with complete response (CR). HLC ratio indicated presence of disease in 8/31 patients who achieved CR and, in sequential studies indicated evolving relapse in three patients before IFE became positive. Highly abnormal HLC ratios at presentation were significantly associated with shorter overall survival (40.5 months vs median not reached, P=0.016). Multivariate analysis revealed HLC ratio (P=0.03) and β2-microglobulin (P<0.01) as independent risk factors for survival. PMID:22955329

  8. Prognosis Can Be Predicted More Accurately Using Pre- and Postchemoradiotherapy Carcinoembryonic Antigen Levels Compared to Only Prechemoradiotherapy Carcinoembryonic Antigen Level in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients Who Received Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sung, SooYoon; Son, Seok Hyun; Kay, Chul Seung; Lee, Yoon Suk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of a change in the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level during neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. A total of 110 patients with clinical T3/T4 or node-positive disease underwent nCRT and curative total mesorectal resection from February 2006 to December 2013. Serum CEA level was measured before nCRT, after nCRT, and then again after surgery. A cut-off value for CEA level to predict prognosis was determined using the maximally selected log-rank test. According to the test, patients were classified into 3 groups, based on their CEA levels (Group A: pre-CRT CEA ≤3.2; Group B: pre-CRT CEA level >3.2 and post-CRT CEA ≤2.8; and Group C: pre-CRT CEA >3.2 and post-CRT CEA >2.8). The median follow-up time was 31.1 months. The 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates of Group A and Group B were similar, while Group C showed a significantly lower 3-year DFS rate (82.5% vs. 89.5% vs. 55.1%, respectively, P = 0.001). Other clinicopathological factors that showed statistical significance on univariate analysis were pre-CRT CEA, post-CRT CEA, tumor distance from the anal verge, surgery type, downstage, pathologic N stage, margin status and perineural invasion. The CEA group (P = 0.001) and tumor distance from the anal verge (P = 0.044) were significant prognostic factors for DFS on multivariate analysis. Post-CRT CEA level may be a useful prognostic factor in patients whose prognosis cannot be predicted exactly by pre-CRT CEA levels alone in the neoadjuvant treatment era. Combined pre-CRT CEA and post-CRT CEA levels enable us to predict prognosis more accurately and determine treatment and follow-up policies. Further large-scale studies are necessary to validate the prognostic value of CEA levels. PMID:26962798

  9. An Estimation for Availability of Battery less LF Band RFID Tag to Identify Patients in Operation Room from Viewpoint of Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Ryosuke

    Nowadays, medical accidents increase in Japanese patient environment. Especially, misidentification of the patients occurred in operation room of higher level hospitals. It is considered that the great deals of accidents are due to mistakes by nurse. However, the accidents are prevented by management of patients. If a suitable patient identification system is developed, the accidents are prevented. In this study, new patient identification system using battery less LF band RFID(Radio Frequency Identification) is proposed. In the method, battery less RFID tag is attached to patient. In operation room, patient is identified before operation using the proposed system. However, identification distance of RFID is small. It is important that extension of the distance. In this study, antennas of RFID tag and sensor are designed. Two types of tag are proposed. One of them is set on wristband. An antenna for the tag is designed as a circular shape with 30mm in diameter. The other one is shaped like a necklace. The antenna is also designed 220mm, 240mm and 260mm in diameter. Using necklace type new antenna, sufficient identification distance for detection of the tag in the operation room is realized. The patient identification is realized using the proposed system

  10. Sequencing EVC and EVC2 identifies mutations in two-thirds of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Tompson, Stuart W J; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L; Blair, Helen J; Barton, Stephanie; Navarro, Victoria; Robson, Joanne L; Wright, Michael J; Goodship, Judith A

    2007-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is caused by mutations in EVC and EVC2, genes in a divergent orientation separated by only 2.6 kb. We systematically sought mutations in both genes in a panel of 65 affected individuals to assess the proportion of cases resulting from mutations in each gene. We PCR amplified and sequenced the coding exons of both genes. We investigated mutations that could affect splicing by in vitro splicing assays and cDNA analysis. We have identified EVC mutations in 20 cases (31%); in all of these we have detected the mutation on each allele. We have identified EVC2 mutations in 25 cases (38%); in 22 of these we have isolated a mutation on each allele. The majority of the mutations introduce a premature termination codon. We sequenced the region between the two genes in 10 of the 20 cases in which we had not identified a mutation in either gene, revealing only one SNP that was not a common polymorphism. As we have not identified mutations in either gene in 20 cases (31%) it is possible that there is further genetic heterogeneity.

  11. SU-E-I-75: Development of New Biological Fingerprints for Patient Recognition to Identify Misfiled Images in a PACS Server

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Y; Yoon, Y; Iwase, K; Yasumatsu, S; Matsunobu, Y; Morishita, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We are trying to develop an image-searching technique to identify misfiled images in a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) server by using five biological fingerprints: the whole lung field, cardiac shadow, superior mediastinum, lung apex, and right lower lung. Each biological fingerprint in a chest radiograph includes distinctive anatomical structures to identify misfiled images. The whole lung field was less effective for evaluating the similarity between two images than the other biological fingerprints. This was mainly due to the variation in the positioning for chest radiographs. The purpose of this study is to develop new biological fingerprints that could reduce influence of differences in the positioning for chest radiography. Methods: Two hundred patients were selected randomly from our database (36,212 patients). These patients had two images each (current and previous images). Current images were used as the misfiled images in this study. A circumscribed rectangular area of the lung and the upper half of the rectangle were selected automatically as new biological fingerprints. These biological fingerprints were matched to all previous images in the database. The degrees of similarity between the two images were calculated for the same and different patients. The usefulness of new the biological fingerprints for automated patient recognition was examined in terms of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: Area under the ROC curves (AUCs) for the circumscribed rectangle of the lung, upper half of the rectangle, and whole lung field were 0.980, 0.994, and 0.950, respectively. The new biological fingerprints showed better performance in identifying the patients correctly than the whole lung field. Conclusion: We have developed new biological fingerprints: circumscribed rectangle of the lung and upper half of the rectangle. These new biological fingerprints would be useful for automated patient identification system

  12. Genome-wide association study identifies TH1 pathway genes associated with lung function in asthmatic patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xingnan; Hawkins, Gregory A.; Ampleford, Elizabeth J.; Moore, Wendy C.; Li, Huashi; Hastie, Annette T.; Howard, Timothy D.; Boushey, Homer A.; Busse, William W.; Calhoun, William J.; Castro, Mario; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Israel, Elliot; Lemanske, Robert F.; Szefler, Stanley J.; Wasserman, Stephen I.; Wenzel, Sally E.; Peters, Stephen P.; Meyers, Deborah A.; Bleecker, Eugene R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies in general populations of European descent have identified 28 loci for lung function. Objective We sought to identify novel lung function loci specifically for asthma and to confirm lung function loci identified in general populations. Methods Genome-wide association studies of lung function (percent predicted FEV1 [ppFEV1], percent predicted forced vital capacity, and FEV1/forced vital capacity ratio) were performed in 4 white populations of European descent (n = 1544), followed by meta-analyses. Results Seven of 28 previously identified lung function loci (HHIP, FAM13A, THSD4, GSTCD, NOTCH4-AGER, RARB, and ZNF323) identified in general populations were confirmed at single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) levels (P < .05). Four of 32 loci (IL12A, IL12RB1, STAT4, and IRF2) associated with ppFEV1 (P < 10−4) belong to the TH1 or IL-12 cytokine family pathway. By using a linear additive model, these 4 TH1 pathway SNPs cumulatively explained 2.9% to 7.8% of the variance in ppFEV1 values in 4 populations (P = 3 × 10−11). Genetic scores of these 4 SNPs were associated with ppFEV1 values (P = 2 × 10−7) and the American Thoracic Society severe asthma classification (P = .005) in the Severe Asthma Research Program population. TH2 pathway genes (IL13, TSLP, IL33, and IL1RL1) conferring asthma susceptibility were not associated with lung function. Conclusion Genes involved in airway structure/remodeling are associated with lung function in both general populations and asthmatic subjects. TH1 pathway genes involved in anti-virus/bacterial infection and inflammation modify lung function in asthmatic subjects. Genes associated with lung function that might affect asthma severity are distinct from those genes associated with asthma susceptibility. PMID:23541324

  13. HBcrAg Identifies Patients Failing to Achieve HBeAg Seroconversion Treated with Pegylated Interferon Alfa-2b

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hui; Yang, Rui-Feng; Li, Xiao-He; Jin, Qian; Wei, Lai

    2016-01-01

    Background: We aimed to evaluate the usefulness of serum hepatitis B virus core-related antigens (HBcrAg) for predicting hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion in HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B patients treated with conventional interferon (IFN) alfa-2b or pegylated IFN. Methods: Fifty-eight patients were enrolled: 29 for the training group and 29 for the validating group. HBcrAg was measured at baseline, week 12, end of the treatment, and 12- and 24-week follow-ups. Sixteen patients in the training group were enrolled in the long-term follow-up (LTFU), during which time the dynamics of the HBcrAg was monitored. Results: The serum HBcrAg level gradually declined during treatment among the HBeAg seroconversion patients of the training group (from baseline, week 12, end of the treatment, 12-week follow-up to 24-week follow-up were 110,245 kU/ml, 3760 kU/ml, 7410 kU/ml, 715 kU/ml, 200 kU/ml, respectively). HBcrAg <19,565 kU/ml at week 24, HBcrAg <34,225 kU/ml at 12-week follow-up, and HBcrAg decrease ≥0.565 log10 kU/ml from the baseline to the end of treatment (EOT) had negative predictive values (NPVs) of 100% for HBeAg seroconversion at the end of follow-up, whereas the positive predictive values (PPVs) were 30.77%, 26.67%, and 25.00%, respectively. The patients with HBeAg seroconversion at the end of 24-week follow-up remained in seroconversion during the LTFU, during which time their serum HBcrAg levels steadily declined or even became undetectable, ranging from 0 to 2.1 kU/ml. Conclusions: Effective antiviral treatment can decrease HBcrAg levels in the serum. The NPVs of HBcrAg for predicting HBeAg seroconversion at 24-week follow-up was 100%, but the PPVs were not satisfactory (all <31%). The serum HBcrAg levels of the patients with HBeAg seroconversion at the end of the 24-week follow-up steadily declined or even became undetectable during the LTFU. PMID:27625094

  14. Identifying factors associated with clinical success in patients treated with NASHA®/Dx injection for fecal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Howard; Barrett, Andrew C; Wolf, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Injection with the bulking agent consisting of non-animal stabilized hyaluronic acid/dextranomer (NASHA®/Dx) is well tolerated and efficacious for the treatment of fecal incontinence (FI); however, the patient population that may derive maximum benefit has not been established. This post hoc responder analysis assessed demographic and baseline characteristics predictive of responsiveness to NASHA/Dx treatment. Methods Adults with a Cleveland Clinic Florida fecal incontinence score (CCFIS) ≥10 were randomized to receive NASHA/Dx or sham treatment. The primary end point was response to treatment (ie, decrease from baseline of ≥50% in number of FI episodes) at 6 months; a prespecified secondary end point was change in fecal incontinence quality of life (FIQL) score at 6 months. Post hoc subgroup analyses were performed for baseline and demographic characteristics and prior FI treatments. Results Overall, response to treatment was significantly greater with NASHA/Dx versus sham injection (52.7% vs 32.1%; P=0.0089). All subgroups analyzed demonstrated evidence of improvement, favoring NASHA/Dx versus sham treatment for both response to treatment and change in the FIQL coping/behavior subscale score. For the primary end point, a significantly greater percentage of patients with CCFIS ≤15, FI symptoms ≤5 years’ duration, or obstetric causes of FI responded to NASHA/Dx treatment versus patients receiving sham treatment (51.1% vs 28.3%, P=0.0169; 55.4% vs 25.7%, P=0.0026; and 53.6% vs 23.1%, P=0.0191, respectively). The mean change in the FIQL coping/behavior score significantly favored NASHA/Dx versus sham treatment for patients with CCFIS ≤15 (P=0.0371), FI symptoms ≤5 years’ duration (P=0.0289), or obstetric causes of FI (P=0.0384). Patients without a history of specific FI treatments (eg, antidiarrheal medications, biofeedback, surgery) were more likely to respond to NASHA/Dx versus sham treatment for both end points. Conclusion Although all

  15. Identifying Network Perturbation in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Logsdon, Benjamin A.; Gentles, Andrew J.; Lee, Su-In

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational framework, called DISCERN (DIfferential SparsE Regulatory Network), to identify informative topological changes in gene-regulator dependence networks inferred on the basis of mRNA expression datasets within distinct biological states. DISCERN takes two expression datasets as input: an expression dataset of diseased tissues from patients with a disease of interest and another expression dataset from matching normal tissues. DISCERN estimates the extent to which each gene is perturbed—having distinct regulator connectivity in the inferred gene-regulator dependencies between the disease and normal conditions. This approach has distinct advantages over existing methods. First, DISCERN infers conditional dependencies between candidate regulators and genes, where conditional dependence relationships discriminate the evidence for direct interactions from indirect interactions more precisely than pairwise correlation. Second, DISCERN uses a new likelihood-based scoring function to alleviate concerns about accuracy of the specific edges inferred in a particular network. DISCERN identifies perturbed genes more accurately in synthetic data than existing methods to identify perturbed genes between distinct states. In expression datasets from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), breast cancer and lung cancer, genes with high DISCERN scores in each cancer are enriched for known tumor drivers, genes associated with the biological processes known to be important in the disease, and genes associated with patient prognosis, in the respective cancer. Finally, we show that DISCERN can uncover potential mechanisms underlying network perturbation by explaining observed epigenomic activity patterns in cancer and normal tissue types more accurately than alternative methods, based on the available epigenomic data from the ENCODE project. PMID:27145341

  16. Identifying Engineering, Clinical and Patient's Metrics for Evaluating and Quantifying Performance of Brain-Machine Interface (BMI) Systems

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Vidal, Jose L.

    2015-01-01

    Brain-machine interface (BMI) devices have unparalleled potential to restore functional movement capabilities to stroke, paralyzed and amputee patients. Although BMI systems have achieved success in a handful of investigative studies, translation of closed-loop neuroprosthetic devices from the laboratory to the market is challenged by gaps in the scientific data regarding long-term device reliability and safety, uncertainty in the regulatory, market and reimbursement pathways, lack of metrics for evaluating and quantifying performance in BMI systems, as well as patient-acceptance challenges that impede their fast and effective translation to the end user. This review focuses on the identification of engineering, clinical and user's BMI metrics for new and existing BMI applications. PMID:26330746

  17. Three-dimensional quantitative imaging of telomeres in buccal cells identifies mild, moderate, and severe Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Shubha; Glogowska, Aleksandra; McAvoy, Elizabeth; Righolt, Christiaan; Rutherford, Jaclyn; Willing, Cornelia; Banik, Upama; Ruthirakuhan, Myuri; Mai, Sabine; Garcia, Angeles

    2014-01-01

    Using three-dimensional (3D) telomeric analysis of buccal cells of 82 Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and cognitively normal age and gender-matched controls, we have for the first time examined changes in the 3D nuclear telomeric architecture of buccal cells among levels of AD severity based on five 3D parameters: i) telomere length, ii) telomere number, iii) telomere aggregation, iv) nuclear volume, and v) a/c ratio, a measure of spatial telomere distribution. Our data indicate that matched controls have significantly different 3D telomere profiles compared to mild, moderate, and severe AD patients (p < 0.0001). Distinct profiles were also evident for each AD severity group. An increase in telomere number and aggregation concomitant with a decrease in telomere length from normal to severe AD defines the individual stages of the disease (p < 0.0001).

  18. Dynamical System Modeling of Immune Reconstitution after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation Identifies Patients at Risk for Adverse Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Toor, Amir A.; Sabo, Roy T.; Roberts, Catherine H.; Moore, Bonny L.; Salman, Salman R.; Scalora, Allison F.; Aziz, May T.; Shubar Ali, Ali S.; Hall, Charles E.; Meier, Jeremy; Thorn, Radhika M.; Wang, Elaine; Song, Shiyu; Miller, Kristin; Rizzo, Kathryn; Clark, William B.; McCarty, John M.; Chung, Harold M.; Manjili, Masoud H.; Neale, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Systems that evolve over time and follow mathematical laws as they evolve are called dynamical systems. Lymphocyte recovery and clinical outcomes in 41 allograft recipients conditioned using antithymocyte globulin (ATG) and 4.5-Gy total body irradiation were studied to determine if immune reconstitution could be described as a dynamical system. Survival, relapse, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were not significantly different in 2 cohorts of patients receiving different doses of ATG. However, donor-derived CD3+ cell reconstitution was superior in the lower ATG dose cohort, and there were fewer instances of donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI). Lymphoid recovery was plotted in each individual over time and demonstrated 1 of 3 sigmoid growth patterns: Pattern A (n = 15) had rapid growth with high lymphocyte counts, pattern B (n = 14) had slower growth with intermediate recovery, and pattern C (n = 10) had poor lymphocyte reconstitution. There was a significant association between lymphocyte recovery patterns and both the rate of change of donor-derived CD3+ at day 30 after stem cell transplantation (SCT) and clinical outcomes. GVHD was observed more frequently with pattern A, relapse and DLI more so with pattern C, with a consequent survival advantage in patients with patterns A and B. We conclude that evaluating immune reconstitution after SCT as a dynamical system may differentiate patients at risk of adverse outcomes and allow early intervention to modulate that risk. PMID:25849208

  19. Two high throughput technologies to detect segmental aneuploidies identify new Williams‐Beuren syndrome patients with atypical deletions

    PubMed Central

    Howald, C; Merla, G; Digilio, M C; Amenta, S; Lyle, R; Deutsch, S; Choudhury, U; Bottani, A; Antonarakis, S E; Fryssira, H; Dallapiccola, B; Reymond, A

    2006-01-01

    Objective To develop and compare two new technologies for diagnosing a contiguous gene syndrome, the Williams‐Beuren syndrome (WBS). Methods The first proposed method, named paralogous sequence quantification (PSQ), is based on the use of paralogous sequences located on different chromosomes and quantification of specific mismatches present at these loci using pyrosequencing technology. The second exploits quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) to assess the relative quantity of an analysed locus. Results A correct and unambiguous diagnosis was obtained for 100% of the analysed samples with either technique (n = 165 and n = 155, respectively). These methods allowed the identification of two patients with atypical deletions in a cohort of 182 WBS patients. Both patients presented with mild facial anomalies, mild mental retardation with impaired visuospatial cognition, supravalvar aortic stenosis, and normal growth indices. These observations are consistent with the involvement of GTF2IRD1 or GTF2I in some of the WBS facial features. Conclusions Both PSQ and QPCR are robust, easy to interpret, and simple to set up. They represent a competitive alternative for the diagnosis of segmental aneuploidies in clinical laboratories. They have advantages over fluorescence in situ hybridisation or microsatellites/SNP genotyping for detecting short segmental aneuploidies as the former is costly and labour intensive while the latter depends on the informativeness of the polymorphisms. PMID:15994861

  20. Utility of Iron Staining in Identifying the Cause of Renal Allograft Dysfunction in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingchun; Doshi, Mona; Khan, Salman; Li, Wei; Zhang, Ping L

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell nephropathy (SCN) is associated with iron/heme deposition in proximal renal tubules and related acute tubular injury (ATI). Here we report the utility of iron staining in differentiating causes of renal allograft dysfunction in patients with a history of sickle cell disease. Case 1: the patient developed acute allograft dysfunction two years after renal transplant. Her renal biopsy showed ATI, supported by patchy loss of brush border and positive staining of kidney injury molecule-1 in proximal tubular epithelial cells, where diffuse increase in iron staining (2+) was present. This indicated that ATI likely resulted from iron/heme toxicity to proximal tubules. Electron microscope confirmed aggregated sickle RBCs in glomeruli, indicating a recurrent SCN. Case 2: four years after renal transplant, the patient developed acute allograft dysfunction and became positive for serum donor-specific antibody. His renal biopsy revealed thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) and diffuse positive C4d stain in peritubular capillaries. Iron staining was negative in the renal tubules, implying that TMA was likely associated with acute antibody-mediated rejection (AAMR, type 2) rather than recurrent SCN. These case reports imply that iron staining is an inexpensive but effective method in distinguishing SCN-associated renal injury in allograft kidney from other etiologies. PMID:26697257

  1. Shared Genetic Etiology of Autoimmune Diseases in Patients from a Biorepository Linked to De-identified Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Nicole A.; Butkiewicz, Mariusz; McGrath, Josephine A.; Crawford, Dana C.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases represent a significant medical burden affecting up to 5–8% of the U.S. population. While genetics is known to play a role, studies of common autoimmune diseases are complicated by phenotype heterogeneity, limited sample sizes, and a single disease approach. Here we performed a targeted genetic association study for cases of multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and Crohn's disease (CD) to assess which common genetic variants contribute individually and pleiotropically to disease risk. Joint modeling and pathway analysis combining the three phenotypes were performed to identify common underlying mechanisms of risk of autoimmune conditions. European American cases of MS, RA, and CD, (n = 119, 53, and 129, respectively) and 1924 controls were identified using de-identified electronic health records (EHRs) through a combination of International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) billing codes, Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes, medication lists, and text matching. As expected, hallmark SNPs in MS, such as DQA1 rs9271366 (OR = 1.91; p = 0.008), replicated in the present study. Both MS and CD were associated with TIMMDC1 rs2293370 (OR = 0.27, p = 0.01; OR = 0.25, p = 0.02; respectively). Additionally, PDE2A rs3781913 was significantly associated with both CD and RA (OR = 0.46, p = 0.02; OR = 0.32, p = 0.02; respectively). Joint modeling and pathway analysis identified variants within the KEGG NOD-like receptor signaling pathway and Shigellosis pathway as being correlated with the combined autoimmune phenotype. Our study replicated previously-reported genetic associations for MS and CD in a population derived from de-identified EHRs. We found evidence to support a shared genetic etiology between CD/MS and CD/RA outside of the major histocompatibility complex region and identified KEGG pathways indicative of a bacterial pathogenesis risk for autoimmunity in a joint model. Future work to

  2. Ebenezer Hopkins Frost (1824-1866): William T.G. Morton's first identified patient and why he was invited to the Ether demonstration of October 16, 1846.

    PubMed

    LeVasseur, Ryan; Desai, Sukumar P

    2012-08-01

    Although he was not the first to use ether as an anesthetic, it was not until William Thomas Green Morton's demonstration of the efficacy of ether anesthesia that its use spread rapidly throughout the world. Full identities of the first anesthetized patients of William Edward Clarke and Horace Wells are not known, but we are quite certain that Crawford Williamson Long correctly identified James Venable as his first patient to receive anesthesia. Using municipal records, historical accounts, and recent analyses of Morton's unsavory side, we undertook this study to explore three questions. First, we examine how Morton refined the technique of administering anesthesia based on Wells' failed attempt. Second, we describe the circumstances under which Morton encountered his first patient to receive anesthesia. Third, we offer an explanation as to why Morton insisted on bringing along this patient to attend the grand event we celebrate as Ether Day. This is an essay about William Thomas Green Morton and Ebenezer Hopkins Frost.

  3. In vitro lymphoproliferative assays with HgCl2 cannot identify patients with systemic symptoms attributed to dental amalgam.

    PubMed

    Cederbrant, K; Gunnarsson, L G; Hultman, P; Norda, R; Tibbling-Grahn, L

    1999-08-01

    Dental amalgam is suspected, by some exposed individuals, to cause various systemic psychological, sensory, and neurological symptoms. Since not all amalgam-bearers experience such reactions, an individual characteristic--for example, a susceptible immune system--might explain these conditions. In vitro lymphocyte proliferation is a valuable tool in the diagnosis of allergy. With HgCl2 as the antigen, however, the test is hampered, because Hg2+ can cause unspecific lymphocyte proliferation, optimal at 1.4 to 9.5 micrograms HgCl2/mL. Recently, the use of suboptimal HgCl2 concentrations (< or = 0.5 microgram/mL) has been suggested to circumvent these problems. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether patients with systemic symptoms alleged to result from the presence of dental amalgam differ from healthy controls, with reference to in vitro lymphoproliferative responses to HgCl2 < or = 0.5 microgram/mL. Three different test protocols--lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) in micro- and macro-cultures, and the memory lymphocyte immunostimulation assay (MELISA)--were used. Other immune parameters--such as a standard patch test for dental materials, the number of T- and B-lymphocytes, monocytes, granulocytes, and NK cells in peripheral blood, allergic symptoms, and predisposition--were also investigated. Twenty-three amalgam patients, 30 healthy blood donors with amalgam, ten healthy subjects without amalgam, and nine patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) adjacent to dental amalgam and a positive patch test to Hg0 were tested. None of the investigated immune parameters revealed any significant differences between amalgam patients and controls. The sensitivity of in vitro lymphocyte proliferation ranged from 33 to 67%, with the OLP patients as a positive control group, and the specificity from 0 to 70% for healthy controls with a negative patch test to Hg0. Thus, despite the use of HgCl2 < or = 0.5 microgram/mL, a high frequency of positive results was

  4. Identifying preoperative language tracts and predicting postoperative functional recovery using HARDI q-ball fiber tractography in patients with gliomas.

    PubMed

    Caverzasi, Eduardo; Hervey-Jumper, Shawn L; Jordan, Kesshi M; Lobach, Iryna V; Li, Jing; Panara, Valentina; Racine, Caroline A; Sankaranarayanan, Vanitha; Amirbekian, Bagrat; Papinutto, Nico; Berger, Mitchel S; Henry, Roland G

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT Diffusion MRI has uniquely enabled in vivo delineation of white matter tracts, which has been applied to the segmentation of eloquent pathways for intraoperative mapping. The last decade has also seen the development from earlier diffusion tensor models to higher-order models, which take advantage of high angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging (HARDI) techniques. However, these advanced methods have not been widely implemented for routine preoperative and intraoperative mapping. The authors report on the application of residual bootstrap q-ball fiber tracking for routine mapping of potentially functional language pathways, the development of a system for rating tract injury to evaluate the impact on clinically assessed language function, and initial results predicting long-term language deficits following glioma resection. METHODS The authors have developed methods for the segmentation of 8 putative language pathways including dorsal phonological pathways and ventral semantic streams using residual bootstrap q-ball fiber tracking. Furthermore, they have implemented clinically feasible preoperative acquisition and processing of HARDI data to delineate these pathways for neurosurgical application. They have also developed a rating scale based on the altered fiber tract density to estimate the degree of pathway injury, applying these ratings to a subset of 35 patients with pre- and postoperative fiber tracking. The relationships between specific pathways and clinical language deficits were assessed to determine which pathways are predictive of long-term language deficits following surgery. RESULTS This tracking methodology has been routinely implemented for preoperative mapping in patients with brain gliomas who have undergone awake brain tumor resection at the University of California, San Francisco (more than 300 patients to date). In this particular study the authors investigated the white matter structure status and language correlation in a

  5. Social Health Insurance-Based Simultaneous Screening for 154 Mutations in 19 Deafness Genes Efficiently Identified Causative Mutations in Japanese Hearing Loss Patients.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kentaro; Moteki, Hideaki; Miyagawa, Maiko; Nishio, Shin-Ya; Usami, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is one of the most common neurosensory disorders in humans. The incidence of SNHL is estimated to be 1 in 500-1000 newborns. In more than half of these patients, the hearing loss is associated with genetic causes. In Japan, genetic testing for the patients with SNHL using the Invader assay to screen for 46 mutations in 13 deafness genes was approved by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for inclusion in social health insurance coverage in 2012. Furthermore, from August 2015, this genetic testing has been expanded to screen for 154 mutations in 19 deafness genes using targeted genomic enrichment with massively parallel DNA sequencing combined with the Invader assay and TaqMan genotyping. For this study we analyzed 717 unrelated Japanese hearing loss patients. The total allele frequency of 154 mutations in 19 deafness genes was 32.64% (468/1434) and the total numbers of cases associated with at least one mutation was 44.07% (316/717). Among these, we were able to diagnose 212 (30%) patients, indicating that the present screening could efficiently identify causative mutations in hearing loss patients. It is noteworthy that 27 patients (3.8%) had coexistent multiple mutations in different genes. Five of these 27 patients (0.7%, 5/717 overall) were diagnosed with genetic hearing loss affected by concomitant with responsible mutations in more than two different genes. For patients identified with multiple mutations in different genes, it is necessary to consider that several genes might have an impact on their phenotypes. PMID:27627659

  6. The AFFORD Clinical Decision Aid To Identify Emergency Department Patients With Atrial Fibrillation At Low Risk For 30-Day Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Tyler W.; Storrow, Alan B.; Jenkins, Cathy A.; Abraham, Robert L.; Liu, Dandan; Miller, Karen F.; Moser, Kelly M.; Russ, Stephan; Roden, Dan M.; Harrell, Frank E.; Darbar, Dawood

    2015-01-01

    There is wide variation in the management of emergency department (ED) patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). We aimed to derive and internally validate the first prospective, ED-based clinical decision aid to identify patients with AF at low risk for 30-day adverse events. We performed a prospective cohort study at a university-affiliated, tertiary-care, ED. Patients were enrolled from June 9, 2010 to February 28, 2013 and followed for 30 days. We enrolled a convenience sample of ED patients presenting with symptomatic AF. Candidate predictors were based on ED data available in the first two hours. The decision aid was derived using model approximation (preconditioning) followed by strong bootstrap internal validation. We utilized an ordinal outcome hierarchy defined as the incidence of the most severe adverse event within 30 days of the ED evaluation. Of 497 patients enrolled, stroke and AF-related death occurred in 13 (3%) and 4 (<1%) patients, respectively. The decision aid included the following: age, triage vitals (systolic blood pressure, temperature, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, supplemental oxygen requirement); medical history (heart failure, home sotalol use, prior percutaneous coronary intervention, electrical cardioversion, cardiac ablation, frequency of AF symptoms); ED data (2 hour heart rate, chest radiograph results, hemoglobin, creatinine, and brain natriuretic peptide). The decision aid’s c-statistic in predicting any 30-day adverse event was 0.7 (95% CI, 0.65, 0.76). In conclusion, among ED patients with AF, AFFORD provides the first evidence based decision aid for identifying patients who are at low risk for 30-day adverse events and candidates for safe discharge. PMID:25633190

  7. Social Health Insurance-Based Simultaneous Screening for 154 Mutations in 19 Deafness Genes Efficiently Identified Causative Mutations in Japanese Hearing Loss Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Kentaro; Moteki, Hideaki; Miyagawa, Maiko; Nishio, Shin-ya; Usami, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is one of the most common neurosensory disorders in humans. The incidence of SNHL is estimated to be 1 in 500–1000 newborns. In more than half of these patients, the hearing loss is associated with genetic causes. In Japan, genetic testing for the patients with SNHL using the Invader assay to screen for 46 mutations in 13 deafness genes was approved by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for inclusion in social health insurance coverage in 2012. Furthermore, from August 2015, this genetic testing has been expanded to screen for 154 mutations in 19 deafness genes using targeted genomic enrichment with massively parallel DNA sequencing combined with the Invader assay and TaqMan genotyping. For this study we analyzed 717 unrelated Japanese hearing loss patients. The total allele frequency of 154 mutations in 19 deafness genes was 32.64% (468/1434) and the total numbers of cases associated with at least one mutation was 44.07% (316/717). Among these, we were able to diagnose 212 (30%) patients, indicating that the present screening could efficiently identify causative mutations in hearing loss patients. It is noteworthy that 27 patients (3.8%) had coexistent multiple mutations in different genes. Five of these 27 patients (0.7%, 5/717 overall) were diagnosed with genetic hearing loss affected by concomitant with responsible mutations in more than two different genes. For patients identified with multiple mutations in different genes, it is necessary to consider that several genes might have an impact on their phenotypes. PMID:27627659

  8. Social Health Insurance-Based Simultaneous Screening for 154 Mutations in 19 Deafness Genes Efficiently Identified Causative Mutations in Japanese Hearing Loss Patients.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kentaro; Moteki, Hideaki; Miyagawa, Maiko; Nishio, Shin-Ya; Usami, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is one of the most common neurosensory disorders in humans. The incidence of SNHL is estimated to be 1 in 500-1000 newborns. In more than half of these patients, the hearing loss is associated with genetic causes. In Japan, genetic testing for the patients with SNHL using the Invader assay to screen for 46 mutations in 13 deafness genes was approved by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for inclusion in social health insurance coverage in 2012. Furthermore, from August 2015, this genetic testing has been expanded to screen for 154 mutations in 19 deafness genes using targeted genomic enrichment with massively parallel DNA sequencing combined with the Invader assay and TaqMan genotyping. For this study we analyzed 717 unrelated Japanese hearing loss patients. The total allele frequency of 154 mutations in 19 deafness genes was 32.64% (468/1434) and the total numbers of cases associated with at least one mutation was 44.07% (316/717). Among these, we were able to diagnose 212 (30%) patients, indicating that the present screening could efficiently identify causative mutations in hearing loss patients. It is noteworthy that 27 patients (3.8%) had coexistent multiple mutations in different genes. Five of these 27 patients (0.7%, 5/717 overall) were diagnosed with genetic hearing loss affected by concomitant with responsible mutations in more than two different genes. For patients identified with multiple mutations in different genes, it is necessary to consider that several genes might have an impact on their phenotypes.

  9. Exome sequencing identifies novel compound heterozygous IFNA4 and IFNA10 mutations as a cause of impaired function in Crohn’s disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chuan-Xing; Xiao, Jing-Jing; Xu, Hong-Zhi; Wang, Huan-Huan; Chen, Xu; Liu, Yuan-Sheng; Li, Ping; Shi, Ying; Nie, Yong-Zhan; Li, Shao; Wu, Kai-Chun; Liu, Zhan-Ju; Ren, Jian-Lin; Guleng, Bayasi

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have highlighted the role of genetic predispositions in disease, and several genes had been identified as important in Crohn’s disease (CD). However, many of these genes are likely rare and not associated with susceptibility in Chinese CD patients. We found 294 shared identical variants in the CD patients of which 26 were validated by Sanger sequencing. Two heterozygous IFN variants (IFNA10 c.60 T > A; IFNA4 c.60 A > T) were identified as significantly associated with CD susceptibility. The single-nucleotide changes alter a cysteine situated before the signal peptide cleavage site to a stop code (TGA) in IFNA10 result in the serum levels of IFNA10 were significantly decreased in the CD patients compared to the controls. Furthermore, the IFNA10 and IFNA4 mutants resulted in an impairment of the suppression of HCV RNA replication in HuH7 cells, and the administration of the recombinant IFN subtypes restored DSS-induced colonic inflammation through the upregulation of CD4+ Treg cells. We identified heterozygous IFNA10 and IFNA4 variants as a cause of impaired function and CD susceptibility genes in Chinese patients from multiple center based study. These findings might provide clues in the understanding of the genetic heterogeneity of CD and lead to better screening and improved treatment. PMID:26000985

  10. Serum profiling identifies novel muscle miRNA and cardiomyopathy-related miRNA biomarkers in Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy dogs and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Jeanson-Leh, Laurence; Lameth, Julie; Krimi, Soraya; Buisset, Julien; Amor, Fatima; Le Guiner, Caroline; Barthélémy, Inès; Servais, Laurent; Blot, Stéphane; Voit, Thomas; Israeli, David

    2014-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal, X-linked neuromuscular disease that affects 1 boy in 3500 to 5000 boys. The golden retriever muscular dystrophy dog is the best clinically relevant DMD animal model. Here, we used a high-thoughput miRNA sequencing screening for identification of candidate serum miRNA biomarkers in golden retriever muscular dystrophy dogs. We confirmed the dysregulation of the previously described muscle miRNAs, miR-1, miR-133, miR-206, and miR-378, and identified a new candidate muscle miRNA, miR-95. We identified two other classes of dysregulated serum miRNAs in muscular dystrophy: miRNAs belonging to the largest known miRNA cluster that resides in the imprinting DLK1-DIO3 genomic region and miRNAs associated with cardiac disease, including miR-208a, miR-208b, and miR-499. No simple correlation was identified between serum levels of cardiac miRNAs and cardiac functional parameters in golden retriever muscular dystrophy dogs. Finally, we confirmed a dysregulation of miR-95, miR-208a, miR-208b, miR-499, and miR-539 in a small cohort of DMD patients. Given the interspecies conservation of miRNAs and preliminary data in DMD patients, these newly identified dysregulated miRNAs are strong candidate biomarkers for DMD patients.

  11. Usefulness of matrix metalloproteinase-9 plasma levels to identify patients with preserved left ventricular systolic function after acute myocardial infarction who could benefit from eplerenone.

    PubMed

    Kampourides, Nikolaos; Tziakas, Dimitrios; Chalikias, Georgios; Papazoglou, Dimitrios; Maltezos, Efstratios; Symeonides, David; Konstantinides, Stavros

    2012-10-15

    We sought to assess possible interactions between eplerenone use and a plasma marker of collagen turnover on prognosis in patients after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and preserved left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (≥40%). Three hundred three patients with AMI (58 ± 11 years old, 249 men) and preserved systolic LV function were studied prospectively for 24 months. Plasma levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were assessed on day 7 after AMI. Patients were categorized according to whether (n = 201) or not (n = 102) they received eplerenone (25 mg/day) and their baseline MMP-9 levels using the cut-off level suggested by receiver operating characteristics analysis (12.7 ng/ml). Death from cardiovascular causes, nonfatal reinfarction, hospitalization for unstable angina, and development of heart failure symptoms were considered study end points. Eplerenone use was not associated with better prognosis in the entire study group (p = 0.132). However, a significant beneficial eplerenone effect on outcome was observed in patients with low baseline levels of MMP-9 (event-free survival for eplerenone vs noneplerenone arm 65% vs 35%, p = 0.005). Eplerenone had no effect (p = 0.741) in the subgroup of patients with high baseline MMP-9 levels. In conclusion, in patients after AMI with preserved LV systolic function, low baseline levels of MMP-9 identify a subgroup of patients in whom eplerenone use is associated with a survival benefit.

  12. NNLOPS accurate associated HW production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astill, William; Bizon, Wojciech; Re, Emanuele; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2016-06-01

    We present a next-to-next-to-leading order accurate description of associated HW production consistently matched to a parton shower. The method is based on reweighting events obtained with the HW plus one jet NLO accurate calculation implemented in POWHEG, extended with the MiNLO procedure, to reproduce NNLO accurate Born distributions. Since the Born kinematics is more complex than the cases treated before, we use a parametrization of the Collins-Soper angles to reduce the number of variables required for the reweighting. We present phenomenological results at 13 TeV, with cuts suggested by the Higgs Cross section Working Group.

  13. Diagnostic Performance of Endoscopic and Microscopic Procedures for Identifying Different Middle Ear Structures and Remaining Disease in Patients with Chronic Otitis Media: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Farahani, Farhad; Shariatpanahi, Elnaz; Jahanshahi, Javane; Poorolajal, Jalal

    2015-01-01

    Background The diagnostic performance of endoscopic and microscopic procedures for detecting diseases of the middle ear in patients with chronic otitis media (COM) has rarely been investigated. This study was conducted to compare the performance of these procedures for identifying middle ear structures and their associated diseases in COM patients. Methods In this prospective cohort study, 58 patients with chronic COM, who were candidates for tympanoplasty with or without a mastoidectomy, were enrolled. Before the surgical intervention, the middle ear was examined via an operating microscope and then through an endoscope to identify the middle ear structures as well as diseases associated with the middle ear. Results The patients were 15 years of age or older. The anatomical parts of the middle ear – the epitympanic, posterior mesotympanic, and hypotympanic structures – were more visible through an endoscope than through a microscope. In addition, the various segments of the mesotympanum, oval window, round window, and Eustachian tube were more visible via endoscopy. The post-operative endoscopic reevaluation of the middle ear revealed that a cholesteatoma had remained in four of 13 patients after surgery. Conclusion According to the results of this study, in cases in which there is poor visibility with the operating microscope or the surgeon suspects remaining disease within the middle ear, endoscopy could be utilized to improve the evaluation of more hidden middle ear pits and structures, particularly if there is a potentially recrudescent pathology. PMID:26167935

  14. Wide mutation spectrum and frequent variant Ala27Thr of FBN1 identified in a large cohort of Chinese patients with sporadic TAAD

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun; Cai, Lun; Jia, Lixin; Li, Xiaoyan; Xi, Xin; Zheng, Shuai; Liu, Xuxia; Piao, Chunmei; Liu, Tingting; Sun, Zhongsheng; Cai, Tao; Du, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Genetic etiology in majority of patients with sporadic thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissections (STAAD) remains unknown. Recent GWAS study suggested common variant(s) in FBN1 is associated with STAAD. The present study aims to test this hypothesis and to identify mutation spectrum by targeted exome sequencing of the FBN1 gene in 146 unrelated patients with STAAD. Totally, 15.75% of FBN1 variants in STAAD were identified, including 5 disruptive and 18 missense mutations. Most of the variants were novel. Genotype-phenotype correlation analysis suggested that the maximum aortic diameter in the disruptive mutation group was significantly larger than that in the non-Cys missense mutation group. Interestingly, the variant Ala27Thr at −1 position, which is predicted to change the cleavage site of the signal peptidase of fibrillin-1, was detected in two unrelated patients. Furthermore, genotyping analysis of this variant detected 10 heterozygous Ala27Thr from additional 666 unrelated patients (1.50%), versus 7 from 1500 controls (0.47%), indicating a significant association of this variant with STAAD. Collectively, the identification of the variant Ala27Thr may represent a relatively common genetic predisposition and a novel pathogenetic mechanism for STAAD. Also, expansion of the mutation spectrum in FBN1 will be helpful in genetic counselling for Chinese patients with STAAD. PMID:26272055

  15. Big data in health care: using analytics to identify and manage high-risk and high-cost patients.

    PubMed

    Bates, David W; Saria, Suchi; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Shah, Anand; Escobar, Gabriel

    2014-07-01

    The US health care system is rapidly adopting electronic health records, which will dramatically increase the quantity of clinical data that are available electronically. Simultaneously, rapid progress has been made in clinical analytics--techniques for analyzing large quantities of data and gleaning new insights from that analysis--which is part of what is known as big data. As a result, there are unprecedented opportunities to use big data to reduce the costs of health care in the United States. We present six use cases--that is, key examples--where some of the clearest opportunities exist to reduce costs through the use of big data: high-cost patients, readmissions, triage, decompensation (when a patient's condition worsens), adverse events, and treatment optimization for diseases affecting multiple organ systems. We discuss the types of insights that are likely to emerge from clinical analytics, the types of data needed to obtain such insights, and the infrastructure--analytics, algorithms, registries, assessment scores, monitoring devices, and so forth--that organizations will need to perform the necessary analyses and to implement changes that will improve care while reducing costs. Our findings have policy implications for regulatory oversight, ways to address privacy concerns, and the support of research on analytics. PMID:25006137

  16. Clinical and molecular characterization of a novel PLIN1 frameshift mutation identified in patients with familial partial lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kozusko, Kristina; Tsang, Venessa H M; Bottomley, William; Cho, Yoon-Hi; Gandotra, Sheetal; Mimmack, Michael; Lim, Koini; Isaac, Iona; Patel, Satish; Saudek, Vladimir; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Srinivasan, Shubha; Greenfield, Jerry R; Barroso, Ines; Campbell, Lesley V; Savage, David B

    2015-01-01

    Perilipin 1 is a lipid droplet coat protein predominantly expressed in adipocytes, where it inhibits basal and facilitates stimulated lipolysis. Loss-of-function mutations in the PLIN1 gene were recently reported in patients with a novel subtype of familial partial lipodystrophy, designated as FPLD4. We now report the identification and characterization of a novel heterozygous frameshift mutation affecting the carboxy-terminus (439fs) of perilipin 1 in two unrelated families. The mutation cosegregated with a similar phenotype including partial lipodystrophy, severe insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, extreme hypertriglyceridemia, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in both families. Poor metabolic control despite maximal medical therapy prompted two patients to undergo bariatric surgery, with remarkably beneficial consequences. Functional studies indicated that expression levels of the mutant protein were lower than wild-type protein, and in stably transfected preadipocytes the mutant protein was associated with smaller lipid droplets. Interestingly, unlike the previously reported 398 and 404 frameshift mutants, this variant binds and stabilizes ABHD5 expression but still fails to inhibit basal lipolysis as effectively as wild-type perilipin 1. Collectively, these findings highlight the physiological need for exquisite regulation of neutral lipid storage within adipocyte lipid droplets, as well as the possible metabolic benefits of bariatric surgery in this serious disease.

  17. Whole exome sequencing identifies a novel frameshift mutation in GPC3 gene in a patient with overgrowth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Das Bhowmik, Aneek; Dalal, Ashwin

    2015-11-10

    Overgrowth syndromes are a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by focal or generalized overgrowth. Many of the syndromes have overlapping clinical features and it is difficult to diagnose the condition based on clinical features alone. In the present study we report on a patient with overgrowth syndrome where extensive investigation did not reveal the cause of disease. Finally exome sequencing revealed a novel hemizygous single base pair deletion in exon 8 of GPC3 gene (chrX:132670203delA) resulting in a frameshift and creating a new stop codon at 62 amino acids downstream to codon 564 (c.1692delT; p.Leu565SerfsTer63) of the protein. The mutation was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The mother was found to be heterozygous for the mutation. This variation is not reported in the 1000 Genomes, Exome Variant Server (EVS), Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) and dbSNP databases and the region is conserved across primates. Exome sequencing was helpful in establishing diagnosis of Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome type 1 (SGBS1) in a patient with unknown overgrowth syndrome.

  18. Whole exome sequencing identifies a novel frameshift mutation in GPC3 gene in a patient with overgrowth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Das Bhowmik, Aneek; Dalal, Ashwin

    2015-11-10

    Overgrowth syndromes are a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by focal or generalized overgrowth. Many of the syndromes have overlapping clinical features and it is difficult to diagnose the condition based on clinical features alone. In the present study we report on a patient with overgrowth syndrome where extensive investigation did not reveal the cause of disease. Finally exome sequencing revealed a novel hemizygous single base pair deletion in exon 8 of GPC3 gene (chrX:132670203delA) resulting in a frameshift and creating a new stop codon at 62 amino acids downstream to codon 564 (c.1692delT; p.Leu565SerfsTer63) of the protein. The mutation was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The mother was found to be heterozygous for the mutation. This variation is not reported in the 1000 Genomes, Exome Variant Server (EVS), Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) and dbSNP databases and the region is conserved across primates. Exome sequencing was helpful in establishing diagnosis of Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome type 1 (SGBS1) in a patient with unknown overgrowth syndrome. PMID:26321508

  19. Big data in health care: using analytics to identify and manage high-risk and high-cost patients.

    PubMed

    Bates, David W; Saria, Suchi; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Shah, Anand; Escobar, Gabriel

    2014-07-01

    The US health care system is rapidly adopting electronic health records, which will dramatically increase the quantity of clinical data that are available electronically. Simultaneously, rapid progress has been made in clinical analytics--techniques for analyzing large quantities of data and gleaning new insights from that analysis--which is part of what is known as big data. As a result, there are unprecedented opportunities to use big data to reduce the costs of health care in the United States. We present six use cases--that is, key examples--where some of the clearest opportunities exist to reduce costs through the use of big data: high-cost patients, readmissions, triage, decompensation (when a patient's condition worsens), adverse events, and treatment optimization for diseases affecting multiple organ systems. We discuss the types of insights that are likely to emerge from clinical analytics, the types of data needed to obtain such insights, and the infrastructure--analytics, algorithms, registries, assessment scores, monitoring devices, and so forth--that organizations will need to perform the necessary analyses and to implement changes that will improve care while reducing costs. Our findings have policy implications for regulatory oversight, ways to address privacy concerns, and the support of research on analytics.

  20. Extracting Information from Electronic Medical Records to Identify the Obesity Status of a Patient Based on Comorbidities and Bodyweight Measures.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Rosa L; Flores, Christopher A

    2016-08-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease with an increasing impact on the world's population. In this work, we present a method of identifying obesity automatically using text mining techniques and information related to body weight measures and obesity comorbidities. We used a dataset of 3015 de-identified medical records that contain labels for two classification problems. The first classification problem distinguishes between obesity, overweight, normal weight, and underweight. The second classification problem differentiates between obesity types: super obesity, morbid obesity, severe obesity and moderate obesity. We used a Bag of Words approach to represent the records together with unigram and bigram representations of the features. We implemented two approaches: a hierarchical method and a nonhierarchical one. We used Support Vector Machine and Naïve Bayes together with ten-fold cross validation to evaluate and compare performances. Our results indicate that the hierarchical approach does not work as well as the nonhierarchical one. In general, our results show that Support Vector Machine obtains better performances than Naïve Bayes for both classification problems. We also observed that bigram representation improves performance compared with unigram representation. PMID:27402260

  1. Extracting Information from Electronic Medical Records to Identify the Obesity Status of a Patient Based on Comorbidities and Bodyweight Measures.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Rosa L; Flores, Christopher A

    2016-08-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease with an increasing impact on the world's population. In this work, we present a method of identifying obesity automatically using text mining techniques and information related to body weight measures and obesity comorbidities. We used a dataset of 3015 de-identified medical records that contain labels for two classification problems. The first classification problem distinguishes between obesity, overweight, normal weight, and underweight. The second classification problem differentiates between obesity types: super obesity, morbid obesity, severe obesity and moderate obesity. We used a Bag of Words approach to represent the records together with unigram and bigram representations of the features. We implemented two approaches: a hierarchical method and a nonhierarchical one. We used Support Vector Machine and Naïve Bayes together with ten-fold cross validation to evaluate and compare performances. Our results indicate that the hierarchical approach does not work as well as the nonhierarchical one. In general, our results show that Support Vector Machine obtains better performances than Naïve Bayes for both classification problems. We also observed that bigram representation improves performance compared with unigram representation.

  2. A Next-Generation Sequencing Approach to Identify Gene Mutations in Early- and Late-Onset Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patients of an Italian Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rubattu, Speranza; Bozzao, Cristina; Pennacchini, Ermelinda; Pagannone, Erika; Musumeci, Beatrice Maria; Piane, Maria; Germani, Aldo; Savio, Camilla; Francia, Pietro; Volpe, Massimo; Autore, Camillo; Chessa, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of sarcomere protein genes in patients fulfilling the clinical diagnostic criteria for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) identifies a disease-causing mutation in 35% to 60% of cases. Age at diagnosis and family history may increase the yield of mutations screening. In order to assess whether Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) may fulfil the molecular diagnostic needs in HCM, we included 17 HCM-related genes in a sequencing panel run on PGM IonTorrent. We selected 70 HCM patients, 35 with early (≤25 years) and 35 with late (≥65 years) diagnosis of disease onset. All samples had a 98.6% average of target regions, with coverage higher than 20× (mean coverage 620×). We identified 41 different mutations (seven of them novel) in nine genes: MYBPC3 (17/41 = 41%); MYH7 (10/41 = 24%); TNNT2, CAV3 and MYH6 (3/41 = 7.5% each); TNNI3 (2/41 = 5%); GLA, MYL2, and MYL3 (1/41=2.5% each). Mutation detection rate was 30/35 (85.7%) in early-onset and 8/35 (22.9%) in late-onset HCM patients, respectively (p < 0.0001). The overall detection rate for patients with positive family history was 84%, and 90.5% in patients with early disease onset. In our study NGS revealed higher mutations yield in patients with early onset and with a family history of HCM. Appropriate patient selection can increase the yield of genetic testing and make diagnostic testing cost-effective. PMID:27483260

  3. A Next-Generation Sequencing Approach to Identify Gene Mutations in Early- and Late-Onset Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patients of an Italian Cohort.

    PubMed

    Rubattu, Speranza; Bozzao, Cristina; Pennacchini, Ermelinda; Pagannone, Erika; Musumeci, Beatrice Maria; Piane, Maria; Germani, Aldo; Savio, Camilla; Francia, Pietro; Volpe, Massimo; Autore, Camillo; Chessa, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of sarcomere protein genes in patients fulfilling the clinical diagnostic criteria for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) identifies a disease-causing mutation in 35% to 60% of cases. Age at diagnosis and family history may increase the yield of mutations screening. In order to assess whether Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) may fulfil the molecular diagnostic needs in HCM, we included 17 HCM-related genes in a sequencing panel run on PGM IonTorrent. We selected 70 HCM patients, 35 with early (≤25 years) and 35 with late (≥65 years) diagnosis of disease onset. All samples had a 98.6% average of target regions, with coverage higher than 20× (mean coverage 620×). We identified 41 different mutations (seven of them novel) in nine genes: MYBPC3 (17/41 = 41%); MYH7 (10/41 = 24%); TNNT2, CAV3 and MYH6 (3/41 = 7.5% each); TNNI3 (2/41 = 5%); GLA, MYL2, and MYL3 (1/41=2.5% each). Mutation detection rate was 30/35 (85.7%) in early-onset and 8/35 (22.9%) in late-onset HCM patients, respectively (p < 0.0001). The overall detection rate for patients with positive family history was 84%, and 90.5% in patients with early disease onset. In our study NGS revealed higher mutations yield in patients with early onset and with a family history of HCM. Appropriate patient selection can increase the yield of genetic testing and make diagnostic testing cost-effective. PMID:27483260

  4. Identifying Early Dehydration Risk With Home-Based Sensors During Radiation Treatment: A Feasibility Study on Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Systems that enable remote monitoring of patients’ symptoms and other health-related outcomes may optimize cancer care outside of the clinic setting. CYCORE (CYberinfrastructure for COmparative effectiveness REsearch) is a software-based prototype for a user-friendly cyberinfrastructure supporting the comprehensive collection and analyses of data from multiple domains using a suite of home-based and mobile sensors. This study evaluated the feasibility of using CYCORE to address early at-home identification of dehydration risk in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. Methods Head and neck cancer patients used home-based sensors to capture weight, blood pressure, pulse, and patient-reported outcomes for two 5-day periods during radiation therapy. Data were sent to the radiation oncologist of each head and neck cancer patient, who viewed them online via a Web-based interface. Feasibility outcomes included study completion rate, acceptability and perceived usefulness of the intervention, and adherence to the monitoring protocol. We also evaluated whether sensor data could identify dehydration-related events. Results Fifty patients consented to participate, and 48 (96%) completed the study. More than 90% of patients rated their ease, self-efficacy, and satisfaction regarding use of the sensor suite as extremely favorable, with minimal concerns expressed regarding data privacy issues. Patients highly valued the ability to have immediate access to objective, self-monitoring data related to personal risk for dehydration. Clinician assessments indicated a high degree of satisfaction with the ease of using the CYCORE system and the resulting ability to monitor their patients remotely. Conclusion Implementing CYCORE in a clinical oncology care setting is feasible and highly acceptable to both patients and providers. PMID:24395986

  5. Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is an anti-inflammatory commensal bacterium identified by gut microbiota analysis of Crohn disease patients.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Harry; Pigneur, Bénédicte; Watterlot, Laurie; Lakhdari, Omar; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Gratadoux, Jean-Jacques; Blugeon, Sébastien; Bridonneau, Chantal; Furet, Jean-Pierre; Corthier, Gérard; Grangette, Corinne; Vasquez, Nadia; Pochart, Philippe; Trugnan, Germain; Thomas, Ginette; Blottière, Hervé M; Doré, Joël; Marteau, Philippe; Seksik, Philippe; Langella, Philippe

    2008-10-28

    A decrease in the abundance and biodiversity of intestinal bacteria within the dominant phylum Firmicutes has been observed repeatedly in Crohn disease (CD) patients. In this study, we determined the composition of the mucosa-associated microbiota of CD patients at the time of surgical resection and 6 months later using FISH analysis. We found that a reduction of a major member of Firmicutes, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, is associated with a higher risk of postoperative recurrence of ileal CD. A lower proportion of F. prausnitzii on resected ileal Crohn mucosa also was associated with endoscopic recurrence at 6 months. To evaluate the immunomodulatory properties of F. prausnitzii we analyzed the anti-inflammatory effects of F. prausnitzii in both in vitro (cellular models) and in vivo [2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced] colitis in mice. In Caco-2 cells transfected with a reporter gene for NF-kappaB activity, F. prausnitzii had no effect on IL-1beta-induced NF-kappaB activity, whereas the supernatant abolished it. In vitro peripheral blood mononuclear cell stimulation by F. prausnitzii led to significantly lower IL-12 and IFN-gamma production levels and higher secretion of IL-10. Oral administration of either live F. prausnitzii or its supernatant markedly reduced the severity of TNBS colitis and tended to correct the dysbiosis associated with TNBS colitis, as demonstrated by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis. F. prausnitzii exhibits anti-inflammatory effects on cellular and TNBS colitis models, partly due to secreted metabolites able to block NF-kappaB activation and IL-8 production. These results suggest that counterbalancing dysbiosis using F. prausnitzii as a probiotic is a promising strategy in CD treatment.

  6. Tradeoffs of Using Administrative Claims and Medical Records to Identify the Use of Personalized Medicine for Patients with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Su-Ying; Phillips, Kathryn A.; Wang, Grace; Keohane, Carol; Armstrong, Joanne; Morris, William M.; Haas, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Administrative claims and medical records are important data sources to examine healthcare utilization and outcomes. Little is known about identifying personalized medicine technologies in these sources. Objectives To describe agreement, sensitivity, and specificity of administrative claims compared to medical records for two pairs of targeted tests and treatments for breast cancer. Research Design Retrospective analysis of medical records linked to administrative claims from a large health plan. We examined whether agreement varied by factors that facilitate tracking in claims (coding and cost) and that enhance medical record completeness (records from multiple providers). Subjects Women (35 – 65 years) with incident breast cancer diagnosed in 2006–2007 (n=775). Measures Use of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and gene expression profiling (GEP) testing, trastuzumab and adjuvant chemotherapy in claims and medical records. Results Agreement between claims and records was substantial for GEP, trastuzumab, and chemotherapy, and lowest for HER2 tests. GEP, an expensive test with unique billing codes, had higher agreement (91.6% vs. 75.2%), sensitivity (94.9% vs. 76.7%), and specificity (90.1% vs. 29.2%) than HER2, a test without unique billing codes. Trastuzumab, a treatment with unique billing codes, had slightly higher agreement (95.1% vs. 90%) and sensitivity (98.1% vs. 87.9%) than adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusions Higher agreement and specificity were associated with services that had unique billing codes and high cost. Administrative claims may be sufficient for examining services with unique billing codes. Medical records provide better data for identifying tests lacking specific codes and for research requiring detailed clinical information. PMID:21422962

  7. TGF-α and IL-6 plasma levels selectively identify CML patients who fail to achieve an early molecular response or progress in the first year of therapy.

    PubMed

    Nievergall, E; Reynolds, J; Kok, C H; Watkins, D B; Biondo, M; Busfield, S J; Vairo, G; Fuller, K; Erber, W N; Sadras, T; Grose, R; Yeung, D T; Lopez, A F; Hiwase, D K; Hughes, T P; White, D L

    2016-06-01

    Early molecular response (EMR, BCR-ABL1 (IS)⩽10% at 3 months) is a strong predictor of outcome in imatinib-treated chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CP-CML) patients, but for patients who transform early, 3 months may be too late for effective therapeutic intervention. Here, we employed multiplex cytokine profiling of plasma samples to test newly diagnosed CP-CML patients who subsequently received imatinib treatment. A wide range of pro-inflammatory and angiogenesis-promoting cytokines, chemokines and growth factors were elevated in the plasma of CML patients compared with that of healthy donors. Most of these normalized after tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment while others remained high in remission samples. Importantly, we identified TGF-α and IL-6 as novel biomarkers with high diagnostic plasma levels strongly predictive of subsequent failure to achieve EMR and deep molecular response, as well as transformation to blast crisis and event-free survival. Interestingly, high TGF-α alone can also delineate a poor response group raising the possibility of a pathogenic role. This suggests that the incorporation of these simple measurements to the diagnostic work-up of CP-CML patients may enable therapy intensity to be individualized early according to the cytokine-risk profile of the patient. PMID:26898188

  8. Development of a tool for defining and identifying the dying patient in hospital: Criteria for Screening and Triaging to Appropriate aLternative care (CriSTAL)

    PubMed Central

    Cardona-Morrell, Magnolia; Hillman, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a screening tool to identify elderly patients at the end of life and quantify the risk of death in hospital or soon after discharge for to minimise prognostic uncertainty and avoid potentially harmful and futile treatments. Design Narrative literature review of definitions, tools and measurements that could be combined into a screening tool based on routinely available or obtainable data at the point of care to identify elderly patients who are unavoidably dying at the time of admission or at risk of dying during hospitalisation. Main measurements Variables and thresholds proposed for the Criteria for Screening and Triaging to Appropriate aLternative care (CriSTAL screening tool) were adopted from existing scales and published research findings showing association with either in-hospital, 30-day or 3-month mortality. Results Eighteen predictor instruments and their variants were examined. The final items for the new CriSTAL screening tool included: age ≥65; meeting ≥2 deterioration criteria; an index of frailty with ≥2 criteria; early warning score >4; presence of ≥1 selected comorbidities; nursing home placement; evidence of cognitive impairment; prior emergency hospitalisation or intensive care unit readmission in the past year; abnormal ECG; and proteinuria. Conclusions An unambiguous checklist may assist clinicians in reducing uncertainty patients who are likely to die within the next 3 months and help initiate transparent conversations with families and patients about end-of-life care. Retrospective chart review and prospective validation will be undertaken to optimise the number of prognostic items for easy administration and enhanced generalisability. Development of an evidence-based tool for defining and identifying the dying patient in hospital: CriSTAL. PMID:25613983

  9. Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS) Identifies Critical Illness among Ward Patients in a Resource Restricted Setting in Kampala, Uganda: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Kruisselbrink, Rebecca; Kwizera, Arthur; Crowther, Mark; Fox-Robichaud, Alison; O'Shea, Timothy; Nakibuuka, Jane; Ssinabulya, Isaac; Nalyazi, Joan; Bonner, Ashley; Devji, Tahira; Wong, Jeffrey; Cook, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Providing optimal critical care in developing countries is limited by lack of recognition of critical illness and lack of essential resources. The Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS), based on physiological parameters, is validated in adult medical and surgical patients as a predictor of mortality. The objective of this study performed in Uganda was to determine the prevalence of critical illness on the wards as defined by the MEWS, to evaluate the MEWS as a predictor of death, and to describe additional risk factors for mortality. Methods We conducted a prospective observational study at Mulago National Referral Teaching Hospital in Uganda. We included medical and surgical ward patients over 18 years old, excluding patients discharged the day of enrolment, obstetrical patients, and patients who self-discharged prior to study completion. Over a 72-hour study period, we collected demographic and vital signs, and calculated MEWS; at 7-days we measured outcomes. Patients discharged prior to 7 days were assumed to be alive at study completion. Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were performed. Results Of 452 patients, the median age was 40.5 (IQR 29–54) years, 53.3% were male, 24.3% were HIV positive, and 45.1% had medical diagnoses. MEWS ranged from 0 to 9, with higher scores representing hemodynamic instability. The median MEWS was 2 [IQR 1–3] and the median length of hospital stay was 9 days [IQR 4–24]. In-hospital mortality at 7-days was 5.5%; 41.4% of patients were discharged and 53.1% remained on the ward. Mortality was independently associated with medical admission (OR: 7.17; 95% CI: 2.064–24.930; p = 0.002) and the MEWS ≥ 5 (OR: 5.82; 95% CI: 2.420–13.987; p<0.0001) in the multivariable analysis. Conclusion There is a significant burden of critical illness at Mulago Hospital, Uganda. Implementation of the MEWS could provide a useful triage tool to identify patients at greatest risk of death. Future research should include

  10. The first case of CDK5RAP2-related primary microcephaly in a non-consanguineous patient identified by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Christopher A; Topper, Scott; Ward Melver, Catherine; Stein, Jennifer; Reeder, Amanda; Arndt, Kelly; Das, Soma

    2014-04-01

    Primary autosomal recessive microcephaly (MCPH) is a genetically heterogeneous condition characterized by congenital microcephaly and intellectual disability. To date, 10 MCPH loci have been identified and due to the genetic heterogeneity of this condition, molecular testing for MCPH can be complicated. Our methods involved employing a next generation sequencing panel of MCPH-related genes allowing for the evaluation of multiple disease loci simultaneously. Next generation sequencing analysis of a 6 year old female with primary microcephaly identified novel compound heterozygous mutations (c.524_528del and c.4005-1G>A) in the CDK5RAP2 gene. A review of the published literature to date reveals that only three mutations have been previously reported in the CDK5RAP2 gene in the homozygous state in three Northern Pakistani and one Somali consanguineous MCPH families. Our patient represents the first non-consanguineous Caucasian individual to have been identified with CDK5RAP2-related MCPH. As only a handful of patients have been reported in the literature with CDK5RAP2-related MCPH, we anticipate the identification of individuals with CDK5RAP2 mutations from all ethnic backgrounds will continue. Our patient contributes to the ethnic and genotypic spectrum of CDK5RAP2-related MCPH and supports the occurrence of this genetic condition beyond that of consanguineous families of certain ethnic populations. Our results also highlight the utility of multi-gene sequencing panels to elucidate the etiology of genetically heterogeneous conditions. PMID:23726037

  11. Evaluation of routinely reported surgical site infections against microbiological culture results: a tool to identify patient groups where diagnosis and treatment may be improved

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Surgeons may improve their decision making by assessing the extent to which their initial clinical diagnosis of a surgical site infection (SSI) was supported by culture results. Aim of the present study was to evaluate routinely reported SSI by surgeons against microbiological culture results, to identify patient groups with lower agreement where decision making may be improved. Methods 701 admissions with SSI were reported by surgeons in a university medical centre in the period 1997-2005, which wer